WorldWideScience

Sample records for care residents primary

  1. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  2. The experience of multiprofessional residents in hospital attention in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Maria da Silva Lira-Batista; Jaqueline Virgulino Ribeiro; Hayanne Osiro Pauletti; Antônio Messias Gama Rospendowiski; Gabriella Novelli Oliveira; Emilia Godoy de Souza

    2012-01-01

    The Multidisciplinary Residency in Hospital Care (MRHC) should be taken as a paradigm of care model adopted in primary care, valuing full attention and establishing a relationship. The Basic Heath Unity  is a very rich place for the integration of activities among its professionals and multidisciplinary residents. That experience helped in building a new outlook and new process of health work in primary care both while in hospital care. All program activities developed allowed MRHC integratio...

  3. Initial evaluation of thyroid nodules by primary care physicians and internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste C. L. Quianzon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The article studied the knowledge and practice patterns of primary care providers and internal medicine residents in their initial evaluation of thyroid nodules and determined whether their practice is in accordance with published guidelines by the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Method: A survey was distributed to primary care physicians (PCPs and internal medicine residents at a community hospital in Baltimore and a chart review was conducted at the Diabetes and Endocrine Center in the same hospital. Results: A total of 47 physicians (70% responded to the survey, 16 PCPs and 33 residents. Most responders (96% will always obtain a TSH, and of these, 21% of PCP and 25% of residents will obtain a TSH without any other laboratory work-up. Fifty percent of the physicians (PCP, 75%; resident, 39% will always obtain a thyroid ultrasound (p=0.043. Most physicians (97% will refer for a fine-needle aspiration (FNA biopsy of a nodule >1 cm. Sixty-two percent of the physicians will not put a euthyroid patient on levothyroxine suppression therapy. Many physicians (48% are not aware of the AACE and ATA thyroid nodule guidelines. Most physicians (65% have not read the guidelines. Of the 113 charts reviewed, TSH was obtained alone in 40% and with other laboratory tests in 74%. Thyroid ultrasound was done in 67%. Only one patient was on levothyroxine for levothyroxine suppression therapy. Discussion: Although many physicians were not aware of the guidelines, and a small number of physicians have read them, many PCP and residents responded in concordance with the guidelines in obtaining TSH, an ultrasound, performing FNA biopsy, and not providing levothyroxine suppressive therapy in euthyroid patients. No differences were found between the responses of PCP and residents except for obtaining an ultrasound. Chart review data also showed that majority of tests ordered for non-toxic thyroid nodule

  4. Pediatric Residents' Perspective on Family-Clinician Discordance in Primary Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Connor, Katherine A; Fenick, Ada M

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of families in health maintenance is associated with better child health outcomes, but demographic discordance between families and clinicians may be a barrier to family engagement. Using a longitudinal qualitative study design, we conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with five pediatric residents who elected to facilitate group well child care (GWCC). Four themes describing residents' perceptions of the role of discordance in family-clinician engagement include: 1) discordance was not a barrier; 2) discordance leads to a lack of engagement and trust; 3) residents transcended discordance in GWCC because either GWCC led residents to change their communication techniques or because, with GWCC, parents have concordant adults in the room; and 4) the education residents obtained in GWCC allowed them to empathize with the families' health-related decisions. Finding ways in which pediatric providers can improve skills in family engagement may be an important step in decreasing health inequities. PMID:27524749

  5. Use of Primary Care Emergency Services in Norway: Impact of Birth Country and Duration of Residence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Småland Goth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In Norway, the General Practitioner Scheme was established in 2001. Satisfaction with the system is generally high. However, people often choose to visit community-based emergency wards (EW for routine care instead. The aim of this paper is to describe which factors influence the choice of seeking care at the EW.Design, setting, and patients: Prior national research on utilization patterns has been based mostly on surveys showing a low response rate. By using merged register data, we analyzed the choice of the EW as a care provider in Oslo (Norway for 2006 and 2007. Applying 1,934,248 observations of 279,531 different individuals, we estimated the probability of choosing the emergency ward for the Norwegian-born population as well as for the14-largest immigrant groups. Substantial variation between groups was identified.Main outcome: The proportion of EW visits was highest among patients from Somalia (11.7 percent while the lowest proportion of EW users was among immigrants from Germany and Vietnam (5.3 percent. The results vary substantially within individual migrant groups; gender, age, and the duration of residence each influence the probability of visiting an EW.Conclusions: We found large differences in the probability of using an EW between individuals from immigrant populations, presumably because of barriers in access to primary care. Continuity in the physician–patient relationship is an important policy goal. A suggestion for policy is thus to improve communication about the organization of the Norwegian health-care sector to newly arrived immigrants, as well as to patients at the EW.  For Appendix klick on "Supplementary Files" in the right hand menu 96 800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE

  6. The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Johnson, Erica D.; Claridy, Mechelle D.; Earle, Rebecca L.; Kaplan, Lee M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20–39) were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40–49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008–0.822) or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004–0.321). Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. There is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight. PMID:26339506

  7. The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Cody Stanford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH. We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20–39 were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40–49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008–0.822 or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004–0.321. Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. There is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight.

  8. Effects of adding a new PCMH block rotation and resident team to existing longitudinal training within a certified PCMH: primary care residents’ attitudes, knowledge, and experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Furey, Christopher; Chandran, Rabin; Goldberg, Arnold; El Rayess, Fadya; Ashley, David; Goldman, Roberta E

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is considered important for the future of primary care in the USA, it remains unclear how best to prepare trainees for PCMH practice and leadership. Following a baseline study, the authors added a new required PCMH block rotation and resident team to an existing longitudinal PCMH immersion and didactic curriculum within a Level 3-certified PCMH, aiming for “enhanced situated learning”. All 39 residents enrolled in a USA family medicine residency program during the first year of curricular implementation completed this new 4-week rotation. This study examines the effects of this rotation after 1 year. Methods A total of 39 intervention and 13 comparison residents were eligible participants. This multimethod study included: 1) individual interviews of postgraduate year (PGY) 3 intervention vs PGY3 comparison residents, assessing residents’ PCMH attitudes, knowledge, and clinical experience, and 2) routine rotation evaluations. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed using immersion/crystallization. Rotation evaluations were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis of free text responses. Results Authors analyzed 23 interviews (88%) and 26 rotation evaluations (67%). Intervention PGY3s’ interviews revealed more nuanced understanding of PCMH concepts and more experience with system-level PCMH tasks than those of comparison PGY3s. More intervention PGY3s rated themselves “extremely prepared” to implement PCMH than comparison PGY3s; however, most self-rated “somewhat prepared”. Their reflections demonstrated deeper understanding of PCMH implementation and challenges than comparison PGY3s but inadequate experience to directly see the results of successful solutions. Rotation evaluations from PGY1, PGY2, and PGY3s revealed strengths and several areas for improvement. Conclusion Adding one 4-week block rotation to existing longitudinal training appears

  9. Resident Rounds: Primary Cutaneous Mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mariah; Fathi, Ramin; Alkousakis, Theodore

    2015-08-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old neutropenic man with acute myelogenous leukemia who presented for evaluation of a rapidly expanding necrotic eschar after adhesive placement. Histopathology revealed infection with primary cutaneous mucormycosis. Our case reviews the presentation and management of this condition as well highlights an uncommon cause in the hospital that can lead to this dangerous infection. PMID:27120566

  10. Spirometry in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Allan L Coates; Brian L Graham; McFadden, Robin G; Colm McParland; Dilshad Moosa; Steeve Provencher; Jeremy Road

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inf...

  11. [Primary care in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  12. Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little SH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sahoko H Little,1,2 Sunil S Menawat,1,3 Michael Worzniak,1 Michael D Fetters2 1Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency, Wayne, Michigan, USA; 2University of Michigan, Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3Ghent Family Medicine Residency, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA Abstract: Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. Keywords: wound care education, primary care, residency education, surgery rotation, curriculum development

  13. Wound Care in Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Nail Ersoz; Ismail Hakki Ozerhan; Fatih Zor

    2008-01-01

    Wound care starts with occuring of wound. Primary health care wound care important as to affect on quality of healing. It is given information about the types of wounds, brief wound physiopathology and presented the options of wound care to primary health care wound care proffessionals in this article. Wound care must be done in a systematic process by health care professionals. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000): 71-74

  14. Wound Care in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail Ersoz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound care starts with occuring of wound. Primary health care wound care important as to affect on quality of healing. It is given information about the types of wounds, brief wound physiopathology and presented the options of wound care to primary health care wound care proffessionals in this article. Wound care must be done in a systematic process by health care professionals. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 71-74

  15. Wound Care in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail Ersoz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound care starts with occuring of wound. Primary health care wound care important as to affect on quality of healing. It is given information about the types of wounds, brief wound physiopathology and presented the options of wound care to primary health care wound care proffessionals in this article. Wound care must be done in a systematic process by health care professionals. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 71-74

  16. Psychiatry and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David

    2003-10-01

    There is now almost universal recognition that primary care is the place where most mentally distressed people first present for help. However, the pace at which the health system has adapted to this reality varies greatly from country to country, depending on the amount of resource devoted to mental illness services, the way in which primary care physicians have organized their practice, and the inertia of the system. Here we present several models from developed and developing countries and address briefly the issue of training of health workers. PMID:16946921

  17. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  18. Primary care guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. DESIGN: A cross...

  19. What Is Primary Care Informatics?

    OpenAIRE

    de Lusignan, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Primary care informatics is an emerging academic discipline that remains undefined. The unique nature of primary care necessitates the development of its own informatics discipline. A definition of primary care informatics is proposed, which encompasses the distinctive nature of primary care. The core concepts and theory that should underpin it are described. Primary care informatics is defined as a science and as a subset of health informatics. The proposed definition is intended to focus th...

  20. The healthy migrant effect in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Gimeno-Feliu, Luis A.; Amaia Calderón-Larrañaga; Esperanza Diaz; Beatriz Poblador-Plou; Rosa Macipe-Costa; Alexandra Prados-Torres

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the morbidity burden of immigrants and natives residing in Aragón, Spain, based on patient registries in primary care, which represents individuals’ first contact with the health system. Methods: A retrospective observational study was carried out, based on linking electronic primary care medical records to patients’ health insurance cards. The study population consisted of the entire population assigned to general practices in Aragón, Spain (1,251,540 individuals, of...

  1. Sexuality and intimacy among care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Paul; Horne, Maria; Brown, Laura J E; Dickinson, Tommy; Wilson, Christine Brown

    Discussing sexuality and intimacy with older people can be problematic, so it is not uncommon that their needs go unrecognised. This article identifies barriers to addressing sexuality and intimacy needs, and outlines some simple strategies to raise awareness of them among older care home residents and staff, thereby facilitating a discussion to enable such needs to be met. PMID:27141720

  2. Primary Care: Medicine's Gordian Knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddone, Eugene Z; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is the cornerstone of effective and efficient healthcare systems. Patients prefer a trusted primary care provider to serve as the first contact for all of their healthcare questions, to help them make important health decisions, to help guide them through an expanding amount of medical information and to help coordinate their care with all other providers. Patients also prefer to establish an ongoing, continuous relationship with their primary care provider. However, fewer and fewer physicians are choosing primary care as a career, threatening the foundation of the health system. We explore the central challenges of primary care defined by work-force controversies about who can best deliver primary care. We also explore the current challenging reimbursement model for primary care that often results in fragmenting care for patients and providers. Finally, we explore new models of primary care health delivery that may serve as partial solutions to the current challenges. PMID:26802754

  3. Critical care education in general surgery residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A A; Fakhry, S M; Sheldon, G F

    1989-08-01

    Surgical critical care (SCC) was recently identified as an essential component of general surgery by the American Board of Surgery (ABS). Previous studies have found limited attention to critical care education in general surgery programs. This survey was developed to determine the changes in critical care education, following the emphasis by the ABS. The survey determined the format for SCC education, the time and resources committed, and the views of the program directors toward SCC. Program directors of all 296 approved general surgery residencies were surveyed, with a 79% response. Most program directors (91%) agree that SCC is an essential component of general surgery, and 72% believe a separate intensive care unit (ICU) rotation should be used in SCC education. Education in SCC was provided by a separate ICU service in 110 (47%) of the programs. The remaining 53% used care of patients in the ICU during traditional services as their educational experience. The average ICU rotation for surgery residents was 9 weeks and usually occurred in the second year of training. In 97% of the 110 programs with an ICU service, lectures and conferences were conducted regularly. Seventeen programs sponsored critical care fellowships, and 25 additional programs were considering them. Ninety percent of surgical ICU services had faculty that consisted exclusively of surgeons or surgeons and other specialists. Only 53% of surgeons attending on an ICU service had a reduction in their other responsibilities. Despite overwhelming agreement that critical care is an essential component of general surgery, less than half of the training programs have an ICU service to coordinate resident education in SCC. If surgeons are to continue to provide total care to their patients, there needs to be increased commitment to SCC education. PMID:2763037

  4. Training the Internist for Primary Care: A View From Nevada

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Kenneth J.

    1982-01-01

    The recent establishment of primary care residencies at the University of Nevada School of Medicine has raised important questions about local priorities in the training of physicians to provide primary care for adults. Because the amount of money available for health care training is decreasing, these questions also have national importance. Primary care internal medicine, not synonymous with general internal medicine, offers distinct advantages to patients over family practice adult care an...

  5. Primary care training and the evolving healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccoralo, Lauren A; Callahan, Kathryn; Stark, Rachel; DeCherrie, Linda V

    2012-01-01

    With growing numbers of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations, and the potential implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the provision of primary care in the United States is expanding and changing. Therefore, there is an urgent need to create more primary-care physicians and to train physicians to practice in this environment. In this article, we review the impact that the changing US healthcare system has on trainees, strategies to recruit and retain medical students and residents into primary-care internal medicine, and the preparation of trainees to work in the changing healthcare system. Recruitment methods for medical students include early preclinical exposure to patients in the primary-care setting, enhanced longitudinal patient experiences in clinical clerkships, and primary-care tracks. Recruitment methods for residents include enhanced ambulatory-care training and primary-care programs. Financial-incentive programs such as loan forgiveness may encourage trainees to enter primary care. Retaining residents in primary-care careers may be encouraged via focused postgraduate fellowships or continuing medical education to prepare primary-care physicians as both teachers and practitioners in the changing environment. Finally, to prepare primary-care trainees to effectively and efficiently practice within the changing system, educators should consider shifting ambulatory training to community-based practices, encouraging resident participation in team-based care, providing interprofessional educational experiences, and involving trainees in quality-improvement initiatives. Medical educators in primary care must think innovatively and collaboratively to effectively recruit and train the future generation of primary-care physicians. PMID:22786734

  6. Results of chart reviews conducted to evaluate primary care patients seen by second and third year family medicine residents for potential adverse polypharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang LF

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of family medicine residents for patients aged more than 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases and seen at least twice in a 12 month timeframe.Methods: This is a descriptive analysis which was based on chart reviews. The setting was the University of Illinois-Rockford Family Practice Residency. Patients aged 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases who were seen at least twice by second and third year residents.Results: Findings from this chart review include: 28.8% of the prescribed medications were not effective for the documented condition, 26.3% of the prescribed doses were incorrect, and 44.5% of the drugs prescribed were not the least expensive alternative.Discussion: This preliminary study suggests a need for a focused intervention with family medicine residents regarding inappropriate polypharmacy issues with older patients.

  7. Primary Medical Care in Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    Primary medical care in Chile: accessibility under military rule [Front Cover] [Front Matter] [Title Page] Contents Tables Figures Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: The Restructuring of Medical Care Financing in Chile Chapter 3: Inflation and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 4: Help......-Seeking Behavior of the Urban Poor Chapter 5: Spatial Organization and Medical Care Accessibility Chapter 6: Conclusion...

  8. African Primary Care Research: Qualitative interviewing in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Steve Reid; Bob Mash

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research and focuses on the topic of qualitative interviewing in primary care. In particular it looks at issues of study design, sample size, sampling and interviewing in relation to individual and focus group interviews. There is a particular focus on helping postgraduate students at a Masters level to write their research proposals.

  9. Digging deep: how organisational culture affects care home residents' experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Killett, A; Burns, D.; F. Kelly; Brooker, D.; Bowes, A.; La Fontaine, J.; Latham, I.; Wilson, M; O'Neill, M

    2014-01-01

    Organisational culture of institutions providing care for older people is increasingly recognised as influential in the quality of care provided. There is little research, however, that specifically examines the processes of care home culture and how these may be associated with quality of care. In this paper we draw from an empirical study carried out in the United Kingdom (UK) investigating the relationship between care home culture and residents' experience of care. Eleven UK care homes we...

  10. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Jun J; Kapur, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically rele...

  11. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The world population has become more globalised with increasing number of people residing in another country for work or other reasons. Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia. Methods Data were derived from the 2012 National Medical Care Survey (NMCS), a cross sectional survey of primary care enco...

  12. Comprehensive care of pain: Developing systems and tools to improve patient care and resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, Julie; Devlin, Kwanza; Krohn, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain is a common condition associated with tremendous risk for morbidity and mortality. In many settings, the management of chronic non-cancer pain by primary care providers, although customary, can be difficult due to inadequate training and conflicts between patient expectations and best practices. Resident physicians, faculty, and staff of this family medicine residency program developed a comprehensive chronic pain management program to address these issues while improving patient outcomes. The program was aligned with evidence-based chronic non-cancer pain management strategies yet tailored to the needs of the providers and patients and the strengths of the clinic. In the end, the societal demand for improved chronic non-cancer pain management resulted in a massive curricular and clinical practice overhaul for this residency program. PMID:27497454

  13. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  14. Primary care workforce development in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Heinemann, S.; Gress, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a large variation in the organization of primary care in Europe. In some health care systems, primary care is the gatekeeper to more specialized care, whilst in others patients have the choice between a wide range of providers. Primary care has increasingly become teamwork. Meth

  15. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... population with a high burden of functional and cognitive impairment. Residential care is an important component of ... RCF and the month and year of the interview. Medicaid beneficiary : A resident who, during the 30 ...

  16. Primary care research in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Kallestrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    inter-professional nature of the discipline, the book also features a section on cross-nation organisations and primary care networks supporting research. National perspectives are offered from researchers in 20 countries that form part of the World Organization of Family Doctors, providing case...

  17. Primary health care quality and diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues Gonçalves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association between primary health care (PHC quality and diabetes mellitus (DM management in adult patients living within the catchment area of PHC services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional, population-based study of adults reporting known diabetes. Quality of PHC was assessed through the Primary Care Assesment Tool (PCATool-Brazil. Statistical analyses were performed with Poisson regression with robust variance. Results: Of the 3,014 adults interviewed, 205 (6.8% reported having diabetes; of these, 64.4% were women and 68.3% were white. Regarding PHC score of the health service attended, people with diabetes that were classified with a high PHC score, presented longer duration of disease (10.9 vs 8.4 anos, p=0.03 and greater frequency of diabetes-related complications (75.3% vs 58.8%, p=0.02. Regarding the proportion of respondents with good glycemic control, no significant difference between groups was found (31.7% vs 38%, p=0.3. In the multivariate analysis, services with a high PHC score presented a better profile of care for the prevention of the main comorbidities – greater blood pressure assessment (PR=1.07; CI95% 1.01-1.14, lipid profile request (PR=1.23; CI95% 1.09-1.39, counseling for physical activity (PR=1.50; CI95% 1.21-1.86, foot examination (PR=2.08; CI95% 1.54-2,81, and counseling for foot care (PR=1.37; CI95% 1.18-1.59. Conclusion: High PHC score services showed better performance in the management of diabetes and care for more complicated patients, but they did not differ significantly from lower PHC score services in terms of patients’ glycemic control.

  18. Improving year-end transfers of care in academic ambulatory clinics: a survey of pediatric resident physician perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In resident primary care continuity clinics, at the end of each academic year, continuity of care is disrupted when patients cared for by the graduating class are redistributed to other residents. Yet, despite the recent focus on the transfers of care between resident physicians in inpatient settings, there has been minimal attention given to patient care transfers in academic ambulatory clinics. We sought to elicit the views of pediatric residents regarding year-end patient handoffs in a pediatric resident continuity clinic.Methods: Residents assigned to a continuity clinic of a large pediatric residency program completed a questionnaire regarding year-end transfers of care.Results: Thirty-one questionnaires were completed out of a total 45 eligible residents (69% response. Eighty seven percent of residents strongly or somewhat agreed that it would be useful to receive a written sign-out for patients with complex medical or social issues, but only 35% felt it would be useful for patients with no significant issues. Residents more frequently reported having access to adequate information regarding their new patients’ medical summary (53% and care plan (47% than patients’ functional abilities (30%, social history (17%, or use of community resources (17%. When rating the importance of receiving adequate sign-out in each those domains, residents gave most importance to the medical summary (87% of residents indicating very or somewhat important and plan of care (84%. Residents gave less importance to receiving sign-out regarding their patients’ functional abilities (71% social history (58%, and community resources (58%. Residents indicated that lack of access to adequate patient information resulted in additional work (80%, delays or omissions in needed care (56%, and disruptions in continuity of care (58%.Conclusions: In a single-site study, residents perceive that they lack adequate information during year-end patient transfers

  19. Learning from UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The Australian Government is wise to examine other health care systems as it strives to improve the quality of care and address rising costs to both governments and individuals. Focus is currently on the United Kingdom, whose National Health Service (NHS) stands out as one that delivers good care at a reasonable price to all who need it. The Australian and UK systems have many similarities: universal access, tax payer support, no or low cost at point of delivery, and good population health outcomes. They also face similar pressures on services from aging, increasingly unwell yet expectant populations.However, there are also differences, largely in the way that health care is funded, organised and delivered. The NHS is a huge system for 60 million people in four home countries with diverging policies. Within England, the system is managed through 10 strategic health authorities, each responsible for about 5 million people and having the right to interpret national policy. Population based health care, including tertiary care, is funded locally via primary care trusts. PMID:19283244

  20. Substitution of Hospital Care with Primary Care: Defining the Conditions of Primary Care Plus

    OpenAIRE

    van Hoof, Sofie Johanna Maria; Kroese, Mariëlle Elisabeth Aafje Lydia; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke Dingena; Elissen, Arianne Mathilda Josephus; Meerlo, Ronald Johan; Hanraets, Monique Margaretha Henriëtte; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyse barriers and facilitators in substituting hospital care with primary care to define preconditions for successful implementation.Methods: A descriptive feasibility study was performed to collect information on the feasibility of substituting hospital care with primary care. General practitioners were able to refer patients, about whom they had doubts regarding diagnosis, treatment and/or the need to refer to hospital care, to medical specialists who performed low-complex ...

  1. Living in institutional care: residents' experiences and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Virpi; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2009-01-01

    Insights into daily living in residential care settings are rare. This article draws on a qualitative dataset (semi-structured interviews and recordings of residents' council meetings) that gives a glimpse of the experiences and coping strategies of (older) people living in residential care. The data highlight the range of unmet needs of the residents, similar to the categories of physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Our analysis indicates that "higher" and "lower" needs are closely intertwined and mutually reinforcing and should therefore be accorded equal emphasis by professionals (including social workers) employed within residential care settings. PMID:19860294

  2. Primary-care physician compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Arik

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews existing models of physician compensation and presents information about current compensation patterns for primary-care physicians in the United States. Theories of work motivation are reviewed where they have relevance to the desired outcome of satisfied, productive physicians whose skills and expertise are retained in the workforce. Healthcare reforms that purport to bring accountability for healthcare quality and value-rather than simply volume-bring opportunities to redesign primary-care physician compensation and may allow for new compensation methodologies that increase job satisfaction. Physicians are increasingly shunning the responsibility of private practice and choosing to work as employees of a larger organization, often a hospital. Employers of physicians are seeking compensation models that reward both productivity and value. PMID:22786738

  3. Workload of primary care midwives.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegers, T.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the actual workload of primary-care midwives in the Netherlands. BACKGROUND: In 2000, a strike and large demonstration before parliament convinced everyone of the shortage of midwives and their excessive workload. The government reacted by increasing the capacity of the midwifery schools and lowering the 'standard caseload' for a full-time working midwife. To assess whether this would lead to sufficient improvement of the situation, more insight was needed of the actual w...

  4. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Damian Antonio; Charles Dalcanele Tesser; Rodrigo Otavio Moretti-Pires

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the ...

  5. Mild Hypertransaminasemia in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Busafi, Said A; Hilzenrat, Nir

    2013-01-01

    The liver enzymes, alanine transaminase (ALT) or aspartate transaminase (AST), are commonly used in clinical practice as screening as well as diagnostic tests for liver diseases. ALT is more specific for liver injury than AST and has been shown to be a good predictor of liver related and all-cause mortality. Asymptomatic mild hypertransaminasemia (i.e., less than five times normal) is a common finding in primary care and this could be attributed to serious underlying condition or has transien...

  6. Assuring professional pastoral care for every nursing home resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, B

    1999-01-01

    Ministry to persons in nursing homes is built on two mandates: "... He has sent me to bring good news to the oppressed, to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and release to the prisoners; ... to comfort all who mourn ..." (Isaiah 61:1-3). The federal government provides the second: "Quality of Life. A facility must care for its residents in a manner and in an environment that promotes maintenance or enhancement of each resident's quality of life" (OBRA '87, Guidance to Surveyors in Long Term Care Facilities, Code of Federal Regulations, Health Care Financing Administration, 1995, section 483.15, F240). This article discusses both the religious and the U.S. political history of caring for the old and frail. It concludes by describing political efforts in one state to increase the quality of that care and pastoral efforts to support the nursing assistants in long-term care facilities. PMID:10387595

  7. Effect of Primary Health Care Orientation on Chronic Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Schmittdiel, Julie A.; Shortell, Stephen M.; Rundall, Thomas G; Bodenheimer, Thomas; SELBY, Joe V.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE It has been suggested that the best way to improve chronic illness care is through a redesign of primary care emphasizing comprehensive, coordinated care as espoused by the Chronic Care Model (CCM). This study examined the relationship between primary care orientation and the implementation of the CCM in physician organizations.

  8. Oncology in primary health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book Oncology in the primary health care, constitutes an important contribution to the prevention and treatment of cancer, from a very comprehensive assessment. It's a disease that is the second leading cause of death in our country, to much pain and suffering is for the patient and their family. The book has a very useful for basic health equipment approach, since it emphasizes that cancer can be prevented if achieved in the population changes in lifestyle. The book is valued not correct food as responsible for one third of all cancers. Currently important research being developed in relation to psiconeuroinmuno-Endocrinology, who is studying the association between psychological factors and the development of cancer valuing that kept stress and depression reduces the antitumor activity of the immune system; that made programs with encouraging results where the treatment of cancer has joined elements of psychotherapy, immunotherapy and the use of the biotherapy. The focus of the book fills an important place in the primary health care and is an indispensable guide for professionals at this level of care (author)

  9. How Do Physicians Teach Empathy in the Primary Care Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    Explored how primary care clinician-teachers actually attempt to convey empathy to medical students and residents. Found that they stress the centrality of role modeling in teaching, and most used debriefing strategies as well as both learner- and patient-centered approaches in instructing learners about empathy. (EV)

  10. Primary care quality management in Uzbekistan.

    OpenAIRE

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Baymirova, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Uzbek government has a central role in primary care quality management. On paper, many quality management structures and procedures exist. Now, primary care practice should follow, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – has shown. The results have been published in a WHO report. With donor support, quality improvement in primary care is a national priority. Many laws, decrees and orders deal with the improvement of (primary) health care service...

  11. Resident-Directed Long-Term Care: Staff Provision of Choice During Morning Care

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Rahman, Annie; Beuscher, Linda; Jani, Victoria; Durkin, Daniel W.; Schnelle, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an observational protocol to assess the quality of staff–resident communication relevant to choice and describe staff–resident interactions as preliminary evidence of the usefulness of the tool to assess current nursing home practices related to offering choice during morning care provision. Design and Methods: This study included 73 long-stay residents in 2 facilities. Research staff conducted observations for 4 consecutive morning hours during targeted care activities (t...

  12. Psychopharmacology in Primary Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benich, Joseph J; Bragg, Scott W; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Psychopharmacology requires clinicians to stay current on the latest guidelines and to use dynamic treatment strategies. Psychiatric conditions are prevalent in the primary care population. Choice of treatment with psychopharmacology should be based on controlling the patient's predominant symptoms while taking into consideration patient age, treatment compliance, patient past response to treatments, dosing frequency, patient preference, medication side effects, potential medication interactions, drug precautions/warnings, and cost. Response to therapy, as well as side effects, needs to be evaluated at regular intervals. The goal is to minimize symptoms and return patients to their maximal level of functioning. PMID:27262011

  13. Care Perceptions among Residents of LTC Facilities Purporting to Offer Person-Centred Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Leeann; MacEntee, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    This study explored qualitatively how residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities feel about and adapt to the care they receive. We interviewed and observed a purposeful selection of elderly residents in seven facilities purporting to provide person-centred care. Interpretative descriptions from 43 personal interviews with 23 participants answered the question: How do residents perceive the care rendered in LTC facilities purporting to offer person-centred care? Three themes emerged: (1) the caring environment; (2) preservation of dignity; and (3) maintenance of personal autonomy. Participants were sympathetic to the nursing staff's workload, but felt distant from the staff. Participants gave examples of poor care and lack of empathy, human indignities, and violations of personal autonomy caused by institutional policies they felt inhibited their ability to receive care based on their preferences. Overall, they challenged the claims of person-centred care, but adapted to cope with an environment that threatened their dignity and autonomy. PMID:27063137

  14. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms. PMID:25171938

  15. Primary care nurses: effects on secondary care referrals for diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, C.E. van; Verheij, R.A.; Hansen, J.; Velden, L. van der; Nijpels, G.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care nurses play an important role in diabetes care, and were introduced in GP-practice partly to shift care from hospital to primary care. The aim of this study was to assess whether the referral rate for hospital treatment for diabetes type II (T2DM) patients has changed with t

  16. Uncovering the systemic issues that reside in home care

    OpenAIRE

    Giannasi, Wynona

    2012-01-01

    This video clip comprises the Keynote Address: “Uncovering the systemic issues that reside in home care” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Wynona Giannasi, Partner, Howegroup – Public Sector Consultants, Vancouver BC. It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older p...

  17. Primary care practice composition in 34 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Heinemann, Stephanie; Greß, Stefan; Schäfer, Willemijn

    2015-01-01

    Health care needs in the population change through ageing and increasing multimorbidity. Primary health care might accommodate to this through the composition of practices in terms of the professionals working in them. The aim of this article is to describe the composition of primary care practices

  18. Primary care team composition in 34 countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Heinemann, S.; Greß, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2015-01-01

    Health care needs in the population change through ageing and increasing multimorbidity. Primary health care might accommodate to this through the composition of practices in terms of the professionals working in them. The aim of this article is to describe the composition of primary care practices

  19. CPC Initiative - Participating Primary Care Practices

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative is a multi-payer initiative fostering collaboration between public and private health care payers to strengthen...

  20. Osteopathic Students' Graduate Medical Education Aspirations Versus Realities: The Relationship of Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Osteopathic medicine is closely identified with primary care. The mission statements of a majority of colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs) mention the goal of producing primary care physicians. By far, there are more family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the American Osteopathic Association graduate medical education (GME) system than programs for any other specialty. In addition, the osteopathic profession is embarking on a new direction to ensure COM graduates are trained as practice-ready primary care physicians. In counterpoint to the osteopathic profession's emphasis on primary care, the majority of entering and graduating osteopathic medical students express preferences for residencies in non-primary care specialties. When graduating students confront their GME options, however, they discover their choices for non-primary care specialties are limited. Currently, approximately two-thirds of COM graduates end up in a primary care residency. The creation of a unified GME accreditation system under the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) may further consolidate the osteopathic identity with primary care: Osteopathic training institutions may reduce the number of non-primary care programs they offer, which would allow them to increase enrollment in primary care programs to meet ACGME standards and remain below their Medicare caps. Additionally, in the National Resident Matching Program Match, selection patterns by program directors for competitive non-primary care residencies currently favor U.S. MDs. Therefore, while osteopathic students enter COMs aspiring to careers in non-primary care specialties, they are encountering a GME environment that offers them a shrinking number of alternatives. PMID:26397702

  1. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  2. Health Care Reform and the Primary Care Workforce Bottleneck

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    To establish and sustain the high-performing health care system envisioned in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), current provisions in the law to strengthen the primary care workforce must be funded, implemented, and tested. However, the United States is heading towards a severe primary care workforce bottleneck due to ballooning demand and vanishing supply. Demand will be fueled by the “silver tsunami” of 80 million Americans retiring over the next 20 years and the expanded insurance coverage fo...

  3. Recruiting Quarterbacks: Strategies for Revitalizing Training in Primary Care Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H

    2016-02-01

    Current U.S. primary care workforce shortages and trainees' declining interest in primary care residency training, especially regarding primary care internal medicine, have many parallels with circumstances in the early 1970s, when modern adult primary care first emerged. Rediscovery of the lessons learned and the solutions developed at that time and applying them to the current situation have the potential to help engage a new generation of young physicians in the primary care mission.The author compares the internal medicine residency primary care track at the University of New Mexico, described by Brislen and colleagues in this issue, with the nation's first three-year primary care internal medicine residency track introduced at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1973. Strategies for addressing the challenges of primary care practice and improving learner attitudes toward the field are discussed. The author suggests that primary care physicians should be likened to "quarterbacks" rather than "gatekeepers" or "providers" to underscore the intensity of training, level of responsibility, degree of professionalism, and amount of compensation required for this profession. The advent of multidisciplinary team practice, modern health information technology, and fundamental payment reform promises to dramatically alter the picture of primary care, restoring its standing as one of the best job descriptions in medicine. PMID:26397701

  4. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M.; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81–87) PMID:26348355

  5. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Peter M; Bauer, Amy M; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C

    2016-04-01

    Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81-87). PMID:26348355

  6. SCDA task force on a special care dentistry residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery; Vishwanat, Lakshmi; Perry, Maureen; Messura, Judith; Dee, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    The Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) has acted on a proposal regarding the status of training in the care of patients with special needs. Two phases of action were undertaken. Phase 1: (a) examination of the literature on existing training and curricula in the care of patients with special needs and (b) a survey of existing postdoctoral programs in special needs. Phase 2: establish a group of experts who: (a) submitted to the Commission on Dental Accreditation a request to approve a postdoctoral general dentistry residency program in Special Care Dentistry and (b) created suggested accreditation standards for such postdoctoral programs. This article describes efforts by the SCDA to evaluate: The status of existing training of dental students in the care of patients with special needs. The number and characteristics of postdoctoral general dentistry programs offering formal training in the care of patients with special needs. Whether additional training in the care of patients with special needs is needed for dental students and -dentists. Possible actions by SCDA to impact the numbers of dentists trained each year in the care of patients with -special needs. PMID:27113992

  7. Integrating Bipolar Disorder Management in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodrich, David E.; O’Donnell, Allison N.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care ma...

  8. Primary Medical Care and Children's Learning Problems

    OpenAIRE

    McGrath, Patrick J; Feldman, William; Rosser, Walter

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the major learning problems that confront the primary-care physician. They discuss why they believe that the primary-care physician has an important role in case finding, referral, case management, and advocacy for the child with learning problems and his or her family.

  9. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-01-01

    -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS) at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1). Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA) especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our coun...

  10. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gage Heather

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621 in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7% worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14; a mean of .39 (SD.163 professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60% managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low

  11. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield

  12. Research in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2013-04-01

    Atenção Primária (CIAP, mais vinculado ao processo de trabalho como um todo do que à Classificação Internacional das Doenças (CID, que se relaciona mais ao processo de vigilância da morbimortalidade. A CIAP, atualmente na sua segunda versão, classifica o processo de cuidado em três diferentes segmentos: razão de encontro, diagnóstico e processo7. Assim, a CIAP-2 possibilita ao clínico ou pesquisador mudar para uma epidemiologia orientada ao episódio do cuidado, ou seja, permite uma análise ao longo do tempo do episódio de cuidado, na medida que esse se desenvolve, marcado pela transição (ou mudanças na relação entre a razão do encontro ou consulta, diagnóstico e intervenções realizadas. A CIAP-2 também é mais leve e com poucos códigos, se comparada ao CID, pois abarca os problemas mais comuns da prática, com frequência intermediária (definidos por taxa de ocorrência de 1-5/1.000 pacientes/ano ou frequentes (definidos por taxa de ocorrência ? 5/1.000 pacientes/ano7. Essa ferramenta desenvolvida pelos médicos de família é parte integrante da agenda da Organização Mundial da Saúde (WHO – Family International Classification6, entretanto necessita ganhar mais espaço na prática e nas pesquisas em APS no Brasil. A presente edição contribui para essa discussão trazendo três artigos – um de Portugal e dois do Brasil – que abordam o tema da CIAP. O primeiro, Tendência de classificação no Capítulo Z da CIAP-2 entre 2006 e 2011 em um centro de saúde de Medicina Familiar em Coimbra, Portugal, faz uma reflexão sobre o aumento do uso de códigos referentes a problemas sociais, que talvez reflita a crise econômica pela qual está passando Portugal. Já os artigos dos autores brasileiros versam sobre a aplicabilidade da CIAP como ferramenta de estudo da demanda em APS. O artigo A methodological proposal to research patients’ demands and pre-test probabilities in a paper form in primary care settings oferece uma

  13. Primary health care nurse practitioners in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCenso, Alba; Auffrey, Lucille; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Matthews, Sue; Opsteen, Joanne

    2007-08-01

    Canada, like many countries, is in the midst of primary health care reform. A key priority is to improve access to primary health care, especially in remote communities and areas with physician shortages. As a result, there is an increased emphasis on the integration of primary health care nurse practitioners. As of March 2006, legislation exists in all provinces and two territories in Canada that allows nurse practitioners (NPs) to implement their expanded nursing role. In this paper, we will briefly review the historical development of the NP role in Canada and situate it in the international context; describe the NP role, supply of NPs in the country, and the settings in which they work; propose an NP practice model framework; summarize facilitators and barriers to NP role implementation in primary health care delivery; and outline strategies to address the barriers. PMID:18041990

  14. Concussion management by primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleacher, M D; Dexter, W W

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess current concussion management practices of primary care providers. Methods An 11 item questionnaire was mailed to primary care providers in the state of Maine, with serial mailings to non‐respondents. Results Over 50% of the questionnaires were completed, with nearly 70% of primary care providers indicating that they routinely use published guidelines as a tool in managing patients with concussion. Nearly two thirds of providers were aware that neuropsychological tests could be used, but only 16% had access to such tests within a week of injury. Conclusions Primary care providers are using published concussion management guidelines with high frequency, but many are unable to access neuropsychological testing when it is required. PMID:16371479

  15. Integrated Primary Care Information Database (IPCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Integrated Primary Care Information Database is a longitudinal observational database that was created specifically for pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, inlcuding data from computer-based patient records supplied voluntarily by general practitioners.

  16. The challenge of supporting care for dementia in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaz Boustani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaz Boustani1,2,3, Cathy Schubert3, Youcef Sennour31Indiana University Center for Aging Research; 2Regenstrief Institute; 3Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAAbstract: Most patients with dementia receive care within primary care systems and have challenging medical and psychiatric issues. Their dementia related symptoms are often not recognized by the primary care system; they suffer from multiple chronic medical conditions; receive numerous psychotropic medications including anticholinergics; and display clinically relevant behavioral and psychological symptoms. Improving the care for such vulnerable patients demands supporting the primary care system with various resources, including dementia care managers, access to and coordination with interdisciplinary dementia specialists, and a feasible dementia screening and diagnosis process. Understanding primary care clinics as a complex adaptive system may enhance our capacity to deliver a flexible supportive process using the above crucial resources to adequately assess and effectively manage patients with dementia. Such a complex adaptive system process would have the best probability of surviving the unknowable future challenges that will face the primary care system.

  17. Choosing a primary care provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et al. Improving patient care. The patient centered medical home. A systematic review. Ann Intern Med . 2013;158(3):169-178. PMID: 24779044 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24779044 . Rohrer JE, Angstman ... Population Health Management . 2013;16(4):242-5. PMID: 23537159 ...

  18. Primary mental health care: Indications and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.G. Pillay

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers indications and obstacles for the development of primary mental health care practice in both developed and under-developed countries. Both are considered as this represents the South African reality. While a significant body of literature has documented the need for primary mental health care, the obstacles (especially in terms of the commodification of health to its fruition are seldom addressed.

  19. Problem behaviour in primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Lamberts, H

    1980-01-01

    Primary health care can be regarded as the boundary between society as a whole and the medical system. Many of the problems patients bring to doctors in primary care are concerned with their personalities and life situation, and can be considered together as problems of human behaviour. On being questioned in a waiting room, 15 per cent of patients considered their problem “psychosocial only”, and an additional 13 to 14 per cent “both somatic and psychosocial”.

  20. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Primary Care Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sanjay; Nihalani, Nikhil D.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased use of neuroleptic agents in the primary care setting. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare complication of neuroleptic therapy that can be missed if not suspected. This manuscript reviews the diagnosis and management of NMS in the primary care setting. There is a lack of prospective data, and most of the information is obtained from case series. Physicians need to have a high index of suspicion with regard to excluding NMS in patients ta...

  1. Root doctors as providers of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, V J

    1983-07-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two "root doctors." These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  2. Effects of dementia-care mapping on residents and staff of care homes: a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertje van de Ven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of dementia-care mapping (DCM for institutionalised people with dementia has been demonstrated in an explanatory cluster-randomised controlled trial (cRCT with two DCM researchers carrying out the DCM intervention. In order to be able to inform daily practice, we studied DCM effectiveness in a pragmatic cRCT involving a wide range of care homes with trained nursing staff carrying out the intervention. METHODS: Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. The primary outcome was agitation, measured with the Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI. The secondary outcomes included residents' neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs and quality of life, and staff stress and job satisfaction. The nursing staff made all measurements at baseline and two follow-ups at 4-month intervals. We used linear mixed-effect models to test treatment and time effects. RESULTS: 34 units from 11 care homes, including 434 residents and 382 nursing staff members, were randomly assigned. Ten nurses from the intervention units completed the basic and advanced DCM training. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effect on the CMAI (mean difference between groups 2·4, 95% CI -2·7 to 7·6; p = 0·34. More NPSs were reported in the intervention group than in usual care (p = 0·02. Intervention staff reported fewer negative and more positive emotional reactions during work (p = 0·02. There were no other significant effects. CONCLUSIONS: Our pragmatic findings did not confirm the effect on the primary outcome of agitation in the explanatory study. Perhaps the variability of the extent of implementation of DCM may explain the lack of effect. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trials Registry NTR2314.

  3. Millennial transformation for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We do not need a crystal ball to see the future. Our web-based future has already arrived in all other aspects of our lives--even our mobile phones. The tools for progress--Personal Health Records, Social Networks, and Online medical information--are widely available. The demand is at hand--Millennials are flexing consumer muscles as they enter the healthcare market. Real "Health Care Reform" requires fundamental changes in practice--which in turn requires effective use of information technologies and adaption to changing consumer expectations. The VHA and the MHS are uniquely capable of leveraging political, academic and technological forces to help move American health care through this millennial transformation. Federal health systems are positioned to demonstrate the value of innovation as America seeks healthcare reform. PMID:20572466

  4. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  5. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    OpenAIRE

    DeJesus, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferenc...

  6. Eating Disorders in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangvai, Devdutta

    2016-06-01

    Eating disorders are a complex set of illnesses most commonly affecting white adolescent girls and young women. The most common eating disorders seen in the primary care setting are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Treatment in the primary care environment ideally involves a physician, therapist, and nutritionist, although complex cases may require psychiatric and other specialist care. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with improved outcomes, whereas the consequences of untreated eating disorders, particularly anorexia nervosa, can be devastating, including death. PMID:27262009

  7. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, P. J.; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ...

  8. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's. PMID:26412408

  9. 76 FR 61103 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Care initiative (CPC), a multipayer model designed to improve primary care. DATES: Letter of Intent... strengthen free-standing primary care capacity by testing a model of comprehensive, accountable primary care... through the implementation of the Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative: To collaborate with...

  10. Prenatal Care for Adolescents and attributes of Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Barbaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: evaluate prenatal care for adolescents in health units, in accordance with the attributes of Primary Health Care (PHC guidelines. METHOD: quantitative study conducted with health professionals, using the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Brazil to assess the presence and extent of PHC attributes. RESULTS: for all the participating units, the attribute Access scored =6.6; the attributes Longitudinality, Coordination (integration of care, Coordination (information systems and Integrality scored =6.6, and the Essential Score =6.6. Comparing basic units with family health units, the attribute scores were equally distributed; Accessibility scored =6.6, the others attributes scored =6.6; however, in the basic units, the Essential Score was =6.6 and, in the family health units, =6.6. CONCLUSION: expanding the coverage of family health units and the training of professionals can be considered strategies to qualify health care.

  11. The potential for deprescribing in care home residents with Type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Lillan Mo; Kjome, Reidun Lisbet Skeide; Sølvik, Una Ørvim; Houghton, Julie; Desborough, James Antony

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a common diagnosis in care home residents that is associated with potentially inappropriate prescribing and thus risk of additional suffering. Previous studies found that diabetes medicines can be safely withdrawn in care home residents, encouraging further investigation of the potential for deprescribing amongst these patients. Objectives Describe comorbidities and medicine use in care home residents with Type 2 diabetes; identify number of potentially inappropr...

  12. Motivational interviewing in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstiss, Tim

    2009-03-01

    Healthcare systems are in the process of reforming themselves to better meet the needs of people with, or at risk of developing, chronic diseases and long term conditions. One goal of these efforts is the coproduction of activated, informed, engaged and motivated patients and citizens. The clinical, public health and financial benefits of achieving such a goal may be dramatic. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a proven and practical front-line approach which can help deliver this goal whilst also helping to deliver such policy objectives and intermediate outcomes as increased levels of patient centered care, participatory or shared decision making, evidence-based healthcare and improved clinician-patient relationships. Until now, MI has been passively diffusing through the system as a result of the innovation and early uptake by insightful individuals and organizations. If healthcare systems want to breakthrough to higher levels of performance, investment in the conscious and deliberate implementation of MI into front-line settings may prove helpful. PMID:19253016

  13. Primary Health Care in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pilar Astier-Peña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Maria Pilar Astier-Peña é licenciada e doutora em Medicina e Cirurgia pela Universidad de Zaragoza, Espanha. Possui Mestrado em Saúde Pública e Administração Sanitária pela Universidad de Valencia e Mestrado em Economia da Saúde e Gestão Sanitária pelas Universidades Central de Barcelona e Pompeu Fabra. Atualmente Pilar é médica de família e comunidade e coordenadora médica do Centro de Saúde de Caspe (Zaragoza do Serviço Aragonês de Saúde e realiza, também, pesquisa sobre sistemas de informação e projetos de melhoria da qualidade assistencial no âmbito hospitalar. Em agosto deste ano, esteve no Brasil, ocasião em que visitou Clínicas da Família no Rio de Janeiro e ministrou oficinas para os residentes e preceptores do Programa de Residência em Medicina de Família e Comunidade da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde do Rio de Janeiro. RBMFC: Qual é a situação atual da atenção primária na Espanha e qual é o papel do médico de família e comunidade?Pilar Astier: O sistema nacional de saúde na Espanha está atualmente organizado em 17 serviços regionais de saúde, que, em seu conjunto, possuem 3.600 centros de saúde e 10.116 consultórios locais em pequenos vilarejos, onde os profissionais de saúde trabalham para dar conta de uma população de 47.213.000 habitantes.Em cada centro de saúde trabalha uma equipe de atenção primária composta por médicos de família e comunidade, pediatras, profissionais de enfermagem, uma enfermeira obstetra e, em algumas equipes, também um odontólogo. Essa equipe conta com o apoio de profissionais administrativos. Cada equipe é responsável por uma população específica chamada de “zona básica de saúde”, e cada médico de família e comunidade tem sob sua responsabilidade entre 1500 e 2000 habitantes.Cada zona básica tem um hospital de referência com serviço de emergência, internação e atenção especializada ambulatorial, para que os médicos de família e

  14. Together but apart: Caring for a spouse with dementia resident in a care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Dawn; MacCourt, Penny; Pierce, Joanna; Strudsholm, Tina

    2016-07-01

    This longitudinal, exploratory study was designed to better understand the lived experience of spousal caregivers age 60 and older providing care to partners with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias resident in a care facility. Twenty eight spousal caregivers were interviewed up to three times over a period of 2 years, and long-term care facility staff from four locations across British Columbia (BC), Canada participated in four focus groups. Thematic analysis of interview and focus group transcripts revealed a central, unifying theme 'together but apart'. The results identify key targets for policy makers and service providers to support positive health and well-being outcomes for spousal caregivers providing care to their partners diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia and living in care facilities. PMID:25027632

  15. Wellness Programmes: Primary-Care Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sarita Verma; Evelyn Forsyth; Leslie Flynn

    1999-01-01

    The evidence suggests that there are benefits associated with wellness programmes but there are methodological limitations with the current state of studies which prohibit strong conclusions in favour of wellness programmes. Concepts of `holistic health' and `traditional' or `alternative health' care have emerged in the past decade as challenges to conventional medical therapies. Wellness programmes may emerge as adjunctive or complementary modalities in primary care, both for the management ...

  16. Spatial analysis of elderly access to primary care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano-Gracia Nancy

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Admissions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs are considered preventable admissions, because they are unlikely to occur when good preventive health care is received. Thus, high rates of admissions for ACSCs among the elderly (persons aged 65 or above who qualify for Medicare health insurance are signals of poor preventive care utilization. The relevant geographic market to use in studying these admission rates is the primary care physician market. Our conceptual model assumes that local market conditions serving as interventions along the pathways to preventive care services utilization can impact ACSC admission rates. Results We examine the relationships between market-level supply and demand factors on market-level rates of ACSC admissions among the elderly residing in the U.S. in the late 1990s. Using 6,475 natural markets in the mainland U.S. defined by The Health Resources and Services Administration's Primary Care Service Area Project, spatial regression is used to estimate the model, controlling for disease severity using detailed information from Medicare claims files. Our evidence suggests that elderly living in impoverished rural areas or in sprawling suburban places are about equally more likely to be admitted for ACSCs. Greater availability of physicians does not seem to matter, but greater prevalence of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates, relative to U.S. medical graduates, does seem to reduce ACSC admissions, especially in poor rural areas. Conclusion The relative importance of non-physician clinicians and international medical graduates in providing primary care to the elderly in geographic areas of greatest need can inform the ongoing debate regarding whether there is an impending shortage of physicians in the United States. These findings support other authors who claim that the existing supply of physicians is perhaps adequate, however the distribution of them across

  17. Barriers and facilitators in providing oral health care to nursing home residents, from the perspective of care aides—a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Hoben, Matthias; Hu, Huimin; Xiong, Tianyuan; Kent, Angelle; Kobagi, Nadia; Yoon, Minn N

    2016-01-01

    Background Unregulated care aides provide up to 80 % of direct resident care in nursing homes. They have little formal training, manage high workloads, frequently experience responsive behaviours from residents, and are at high risk for burnout. This affects quality of resident care, including quality of oral health care. Poor quality of oral health care in nursing homes has severe consequences for residents and the health care system. Improving quality of oral health care requires tailoring ...

  18. [The scientific entertainer in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Santos, José Manuel; Lapetra, José

    2012-09-01

    The scientific method is capable of being applied in primary care. In this article we defend the role of the "scientific entertainer "as strategic and necessary in achieving this goal. The task has to include playful and light-hearted content. We explore some words in English that may help us to understand the concept of "scientific entertainer" from a semantic point of view (showman, master of ceremonies, entrepreneur, go-between) also in Spanish language (counsellor, mediator, methodologist) and finally in Latin and Greek (tripalium, negotium, chronos, kairos). We define the clinical, manager or research health-worker who is skilled in primary care as a "primarylogist". PMID:22018794

  19. Primary health care of the newborn baby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    More than 50% of infant deaths in India occur during the neonatal period. High priority therefore needs to be given to improving the survival of newborns. A large number of neonatal deaths have their origin in the perinatal period and are mainly determined by the health and nutritional status of the mother, the quality of care during pregnancy and delivery, and the immediate care of the newborn at birth. Main causes of neonatal mortality are birth asphyxia, respiratory problems, and infections, especially tetanus. Most such deaths occur among low birthweight babies. Hypothermia, undernutrition, and mismanaged breast feeding may also indirectly contribute to neonatal mortality. Community-based studies have, however, demonstrated that most neonatal mortality can be affordably prevented through primary health care. Efforts are underway to expand the health care infrastructure, but the outreach of maternal and child health care remains unsatisfactory especially in rural areas. PMID:12319228

  20. Fostering dignity in the care of nursing home residents through slow caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Lillestø, Britt;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical impairment and dependency on others may be a threat to dignity. Research questions: The purpose of this study was to explore dignity as a core concept in caring, and how healthcare personnel focus on and foster dignity in nursing home residents. Research design: This study has...... health personnel, maintaining human dignity requires slow caring in nursing homes, as an essential approach....... a hermeneutic design. Participants and research context: In all, 40 healthcare personnel from six nursing homes in Scandinavia participated in focus group interviews in this study. Ethical considerations: This study has been evaluated and approved by the Regional Ethical Committees and the Social...

  1. Primary care. Match of the day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Lynne

    2007-10-11

    Preston North End's Deepdale redevelopment is a prime example of the new wave of partnerships between primary care trusts and sports clubs. Warrington Wolves rugby league club was a pioneer, with a 1.3m pound sterling PCT health centre at its ground since 2005. Financial issues include sports club business stability. Benefits include health promotion opportunities. PMID:18163265

  2. Prognosis of trochanteric pain in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.V. Schouten (Boris); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); B.W. Koes (Bart); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); A.M. Lievense (Annet)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Trochanteric pain is the second most important diagnosis of hip problems presenting in primary care, but its incidence and prognosis in this context is largely unknown. AIM: To determine the 1- and 5-year prognoses of trochanteric pain and the predictive var

  3. Primary care psychiatry: the case for action.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, M.

    1991-01-01

    Since the introduction of the National Health Service a number of epidemiological enquiries have established the importance of mental disorders in the field of primary care. Examples are provided from the work of the General Practice Research Unit at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. The results furnish a rational basis for collaborative action between research workers, general practitioners and policy makers.

  4. Parasitic Skin Infections for Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadabhoy, Irfan; Butts, Jessica F

    2015-12-01

    The 2 epidermal parasitic skin infections most commonly encountered by primary care physicians in developed countries are scabies and pediculosis. Pediculosis can be further subdivided into pediculosis capitis, corporis, and pubis. This article presents a summary of information and a review of the literature on clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of these commonly encountered parasitic skin infestations. PMID:26612378

  5. Depression In Primary Care Part 2: Management

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The management of depression in the primary care setting should ideally take a biological, psychological, and sociological approach. Antidepressants are the most commonly used biological agents in the treatment of depression. Psychological therapies and psychosocial interventions improve the outcome of treatment when combined with pharmacotherapy. Clinical depression is treatable and thus efforts should be made to alleviate the suffering of patients with depression.

  6. Financial incentive schemes in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillam S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Gillam Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Pay-for-performance (P4P schemes have become increasingly common in primary care, and this article reviews their impact. It is based primarily on existing systematic reviews. The evidence suggests that P4P schemes can change health professionals' behavior and improve recorded disease management of those clinical processes that are incentivized. P4P may narrow inequalities in performance comparing deprived with nondeprived areas. However, such schemes have unintended consequences. Whether P4P improves the patient experience, the outcomes of care or population health is less clear. These practical uncertainties mirror the ethical concerns of many clinicians that a reductionist approach to managing markers of chronic disease runs counter to the humanitarian values of family practice. The variation in P4P schemes between countries reflects different historical and organizational contexts. With so much uncertainty regarding the effects of P4P, policy makers are well advised to proceed carefully with the implementation of such schemes until and unless clearer evidence for their cost–benefit emerges. Keywords: financial incentives, pay for performance, quality improvement, primary care

  7. Opportunity Knocks: HIV Prevention in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Expansions in health care coverage, a comprehensive framework for HIV prevention and care, electronic medical records, and novel HIV prevention modalities create a current opportunity to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in the United States. HIV is increasingly disproportionately found in populations historically at higher risk, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender women, injection drug users, and persons of color. This underscores the need for providers to identify persons at higher risk for HIV and assure the provision of screening and prevention services. In turn, universal screening for HIV-testing every adolescent and adult at least once in their lifetime-will increasingly be necessary to find the infrequent cases of HIV in lower risk populations. In both these domains, primary care providers will play a unique role in complementing traditional providers of HIV prevention and care services by increasing the proportion of their patients who have been screened for HIV, opening dialogues around sexual health, including asking about sexual orientation and gender identity, and prescribing antivirals as pre- and postexposure prophylaxis for their non-HIV-infected patients. Primary care providers must understand and embrace their importance along the HIV prevention and care continuum. PMID:26789615

  8. Attitude of Lithuanian residents to confidentiality of adolescent sexual and reproductive health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Lazarus, Jeff; Zaborskis, Apolinaras

    2011-01-01

    To assess the attitudes of Lithuanian residents towards the protection of confidentiality in the sexual and reproductive health care of adolescents.......To assess the attitudes of Lithuanian residents towards the protection of confidentiality in the sexual and reproductive health care of adolescents....

  9. Primary care and ophthalmology in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Riad, S F; Dart, J K G; Cooling, R J

    2003-01-01

    The National Health Service is now primary care led. There are different definitions for primary care and in this review they are analysed and related to ophthalmology to produce a working definition for ophthalmic primary care, summarised as the provision of first contact care for all ophthalmic conditions and follow up, preventive, and rehabilitative care of selected ophthalmic conditions, in a variety of settings, by a diverse workforce. The attributes of primary care are first contact, ac...

  10. A `house doctor' scheme for primary health care for the single homeless in Edinburgh

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, P. V.

    1987-01-01

    The single homeless are a heterogeneous population with health care needs greater than those of the general population. The Edinburgh primary health care scheme for single homeless hostel dwellers is an attempt to provide an easily accessible service for this population. Having continued for eight years it is one of the longest established of such schemes. The original aim was for house doctors to take services to the residents in the hostels but the scheme has developed to include a primary ...

  11. Bolstering the pipeline for primary care: a proposal from stakeholders in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Hanyuan; Kevin C. Lee

    2016-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges reports an impending shortage of over 90,000 primary care physicians by the year 2025. An aging and increasingly insured population demands a larger provider workforce. Unfortunately, the supply of US-trained medical students entering primary care residencies is also dwindling, and without a redesign in this country’s undergraduate and graduate medical education structure, there will be significant problems in the coming decades. As an institution ...

  12. Bolstering the pipeline for primary care: a proposal from stakeholders in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Hanyuan Shi; Kevin C. Lee

    2016-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges reports an impending shortage of over 90,000 primary care physicians by the year 2025. An aging and increasingly insured population demands a larger provider workforce. Unfortunately, the supply of US-trained medical students entering primary care residencies is also dwindling, and without a redesign in this country's undergraduate and graduate medical education structure, there will be significant problems in the coming decades. As an institution ...

  13. Developing Strategies to Improve Advance Care Planning in Long Term Care Homes: Giving Voice to Residents and Their Family Members

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Ramsbottom; Mary Lou Kelley

    2014-01-01

    Long term care (LTC) homes, also known as residential care homes, commonly care for residents until death, making palliative care and advance care planning (ACP) important elements of care. However, limited research exists on ACP in LTC. In particular, research giving voice to family members and substitute decision makers is lacking. The objective of this research was to understand experiences, perspectives, and preferences to guide quality improvement of ACP in LTC. This qualitative descript...

  14. Ten years of primary care reform in Lithuania: comparing the task profiles of primary care doctors in 1994 and GPs in 2004.

    OpenAIRE

    Juodryte, I.; Boerma, W. G. W.; Milasauskiene, Z.; Valius, L.; Miseviciene, I.; Groenewegen, P. P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Since its independence in 1990 Lithuania is transforming health care from the previous Soviet system to a decentralised social insurance based system with a strong emphasis on primary care. Doctors have been re-trained to become GPs with a gatekeeping position. GPs can either work as employees in the public centres or in their own private practice, contracted to the system. Family medicine residency programmes have been developed. Health centres have been modernised and new centre...

  15. An Optometrist-Led Eye Care Program for Older Residents of Retirement Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Labreche, Tammy; Stolee, Paul; McLeod, Jordache

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visual impairment among older adults residing in long-term care (LTC) facilities and retirement homes is common and can have a significant adverse impact on their quality of life. Despite the burden of illness, they frequently receive inadequate eye care. We describe an optometrist-led eye care program serving this population, including a profile of participants and the program’s educational role for optometry students. Methods An optometrist assessed residents of LTC f...

  16. Health of the elderly: multidisciplinary residence as an instrument for the care improvement Saúde do idoso: residência multiprofissional como instrumento transformador do cuidado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Klaesener

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the actions taken by the team of the Health Aging Program Multidisciplinary Residency in Health (PREMUS / PUCRS. Description of the experience: In the primary care, the residents participated in home assistance, outpatient services and developed actions of health popular education in aged groups. The team was also inserted in a University hospital, assisting in the fields of outpatient and hospitalization units. Conclusion: The Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Health, with emphasis on the health of the elderly, has proposed a dynamic care based on the concepts of interdisciplinarity, integration and humanized care, as well as guided by the guidelines of the Unified Health System (SUS.Objetivo: Relatar as ações realizadas pela equipe Saúde do Idoso do Programa de Residência Multiprofissional em Saúde (PREMUS/PUCRS. Descrição da experiência: Na atenção básica, os residentes participaram na assistência domiciliar, ambulatorial e desenvolveram ações de educação popular em saúde em um grupo de idosos. A equipe também atuou em um hospital universitário, prestando assistência nos âmbitos ambulatorial e unidades de internação. Conclusão: O Programa de Residência Multiprofissional em Saúde, com ênfase na saúde do idoso, proporcionou aos residentes uma dinâmica assistencial fundamentada nos conceitos da interdisciplinaridade, integralidade e humanização do cuidado, tal como orientado pelas diretrizes do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS.

  17. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Verbakel, N. J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants: Professional staff from primary care practices. Nine professions participated: dental care, dietetics, exercise therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, midwifery, anticoagulation clinics, ski...

  18. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede;

    BACKGROUND. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a GP's work. Although every GP is frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how these palliative efforts are perceived by the patients and their families, a knowledge that is...... vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care...... sectors.METHOD. A number of focus group interviews were conducted with three types of subgroups: 1) Bereaved relatives, 2) GPs and 3) Various health-care-professionals, namely community nurses, hospital physicians and GPs. The interviews were transcribed and analysed according to a phenomenological...

  19. Older care-home residents as collaborators or advisors in research: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Backhouse, Tamara; Kenkmann, Andrea; Lane, Kathleen; Penhale, Bridget; Poland, Fiona; Killett, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background: patient and public involvement (PPI) in research can enhance its relevance. Older care-home residents are often not involved in research processes even when studies are care-home focused. Objective: to conduct a systematic review to find out to what extent and how older care-home residents have been involved in research as collaborators or advisors. Methods: a systematic literature search of 12 databases, covering the period from 1990 to September 2014 was conducted. A lateral sea...

  20. Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Anette; Berg, Lars-Erik; Hellström Muhli, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence. PMID:27131273

  1. Biofield therapies: energy medicine and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindfleisch, J Adam

    2010-03-01

    Energy medicine modalities, also known as biofield therapies, are perhaps the most mysterious and controversial complementary alternative medicine therapies. Although many of these approaches have existed for millennia, scientific investigation of these techniques is in its early stages; much remains to be learned about mechanisms of action and efficacy. These techniques are increasingly used in clinical and hospital settings and can be incorporated into an integrative primary care practice. This article describes several energy medicine and biofield therapies and outlines key elements they hold in common. Several specific approaches are described. Research findings related to the efficacy of energy medicine are summarized, and proposed mechanisms of action and safety issues are discussed. Guidelines are offered for primary care providers wishing to advise patients about energy medicine or to integrate it into their practices, and Internet and other resources for obtaining additional information are provided. PMID:20189005

  2. The productivity of primary care research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, F; Wild, A; Harvey, J; Fenton, E

    2000-11-01

    Primary care research networks are being publicly funded in the United Kingdom to promote a culture of research and development in primary care. This paper discusses the organisational form of these networks and how their productivity can be evaluated, drawing on evidence from management science. An evaluation of a research network has to take account of the complexity of the organisation, the influence of its local context, and its stage of development. Output measures, such as number of research papers, and process measures, such as number of research meetings, may contribute to an evaluation. However, as networking relies on the development of informal, trust-based relationships, the quality of interactions within a network is of paramount importance for its success. Networks can audit and reflect on their success in promoting such relationships and a more formal qualitative evaluation by an independent observer can document their success to those responsible for funding. PMID:11141879

  3. Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Munck, Anders; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth;

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Baseline description of a multicenter cohort study. Objective. To describe patients with low back pain (LBP) in both chiropractic and general practice in Denmark. Background. To optimize standards of care in the primary healthcare sector, detailed knowledge of the patient populations...... in different settings is needed. In Denmark, most LBP-patients access primary healthcare through chiropractic or general practice. Methods. Chiropractors and general practitioners recruited adult patients seeking care for LBP. Extensive baseline questionnaires were obtained and descriptive analyses presented...... separately for general and chiropractic practice patients, Mann-Whitney rank sum test and Pearson's chi-square test, were used to test for differences between the two populations. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 934 patients in chiropractic practice and 319 patients from general practice. Four out...

  4. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi Nadeem; Mitchell Caroline; Magin Parker; McCowan Colin; Lasserson Daniel; Kadam Umesh; Hanratty Barbara; Del Mar Chris; Cleland Jennifer; Furler John; Rait Greta; Steel Nick; van Driel Mieke; Ward Alison

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some cou...

  5. Evaluation of psychological treatment in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Trepka, Chris; Griffiths, Terry

    1987-01-01

    As clinical psychology services to primary care have grown considerably in recent years, several papers have examined the impact of such services. Benefits to patients following contact with the psychologist have been described, but the few studies which have used control groups have -not shown long-lasting effects. However, assessing the global effects of psychological treatment creates several methodological problems, and many of the studies have serious shortcomings in their use of samplin...

  6. Bulimia Nervosa: A Primary Care Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rushing, Jona M.; Jones, Laura E.; Carney, Caroline P

    2003-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric condition that affects many adolescent and young adult women. The disorder is characterized by bingeing and purging behavior and can lead to medical complications. Thus, patients with bulimia nervosa commonly present in the primary care setting. Physical and laboratory examinations reveal markers of bulimia nervosa that are useful in making the diagnosis. Treatment is beneficial, and outcomes of early intervention are good. This article discusses the history, ...

  7. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    OpenAIRE

    Allwright Shane PA; Thomas David E; Darker Catherine D; Barry Joe M; O'Dowd Tom

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS) took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT)...

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of spirometry in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Dinant Geert-Jan; Schermer Tjard; Tilemann Lisa; Gindner Lena; Schneider Antonius; Meyer Franz; Szecsenyi Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of spirometry for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma in patients suspected of suffering from an obstructive airway disease (OAD) in primary care. Methods Cross sectional diagnostic study of 219 adult patients attending 10 general practices for the first time with complaints suspicious for OAD. All patients underwent spirometry and structured medical histories were documente...

  9. African Primary Care Research: Participatory action research

    OpenAIRE

    Bob Mash

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of the series on African primary care research and focuses on participatory action research. The article gives an overview of the emancipatory-critical research paradigm, the key characteristics and different types of participatory action research. Following this it describes in detail the methodological issues involved in professional participatory action research and running a cooperative inquiry group. The article is intended to help students with writing thei...

  10. Naturopathy and the Primary Care Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Sara A.; Gutknecht, Nancy C.

    2010-01-01

    Naturopathy is a distinct type of primary care medicine that blends age-old healing traditions with scientific advances and current research. It is guided by a unique set of principles that recognize the body's innate healing capacity, emphasize disease prevention, and encourage individual responsibility to obtain optimal health. Naturopathic treatment modalities include diet and clinical nutrition, behavioral change, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical medicine, pharmaceut...

  11. They know! - do they? A qualitative study of residents and relatives views on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bollig, Georg; Gjengedal, Eva; Rosland, Jan Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residents living in long-term care facilities are a vulnerable population. For many residents, a nursing home is their place of death. Palliative care and end-of-life decisions are important components of their care provision. Aim: To study the views of cognitively able residents and relatives on advance care planning, end-of-life care, and decision-making in nursing homes. Design: A qualitative study with in-depth interviews with nursing home residents and focus group inter...

  12. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannelli P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Nonetheless, concerns remain about the ability of busy primary care settings to manage problem opioid users along with other patients. In particular, proposed extensions of buprenorphine treatment, a critically effective intervention for opioid use disorder (OUD, are cautiously considered due to the potential risk of misuse or abuse.2 General practitioners are already facing this burden daily in the treatment of chronic pain, and expert supervision and treatment model adjustment are needed to help improve outcomes. Approximately 20% of patients in primary care have noncancer pain symptoms, with most of them receiving opioid prescriptions by their physicians, and their number is increasing.3 Pain diagnoses are comparable in severity to those of tertiary centers and are complicated by significant psychiatric comorbidity, with a measurable lifetime risk of developing OUD.4,5 Some primary care physicians report frustration about opioid abuse and diversion by their patients; support from pain specialists would improve their competence, the quality f their performance, and the ability to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse.6 Thus, buprenorphine treatment should not be adding to a complex clinical scenario. To this end, the promising models of care emphasize the integration of medical with psychological and pharmacological expertise for the management of OUD. 

  13. Reciprocal learning and chronic care model implementation in primary care: results from a new scale of learning in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Noël Polly H; Jordan Michelle; McDaniel Reuben R; Lanham Holly; Palmer Ray; Leykum Luci K; Parchman Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Efforts to improve the care of patients with chronic disease in primary care settings have been mixed. Application of a complex adaptive systems framework suggests that this may be because implementation efforts often focus on education or decision support of individual providers, and not on the dynamic system as a whole. We believe that learning among clinic group members is a particularly important attribute of a primary care clinic that has not yet been well-studied in ...

  14. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  15. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  16. Primary Care of the Prostate Cancer Survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Erika M; Farrell, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    This summary of the American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines targets primary care physicians who coordinate care of prostate cancer survivors with subspecialists. Prostate cancer survivors should undergo prostate-specific antigen screening every six to 12 months and digital rectal examination annually. Surveillance of patients who choose watchful waiting for their prostate cancer should be conducted by a subspecialist. Any hematuria or rectal bleeding must be thoroughly evaluated. Prostate cancer survivors should be screened regularly for urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Patients with predominant urge incontinence symptoms, which can occur after surgical and radiation treatments, may benefit from an anticholinergic agent. If there is difficulty with bladder emptying, a trial of an alpha blocker may be considered. A phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor can effectively treat sexual dysfunction following treatment for prostate cancer. Osteoporosis screening should occur before initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, and patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for anemia, metabolic syndrome, and vasomotor symptoms. Healthy lifestyle choices should be encouraged, including weight management, regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and smoking cessation. Primary care physicians should be vigilant for psychosocial distress, including depression, among prostate cancer survivors, as well as the potential impact of this distress on patients' family members and partners. PMID:27175954

  17. Multidisciplinary teamwork in US primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Karen; McElmurry, Beverly J; Kim, Mi Ja

    2007-08-01

    Primary health care (PHC) is a systems perspective for examining the provision of essential health care for all. A multidisciplinary collaborative approach to health care delivery is associated with effective delivery and care providers' enrichment. Yet data regarding multidisciplinary practice within PHC are limited. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative descriptive study was to better understand team-based PHC practice in the US. Aims included (a) describing nursing faculty involvement in PHC, (b) analyzing ways that multidisciplinary work was enacted, and (c) recommending strategies for multidisciplinary PHC practice. After institutional review board (IRB) protocol approval, data collection occurred by: (a) surveying faculty/staff in a Midwestern nursing college (N=94) about their PHC practice, and (b) interviewing a purposive sample of nursing faculty/staff identified with PHC (n=10) and their health professional collaborators (n=10). Survey results (28% return rate) were summarized, interview notes were transcribed, and a systematic process of content analysis applied. Study findings show team practice is valued because health issues are complex, requiring different types of expertise; and because teams foster comprehensive care and improved resource use. Mission, membership attributes, and leadership influence teamwork. Though PHC is not a common term, nurses and their collaborators readily associated their practice with a PHC ethos. PHC practice requires understanding community complexity and engaging with community, family, and individual viewpoints. Though supports exist for PHC in the US, participants identified discord between their view of population needs and the health care system. The following interpretations arise from this study: PHC does not explicitly frame health care activity in the US, though some practitioners are committed to its ethics; and, teamwork within PHC is associated with better health care and rewarding professional

  18. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eefsting Jan A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. Methods/Design The care programme is based on Dutch national guidelines. It will consist of four steps: detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation. A stepped wedge design will be used. A total of 14 dementia special care units will implement the care programme. The primary outcome is behavioural problems. Secondary outcomes will include quality of life, prescription rate of antipsychotics, use of physical restraints and workload and job satisfaction of nursing staff. The effect of the care programme will be estimated using multilevel linear regression analysis. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will also be carried out. Discussion The care programme is expected to be cost-effective and effective in decreasing behavioural problems, workload of nursing staff and in increasing quality of life of residents. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR. Trial number: NTR 2141

  19. Prediction of dementia in primary care patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Jessen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current approaches for AD prediction are based on biomarkers, which are however of restricted availability in primary care. AD prediction tools for primary care are therefore needed. We present a prediction score based on information that can be obtained in the primary care setting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a longitudinal cohort study in 3.055 non-demented individuals above 75 years recruited via primary care chart registries (Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia, AgeCoDe. After the baseline investigation we performed three follow-up investigations at 18 months intervals with incident dementia as the primary outcome. The best set of predictors was extracted from the baseline variables in one randomly selected half of the sample. This set included age, subjective memory impairment, performance on delayed verbal recall and verbal fluency, on the Mini-Mental-State-Examination, and on an instrumental activities of daily living scale. These variables were aggregated to a prediction score, which achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.84 for AD. The score was applied to the second half of the sample (test cohort. Here, the prediction accuracy was 0.79. With a cut-off of at least 80% sensitivity in the first cohort, 79.6% sensitivity, 66.4% specificity, 14.7% positive predictive value (PPV and 97.8% negative predictive value of (NPV for AD were achieved in the test cohort. At a cut-off for a high risk population (5% of individuals with the highest risk score in the first cohort the PPV for AD was 39.1% (52% for any dementia in the test cohort. CONCLUSIONS: The prediction score has useful prediction accuracy. It can define individuals (1 sensitively for low cost-low risk interventions, or (2 more specific and with increased PPV for measures of prevention with greater costs or risks. As it is independent of technical aids, it may be used within large scale prevention programs.

  20. Clinical research in primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasman, P A; Macpherson, L E; Haining, S A; Breckons, M

    2015-08-28

    Many commissioning bodies for research expect that researchers will actively involve the public and patients in their projects. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), for example, involves members of the public in reviewing funding applications and making recommendations about research funding. The NIHR's portfolio is currently operating in 97% of NHS Trusts and this now includes research sited in primary dental care. This paper presents some case studies of these and other projects which are designed specifically for patient benefit in dental services in the community. This means there is no necessity to translate the outcomes of such research from a university or hospital base to the general population as the projects are undertaken in dental practices that provide primary dental care to (predominantly) NHS patients. The relevance of the outcomes to dental care is, therefore, likely to be of direct interest and importance to commissioners of healthcare funding in the UK who have a duty to use evidence bases for commissioning decisions. PMID:26315174

  1. Integrating Primary Care in Cancer Survivorship Programs: Models of Care for a Growing Patient Population

    OpenAIRE

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    The author describes the primary care physician’s role in caring for cancer survivors who are transitioning from oncology settings to primary care settings. Four scenarios are addressed and advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  2. Geographic accessibility around health care facilities for elderly residents in Hong Kong: a microscale walkability assessment

    OpenAIRE

    LOO, Becky P.Y.; Winnie Wing Yee Lam

    2012-01-01

    An ageing population poses various challenges to a society. Improvements in the medical system and the transportation network are both needed to maintain and to improve the quality of life of the elderly population. In this study we first analyze the travel patterns of elderly residents to health care facilities (HCFs) in Hong Kong. Then, we focus on elderly residents walking to and from major transit stops and on a major HCF for elderly residents as a case study. In particular, a microscale ...

  3. Effect of Medicaid Payment on Rehabilitation Care for Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Wodchis, Walter P; Richard A Hirth; Fries, Brant E

    2007-01-01

    There is considerable interest in examining how Medicaid payment affects nursing home care. This study examines the effect of Medicaid payment methods and reimbursement rates on the delivery of rehabilitation therapy to Medicaid nursing home residents in six States from 1992-1995. In States that changed payment from prospective facility-specific to prospective case-mix adjusted payment methods, Medicaid residents received more rehabilitation therapy after the change. While residents in States...

  4. A review of certain recent advances in primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Baldacchino, Marilyn; Bezzina, Glorianne; Scerri, Anne Marie; Sammut, Mario R.

    2014-01-01

    A strong primary health care system is the keystone of health care and helps patients manage their health conditions in the community, whilst also providing disease prevention services. Primary care is a continuously evolving specialty, with recent exciting innovations, aiming to improve all aspects of care and to meet people’s needs and expectations. A search for articles focusing on the specific aspects of recent advances in primary health care was done using interne...

  5. 75 FR 37463 - Dispensing of Controlled Substances to Residents at Long Term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... practitioners, pharmacists, LTCFs, nurses, residents and family of residents in long term care facilities, State... professional staff (physicians, nurses, etc.) and facilities to provide a proper standard of hospital service... legitimate medical purpose by DEA-registered practitioners acting in the usual course of their...

  6. Attitudes of Medical Students and Residents toward Care of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangpaisan, Weerasak; Intalapapron, Somboon; Assantachai, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this article examined attitudes toward the care of the elderly between and among medical students and residents in training. Data were collected with a 16-item attitude questionnaire. Participants were medical students in their introduction period (prior to clinical experience) and residents of the Department of Internal…

  7. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound. PMID:27477374

  8. Nail Disease for the Primary Care Provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Fleckman, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Nail disorders are a common presenting complaint for both the primary care physician and the dermatologist. Nail diagnoses are broad in scope and include infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions. Onychomycosis is an especially common nail condition, and treatment should always be preceded by appropriate fungal studies for confirmation of diagnosis. Inflammatory conditions of the nail unit can mimic onychomycosis, and a dermatologist can assist with diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Likewise, subungual tumors often require biopsy, and should be evaluated by a dermatologist who is experienced in nail evaluation and treatment. PMID:26476249

  9. The relationships between work stressors and organizational performance in long-term care for elderly residents

    OpenAIRE

    Pekkarinen, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between work stressors and organizational performance in terms of the quality of care provided by the long-term care facilities. Work stressors are first examined in relation to the unit's structural factors, resident characteristics, and to the unit specialization. The study is completed by an investigation into the associations of work stressors such as job demands or time pressure, role ambiguity, resident-related stress, and procedural injustice t...

  10. Tetanus immunization: perception of residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Western India

    OpenAIRE

    Dhande Priti P, Beri Shirish G, Patel Hardik R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prevention of tetanus is far easier than its treatment where mortality is very high. Most cases of tetanus occur due to lack of proper vaccination against the disease and incomplete immunization on exposure. Residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital constitute the first contact physicians for patients. Aim: To assess the perception about Tetanus immunization among residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Pune city. Methodology: A pre tested questionnaire was used to ...

  11. Chronicles of a primary care practice pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman CR

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Freeman,1 W Neil Cottrell,1 Greg Kyle,2 Ian D Williams,3 Lisa M Nissen11School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia; 3Camp Hill Healthcare, Camp Hill, Brisbane, AustraliaBackground: In 2009, a pharmacist commenced working in a nondispensing role at a primary care medical center located in a metropolitan suburb of Brisbane, Australia. Research into the role and function of a practice pharmacist in this setting is still in its infancy.Methods: Ethnographic methods were used over a 3-month period to record activities undertaken by the practice pharmacist on a daily basis.Results: During the 3-month period, 296 hours of activity were documented. Activities the practice pharmacist performed most frequently included medication review, “pharmaceutical opinion,” student supervision, drug information, and administrative tasks.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the broad range of activities which were conducted by a practice pharmacist in the primary care setting as part of a multidisciplinary team.Keywords: practice pharmacist, general practice, integration, medical center

  12. Transforming Perioperative Care: The Case for a Novel Curriculum for Anesthesiology Resident Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem, Navid; Cohen, Neal; Cannesson, Maxime; Kain, Zeev

    2016-06-15

    Currently, perioperative health care is undergoing transformative changes. One prospect for the specialty of anesthesiology is a reorientation of resident education to focus more on the entire spectrum of perioperative care as exemplified by the perioperative surgical home (PSH). To advance this novel paradigm for patients and anesthesiologists, one must also consider further incorporating the competencies fundamental to the PSH during residency training. As such, the purpose of this case report is to outline the successful implementation of a comprehensive PSH curriculum for anesthesiology residents. PMID:27166744

  13. Effects of Namaste Care on residents who do not benefit from usual activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Joyce; Volicer, Ladislav

    2010-02-01

    Namaste Care is a program designed to offer meaningful activities to nursing home residents with advanced dementia or those who cannot be engaged in traditional activities. This 7-day-a-week program is staffed by specially trained nursing assistants who provide activities of daily living in an unhurried manner, with a ''loving touch'' approach to care. The program takes place in a room with lowered lighting, soft music playing, and the scent of lavender. Analyses of Minimum Data Set data before the program were implemented and after residents were involved in the program for at least 30 days showed a decrease in residents' withdrawal, social interaction, delirium indicators, and trend for decreased agitation. Namaste Care helps families feel that in spite of the many losses experienced because of the disease process, something special can still help their loved one to feel comforted, cared for, and cared about in a unique loving environment. PMID:19332652

  14. Primary medical care in Irish prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allwright Shane PA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An industrial dispute between prison doctors and the Irish Prison Service (IPS took place in 2004. Part of the resolution of that dispute was that an independent review of prison medical and support services be carried out by a University Department of Primary Care. The review took place in 2008 and we report here on the principal findings of that review. Methods This study utilised a mixed methods approach. An independent expert medical evaluator (one of the authors, DT inspected the medical facilities, equipment and relevant custodial areas in eleven of the fourteen prisons within the IPS. Semistructured interviews took place with personnel who had operational responsibility for delivery of prison medical care. Prison doctors completed a questionnaire to elicit issues such as allocation of clinician's time, nurse and administrative support and resources available. Results There was wide variation in the standard of medical facilities and infrastructure provided across the IPS. The range of medical equipment available was generally below that of the equivalent general practice scheme in the community. There is inequality within the system with regard to the ratio of doctor-contracted time relative to the size of the prison population. There is limited administrative support, with the majority of prisons not having a medical secretary. There are few psychiatric or counselling sessions available. Conclusions People in prison have a wide range of medical care needs and there is evidence to suggest that these needs are being met inconsistently in Irish prisons.

  15. Acting as standardized patients enhances family medicine residents' self-reported skills in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittikariyakul, Pat; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kirshen, A J

    2015-08-01

    Recent publications have confirmed the use of standardized patients (SPs) in improving clinical skills and enhancing competency. Little research has studied the benefits residents may themselves gain in palliative care playing the role of SPs. Nineteen Family Medicine residents were recruited as standardized patients (FMR-SPs) for a mandatory palliative care workshop in communication for incoming, first-year trainees. Four months later, FMR-SPs reflected upon their own experiences. Two independent researchers performed thematic analysis of these interviews. Most of the residents were satisfied with their roles. Twelve reported improved understanding of self, their patients, the doctor-patient relationship, and the underlying philosophy of palliative care. They also described improved verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Eleven of 14 residents reflected upon behavioral changes in problem coping styles. All residents indicated an intention to apply the learning in their future work. Encouraging Thai Family Medicine residents, in years one through three, to portray SPs in palliative care appears to be a valuable learning experience for the resident. Future studies to validate whether this learning has been applied in subsequent practice are planned. PMID:25256636

  16. Acceptability and usability of a telepresence robot for geriatric primary care: A pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Patricia; Sampsel, Debi D; Kleman, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The dual challenge of increasing numbers of older adults and overall increases in those with some form of insurance is driving the need to develop and evaluate novel methods of primary care delivery such as telehealth. The goal of this study was to explore the acceptability and usability of a remote presence robot (RPR) in a simulated primary care wellness encounter for older adults. A descriptive exploratory study was used to determine the acceptability and usability of the RPR operated by an APRN 250 miles from 13 older adults residing in a high rise during a simulated primary care visit. The results support previous research that technology such as the RPR can be both acceptable and useful for an older adult and primary care provider but only in certain circumstances. PMID:25959035

  17. Knowledge of the residents at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (KAAUH about palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan H Alamri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative care is a rapidly growing subspecialty that aims at improving the quality of life and relieving suffering associated with life threatening disease. Despite its rapid growth and huge demand, the knowledge of health care professionals on palliative care remains inadequate. Objective: This study aims to determine the knowledge of residents at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (KAAUH on palliative care. Materials and Methods: Through a cross-sectional design, all residents in the hospital were invited to complete a two-part self-administered questionnaire in June 2010. The first part of the questionnaire included variables describing the socio-demographic characteristics and educational background, and the second part developed by palliative care education initiative at Dalhousie University in Canada in 2000 had 25 items on the knowledge of palliative care. Results : Of the 80 residents 65 (81% responded, the overwhelming majority of whom were Saudis (92.3% with an equal representation of males and females. The mean age of the participants was 29.1 ± 2.4 years. Less than one-third (29.2% indicated that they had previous didactic education on palliative care. The percentage of right answers on items reflecting knowledge on palliative care accounted for 29.9% ± 9.9%. No statistically significant difference was found in the level of knowledge among the residents according to their demographics or graduation and training characteristics. Conclusion: Resident physicians enrolled in postgraduate programs have suboptimal knowledge of basic palliative care. Substantial efforts should be made to incorporate a palliative care module into the theoretical and practical training of medical students and resident physicians.

  18. The european primary care monitor: structure, process and outcome indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scientific research has provided evidence on benefits of well developed primary care systems. The relevance of some of this research for the European situation is limited. There is currently a lack of up to date comprehensive and comparable information on variation in development of primary care, and a lack of knowledge of structures and strategies conducive to strengthening primary care in Europe. The EC funded project Primary Health Care Activity Monitor for Europe (PHAMEU aims to fill this gap by developing a Primary Care Monitoring System (PC Monitor for application in 31 European countries. This article describes the development of the indicators of the PC Monitor, which will make it possible to create an alternative model for holistic analyses of primary care. Methods A systematic review of the primary care literature published between 2003 and July 2008 was carried out. This resulted in an overview of: (1 the dimensions of primary care and their relevance to outcomes at (primary health system level; (2 essential features per dimension; (3 applied indicators to measure the features of primary care dimensions. The indicators were evaluated by the project team against criteria of relevance, precision, flexibility, and discriminating power. The resulting indicator set was evaluated on its suitability for Europe-wide comparison of primary care systems by a panel of primary care experts from various European countries (representing a variety of primary care systems. Results The developed PC Monitor approaches primary care in Europe as a multidimensional concept. It describes the key dimensions of primary care systems at three levels: structure, process, and outcome level. On structure level, it includes indicators for governance, economic conditions, and workforce development. On process level, indicators describe access, comprehensiveness, continuity, and coordination of primary care services. On outcome level, indicators

  19. Queues and care: how medical residents organize their work in a busy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, W; Mutran, E J; Zeitler, R R; Randall, C S

    1990-09-01

    How do medical residents organize their work in settings where queue demands are heavy and resources are limited? Under such conditions, a queue theory would predict the delivery of care that is indifferent to clients' needs or that gets rid of clients as quickly as possible. In an exploratory case study of medical residents in a Veterans Administration outpatient clinic, we found instead that the medical residents' work was characterized by a high level of professional commitment: they provided thorough medical examinations and attempted to expedite patient care in other ways. We attribute the residents' professional ethos to opportunities provided in the VA hospital to learn the craft of routine medicine and to be directly responsible for patient care; such opportunities were not available in other settings. PMID:2133482

  20. Tetanus immunization: perception of residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhande Priti P, Beri Shirish G, Patel Hardik R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of tetanus is far easier than its treatment where mortality is very high. Most cases of tetanus occur due to lack of proper vaccination against the disease and incomplete immunization on exposure. Residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital constitute the first contact physicians for patients. Aim: To assess the perception about Tetanus immunization among residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Pune city. Methodology: A pre tested questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge & recommendations about tetanus immunization among randomly selected 157 residents. Results: 73.25% residents were not aware of the number of doses of tetanus vaccine recommended for children under the age of 16 years. Around 50% residents were not aware of the recommended number of doses of tetanus vaccine for adults over the age of 16 years and during pregnancy. Nearly 60% of the residents considered the wound after every injury to be tetanus prone. 75.8% of residents thought burn injuries to be prone to the development of tetanus while 13.4% and 36.9% of the residents did not consider animal bite and human bite to be tetanus prone respectively. 99.4% residents considered tetanus toxoid administration in wound with rusted iron. The knowledge regarding tetanus immunization in relation to the wound categories depending on the immunization status of the patients was very poor amongst the residents. Conclusion: Better awareness and adherence of tetanus prophylaxis recommendations is needed in residents who are the first tier of health care providers in teaching hospitals.

  1. Physicians, the Affordable Care Act, and Primary Care: Disruptive Change or Business as Usual?

    OpenAIRE

    JACOBSON, Peter D.; Jazowski, Shelley A.

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act1 (ACA) presages disruptive change in primary care delivery. With expanded access to primary care for millions of new patients, physicians and policymakers face increased pressure to solve the perennial shortage of primary care practitioners. Despite the controversy surrounding its enactment, the ACA should motivate organized medicine to take the lead in shaping new strategies for meeting the nation’s primary care needs. In this commentary, we arg...

  2. Lost in Translation: Identifying Behavioral Health Disparities in Pediatric Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker Herbst, Rachel; Margolis, Kate L; Millar, Amanda M; Muther, Emily F; Talmi, Ayelet

    2016-05-01

    Although care within a medical home increases parental satisfaction with health care services and improves health care utilization, significant racial/ethnic and language disparities persist in health care settings. Integrated, team-based approaches can decrease health disparities. The current study examines medical records of 2,353 youth who received a behavioral health consultation in an urban, residency training pediatric primary care clinic. A three-phase, mixed-method approach was used to examine whether differences in clinician-identified presenting concerns and recommendations were present across English-, Spanish-, and Other-language-speaking families. Findings reveal disparities among language groups in presenting concerns and referral to behavioral health services. Factors in medical record documentation also differed across language groups and by provider type. Recommendations for further research, identification, and assessment of psychosocial concerns for families with limited English proficiency (LEP) and development of evidence-based approaches for families with LEP in primary care are discussed. PMID:26338958

  3. 'Fried chicken' medicine: the business of primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, G A

    1994-01-01

    The current environment of pressures for health care reform have created a renewed interest in primary health care delivery. In most health care reform scenarios, family physicians and other primary care doctors are the case managers for all health care delivery. At the same time, there are intense activities from investment banking firms, insurance companies, hospitals, and home health companies, directed toward the purchase of primary care practices and organizing primary care delivery systems. These organizations seek to profit either from ancillary services generated by primary care or from capitation for a population of managed-care patients. Based on personal employment experiences with a for-profit hospital company, the author illustrates the difficulty in developing and managing primary care as a business and the inevitable conflict between management and primary care physicians. The article has detailed advice for family physicians to aid them in carefully examining organizational culture, financial structuring, physician relations, and operational aspects of any for-profit or hospital primary care system before deciding to become part of it. PMID:8289054

  4. Transplantation and the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Rita L; Ko, Tina Y

    2011-11-01

    Increasing appreciation of the survival benefits of kidney transplantation, compared with chronic dialysis, has resulted in more patients with kidney disease being referred and receiving organs. The evolving disparity between a rapidly increasing pool of candidates and a smaller pool of available donors has created new issues for the physicians who care for kidney patients and their potential living donors. This article outlines current efforts to address the growing number of patients who await transplantation, including relaxation of traditional donation criteria, maximization of living donation, and donation schemas that permit incompatible donor-recipient pairs to participate through paired donation and transplantation chains. New ethical issues faced by donors and recipients are discussed. Surgical advances that reduce the morbidity of donors are also described, as is the role of the primary physician in medical issues of both donors and recipients. PMID:22098662

  5. Quality of Care and Mortality among Long-term Care Residents with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid, Colin R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishSeniors with dementia who enter long-term care facilities are at greater risk of death than are similar individuals that remain in the community. Previous research has focused primarily on social selection factors such as health status to explain mortality in this population. This study seeks to determine whether resident mortality within 12 months of admission to a facility can be explained by post-admission social causative factors, that is, by institutional quality of care. Logistic regression results are based on the study of 402 residents in 73 long-term care facilities throughout British Columbia, Canada. Mortality data were obtained from Vital Statistics. Although social selection factors (e.g.,physical dependency emerge as the strongest predictors, one social causative factor – facility level restraint use – also predicts mortality. This study provides some evidence that social causative factors play a role in determining mortality among long-term care residents with dementia. Further research on the social causative factors is needed to understand the degree to which they affect mortality, and the way in which they do so.FrenchLes personnes âgées atteintes de démence qui entrent en établissements de soinsde longue durée encourent un risque plus élevé de décès que d’autres personnessouffrant de manière similaire mais qui demeurent au sein de leur communauté.Jusqu’à présent la recherche s’est surtout intéressée aux facteurs de sélectionsociale tels que l’âge, le genre, et l’état de santé, pour expliquer le taux demortalité au sein de cette population. L’étude présente cherche à déterminer si lamort d’un résident dans les 12 mois qui suivent l’admission dans unétablissement peut être expliqué par des facteurs causals sociaux survenant aprèsleur admission, et qui seraient donc liés à la qualité des soins dans lesinstitutions. Les résultats de régression logique sont basés sur une

  6. Measuring the strength of primary care systems in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, D.S.; Boerma, W.G.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The investment in primary care (PC) reforms to improve the overall performance of health care systems has been substantial in Europe. There is however a lack of up to date comparable information to evaluate the development and strength of PC systems. This EU-funded Primary Health Care A

  7. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Warren

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins.We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR and usual provider continuity index (UPI for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR and 95% confidence interval (CI for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample.36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04-1.06 for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15-1.54.Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors.

  8. Linking Resident Behavior to Dementia Care Communication: Effects of Emotional Tone

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Kristine N.; Herman, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    Care for older adults with dementia is complicated by behaviors such as verbal and physical aggression and withdrawal that disrupt and increase the costs of providing care. These behaviors, referred to as resistiveness to care (RTC), have been linked to staff elderspeak communication, measured by behaviorally coded explicit behaviors. This study examined videotapes of nursing home (NH) residents with dementia interacting with staff during bathing to explore the relationships between implicit ...

  9. The Impact of Direct Provision Accommodation for Asylum Seekers on Organisation and Delivery of Local Primary Care and Social Care Services: A Case Study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pieper, Hans-Olaf

    2011-05-15

    Abstract Background Many western countries have policies of dispersal and direct provision accommodation (state-funded accommodation in an institutional centre) for asylum seekers. Most research focuses on its effect on the asylum seeking population. Little is known about the impact of direct provision accommodation on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services in the community. The aim of this research is to explore this issue. Methods In 2005 a direct provision accommodation centre was opened in a rural area in Ireland. A retrospective qualitative case study was designed comprising in-depth interviews with 37 relevant stakeholders. Thematic analysis following the principles of framework analysis was applied. Results There was lack of advance notification to primary care and social care professionals and the community about the new accommodation centre. This caused anxiety and stress among relevant stakeholders. There was insufficient time to plan and prepare appropriate primary care and social care for the residents, causing a significant strain on service delivery. There was lack of clarity about how primary care and social care needs of the incoming residents were to be addressed. Interdisciplinary support systems developed informally between healthcare professionals. This ensured that residents of the accommodation centre were appropriately cared for. Conclusions Direct provision accommodation impacts on the organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services. There needs to be sufficient advance notification and inter-agency, inter-professional dialogue to manage this. Primary care and social care professionals working with asylum seekers should have access to training to enhance their skills for working in cross-cultural consultations.

  10. Occupational therapy for care home residents with stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, Esther; Fletcher-Smith, J.; Walker, M.; Feltham, M.; Sackley, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review we aim to measure the effects of occupational therapy interventions (provided directly by an occupational therapist or under the supervision of an occupational therapist) targeted at improving, restoring and maintaining independence in ADL (to include both self-care and lei

  11. Comorbidity and the Use of Primary Care and Specialist Care in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Starfield, Barbara; Lemke, Klaus W.; Herbert, Robert; Pavlovich, Wendy D.; Anderson, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE The impact of comorbidity on use of primary care and specialty services is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between morbidity burden, comorbid conditions, and use of primary care and specialist services

  12. Good clinical practice guidelines for care home residents with diabetes: an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A J

    2011-07-01

    A Task and Finish Group of Diabetes UK was convened over 14 months to undertake a systematic review of the original 1999 British Diabetic Association guidance on care home diabetes, incorporate new research findings and produce a set of recommendations that are evidenced-based, practical and implementable within UK care home settings. The anticipation of Diabetes UK is that these guidelines will represent a national policy of good clinical practice for diabetes care within care homes. This executive summary demonstrates how the full guidelines should provide a framework of assessment of the quality of diabetes care within care homes, for use by regulatory bodies who have responsibility for this provision of diabetes care. This document is primarily based on recommendations for adults living within British care home environments and its focus, by virtue of the nature and characteristics of residents, is on older adults. Improvements in diabetes care within residential and nursing homes are likely to follow a sustained commitment by health and social care professionals to ensure that the well-being of residents with diabetes is paramount, that high-quality policies of diabetes care are implemented and monitored and effective diabetes education is a mandatory and integral part of care home staff training. PMID:21672001

  13. Special features of general practice (primary care) and ethical implications.

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, J

    1980-01-01

    In all systems of health care there are certain essential levels of care and service. These take the form of self-care within the family unit; primary professional care by general medical nursing or social practitioners within a local neighbourhood; general specialist care in a district and super-specialist care in a region. Each of these has its own special roles and responsibilities and each is considered in this paper.

  14. Review of Integrated Psychological Services in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michele S

    2016-06-01

    Reviews the book, Integrated Psychological Services in Primary Care edited by William Scott Craig (see record 2016-01850-000). This book opens with an article by the editor, in which he outlines the behavioral health needs of primary care patients and the rationale behind integrating mental health services in primary care settings. Subsequent chapters address basic and practical information for a variety of practice locations, such as Patient Centered Medical Home clinics, the Veteran's Administration medical centers, and primary care settings where the concept of integrated health is new. This is an excellent primer for anyone planning to implement an integrated care program or for those considering moving from an independent practice, agency, or traditional health care/hospital environment into an integrated primary care environment. The authors' writing styles made difficult concepts easy to understand and their knowledge of the utility of integration was evident. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27270257

  15. Patient safety in primary care has many aspects: an interview study in primary care doctors and nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, S.; Laarhoven, E. van; Wolters, R.J.; Wetzels, R.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Scientific definitions of patient safety may be difficult to apply in routine health care delivery. It is unknown what primary care workers consider patient safety. This study aimed to clarify the concept of patient safety in primary care. METHODS: We held 29 semi-str

  16. Facilitators and barriers of implementing the chronic care model in primary care: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kadu, Mudathira K; Stolee, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is a framework developed to redesign care delivery for individuals living with chronic diseases in primary care. The CCM and its various components have been widely adopted and evaluated, however, little is known about different primary care experiences with its implementation, and the factors that influence its successful uptake. The purpose of this review is to synthesize findings of studies that implemented the CCM in primary care, in order to identi...

  17. Contracting with private providers for primary care services: evidence from urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Eggleston, Karen; Yu, Zhenjie; Zhang, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the role of the private sector in health service delivery, including primary care and population health services. China's recent health reforms call for non-discrimination against private providers and emphasize strengthening primary care, but formal contracting-out initiatives remain few, and the associated empirical evidence is very limited. This paper presents a case study of contracting with private providers for urban primary and preventive health services in Shandong Province, China. The case study draws on three primary sources of data: administrative records; a household survey of over 1600 community residents in Weifang and City Y; and a provider survey of over 1000 staff at community health stations (CHS) in both Weifang and City Y. We supplement the quantitative data with one-on-one, in-depth interviews with key informants, including local officials in charge of public health and government finance.We find significant differences in patient mix: Residents in the communities served by private community health stations are of lower socioeconomic status (more likely to be uninsured and to report poor health), compared to residents in communities served by a government-owned CHS. Analysis of a household survey of 1013 residents shows that they are more willing to do a routine health exam at their neighborhood CHS if they are of low socioeconomic status (as measured either by education or income). Government and private community health stations in Weifang did not statistically differ in their performance on contracted dimensions, after controlling for size and other CHS characteristics. In contrast, the comparison City Y had lower performance and a large gap between public and private providers. We discuss why these patterns arose and what policymakers and residents considered to be the main issues and concerns regarding primary care services. PMID:23327666

  18. The 10 Building Blocks of High-Performing Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Ghorob, Amireh; Willard-Grace, Rachel; Grumbach, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Our experiences studying exemplar primary care practices, and our work assisting other practices to become more patient centered, led to a formulation of the essential elements of primary care, which we call the 10 building blocks of high-performing primary care. The building blocks include 4 foundational elements—engaged leadership, data-driven improvement, empanelment, and team-based care—that assist the implementation of the other 6 building blocks—patient-team partnership, population mana...

  19. Primary Health Care Models: A Review of the International Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Abelson; Brian Hutchison

    1994-01-01

    A common element in many countries’ health system reform agenda is an emphasis on changes to the organization, financing and delivery of primary health care. Numerous objectives for primary health care reform have been cited in jurisdictions around the world with different approaches being taken toward achieving stated objectives. This paper reviews the literature which has described and evaluated experiences with different primary health care delivery models in Canadian and other jurisdictio...

  20. Research of organization of integrated primary care: a conceptual model

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Bruijnzeels

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Primary health care in The Netherlands evolves from small general practices to multidisciplinary teams. Research on the effects on outcomes of organization of primary care is hardly available. Aims Develop a conceptual model to be able to systematically arrange empirical evidence on the effects of different types of organizations of integrated (primary) care. Methods During an expert meeting of directors of health centres we identified essential elements which they consider impor...

  1. Developing Strategies to Improve Advance Care Planning in Long Term Care Homes: Giving Voice to Residents and Their Family Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Ramsbottom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term care (LTC homes, also known as residential care homes, commonly care for residents until death, making palliative care and advance care planning (ACP important elements of care. However, limited research exists on ACP in LTC. In particular, research giving voice to family members and substitute decision makers is lacking. The objective of this research was to understand experiences, perspectives, and preferences to guide quality improvement of ACP in LTC. This qualitative descriptive study conducted 34 individual semistructured interviews in two LTC homes, located in Canada. The participants were 31 family members and three staff, consisting of a front line care worker, a registered nurse, and a nurse practitioner. All participants perceived ACP conversations as valuable to provide “resident-centred care”; however, none of the participants had a good understanding of ACP, limiting its effectiveness. Strategies generated through the research to improve ACP were as follows: educating families and staff on ACP and end-of-life care options; better preparing staff for ACP conversations; providing staff skills training and guidelines; and LTC staff initiating systematic, proactive conversations using careful timing. These strategies can guide quality improvement of palliative care and development of ACP tools and resources specific to the LTC home sector.

  2. Effects of integrated dental care on oral treatment needs in residents of nursing homes older than 70 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Paul; Cune, Marco; van der Bilt, Andries; Abbink, Jan; de Putter, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine effects of integrated dental care in older nursing home residents. Methods: In three nursing homes offering integrated dental care, we studied the oral treatment need of 355 residents older than 70 years. To determine effects of integrated care, we discriminated between short-stay

  3. The inverse care law - is Australian primary care research funding headed this way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Tom

    2011-08-01

    Tudor Hart's Inverse Care Law classically described the inequity in medical service access in South Wales. From his primary care perspective, the availability of good medical care varied inversely with the need and the population served. In Australia, future funding for primary care research capacity building appears headed in a similar direction - at least for newly established medical schools. PMID:21814660

  4. Models for Primary Eye Care Services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhra Misra

    2015-01-01

    In the current situation, an integrated health care system with primary eye care promoted by government of India is apparently the best answer. This model is both cost effective and practical for the prevention and control of blindness among the underprivileged population. Other models functioning with the newer technology of tele-ophthalmology or mobile clinics also add to the positive outcome in providing primary eye care services. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various models presently functioning in the country with the idea of providing useful inputs for eye care providers and enabling them to identify and adopt an appropriate model for primary eye care services.

  5. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancarrow S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sonya Brownie, Susan NancarrowSchool of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff.Methods: We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes.Results: The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4. The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents' levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses' sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an

  6. PRIMARY IMMUNE DEFICIENCIES – PRINCIPLES OF CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eChapel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary Immune Deficiencies (PIDs are a growing group of over 230 different disorders caused by ineffective, absent or an increasing number of gain of function mutations in immune components (mainly cells and proteins. Once recognised, these rare disorders are treatable and in some cases curable. Otherwise untreated PIDs are often chronic, serious or even fatal. The diagnosis of PIDs can be difficult due to lack of awareness and facilities for diagnosis, and management of PIDs is complex. This document was prepared by a worldwide multi-disciplinary team of specialists; it aims to set out comprehensive principles of care for PIDs. These include the role of specialised centres, the importance of registries, the need for multinational research, the role of patient organisations, management and treatment options, the requirement for sustained access to all treatments including immunoglobulin (Ig therapies and HSCT, important considerations for developing countries and suggestions for implementation. A range of healthcare policies and services have to be put into place by government agencies and healthcare providers, to ensure that PID patients world-wide have access to appropriate and sustainable medical and support services.

  7. Primary immune deficiencies - principles of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Helen; Prevot, Johan; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Español, Teresa; Bonilla, Francisco A; Solis, Leire; Drabwell, Josina

    2014-01-01

    Primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are a growing group of over 230 different disorders caused by ineffective, absent or an increasing number of gain of function mutations in immune components, mainly cells and proteins. Once recognized, these rare disorders are treatable and in some cases curable. Otherwise untreated PIDs are often chronic, serious, or even fatal. The diagnosis of PIDs can be difficult due to lack of awareness or facilities for diagnosis, and management of PIDs is complex. This document was prepared by a worldwide multi-disciplinary team of specialists; it aims to set out comprehensive principles of care for PIDs. These include the role of specialized centers, the importance of registries, the need for multinational research, the role of patient organizations, management and treatment options, the requirement for sustained access to all treatments including immunoglobulin therapies and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, important considerations for developing countries and suggestions for implementation. A range of healthcare policies and services have to be put into place by government agencies and healthcare providers, to ensure that PID patients worldwide have access to appropriate and sustainable medical and support services. PMID:25566243

  8. Stress among Doctors Doing Residency: A Cross-Sectional Study at a Tertiary Care Hospital in the City of Mumbai

    OpenAIRE

    Aarti G Sahasrabuddhe, S R Suryawanshi, Suman Rai Bhandari

    2015-01-01

    "Background: The workload of a tertiary care teaching hospital in a metropolitan city is tremendous. Resident doctors in these health care facilities bear the over whelming burden. This study was carried out to assess the stress among resident doctors and the factors associated with it. Methods: This was a cross sectional study carried out on resident doctors in a tertiary care hospital in the city of Mumbai. Statistical analysis was done using proportions and chi squre. Results:...

  9. “This is my life now”: Lived experiences of residents in care homes in Goa, India

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes, Deborah Christina

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, old people in India are moving into institutional settings. There is a paucity of qualitative research examining the condition of residents in care homes. This thesis addresses this gap through a detailed qualitative study of three such homes in Goa, India. It explores the care processes and practices in the care homes and how far they are attuned to the needs, lives and identities of their residents. An understanding of the experiences of residents as they have b...

  10. Older Residents' Perspectives of Long-Term Care Facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Junqiao; Cao, Yuling; Jia, Shoumei; Wu, Bei

    2016-08-01

    China's formal long-term care (LTC) system is in its developmental stage due to lack of standardized health assessments for resident admission, limited government funding, an acute shortage of qualified staff at all levels, and regional disparities in quality of care. Relocation to LTC facilities changes the lives of older adults because they have to leave behind their homes and previous social networks. The current study aimed to provide an in-depth exploration of 25 older adult residents' lives in four LTC facilities in China. A conventional content analysis approach was used to interpret participant interviews. Residents experienced losses and gains from residential life. Three themes emerged: (a) influences of cultural beliefs, (b) basic care needs fulfilled in LTC facilities, and (c) lack of quality care in LTC facilities. Findings show that residents' basic needs were met in Chinese LTC facilities, but there is room for improvement in delivering quality care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(8), 34-43.]. PMID:27319405

  11. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nadeem

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment.

  12. The impact of the transition to a care home on residents' sense of identity

    OpenAIRE

    Paddock, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The transition to a care home can be a difficult experience for older people, with various changes and losses, which can impact an older person’s sense of identity. However, it is not clear how older people perceive and manage their sense of identity within a care home, particularly in the United Kingdom. This study aimed to explore how the transition to a care home impacted on the identities of care home residents, and how they addressed this impact. Findings were interpreted using the Socia...

  13. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibbald, B.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Reeves, D.

    2006-01-01

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected

  14. Multidisciplinary care planning in the primary care management of completed stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erikssen Lars

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease management requires input from multiple health professionals, both specialist and primary care providers. This study sought to assess the impact of co-ordinated multidisciplinary care in primary care, represented by the delivery of formal care planning by primary care teams or shared across primary-secondary teams, on outcomes in stroke, relative to usual care. Methods A Systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL (all 1990–2006, Cochrane Library (Issue 1 2006, and grey literature from web based searching of web sites listed in the CCOHA Health Technology Assessment List Analysis used narrative analysis of findings of randomised and non-randomised trials, and observational and qualitative studies of patients with completed stroke in the primary care setting where care planning was undertaken by 1 a multi-disciplinary primary care team or 2 through shared care by primary and secondary providers. Results One thousand and forty-five citations were retrieved. Eighteen papers were included for analysis. Most care planning took part in the context of multidisciplinary team care based in hospitals with outreach to community patients. Mortality rates are not impacted by multidisciplinary care planning. Functional outcomes of the studies were inconsistent. It is uncertain whether the active engagement of GPs and other primary care professionals in the multidisciplinary care planning contributed to the outcomes in the studies showing a positive effect. There may be process benefits from multidisciplinary care planning that includes primary care professionals and GPs. Few studies actually described the tasks and roles GPs fulfilled and whether this matched what was presumed to be provided. Conclusion While multidisciplinary care planning may not unequivocally improve the care of patients with completed stroke, there may be process benefits such as improved task allocation between providers. Further study on the impact

  15. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  16. Predictors of regular exercise among older residents of long-term care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Li, Yueh-Ping; Yen, Min-Ling

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply self-efficacy theory to explore predictors of regular exercise among older residents of long-term care institutions. Convenience sampling was used to collect data from 151 older adults residing in three residential care homes in Taiwan. Data collection instruments included a background data sheet, Self Efficacy for Exercise Scale, Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale and self-reported regular exercise. Results indicated that older residents who exercised regularly had fewer chronic diseases, better perceived health status and functional status, and higher self-efficacy expectations and outcome expectations related to exercise. Older residents with a regular exercise habit prior to institutionalization were more likely to engage in regular exercise. Logistic regression analysis indicated past exercise participation and self-efficacy expectations to be significant positive predictors of regular exercise. To promote regular exercise within this population, these can be potential target areas for interventions. These factors should be targeted in the development and implementation of interventions to promote regular exercise among older residents of long-term care institutions. PMID:25964013

  17. The adequacy of antenatal care services among slum residents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Bayou, Yibeltal T.; Mashalla, Yohana S.; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Background There are recent efforts made to eliminate inequalities in the utilisation of basic health care services. More emphasis is given for improvement of health in developing countries including maternal and child health. However, disparities for the fast-growing population of urban poor are masked by the urban averages. The aim of this paper is to report on the findings of antenatal care adequacy among slum residents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods This was a quantitative and cross-se...

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of spirometry in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Geert-Jan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of spirometry for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma in patients suspected of suffering from an obstructive airway disease (OAD in primary care. Methods Cross sectional diagnostic study of 219 adult patients attending 10 general practices for the first time with complaints suspicious for OAD. All patients underwent spirometry and structured medical histories were documented. All patients received whole-body plethysmography (WBP in a lung function laboratory. The reference standard was the Tiffeneau ratio (FEV1/VC received by the spirometric maneuver during examination with WBP. In the event of inconclusive results, bronchial provocation was performed to determine bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR. Asthma was defined as a PC20 fall after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 16 mg/ml. Results 90 (41.1% patients suffered from asthma, 50 (22.8% suffered from COPD, 79 (36.1% had no OAD. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in COPD was 92% (95%CI 80–97; specificity was 84% (95%CI 77–89. The positive predictive value (PPV was 63% (95%CI 51–73; negative predictive value (NPV was 97% (95%CI 93–99. The sensitivity for diagnosing airway obstruction in asthma was 29% (95%CI 21–39; specificity was 90% (95%CI 81–95. PPV was 77% (95%CI 60–88; NPV was 53% (95%CI 45–61. Conclusion COPD can be estimated with high diagnostic accuracy using spirometry. It is also possible to rule in asthma with spirometry. However, asthma can not be ruled out only using spirometry. This diagnostic uncertainty leads to an overestimation of asthma presence. Patients with inconclusive spirometric results should be referred for nitric oxide (NO – measurement and/or bronchial provocation if possible to guarantee accurate diagnosis.

  19. Mental Health Problems in Primary Care: Progress in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Magruder

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Research in the last decade has acknowledged that primary care plays a pivotal role in the delivery of mental health services. The aim of this paper is to review major accomplishments, emerging trends, and continuing gaps concerning mental health problems in primary care in North America. Methods: Literature from North America was reviewed and synthesized. Results: Major accomplishments include: the development and adoption of a number of clinical guidelines specifically for mental health conditions in primary care, the acceptance of the chronic care model as a framework for treating depression in primary care, and the clear adoption of pharmacologic approaches as the predominant mode for treating depression and anxiety. Emerging trends include: the use of non-physician facilitators as care managers in the treatment of depression in primary care, increasing use of technology in the assessment and treatment of mental health conditions in primary care, and dissemination and implementation of integrated mental health treatment approaches. Lingering issues include: the difficulty in moving beyond problem identification and initiation of treatment to sustaining evidence-based treatments, agreement on a common metric to evaluate outcomes, and the stigma still associated with mental illness. Conclusion: Though there now exists a solid and growing evidence base for the delivery of mental health services in primary care, there are still significant challenges which must be overcome in order to make further advances.

  20. Consulting Psychiatry within an Integrated Primary Care Model

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiter, Elizabeth A. Zeidler; Pandhi, Nancy; Fondow, Meghan D. M.; Thomas, Chantelle; Vonk, Jantina; Reardon, Claudia L; Serrano, Neftali

    2013-01-01

    After implementation of an integrated consulting psychiatry model and psychology services within primary care at a federally qualified health center, patients have increased access to needed mental health services, and primary care clinicians receive the support and collaboration needed to meet the psychiatric needs of the population.

  1. International sources of learning for the organisation of primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Meads, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the potential to learn from emerging international models of primary care organisation. It examines a series of exemplars from Southern Europe and Latin America which may help support moves towards a ‘new localism’ in the public management of primary care. Six lessons for the UK are identified.

  2. Primary Care of Adult Women: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Mhlaba, Julie; Roman, Carly

    2016-06-01

    Dermatologic disease often presents in the primary care setting. Therefore, it is important for the primary care provider to be familiar with the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common skin conditions. This article provides an overview of acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, alopecia, nonmelanoma, and melanoma skin cancer, dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. PMID:27212088

  3. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  4. Obstetric emergencies in primary midwifery care In The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Marrit

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, the primary aim was to gain insight into management of obstetric emergencies occurring in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands. Secondly, we aimed to develop preventative strategies and tools to optimise care in case of an obstetric emergency. From 2008-2010, a unique dataset of

  5. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  6. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants:

  7. College Students' Reasons for Depression Nondisclosure in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William J.; Morrison, Patrick; Lombardero, Anayansi; Swingle, Kelsey; Campbell, Duncan G.

    2016-01-01

    Unwillingness to share depression experiences with primary care physicians contributes to the undertreatment of depression. This project examined college students' reasons for depression nondisclosure to primary care providers (PCPs). Undergraduate participants read a vignette describing someone with depression and completed measures of disclosure…

  8. Training primary care physicians improves the management of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, TWDP; Ormel, J; van den Brink, RHS; Jenner, JA; Van der Meer, K; Tiemens, BG; van der Doorn, W; Smit, A; van den Brink, W

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this pretest-posttest study was to evaluate effects of a training program designed to improve primary care physicians' (PCPs) ability to recognize mental health problems (MHP) and Co diagnose and manage depression according to clinical guidelines. The primary care settings were in the

  9. The Importance of Somatic Symptoms in Depression in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Tylee, André; Gandhi, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Patients with depression present with psychological and somatic symptoms, including general aches and pains. In primary care, somatic symptoms often dominate. A review of the literature was conducted to ascertain the importance of somatic symptoms in depression in primary care.

  10. Identifying resident care areas for a quality improvement intervention in long-term care: a collaborative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cranley Lisa A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, healthcare aides (also referred to as nurse aides, personal support workers, nursing assistants are unregulated personnel who provide 70-80% of direct care to residents living in nursing homes. Although they are an integral part of the care team their contributions to the resident care planning process are not always acknowledged in the organization. The purpose of the Safer Care for Older Persons [in residential] Environments (SCOPE project was to evaluate the feasibility of engaging front line staff (primarily healthcare aides to use quality improvement methods to integrate best practices into resident care. This paper describes the process used by teams participating in the SCOPE project to select clinical improvement areas. Methods The study employed a collaborative approach to identify clinical areas and through consensus, teams selected one of three areas. To select the clinical areas we recruited two nursing homes not involved in the SCOPE project and sampled healthcare providers and decision-makers within them. A vote counting method was used to determine the top five ranked clinical areas for improvement. Results Responses received from stakeholder groups included gerontology experts, decision-makers, registered nurses, managers, and healthcare aides. The top ranked areas from highest to lowest were pain/discomfort management, behaviour management, depression, skin integrity, and assistance with eating. Conclusions Involving staff in selecting areas that they perceive as needing improvement may facilitate staff engagement in the quality improvement process.

  11. Continuity of Care in the Family Medicine Residency: Results of a national survey of program directors

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Lisa; Busing, Nick

    1993-01-01

    Based on the results of a survey of family medicine residency program directors across the country, there is a need for a national consensus on the definition of continuity of care, and on structures for teaching it and methods of evaluating it.

  12. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection ...... this study suggest that elderly nursing home residents with a low BMI or weight loss may add to the substantial and costly burden of nursing home care due to the associated need for higher levels of ADL assistance.......Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection...... points. RAI-NH data related to facility staff ratings of residents’ physical functioning (Activities of Daily Living, ADL) status and their need for health care staff assistance related to ADLs were collected at each time point in addition to the resident weight status and experience of weight loss...

  13. AWARENESS ABOUT PHARMACOVIGILANCE AMONG RESIDENT DOCTORS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Amit A.; Zad; Sawant; Dudhal

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring and evaluation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) through a well - organized pharmacovigilance system is vital for safe use of medicines. ADR reporting by healthcare professionals forms the backbone of pharmacovigilance system. AIM: To assess the awareness of pharmacovigilance among resident doctors in a tertiary care hospital. ...

  14. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  15. Factors related to the high fall rate in long-term care residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosse, Nienke M.; de Groot, Maartje H.; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Falls in long-term care residents with dementia represent a costly but unresolved safety issue. The aim of the present study was to (1) determine the incidence of falls, fall-related injuries and fall circumstances, and (2) identify the relationship between patient characteristics and fa

  16. Understanding effective care management implementation in primary care: a macrocognition perspective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status. Primary care practices, however, are often challenged with its implementation. Incorporating care management involves more than a simple physical process redesign to existing clinical care routines. It involves changes to who is working with patients, and consequently such things as who is making decisions, who is sharing patient information, and how. Studying the ...

  17. Health care utilization, prognosis and outcomes of vestibular disease in primary care settings: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Grill, Eva; Penger, Mathias; Kentala, Erna

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are frequent complaints in primary care that lead to extensive health care utilization. The objective of this systematic review was to examine health care of patients with vertigo and dizziness in primary care settings. Specifically, we wanted to characterize health care utilization, therapeutic and referral behaviour and to examine the outcomes associated with this. A search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was carried out in May 2015 using the search terms ‘vertigo’...

  18. From Practice Culture to Patient Outcomes: Improving Primary Care Through Interdisciplinary Health Care Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Grace, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2011, a large integrated healthcare organization implemented a primary care team redesign in five pilot practices to improve the delivery of patient-centered chronic illness care and augment the physician-medical assistant dyads by adding two new primary care team roles for each practice - a nurse care manager (NCM) and a patient health coach (PHC). This work examines three aspects of implementing the care team redesign: 1) The facilitators and barriers of implementation, 2) Th...

  19. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    OpenAIRE

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high health care expenditures. In the Utrecht Proactive Frailty Intervention Trial (U-PROFIT, in Dutch:’ Om U’), we designed and evaluated a strategy for proactive patient-centred primary care of frail...

  20. PRIMARY CARE PROBLEMS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shtegman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate primary care efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. Outpatients (n=139 with CHF and 35 primary care physicians were included into the study. The evaluation of drug therapy and patient awareness of the principles of non-drug CHF treatment were performed. An anonymous survey among doctors in terms of current CHF guidelines knowledge, patient information provided by physicians, and doctors’ burnout status was also carried out.Results. Only 39% and 10% of CHF outpatients received target doses of ACE inhibitors/sartans and beta-blockers, respectively. Majority of CHF outpatients and their doctors need in additional education/training. 56% of primary care physicians demonstrated an emotional burnout.Conclusion. Author considers it essential to distribute short pocket-guidelines on CHF management among primary care physicians, and to reduce the load on primary care physicians with simultaneous strengthening of their performance control.

  1. Decentralization and Primary Health Care Innovations in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miharti, Suwatin; Holzhacker, Ronald; Wittek, Rafael; Holzhacker, Ronald; Wittek, Rafael; Woltjer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    A well-functioning primary health care system (PHCS) is a fundamental precondition for a nation’s overall health performance. PHCSs are designed to improve universal access to health care, which in turn leads to healthier communities, higher quality of care, and a more effective and efficient health

  2. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Sadik, Sabah; Abdulrahman, Saad; Bradley, Marie; Jenkins, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Iraq is undertaking a systematic programme to integrate mental health into primary care in order to increase population access to mental health care. This paper reports the evaluation of the delivery of a ten day interactive training programme to 20% of primary care centres across Iraq. The multistage evaluation included a pre- and post-test questionnaire to assess knowledge, attitudes and practice in health workers drawn from 143 health centres, a course evaluation ...

  3. Self Help Access in Routine Primary Care - the SHARP project

    OpenAIRE

    Lucock, Mike; Lawson, Mike; Khan, W.(National Centre for Physics, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan)

    2011-01-01

    NICE guidance recommends guided self-help approaches for anxiety and depression, provided in a stepped care service model. These interventions are provided within IAPT services and to compliment this, the SHARP (Self-help Access in Routine Primary Care) project was designed to enable primary care practitioners to support patients with mild to moderate anxiety and/or depression to access CBT based self-help information. The project consists of a training course, website and brief self-help lea...

  4. Integrated primary health care: Finnish solutions and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background: Finland has since 1972 had a primary health care system based on health centres run and funded by the local public authorities called ‘municipalities’. On the world map of primary health care systems, the Finnish solution claims to be the most health centre oriented and also the widest, both in terms of the numbers of staff and also of different professions employed. Offering integrated care through multi-professional health centres has been overshadowed by exceptional difficultie...

  5. Brief intervention for anxiety in primary care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Roy-Byrne, Peter; Veitengruber, Jason P.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Edlund, Mark J.; Sullivan, Greer; Craske, Michelle G.; Welch, Stacy Shaw; Stein, Murray B.

    2009-01-01

    In order to address the difficulty of assessing and managing multiple anxiety disorders in the primary care setting, this paper provides a simple, easy to learn, unified approach to the diagnosis, care management and pharmacotherapy of the four most common anxiety disorders (panic, generalized, and social anxiety disorders, and PTSD) in primary care. This evidence-based approach was developed for an ongoing NIMH-funded study designed to improve the delivery of evidence-based medication and ps...

  6. Evaluating medical residents as managers of care: a critical appraisal of assessment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari JO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jamiu O Busari,1,2 Lorette A Stammen,2 Lokke M Gennissen,2 Rob M Moonen1 1Department of Pediatrics, Atrium Medical Center, Henri Dunantstraat 5, 6401 CX Heerlen, the Netherlands; 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, the Netherlands Introduction: The increasing demands for effective and efficient health care delivery systems worldwide have resulted in an expansion of the desired competencies that physicians need to possess upon graduation. Presently, medical residents require additional professional competencies that can prepare them to practice adequately in a continuously changing health care environment. Recent studies show that despite the importance of competency-based training, the development and evaluation of management competencies in residents during residency training is inadequate. The aim of this literature review was to find out which assessment methods are currently being used to evaluate trainees' management competencies and which, if any, of these methods make use of valid and reliable instruments. Methods: In September 2012, a thorough search of the literature was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase®, MEDLINE®, and ERIC databases. Additional searches included scanning the references of relevant articles and sifting through the “related topics” displayed by the databases. Results: A total of 25 out of 178 articles were selected for final review. Four broad categories emerged after analysis that best reflected their content: 1 measurement tools used to evaluate the effect of implemented curricular interventions; 2 measurement tools based on recommendations from consensus surveys or conventions; 3 measurement tools for assessing general competencies, which included care-management; and 4 measurement tools focusing exclusively on care-management competencies. Conclusion: Little information was found about (validated assessment tools being used to measure care-management competence

  7. [Differences and similarities of Primary Care in the German and Spanish Health Care Systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador Comino, María Rosa; Krane, Sibylla; Schelling, Jörg; Regife García, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    An efficient primary care is of particular importance for any countries' health care system. Many differences exist on how distinctive countries try to obtain the goal of an efficient, cost-effective primary care for its population. In this article we conducted a selective literature review, which includes both scientific and socio-political publications. The findings are complemented with the experience of a Spanish physician from Seville in her last year of training in family medicine, who completed a four months long rotation in the German health care system. We highlighted different features by comparing both countries, including their health care expenditure, the relation between primary and secondary care, the organization in the academic field and the training of future primary care physicians. It is clear that primary care in both countries plays a central role, have to deal with shortcomings, and in some points one system can learn from the other. PMID:26363955

  8. Hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and the role of primary care in Italian regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Rosano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract
    Background: Hospitalization may often be prevented by timely and effective outpatient care either by preventing the onset of an illness, controlling an acute illness or managing a chronic disease with an appropriate follow-up. The objective of the study is to examine the variability of hospital admissions within Italian regions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs, and their relationship with primary care supply.
    Methods: Hospital discharge data aggregated at a regional level collected in 2005 were analysed by type of ACS conditions. Main outcome measures were regional hospital admission rates for ACSCs. Negative binomial models were used to analyse the association with individual risk factors (age and gender and regional risk factors (propensity to hospitalisation and prevalence of specific conditions.
    Non-parametric correlation indexes between standardised hospital admission rates and quantitative measures of primary care services were calculated.
    Results: ACSC admissions accounted for 6.6% of total admissions, 35.7% were classified as acute conditions and 64.3% as chronic conditions. Admission rates for ACSCs varied widely across Italian regions with different patterns for chronic and acute conditions. Southern regions showed significantly higher rates for chronic conditions and North-eastern regions for acute conditions. We found a significant negative association between the provision of ambulatory specialist services and standardised hospitalization rates
    (SHR for ACS chronic conditions (r=-0.50; p=0.02 and an inverse correlation among SHR for ACS acute conditions and the rate of GPs per 1,000 residents, although the latter was not statistically significant.
    Conclusions: In Italy, about 480,000 inpatient hospital admissions in 2005 were attributable to ACSCs. Even
    adjusting for potential confounders

  9. Depression In Primary Care, Part 1: Screening And Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    One of the commonest psychological problems that a clinician would encounter in primary care is depression. The prevalence of depression is high in women, the elderly and those with underlying physical problems or during the postpartum period. The spectrum of clinical presentations is wide and somatic complaints are more common in primary care clinics. Depression may present as a primary disorder and co-morbidity with other psychological problems or physical illnesses is high. A good clinical...

  10. Quality of Diabetes Mellitus Care by Rural Primary Care Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, Stephen A.; Makwana, Sohil; Salanitro, Amanda H.; Safford, Monika M.; Houston, Thomas K.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Curry, William; Estrada, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the relationship between degree of rurality and glucose (hemoglobin A1c), blood pressure (BP), and lipid (LDL) control among patients with diabetes. Methods: Descriptive study; 1,649 patients in 205 rural practices in the United States. Patients' residence ZIP codes defined degree of rurality (Rural-Urban Commuting Areas…

  11. Health psychology in primary care: recent research and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thielke S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Thielke1, Alexander Thompson2, Richard Stuart31Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Puget Sound VA Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Over the last decade, research about health psychology in primary care has reiterated its contributions to mental and physical health promotion, and its role in addressing gaps in mental health service delivery. Recent meta-analyses have generated mixed results about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of health psychology interventions. There have been few studies of health psychology interventions in real-world treatment settings. Several key challenges exist: determining the degree of penetration of health psychology into primary care settings; clarifying the specific roles of health psychologists in integrated care; resolving reimbursement issues; and adapting to the increased prescription of psychotropic medications. Identifying and exploring these issues can help health psychologists and primary care providers to develop the most effective ways of applying psychological principles in primary care settings. In a changing health care landscape, health psychologists must continue to articulate the theories and techniques of health psychology and integrated care, to put their beliefs into practice, and to measure the outcomes of their work.Keywords: health psychology, primary care, integrated care, collaborative care, referral, colocation

  12. Primary care quality management in Slovenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Bulc, M.

    2008-01-01

    Of all GPs in Slovenia 86% are not interested in activities to systematically improve care. A clear national quality policy, further education for care managers and financial incentives for GPs could change the picture, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO

  13. Quality and effectiveness of different approaches to primary care delivery in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trindade Thiago G

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1994, Brazil has developed a primary care system based on multidisciplinary teams which include not only a physician and a nurse, but also 4–6 lay community health workers. This system now consists of 26,650 teams, covering 46% of the Brazilian population. Yet relatively few investigations have examined its effectiveness, especially in contrast with that of the traditional multi-specialty physician team approach it is replacing, or that of other existing family medicine approaches placing less emphasis on lay community health workers. Primary health care can be defined through its domains of access to first contact, continuity, coordination, comprehensiveness, community orientation and family orientation. These attributes can be ascertained via instruments such as the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCATool, and correlated with the effectiveness of care. The objectives of our study are to validate the adult version of this instrument in Portuguese, identify the extent (quality of primary care present in different models of primary care services, and correlate this extent with measures of process and outcomes in patients with diabetes, hypertension and coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods/Design We are conducting a population-based cross-sectional study of primary care in the municipality of Porto Alegre. We will interview a random sample totaling 3000 adults residing in geographic areas covered by four distinct models of primary care of the Brazilian national health system or, alternatively, by one nationally prominent complementary health care service, as well as the physicians and nurses of the health teams of these services. Interviews query perceived quality of care (PCATool-Adult Version, patient satisfaction, and process indicators of management of diabetes, hypertension and known CHD. We are measuring blood pressure, anthropometrics and, in adults with known diabetes, glycated hemoglobin. Discussion We hope to

  14. Clients′ satisfaction with primary health care in Muscat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima M Albalushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To measure clients′ satisfaction with primary health care in the capital of Oman, Muscat, and also to identify the factors affecting their satisfaction. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study in health centers, 400 participants during the period from November 2009 to February 2010 were interviewed about their satisfaction degree with the primary health care services and setting. Four urban primary health care clinics from Muscat were selected randomly. Six domains of satisfaction including accessibility to services, continuity of care, humaneness of staff, comprehensiveness of care, provision of health education, and effectiveness of services were calculated from selected variables. The mean score of each area were calculated and then divided by the number of items in each area. Finally satisfaction areas were ranked based on recent criteria. Results: Mean age was 29.5 years (SD = 9.37 for male and 26.01 years (SD = 7.12 for female participants. All the areas were suitable and only continuity of care had negative score. The ranked areas of satisfaction were as humanness of staff, effectiveness of services, access to services, provision of health educational materials, comprehensiveness of care, continuity of care. Conclusions: Primary health care were accepted as a suitable strategy for providing health care among clients of urban health centers of Muscat. It can be recommended to other countries to use this as a choice for health care provision.

  15. Mental health in primary care for adolescent parents

    OpenAIRE

    LePlatte, Dayna; Rosenblum, Katherine Lisa; Stanton, Emily; Miller, Nicole; Muzik, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Mental health care is important for everyone, especially teenagers. However, seeking mental health services may be challenging for teenagers, particularly when they are also parents. Offering mental health care in a safe, attractive and easily accessible manner, such as primary care, increases the chances that teenage parents will receive help. Comprehensive care models need to be established to address the many needs that at-risk young mothers and their children face. There are a number of p...

  16. Patient determinants of mental health interventions in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Raine, R.; Lewis, L.; Sensky, T; Hutchings, A; Hirsch, S; Black, N.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large proportion of a general practitioner's (GP's) caseload comprises patients with mental health problems. It is important to ensure that care is provided appropriately, on the basis of clinical need. It is therefore necessary to investigate the determinants of the use of mental health care in the primary care sector and, in particular, to identify any non-clinical characteristics of patients that affect the likelihood of their receiving appropriate care. AIM: To identify and ...

  17. Spirometry in Primary Care: An Analysis of Spirometry Test Quality in a Regional Primary Care Asthma Program

    OpenAIRE

    Licskai, Christopher J; Todd W Sands; Lisa Paolatto; Ivan Nicoletti; Madonna Ferrone

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care office spirometry can improve access to testing and concordance between clinical practice and asthma guidelines. Compliance with test quality standards is essential to implementation.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of spirometry performed onsite in a regional primary care asthma program (RAP) by health care professionals with limited training.METHODS: Asthma educators were trained to perform spirometry during two 2 h workshops and supervised during up to six patien...

  18. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care. PMID:27232685

  19. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians is...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...... are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and...

  20. Community nurses working in piloted primary care teams: Irish Republic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Triona

    2010-08-01

    Primary care health services in the Irish Republic have undergone fundamental transformation with the establishment of multidisciplinary primary care teams nationwide. Primary care teams provide a community-based health service delivered through a range of health professionals in an integrated way. As part of this initiative ten pilot teams were established in 2003. This research was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of nurse\\'s experiences of working in a piloted primary care team. The methodology used was a focus group approach. The findings from this study illustrated how community nurse\\'s roles and responsibilities have expanded within the team. The findings also highlighted the benefits and challenges of working as a team with various other community-based health-care disciplines.

  1. Quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, WY; Lam, CLK; Lo, SV

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature regarding quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics with specific attention to the quality indicators for fall prevention, continence care, pulmonary rehabilitation, mental health, pharmaceutical care, and wound care services. Data sources Literature search from 1990 to 2010 including Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database, RAND (Research and Development) Corporation Health Database, the ACOVE (Assessing the Care of Vulnerab...

  2. Applying the guidelines for pharmacists integrating into primary care teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Arden R.; Pammett, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2013, Jorgenson et al. published guidelines for pharmacists integrating into primary care teams. These guidelines outlined 10 evidence-based recommendations designed to support pharmacists in successfully establishing practices in primary care environments. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed, practical approach to implementing these recommendations in real life, thereby aiding to validate their effectiveness. Methods: Both authors reviewed the guidelines independently and ranked the importance of each recommendation respective to their practice. Each author then provided feedback for each recommendation regarding the successes and challenges they encountered through implementation. This feedback was then consolidated into agreed upon statements for each recommendation. Results and Discussion: Focusing on building relationships (with an emphasis on face time) and demonstrating value to both primary care providers and patients were identified as key aspects in developing these new roles. Ensuring that the environment supports the practice, along with strategic positioning within the clinic, improves uptake and can maximize the usefulness of a pharmacist in primary care. Demonstrating consistent and competent clinical and documentation skills builds on the foundation of the other recommendations to allow for the effective provision of clinical pharmacy services. Additional recommendations include developing efficient ways (potentially provider specific) to communicate with primary care providers and addressing potential preconceived notions about the role of the pharmacist in primary care. Conclusion: We believe these guidelines hold up to real-life integration and emphatically recommend their use for new and existing primary care pharmacists.

  3. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  4. In-Hospital Cardiology Consultation and Evidence-Based Care for Nursing Home Residents with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S.; Rich, Michael W.; Goodlin, Sarah J.; Birkner, Thomas; Zhang, Yan; Feller, Margaret A.; Aban, Inmaculada B.; Jones, Linda G.; Bearden, Donna M.; Allman, Richard M.; Ahmed, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association between cardiology consultation and evidence-based care for nursing home (NH) residents with heart failure (HF). Participants Hospitalized NH residents (n= 646) discharged from 106 Alabama hospitals with a primary discharge diagnosis of HF during 1998–2001. Design Observational. Measurements of Evidence-Based Care Pre-admission estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) for patients with known HF (n=494), in-hospital LVEF estimation for HF patients without known LVEF (n=452), and discharge prescriptions of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEIs-or-ARBs) to systolic HF (LVEF 100 mm Hg. Results Pre-admission LVEF was estimated in 38% and 12% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (adjusted odds ratio {AOR}, 3.49; 95% CI, 2.16–5.66; p <0.001). In-hospital LVEF was estimated in 71% and 28% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (AOR, 6.01; 95% CI, 3.69–9.79; p <0.001). ACEIs-or-ARBs were prescribed to 62% and 82% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (AOR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.07–0.81; p=0.022). Conclusion In-hospital cardiology consultation was associated with significantly higher odds of LVEF estimation among NH residents with HF. However, it did not translate into higher odds of discharge prescriptions for ACEIs-or-ARBs to NH resident with systolic HF who were eligible for the receipt of these drugs. PMID:21982687

  5. Frailty screening in older patients in primary care using routine care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drubbel, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary care for frail older people is reported to be suboptimal. A transition toward proactive patient-centred care is needed. We investigated the effectiveness of U-PRIM, a frailty screening intervention based on routine care data, and of U-PRIM followed by U-CARE, a nurse-led personal

  6. Legal limitations for nurse prescribers in Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    N. Geyer

    1998-01-01

    The nurse plays an important role in the delivery of primary health care services in South Africa. The primary purpose is to provide the public with access to safe competent basic health care and to achieve this, the nurse should be empowered to practice within legal and ethical boundaries. This paper explores and describes the limitations imposed by legislation on the nurse’s ability to prescribe treatment in the primary health care field. The focus is mainly on the Nursing Act, the Pharmacy...

  7. What Can Primary Care Learn From Sports Teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Fogarty, Colleen; Salas, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Teams are familiar to sports but relatively new to primary care. In this perspective, we use sports teams to illustrate key principles from team science and extract practical lessons for primary care teams. The most notable lessons include the need for continuous team learning based on presession planning and postsession debriefing, real-world team training focused on identified teamwork needs, and on-site team coaching. Implementation of these principles requires organizational commitment coupled with alignment of continuing medical education and recertification requirements with primary care teamwork competencies. PMID:27232689

  8. The DIAMOND initiative: implementing collaborative care for depression in 75 primary care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Leif I.; Crain, A. Lauren; Jaeckels, Nancy; Ohnsorg, Kris A.; Margolis, Karen L; Beck, Arne; Whitebird, Robin R.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Andrew H. Van de Ven

    2013-01-01

    Background The many randomized trials of the collaborative care model for improving depression in primary care have not described the implementation and maintenance of this model. This paper reports how and the degree to which collaborative care process changes were implemented and maintained for the 75 primary care clinics participating in the DIAMOND Initiative (Depression Improvement Across Minnesota–Offering a New Direction). Methods Each clinic was trained to implement seven components o...

  9. Collaborative care for anxiety disorders in primary care: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Muntingh, A.D.T.; Feltz-Cornelis, C.M. van der; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Spinhoven, P.; van Balkom, A J L M

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating collaborative care for anxiety disorders are recently emerging. A systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the effect of collaborative care for adult patients with anxiety disorders in primary care is therefore warranted. Methods A literature search was performed. Data sources: PubMed, Psycinfo, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane library. Study eligibility criteria: Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of collaborative care for adult primary ca...

  10. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Blake-Gumbs, Lyla; Miedema, Baujke;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare...... psychosocial issues the YA cancer patient may present with. The role of the FP in follow-up care seems to be very limited. CONCLUSIONS: YACs in the western world seem to have comparable medical and psychosocial problems. However, the nature of health insurance is such that it impacts differently on the care of...... this group of cancer patients. Primary care features such as patient-centered, integrated, and comprehensive care over extended periods of time bring the FP into the unique position to provide follow-up for YAC. However, this will require integrating patient's perspectives on their care, professional...

  11. The Australian experiment: how primary health care organizations supported the evolution of a primary health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Marley, John E; Wells, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Primary health care in Australia has undergone 2 decades of change. Starting with a vision for a national health strategy with general practice at its core, Australia established local meso-level primary health care organizations--Divisions of General Practice--moving from focus on individual practitioners to a professional collective local voice. The article identifies how these meso-level organizations have helped the Australian primary health care system evolve by supporting the roll-out of initiatives including national practice accreditation, a focus on quality improvement, expansion of multidisciplinary teams into general practice, regional integration, information technology adoption, and improved access to care. Nevertheless, there are still challenges to ensuring equitable access and the supply and distribution of a primary care workforce, addressing the increasing rates of chronic disease and obesity, and overcoming the fragmentation of funding and accountability in the Australian system. PMID:22403246

  12. Burnout among primary care physicians: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Giulianne Silva Morelli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to analyze the associations between burnout syndrome and individual and work-related characteristics among primary care physicians. Methods: a systematic review was performed using the Medline (PubMed, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases. In November, 2013, we ran a search based on the descriptors: “professional burnout”, “health personnel”, and “primary care”. We assessed 2,416 titles and 18 studies were selected. Results: the prevalence of burnout was high among primary care physicians. Burnout was associated with physical illnesses, mental disorders, and alcohol and substance abuse. Physicians who had higher levels of emotional exhaustion were more likely to be absent from work, and to change their job. Physicians suffering from burnout were also more likely to increase pharmaceutical expenditure per patient. The work-related characteristics associated with burnout were: length of employment in primary care, number of working hours per week, number of patients attended, type of employment contract, teaching activity, holiday period, and difficulties in dealing with other staff. Conclusion: the high prevalence of burnout among primary care physicians is a major concern for policy makers, since primary care is the cornerstone of health systems, and burnout syndrome can jeopardize the quality of care provided to populations, and the effectiveness of the entire health care system. Understanding the factors associated with burnout allows the development of strategies for intervention and prevention.

  13. Mental health and primary care: an experience with community health agents in Salvador-BA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noêmia Aragão Casais

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To share an experience of a link between primary care and mental health by means of matrix support. Method: A survey conducted from March to December 2007, in Pernambués neighborhood, District of Cabula-beiru, in Salvador - Bahia. The shared knowledge construction was carried out by residents of the Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Health from the Nucleus of Mental Health, State University of Bahia, with Community Health Agents (ACS. Meetings, discussions and domiciliary visits were applyed as sharing technics and tools with phonographic recording, photographic register and report. The obtained information were evaluated regarding their content and were divided into stages and categories. Results: We determined the following stages by means of the technique: approach, ties’ strengthening, teamwork and conclusion. The results were analyzed based on the ACS’ everyday interactivity for cooperation, thus obtaining the development of a critical spirit in the assesment of the relationship between primary care and mental health. Final Considerations: The exchange of experiences produced significant learning, besides health promotion for all those involved in the process: ACS, families cared for and residents.

  14. 78 FR 14315 - Notice of Chargeable Rates Under the National Flood Insurance Program for Non-Primary Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Notice of Chargeable Rates Under the National Flood Insurance Program for Non-Primary Residences AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice... Federal Insurance, Federal Emergency Management Agency. BILLING CODE 9110-11-P...

  15. Quality indicators for primary care mental health services

    OpenAIRE

    Shield, T; Campbell, S; Rogers, A; Worrall, A; Chew-Graham, C; Gask, L

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To identify a generic set of face valid quality indicators for primary care mental health services which reflect a multi-stakeholder perspective and can be used for facilitating quality improvement.

  16. Whole home exercise intervention for depression in older care home residents (the OPERA study): a process evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Ellard, DR; Thorogood, M; Underwood, M; Seale, C.; Taylor, SJC

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 'Older People's Exercise intervention in Residential and nursing Accommodation' (OPERA) cluster randomised trial evaluated the impact of training for care home staff together with twice-weekly, physiotherapist-led exercise classes on depressive symptoms in care home residents, but found no effect. We report a process evaluation exploring potential explanations for the lack of effect.Methods: The OPERA trial included over 1,000 residents in 78 care homes in the UK. We used a mi...

  17. Depression in Older Adults in Primary Care: An Integrative Approach to Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Sheila

    2015-09-01

    Depression in older adults is a problem often encountered in primary care. While depression is evident in all populations in the primary care setting, assessment and care are more complicated in the older adult due to factors such as comorbidities, clinical presentation, adverse drug effects and drug interactions, and psychosocial factors. Due to these complications, it is essential to incorporate both conventional and alternative methods in assessment and treatment. This article aims to define depression in older adults, present the epidemiology, discuss clinical presentation and screening, and offer an integrative approach to intervention, including both pharmacological and nonpharmacological methods. Providing holistic and integrative care to older adults diagnosed with depression in the primary care setting is essential to promote healing and recovery. This article aims to provide insight for nurses, nurse practitioners, and other providers regarding the holistic and integrative care of depression in older adults in the primary care setting. PMID:25673577

  18. Adoption of interorganisational ICT in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.G.A.; Batenburg, R.S.; Verheij, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient and effective collaboration among health care providers is of great importance. Interorganisational ICT can enable and facilitate this collaboration, but the adoption of such information systems is still sparsely analysed. In this paper we describe the results of a survey among 49 GP pract

  19. PRIMARY NURSING IMPLICATIONS ON NURSING CARE ASSISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mahnis Pereira Carmona

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the method “Primary Nursing”, which has as principle the elevation of thenurse’s autonomy, in which he is responsible for the patient 24 hours a day. The also present the function of eachnurse engaged in that process, pointing out the advantages of the method and its implications in the practice. In itsreview, they put results of 07 present works accomplished with the introduction of the “Primary Nursing”. As finalconsiderations, the state that the “Primary Nursing” improves the quality of assistance given by the nurse, and itsperformance will mainly depend on the nurse’s interest, on changing the reference system towards the professionalcompetence.

  20. Screening for depression in the primary care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneke, D Edward; Schultz, Heather E; Fluent, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Despite strong efforts, the diagnosis and treatment of depression bring many challenges in the primary care setting. Screening for depression has been shown to be effective only if reliable systems of care are in place to ensure appropriate treatment by clinicians and adherence by patients. New evidence-based models of care for depression exist, but spread has been slow because of inadequate funding structures and conflicts within current clinical culture. The Affordable Care Act introduces potential opportunities to reorganize funding structures, conceivably leading to increased adoption of these collaborative care models. Suicide screening remains controversial. PMID:25725567

  1. Genetic Assessment of Breast Cancer Risk in Primary Care Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Wylie; Culver, Julie; Pinsky, Linda; Hall, Sarah; Reynolds, Susan E; Yasui, Yutaka; Press, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Family history is increasingly important in primary care as a means to detect candidates for genetic testing or tailored prevention programs. We evaluated primary care physicians’ skills in assessing family history for breast cancer risk, using unannounced standardized patient visits to 86 general internists and family medicine practitioners in King County, WA. Transcripts of clinical encounters were coded to determine ascertainment of family history, risk assessment, and clinical follow-up. ...

  2. Primary Health Care (phc): Back to the Past?

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Franco-Giraldo

    2012-01-01

    Primary health care is analyzed as the alternative throughwhich health systems will recover the role they had during thelate twentieth century: working with other sectors to implementhealth promotion actions to improve the users’ quality of lifeand equity. A renewal is presented in recognition of the effortsduring the final century to establish primary care policies andprograms as the core of the health systems, emphasizing thereorientation of health services. This paper discusses the princip...

  3. Managing dengue fever in primary care: A practical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lum, LCS; Ng, CJ; Khoo, EM

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a common cause of illness seen in primary care in the tropical and subtropical countries. An understanding of the course of disease progression, risk factors, recognition of the warning signs and look out for clinical problems during the different phases of the disease will enable primary care physicians to manage dengue fever in an appropriate and timely manner to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  4. Primary care management of depression in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, Judy

    2016-06-19

    Depression is the most common mental health disorder in children and adolescents, and primary care is often the first point of contact for children and adolescents with depression. Depression impacts all areas of life, impairing academics and interactions with family and friends. The purpose of this article is to help NPs identify and treat children and adolescents presenting with depression in the primary care setting. PMID:27214067

  5. Dissemination of Cognitive Therapy for Panic Disorder in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Grey, Nick; Salkovskis, Paul; Quigley, Alexandra; David M. Clark; Ehlers, Anke

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether brief training in cognitive therapy for panic disorder (Clark et al., 1994) can improve the outcomes that primary care therapists obtain with their patients. Seven primary care therapists treated 36 patients meeting DSM-IV (APA, 1994) criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in general practice surgeries. Outcomes for the cohort of patients whom the therapists treated with their usual methods (treatment-as-usual) before the training (N = 12) were...

  6. Experiences of social workers in primary care in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Ní Raghallaigh, Muireann; Allen, Mary; Cunniffe, Rosemary; Quin, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the findings of research conducted with social workers in primary health care teams in Ireland. Data from questionnaires and from a focus group were analysed. The findings draw attention to the nature of the role of the primary care social worker, including both the satisfying and challenging aspects of this role. It was evident that the participants liked the generic nature of their role and the fact that they worked with non-mandated clients. However, th...

  7. Eating disordered patients: personality, alexithymia, and implications for primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Beales, D. L.; Dolton, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eating disorders are becoming more apparent in primary care. Descriptions of character traits related to people with eating disorders are rarely reported in the primary care literature and there is little awareness of the implications of alexithymia--a concept that defines the inability to identify or express emotion. We hypothesised that many individuals with active eating disorders have alexithymic traits and a tendency to somatize their distress. AIM: To analyse the character t...

  8. Diagnostic ultrasound: a primary care-led service?

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, L; J. Potterton; Owen, P.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A training programme has been proposed for general practitioners (GPs) to perform ultrasound in primary care. This has generated considerable concern among radiologists as to the adequacy and appropriateness of such training. AIM: To assess the current provision of ultrasound services to primary care in the former Northern health region of England, the level of interest among GPs in undertaking recommended training, and the willingness or ability of radiology departments to provid...

  9. Primary care utilisation and workers’ opportunity costs. Evidence from Italy

    OpenAIRE

    De Luca, Giuliana; Ponzo, Michela

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the effects of employment condition and work hours on the utilisation of primary care services in Italy. Although the Italian NHS provides free and equitable access to primary care, type of occupation and labour contracts may still deter workers to attend medical appointments. The hypothesis is that the higher the workers’ opportunity cost in terms of earning forgone, the less the demand for General Practitioner (GP) visits. Using survey data provided by the Italian Nation...

  10. Diagnosis of Asthma in Primary Health Care: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Karin C. Ringsberg; Paula Bjärneman; Ronny Larsson; Elisabeth Wallström; Olle Löwhagen

    2014-01-01

    Some patients with an asthma diagnosis have a poor controlled asthma. One explanation may be an incorrect diagnosis. Aim. The aim of the study was to diagnose and classify patients with non-infectious lower respiratory tract problems in primary health care using internationally applied diagnostic criteria and diagnostic tests. Patients and Methods. New adult patients visiting a primary health care centre due to lower airway problems were included. The diagnostic tests included FEV1, FVC, PEF,...

  11. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Simon; Blakeman, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Simon DS Fraser,1 Tom Blakeman2 1Academic Unit of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, University of Southampton, Southampton, 2National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research Greater Manchester, Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally...

  12. Atrial fibrillation in a primary care practice: prevalence and management

    OpenAIRE

    Upshur Ross E; Ceresne Lance

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation is a common serious cardiac arrhythmia. Knowing the prevalence of atrial fibrillation and documentation of medical management are important in the provision of primary care. This study sought to determine the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in a primary care population and to identify and quantify the treatments being used for stroke prevention in this group of patients. Methods A prevalence study through chart audit was conducted in the family medici...

  13. Living with Dementia: Plotting a Revolution in Care Home Catering Provision through Resident Directed Services

    OpenAIRE

    Dinsdale, Norman

    2016-01-01

    The first wave of the Baby Boomer generation are already in their mix-sixties to seventies. The expectations of the coming generation are far higher with an ingrained sense of entitlement, with food being a major component in resident's health and happiness. This sense of entitlement may well prove to be a significant challenge requiring a revolutionary paradigm shift, to future care home management, staff and caterers.

  14. Quality of care in family practice: does residency training make a difference?

    OpenAIRE

    Borgiel, A E; Williams, J I; Bass, M J; Dunn, E V; Evensen, M K; Lamont, C T; MacDonald, P J; McCoy, J M; Spasoff, R A

    1989-01-01

    As the proportion of physicians who enter residency training in family practice steadily increases, so does the need to evaluate the impact of their training and postgraduate education on the quality of care in their practices. We audited the practices of 120 randomly selected family physicians in Ontario, who were separated into four groups: nonmembers of the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), members of the CFPC with no certification in family medicine, certificated members with...

  15. Mental Health Collaborative Care and its Role in Primary Care Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Goodrich, David E.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Nord, Kristina M; Bauer, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative care models (CCMs) provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated mental health and medical care for persons with mental health conditions served in primary care settings. CCMs are team-based intervention to enact system-level redesign by improving patient care through organizational leadership support, provider decision support, and clinical information systems as well as engaging patients in their care through self-management support and linkages to community resources. Th...

  16. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients...... with type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action...

  17. Hypertensive patients in primary health care: access, connection and care involved in spontaneous demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girão, Ana Lívia Araújo; Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires de

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the impacts of inclusion of care for spontaneous demands in the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care. Methods Third generation qualitative assessment survey conducted with 16 workers in a Primary Care Health Unit (PHCU) of the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceara, in the period between July and September of 2015. To collect data, systematic field observation and semi-structured interviews were used, and the stages of thematic content analysis were adopted for data analysis. Results Participants revealed that access, connection and care are fundamental to the treatment of hypertension. However, they said that the introduction of free access for spontaneous demands compromised the flow of care in the hypertension programs. Conclusion A dichotomy between the practice of care recommended by health policies and the one existing in the reality of PHCUs was shown, causing evident losses to the care of hypertensive patients in primary care. PMID:27253602

  18. The ethics of complex relationships in primary care behavioral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Jeff; Runyan, Christine

    2013-03-01

    Primary care settings are particularly prone to complex relationships that can be ethically challenging. This is due in part to three of the distinctive attributes of primary care: a whole family orientation; team-based care; and a longitudinal care delivery model. In addition, the high patient volume of primary care means that the likelihood of encountering ethically challenging relationships is probably greater than in a specialty setting. This article argues that one ethical standard of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2010, Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct, www.apa.org/ethics/code) (10.02, Therapy Involving Couples or Families) should be revised to better accommodate the work of psychologists in primary care. The corresponding Principles of Medical Ethics from the American Medical Association (AMA, 2012, Code of medical ethics: Current opinions with annotations, 2012-2013, Washington, DC: Author), most notably the principle regarding a physician's duty to "respect the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals as well as safeguard privacy" are also noted. In addition, the article details how the three attributes of primary care often result in complex relationships, and provides suggestions for handling such relationships ethically. PMID:23566124

  19. [Research and the recent evolution of primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, L

    2002-01-01

    Primary care in Spain has undergone a burgeoning phase in the 80's, followed by a decade of stagnation in the 90's, with little creativity, a routinisation of tasks, and the set up of service port-folios and program-contracts. On the other hand, the recent changes in the orientation of the research promoted by the health administration, in favor of basic research, at the expense of health services research and clinical epidemiology, are in contrast with the importance of primary care as a natural setting for the management of many causal agents and risk factors for health. Despite such limitations, the culture of research has become present in many primary care centres and pharmacies, and primary care research is increasingly present in scientific journals. Nevertheless, it is necessary, also for the case of primary care, to manage research, in differentiated and specific ways, favoring priorization, evaluation and responsibility through flexible organisational formulas and information systems. This should include contracting procedures allowing for at least part-time research, as well as professional career models acknowledging research and teaching activities. Scientific and professional associations in primary care face the challenge of maintaning research projects, of increasing their presence among professionals, of formulating opinions regarding the problems of their sector, as well as of reinforcing their organizational and communication capabilities. PMID:11958755

  20. Difficulties of residents in training in end-of-life care. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, C; Cedraschi, C; Pautex, S; Rentsch, D; Piguet, V; Allaz, A F

    2009-01-01

    Residents in training are first-line physicians in hospital settings and they are in the process of developing knowledge and mastering clinical skills. They have to confront complex tasks calling upon their personal background, professional identity and relationships with the patients. We conducted a qualitative study investigating the difficulties they perceive in end-of-life care. In all, 24 consecutive residents were presented with a written query asking them to indicate the difficulties they identify in the management of patients hospitalised for end-of-life care. Their responses were submitted to content analysis. Physicians' mean age was 28 +/- 2.2 years, 37% were women, average postgraduate training duration was 2.5 +/- 1.3 years. Content analysis elicited eight categories of difficulties: ability to provide adequate explanations, understand the patients' needs, have sufficient theoretical knowledge, avoid flight, avoid false reassurance, manage provision of time, face one's limits as a physician and be able to help despite everything. Residents' responses showed that they identify the complexity of care in terminally-ill patients early in their training. Their responses pointed to the 'right distance' in-between getting involved and preserving oneself as a dimension of major importance. PMID:18996979

  1. Menu planning in long-term care: toward resident-centred menus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducak, Kate; Keller, Heather H

    2011-01-01

    Factors that influence the menu planning process in Ontario long-term care (LTC) homes were studied, as were key informants' perspectives on how this process could be improved to promote resident-centred menus. Key informants were interviewed by telephone to obtain qualitative data through standardized open-ended questions. The key informants (n=35) were randomly selected nutrition managers of Ontario LTC homes. Selected registered dietitians from the Ontario Long-Term Care Action Group also participated (n=5). Descriptive thematic analysis was completed on data provided. Three over arching themes emerged from the data as drivers in the menu planning process: resource limitations, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care standards, and the accommodation of diverse and evolving preferences. Challenges involving resources include insufficient food labour and raw food funding, the workload involved with altering menus, and providing food items for special diets or preferences. In terms of ministry standards, participants reported barriers to complying with rotation and portion standards. Other common obstacles within LTC homes include accommodating personal preferences, cultural preferences, and therapeutic diets. Ontario LTC homes face numerous challenges in the planning of menus for residents, regardless of a home's size, location, or profit status. Suggestions are aimed at improving the menu planning process and providing high-quality, palatable, and culturally appropriate food in these homes so that menus are resident-centred. PMID:21645428

  2. Team Sports: A Place for Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Hancock, Larry

    1985-01-01

    Physicians' role in team sports goes beyond the traditional ‘Doc’ who attends the game for stitching and primary injury management. Injury and illness prevention, ongoing supervision of rehabilitation, education, fitness evaluation, and training prescription are roles which have often fallen, by default, to paramedicals. The author recounts his experience in medical supervision of major junior hockey in the Western Hockey League.

  3. Primary Medical Care Provider Accreditation (PMCPA): pilot evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, S.M.; Chauhan, U.; Lester, H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While practice-level or team accreditation is not new to primary care in the UK and there are organisational indicators in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) organisational domain, there is no universal system of accreditation of the quality of organisational aspects of care in the

  4. Determinants of increased primary health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.; Schellevis, F.; Rijken, M.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The number of cancer survivors is increasing, and patients with cancer often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment. Because of the variety of health problems and high prevalence of comorbidity, primary care physicians (PCPs) seem obvious candidates to take care of

  5. Assessing Health Literacy in Diverse Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Renee L.

    2010-01-01

    Patient health literacy skills are critical to effective healthcare communication and safe care delivery in primary care settings. Methods and strategies to identify patient health literacy (HL) capabilities and provider/staff knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) regarding HL must be known before addressing provider/staff communication skills.…

  6. Outness, Stigma, and Primary Health Care Utilization among Rural LGBT Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Whitehead

    Full Text Available Prior studies have noted significant health disadvantages experienced by LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations in the US. While several studies have identified that fears or experiences of stigma and disclosure of sexual orientation and/or gender identity to health care providers are significant barriers to health care utilization for LGBT people, these studies have concentrated almost exclusively on urban samples. Little is known about the impact of stigma specifically for rural LGBT populations, who may have less access to quality, LGBT-sensitive care than LGBT people in urban centers.LBGT individuals residing in rural areas of the United States were recruited online to participate in a survey examining the relationship between stigma, disclosure and "outness," and utilization of primary care services. Data were collected and analyzed regarding LGBT individuals' demographics, health care access, health risk factors, health status, outness to social contacts and primary care provider, and anticipated, internalized, and enacted stigmas.Higher scores on stigma scales were associated with lower utilization of health services for the transgender & non-binary group, while higher levels of disclosure of sexual orientation were associated with greater utilization of health services for cisgender men.The results demonstrate the role of stigma in shaping access to primary health care among rural LGBT people and point to the need for interventions focused towards decreasing stigma in health care settings or increasing patients' disclosure of orientation or gender identity to providers. Such interventions have the potential to increase utilization of primary and preventive health care services by LGBT people in rural areas.

  7. Outness, Stigma, and Primary Health Care Utilization among Rural LGBT Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, J.; Shaver, John; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies have noted significant health disadvantages experienced by LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) populations in the US. While several studies have identified that fears or experiences of stigma and disclosure of sexual orientation and/or gender identity to health care providers are significant barriers to health care utilization for LGBT people, these studies have concentrated almost exclusively on urban samples. Little is known about the impact of stigma specifically for rural LGBT populations, who may have less access to quality, LGBT-sensitive care than LGBT people in urban centers. Methodology LBGT individuals residing in rural areas of the United States were recruited online to participate in a survey examining the relationship between stigma, disclosure and “outness,” and utilization of primary care services. Data were collected and analyzed regarding LGBT individuals’ demographics, health care access, health risk factors, health status, outness to social contacts and primary care provider, and anticipated, internalized, and enacted stigmas. Results Higher scores on stigma scales were associated with lower utilization of health services for the transgender & non-binary group, while higher levels of disclosure of sexual orientation were associated with greater utilization of health services for cisgender men. Conclusions The results demonstrate the role of stigma in shaping access to primary health care among rural LGBT people and point to the need for interventions focused towards decreasing stigma in health care settings or increasing patients’ disclosure of orientation or gender identity to providers. Such interventions have the potential to increase utilization of primary and preventive health care services by LGBT people in rural areas. PMID:26731405

  8. Primary care experience “The pro-active student”.

    OpenAIRE

    Covill, Carl; Batt, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Currently the emphasis on primary care is that of pro-active management and patient participation (South 2005). In a rights based health system it is argued that the patient has the right to expect, high quality and accountable nursing care, delivered by health care professionals who have the skills and experience to underpin this philosophy as advocates of professional practice (Barnes 1997). With the widening participation of patient involvement as promoted by the DoH( 2002), the prominence...

  9. Overweight and obesity and the demand for primary physician care

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Greve, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The standard economic model for the demand for health care predicts that unhealthy behaviour such as being overweight or obese should increase the demand for medical care, particularly as clinical studies link obesity to a number of serious diseases. In this paper, we investigate whether overweight or obese individuals demand more medical care than normal weight individuals by estimating a finite mixture model which splits the population into frequent and non-frequent users of primary physici...

  10. Towards a model for integrative medicine in Swedish primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Falkenberg Torkel; Warenmark Anders; Halpin Jeremy; Sundberg Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Collaboration between providers of conventional care and complementary therapies (CTs) has gained in popularity but there is a lack of conceptualised models for delivering such care, i.e. integrative medicine (IM). The aim of this paper is to describe some key findings relevant to the development and implementation of a proposed model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care. Methods Investigative procedures involved research group and key informant meetings with multiple st...

  11. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Mannelli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Noneth...

  12. Adoption of interorganisational ICT in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Plomp, M.G.A.; Batenburg, R.S.; Verheij, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient and effective collaboration among health care providers is of great importance. Interorganisational ICT can enable and facilitate this collaboration, but the adoption of such information systems is still sparsely analysed. In this paper we describe the results of a survey among 49 GP practices in The Netherlands held in 2009 and 2010, which were queried on their adoption of different types of interorganisational ICT, such as the exchange with out-of-hours services and with other pri...

  13. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  14. 1st National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care: A Journey Toward Stronger Primary Care in India

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    Academy of Family Physicians of India organized the first National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care (FMPC) on 20-21 April 2013 at India International Centre New Delhi. The conference was a major success towards positioning of requirement for a distinct academic discipline (family medicine) within the medical and nursing education system as a means for strengthening of primary care in India. The event gained its prominence in the times when universal health coverage is being deba...

  15. Informal carers and the primary care team.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, C.

    2001-01-01

    The number of carers in the community is rising, and the importance of general practice in providing supportfor them has been highlighted. Caring for a disabled friend or relative has been shown to be harmful to the health of the caregiver and changes in social and family structure have led carers to become isolated and more reliant on the formal support services. However, many carersfeel that GPs do not understand their needs, and in turn many GPs and nursesfeel that they lack the relevant r...

  16. Improving Prescribing Practices in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Atle Fretheim; Oxman, Andrew D.; Kari Håvelsrud; Shaun Treweek; Kristoffersen, Doris T; Arild Bjørndal

    2006-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. An important issue in health care is “getting research into practice,” in other words, making sure that, when evidence from research has established the best way to treat a disease, doctors actually use that approach with their patients. In reality, there is often a gap between evidence and practice.   An example concerns the treatment of people who have high blood pressure (hypertension) and/or high cholesterol. These are common conditions, and both increase the ...

  17. Strengthening of primary health care: Key to deliver inclusive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Yeravdekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inequity and poverty are the root causes of ill health. Access to quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis in many parts of the country remains an unfulfilled aspiration. Disparity in health care is interpreted as compromise in ′Right to Life.′ It is imperative to define ′essential health care,′ which should be made available to all citizens to facilitate inclusivity in health care. The suggested methods for this include optimal utilization of public resources and increasing public spending on health care. Capacity building through training, especially training of paramedical personnel, is proposed as an essential ingredient, to reduce cost, especially in tertiary care. Another aspect which is considered very important is improvement in delivery system of health care. Increasing the role of ′family physician′ in health care delivery system will improve preventive care and reduce cost of tertiary care. These observations underlie the relevance and role of Primary health care as a key to deliver inclusive health care. The advantages of a primary health care model for health service delivery are greater access to needed services; better quality of care; a greater focus on prevention; early management of health problems; and cumulative improvements in health and lower morbidity as a result of primary health care delivery.

  18. An opportunity for coordinated cancer care: intersection of health care reform, primary care providers, and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lauren G; Wender, Richard; Altshuler, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The US health care system has become increasingly unsustainable, threatened by poor quality and spiraling costs. Many Americans are not receiving recommended preventive care, including cancer screening tests. Passage of the Affordable Care Act in March 2010 has the potential to reverse this course by increasing access to primary care providers, extending coverage and affordability of health insurance, and instituting proven quality measures. In order for health care reform to succeed, it will require a stronger primary care workforce, a new emphasis on patient-centered care, and payment incentives that reward quality over quantity. Innovations such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and improved quality reporting methods are central features of a redesigned health care delivery system and will ultimately change the face of cancer care in the United States. PMID:21131791

  19. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high

  20. Occupational Therapy experience in family care in a primary health care service

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Baissi; Bruno Souza Bechara Maxta

    2013-01-01

    Occupational therapy is presented as the core knowledge involved in the remodeling and strengthening of Primary Health Care in the Brazilian Unified Health Care System (Sistema Único de Saúde – SUS). In this study, we aimed to describe the interventions in the process of occupational therapy in supervised family care in a primary health care service in the municipality of Várzea Paulista, São Paulo state. In this case study, the moments of care were described and analyzed in light of narrativ...

  1. Health Literacy in Primary Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Lauren; Salzman, Brooke; Snyderman, Danielle

    2015-07-15

    Health literacy includes a set of skills needed to make appropriate health decisions and successfully navigate the health care system. These skills include reading, writing, numeracy, communication, and, increasingly, the use of electronic technology. National data indicate that more than one-third of U.S. adults have limited health literacy, which contributes to poor health outcomes and affects patient safety, and health care access and quality. Although there are a number of tools that screen for limited health literacy, they are primarily used for research. Routinely screening patients for health literacy has not been shown to improve outcomes and is not recommended. Instead, multiple professional organizations recommend using universal health literacy precautions to provide understandable and accessible information to all patients, regardless of their literacy or education levels. This includes avoiding medical jargon, breaking down information or instructions into small concrete steps, limiting the focus of a visit to three key points or tasks, and assessing for comprehension. Additionally, printed information should be written at or below a fifth- to sixth-grade reading level. Visual aids, graphs, or pictures can enhance patient understanding, as can more concrete presentation of numerical information. PMID:26176370

  2. Potential of physician assistants to support primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Sarah; Botting, Ingrid; Huebner, Lori-Anne; Wright, Brock; Beaupre, Beth; Permack, Sheldon; Jones, Ian; Mihlachuk, Ainslie; Edwards, Jeanette; Rhule, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine effective strategies for introducing physician assistants (PAs) in primary care settings and provide guidance to support ongoing provincial planning for PA roles in primary care. Design Time-series research design using multiple qualitative methods. Setting Manitoba. Participants Physician assistants, supervising family physicians, clinic staff, members of the Introducing Physician Assistants into Primary Care Steering Committee, and patients receiving care from PAs. Methods The PA role was evaluated at 6 health care sites between 2012 and 2014; sites varied in size, funding models, geographic locations (urban or rural), specifics of the PA role, and setting type (clinic or hospital). Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted; patient feedback on quality improvement was retrieved; observational methods were employed; and documents were reviewed. A baseline assessment was conducted before PA placement. In 2013, there was a series of interviews and focus groups about the introduction of PAs at the 3 initial sites; in 2014 interviews and focus groups included all 6 sites. Main findings The concerns that were expressed during baseline interviews about the introduction of PAs (eg, community and patient acceptance) informed planning. Most concerns that were identified did not materialize. Supervising family physicians, site staff, and patients were enthusiastic about the introduction of PAs. There were a few challenges experienced at the site level (eg, front-desk scheduling), but they were perceived as manageable. Unanticipated challenges at the provincial level were identified (eg, diagnostic test ordering). Increased attachment and improved access—the goals of introducing PAs to primary care—were only some of the positive effects that were reported. Conclusion This first systematic multisite evaluation of PAs in primary care in Canada demonstrated that with appropriate collaborative planning, PAs can effectively

  3. A cluster randomised controlled trial of an occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke living in UK care homes (OTCH: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sackley Cath M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occupational therapy (OT in care homes study (OTCH aims to investigate the effect of a targeted course of individual OT (with task training, provision of adaptive equipment, minor environmental adaptations and staff education for stroke survivors living in care homes, compared to usual care. Methods/Design A cluster randomised controlled trial of United Kingdom (UK care homes (n = 90 with residents (n = 900 who have suffered a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA, and who are not receiving end-of-life care. Homes will be stratified by centre and by type of care provided and randomised (50:50 using computer generated blocked randomisation within strata to receive either the OT intervention (3 months intervention from an occupational therapist or control (usual care. Staff training on facilitating independence and mobility and the use of adaptive equipment, will be delivered to every home, with control homes receiving this after the 12 month follow-up. Allocation will be concealed from the independent assessors, but the treating therapists, and residents will not be masked to the intervention. Measurements are taken at baseline prior to randomisation and at 3, 6 and 12 months post randomisation. The primary outcome measure is independence in self-care activities of daily living (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index. Secondary outcome measures are mobility (Rivermead Mobility Index, mood (Geriatric Depression Scale, preference based quality of life measured from EQ-5D and costs associated with each intervention group. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs will be derived based on the EQ-5D scores. Cost effectiveness analysis will be estimated and measured by incremental cost effectiveness ratio. Adverse events will be recorded. Discussion This study will be the largest cluster randomised controlled trial of OT in care homes to date and will clarify the currently inconclusive literature on the efficacy of OT for

  4. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites. PMID:15671788

  5. Primary nursing in Intensive Care Unit: measuring nurses' attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetta, S.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Intensive Care Units have been identified as having advantages for the use of primary nursing. Nursing staff play an important role οn the successful implementation of primary nursing. It is important to know in advance of the implementation plan the attitudes and opinions of the nurses. Such knowledge would adequately inform the management and enable them to use the right approaches to achieve successful implementation. Aim and Method The current study is a non-experimental, cross-sectional descriptive research design aiming to identify nurses’ attitudes towards primary nursing. The study was conducted in an 8-beded Intensive Care Unit (ICU part of a University Hospital in Scotland. The sample consisted of all 38 registered and enrolled nurse working at the unit at the time. Results Results indicated that nurses were aware and identified benefits and shortcomings of primary nursing which have been seen in the primary care literature. Nurses’ attitudes towards implementation of primary nursing were positive and appeared to agree with the positive impact of primary nursing to the patients either in term of patient satisfaction or patient autonomy. Conclusions Primary nursing advocates a shift away from the traditional system of hierarchical task allocation. Nurses are willing to change and want to learn more in order to improve patients’ outcomes.

  6. Verbal Communication among Alzheimer’s Disease Patients, their Caregivers, and Primary Care Physicians during Primary Care Office Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karen L.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Schulz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Objective Primary care visits of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) often involve communication among patients, family caregivers, and primary care physicians (PCPs). The objective of this study was to understand the nature of each individual’s verbal participation in these triadic interactions. Methods To define the verbal communication dynamics of AD care triads, we compared verbal participation (percent of total visit speech) by each participant in patient/caregiver/PCP triads. Twenty three triads were audio taped during a routine primary care visit. Rates of verbal participation were described and effects of patient cognitive status (MMSE score, verbal fluency) on verbal participation were assessed. Results PCP verbal participation was highest at 53% of total visit speech, followed by caregivers (31%) and patients (16%). Patient cognitive measures were related to patient and caregiver verbal participation, but not to PCP participation. Caregiver satisfaction with interpersonal treatment by PCP was positively related to caregiver’s own verbal participation. Conclusion Caregivers of AD patients and PCPs maintain active, coordinated verbal participation in primary care visits while patients participate less. Practice Implications Encouraging verbal participation by AD patients and their caregivers may increase the AD patient’s active role and caregiver satisfaction with primary care visits. PMID:19395224

  7. Grip on challenging behaviour : a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, Sandra A; Smalbrugge, Martin; Zuidema, Sytse U; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Bosmans, Judith E; van Tulder, Maurits W; Eefsting, Jan A; Gerritsen, Debby L; Pot, Anne-Margriet

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. METHODS/DESIGN:

  8. Nurse led, primary care based antiretroviral treatment versus hospital care: a controlled prospective study in Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Kerry A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral treatment services delivered in hospital settings in Africa increasingly lack capacity to meet demand and are difficult to access by patients. We evaluate the effectiveness of nurse led primary care based antiretroviral treatment by comparison with usual hospital care in a typical rural sub Saharan African setting. Methods We undertook a prospective, controlled evaluation of planned service change in Lubombo, Swaziland. Clinically stable adults with a CD4 count > 100 and on antiretroviral treatment for at least four weeks at the district hospital were assigned to either nurse led primary care based antiretroviral treatment care or usual hospital care. Assignment depended on the location of the nearest primary care clinic. The main outcome measures were clinic attendance and patient experience. Results Those receiving primary care based treatment were less likely to miss an appointment compared with those continuing to receive hospital care (RR 0·37, p p = 0·001. Those receiving primary care based, nurse led care were more likely to be satisfied in the ability of staff to manage their condition (RR 1·23, p = 0·003. There was no significant difference in loss to follow-up or other health related outcomes in modified intention to treat analysis. Multilevel, multivariable regression identified little inter-cluster variation. Conclusions Clinic attendance and patient experience are better with nurse led primary care based antiretroviral treatment care than with hospital care; health related outcomes appear equally good. This evidence supports efforts of the WHO to scale-up universal access to antiretroviral treatment in sub Saharan Africa.

  9. Multimorbidity and quality of preventive care in Swiss university primary care cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Streit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caring for patients with multimorbidity is common for generalists, although such patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and thus such trials lack of generalizability. Data on the association between multimorbidity and preventive care are limited. We aimed to assess whether comorbidity number, severity and type were associated with preventive care among patients receiving care in Swiss University primary care settings. METHODS: We examined a retrospective cohort composed of a random sample of 1,002 patients aged 50-80 years attending four Swiss university primary care settings. Multimorbidity was defined according to the literature and the Charlson index. We assessed the quality of preventive care and cardiovascular preventive care with RAND's Quality Assessment Tool indicators. Aggregate scores of quality of provided care were calculated by taking into account the number of eligible patients for each indicator. RESULTS: Participants (mean age 63.5 years, 44% women had a mean of 2.6 (SD 1.9 comorbidities and 67.5% had 2 or more comorbidities. The mean Charlson index was 1.8 (SD 1.9. Overall, participants received 69% of recommended preventive care and 84% of cardiovascular preventive care. Quality of care was not associated with higher numbers of comorbidities, both for preventive care and for cardiovascular preventive care. Results were similar in analyses using the Charlson index and after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, center and number of visits. Some patients may receive less preventive care including those with dementia (47% and those with schizophrenia (35%. CONCLUSIONS: In Swiss university primary care settings, two thirds of patients had 2 or more comorbidities. The receipt of preventive and cardiovascular preventive care was not affected by comorbidity count or severity, although patients with certain comorbidities may receive lower levels of preventive care.

  10. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Stellefson, Michael; Dipnarine, Krishna; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academi...

  11. Do primary care providers who speak Chinese improve access to mental health care of Chinese immigrants?

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Alice W.; Kazanjian, Arminée

    2009-01-01

    Background The utilization of health care providers who share the language and culture of their patients has been advocated as a strategy to improve access to the mental health care of immigrants. This study examines the relationship between patients receiving primary care from health care providers who speak Chinese and the rate of mental health diagnosis and consultation among Chinese immigrants in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods The study analyzed 3 linked administrative databases: ...

  12. The link between health care spending and health outcomes for the new English Primary Care Trusts

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Martin; Nigel Rice; Peter C Smith

    2008-01-01

    English programme budgeting data have yielded major new insights into the link between health care spending and health outcomes. This paper updates two recent studies that have used programme budgeting data for 295 Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) in England to examine the link between spending and outcomes for several programmes of care. We use the same economic model employed in the two previous studies. It focuses on a decision maker who must allocate a fixed budget across programmes of care so ...

  13. Delivering pharmacogenetic testing in a primary care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills R

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Mills,1 Deepak Voora,1,2 Bruce Peyser,3 Susanne B Haga1,2 1Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, 2Duke Center for Personalized and Precision Medicine, 3Duke University Medical Center, Pickett Road Primary Care Clinic, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Pharmacogenetic testing refers to a type of genetic test to predict a patient's likelihood to experience an adverse event or not respond to a given drug. Despite revision to several labels of commonly prescribed drugs regarding the impact of genetic variation, the use of this testing has been limited in many settings due to a number of factors. In the primary care setting, the limited office time as well as the limited knowledge and experience of primary care practitioners have likely attributed to the slow uptake of pharmacogenetic testing. This paper provides talking points for primary care physicians to discuss with patients when pharmacogenetic testing is warranted. As patients and physicians become more familiar and accepting of pharmacogenetic testing, it is anticipated that discussion time will be comparable to that of other clinical tests. Keywords: pharmacogenetics, primary care, pharmacogenetic testing, patient education

  14. Spatial accessibility of primary care: concepts, methods and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guagliardo Mark F

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary care is recognized as the most important form of healthcare for maintaining population health because it is relatively inexpensive, can be more easily delivered than specialty and inpatient care, and if properly distributed it is most effective in preventing disease progression on a large scale. Recent advances in the field of health geography have greatly improved our understanding of the role played by geographic distribution of health services in population health maintenance. However, most of this knowledge has accrued for hospital and specialty services and services in rural areas. Much less is known about the effect of distance to and supply of primary care on primary care utilization, particularly in the U.S. For several reasons the shortage of information is particularly acute for urban areas, where the majority of people live. First, explicit definitions and conceptualizations of healthcare access have not been widely used to guide research. An additional barrier to progress has been an overwhelming concern about affordability of care, which has garnered the majority of attention and research resources. Also, the most popular measures of spatial accessibility to care – travel impedance to nearest provider and supply level within bordered areas – lose validity in congested urban areas. Better measures are needed. Fortunately, some advances are occurring on the methodological front. These can improve our knowledge of all types of healthcare geography in all settings, including primary care in urban areas. This paper explains basic concepts and measurements of access, provides some historical background, outlines the major questions concerning geographic accessibility of primary care, describes recent developments in GIS and spatial analysis, and presents examples of promising work.

  15. Primary Care Endocrinology in the Adult Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Celeste C; Zeytinoglu, Meltem

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, and osteoporosis are endocrine conditions affecting a significant proportion of women presenting to the obstetrician-gynecologist. Obstetrician-gynecologists are often the first health-care providers that young women see in adulthood, and thus, have a critical opportunity to identify women at risk for gestational and overt diabetes and manage the condition in those who have developed it. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be aware of the appropriate therapeutic options and treatment goals (eg, hemoglobin A1c) for women with diabetes. Thyroid disorders often present with menstrual irregularities or infertility, can affect pregnancy outcomes, and contribute to cardiovascular and bone disorders as women age. Finally, osteoporosis and low bone mineral density affect a substantial proportion of older women and some younger women with risk factors for secondary osteoporosis. The morbidity and mortality of osteoporotic fractures is substantial. There are many lifestyle interventions and therapeutic options available for these conditions, and the gynecologist plays a key role in optimizing risk factor assessment, screening, and providing treatment when appropriate. PMID:27212095

  16. "PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, AB; Olesen, Frede;

    2006-01-01

    4th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care "Collaborate to Catalyse Research", Venice Lido,......4th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care "Collaborate to Catalyse Research", Venice Lido,...

  17. Orientation behaviors in residents relocated to a redesigned dementia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Margaret C; MacLean, Jill; Borrie, Michael; Geiger, Julia

    2004-01-01

    This descriptive study took advantage of a scheduled environmental renovation in a secured dementia care unit. A convenience sample of 19 residents who were relocated to the unit completed a performance-based orientation task involving locating their own room. The study included a brief structured interview and tests of psychological function (cognition, depression, and visual-spatial ability) two months after admission. Intrusions (uninvited entry into another resident's room) were tracked for one week. Eighty-four percent of participants were able to find their own rooms during the orientation task. The majority of participants reported use of color (n = 13) and structure (n = 12) as cues for locating their rooms. Thirty-eight percent of those who could find their own rooms also intruded into others' rooms; these intrusions were most commonly related to seeking social interaction. The results attest to the importance of understanding the multiple factors that determine environmental use in this population. PMID:15002345

  18. Dientes! Community dental clinic: dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, J; Webb, C

    1998-05-01

    Dientes! is a private nonprofit community dental clinic that was established in 1994 to provide dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County. Its founders were successful in securing support from a diverse group of community agencies, including city and county governments, philanthropic foundations, the dental community, and corporate and individual donors. Dientes! provides approximately 250 visits per month in a three-chair clinic in Santa Cruz; a school-based program in Watsonville began March 1998. The major challenge facing Dientes! is to establish a reliable financial base that will allow the program to better meet the needs of low-income county residents over the long term. PMID:10528572

  19. Children's health care assistance according to their families: a comparison between models of Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bertoglio Comassetto Antunes de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To compare the health assistance models of Basic Traditional Units (UBS with the Family Health Strategy (ESF units for presence and extent of attributes of Primary Health Care (APS, specifically in the care of children. METHOD A cross-sectional study of a quantitative approach with families of children attended by the Public Health Service of Colombo, Paraná. The Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCA-Tool was applied to parents of 482 children, 235 ESF units and 247 UBS units covering all primary care units of the municipality, between June and July 2012. The results were analyzed according to the PCA-Tool manual. RESULTS ESF units reached a borderline overall score for primary health care standards. However, they fared better in their attributes of Affiliation, Integration of care coordination, Comprehensiveness, Family Centeredness and Accessibility of use, while the attributes of Community Guidance/Orientation, Coordination of Information Systems, Longitudinality and Access attributes were rated as insufficient for APS. UBS units had low scores on all attributes. CONCLUSION The ESF units are closer to the principles of APS (Primary Health Care, but there is need to review actions of child care aimed at the attributes of APS in both care models, corroborating similar studies from other regions of Brazil.

  20. Factors Related to Rejection of Care and Behaviors Directed towards Others: A Longitudinal Study in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Volicer, Ladislav; van der Steen, Jenny T

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to analyze factors related to rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others in nursing home residents with dementia. Methods The relationship of lack of understanding, depression, psychosis and pain with rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others was explored using four assessments from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) within a period of 15 months on 1,101 residents with dementia in Dutch nursing homes. Presence of depressive symptoms was ascert...

  1. Policy statement--The future of pediatrics: mental health competencies for pediatric primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Pediatric primary care clinicians have unique opportunities and a growing sense of responsibility to prevent and address mental health and substance abuse problems in the medical home. In this report, the American Academy of Pediatrics proposes competencies requisite for providing mental health and substance abuse services in pediatric primary care settings and recommends steps toward achieving them. Achievement of the competencies proposed in this statement is a goal, not a current expectation. It will require innovations in residency training and continuing medical education, as well as a commitment by the individual clinician to pursue, over time, educational strategies suited to his or her learning style and skill level. System enhancements, such as collaborative relationships with mental health specialists and changes in the financing of mental health care, must precede enhancements in clinical practice. For this reason, the proposed competencies begin with knowledge and skills for systems-based practice. The proposed competencies overlap those of mental health specialists in some areas; for example, they include the knowledge and skills to care for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, depression, and substance abuse and to recognize psychiatric and social emergencies. In other areas, the competencies reflect the uniqueness of the primary care clinician's role: building resilience in all children; promoting healthy lifestyles; preventing or mitigating mental health and substance abuse problems; identifying risk factors and emerging mental health problems in children and their families; and partnering with families, schools, agencies, and mental health specialists to plan assessment and care. Proposed interpersonal and communication skills reflect the primary care clinician's critical role in overcoming barriers (perceived and/or experienced by children and families) to seeking help for mental health and substance abuse concerns

  2. The emerging primary care workforce: preliminary observations from the primary care team: learning from effective ambulatory practices project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladden, Maryjoan D; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Fishman, Nancy W; Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Parchman, Michael; Wagner, Edward H

    2013-12-01

    Many primary care practices are changing the roles played by the members of their health care teams. The purpose of this article is to describe some of these new roles, using the authors' preliminary observations from 25 site visits to high-performing primary care practices across the United States in 2012-2013. These sites visits, to practices using their workforce creatively, were part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded initiative, The Primary Care Team: Learning From Effective Ambulatory Practices.Examples of these new roles that the authors observed on their site visits include medical assistants reviewing patient records before visits to identify care gaps, ordering and administering immunizations using protocols, making outreach calls to patients, leading team huddles, and coaching patients to set self-management goals. The registered nurse role has evolved from an emphasis on triage to a focus on uncomplicated acute care, chronic care management, and hospital-to-home transitions. Behavioral health providers (licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, or licensed counselors) were colocated and integrated within practices and were readily available for immediate consults and brief interventions. Physicians have shifted from lone to shared responsibility for patient panels, with other team members empowered to provide significant portions of chronic and preventive care.An innovative team-based primary care workforce is emerging. Spreading and sustaining these changes will require training both health professionals and nonprofessionals in new ways. Without clinical experiences that model this new team-based care and role models who practice it, trainees will not be prepared to practice as a team. PMID:24128622

  3. Primary health care staff's perception of childhood tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Rose, Michala Vaaben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing tuberculosis in children remains a great challenge in developing countries. Health staff working in the front line of the health service delivery system has a major responsibility for timely identification and referral of suspected cases of childhood tuberculosis. This study...... explored primary health care staff’s perception, challenges and needs pertaining to the identification of children with tuberculosis in Muheza district in Tanzania. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study that included 13 semi-structured interviews and 3 focus group discussions with a total of 29 health...... staff purposively sampled from primary health care facilities. Analysis was performed in accordance with the principles of a phenomenological analysis. Results: Primary health care staff perceived childhood tuberculosis to be uncommon in the society and tuberculosis was rarely considered as a likely...

  4. Immunization: a key to primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Focus of this discussion is on some of the problems enountered by national immunization programs and on the technology that is available now or that will be in the near future to help solve these problems. 4 basic aspects of immunization services are examined: the safety, effectiveness, and stability of vaccines; the cold chain, i.e., the transportation, storage, and handling of heat-sensitives vaccines from manufacturer to health worker in the field; vaccination equipment and sterilization for correct administration of immunization; and program management--schedules, records, training, resource allocation. The section devoted to vaccines focuses on immunization against 6 of (diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, measles, polio, and tuberculosis) against 6 of the major killers of children in developing countries: BCG, DPT (diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus), measles and poli vaccines, and tetanus toxiod. The bacillus of Calmette and Guerline (BCG) is considered a very safe vaccine. Questions about the effectiveness of BCG in preventing tuberculosis have been raised throughout its 60-year history. Different studies have produced conflicting results, some showing BCG to be highly effective and others showing no positive effect. Diphtheria toxioid, a very safe and relatively stable vaccine, is very effective in protecting against the development of diphtheria. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine is a safe, highly effective vaccine, but it requires careful handling and storage to prevent damage due to excessive heat or light exposure. The vaccine used for pertussis (whooping cough) is a saline suspension of killed Bordetella pertussis bacteria. The vaccine usually is administered as part of the triple DPT vaccine. Concerns about its safety have led to greatly reduced levels of use in some European countries in recent years. Its effectiveness also has been questioned. 2 types of polio vaccine are available: a live, attenuated vaccine given orally (Sabin) and a killed or

  5. Improving Obesity Prevention and Management in Primary Care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sharma, Arya Mitra

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases with significant morbidity, mortality and health care cost. There is concern due to the dramatic increase in overweight and obesity in Canada in the last 20 years. The causes of obesity are multifactorial, with underestimation by patients and healthcare providers of the long-term nature of the condition, and its complexity. Solutions related to prevention and management will require multifaceted strategies involving education, health policy, public health and health systems across the care continuum. We believe that to support such strategies we need to have a strong primary care workforce equipped with appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes to support persons at risk for, or with, obesity. To achieve this end, significant skills building is required to improve primary care obesity prevention and management efforts. This review will first examine the current state, and then will outline how we can improve. PMID:27342445

  6. Overweight and Obesity and the Demand for Primary Physician Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Greve, Jane

    The standard economic model for the demand for health care predicts that unhealthy behaviour such as being overweight or obese should increase the demand for medical care, particularly as clinical studies link obesity to a number of serious diseases. In this paper, we investigate whether overweight...... or obese individuals demand more medical care than normal weight individuals by estimating a finite mixture model which splits the population into frequent and non-frequent users of primary physician (GP) services according to the individual's latent health status. Based on a sample of wage-earners aged 25......-60 years drawn from the National Health Interview (NHI) survey 2000 and merged to Danish register data, we compare differences in the impact of being overweight and obese relative to being normal weight on the demand for primary physician care. Estimated bodyweight effects vary across latent classes...

  7. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  8. Quality of Dying in Nursing Home Residents Dying with Dementia: Does Advanced Care Planning Matter? A Nationwide Postmortem Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vandervoort, An; Houttekier, Dirk; Vander Stichele, Robert; van der Steen, Jenny T; Van den Block, Lieve

    2014-01-01

    Background Advance care planning is considered a central component of good quality palliative care and especially relevant for people who lose the capacity to make decisions at the end of life, which is the case for many nursing home residents with dementia. We set out to investigate to what extent (1) advance care planning in the form of written advance patient directives and verbal communication with patient and/or relatives about future care and (2) the existence of written advance general...

  9. Treating Fecal Incontinence: An Unmet Need in Primary Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, William E; Palsson, Olafur S; Simren, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence affects up to 36% of primary care patients. Although effective treatments are available, doctors rarely screen for this condition and patients seldom volunteer complaints of fecal incontinence. Conservative management yields 60% improvement in symptoms and continence in 20% of patients. Referrals are currently being accepted for studies seeking to improve case detection and to support conservative management or self-care. PMID:27154893

  10. Essential attributes and qualifiers of primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Andréa Silvia Walter de Aguiar; Pollyanna Martins

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the primary health care (PHC) has been associated with the first level of care from a health system and characterized by the kind of professional that in it operates, where is expected a predominance of specialists in this area. However, the major limitation for this type of characterization is that the profile of professionals engaged in this service may vary from country to country.Several theoretical and conceptual landmarks proposed approaches and indicators to assess and ch...

  11. The Philadelphia PRIME Program: A Model For Primary Care Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, Lisa M; Asch, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Expanding primary care and ambulatory experiences in internal medicine training programs is limited by insufficient resources devoted to their development and implementation, heavy inpatient service demands and loyalty to the traditional inpatient based training model. Overcoming these barriers is a challenge likely to create new approaches to ambulatory education. The Pilot Education and Ambulatory Care (PACE) program at the Sepulveda VA is one such initiative that represents a multidiscipli...

  12. Modern innovative pedagogical technologies in training primary care physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Ryaboshapko A.I.; Krasnikova N.V.; Shemetova G.N.; Balashova М.Е.; Shlyakhova G.N.; Ryzhkova L.K.; Ilyasova T.A.

    2011-01-01

    Training primary care physicians and general practitioners/family doctors is performed at different departments of Saratov State Medical University: Ambulatory Care, Polyclinic Therapy and Family Medicine. Since the foundation of department of Polyclinic Therapy, traditional training in polyclinic therapy has been carried out in different directions: outpatient therapy for the general practitioners/family doctors, for the 6th-year students of the Therapeutic faculty, for the 4th-year students...

  13. Health Services for Behavioral Problems in Pediatric Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Arwa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; DiRenzo-Coffey, Gina

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to explore primary care pediatricians' experiences in delivering behavioral health services in their own practices within the Nebraska context. An online survey was sent to the 154 primary care pediatricians who are members of the Nebraska chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Questions explored their management of behavioral problems, attitudes, and perceived barriers to providing behavioral health services in their practices. Seventy pediatricians completed the survey (47%). The majority of pediatricians reported seeing substantial numbers of children with behavioral problems. Eighty-five percent believed that most emotional and behavioral complaints could be managed by the pediatrician. Eighty-eight percent believed that the parents would prefer to receive services for their children's behavioral problems in the primary care office. Most felt that their training in mental health issues was inadequate. Pediatricians in this survey feel that pediatric behavioral problems are best managed in the primary care office and perceive that parents also prefer this setting. Improving training in behavioral health in pediatrics is necessary to meet the delivery of much needed behavioral health care to children and families. PMID:25398258

  14. The unique requirements of primary health care in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Knobel

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available The critical need for primary health care in Southern Africa with special reference to the demands of the heterogenous population is measured against the background of the declaration of Alma Ata at the WHO/UNICEF conference in 1978. In particular the provision of primary health care to the Third World communities of the RSA as an essential part of the security power base of the State is underlined and it is analised in terms of how shortcomings in this service can be exploited in a subversive revolutionary onslaught.

  15. Introduction to integrative primary care: the health-oriented clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Luke; Rakel, Dave; Rindfleisch, J Adam; Mallory, Jill

    2010-03-01

    Integrative medicine is healing-oriented medicine that accounts for the whole person (body, mind, and spirit), including all aspects of lifestyle. Integrative medicine emphasizes the therapeutic relationship and makes use of all appropriate therapies, both conventional and alternative. This article describes ways to bring the integrative perspective into primary care practice. Several approaches are described, including some that are routinely used in the authors' practice. Changes in practice philosophy that can (1) help inform primary care redesign, (2) facilitate the creation of patient-centered medical homes, (3) strengthen provider-patient relationships, and (4) enhance patient satisfaction are also provided. PMID:20188994

  16. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact. PMID:27399864

  17. African primary care research: Performing surveys using questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indiran Govender

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to provide practical guidance on conducting surveys and the use of questionnaires for postgraduate students at a Masters level who are undertaking primary care research. The article is intended to assist with writing the methods section of the research proposal and thinking through the relevant issues that apply to sample size calculation, sampling strategy, design of a questionnaire and administration of a questionnaire. The articleis part of a larger series on primary care research, with other articles in the series focusing on the structure of the research proposal and the literature review, as well as quantitative data analysis.

  18. Provider and Clinic Cultural Competence in a Primary Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cooper, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA. completed an on-line survey which includ...

  19. INSOMNIA AND CORRELATION WITH PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    OpenAIRE

    Made Gede Cahyadi Permana

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is regarded as sleep disorder that most often affects people in the world, both in primary and in the presence of comorbid conditions. Based on those facts, insomnia could be a serious problem at the level of primary health care. General Practitioner should be able to diagnose insomnia and able to perform the appropriate treatment for the patient. Psychosocial factors may related to the degree of severity of insomnia, among others are health status, depression, dysfunctional beliefs ...

  20. fi Procedure for Evaluating Primary Health Care Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T McDonald

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Managers in health care often find themselves in the difficult position of having to make decisions regarding the purchasing of software and hardware which they are not qualified to make. The aim of this paper is to support health managers in their decision making by means of a procedure and an instrument that can be used to evaluate primary health care software. A seven step approach to the evaluation process is proposed and each step is discussed in detail. The paper concludes with a proposed software evaluation instrument that is suitable for application in the health care environment.

  1. Primary health services at district level in South Africa: a critique of the primary health care approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dookie Sunitha; Singh Shenuka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The rhetoric of primary health care philosophy in the district health system is widely cited as a fundamental component of the health transformation process in post-apartheid South Africa. Despite South Africa’s progress and attempts at implementing primary health care, various factors still limit its success. Discussion Inconsistencies and poor understanding of primary care and primary health care raises unrealistic expectations in service delivery and health outcomes, an...

  2. Anxiety and diabetes: Innovative approaches to management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Allison; Tapp, Hazel

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chief concern for patients, healthcare providers, and health care systems in America, and around the globe. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit clinical and subclinical symptoms of anxiety more frequently than people without diabetes. Anxiety is traditionally associated with poor metabolic outcomes and increased medical complications among those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Collaborative care models have been utilized in the multidisciplinary treatment of mental health problems and chronic disease, and have demonstrated success in managing the pathology of depression which often accompanies diabetes. However, no specific treatment model has been published that links the treatment of anxiety to the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the success of collaborative care models in treating depression associated with diabetes, and anxiety unrelated to chronic disease, it is possible that the collaborative care treatment of primary care patients who suffer from both anxiety and diabetes could be met with the same success. The key issue is determining how to implement and sustain these models in practice. This review summarizes the proposed link between anxiety and diabetes, and offers an innovative and evidence-based collaborative care model for anxiety and diabetes in primary care. PMID:27390262

  3. Determinants of Medical and Health Care Expenditure Growth for Urban Residents in China: A Systematic Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Zhu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, medical and health care consumption has risen, making health risk an important determinant of household spending and welfare. We aimed to examine the determinants of medical and health care expenditure to help policy-makers in the improvement of China's health care system, benefiting the country, society and every household. This paper employs panel data from China's provinces from 2001 to 2011 with all possible economic variations and studies the determinants of medical and healthcare expenditure for urban residents. CPI (consumer price index of medical services and the resident consumption level of urban residents have positive influence on medical and health care expenditures for urban residents, while the local medical budget, the number of health institutions, the incidence of infectious diseases, the year-end population and the savings of urban residents will not have effect on medical and health care expenditure for urban residents. This paper proposed three relevant policy suggestions for Chinese governments based on the findings of the research.

  4. Occupational Therapy in health care contexts: possibilities and challenges of multidisciplinary residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria de Araujo Mitre

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a presentation at the Symposium of Occupational Therapy in HospitalSettings on the subject of graduate studies in the process of training and research in occupational therapy in hospitalsettings. The multi-professional residency was the main focus of this research. As it is a new experience in terms ofoccupational therapy, the impact it can have not only on the training of new professionals, but also in the practice ofexperienced ones was considered. While it broadens opportunities on the one hand, on the other hand, it challengesand makes us reflect about what we want: reproduce existing models of practice or consider new ones? To this end,two instruments used with residents to promote reflection on practice were questioned: the reflective journal and thecase study. They have allowed for further reflection on existing practices and the possibility of building an extendedclinic. It is believed that multidisciplinary residency can provide an important opportunity to consolidate the roleof OT in hospital settings; not only for the chance to educate and train new professionals to the market, but also toreview our practices and contribute to a more comprehensive model of care. However, no method or instrument isable to promote changes on its own; it depends on how it is used. This is not set up, though; it must be built.

  5. Helping Families Improve: An Evaluation of Two Primary Care Approaches to Parenting Support in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Ireen; Onrust, Simone; Haverman, Merel; Janssens, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated two primary care parenting interventions. First, we evaluated the most widely used Dutch practices for primary care parenting support. Second, we assessed the applicability of the Primary Care Triple P approach, which is now being utilized in a wide variety of primary care settings. Both interventions target parents of…

  6. Occupational Therapy experience in family care in a primary health care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Baissi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy is presented as the core knowledge involved in the remodeling and strengthening of Primary Health Care in the Brazilian Unified Health Care System (Sistema Único de Saúde – SUS. In this study, we aimed to describe the interventions in the process of occupational therapy in supervised family care in a primary health care service in the municipality of Várzea Paulista, São Paulo state. In this case study, the moments of care were described and analyzed in light of narratives on the supervised practice of occupational therapy with a family. The results showed forms of intervention that characterize the process of occupational therapy focused on family health needs in favor of creativity and the role for changes in health practices in everyday life. Through the accomplishment of occupational activities directed to self-care, Occupational Therapy can aid families to cope with daily life adversity.

  7. Caring for Non-residents in Barbados: Examining the Implications of Inbound Transnational Medical Care for Public and Private Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie; Turner, Leigh; Adams, K.; Johnston, Rory; Fraser, Henry; Kadowaki, L.; Choi, M

    2013-01-01

    Barbados is a tourism dependent island state whose income is very sensitive to perturbations in the global economy and is thus seeking ways to diversify its service exports: Barbados has a two-tiered health system with a publicly funded health system operating alongside numerous private clinics. Private provision of health services in Barbados has grown between 2000-2010. Barbados has an established history of providing health care to ill vacationers, other Caribbean residents and mo...

  8. Alarming signs of serious infections in febrile children: Studies in primary care and hospital emergency care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. van Ierland (Yvette)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Children constitute a substantial part of the workload of physicians in primary care and hospital emergency care. In the Netherlands, about 70% of the 3.9 million inhabitants less than 20 years of age had one or more contacts with their general practitioner (GP) in 2011

  9. Use of antibiotics by primary care doctors in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine the use of antibiotics by primary care doctors. Methods General practitioners in Hong Kong were invited to fill in a short questionnaire on every patient with infection that they had seen on the first full working day once every three months for four consecutive quarters starting from December 2005. Results Forty six primary care doctors took part and a total of 3096 completed questionnaires were returned. The top three diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (46.7%, gastrointestinal infection (8.2% and pharyngitis (7.1%. Thirty percent of patient encounters with infections were prescribed antibiotics but only 5.2% of patient encounters with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI were prescribed antibiotics. Amino-penicillins were the most commonly used antibiotics while beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (BLBLIs were the second most commonly used antibiotics and they accounted for 16.5% and 14.0% of all antibiotics used respectively. Of all patients or their carers, those who demanded or wished for antibiotics were far more likely to be prescribed antibiotics (Pearson chi-square test, p Conclusion The antibiotic prescribing patterns of primary care doctors in Hong Kong are broadly similar to primary care doctors in other developed countries but a relatively low rate of antibiotics is used for URTI.

  10. Priorities for health services research in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schäfer, W.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Hansen, J.; Black, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: All European health systems face several common challenges related to increases in lifestyle and chronic diseases, a decreasing future workforce, inequalities in health and the consequences of societal changes. Primary care, which has the potential to help meet these challenges, would be

  11. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students' Training Experiences in Primary Care Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jared

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on counseling psychology doctoral students' perspectives regarding their practicum training experience in primary care psychology. The four participants included three females and one male. Semi-structured individual and focus group interviews were used to explore participants' experiences. The participants described…

  12. Hypertension management in primary care in Belarus and The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Rusovich, V.; Egorov, K.N.; Podpalov, V.P.; Boerma, W.G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Both in Belarus and in the Netherlands, guidelines on the management of hypertension in primary care have been developed, including recommendations about detection, treatment and follow-up. These guidelines are meant to harmonize actual practice management of hypertension of improve the quality of c

  13. Primary Health Care in Canada: Systems in Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchison, Brian; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Strumpf, Erin; Coyle, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Context: During the 1980s and 1990s, innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of primary health care in Canada were at the periphery of the system rather than at its core. In the early 2000s, a new policy environment emerged.

  14. Identifying Primary Care Skills and Competencies in Opioid Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.; Zacharoff, Kevin; Bond, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care physicians (PCPs) treat a high proportion of chronic pain patients but often lack training about how to assess and address issues associated with prescribing opioids when they are an appropriate component of therapy. The result may be that they may avoid treating these patients, which can lead to an undertreatment of…

  15. Cardiovascular risk management in diabetes in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-08-01

    This communication describes simple targets and interventions, aimed at cardiovascular risk reduction in diabetes mellitus, which are feasible at primary care level. It summarizes therapeutic goals and strategies for management of high blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, and anti-platelet therapy. PMID:26228345

  16. Technology Mediated Information Sharing (Monitor Sharing) in Primary Care Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Onur

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation study was to identify and describe the use of electronic health records (EHRs) for information sharing between patients and clinicians in primary-care encounters and to understand work system factors influencing information sharing. Ultimately, this will promote better design of EHR technologies and effective training…

  17. The natural history of asthma in a primary care cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler Prins, V.; Nieuwenhof, L.J.L. van den; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bor, J.H.J.; Weel, C. van

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined the natural history of asthma in a primary care cohort of patients 10 years after the cohort was stratified for asthma risk by responses to a questionnaire and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) testing. METHODS: Children and young adults who were born between 1967 and 1979

  18. The Experience of Working with Refugees: Counsellors in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Century, Gillian; Leavey, Gerard; Payne, Helen

    2007-01-01

    The provision of counselling services for refugee and asylum-seeking patients is relatively new in the UK and their complex needs may present considerable challenges within primary care, where access to specialist support resources is often limited. As far as we know, no previous research has attempted to look at the experiences of the counsellors…

  19. Family practices registration networks contributed to primary care research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Grauw, W.J.C. de

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Family physicians (FP) play a key role in the diagnosis and treatment of health problems in the community and for evidence-based guidance clinical research must be based on primary care data. This paper analyses the state-of-the-art approaches to collection of data and the

  20. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  1. Primary Care Evaluation and Management of Gastroenterologic Issues in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vijaya L; Micic, Dejan; Kim, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders often present to the primary care setting where initial preventive, diagnostic, and treatment strategies are implemented. This article reviews the presentation and diagnosis of common gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, peptic ulcer disease, gallbladder disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and Barrett's esophagus. We focus on the evaluation and management of these diseases in women. PMID:27212096

  2. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  3. Suicide Attempts among Depressed Adolescents in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordwood, Samantha R.; Asarnow, Joan R.; Huizar, Diana P.; Reise, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    Although depression is strongly associated with suicide attempts and suicide deaths, most depressed youth do not make an attempt, indicating the need to identify additional risk factors. We examined suicide attempts among 451 depressed primary care patients, 13 to 21 years of age. In bivariate analyses, youth classified as suicide attempters…

  4. Prioritizing Threats to Patient Safety in Rural Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjit; Singh, Ashok; Servoss, Timothy J.; Singh, Gurdev

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural primary care is a complex environment in which multiple patient safety challenges can arise. To make progress in improving safety with limited resources, each practice needs to identify those safety problems that pose the greatest threat to patients and focus efforts on these. Purpose: To describe and field-test a novel approach to…

  5. DIABETIC RETINOPATHY: IMPORTANCE OF PRIMARY CARE PHYSCIAN IN SCREENING

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen Kumar Tamma; T Naga Reddy; N Radha Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is importance of primary care physician in screening diabetic retinopahy patients Material and Methods : Patients of type-2 diabetes mellitus attending diabetic clinic in melaka manipal medical college , malaysia were prospectively reviewed. Risk factors associated in study population were assessed by biochemical parameters, clinical examination , retinal photographs and referred to ophthalmology clinic. Results: The prevalence of non prolife...

  6. Integration of mental health into primary care in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Rachel; Kiima, David; Njenga, Frank; Okonji, Marx; Kingora, James; Kathuku, Dammas; Lock, Sarah

    2010-06-01

    Integration of mental health into primary care is essential in Kenya, where there are only 75 psychiatrists for 38 million population, of whom 21 are in the universities and 28 in private practice. A partnership between the Ministry of Health, the Kenya Psychiatric Association and the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London was funded by Nuffield Foundation to train 3,000 of the 5,000 primary health care staff in the public health system across Kenya, using a sustainable general health system approach. The content of training was closely aligned to the generic tasks of the health workers. The training delivery was integrated into the normal national training delivery system, and accompanied by capacity building courses for district and provincial level staff to encourage the inclusion of mental health in the district and provincial annual operational plans, and to promote the coordination and supervision of mental health services in primary care by district psychiatric nurses and district public health nurses. The project trained 41 trainers, who have so far trained 1671 primary care staff, achieving a mean change in knowledge score of 42% to 77%. Qualitative observations of subsequent clinical practice have demonstrated improvements in assessment, diagnosis, management, record keeping, medicine supply, intersectoral liaison and public education. Around 200 supervisors (psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses and district public health nurses) have also been trained. The project experience may be useful for other countries also wishing to conduct similar sustainable training and supervision programmes. PMID:20671901

  7. Availability of primary care health personnel. The States speak out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamliel, S; Mullan, F; Politzer, R; Stambler, H

    1992-02-01

    The adequacy of the supply of health personnel, and primary care personnel in particular, has been assessed at the aggregate national level and the disaggregate or regional/state perspective. While Federal programs have been successful in expanding the Nation's supply of health care practitioners and alleviating aggregate national shortages in some occupations and specialties, problems of geographic distribution remain. In an effort to obtain information on the adequacy of the supply of health care personnel within each state and jurisdiction, the chief executives were asked to assess their most pressing personnel supply concerns. The two occupations most often cited as being in short supply were primary care physicians and registered nurses. The state assessment of shortages of registered nurses is in concert with national assessments. In contrast, the supply of primary care physicians appears to be adequate if not in excess at the national level, implying that aggregate assessments may camouflage significant regional and state shortages. Disaggregate assessments are essential to derive an appropriate picture of national supply adequacy. PMID:1739353

  8. The new Australian Primary Health Networks: how will they integrate public health and primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Mark; Hill, Graham; Moore, Michael J; Dalla, Danielle; Moore, Michael G; Messenger, Anne

    2016-01-01

    On 1 July 2015, the Australian Government established 31 new Primary Health Networks (PHNs), following a review by its former Chief Medical Officer, John Horvath, of 61 Medicare Locals created under the previous Labor administration. The Horvath review recommended, among other things, that new, larger primary health organisations be established to reduce fragmentation of care by integrating and coordinating health services, supporting the role of general practice, and leveraging and administering health program funding. The two main objectives of the new PHNs, as stated on the Department of Health's website, are "increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of medical services for patients, particularly those at risk of poor health outcomes, and improving coordination of care to ensure patients receive the right care in the right place at the right time". Below are three viewpoints, commissioned for this primary health care themed issue of Public Health Research & Practice, from the Australian Government Department of Health, the Public Health Association of Australia and a Sydney-based PHN. We asked the authors to focus particularly on how the newly established networks might help to integrate public health within the primary health care landscape. Our authors have pointed out the huge overlap between public health and primary care and looked at evidence showing the great benefits for health systems of collaboration between the two. Challenges ahead include a possible government focus on delivery of 'frontline' medical services, which may come at the expense of population health, and the complexity of dealing with all primary health care stakeholders, including health professionals, Local Health Districts, nongovernment organisations, research institutions and local communities. PMID:26863166

  9. Identification and characteristics of patients with palliative care needs in Brazilian primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucci, Fernando C. I.; Cabrera, Marcos A. S.; Perilla, Anamaria Baquero; Brun, Marilia Maroneze; de Barros, Eder Marcos L.; Martins, Vanessa M.; Rosenberg, John P.; Yates, Patsy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brazilian healthcare system offers universal coverage but lacks information about how patients with PC needs are serviced by its primary care program, Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF). Methods Cross-sectional study in community settings. Patients in ESF program were screened using a Palliative Care Screening Tool (PCST). Included patients were assessed with Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). Res...

  10. Lesbian health care. What a primary care physician needs to know.

    OpenAIRE

    White, J. C.; Levinson, W

    1995-01-01

    Many primary care physicians take care of lesbians and women sexually active with women without being aware of their patients' sexual orientation. These women have unique medical and psychosocial needs that each physician must consider. Lesbian identity or being sexually active exclusively with women influences care in areas such as sexually transmitted diseases, risk of human immunodeficiency virus infection, counseling, cancer risk, screening, parenting, depression, alcohol use, and violenc...

  11. Age, gender, socioeconomic, and ethnic differences in patients' assessments of primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, J.; Ramsay, J.; Green, J.

    2001-01-01

    Background—Patients' evaluations are an important means of measuring aspects of primary care quality such as communication and interpersonal care. This study aims to examine variations in assessments of primary care according to age, gender, socioeconomic, and ethnicity variables.

  12. Skill mix, roles and remuneration in the primary care workforce: who are the healthcare professionals in the primary care teams across the world?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Everett, C.; Griffiths, P.; Hudon, C.; Naccarella, L.; Laurant, M.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    World-wide, shortages of primary care physicians and an increased demand for services have provided the impetus for delivering team-based primary care. The diversity of the primary care workforce is increasing to include a wider range of health professionals such as nurse practitioners, registered n

  13. Metals and Disease: A Global Primary Health Care Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Mamtani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals are an important and essential part of our daily lives. Their ubiquitous presence and use has not been without significant consequences. Both industrial and nonindustrial exposures to metals are characterized by a variety of acute and chronic ailments. Underreporting of illnesses related to occupational and environmental exposures to chemicals including metals is of concern and presents a serious challenge. Many primary care workers rarely consider occupational and environmental exposures to chemicals in their clinical evaluation. Their knowledge and training in the evaluation of health problems related to such exposures is inadequate. This paper presents documented research findings from various studies that have examined the relationship between metal exposures and their adverse health effects both in developing and developed countries. Further, it provides some guidance on essential elements of a basic occupational and environmental evaluation to health care workers in primary care situations.

  14. Primary health care to elderly people: Occupational Therapy actions perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Batista Alves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, Occupational Therapy (OT was legislated in 1969, and was introduced into the Primary Health Care (PHC in the 90s. At this level of care, the OT serves various stages of human development, including aging, in a perspective of care and active aging line, seeks to optimize opportunities for health, participation and safety, using clinical reasoning in order to plan, guide, conduct and reflect their actions in producing the line of care. This career considers human activities as part of the construction of the man himself as an expertise area and seeks to understand the relationships that the active human establishes in its life and health. This study aimed to verify the actions and identify the occupational therapy line of care with the elderly in APS. This is a qualitative study that used a semi-structured interview applied during April to May 2013 with six occupational therapists that cared for older people in the APS at Uberaba-MG. The data was analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD technique. We observed that the OT actions to produce line of care for the elderly happen according to the general public care, whether individual or group, with the team during case discussions, referrals or work management and the territory during the territorial diagnosis and networks formation, all permeated by the principles of fairness, integrity, intersectoriality and clinical reasoning in OT.

  15. Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care: responsibilities, actions, and technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata dos Humildes Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide means to mobilize occupational therapists towards reflections and studiesthat support and tool up Occupational Therapy (OT for its attributions, actions and technologies related toPrimary Health Care (PHC. It is the result of discussions held at the First National Seminar on OccupationalTherapy in PHC, which occurred in the Brazilian Congress of OT in Sao Paulo/2011. Its goal is to look at PHCin the sanitary international movement, its expression in Brazil and some historical reflections on the insertionof OT at such level of care. It points out that the formation of such profession, in spite of being historicallygrounded on the biomedical view of health, has contributed to a more effectual and comprehensive approachto the concept of health, for in its object of study and intervention, which includes the understanding of therelationship that individuals establish with their everyday activities, there is an expansion of awareness of the processes of illness and disabilities and also the biopsychosocial understanding of the individuals cared at thislevel. It also carries out an exercise of confrontation between the principles and propositions advocated byPrimary Care and the normative, epistemic and pragmatic precepts of this profession, suggesting possible OTattributions, actions and technologies related to Primary Health Care. It ends with the warning that, in spite ofOT progress so far, this profession is still quantitatively and qualitatively limited as to its actions, attributionsand technologies, and suggests further studies and debates on the matter to strengthen and tool up OccupationalTherapy for Primary Health Care.

  16. Rainbow of Chaos: A study into the Theory and Practice of Integrated Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Valentijn, Pim Peter

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to contribute to a better understanding of what integrated primary care is, and how it can be achieved by focussing on the collaboration processes that underlie the development of integrated primary care. The first part of this thesis operationalized the concept of integrated care from a primary care perspective. The second part of this thesis described the collaboration mechanisms among integrated care projects that were part of a national integrated primary care study in T...

  17. Idosos asilados em hospitais gerais Long-term care elderly residents in general hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luiz Gorzoni

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Instituições de longa permanência para idosos interagem periodicamente com hospitais gerais para internações de casos agudos ou dos que necessitam de métodos diagnósticos complexos e da atenção de várias especialidades simultaneamente. A decisão de indicar hospitalização é multifatorial, sendo influenciada por circunstâncias como a gravidade do quadro clínico e a infra-estrutura das instituições de longa permanência para idosos. Internações hospitalares apresentam benefícios e riscos, como o desenvolvimento de iatrogenias, delirium e declínios funcionais, podendo resultar em piora do estado geral e da qualidade de vida do idoso asilado durante e/ou após a hospitalização. O objetivo do estudo foi abordar aspectos peculiares na avaliação, tratamento e manejo de idosos asilados em internações hospitalares, particularmente quanto a cuidados que os auxiliem efetivamente nessas circunstâncias. Discutiram-se situações freqüentes como delirium, iatrogenias, desnutrição, declínio funcional e cuidados paliativos e características próprias de residentes em instituições para idosos durante internações em hospitais gerais.Long-term care facilities for the elderly have regularly to work together with general hospitals to provide care to acutely ill residents or when they require all together more complex diagnostic procedures and multi-specialty care. The decision to hospitalize a nursing home elderly resident is multifactorial and it is based on factors such as illness severity and care facility infrastructure. Hospitalizations have benefits and risks such developing iatrogenic diseases, delirium, and functional decline, which may deteriorate patients' general condition and their quality of life during and/or after hospitalization. This study aimed at addressing specific aspects of assessment, treatment and management of nursing home elderly who require to be hospitalized, especially focusing on their effective care

  18. Alarming signs of serious infections in febrile children: Studies in primary care and hospital emergency care

    OpenAIRE

    van Ierland, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Children constitute a substantial part of the workload of physicians in primary care and hospital emergency care. In the Netherlands, about 70% of the 3.9 million inhabitants less than 20 years of age had one or more contacts with their general practitioner (GP) in 2011. Primary out-ofhours care is annually visited by approximately 600,000 children younger than 14 years of age and hospital emergency departments (EDs) by nearly 400,000 children in this age group. F...

  19. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  20. Primary care for urban adolescent girls from ethnically diverse populations: foregone care and access to confidential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Diane; Fletcher, Jason

    2006-11-01

    Adolescent girls face unique challenges in health care utilization, which can result in unmet needs. We sought to describe settings of usual care and primary care use, and to identify predictors of foregone care and experience of confidential care in a primarily racial/ethnic minority low-income sample. We conducted an anonymous computer-assisted self-administered survey of 9th-12th grade girls (n=819) in three Bronx public high schools, the majority of whom were Hispanic (69.8%) and Black (21.4%). Most (80%) reported having a usual source of care. Of these, 77.2% had a regular doctor. Those least likely to have a usual source of care were non-U.S. born girls (73.1% vs. 83.1%) and less acculturated girls. Predictors of foregone care in the last year include being sexually active, poor family social support, and low self esteem. Predictors of access to confidential care at last visit were age, self-efficacy for confidential care, having a regular doctor, setting of care, and having had a recent physical exam. Many urban adolescent girls, especially non-U.S. born girls, lack a usual source of care and regular health care provider. Continued attention to reducing both financial and non-financial barriers to care is required to ensure access to and quality of care for diverse populations. PMID:17242529

  1. Differences in referral rates to specialised health care from four primary health care models in Klaipeda, Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Andrzej; Håkansson, Anders; Jurgutis, Arnoldas; Ovhed, Ingvar; Halling, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Background Lithuanian primary health care (PHC) is undergoing changes from the systems prevalent under the Soviet Union, which ensured free access to specialised health care. Currently four different PHC models work in parallel, which offers the opportunity to study their respective effect on referral rates. Our aim was to investigate whether there were differences in referrals rates from different Lithuanian PHC models in Klaipeda after adjustment for co-morbidity. Methods The population listed with 18 PHC practices serving inhabitants in Klaipeda city and region (250 070 inhabitants). Four PHC models: rural state-owned family medicine practices, urban privately owned family medicine practices, state-owned polyclinics and privately owned polyclinics. Information on listed patients and referrals during 2005 from each PHC practice in Klaipeda was obtained from the Lithuanian State Sickness Fund database. The database records included information on age, gender, PHC model, referrals and ICD 10 diagnoses. The Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix system was used to study co-morbidity. Referral rates from different PHC models were studied using Poisson regression models. Results Patients listed with rural state-owned family medicine practices had a significantly lower referral rate to specialised health care than those in the other three PHC models. An increasing co-morbidity level correlated with a higher physician- to self-referral ratio. Conclusion Family medicine practices located in rural-, but not in urban areas had significantly lower referral rates to specialised health care. It could not be established whether this was due to organisation, training of physicians or financing, but suggests there is room for improving primary health care in urban areas. Patient's place of residence and co morbidity level were the most important factors for referral rate. We also found that gatekeeping had an effect on the referral pattern with respect to co-morbidity level, so that those

  2. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sackley, Catherine M.; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Chris R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E.; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an established programme of occupational therapy in maintaining functional activity and reducing further health risks from inactivity in care home residents living with stroke sequelae. Design Pragmatic, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 228 care homes (>10 beds each), both with and without the provision of nursing care, local to 11 trial administrative centres across the United Kingdom. Participants 1042 ca...

  3. Primary care referral to a commercial provider for weight loss treatment versus standard care: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jebb, Susan A.; Ahern, Amy L; Olson, Ashley D.; Aston, Louise M.; Holzapfel, Christina; Stoll, Julia; Amann-Gassner, Ulrike; Simpson, Annie E; Fuller, Nicholas R.; Pearson, Suzanne; Lau, Namson S; Mander, Adrian P; Hauner, Hans; Ian D. Caterson

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity needs effective approaches for weight loss in primary care and community settings. We compared weight loss with standard treatment in primary care with that achieved after referral by the primary care team to a commercial provider in the community. Methods In this parallel group, non-blinded, randomised controlled trial, 772 overweight and obese adults were recruited by primary care practices in Australia, Germany, and the...

  4. ABC for Nursing Care to Terminal Patients in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Basilia Estela Díaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Terminal patients suffer from an acute or chronic process that immerses them in a critical situation leading to death. When providing a cure is no longer possible, the focus is on providing comfort and relief for the dying. Therefore, it is very important to provide an appropriate orientation to the staff nurses taking care of these patients. Objective: To develop an ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Methods: A research was conducted in Area VI Polyclinic, in the municipality of Cienfuegos, from January to June 2012, in order to conform the ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Theoretical methods of analysis and synthesis and induction-deduction as well as empirical methods were used: document analysis and brainstorming. Results: The ABC for nursing care to terminal patients was conformed for the following stages: initial or stability, symptomatic or state, and decline and final agony. In each of them possible diagnoses, objectives and actions were included. The document was created in such a way that it can be used by all nurses who attend these patients, regardless of their occupational category. Conclusions: This ABC could be useful to facilitate nursing care to terminally ill patients in primary health care.

  5. [Social inequalities in health and primary care. SESPAS Report 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso; Santaolaya Cesteros, María; Campos Esteban, Pilar

    2012-03-01

    The health system is a social determinant of health. Although not the most important determinant of health, the health system's potential contribution to reducing social inequalities in health should not be underestimated. Due to its characteristics, primary health care is well placed to attain equity in health. To make progress in achieving this goal, the main measures to be considered are the removal of barriers to access to services, the provision of care proportionate to need, and engagement in intersectoral work. This article reviews the background and framework for action to tackle social inequalities in health and provides a summary of the primary health care actions that could help to reduce social inequalities in health and are mentioned in the most important national and international documents on health policy. We hope to stimulate debate, promote research in the field and encourage implementation. The proposals are grouped in the following five intervention lines: information systems; participation; training; intersectoral work; and reorientation of health care. Each intervention is ordered according to its targets (population and civil society; primary health team; health center and health area management; and health policy decision-makers). PMID:22321945

  6. General practitioners' perspectives on primary care consultations for suicidal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Pooja; Chantler, Khatidja; Kapur, Navneet

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about general practitioners' (GPs') perspectives, management of and interactions with suicidal patients prior to the patient's suicide. The aims of the study were to explore GPs' interpretations of patient communication and treatment in primary care leading up to suicide and to investigate the relationship between GPs and mental health services prior to a patient's suicide. Thirty-nine semi-structured interviews with GPs of people who had died by suicide were conducted as part of a retrospective study. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. The following themes emerged from GP interviews: (i) GP interpretations of suicide attempts or self-harm; (ii) professional isolation; and (iii) GP responsibilities versus patient autonomy. GPs recruited for the study may have different views from GPs who have never experienced a patient suicide or who have experienced the death of a patient by suicide who was not under the care of specialist services. Our findings may not be representative of the rest of the United Kingdom, although many of the issues identified are likely to apply across services. This study highlighted the following recommendations for future suicide prevention in general practice: increasing GP awareness of suicide-related issues and improving training and risk assessment skills; removing barriers to accessing therapies and treatments needed in primary care; improving liaison and collaboration between services to provide better patient outcomes; and increasing awareness in primary care about why patients may not want treatments offered by focusing on each individual's situational context. PMID:25661202

  7. Attributes of primary health care provided to children/adolescents with and without disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodrigues Peixoto Quaresma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study sought to compare the attributes of the Primary Health Care (PHC provided by caregivers of the Family Health Strategy (FHS to children and adolescents with and without physical disabilities in Palmas (State of Tocantins, Brazil. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study with a quantitative approach. For data collection, the PCA Tool-Brazil (child version was applied to caregivers of children and adolescents residing and registered in family health teams. The attributes of primary care were evaluated through scores measured according to the criteria of the instrument. The results indicated that three attributes had scores above the cutoff point for the physically disabled population and two attributes for the population without disabilities. Overall, the data showed no significant differences between children with and without disabilities from the standpoint of caregivers. The general score also showed a below satisfactory score in both groups. The evaluation of the attributes of the PHC was characterized as low-quality care to children and adolescents, be they physically challenged or not, which highlights the fact that the biggest challenges lie in ensuring health care to children and adolescents.

  8. Attributes of primary health care provided to children/adolescents with and without disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Fernando Rodrigues Peixoto; Stein, Airton Tetelbom

    2015-08-01

    This study sought to compare the attributes of the Primary Health Care (PHC) provided by caregivers of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) to children and adolescents with and without physical disabilities in Palmas (State of Tocantins, Brazil). This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study with a quantitative approach. For data collection, the PCA Tool-Brazil (child version) was applied to caregivers of children and adolescents residing and registered in family health teams. The attributes of primary care were evaluated through scores measured according to the criteria of the instrument. The results indicated that three attributes had scores above the cutoff point for the physically disabled population and two attributes for the population without disabilities. Overall, the data showed no significant differences between children with and without disabilities from the standpoint of caregivers. The general score also showed a below satisfactory score in both groups. The evaluation of the attributes of the PHC was characterized as low-quality care to children and adolescents, be they physically challenged or not, which highlights the fact that the biggest challenges lie in ensuring health care to children and adolescents. PMID:26221811

  9. Advancing Primary Care Use of Electronic Medical Records in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Zelmer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, the federal government's Economic Action Plan funded Canada Health Infoway to co-invest with provinces, territories, and health care providers in electronic medical records (EMRs in primary care. The goal is to help improve access to care, quality of health services, and productivity of the health system, as well as to deliver economic benefits. The decision to fund EMRs was consistent with a long-term framework for digital health established in consultation with stakeholders across the country, spurred by analysis demonstrating the economic impact of such investments and data on Canada's low rate of EMR use in primary care compared with other countries. The decision reflected widespread public and stakeholder consensus regarding the importance of such investments. EMR adoption has more than doubled since 2006, with evaluations identifying efficiency and patient care benefits (e.g., reduced time managing laboratory test results and fewer adverse drug events in community-based practices. These benefits are expected to rise further as EMR adoption continues to grow and practices gain more experience with their use.

  10. Towards a model for integrative medicine in Swedish primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkenberg Torkel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between providers of conventional care and complementary therapies (CTs has gained in popularity but there is a lack of conceptualised models for delivering such care, i.e. integrative medicine (IM. The aim of this paper is to describe some key findings relevant to the development and implementation of a proposed model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care. Methods Investigative procedures involved research group and key informant meetings with multiple stakeholders including general practitioners, CT providers, medical specialists, primary care administrators and county council representatives. Data collection included meeting notes which were fed back within the research group and used as ongoing working documents. Data analysis was made by immersion/crystallisation and research group consensus. Results were categorised within a public health systems framework of structures, processes and outcomes. Results The outcome was an IM model that aimed for a patient-centered, interdisciplinary, non-hierarchical mix of conventional and complementary medical solutions to individual case management of patients with pain in the lower back and/or neck. The IM model case management adhered to standard clinical practice including active partnership between a gate-keeping general practitioner, collaborating with a team of CT providers in a consensus case conference model of care. CTs with an emerging evidence base included Swedish massage therapy, manual therapy/naprapathy, shiatsu, acupuncture and qigong. Conclusion Despite identified barriers such as no formal recognition of CT professions in Sweden, it was possible to develop a model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care. The IM model calls for testing and refinement in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to explore its clinical effectiveness.

  11. Revitalizing primary health care--another utopian goal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahatta, Sujan B

    2010-01-01

    The quest for greater efficiency, fairness and responsiveness to the expectation of the people that system serve have brought about three generations of health system reforms in the twentieth century. The first generation saw the founding of national health care systems and extension to middle income nations of social insurance systems in the 1940s and 1950s. By the late 1960s the rising costs of hospital based care, its usage by better off, inaccessibility by the poor and rural population of even the most basic services heralded second generation reforms promoting primary health care as a means of achieving the affordable universal coverage. It included the best public health strategy that is prevention and the highest ethical principle of public health that is equity. It was expected the best system for reaching households with essential and affordable care, and the best route towards universal coverage. The primary health care approach though adopted universally did not materialize its notion of translating ethos of Health for All by 2000. Overall, primary health care movement by the end of 20th century became lifeless. Since the Declaration of Alma-Ata, fundamental changes have occurred affecting health service delivery, such as economic development and financing approaches, globalization of trade and knowledge, and the shift to privatization. This is the time to develop a new vision, taking into consideration the many changes affecting global health and the strategic developments in health of recent years. With this recognition, the third generation of reforms now underway in many countries is driven by the idea of responding more to demand, assuring access for the poor and emphasizing financing rather than just provision within the public sector. The key concern is: how to translate ethos of revitalizing in the reality. Otherwise the revitalizing concept will turn into utopian goal so like HFA by 2000 strategy. PMID:22610741

  12. Survey of Third-Year Postgraduate Training Positions in Family Medicine: Adding more positions for adequate training in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Busing, Nick

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 16 program directors of residency training in family medicine, respondents were asked about numbers and types of third-year positions they offer. As Canadian educational programs move toward implementing or expanding 2-year prelicensure requirements, many directors are exploring the need to add even more positions for adequate training in primary care. Respondents offered suggestions on tailoring strategies in view of the educational, political, and economic climate.

  13. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina O. Odusola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective: We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11 and health insurance managers (n=4. Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results: Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions: By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA.

  14. Primary health care in a paediatric setting — the background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Power

    1979-09-01

    Full Text Available At a recent conference, a definition was drawn up that is most appropriate to the South African situation: “ Primary health care is essential health care made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community by means acceptable to them, through their full participation, and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country’s health system of which it is the nucleus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community.”

  15. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results S...

  16. [HOLDING OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ANESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE CLINICAL RESIDENCY IN STATE GRADUATES CERTIFICATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schegolev, A V; Andreenko, A A; Ershov, E N; Lahin, R E; Makarenko, E P

    2016-01-01

    The modern system of medical education requires objective methods to assess clinical competence of medical specialists. Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) during the final certification of graduates of clinical residency allows to evaluate the theoretical knowledge, manual skills. Enabling simulation scenarios in the program makes it possible to objectively evaluate the important non-technical skills of anesthesiologists, identify gaps in the system of training and modify it. The experience of the objective structured clinical examination as part of the state certification of graduates of clinical residency of the Department ofAnesthesiology and Intensive Care, Military MedicalAcademy after C M Kirov allows us to consider this technique in an objective way a comprehensive assessment of the competence of health professionals. Students confirmed its highly realistic, they have revealed the presence of emotional stress during the simulation sessions, the majority agreed that the simulation session increased the level of their readiness to address these situations in clinical practice. Staff of the department is planning to testing and introduction rating scales into a system of assessment, to improved exam program, increasing the number of clinical scenarios for simulation sessions. PMID:27192861

  17. Verbal and nonverbal indicators of quality of communication between care staff and residents in ethnoculturally and linguistically diverse long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Jeff; Chan, Sing Mei; Drance, Elisabeth; Globerman, Judith; Hulko, Wendy; O'Connor, Deborah; Perry, JoAnn; Stern, Louise; Ho, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Linguistic and ethnocultural diversity in long-term residential care is a growing trend in many urban settings. When long-term care staff and residents do not share the same language or ethnocultural background, the quality of their communication and care are jeopardized. There is very little research addressing how staff and residents communicate when they experience a mismatch in their language and ethnocultural backgrounds. Thus, the goals of the present study were to 1) document the verbal and nonverbal behaviours used by staff and residents in diverse interactions, and 2) identify and account for behaviours that either promoted or detracted from positive communication by drawing on principles from 'Communication Accommodation Theory'. Two long-term care facilities in British Columbia Canada were selected due to the diverse linguistic and ethnocultural backgrounds of their staff and residents. Twenty-seven staff and 27 residents consented to being video-recorded during routine activities (e.g., mealtimes, recreational activities). The recorded observations were transcribed, translated, and coded using qualitative descriptive and interpretive analyses. A number of verbal and nonverbal behaviours were identified and interpreted in relation to whether they promoted or detracted from positive communication. The findings point to considering a variety of proactive strategies that staff and administrators could employ to effectively accommodate to language and ethnocultural diversity in long-term care practice. PMID:26260486

  18. Depression in primary care: Strategies for a psychiatry-scarce environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alson, Amy R; Robinson, Diana M; Ivanova, Danielle; Azer, John; Moreno, Maria; Turk, Marie Lyse; Nitturkar, Abhishek; Blackman, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    More than an algorithm to guide primary care providers through treatment options, integrated care, also called collaborative care, is a validated, systematic, multidisciplinary approach to depression treatment in primary care. Historically, integrated care emerged in response to a mismatch between a growing demand for mental health treatment and scarce mental healthcare resources. Working together, psychiatrists and primary care providers have demonstrated that the principles and tools of chronic disease management improve depression outcomes in primary care. Currently, most antidepressants are prescribed by primary care providers, but with disappointing rates of full, sustained remission. Primary care patients may derive the greatest benefit from existing depression treatment guidelines when they are melded with an approach informed by integrated care principles. This paper will present established guidelines for pharmacologic management of depression as part of a broader framework for depression treatment in the primary care office. PMID:27079777

  19. Embedding effective depression care: using theory for primary care organisational and systems change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunn Jane M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and related disorders represent a significant part of general practitioners (GPs daily work. Implementing the evidence about what works for depression care into routine practice presents a challenge for researchers and service designers. The emerging consensus is that the transfer of efficacious interventions into routine practice is strongly linked to how well the interventions are based upon theory and take into account the contextual factors of the setting into which they are to be transferred. We set out to develop a conceptual framework to guide change and the implementation of best practice depression care in the primary care setting. Methods We used a mixed method, observational approach to gather data about routine depression care in a range of primary care settings via: audit of electronic health records; observation of routine clinical care; and structured, facilitated whole of organisation meetings. Audit data were summarised using simple descriptive statistics. Observational data were collected using field notes. Organisational meetings were audio taped and transcribed. All the data sets were grouped, by organisation, and considered as a whole case. Normalisation Process Theory (NPT was identified as an analytical theory to guide the conceptual framework development. Results Five privately owned primary care organisations (general practices and one community health centre took part over the course of 18 months. We successfully developed a conceptual framework for implementing an effective model of depression care based on the four constructs of NPT: coherence, which proposes that depression work requires the conceptualisation of boundaries of who is depressed and who is not depressed and techniques for dealing with diffuseness; cognitive participation, which proposes that depression work requires engagement with a shared set of techniques that deal with depression as a health problem; collective action

  20. Ready for discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition of Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona E. Gallahue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9% of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency.

  1. We can work it out: Group decision-making builds social identity and enhances the cognitive performance of care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Catherine; Alexander Haslam, S; Knight, Craig; Gleibs, Ilka; Ysseldyk, Renate; McCloskey, Lauren-Grace

    2014-02-01

    Group-based interventions have been argued to slow the cognitive decline of older people residing in care by building social identification and thereby increasing motivation and engagement. The present study explored the identity-cognition association further by investigating the impact of a group decision-making intervention on cognition. Thirty-six care home residents were assigned to one of three conditions: an Intervention in which they made decisions about lounge refurbishment as a group, a Comparison condition in which staff made these decisions, or a no-treatment Control. Cognitive function, social identification, home satisfaction, and lounge use were measured before and after the intervention. Participants in the Intervention condition showed significant increases on all measures, and greater improvement than participants in both Comparison and Control conditions. Consistent with social identity theorizing, these findings point to the role of group activity and social identification in promoting cognitive integrity and well-being among care residents. PMID:24387094

  2. Quality of after-hours primary care in the Netherlands: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, P.H.J.; Smits, M.; Huibers, L.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Many Western countries are seeking an organizational model for after-hours primary care that is safe, efficient, and satisfactory for patients and health care professionals. Around the year 2000, Dutch primary care physicians (PCPs) reorganized their after-hours primary care and shifted from small r

  3. Do illness perceptions predict health outcomes in primary care patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostholm, Lisbeth; Oernboel, Eva; Christensen, Kaj S;

    2007-01-01

    follow-up for the whole group of patients. Patients presenting with MUS had more negative illness perceptions and lower mental and physical components subscale of the SF-36 scores at all time points. CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perception of a new or recurrent health problem predicts self-reported physical......OBJECTIVE: Little is known about whether illness perceptions affect health outcomes in primary care patients. The aim of this study was to examine if patients' illness perceptions were associated with their self-rated health in a 2-year follow-up period. METHODS: One thousand seven hundred eighty......-five primary care patients presenting a new or recurrent health problem completed an adapted version of the illness perception questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) at baseline and 3, 12, and 24 months' follow-up. Linear regressions were performed for (1) all...

  4. Economies of scope in Danish primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Rose Olsen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We analyze total operating costs and activities in Danish General Practice units to assess whether there are unexploited economies of scope in the production of primary care services. Methods: We apply stochastic frontier analysis to derive cost functions and associated cost complementarities...... between GP services and overall economies of scope. Data: Cross-section data for a sample of 331 primary care practices with 1-8 GPs from the year 2006. This is a unique combined dataset consisting of survey and register data. Results: We find a trend towards cost complementarities between the production...... positive economies of scope in the production of GP services. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that there were overall economies of scope associated with the joint production of a) standard consultations, b) email/phone consultations and c) home visits. Cost complementarities between standard...

  5. HEALTH WATCH: health promotion and disease prevention in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R M

    1993-04-01

    HEALTH WATCH, a longitudinal prospective study of healthy aging, was designed to characterize a healthy population of 2,200 men and women, ages 20-80 years in 1970. Biochemical, hematological, and physiological tests are performed annually over three weekly visits, combined with a self-administered HEALTH WATCH questionnaire to measure health status and behaviors in seven areas (with over 1,330 variables). In 1988, the HEALTH WATCH study was modified to assess characteristics of an oldest old "productive aging" cohort in Kauai, Hawaii. Nutrition, physical activity, extended family, and spirituality were found to be major health determinants. During 1989 to 1991 a controlled intervention study (ten local primary care physicians and their patients, aged 65-89 years) was completed in the Sun Cities, Arizona. These studies provide evidence that primary care physicians can promote positive health outcomes in patients of any chronological age and baseline health status through active healthy aging interventions. PMID:8341160

  6. The Copenhagen primary care differential count (CopDiff) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Bertel L; Siersma, V.; Karlslund, W.;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The differential blood cell count provides valuable information about a person's state of health. Together with a variety of biochemical variables, these analyses describe important physiological and pathophysiological relations. There is a need for research databases to explore...... Practitioners' Laboratory has registered all analytical results since July 1, 2000. The Copenhagen Primary Care Differential Count database contains all differential blood cell count results (n=1,308,022) from July 1, 2000 to January 25, 2010 requested by general practitioners, along with results from analysis...... behind the construction of the Copenhagen Primary Care Differential Count database as well as the distribution of characteristics of the population it covers and the variables that are recorded. Finally, it gives examples of its use as an inspiration to peers for collaboration....

  7. Carrier screening in preconception consultation in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Sylvia A

    2012-07-01

    Discussing carrier screening during preconception consultation in primary care has a number of advantages in terms of promoting autonomy and enabling the greatest range of reproductive choices. For those with a family history of an inherited condition, this ought to be a routine discussion; however, this can be expanded to include the wider population, especially for those conditions for which carrier frequencies are considered relatively common. There is published literature from around the world regarding experiences with carrier screening in primary care for cystic fibrosis, haemoglobinopathies, fragile X syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease and spinal muscular atrophy, although many of these have tended to focus on consultations during rather than before pregnancy. Overall, these studies reveal that population carrier screening is well received by the participants with apparent minimal psychosocial harms; however, challenges exist in terms of approaches to ensure couples receive adequate information to make personally relevant decisions and for ongoing health professional engagement. PMID:22183783

  8. Cervical cancer screening in primary health care setting in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Aro, Arja R.; Rasch, Vibeke;

    2012-01-01

    of this study showed that VIA has higher sensitivity and lower specificity compared to Pap smear, but a combination of both tests has greater sensitivity and specificity than each test independently. It indicates that VIA is useful for screening of cervical cancer in the primary health care setting in Sudan......OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of visual inspection with the use of acetic acid (VIA) as a screening method for cervical cancer, an alternative to the Pap smear used in primary health care setting in Sudan, and to compare sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values......, and histological diagnosis of positive cases of both tests. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 934 asymptomatic women living in Khartoum, Sudan, was conducted during 2009-2010. A semi-structured questionnaire containing socio-economic and reproductive variables was used to collect data from each participant...

  9. Primary care team working in Ireland: a qualitative exploration of team members' experiences in a new primary care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Norelee; Armstrong, Claire; Woodward, Oonagh; Cullen, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Team working is an integral aspect of primary care, but barriers to effective team working can limit the effectiveness of a primary care team (PCT). The establishment of new PCTs in Ireland provides an excellent opportunity to explore team working in action. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of team members working in a PCT. Team members (n = 19) from two PCTs were interviewed from May to June 2010 using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using NVivo (version 8). Thematic analysis was used to explore the data. We identified five main themes that described the experiences of the team members. The themes were support for primary care, managing change, communication, evolution of roles and benefits of team working. Team members were generally supportive of primary care and had experienced benefits to their practice and to the care of their patients from participation in the team. Regular team meetings enabled communication and discussion of complex cases. Despite the significant scope for role conflict due to the varied employment arrangements of the team members, neither role nor interpersonal conflict was evident in the teams studied. In addition, despite the unusual team structure in Irish PCTs - where there is no formally appointed team leader or manager - general issues around team working and its benefits and challenges were very similar to those found in other international studies. This suggests, in contrast to some studies, that some aspects of the leadership role may not be as important in successful PCT functioning as previously thought. Nonetheless, team leadership was identified as an important issue in the further development of the teams. PMID:25429985

  10. Helping families improve: an evaluation of two primary care approaches to parenting support in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, I.M. de; Onrust, S.A.; Haverman, M.C.C.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated two primary care parenting interventions. First, we evaluated the most widely used Dutch practices for primary care parenting support. Second, we assessed the applicability of the Primary Care Triple P approach, which is now being utilized in a wide variety of primary car

  11. QUALICOPC, a multi-country study evaluating quality, costs and equity in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schäfer, W.L.A.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Maeseneer, J. de; Gress, S.; Heinemann, S.; Rotar-Pavlic, D.; Seghieri, C.; Svab, I.; Berg, M.J. van den; Vainieri, M.; Westert, G.P.; Willems, S.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The QUALICOPC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe) study aims to evaluate the performance of primary care systems in Europe in terms of quality, equity and costs. The study will provide an answer to the question what strong primary care systems entail and which effects primary c

  12. A multi-organisation aged care emergency service for acute care management of older residents in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jane; Dilworth, Sophie; Hullick, Carolyn; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Turner, Catherine; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    This case study describes a multi-organisation aged care emergency (ACE) service. The service was designed to enable point-of-care assessment and management for older people in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Design of the ACE service involved consultation and engagement of multiple key stakeholders. The ACE service was implemented in a large geographical region of a single Medicare Local (ML) in New South Wales, Australia. The service was developed over several phases. A case control pilot evaluation of one emergency department (ED) and four RACFs revealed a 16% reduction in presentations to the ED as well as reductions in admission to the hospital following ED presentation. Following initial pilot work, the ACE service transitioned across another five EDs and 85 RACFs in the local health district. The service has now been implemented in a further 10 sites (six metropolitan and four rural EDs) across New South Wales. Ongoing evaluation of the implementation continues to show positive outcomes. The ACE service offers a model shown to reduce ED presentations and admissions from RACFs, and provide quality care with a focus on the needs of the older person. PMID:25981903

  13. Diagnosis of penile fracture in primary care: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan, Sevgi; Akpinar, Ersin

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Penile fracture has been reported with sexual intercourse, masturbation, rolling over or falling on to the erect penis. Classically the history is with a sudden snap, pain, detumescence and a hematoma of the penis with deformity. Immediate surgical treatment is recommended. The patients may delay the admission due to fear and embarrassment or the condition may usually be underreported. Case presentation A 32-year-old man presented to primary care complaining of discoloration of p...

  14. Primary Health Care (phc: Back to the Past?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Franco-Giraldo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary health care is analyzed as the alternative throughwhich health systems will recover the role they had during thelate twentieth century: working with other sectors to implementhealth promotion actions to improve the users’ quality of lifeand equity. A renewal is presented in recognition of the effortsduring the final century to establish primary care policies andprograms as the core of the health systems, emphasizing thereorientation of health services. This paper discusses the principles and methods establishedby the new proposal for primary health care. This renewalproposal raises expectations regarding its return to the past,not only as a strategy but also because it raises hopes at a timeof global crisis whose impact on health services is evident.The first question posed here is: Is there really a renewal?The discussion focuses on the following topics: phc and thedeterioration of health indicators in many areas in the world,social inequalities and health inequities, the weaknesses inthe declarations of Alma Ata understood as “medicine forthe poor,” the renewal of phc as opposed to the critical healthstatus in countries and the opposing progress of the neoliberalglobalization, phc and the political conceptions of the Right,phc and the reform to the reform of the health systems;coordination of phc with health promotion and public health,the changes in the contexts and the new economic crisis in thisglobal event. The paper concludes with a call to revitalize theprocesses of the health systems from a political standpoint, andto rethink the sanitary reforms of the health systems basing thereasoning on primary health care, which is the focus of theirtransformation.

  15. Determinants of nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiddink, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to analyze nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians (PCPs), their nutritional attitudes and knowledge and their interest in the role of nutrition in health and disease. A second objective was to identify the determinants of nutrition guidance practices as well as their working mechanism. In addition one study is described, on consumers expectations of such nutrition guidance.The consumer study revealed that PCPs appeared to be...

  16. Quality in public services: the challenges of Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Cançado Monteiro Savassi

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilian Ministry of Health has signaled a policy of evaluating the quality of primary care through the 1654 decree of 19.07.2011. Any organizational change interferes with the culture of any institution, especially when this change is directed toward the issue of quality. It involves processes, internal resources and people, and cannot be artificially produced by the power of the pen. In the health sector, management based on quality involves changes in business focus and technology, su...

  17. Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care: responsibilities, actions, and technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Renata dos Humildes Oliveira; Luzianne Feijó Alexandre Paiva; Eucenir Fredini Rocha

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to provide means to mobilize occupational therapists towards reflections and studiesthat support and tool up Occupational Therapy (OT) for its attributions, actions and technologies related toPrimary Health Care (PHC). It is the result of discussions held at the First National Seminar on OccupationalTherapy in PHC, which occurred in the Brazilian Congress of OT in Sao Paulo/2011. Its goal is to look at PHCin the sanitary international movement, its expression in Brazil and s...

  18. Provider's Constraints and Difficulties in Primary Health Care System

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pawan; Khan, Abdul Majeed; Inder, Deep; Anu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The contractualization of human resource in recent years has resulted into various human resource management issues. Objective: To explore the administrative and management issues of contractual model of human resource under primary health care system in Delhi. Materials and Methods: Comparative study was conducted on randomly selected sample of 333, comprised of Medical Officers, ANMs, Pharmacist and Laboratory Assistants and Technicians, both regular and contractual cadre. The d...

  19. Leadership practice as interaction in primary care emergency team training

    OpenAIRE

    Brandstorp, Helen; Kirkengen, Anna Luise; Sterud, Birgitte; Haugland, Bjørgun; Halvorsen, Peder Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The present study, framed as critical action research, aimed at contributing to the improvement of training emergency teams in primary care. The first author was a participating observer in local simulation sessions performed by 10 different teams. Leadership practice as interaction was analysed in three types of communicative spaces: in the review and debriefing sessions; in the author group; and in focus groups involving local stakeholders. The teams practiced both designated and distribute...

  20. Epilepsy in Ireland: Towards the primary-tertiary care continuum

    OpenAIRE

    Grimson, Jane; Normand, Charles; COYNE, IMELDA

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Background Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease affecting people of every age, gender, race and socio-economic background. The diagnosis and optimal management relies on contribution from a number of healthcare disciplines in a variety of healthcare settings. Objective To explore the interface between primary care and specialist epilepsy services in Ireland. Methods Using appreciative inquiry, focus groups were held with healthcare professionals (n = 33) f...

  1. Hepatitis C: a review for primary care physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Tom; Lee, Samuel S.

    2006-01-01

    Primary care physicians see many of the estimated 250 000 Canadians chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Of this number, about one-third are unaware they are infected, which constitutes a large hidden epidemic. They continue to spread HCV unknowingly and cannot benefit from advances in antiviral therapy that may clear them of the virus. Many HCV-infected people remain asymptomatic, which means it is important to assess for risk factors and test patients accordingly. The thir...

  2. Information and interaction : influencing drug prescribing in Swedish primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    1999-01-01

    Aim The studies concern drug information and continuing education on drug treatment, focusing on doctors' prescribing in primary care in Sweden. The long-term aim has been to develop educational models accepted by the doctors, and to develop and apply means of evaluating the education. Methods Data have been collected from the study populations mainly through questionnaires and dispensed prescriptions, i.e., quantitative data. In addition, qualitative interview data w...

  3. Best practice in primary care pathology: review 1

    OpenAIRE

    Smellie, W S A; Wilson, D; McNulty, C A M; Galloway, M. J.; Spickett, G A; Finnigan, D I; Bareford, D A; Greig, M A; Richards, J

    2005-01-01

    This first best practice review examines four series of common primary care questions in laboratory medicine, namely: (i) measurement and monitoring of cholesterol and of liver and muscle enzymes in patients in the context of lipid lowering drugs, (ii) diagnosis and monitoring of vitamin B12/folate deficiency, (iii) investigation and monitoring of paraprotein bands in blood, and (iv) management of Helicobacter pylori infection. The review is presented in a question–answer format, referenced f...

  4. Metals and Disease: A Global Primary Health Care Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ravinder Mamtani; Penny Stern; Ismail Dawood; Sohaila Cheema

    2011-01-01

    Metals are an important and essential part of our daily lives. Their ubiquitous presence and use has not been without significant consequences. Both industrial and nonindustrial exposures to metals are characterized by a variety of acute and chronic ailments. Underreporting of illnesses related to occupational and environmental exposures to chemicals including metals is of concern and presents a serious challenge. Many primary care workers rarely consider occupational and environmental exposu...

  5. Understanding Physiotherapists' Roles in Ontario Primary Health Care Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Dufour, Sinéad Patricia; Lucy, S. Deborah; Brown, Judith Belle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To understand physiotherapists' roles and how they are enacted within Ontario primary health care (PHC) teams. Methods: Following a pragmatic grounded theory approach, 12 physiotherapists practising within Ontario PHC teams participated in 18 semi-structured in-depth in-person interviews. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim, then entered into NVIVO-8. Coding followed three progressive analytic stages and was iterative in nature, guided by grounded theory. An expla...

  6. Implementation of a primary care physician network obesity management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, S; Bellman, M; Saltsman, P; Garvey, D; Pimstone, K; Skootsky, S; Wang, H J; Elashoff, R; Heber, D

    2001-11-01

    Most primary care physicians do not treat obesity, citing lack of time, resources, insurance reimbursement, and knowledge of effective interventions as significant barriers. To address this need, a 10-minute intervention delivered by the primary care physician was coupled with individual dietary counseling sessions delivered by a registered dietitian via telephone with an automated calling system (House-Calls, Mobile, AL). Patients were seen for follow-up by their physician at weeks 4, 12, 24, 36 and 52. A total of 252 patients (202 women and 50 men) were referred by 18 primary care physicians to the program. The comorbid conditions reported for all patients at baseline included low back pain, 29% (n = 72); hypertension, 45% (n = 113); hypercholesterolemia, 41% (n = 104); type 2 diabetes, 10% (n = 26); and sleep apnea, 5% (n = 12). When offered a choice of meal plans based on foods or meal replacements, two-thirds of patients (n = 166) chose to use meal replacements (Ultra Slim-Fast; Slim-Fast Foods Co., West Palm Beach, FL) at least once daily. Baseline weights of subjects averaged 200 +/- 46 lb for women (n = 202) and 237 +/- 45 lb for men (n = 50). Patients completing 6 months in the program lost an average of 19.0 +/- 4.0 lb for women (n = 94) and 15.5 +/- 8.2 lb for men (n = 26). Physicians reported a high degree of satisfaction with the program, suggesting that a brief, effective physician-directed program with nutritionist support by telephone can be implemented in a busy primary care office. PMID:11707560

  7. The Natural History of Asthma in a Primary Care Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler Prins, V.; Nieuwenhof, L.J.L. van den; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Bor, J.H.J.; van Weel, C

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined the natural history of asthma in a primary care cohort of patients 10 years after the cohort was stratified for asthma risk by responses to a questionnaire and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) testing. METHODS: Children and young adults who were born between 1967 and 1979 within 1 of 4 affiliated family practices of the Nijmegen Department of Family Medicine, The Netherlands, were asked to participate in an asthma study in 1989. Of 926 patients available, 581 (63%) ...

  8. Asthma in Primary Care : Severity, Treatment and Level of Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ställberg, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Aims. The overall aim was to examine the severity, treatment and level of control in patients with asthma in primary care in Sweden. The specific aims were to assess what matters to asthma patients, evaluate symptoms, medication and identify factors related to asthma severity, compare the extent of asthma control in 2001 and 2005, and investigate the development of asthma and degree of asthma control in adolescents and young adults who had reported asthma six years earlier. Methods. The first...

  9. Home Visiting Programs: What the Primary Care Clinician Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finello, Karen Moran; Terteryan, Araksi; Riewerts, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Responsibilities for primary care clinicians are rapidly expanding ascomplexities in families' lives create increased disparities in health and developmental outcomes for young children. Despite the demands on primary care clinicians to promote health in the context of complex family and community factors, most primary care clinicians are operating in an environment of limited training and a shortage of resources for supporting families. Partnerships with evidence-based home visiting programs for very young children and their families can provide a resource that will help to reduce the impact of adverse early childhood experiences and facilitate health equity. Home visiting programs in the United States are typically voluntary and designed to be preventative in nature, although families are usually offered services based on significant risk criteria since the costs associated with universal approaches have been considered prohibitive. Programs may be funded within the health (physical orbehavioral/mental health), child welfare, early education, or early intervention systems or by private foundation dollars focused primarily on oneof the above systems (e.g., health), with a wide range of outcomes targeted by the programs and funders. Services may be primarily focused on the child, the parent, or parent-child interactions. Services include the development of targeted and individualized intervention strategies, better coaching of parents, and improved modeling of interactions that may assist struggling families. This paper provides a broad overview ofthe history of home visiting, theoretical bases of home visiting programs, key components of evidence-based models, outcomes typically targeted, research on effectiveness, cost information, challenges and benefits of home visiting, and funding/sustainability concerns. Significance for primary care clinicians isdescribed specifically and information relevant for clinicians is emphasized throughout the paper. PMID:26872870

  10. Sexually transmitted infections in primary care: a need for education.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherrard, J.; Shakespeare, J

    2001-01-01

    General practitioners and practice nurses require the clinical skills that will enable them to detect sexually transmitted infections in the context of a shift to having no, or insidious symptoms. They need to be able to confirm the diagnosis and have clear models for management and referral. Primary care and genitourinary medicine need to work more closely together to increase mutual understanding and clarify the issues which surround referral and attendance. Sexual health risk assessment th...

  11. Depression in primary care : detection, description and mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Strömberg de Sousa Soares, Ranja

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aims of these studies were to explore the prevalence and severity of depression among unscheduled drop – in patients in primary care and to identify possible cues to depression in the consultation. Further aims were to analyze the association between depression and psychosocial stressors and lifestyle factors from a gender perspective and to evaluate the usefulness of the Gotland Male Depression Scale (GS) in screening for depression among men. A final aim was to analyze the long ter...

  12. Health psychology in primary care: recent research and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Thielke S; Thompson A.; Stuart R

    2011-01-01

    Stephen Thielke1, Alexander Thompson2, Richard Stuart31Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Puget Sound VA Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Over the last decade, research about health psychology in primary care has reiterated its contributions to mental and physical health promotion, ...

  13. Treatment-Resistant Depression in Primary Care Across Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, Sakina J.; Grima, Etienne; Tan, Mary; Rotzinger, Susan; Lin, Peter; McIntyre, Roger S; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) represents a considerable global health concern. The goal of the InSight study was to investigate the prevalence of TRD and to evaluate its clinical characterization and management, compared with nonresistant depression, in primary care centres. Methods: Physicians completed a case report on a consecutive series of patients with major depressive disorder (n = 1212), which captured patient demographics and comorbidity, as well as current and past...

  14. Intimate Partner Aggression Perpetration in Primary Care Chronic Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Taft, Casey; Schwartz, Sonia; Liebschutz, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of partner aggression perpetration in 597 primary care chronic pain patients. Approximately 30% of participants reported perpetrating low-level aggression, 12% reported injuring their partner, and 5% reported engaging in sexual coercion. Women reported more low-level aggression perpetration than men, and men reported more engagement in sexual coercion than women. Substance use disorders (SUD) were associated with all outcomes, and both aggress...

  15. HTRAK, a computerized health maintenance tracking system for primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Frame, P. S.; Werth, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation describes a computerized health maintenance tracking system for primary care designed to be linked to the practice billing system. Providers enter health maintenance data along with billing data on an encounter form. Physician and patient reminders are generated once a year for all patients regardless of appointment status. Multiple entry options are available and the frequency of procedures can be varied for individual patients. Summary reports are generated to assist compl...

  16. Carrier screening in preconception consultation in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalfe, Sylvia A

    2011-01-01

    Discussing carrier screening during preconception consultation in primary care has a number of advantages in terms of promoting autonomy and enabling the greatest range of reproductive choices. For those with a family history of an inherited condition, this ought to be a routine discussion; however, this can be expanded to include the wider population, especially for those conditions for which carrier frequencies are considered relatively common. There is published literature from around the ...

  17. Visualization of contagious disease outbreak information for primary care physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Aronsen, Gudleif

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is a part of an ongoing project at NST. This ongoing project has the intention to make a system for early detection of contagious diseases based on symptoms and diagnosis. The main goal of this project is to develop a system that will help detect outbreaks of contagious diseases. The system intends to create a logic model based on collected data from symptoms and diagnosis entered into the primary health care physicians electronic health record system. They will again exchange dat...

  18. Bridging the treatment gap: the primary care perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fuat, A

    2005-01-01

    The Darlington heart failure service model, part of the South Durham Heart Failure Network, was devised to overcome barriers to accurate diagnosis and effective management of heart failure. It involves rapid diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) and ongoing heart failure management. A weekly one stop diagnostic clinic, run by a general practitioner (GP) specialist and a heart failure nurse, is jointly funded by the primary care trust and the South Durham NHS Trust. If LVSD...

  19. Attitude of Korean Primary Care Family Physicians Towards Telehealth

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Yun-Mi; Park, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Ri

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, a revised telehealth legislation that allows direct doctor to patient teleconsultation was proposed in Korea. However, there have been some debates. This study aimed to examine the attitude of primary care physicians towards telehealth. Methods A questionnaire asking attitude towards telehealth and revised telehealth legislation was self-administered to 1,988 registered members of Practitioners Council of Korean Academy of Family Medicine. A total of 218 complete response...

  20. African primary care research: performing surveys using questionnaires

    OpenAIRE

    Indiran Govender; Mabuza, Langalibalele H.; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.; Bob Mash

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide practical guidance on conducting surveys and the use of questionnaires for postgraduate students at a Masters level who are undertaking primary care research. The article is intended to assist with writing the methods section of the research proposal and thinking through the relevant issues that apply to sample size calculation, sampling strategy, design of a questionnaire and administration of a questionnaire. The articleis part of a larger series on pri...

  1. Promoting Healthy Eating Attitudes Among Uninsured Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akiko; Tabler, Jennifer; Nourian, Maziar M; Jess, Allison; Stephens, Tamara; Aguilera, Guadalupe; Wright, Lindsey; Ashby, Jeanie

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of chronic health problems such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. While common prevention and treatment strategies to control unhealthy weight gain tend to target behaviors and lifestyles, the psychological factors which affect eating behaviors among underserved populations also need to be further addressed and included in practice implementations. The purpose of this study is to examine positive and negative emotional valence about food among underserved populations in a primary care setting. Uninsured primary care patients (N = 621) participated in a self-administered survey from September to December in 2015. Higher levels of perceived benefits of healthy food choice were associated with lower levels of a negative emotional valence about food while higher levels of perceived barriers to healthy food choice are related to higher levels of a negative emotional valence about food. Greater acceptance of motivation to eat was associated with higher levels of positive and negative emotional valence about food. Spanish speakers reported greater acceptance of motivation to eat and are more likely to have a negative emotional valence about food than US born or non-US born English speakers. The results of this study have important implications to promote healthy eating among underserved populations at a primary care setting. Healthy food choice or healthy eating may not always be achieved by increasing knowledge. Psychological interventions should be included to advance healthy food choice. PMID:26831483

  2. Potential benefits of integrated COPD management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, A L; Chavannes, N H

    2010-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a major and progressive cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, resulting in an important financial and health burden in coming decades. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been proven to be the most effective treatment in all patients in whom respiratory symptoms are associated with diminished functional capacity or reduced quality of life. Nevertheless, despite wide recommendation and proven efficacy, the use of PR is limited in daily practice. Reasons for these include low accessibility and availability, high costs, and lack of motivation to continue a healthy life style after treatment. By contrast, it has been demonstrated that primary care patients can be reactivated by formulating personal targets and designing individualized treatment plans in collaboration with their general practitioner or practice nurse. Based on these personal plans and targets, specific education must be provided and development of self management skills should be actively encouraged. Ideally, elements of pulmonary rehabilitation are tailored into a comprehensive primary care integrated disease management program. In that way, the benefits of PR can be extended to a substantially larger part of the COPD population, to reach even those with milder stages of disease. Favorable long-term effects on exercise tolerance and quality of life in a number of studies have been demonstrated in recent years, but broad introduction in the primary care setting still needs further justification in the form of a proper cost effectiveness analysis. PMID:21214043

  3. Primary health care: a necessity in developing countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaezi Okpokoro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resource limited countries continue to be plagued with rising prevalence of malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS as well as other emerging diseases despite the huge financial support provided by bilateral and multilateral agencies to combat these diseases. While progress may have been made in reducing the global burden caused by these diseases on one hand, there has also been a weakening of the primary health care facility on the other hand which was the hallmark to the Alma Ata declaration of 1978. More attention has been placed on our global health needs while the diverse health needs of every community have been neglected. This fatal neglect at the community level highlights the need for the provision of specialize primary health care (PHC facilities which should not only be affordable, accessible and available, but be appropriate to the priority health needs of the community, especially at the rural level. Hence specialized PHC facilities will be tailored to meet the most pressing health needs of the communities it covers among other diseases. Consequently, this innovative approach will not only strengthen the primary health care system by improving wellbeing especially at the rural level but will also improve the outcome of vertical program at communities where it is most needed.

  4. Child Health Booklet: experiences of professionals in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Nepomuceno de Andrade

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Understanding the experiences of health professionals in primary care with the Child Health Booklet in child health care. Method: A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach, in which participated nurses and doctors from six teams of the Family Health Strategy (FHS in Belo Horizonte, MG. In total, were carried out 12 non-directive interviews, using two guiding questions. Results: A comprehensive analysis of the speeches enabled the construction of three categories that signal the experiences of the professionals with the booklet. The experiments revealed difficulties arising from the limitations of knowledge about the instrument; incomplete filling out of the booklet by many professionals that care for children; the daily confrontations of the process and the organization of work teams; disinterest of families with the instrument. Conclusion: The research points possible and necessary ways to improve the use of booklets as an instrument of full child health surveillance.

  5. Creating collaborative learning environments for transforming primary care practices now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William L; Cohen-Katz, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The renewal of primary care waits just ahead. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement and a refreshing breeze of collaboration signal its arrival with demonstration projects and pilots appearing across the country. An early message from this work suggests that the development of collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams may be essential for the success of the PCMH. Our focus in this article is on training existing health care professionals toward being thriving members of this transformed clinical care team in a relationship-centered PCMH. Our description of the optimal conditions for collaborative training begins with delineating three types of teams and how they relate to levels of collaboration. We then describe how to create a supportive, safe learning environment for this type of training, using a different model of professional socialization, and tools for building culture. Critical skills related to practice development and the cross-disciplinary collaborative processes are also included. Despite significant obstacles in readying current clinicians to be members of thriving collaborative teams, a few next steps toward implementing collaborative training programs for existing professionals are possible using competency-based and adult learning approaches. Grasping the long awaited arrival of collaborative primary health care will also require delivery system and payment reform. Until that happens, there is an abundance of work to be done envisioning new collaborative training programs and initiating a nation-wide effort to motivate and reeducate our colleagues. PMID:21299280

  6. HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS (HCAI) AND HAND HYGIENE: A STUDY OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE AMONG RESIDENT DOCTORS FROM A TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Namrata Vijay; Jayshree Dayanand; Vikram Kumar; Priya.M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care associated infections HCAI are serious problem in health care services and the common cause of morbidity and mortality in the hospitalized patients. Resident doctors are among those health care workers [HCWs], who are the first care providers. Also, HCWs contribute greatly to t he transmission of HCAI. OBJECTIVE: To assess the awareness of HCAI and knowledge, attitude and practice of hand hygiene among resident doctors in a tertiary care hosp...

  7. What is boredom of the older person residing in long-term care? The development of a theoretical definition and a conceptual model.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Heather

    2008-01-01

    In an ageing and "chronologically gifted" population (Lewis, 1998 cited in Tavormina 1999), quality of life for residents in long-term care facilities is under scrutiny. Boredom specifically has been identified as an issue for residents. Interventions have been introduced to alleviate boredom and long-term care facilities have also adopted philosophies of care to tackle perceived boredom. The familiar image of passive older residents sitting in chairs for most of the day, may summon up the co...

  8. Moving toward a United States strategic plan in primary care informatics: a White Paper of the Primary Care Informatics Working Group, American Medical Informatics Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Little

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The Primary Care Informatics Working Group (PCIWG of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA has identified the absence of a national strategy for primary care informatics. Under PCIWG leadership, major national and international societies have come together to create the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics (NAPCI, to promote a connection between the informatics community and the organisations that support primary care. The PCIWG clinical practice subcommittee has recognised the necessity of a global needs assessment, and proposed work in point-of-care technology, clinical vocabularies, and ambulatory electronic medical record development. Educational needs include a consensus statement on informatics competencies, recommendations for curriculum and teaching methods, and methodologies to evaluate their effectiveness. The research subcommittee seeks to define a primary care informatics research agenda, and to support and disseminate informatics research throughout the primary care community. The AMIA board of directors has enthusiastically endorsed the conceptual basis for this White Paper.

  9. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Vedel Isabelle; Ghadi Veronique; De Stampa Matthieu; Routelous Christelle; Bergman Howard; Ankri Joel; Lapointe Liette

    2013-01-01

    Background Although collaborative team models (CTM) improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs). The objectives of this study are to understand: (1) how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2) the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Th...

  10. Does collaborative care help in the treatment of anxiety in primary health care?

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Moscovici; João Mazzoncini de Azevedo Marques; Antonio Waldo Zuardi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Anxiety disorders represent an important part of mental health problems in primary care. This literature review seeks to find out whether collaborative care (called “matrix support” in Brazil) assists the treatment of anxiety disorders and/or anxiety symptoms. Methods: We performed a literature search with no time period restriction using PubMed, ISI, and LILACS PSYCINFO databases. The descriptors sought were “collaborative care”, “shared care”, “primary care”, “anxiety”, “generali...

  11. EBM in primary care: a qualitative multicenter study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderón Carlos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine (EBM has made a substantial impact on primary care in Spain over the last few years. However, little research has been done into family physicians (FPs' attitudes related to EBM. The present study investigates FPs' perceptions of EBM in the primary care context. Methods This study used qualitative methodology. Information was obtained from 8 focus groups composed of 67 FPs from 47 health centers in 4 autonomous regions in Spain. Intentional sampling considered participants' previous education in EBM, and their experience as tutors in family medicine or working groups' members of the Spanish Society of Family Practice. Sociological discourse analysis was used with the support of the MAXqda software. Results were validated by means of triangulation among researchers and contrast with participants. Results Findings were grouped into three main areas: 1 The tug-of-war between the "science" of EBM and "experience" in the search for good clinical practice in primary care; 2 The development of EBM sensemaking as a reaction to contextual factors and interests; 3 The paradox of doubt and trust in the new EBM experts. The meaning of EBM was dynamically constructed within the primary care context. FPs did not consider good clinical practice was limited to the vision of science that EBM represents. Its use appeared to be conditioned by several factors that transcended the common concept of barriers. Along with concerns about its objectivity, participants showed a tendency to see EBM as the use of simplified guidelines developed by EBM experts. Conclusions The identification of science with EBM and its recognition as a useful but insufficient tool for the good clinical practice requires rethinking new meanings of evidence within the primary care reality. Beyond the barriers related to accessing and putting into practice the EBM, its reactive use can determine FPs' questions and EBM development in a direction not

  12. Primary care clinicians' attitudes towards point-of-care blood testing: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, CH; Howick, J; Roberts, NW; Price, CP; Heneghan, C; Plüddemann, A; Thompson, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care blood tests are becoming increasingly available and could replace current venipuncture and laboratory testing for many commonly used tests. However, at present very few have been implemented in most primary care settings. Understanding the attitudes of primary care clinicians towards these tests may help to identify the barriers and facilitators to their wider adoption. We aimed to systematically review qualitative studies of primary care clinicians' attitudes to poi...

  13. Collaborative stepped care for anxiety disorders in primary care: aims and design of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Spinhoven Philip; van Marwijk Harm WJ; Feltz-Cornelis Christina; Muntingh Anna DT; Assendelft Willem JJ; de Waal Margot WM; Hakkaart-van Roijen Leona; Adèr Herman J; van Balkom Anton JLM

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Panic disorder (PD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are two of the most disabling and costly anxiety disorders seen in primary care. However, treatment quality of these disorders in primary care generally falls beneath the standard of international guidelines. Collaborative stepped care is recommended for improving treatment of anxiety disorders, but cost-effectiveness of such an intervention has not yet been assessed in primary care. This article describes the aims...

  14. Nutritional and functional status indicators in residents of a long-term care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A; Ackland, Leigh M

    2009-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we determined whether results from the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL), were associated with nutritional status and mobility in long-term care residents. One hundred and fifteen study participants (mean [SD] age: 80.2 [10.6]) provided informed consent. Fifty eight percent (n = 66) responded to all three questionnaires: 12 were assessed as malnourished (MNA or = 6). Higher levels of depression were associated with lower serum zinc (n = 71, r = -.356, p = .001) and associated with a slower Timed Up and Go test (TUG, n = 38, r = .301, p = .030). MNA was also associated with serum zinc (n = 44, r = .307, P = .021). Non responders to questionnaires (n = 36) had a lower BMI (mean difference: -2.5 +/- 1.0 kg/m(2), p = .013) and serum 25(OH)D (-8.7 +/- 3.8 nmol/l, p = .023) vs. responders. The GDS, in addition to the MNA, is useful in identifying poor nutritional status in residential care. Intervention programs that target depression and poor nutritional status could potentially improve overall quality of life, but it is not clear if depression is leading to poor nutritional status or if poor nutrition is leading to depression. PMID:19234994

  15. Comprehensive Care Plan Development Using Resident Assessment Instrument Framework: Past, Present, and Future Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ellen Dellefield

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Development of the comprehensive care plan (CCP is a requirement for nursing homes participating in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs, referred to as skilled nursing facilities. The plan must be developed within the context of the comprehensive interdisciplinary assessment framework—the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI. Consistent compliance with this requirement has been difficult to achieve. To improve the quality of CCP development within this framework, an increased understanding of complex factors contributing to inconsistent compliance is required. In this commentary, we examine the history of the comprehensive care plan; its development within the RAI framework; linkages between the RAI and registered nurse staffing; empirical evidence of the CCP’s efficacy; and the limitations of extant standards of practices in CCP development. Because of the registered nurse’s educational preparation, professional practice standards, and licensure obligations, the essential contributions of professional nurses in CCP development are emphasized. Recommendations for evidence-based micro and macro level practice changes with the potential to improve the quality of CCP development and regulatory compliance are presented. Suggestions for future research are given.

  16. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  17. Stepped care treatment for depression and anxiety in primary care. a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Straten Annemieke

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive and anxiety disorders are common in general practice but not always treated adequately. Introducing stepped care might improve this. In this randomized trial we examined the effectiveness of such a stepped care model. Methods The study population consisted of primary care attendees aged 18-65 years with minor or major DSM-IV depressive and/or anxiety disorders, recruited through screening. We randomized 120 patients to either stepped care or care as usual. The stepped care program consisted of (1 watchful waiting, (2 guided self-help, (3 short face-to-face Problem Solving Treatment and (4 pharmacotherapy and/or specialized mental health care. Patients were assessed at baseline and after 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Results Symptoms of depression and anxiety decreased significantly over time for both groups. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (IDS: P = 0.35 and HADS: P = 0.64. The largest, but not significant, effect (d = -0.21 was found for anxiety on T3. In both groups approximately 48% of the patients were recovered from their DSM-IV diagnosis at the final 6 months assessment. Conclusions In summary we could not demonstrate that stepped care for depression and anxiety in general practice was more effective than care as usual. Possible reasons are discussed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610.

  18. Determinants of Health and Pediatric Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew F; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Cox, Joanne E; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Grace, Aimee M; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri E; Lobach, Katherine S; Ma, Christine T; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberly D; Sadof, Matthew D; Shah, Anita N; Fierman, Arthur H

    2016-03-01

    More than 20% of children nationally live in poverty. Pediatric primary care practices are critical points-of-contact for these patients and their families. Practices must consider risks that are rooted in poverty as they determine how to best deliver family-centered care and move toward action on the social determinants of health. The Practice-Level Care Delivery Subgroup of the Academic Pediatric Association's Task Force on Poverty has developed a roadmap for pediatric providers and practices to use as they adopt clinical practice redesign strategies aimed at mitigating poverty's negative impact on child health and well-being. The present article describes how care structures and processes can be altered in ways that align with the needs of families living in poverty. Attention is paid to both facilitators of and barriers to successful redesign strategies. We also illustrate how such a roadmap can be adapted by practices depending on the degree of patient need and the availability of practice resources devoted to intervening on the social determinants of health. In addition, ways in which practices can advocate for families in their communities and nationally are identified. Finally, given the relative dearth of evidence for many poverty-focused interventions in primary care, areas that would benefit from more in-depth study are considered. Such a focus is especially relevant as practices consider how they can best help families mitigate the impact of poverty-related risks in ways that promote long-term health and well-being for children. PMID:26933205

  19. Health service utilization patterns of primary care patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laux Gunter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess factors associated with visits to GPs, orthopaedists, and non-physician practitioners of complementary medicine (alternative practitioners by primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA. Methods Cross-sectional survey among 1250 consecutively addressed patients from 75 primary care practices in Germany. All patients suffered from OA of the knee or hip according to ACR criteria. They received questionnaires collecting sociodemographic data, data about health service utilisation, prescriptions, comorbidities. They also included established instruments as the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS2-SF to assess disease-specific quality of life and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 to assess depression. Hierarchical stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to reveal significant factors influencing health service utilization. Results 1021 of 1250 (81.6% questionnaires were returned. Nonrespondents did not differ from participants. Factors associated with health service use (HSU varied between providers of care. Not being in a partnership, achieving a high score on the PHQ-9, increased pain severity reflected in the “symptom” scale of the AIMS2-SF, and an increased number of drug prescriptions predicted a high frequency of GP visits. The PHQ-9 score was also a predictor for visits to orthopaedists, as were previous GP contacts, a high score in the "symptom" scale as well as a high score in the "lower limb scale" of the AIMS2-SF. Regarding visits to alternative practitioners, a high score in the AIMS -"social" scale was a positive predictor as older people were less likely to visit them. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for awareness of psychological factors contributing to the use of health care providers. Addressing the revealed factors associated with HSU appropriately may lead to decreased health care utilization. But further research is needed to assess how this can be done

  20. [Clinical practice guidelines and primary care. SESPAS report 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza, Gerardo; Bañeres, Joaquim; Gracia, Francisco Javier

    2012-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are intended to serve as a bridge between the decision levels and the sources of knowledge, giving decision makers the best synthesis of scientific evidence and an analysis of context, to provide elements of judgement and to transfer scientific knowledge into clinical practice. However, the actual impact on health care is variable and effectiveness in changing medical practice, moderate. Qualitative and quantitative studies show that most primary care physicians consider that the guides are a valuable source of advice and training and a kind of improving the quality of healthcare. However, they underline its rigidity, the difficulty to apply to individual patients and that their main goal is to reduce healthcare costs. In Spain, there are several experiences as GuíaSalud in developing clinical practice guidelines aimed specifically at primary care. However, the proper implementation of a clinical practice guideline includes not only the quality and thoroughness of the evidence, but the credibility of professionals and organizations and other contextual factors such as characteristics of patients, providers and organizations or systems. An important step in future research is to develop a better theoretical understanding of organizational change that is required for management and professionals to give appropriate guidance to the implementation of the clinical practice guidelines. PMID:21993072

  1. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeria Jimenez-Baez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01. Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1 than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8. Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  2. Modern innovative pedagogical technologies in training primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryaboshapko A.I.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Training primary care physicians and general practitioners/family doctors is performed at different departments of Saratov State Medical University: Ambulatory Care, Polyclinic Therapy and Family Medicine. Since the foundation of department of Polyclinic Therapy, traditional training in polyclinic therapy has been carried out in different directions: outpatient therapy for the general practitioners/family doctors, for the 6th-year students of the Therapeutic faculty, for the 4th-year students of the Medico-prophylactic faculty, and for the 4th-year students of faculty of higher nursing professional education. In the recent years, the educational system is being reformed, so it has led to some changes in all fields of education in general. Innovative technologies, such as multimedia lectures, seminars, discussions, round tables, self-study with the use of different information resources, making out presentations of clinical cases, making reports and discussions in groups, carrying out mini-conferences, role model and business games for the primary care physicians, are introduced to the modern educational process. Therefore it is of high priority to use not only traditional education in the training of a general practitioner, but innovative technologies as well, which can guarantee high level of education and professional development

  3. The HIV Primary Care Workforce of Tomorrow: The UCSF Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Carmen J; Stringari-Murray, Suzan; Fox, Christopher B; Monasterio, Erica; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for primary care services and the current health care workforce shortage is predicted to cause drastic reductions in the number of clinicians who are competent to provide HIV care. For the past decade, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing has provided HIV specialty education for Advanced Practice Nursing students in the Master's curriculum. In 2013, UCSF was funded by the Health Resources Services Administration to establish a nurse practitioner (NP) HIV primary care education program to expand the number of NPs prepared to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive HIV primary care. To this end, UCSF faculty have developed and validated a set of HIV Primary Care entry-level NP competencies, integrated general HIV knowledge into the NP curriculum, and enhanced our current HIV Specialty curriculum and clinical training. Described herein is UCSF's Integrated HIV/AIDS Primary Care Capacity Nurse Practitioner Program. PMID:27086186

  4. Evidence-based primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: a comparative analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Europe, most antibiotics for human use are prescribed in primary care. Incorporating resistance data into treatment guidelines could improve appropriate prescribing, increase treatment effectiveness and control the development of resistance. Objectives: This study reviews primary care

  5. Evidence-based primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: a comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, J.; Heijer, C.D. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Europe, most antibiotics for human use are prescribed in primary care. Incorporating resistance data into treatment guidelines could improve appropriate prescribing, increase treatment effectiveness and control the development of resistance. OBJECTIVES: This study reviews primary care

  6. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiro Meritxell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1 improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2 benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients. The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of

  7. Effects of online palliative care training on knowledge, attitude and satisfaction of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agra Yolanda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Spanish Palliative Care Strategy recommends an intermediate level of training for primary care physicians in order to provide them with knowledge and skills. Most of the training involves face-to-face courses but increasing pressures on physicians have resulted in fewer opportunities for provision of and attendance to this type of training. The effectiveness of on-line continuing medical education in terms of its impact on clinical practice has been scarcely studied. Its effect in relation to palliative care for primary care physicians is currently unknown, in terms of improvement in patient's quality of life and main caregiver's satisfaction. There is uncertainty too in terms of any potential benefits of asynchronous communication and interaction among on-line education participants, as well as of the effect of the learning process. The authors have developed an on-line educational model for palliative care which has been applied to primary care physicians in order to measure its effectiveness regarding knowledge, attitude towards palliative care, and physician's satisfaction in comparison with a control group. The effectiveness evaluation at 18 months and the impact on the quality of life of patients managed by the physicians, and the main caregiver's satisfaction will be addressed in a different paper. Methods Randomized controlled educational trial to compared, on a first stage, the knowledge and attitude of primary care physicians regarding palliative care for advanced cancer patients, as well as satisfaction in those who followed an on-line palliative care training program with tutorship, using a Moodle Platform vs. traditional education. Results 169 physicians were included, 85 in the intervention group and 84 in the control group, of which five were excluded. Finally 82 participants per group were analyzed. There were significant differences in favor of the intervention group, in terms of knowledge (mean 4.6; CI

  8. Laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection in immunized long-term care facility residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Anne-Luise; Peci, Adriana; Eshaghi, Alireza; Baird, Michelle; Memari, Nader; Kristjanson, Erik; Balogun, Elizabeth; Higgins, Rachel R; Li, Aimin; Farrell, David J; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2013-11-01

    We report on an influenza B outbreak in an Ontario long-term care facility in which 2 immunized residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis for at least 5 days developed laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection. All isolates were tested for the most common oseltamivir resistance, and none of them had resistance identified. PMID:24113612

  9. Risk factors for fecal colonization with multiple distinct strains of Escherichia coli among long-term care facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N

    2009-05-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with 2 or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest that future efforts to efficiently identify the diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging. PMID:19292660

  10. Risk Factors for Fecal Colonization with Multiple Distinct Strains of Escherichia coli Among Long-Term Care Facility Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N.

    2009-01-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with two or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest future efforts to efficiently identify diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging.

  11. The Geriatrics in Primary Care Demonstration: Integrating Comprehensive Geriatric Care into the Medical Home: Preliminary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Peter A; Spencer, Jacqueline; Paul, Todd; Boardman, Judith B

    2016-04-01

    Three thousand nine hundred thirty-one veterans aged 75 and older receive primary care (PC) in two large practices of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Boston Healthcare System. Cognitive and functional disabilities are endemic in this group, creating needs that predictably exceed available or appropriate resources. To address this problem, Geriatrics in Primary Care (GPC) embeds geriatric services directly into primary care. An on-site consulting geriatrician and geriatric nurse care manager work directly with PC colleagues in medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, and mental health within the VA medical home. This design delivers interdisciplinary geriatric care within PC that emphasizes comprehensive evaluations, care management, planned transitions, informed resource use, and a shift in care focus from multiple subspecialties to PC. Four hundred thirty-five veterans enrolled during the project's 4-year course. Complex, fragmented care was evident in a series of 50 individuals (aged 82 ± 7) enrolled during Months 1 to 6. The year before, these individuals made 372 medical or surgical subspecialty clinic visits (7.4 ± 9.8); 34% attended five or more subspecialty clinics, 48% had dementia, and 18% lacked family caregivers. During the first year after enrollment the mean number of subspecialty clinic visits declined significantly (4.7 ± 5.0, P = .01), whereas the number of PC-based visits remained stable (3.1 ± 1.5 and 3.3 ± 1.5, respectively, P = .50). Telephone contact by GPC (2.3 ± 2.0) and collaboration with PC clinicians replaced routine follow-up geriatric care. GPC facilitated planned transitions to rehabilitation centers (n = 5), home hospice (n = 2), dementia units (n = 3), and home care (n = 37). GPC provides efficient, comprehensive geriatric care and case management while preserving established relationships between patients and the PC team. Preliminary results suggest "care defragmentation," as reflected by a

  12. A snapshot of the organization and provision of primary care in Turkey.

    OpenAIRE

    Kringos, D.S.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Spaan, E.; Pellny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This WHO study aimed to support Turkey in its efforts to strengthen the primary care (PC) system by implementing the WHO Primary Care Evaluation Tool (PCET). This article provides an overview of the organization and provision of primary care in Turkey. Methods: The WHO Primary Care Evaluation Tool was implemented in two provinces (Bolu and Eskisehir) in Turkey in 2007/08. The Tool consists of three parts: a national questionnaire concerning the organisation and financing of primar...

  13. A snapshot of the organization and provision of primary care in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Spaan Ernst; Boerma Wienke GW; Kringos Dionne S; Pellny Martina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This WHO study aimed to support Turkey in its efforts to strengthen the primary care (PC) system by implementing the WHO Primary Care Evaluation Tool (PCET). This article provides an overview of the organization and provision of primary care in Turkey. Methods The WHO Primary Care Evaluation Tool was implemented in two provinces (Bolu and Eskişehir) in Turkey in 2007/08. The Tool consists of three parts: a national questionnaire concerning the organisation and financing of...

  14. A snapshot of the organization and provision of primary care in Turkey.

    OpenAIRE

    Kringos, D.S.; Boerma, W.G.; Spaan, E.J.A.M.; Pellny, M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This WHO study aimed to support Turkey in its efforts to strengthen the primary care (PC) system by implementing the WHO Primary Care Evaluation Tool (PCET). This article provides an overview of the organization and provision of primary care in Turkey. METHODS: The WHO Primary Care Evaluation Tool was implemented in two provinces (Bolu and Eskisehir) in Turkey in 2007/08. The Tool consists of three parts: a national questionnaire concerning the organisation and financing of primar...

  15. Would primary health care workers give appropriate dietary advice after cholesterol screening?

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, J; Roche, M; Mant, D.; Jones, L.; Fullard, E.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the dietary knowledge of primary health care workers and on their ability to apply this knowledge in practice. A total of 128 primary health care workers (53 general practitioners and 61 nurses) in 12 practices and 14 primary care facilitators were surveyed by questionnaire between December 1987 and June 1988. All of the practices were participating in a project to promote prevention in primary care and offered health checks designed to i...

  16. The strength of primary care in Europe : an international comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kringos, D.S.; Boerma, W. G. W.; Bourgueil, Y.; Cartier, T.; Dedeu, T; Hasvold, T.; Groenewegen, P.P.; et al, [No Value

    2013-01-01

    Background A suitable definition of primary care to capture the variety of prevailing international organisation and service-delivery models is lacking. Aim Evaluation of strength of primary care in Europe. Design and setting International comparative cross-sectional study performed in 2009–2010, involving 27 EU member states, plus Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, and Turkey. Method Outcome measures covered three dimensions of primary care structure: primary care governance, economic conditions ...

  17. Identification of core competencies for primary care of allergy patients using a modified Delphi technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallengren Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The majority of allergy patients who seek medical advice are seen in primary care. In-service training of professionals in general practice is needed in order to increase knowledge among primary care clinicians about allergy. Therefore it is important to establish a consensus about what primary care professionals should be able to do, and what the public can expect. We sought to identify core competencies for good practice amongst primary care providers with respect to dia...

  18. Review of behavioral health integration in primary care at Baylor Scott and White Healthcare, Central Region

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly, John B.; Fluet, Norman R.; Reis, Michael D.; Stern, Charles H.; Thompson, Alexander W.; Jolly, Gillian A.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of behavioral health services in primary care has been referred to in many ways, but ultimately refers to common structures and processes. Behavioral health is integrated into primary care because it increases the effectiveness and efficiency of providing care and reduces costs in the care of primary care patients. Reimbursement is one factor, if not the main factor, that determines the level of integration that can be achieved. The federal health reform agenda supports change...

  19. Aspects of quality of primary care provided by physicians certified in phytotherapy in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Melzer, J.; Saller, R; Meier, B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on the use of phytotherapy in primary care are scarce and difficult to compare (e.g. different health-care systems, study designs). OBJECTive: Are there differences in Switzerland regarding demographic data, practice structure, process of care and outcome/ treatment satisfaction between primary care physicians certified in phytotherapy (CAM) and physicians performing conventional primary care (COM) and their patients? MATERIAL AND METHODS: Subgroup analysis of the data of phy...

  20. Advanced access: reducing waiting and delays in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mark; Berwick, Donald M

    2003-02-26

    Delay of care is a persistent and undesirable feature of current health care systems. Although delay seems to be inevitable and linked to resource limitations, it often is neither. Rather, it is usually the result of unplanned, irrational scheduling and resource allocation. Application of queuing theory and principles of industrial engineering, adapted appropriately to clinical settings, can reduce delay substantially, even in small practices, without requiring additional resources. One model, sometimes referred to as advanced access, has increasingly been shown to reduce waiting times in primary care. The core principle of advanced access is that patients calling to schedule a physician visit are offered an appointment the same day. Advanced access is not sustainable if patient demand for appointments is permanently greater than physician capacity to offer appointments. Six elements of advanced access are important in its application balancing supply and demand, reducing backlog, reducing the variety of appointment types, developing contingency plans for unusual circumstances, working to adjust demand profiles, and increasing the availability of bottleneck resources. Although these principles are powerful, they are counter to deeply held beliefs and established practices in health care organizations. Adopting these principles requires strong leadership investment and support. PMID:12597760

  1. Upgrading physical activity counselling in primary care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwey, Renée; van der Weegen, Sanne; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Tange, Huibert; van der Weijden, Trudy; de Witte, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The systematic development of a counselling protocol in primary care combined with a monitoring and feedback tool to support chronically ill patients to achieve a more active lifestyle. An iterative user-centred design method was used to develop a counselling protocol: the Self-management Support Programme (SSP). The needs and preferences of future users of this protocol were identified by analysing the literature, through qualitative research, and by consulting an expert panel. The counselling protocol is based on the Five A's model. Practice nurses apply motivational interviewing, risk communication and goal setting to support self-management of patients in planning how to achieve a more active lifestyle. The protocol consists of a limited number of behaviour change consultations intertwined with interaction with and responses from the It's LiFe! monitoring and feedback tool. This tool provides feedback on patients' physical activity levels via an app on their smartphone. A summary of these levels is automatically sent to the general practice so that practice nurses can respond to this information. A SSP to stimulate physical activity was defined based on user requirements of care providers and patients, followed by a review by a panel of experts. By following this user-centred approach, the organization of care was carefully taken into account, which has led to a practical and affordable protocol for physical activity counselling combined with mobile technology. PMID:25539787

  2. The adoption of the Reference Framework for diabetes care among primary care physicians in primary care settings: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Wang, Harry H X; Kwan, Mandy W M; Chan, Wai Man; Fan, Carmen K M; Liang, Miaoyin; Li, Shannon Ts; Fung, Franklin D H; Yeung, Ming Sze; Chan, David K L; Griffiths, Sian M

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has been increasing both globally and locally. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are in a privileged position to provide first contact and continuing care for diabetic patients. A territory-wide Reference Framework for Diabetes Care for Adults has been released by the Hong Kong Primary Care Office in 2010, with the aim to further enhance evidence-based and high quality care for diabetes in the primary care setting through wide adoption of the Reference Framework.A valid questionnaire survey was conducted among PCPs to evaluate the levels of, and the factors associated with, their adoption of the Reference Framework.A total of 414 completed surveys were received with the response rate of 13.0%. The average adoption score was 3.29 (SD 0.51) out of 4. Approximately 70% of PCPs highly adopted the Reference Framework in their routine practice. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that the PCPs perceptions on the inclusion of sufficient local information (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.748, 95%CI 1.597-14.115, P = 0.005) and reduction of professional autonomy of PCPs (aOR = 1.859, 95%CI 1.013-3.411, P = 0.045) were more likely to influence their adoption level of the Reference Framework for diabetes care in daily practices.The overall level of guideline adoption was found to be relatively high among PCPs for adult diabetes in primary care settings. The adoption barriers identified in this study should be addressed in the continuous updating of the Reference Framework. Strategies need to be considered to enhance the guideline adoption and implementation capacity. PMID:27495018

  3. Vector surveillance and eradication in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Crespo Guzmán

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A bibliographical revision was done about in Dengue fever and the control that is carrier on against the Aedes aegypti “mosquito”, the principal agent that treatments this illness, with the objective of describing the functioning of the Control and Elimination Program of the Mosquito in the Cuban Primary Health Care System. The main objective of this program is to avoid the Dengue epidemics and the loss of human life and the negative impact that will cost to, the socioeconomic development of over country. Accomplishing the promotion, prevention and controlling actions by the basic health care team the mosquito campaign workers and our population, the vector infestation index has been diminished below 0.5 in the last five years. It is important to point out that the rapid decisions taken by our government and its consequent efforts and political willingness has made this program sustained.

  4. Coding and reimbursement of primary care debridement and excision procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, T J; Purvis, J R

    1992-12-01

    Current medical practice requires physicians to accurately report services provided to patients. Patient billing for debridement and excision procedures involves the selection of specific 1992 Physicians' Current Procedural Terminology codes. Although a site-specific surgical procedure code often yields higher reimbursement than a general procedure code, physicians should select the code that most accurately reflects the procedure performed. This review identifies the codes used to report destruction and excision procedures performed by primary care physicians. Included in this review are skin debridement, burn debridement, excision of benign and malignant lesions of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, cyst and ganglion excision, nail excision, anorectal lesion excision, shave, paring, and skin tag excision procedures, and foreign body removal. The Health Care Financing Administration's relative value units and one state's published Medicaid payment rates are included for each procedure code. Instructions are provided for selecting between multiple coding options when more than one code describes the service provided. PMID:1453151

  5. Toddler Developmental Delays After Extensive Hospitalization: Primary Care Practitioner Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Dana C; Sadler, Lois S

    2015-01-01

    This review investigated developmental delays toddlers may encounter after a lengthy pediatric hospitalization (30 days or greater). Physical, motor, cognitive, and psychosocial development of children aged 1 to 3 years was reviewed to raise awareness of factors associated with developmental delay after extensive hospitalization. Findings from the literature suggest that neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit (NICU/PICU) graduates are most at risk for developmental delays, but even non-critical hospital stays interrupt development to some extent. Primary care practitioners (PCPs) may be able to minimize risk for delays through the use of formal developmental screening tests and parent report surveys. References and resources are described for developmental assessment to help clinicians recognize delays and to educate families about optimal toddler development interventions. Pediatric PCPs play a leading role in coordinating health and developmental services for the young child following an extensive hospital stay. PMID:26665423

  6. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergård, Jens

    2012-01-01

    challenges. Practice units are fairly small: close to 2 GPs per unit plus nurses and secretaries. The units are fully computerized, that is, with computer-based patient records and submission of prescriptions digitally to pharmacies etc. Over the past few years a decrease in solo practices has been seen and......General practice is the corner stone of Danish primary health care. General practitioners (GPs) are similar to family physicians in the United States. On average, all Danes have 6.9 contacts per year with their GP (in-person, telephone, or E-mail consultation). General practice is characterized by...... postgraduate education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new...

  7. The use of routinely collected computer data for research in primary care: opportunities and challenges.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusignan, S. de; Weel, C. van

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Routinely collected primary care data has underpinned research that has helped define primary care as a specialty. In the early years of the discipline, data were collected manually, but digital data collection now makes large volumes of data readily available. Primary care informatics

  8. QUALICOPC, a multi-country study evaluating quality, costs and equity in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, W.L.; Boerma, W.G.; Kringos, D.S.; Maeseneer, J. De; Gress, S.; Heinemann, S.; Rotar-Pavlic, D.; Seghieri, C.; Svab, I.; Berg, M.J. van den; Vainieri, M.; Westert, G.P.; Willems, S.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The QUALICOPC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe) study aims to evaluate the performance of primary care systems in Europe in terms of quality, equity and costs. The study will provide an answer to the question what strong primary care systems entail and which effects

  9. Patient safety in primary care: A survey of general practitioners in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, S.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care encompasses many different clinical domains and patient groups, which means that patient safety in primary care may be equally broad. Previous research on safety in primary care has focused on medication safety and incident reporting. In this study, the views of general prac

  10. [Primary health care and the millennium development goals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, A; Bob, M; Fall, A; Fall, C

    2012-01-01

    Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) met in Alma Ata (8-12 September 1978) to define and advocate the implementation of primary health care (PHC) worldwide, above all, in developing countries, which had a real need to review their strategies for meeting the health needs of their populations. They did not suspect that 20 years later the vision they displayed would remain undeniably relevant. Here we examine the similarities and points of convergence of their declaration about PHC with the Millennium Development Goals that seek today to reduce poverty across the world. An exhaustive and analytic literature review was conducted to collect those similarities. Further analysis of the definitions, objectives, principles and recommendations of the Alma Ata Declaration and the Millennium Declaration reveals multiple dependencies and fundamental points of similarity between these two representations. Almost all states have pledged to achieve the eight MDG by 2015: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and develop a global partnership for development. The Alma Ata conference defined primary health care as essential health care, based on practical methods and techniques that are both scientifically sound and socially acceptable, universally accessible to all individuals and all families of the community, through their full participation and at a cost that the community and countries can afford at all stages of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination. It is an integral part of economic and social development. The following principles are involved in the achievement of both primary health care and the MDG: social equity, community participation, and intersectorality. Public health is an essential condition of poverty

  11. Net one, net two: the primary care network income statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, M D; Little, A W

    1999-10-01

    Although hospital-owned primary care practices have been unprofitable for most hospitals, some hospitals are achieving competitive advantage and sustainable practice operations. A key to the success of some has been a net income reporting tool that separates practice operating expenses from the costs of creating and operating a network of practices to help healthcare organization managers, physicians, and staff to identify opportunities to improve the network's financial performance. This "Net One, Net Two" reporting allows operations leadership to be held accountable for Net One expenses and strategic leadership to be held accountable for Net Two expenses. PMID:11066669

  12. Citizen’s needs in primary health care in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharenia Androulaki; Nicolaos Kontas; Theodoros Palios; Katerina Mazgala; Athanasios Tzavaras; Apostolia Marvaki; Olga Kadda

    2010-01-01

    During last decades, the National Health System’s interest of many countries has been focused on primary health care (PHC), of which the main centre is the human being and it is the main pillar for promoting health and improving quality of life.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore Greek citizen’s needs and the responsiveness of health services in terms of coverage.Material-Method: The sample studied consisted of 1206 citizens of Greece. Collection of data was performed by means o...

  13. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Pharmacologic Approach to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    Obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m) is a chronic disease requiring a range of lifestyle and medical interventions. A suggested approach to managing patients with overweight or obesity in the primary care setting was developed by the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and The Obesity Society (AHA/ACC/TOS) in 2013. In 2015, the Endocrine Society published guidelines for the pharmacologic management of obesity. For patients with obesity, the initial weight loss goal is 5% to 10% of baseline body weight within 6 months as this has been shown to yield significant health benefits. PMID:26845011

  14. General Approach to Familial Mediterranean Fever in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarı O et al.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, an autoinflammatory periodic disorder, is an autosomal recessive disease that is prevalent among eastern Mediterranean populations, mainly Sephardic Jews, Turks, Armenians and Arabs. FMF is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and pain secondary to polyserositis, especially peritoneum, pleura and joints. The symptoms are sudden onset, usually happen before the age of 20 and generally decrease spontaneously within 1-4 days. Since a large proportion of all the FMF patients in the world live in Turkey, approach to patients with FMF in the primary care is discussed in this article.

  15. Mental Health Screening of Older Adults in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Mary J.; Moye, Jennifer; Karel, Michele J.

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to document mental health outreach in our primary care clinic, 316 veterans (mean age 72) not currently in psychiatric treatment were screened for multiple mental health symptoms. Depressed mood was reported by 18% of the sample, insomnia by 26%, and morbid/suicidal ideation by 6.9% for at least several days during the past 2 weeks. Of those who experienced a loss over the past year (43%), 36% remained affected by the loss. Also reported were anxiety symptoms (29%) and PTSD sympt...

  16. 77 FR 27671 - Medicaid Program; Payments for Services Furnished by Certain Primary Care Physicians and Charges...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... medicine, general internal medicine, or pediatric medicine. Primary care for any population is critical to... care, such as hospital and nursing home care, Medicare makes payments to providers using prospective... medicine, and pediatric medicine qualify as primary care providers for purposes of increased payment....

  17. Service Users' and Caregivers' Perspectives on Continuity of Care in Out-of-Hours Primary Care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Niamh

    2012-12-20

    Modernization policies in primary care, such as the introduction of out-of-hours general practice cooperatives, signify a marked departure from many service users\\' traditional experiences of continuity of care. We report on a case study of accounts of service users with chronic conditions and their caregivers of continuity of care in an out-of-hours general practice cooperative in Ireland. Using Strauss and colleagues\\' Chronic Illness Trajectory Framework, we explored users\\' and caregivers\\' experiences of continuity in this context. Whereas those dealing with "routine trajectories" were largely satisfied with their experiences, those dealing with "problematic trajectories" (characterized by the presence of, for example, multimorbidity and complex care regimes) had considerable concerns about continuity of experiences in this service. Results highlight that modernization policies that have given rise to out-of-hours cooperatives have had a differential impact on service users with chronic conditions and their caregivers, with serious consequences for those who have "problematic" trajectories.

  18. 《中国医药导报》杂志稿约%Study on continuing education of primary residencies and its development path

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    The quality of the continuing education of primary resident takes a direct impact on the level of hospital doctors and affect the grassroots overall medical quality. Study the development of primary residency path has important practical significance. Primary residency status of continuing education is analyzed from management system,operating mode,the implementation effects and the development practical of grassroots regional. The problems of inadequate funding,inadequate attention,lack of resources,the implementation of a single are pointed out. The establishment of step-by-step development of grassroots resident physician continuing education path is proposed,the continuing education status and implementation methods are studied. A system of credit system mode,all-round system,resource sharing system,case discussion system,and build a workbench is determine. The results promote the development of the primary resident physician continuing education work.

  19. Pharmacists in primary care. Determinants of the care-providing function of Dutch community pharmacists in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijrers, P.E.; Knottnerus, J.A.; Sijbrandij, J.; Janknegt, R.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify determinants of the care-providing function of the community pharmacists (CPs) to explain variations in professional practice. SETTING: The Netherlands 2001. PARTICIPANTS: 328 CPs. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed. Questionnaires were used to collec

  20. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; Pimmersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679