WorldWideScience

Sample records for care quality improvement

  1. Does Audit Improve the Quality of Care?

    OpenAIRE

    Areti Tsaloglidou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The quality of health care and quality assurance are concepts which have been established for many years. Audit nowadays is adopted as a means of developing high quality care.AIM: This study aims to identify the perspectives of audit in practice and its relationship to quality assessment and assurance, quality improvement, and clinical effectiveness.METHODS: There were used the databases Medline and Cinahl to identify studies related to clinical audit. These databases were searche...

  2. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell;

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry was...... opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  3. Does Audit Improve the Quality of Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areti Tsaloglidou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The quality of health care and quality assurance are concepts which have been established for many years. Audit nowadays is adopted as a means of developing high quality care.AIM: This study aims to identify the perspectives of audit in practice and its relationship to quality assessment and assurance, quality improvement, and clinical effectiveness.METHODS: There were used the databases Medline and Cinahl to identify studies related to clinical audit. These databases were searched up to May 2009.DISCUSSION: Audit is used as a tool to assure and assess the quality of patient health care. It is also an educational tool as it creates a lot of opportunities for professionals to think about practice and to learn from the experience of others.CONCLUSIONS: Although that audit is a powerfull and useful tool to improve and evaluate the quality of health care, on the other hand there are many barriers that make its use difficult in everyday practice.

  4. Leadership: improving the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, A

    The satisfaction staff achieve from their work is in part determined by the style of management they work under. This article analyses the impact of a proactive leadership style on team performance and the quality of patient care. PMID:11973895

  5. Improving care at cystic fibrosis centers through quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynack, Nathan C; McBride, John T

    2009-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) using a clinical microsystems approach provides cystic fibrosis (CF) centers the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the health of their patients. The availability of center-specific outcomes data and the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are important advantages for these quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how the clinical microsystems methodology can improve care delivery and outcomes by describing the gradual application of quality improvement principles over the past 5 years by the CF team at the Lewis Walker Cystic Fibrosis Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Using the example of a project to improve the pulmonary function of the pediatric patients at our center as a framework, we describe the QI process from the initial team-building phase, through the assessment of care processes, standardization of care, and developing a culture of continuous improvement. We outline how enthusiastic commitment from physician leadership, clinical managers and central administration, the availability of coaches, and an appreciation of the importance of measurement, patient involvement, communication, and standardization are critical components for successful process improvement. PMID:19760542

  6. Improving quality of care through improved audit and feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hysong Sylvia J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has led the industry in measuring facility performance as a critical element in improving quality of care, investing substantial resources to develop and maintain valid and cost-effective measures. The External Peer Review Program (EPRP of the VA is the official data source for monitoring facility performance, used to prioritize the quality areas needing most attention. Facility performance measurement has significantly improved preventive and chronic care, as well as overall quality; however, much variability still exists in levels of performance across measures and facilities. Audit and feedback (A&F, an important component of effective performance measurement, can help reduce this variability and improve overall performance. Previous research suggests that VA Medical Centers (VAMCs with high EPRP performance scores tend to use EPRP data as a feedback source. However, the manner in which EPRP data are used as a feedback source by individual providers as well as service line, facility, and network leadership is not well understood. An in-depth understanding of mental models, strategies, and specific feedback process characteristics adopted by high-performing facilities is thus urgently needed. This research compares how leaders of high, low, and moderately performing VAMCs use clinical performance data from the EPRP as a feedback tool to maintain and improve quality of care. Methods We will conduct a qualitative, grounded theory analysis of up to 64 interviews using a novel method of sampling primary care, facility, and Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN leadership at high-, moderate-, and low-performing facilities. We will analyze interviews for evidence of cross-facility differences in perceptions of performance data usefulness and strategies for disseminating performance data evaluating performance, with particular attention to timeliness, individualization, and punitiveness

  7. Measuring quality of care for colorectal cancer care: comprehensive feedback driving quality improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Kolfschoten, Nicoline Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Data from clinical audits such as the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit, can be used for valid and meaningful feedback information, which may support improvement of quality of care. First, we showed that the continuous feedback cycle of clinical auditing has an autonomous, positive effect on the quality of surgical care. Second, we describe how data from clinical audits can be used to monitor and improve national practice and performance in colorectal cancer care, especially for high-risk patie...

  8. System Change: Quality Assessment and Improvement for Medicaid Managed Care

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Wally R.; Cotter, J. James; Louis F Rossiter

    1996-01-01

    Rising Medicaid health expenditures have hastened the development of State managed care programs. Methods to monitor and improve health care under Medicaid are changing. Under fee-for-service (FFS), the primary concern was to avoid overutilization. Under managed care, it is to avoid underutilization. Quality enhancement thus moves from addressing inefficiency to addressing insufficiency of care. This article presents a case study of Virginia's redesign of Quality Assessment and Improvement (Q...

  9. Improving the quality of cardiovascular preventive care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we target cardiovascular preventive care from a continuous quality improvement point of view in a project called CARPE (CArdiovascular Risk reduction in Primary carE). We created a multifaceted intervention based on a ·quality cycle· and used outreach visitors for its implementation, since this approach has proven successful in modifying professional behavior. 13 In addressing prevention we considered Donebedian's model 14 to assess quality of care: i.e. we distingu...

  10. Quality improvement in depression care in the Netherlands: the Depression Breakthrough Collaborative. A quality improvement report.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background: Improving the healthcare for patients with depression is a priority health policy across the world. Roughly, two major problems can be identified in daily practice: (1) the content of care is often not completely consistent with recommendations in guidelines and (2) the organization of care is not always integrated and delivered by multidisciplinary teams. Aim: To describe the content and preliminary results of a quality improvement project in primary care, aiming at improving th...

  11. Improving the Quality of Behavioral Health Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries

    OpenAIRE

    Allison Siegwarth

    2015-01-01

    This brief highlights Mathematica’s work to find opportunities for quality improvement in Medicaid’s behavioral health services, develop measures that can help monitor the quality of care, and to identify innovative strategies to better coordinate behavioral and physical health care.

  12. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  13. Quality improvement and accountability in the Danish health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainz, Jan; Kristensen, Solvejg; Bartels, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Denmark has unique opportunities for quality measurement and benchmarking since Denmark has well-developed health registries and unique patient identifier that allow all registries to include patient-level data and combine data into sophisticated quality performance monitoring. Over decades, Denmark has developed and implemented national quality and patient safety initiatives in the healthcare system in terms of national clinical guidelines, performance and outcome measurement integrated in clinical databases for important diseases and clinical conditions, measurement of patient experiences, reporting of adverse events, national handling of patient complaints, national accreditation and public disclosure of all data on the quality of care. Over the years, Denmark has worked up a progressive and transparent just culture in quality management; the different actors at the different levels of the healthcare system are mutually attentive and responsive in a coordinated effort for quality of the healthcare services. At national, regional, local and hospital level, it is mandatory to participate in the quality initiatives and to use data and results for quality management, quality improvement, transparency in health care and accountability. To further develop the Danish governance model, it is important to expand the model to the primary care sector. Furthermore, a national quality health programme 2015-18 recently launched by the government supports a new development in health care focusing upon delivering high-quality health care-high quality is defined by results of value to the patients. PMID:26443814

  14. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance. PMID:23429226

  15. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  16. Evidence of improved quality of life with pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Quinn, Lucy P; Giambra, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric nurses provide holistic family-centered care for children with life-limiting illnesses while being sensitive to children's growth and developmental needs. To learn how pediatric palliative care programs benefit children and their families, the following clinical question was asked: Among children with a life-limiting illness, does the use of a palliative care program compared with not using a palliative care program improve quality of life for patients and their families? Evidence from two studies found that palliative care services improve quality of life for children with life-limiting illness and their families in the areas of the child's emotional well-being and parental perception of preparation for the child's end of life, resulting in a low grade for the body of evidence. Future research should include high quality studies with larger sample sizes and control groups, and include children's perspectives--from both patients and siblings--to give a more complete picture of how best to improve their quality of life. A reliable tool is needed that includes a spiritual component and sensitive indicators specific to children with a life-limiting illness. Future research using this tool will more fully answer how palliative care services improve children's quality of life. PMID:25929123

  17. Training in data definitions improves quality of intensive care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, DGT; Bosman, RJ; de Jonge, E; Joore, JCA; de Keizer, NF

    2003-01-01

    Background Our aim was to assess the contribution of training in data definitions and data extraction guidelines to improving quality of data for use in intensive care scoring systems such as the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)

  18. Improving the quality of health care: what's taking so long?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, Mark R

    2013-10-01

    Nearly fourteen years ago the Institute of Medicine's report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, triggered a national movement to improve patient safety. Despite the substantial and concentrated efforts that followed, quality and safety problems in health care continue to routinely result in harm to patients. Desired progress will not be achieved unless substantial changes are made to the way in which quality improvement is conducted. Alongside important efforts to eliminate preventable complications of care, there must also be an effort to seriously address the widespread overuse of health services. That overuse, which places patients at risk of harm and wastes resources at the same time, has been almost entirely left out of recent quality improvement endeavors. Newer and much more effective strategies and tools are needed to address the complex quality challenges confronting health care. Tools such as Lean, Six Sigma, and change management are proving highly effective in tackling problems as difficult as hand-off communication failures and patient falls. Finally, the organizational culture of most American hospitals and other health care organizations must change. To create a culture of safety, leaders must eliminate intimidating behaviors that suppress the reporting of errors and unsafe conditions. Leaders must also hold everyone accountable for adherence to safe practices. PMID:24101066

  19. Issues of therapeutic communication relevant for improving quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Popa-Velea, O; Purcărea, VL

    2014-01-01

    Communication issues are extensively considered a topic of high interest for improving the efficacy of the therapeutic act. This article aimed to overview several issues of therapeutic communication relevant for improving quality of care. A number of 15 bibliographic resources on these topics published in peer-reviewed journals between 1975 and 2010, and indexed in PubMed, ProQuest and EBSCO databases were examined, to seek for evidence regarding these data. Results highlight a number of comm...

  20. Reforming primary care in England--again. Plans for improving the quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R

    2000-06-01

    An extensive programme of health service reform has begun in England. Improvement in the quality of care is a key objective of the reforms, and several initiatives are being introduced in response. These include systems to provide national guidance about appropriate treatment and services, a local system to support quality improvement and arrangements to monitor performance, including a new performance framework, an inspection agency and an annual survey of patients. The local quality improvement system has features of particular interest. These include arrangements for setting objectives for quality improvement, the use of various quality improvement methods tailored to local needs and a new system to provide accountability to both the health service and the public. The introduction of clinical governance and all the other reforms presents primary care practitioners with a major challenge. However, if sufficient time is allowed and adequate resources are made available, the reforms do have the potential to improve health care in England. PMID:10944059

  1. Intensive-care unit lungs - possibilities to improve the quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray lung diagnosis in an intensive-care unit makes special demands on technique, imaging and on the physician's experience. The quality of image interpretation and evaluation is considerably improved by superimposing the technical data on the X-ray image and by using an antiscatter grid cassette. Proper evaluation of the parameters important for diagnosis is improved by registration of the data on the X-ray film; taking a maximum possible score of 100 as reference value, quality of evaluation is improved from 66.5 points to 71.8 points by data registration on the film itself, whereas the simultaneous use of an antiscatter grid cassette improves the score still further, namely, to 84.3 points. The importance of the clinical condition of the patient, and of the type of breathing chosen, for assessing the chest X-ray, is emphasized. (orig.)

  2. Health System Quality Improvement: Impact of Prompt Nutrition Care on Patient Outcomes and Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Anita; Loose, Claire; Bell, Jvawnna; Partridge, Jamie; Nelson, Jeffrey; Goates, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Among hospitalized patients, malnutrition is prevalent yet often overlooked and undertreated. We implemented a quality improvement program that positioned early nutritional care into the nursing workflow. Nurses screened for malnutrition risk at patient admission and then immediately ordered oral nutritional supplements for those at risk. Supplements were given as regular medications, guided and monitored by medication administration records. Post-quality improvement program, pressure ulcer incidence, length of stay, 30-day readmissions, and costs of care were reduced. PMID:26910129

  3. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and

  4. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loovere, L.; Boyle, E.M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Blatz, S. [Dept. of Pediactrics, McMaster Children' s Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Bowslaugh, M.; Kereliuk, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Paes, B. [Dept. of Pediatrics, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: paes@mcmaster.ca

    2008-10-15

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  5. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  6. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care – a feasibility study with caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Hermenau, Katharin; Kaltenbach, Elisa; Mkinga, Getrude; Hecker, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy...

  7. Improving Quality of Care in Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Steffen J; Møller, Morten H; Larsson, Heidi; Johnsen, Søren P; Madsen, Anders H; Bendix, Jørgen; Adamsen, Sven; Jensen, Anders G; Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik; Nielsen, Ann-Sophie; Kallehave, Finn; Oxholm, Dorthe; Skarbye, Mona; Jølving, Line R; Jørgensen, Henrik S; de Muckadell, Ove B Schaffalitzky; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:The treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is complex, and mortality remains high. We present results from a nationwide initiative to monitor and improve the quality of care (QOC) in PUB.METHODS:All Danish hospitals treating PUB patients between 2004 and 2011 prospectively registered...... demographic, clinical, and prognostic data. QOC was evaluated using eight process and outcome indicators, including time to initial endoscopy, hemostasis obtainment, proportion undergoing surgery, rebleeding risks, and 30-day mortality.RESULTS:A total of 13,498 PUB patients (median age 74 years) were included...

  8. Choosing quality of care measures based on the expected impact of improved care on health.

    OpenAIRE

    Siu, A L; McGlynn, E A; Morgenstern, H; Beers, M H; Carlisle, D M; Keeler, E B; Beloff, J.; Curtin, K; Leaning, J; Perry, B C

    1992-01-01

    Consumers, payers, and policymakers are demanding to know more about the quality of the services they are purchasing or might purchase. The information provided, however, is often driven by data availability rather than by epidemiologic and clinical considerations. In this article, we present an approach for selecting topics for measuring technical quality of care, based on the expected impact on health of improved quality. This approach employs data or estimates on disease burden, efficacy o...

  9. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    van Dam, P. A.; Verkinderen, L.; Hauspy, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Dirix, L.; Huizing, M.; Altintas, S.; K. Papadimitriou; Peeters, M.; Tjalma, W

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on “QIs ...

  10. The myADHDportal.com Improvement Program: An innovative quality improvement intervention for improving the quality of ADHD care among community-based pediatricians

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Jeffery N.; Langberg, Joshua M.; Lichtenstein, Philip K.; Kolb, Rebecca; Simon, John O

    2013-01-01

    Though the American Academy of Pediatrics has developed and disseminated clear evidence-based guidelines for ADHD care, community-based pediatricians often have difficulty implementing these guidelines. New strategies are needed to improve the quality of care received by children with ADHD and to improve utilization of the AAP consensus guidelines by pediatricians. An evidence-based quality improvement intervention has been developed that effectively improves the quality of ADHD care delivere...

  11. Antenatal care strengthening for improved quality of care in Jimma, Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted; Negussie, Dereje; GebreMariam, Abebe;

    2015-01-01

    in the evaluation. Improved content of care (physical examinations, laboratory testing, tetanus toxoid (TT)-immunization, health education, conduct of health professionals, and waiting time) were defined as proximal project outcomes and increased quality of care (better identification of health problems......BACKGROUND: Interventions for curing most diseases and save lives of pregnant and delivering women exist, yet the power of health systems to deliver them to those in most need is not sufficient. The aims of this study were to design a participatory antenatal care (ANC) strengthening intervention....... The effect of the intervention was assessed by comparing the change in quality of care from before to after the intervention period at intervention sites, relative to control sites, using logistic mixed effect regression. RESULTS: The continued attention to the ANC provision during implementation stimulated...

  12. Quality-based financial incentives in health care: can we improve quality by paying for it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Douglas A; Perry, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This article asks whether financial incentives can improve the quality of health care. A conceptual framework drawn from microeconomics, agency theory, behavioral economics, and cognitive psychology motivates a set of propositions about incentive effects on clinical quality. These propositions are evaluated through a synthesis of extant peer-reviewed empirical evidence. Comprehensive financial incentives--balancing rewards and penalties; blending structure, process, and outcome measures; emphasizing continuous, absolute performance standards; tailoring the size of incremental rewards to increasing marginal costs of quality improvement; and assuring certainty, frequency, and sustainability of incentive payoffs--offer the prospect of significantly enhancing quality beyond the modest impacts of prevailing pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. Such organizational innovations as the primary care medical home and accountable health care organizations are expected to catalyze more powerful quality incentive models: risk- and quality-adjusted capitation, episode of care payments, and enhanced fee-for-service payments for quality dimensions (e.g., prevention) most amenable to piece-rate delivery. PMID:19296779

  13. Health-care Worker Engagement in HIV-related Quality Improvement in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Maria E; Li, Michelle S.; Siril, Hellen; Hawkins, Claudia; Kaaya, Sylvia; Ismail, Shabbir; Chalamilla, Guerino; Mdingi, Sarah Geoffrey; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    To assess health-care worker (HCW) awareness, interest and engagement in quality improvement (QI) in HIV care sites in Tanzania. Cross-sectional survey distributed in May 2009. Sixteen urban HIV care sites in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 1 year after the introduction of a quality management program. Two hundred seventy-nine HCWs (direct care, clinical support staff and management). HCW perceptions of care delivered, rates of engagement, knowledge and interest in QI. HCW-identified barriers to and...

  14. Improving the quality of emergency medicine care by developing a quality requirement framework: a study from The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Ikkersheim, David E; van de Pas, Harm

    2012-01-01

    Background In The Netherlands, mainly inexperienced physicians work in the ED on all shifts, including the evening and night shifts, when no direct supervision is available. In 2004 a report of the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate revealed that quality of care at Emergency Departments (EDs) was highly variable. Based on this report and international studies showing significant potential for quality improvement, stakeholders felt the need to improve the quality of EM care. Based on the literatur...

  15. How Health Care Organizations Are Using Data on Patients' Race and Ethnicity to Improve Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Thorlby, Ruth; Jorgensen, Selena; Siegel, Bruce; Ayanian, John Z.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Racial and ethnic disparities in the quality of health care are well documented in the U.S. health care system. Reducing these disparities requires action by health care organizations. Collecting accurate data from patients about their race and ethnicity is an essential first step for health care organizations to take such action, but these data are not systematically collected and used for quality improvement purposes in the United States. This study explores the challenges encounte...

  16. Using a big conversation to improve care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Maggie

    The Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) compiled a report on the day, in which it noted: "The overriding result was one of inspiration through being heard, having honest, genuine and open dialogue and positively engaging with like-minded people. The event gave many the confidence to try to take things forward and influence others, and there was a sense of the event being an opportunity that gave hope for the future." The next step is to set up a "nursing cabinet"--a stakeholder board that will oversee work to improve "care through the patients' eyes". This will involve health professionals, academics, voluntary organisations and patient groups. Box 1 outlines key actions taken as a result of the event. The report on the day's findings is available on the trust website. PMID:22667075

  17. Improving palliative care in selected settings in England using quality indicators: a realist evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, S.; Davies, N; Manthorpe, J; Crome, P; Ahmedzai, S.; Vernooij-Dassen, M; Engels, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a gap between readily available evidence of best practice and its use in everyday palliative care. The IMPACT study evaluated the potential of facilitated use of Quality Indicators as tools to improve palliative care in different settings in England. / Methods: 1) Modelling palliative care services and selecting a set of Quality Indicators to form the core of an intervention, 2) Case studies of intervention using the Quality Indicator set supported by an expert in service...

  18. Improving palliative care in selected settings in England using quality indicators: a realist evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, Steve; Davies, Nathan; Manthorpe, Jill; Crome, Peter; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Engels, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a gap between readily available evidence of best practice and its use in everyday palliative care. The IMPACT study evaluated the potential of facilitated use of Quality Indicators as tools to improve palliative care in different settings in England.Methods: 1) Modelling palliative care services and selecting a set of Quality Indicators to form the core of an intervention, 2) Case studies of intervention using the Quality Indicator set supported by an expert in service ch...

  19. The national improvement partnership network: state-based partnerships that improve primary care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Judith S; Norlin, Chuck; Gillespie, R J; Weissman, Mark; McGrath, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Improvement partnerships (IPs) are a model for collaboration among public and private organizations that share interests in improving child health and the quality of health care delivered to children. Their partners typically include state public health and Medicaid agencies, the local chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and an academic health care organization or children's hospital. Most IPs also engage other partners, including a variety of public, private, and professional organizations and individuals. IPs lead and support measurement-based, systems-focused quality improvement (QI) efforts that primarily target primary care practices that care for children. Their projects are most often conducted as learning collaboratives that involve a team from each of 8 to 15 participating practices over 9 to 12 months. The improvement teams typically include a clinician, office manager, clinical staff (nurses or medical assistants), and, for some projects, a parent; the IPs provide the staff and local infrastructure. The projects target clinical topics, chosen because of their importance to public health, local clinicians, and funding agencies, including asthma, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental screening, obesity, mental health, medical home implementation, and several others. Over the past 13 years, 19 states have developed (and 5 are exploring developing) IPs. These organizations share similar aims and methods but differ substantially in leadership, structure, funding, and longevity. Their projects generally engage pediatric and family medicine practices ranging from solo private practices to community health centers to large corporate practices. The practices learn about the project topic and about QI, develop specific improvement strategies and aims that align with the project aims, perform iterative measures to evaluate and guide their improvements, and implement systems and processes to support and sustain those improvements

  20. Pediatric recertification and quality of care: the role of the American Board of Pediatrics in improving children's health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Paul V

    2007-11-01

    American health care is in the middle of a second revolution in quality as profound as the Flexner revolution occurring almost 100 years ago. Although systems issues are the basis for most of the concern, physician quality and professional development are also pertinent. Specialty board certification and maintenance of certification are key drivers of professional development and improvement of care. PMID:17950317

  1. Physician attitude toward depression care interventions: Implications for implementation of quality improvement initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Chanin Johann C; Chou Ann F; Henke Rachel; Zides Amanda B; Scholle Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Few individuals with depression treated in the primary care setting receive care consistent with clinical treatment guidelines. Interventions based on the chronic care model (CCM) have been promoted to address barriers and improve the quality of care. A current understanding of barriers to depression care and an awareness of whether physicians believe interventions effectively address those barriers is needed to enhance the success of future implementation. Methods We cond...

  2. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care - a feasibility study with caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenau, Katharin; Kaltenbach, Elisa; Mkinga, Getrude; Hecker, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy of the training immediately before, directly after, and 3 months following the training workshop. The results showed high demand, good feasibility, high motivation, and acceptance of caregivers. They reported improvements in caregiver-child relationships, as well as in the children's behavior. Study 2 assessed exposure to maltreatment and the mental health of 28 orphans living in one institution in which all caregivers had been trained. The children were interviewed 20 months before, 1 month before, and 3 months after the training. Children reported a decrease in physical maltreatment and assessments showed a decrease in mental health problems. Our approach seems feasible under challenging circumstances and provides first hints for its efficacy. These promising findings call for further studies testing the efficacy and sustainability of this maltreatment prevention approach. PMID:26236248

  3. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care – a feasibility study with caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharin eHermenau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy of the training immediately before, directly after, and three months following the training workshop. The results showed high demand, good feasibility, high motivation and acceptance of caregivers. They reported improvements in caregiver-child relationships, as well as in the children’s behavior. Study 2 assessed exposure to maltreatment and the mental health of 28 orphans living in one institution in which all caregivers had been trained. The children were interviewed 20 months before, one month before, and three months after the training. Children reported a decrease in physical maltreatment and assessments showed a decrease in mental health problems. Our approach seems feasible under challenging circumstances and provides first hints for its efficacy. These promising findings call for further studies testing the efficacy and sustainability of this maltreatment prevention approach.

  4. Improving Health Promotion Using Quality Improvement Techniques in Australian Indigenous Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Nikki; O'Donoghue, Lynette; Lin, Vivian; Tsey, Komla; Bailie, Ross Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Although some areas of clinical health care are becoming adept at implementing continuous quality improvement (CQI) projects, there has been limited experimentation of CQI in health promotion. In this study, we examined the impact of a CQI intervention on health promotion in four Australian Indigenous primary health care centers. Our study objectives were to (a) describe the scope and quality of health promotion activities, (b) describe the status of health center system support for health promotion activities, and (c) introduce a CQI intervention and examine the impact on health promotion activities and health centers systems over 2 years. Baseline assessments showed suboptimal health center systems support for health promotion and significant evidence-practice gaps. After two annual CQI cycles, there were improvements in staff understanding of health promotion and systems for planning and documenting health promotion activities had been introduced. Actions to improve best practice health promotion, such as community engagement and intersectoral partnerships, were inhibited by the way health center systems were organized, predominately to support clinical and curative services. These findings suggest that CQI can improve the delivery of evidence-based health promotion by engaging front line health practitioners in decision-making processes about the design/redesign of health center systems to support the delivery of best practice health promotion. However, further and sustained improvements in health promotion will require broader engagement of management, senior staff, and members of the local community to address organizational and policy level barriers. PMID:27066470

  5. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... health and safety, nutrition, first aid, the recognition of communicable diseases, child abuse detection... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child care... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to...

  6. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided as...... insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  7. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. Toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also. (author)

  8. Quality improvement in pre-hospital critical care: increased value through research and publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Marius; Krüger, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Pre-hospital critical care is considered to be a complex intervention with a weak evidence base. In quality improvement literature, the value equation has been used to depict the inevitable relationship between resources expenditure and quality. Increased value of pre-hospital critical care involves moving a system from quality assurance to quality improvement. Agreed quality indicators can be integrated in existing quality improvement and complex intervention methodology. A QI system for pre-hospital critical care includes leadership involvement, multi-disciplinary buy-in, data collection infrastructure and long-term commitment. Further, integrating process control with governance systems allows evidence-based change of practice and publishing of results. PMID:24887186

  9. Developing evidence-based maternity care in Iran: a quality improvement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current Iranian perinatal statistics indicate that maternity care continues to need improvement. In response, we implemented a multi-faceted intervention to improve the quality of maternity care at an Iranian Social Security Hospital. Using a before-and-after design our aim was to improve the uptake of selected evidence based practices and more closely attend to identified women's needs and preferences. Methods The major steps of the study were to (1 identify women's needs, values and preferences via interviews, (2 select through a process of professional consensus the top evidence-based clinical recommendations requiring local implementation (3 redesign care based on the selected evidence-based recommendations and women's views, and (4 implement the new care model. We measured the impact of the new care model on maternal satisfaction and caesarean birth rates utilising maternal surveys and medical record audit before and after implementation of the new care model. Results Twenty women's needs and requirements as well as ten evidence-based clinical recommendations were selected as a basis for improving care. Following the introduction of the new model of care, women's satisfaction levels improved significantly on 16 of 20 items (p Conclusion The introduction of a quality improvement care model improved compliance with evidence-based guidelines and was associated with an improvement in women's satisfaction levels and a reduction in rates of caesarean birth.

  10. Improving the quality of EHR recording in primary care: a data quality feedback tool.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bij, S. van der; Khan, N.; Veen, P. ten; Bakker, D.H. de; Verheij, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electronic health record (EHR) data are used to exchange information among health care providers. For this purpose, the quality of the data is essential. We developed a data quality feedback tool that evaluates differences in EHR data quality among practices and software packages as part o

  11. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Darko Gvozdanovi_; Miroslav Kon_ar; Vinko Kojund_i_; Hrvoje Jezid_i_

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on...

  12. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design: Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting: Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants: In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes: The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed ...

  13. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed for all 129 quali...

  14. Improving Quality of Care in Renal Replacement Therapy Using a Collaborative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Azri Mohamed Nache

    2012-01-01

    AbstractImproving Quality of Care in Renal Replacement Therapy Using a Collaborative ApproachAzri Mohamed Nache, MB ChB MRCPUnder direction of Professor Ruth BoadenMaster of Philosophy Business and Management, University of ManchesterOctober 2012Introduction:In the past few decades, there have been rapid advances in knowledge of best practice in all areas within healthcare. Despite this, a large gap remains between what is best practice and the care that actually received by patients. Quality...

  15. Improving quality of care in renal replacement therapy using collaborative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nache, Azri

    2012-01-01

    Improving Quality of Care in Renal Replacement Therapy Using a Collaborative ApproachAzri Mohamed Nache, MB ChB MRCPUnder direction of Professor Ruth BoadenMaster of Philosophy Business and Management, University of ManchesterOctober 2012Introduction:In the past few decades, there have been rapid advances in knowledge of best practice in all areas within healthcare. Despite this, a large gap remains between what is best practice and the care that actually received by patients.Quality improvem...

  16. Ergonomic redesign using quality improvement for pre-hospital care of acute myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Essam, Nadya; Wood, Kate; Hall, Mark; Shaw, Deborah; Spaight, Anne; Baird, Andrew; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2012-01-01

    Context: Frontline emergency ambulance clinicians collaborated in a national quality improvement (QI) initiative to improve pre-hospital care for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Problem: The National Ambulance Clinical Performance Indicator (CPI) care bundle for AMI (consisting of aspirin, GTN, pain assessment and administration of analgesia) highlighted a consistent shortfall in patient pain assessment and inadequate provision of analgesia. Ineffective pain management in...

  17. What are the effective ways to translate clinical leadership into health care quality improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McSherry R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert McSherry,1 Paddy Pearce2 1School of Health and Social Care, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, 2PKP Consulting, Yarm, United Kingdom Abstract: The presence and/or absence of effective leaders in health care can have a stark consequence on the quality and outcomes of care. The delivery of safe, quality, compassionate health care is dependent on having effective clinical leaders at the frontline. In light of the Kirkup and Francis reports, this article explores some ways of translating clinical leadership into health care quality improvement. This is achieved by exploring what is clinical leadership and why and how this is important to health care quality improvement, clinical leadership, and a duty of candor, along with the importance clinical leadership plays in the provision of quality care improvement and outcomes. Clinical leaders are not predefined roles but emerge from the complex clinical setting by gaining an acquired expertise and from how they then internalize this to develop and facilitate sound relationships within a team. Clinical leaders are effective in facilitating innovation and change through improvement. This is achieved by recognizing, influencing, and empowering individuals through effective communication in order to share and learn from and with each other in practice. The challenge for health care organizations in regard to creating organizational cultures where a duty of candor exists is not to reinvent the wheel by turning something that is simple into something complex, which can become confusing to health care workers, patients, and the public. By focusing on the clinical leader's role and responsibilities we would argue they play a crucial and pivotal role in influencing, facilitating, supporting, and monitoring that this duty of candor happens in practice. This may be possible by highlighting where and how the duty of candor can be aligned within existing clinical governance frameworks. Keywords: governance

  18. Improving the provision of pregnancy care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women: a continuous quality improvement initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson-Helm, Melanie E.; Rumbold, Alice R; Teede, Helena J; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Bailie, Ross S; Jacqueline A. Boyle

    2016-01-01

    Background Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) women are at greater risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes than non-Indigenous women. Pregnancy care has a key role in identifying and addressing modifiable risk factors that contribute to adverse outcomes. We investigated whether participation in a continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiative was associated with increases in provision of recommended pregnancy care by primary health care centers (PHCs) in predominantly I...

  19. The Dorset Seedcorn Project: interprofessional learning and continuous quality improvement in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcock, Peter M; Campion-Smith, Charles; Head, Michael

    2002-01-01

    There is a need to develop models of practice-based learning that are effective in bringing about improvement in the quality of care that patients receive. This paper describes a facilitated practice-based project where five general practices in Dorset formed interprofessional teams that worked over a six-month period using a continuous quality improvement (CQI) approach to make a change in areas of importance to them. All the teams completed the project and planned and implemented demonstrab...

  20. Facilitators and barriers to applying a national quality registry for quality improvement in stroke care

    OpenAIRE

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; Fredriksson, Mio; Halford, Christina; Wallin, Lars; Dahlström, Tobias; Vengberg, Sofie; Winblad, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Background: National quality registries (NQRs) purportedly facilitate quality improvement, while neither the extent nor the mechanisms of such a relationship are fully known. The aim of this case study is to describe the experiences of local stakeholders to determine those elements that facilitate and hinder clinical quality improvement in relation to participation in a well-known and established NQR on stroke in Sweden. Methods: A strategic sample was drawn of 8 hospitals in 4 county council...

  1. Through Their Eyes: Lessons Learned Using Participatory Methods in Health Care Quality Improvement Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva N; Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2016-08-01

    In this methodological article, we examine participatory methods in depth to demonstrate how these methods can be adopted for quality improvement (QI) projects in health care. We draw on existing literature and our QI initiatives in the Department of Veterans Affairs to discuss the application of photovoice and guided tours in QI efforts. We highlight lessons learned and several benefits of using participatory methods in this area. Using participatory methods, evaluators can engage patients, providers, and other stakeholders as partners to enhance care. Participant involvement helps yield actionable data that can be translated into improved care practices. Use of these methods also helps generate key insights to inform improvements that truly resonate with stakeholders. Using participatory methods is a valuable strategy to harness participant engagement and drive improvements that address individual needs. In applying these innovative methodologies, evaluators can transcend traditional approaches to uniquely support evaluations and improvements in health care. PMID:26667882

  2. Academic Detailing in Diabetes: Using Outreach Education to Improve the Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most diabetes care is provided in primary care settings, but typical primary care clinicians struggle to keep up with the latest evidence on diabetes screening, pharmacotherapy, and monitoring. Accordingly, many patients with diabetes are not receiving optimal guideline-based therapy. Relying on front-line clinicians on their own to assess the huge volume of new literature and incorporate it into their practice is unrealistic, and conventional continuing medical education has not proven adequate to address gaps in care. Academic detailing, direct educational outreach to clinicians that uses social marketing techniques to provide specific evidence-based recommendations, has been proven in clinical trials to improve the quality of care for a range of conditions. By directly engaging with clinicians to assess their needs, identify areas for change in practice, and provide them with specific tools to implement these changes, academic detailing can serve as a tool to improve care processes and outcomes for patients with diabetes. PMID:27586191

  3. Expanding Continuous Quality Improvement Capacity in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: Prehealth Volunteers as a Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Kelsey C; Lobingier, Hannah; McCully, Nancy; Lombard, Jackie; Hansen, Mark; Uchiyama, Makoto; Hagg, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are challenged to support the increasing demands for improving patient safety, satisfaction, and outcomes. Limited resources and staffing are common barriers for making significant and sustained improvements. At Oregon Health & Science University, the medical intensive care unit (MICU) leadership team faced internal capacity limitations for conducting continuous quality improvement, specifically for the implementation and evaluation of the mobility portion of an evidence-based care bundle. The MICU team successfully addressed this capacity challenge using the person power of prehealth volunteers. In the first year of the project, 52 trained volunteers executed an evidence-based mobility intervention for 305 critically ill patients, conducting more than 200 000 exercise repetitions. The volunteers contributed to real-time evaluation of the project, with the collection of approximately 26 950 process measure data points. Prehealth volunteers are an untapped resource for effectively expanding internal continuous quality improvement capacity in the MICU and beyond. PMID:27031356

  4. Stakeholder Engagement to Identify Priorities for Improving the Quality and Value of Critical Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry T Stelfox

    Full Text Available Large amounts of scientific evidence are generated, but not implemented into patient care (the 'knowledge-to-care' gap. We identified and prioritized knowledge-to-care gaps in critical care as opportunities to improve the quality and value of healthcare.We used a multi-method community-based participatory research approach to engage a Network of all adult (n = 14 and pediatric (n = 2 medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs in a fully integrated geographically defined healthcare system serving 4 million residents. Participants included Network oversight committee members (n = 38 and frontline providers (n = 1,790. Network committee members used a modified RAND/University of California Appropriateness Methodology, to serially propose, rate (validated 9 point scale and revise potential knowledge-to-care gaps as priorities for improvement. The priorities were sent to frontline providers for evaluation. Results were relayed back to all frontline providers for feedback.Initially, 68 knowledge-to-care gaps were proposed, rated and revised by the committee (n = 32 participants over 3 rounds of review and resulted in 13 proposed priorities for improvement. Then, 1,103 providers (62% response rate evaluated the priorities, and rated 9 as 'necessary' (median score 7-9. Several factors were associated with rating priorities as necessary in multivariable logistic regression, related to the provider (experience, teaching status of ICU and topic (strength of supporting evidence, potential to benefit the patient, potential to improve patient/family experience, potential to decrease costs.A community-based participatory research approach engaged a diverse group of stakeholders to identify 9 priorities for improving the quality and value of critical care. The approach was time and cost efficient and could serve as a model to prioritize areas for research quality improvement across other settings.

  5. Interdisciplinary teamwork and the power of a quality improvement collaborative in tertiary neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Theresa R; Pallotto, Eugenia K; Brozanski, Beverly; Piazza, Anthony J; Chuo, John; Moran, Susan; McClead, Richard; Mingrone, Teresa; Morelli, Lorna; Smith, Joan R

    2015-01-01

    Significant gaps in healthcare quality and outcomes can be reduced via quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), which improve care by leveraging data and experience from multiple organizations.The Children's Hospital Neonatal Consortium Collaborative Initiatives for Quality Improvement team developed an infrastructure for neonatal QICs. We describe the structure and components of an effective multi-institutional neonatal QIC that implemented the "SLUG Bug" project designed to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).The operational infrastructure of SLUG Bug involved 17 tertiary care neonatal intensive care units with a goal to reduce CLABSI in high-risk neonates. Clinical Practice Recommendations were produced, and the Institute of Healthcare Improvement Breakthrough Series provided the framework for the collaborative. Process measures studied the effectiveness of the collaborative structure.CLABSI rates decreased by 20% during a 12-month study period. Compliance bundle reporting exceeded 80%. A QIC score of 2.5 or more ("improvement") was achieved by 94% of centers and a score 4 or more ("significant improvement") was achieved by 35%.Frequent interactive project meetings, well-defined project metrics, continual shared learning opportunities, and individual team coaching were key QIC success components. Through a coordinated approach and committed leadership, QICs can effectively implement change and improve the care of neonates with complex diagnoses and rare diseases. PMID:25919608

  6. Quality Improvement for Cardiovascular Disease Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward S.; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Kamano, Jemima H.; Kudesia, Preeti; Rajan, Vikram; Engelgau, Michael; Moran, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of global cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden falls on people living in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In order to reduce preventable CVD mortality and morbidity, LMIC health systems and health care providers need to improve the delivery and quality of CVD care. Objectives As part of the Disease Control Priorities Three (DCP3) Study efforts addressing quality improvement, we reviewed and summarized currently available evidence on interventions to improve quality of clinic-based CVD prevention and management in LMICs. Methods We conducted a narrative review of published comparative clinical trials that evaluated efficacy or effectiveness of clinic-based CVD prevention and management quality improvement interventions in LMICs. Conditions selected a priori included hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, stroke, rheumatic heart disease, and congestive heart failure. MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were systematically searched. Studies were categorized as occurring at the system or patient/provider level and as treating the acute or chronic phase of CVD. Results From 847 articles identified in the electronic search, 49 met full inclusion criteria and were selected for review. Selected studies were performed in 19 different LMICs. There were 10 studies of system level quality improvement interventions, 38 studies of patient/provider interventions, and one study that fit both criteria. At the patient/provider level, regardless of the specific intervention, intensified, team-based care generally led to improved medication adherence and hypertension control. At the system level, studies provided evidence that introduction of universal health insurance coverage improved hypertension and diabetes control. Studies of system and patient/provider level acute coronary syndrome quality improvement interventions yielded inconclusive results. The duration of most studies was less than 12 months. Conclusions The

  7. Implementing large-scale quality improvement – lessons from the productive ward: Releasing time to care

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Elizabeth; Robert, Glenn; Maben, Jill; Griffiths, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is concerned with facilitating large-scale quality improvement in health care, and specifically understanding more about the known challenges associated with implementation of Lean innovations: receptivity, the complexity of adoption processes, evidence of the innovation, and embedding change. Lessons are drawn from the implementation of The Productive Ward: Releasing Time to CareTM programme in English hospitals. Design/participants: The study which the paper draws up...

  8. Identifying resident care areas for a quality improvement intervention in long-term care: a collaborative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cranley Lisa A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, healthcare aides (also referred to as nurse aides, personal support workers, nursing assistants are unregulated personnel who provide 70-80% of direct care to residents living in nursing homes. Although they are an integral part of the care team their contributions to the resident care planning process are not always acknowledged in the organization. The purpose of the Safer Care for Older Persons [in residential] Environments (SCOPE project was to evaluate the feasibility of engaging front line staff (primarily healthcare aides to use quality improvement methods to integrate best practices into resident care. This paper describes the process used by teams participating in the SCOPE project to select clinical improvement areas. Methods The study employed a collaborative approach to identify clinical areas and through consensus, teams selected one of three areas. To select the clinical areas we recruited two nursing homes not involved in the SCOPE project and sampled healthcare providers and decision-makers within them. A vote counting method was used to determine the top five ranked clinical areas for improvement. Results Responses received from stakeholder groups included gerontology experts, decision-makers, registered nurses, managers, and healthcare aides. The top ranked areas from highest to lowest were pain/discomfort management, behaviour management, depression, skin integrity, and assistance with eating. Conclusions Involving staff in selecting areas that they perceive as needing improvement may facilitate staff engagement in the quality improvement process.

  9. Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Quality Improvement-What is the Difference and Why Should Compounding Pharmacies Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaleiro, Joe

    2009-01-01

    This article provides scenarios of three different pharmacies in the areas of quality control, quality assurance, and quality improvement. The scenarios show the importance that each pharmacy placed on a problem of dented capsules and the potential impact that an unresolved problem can have on a compounding pharmacy's business. Although this article focuses on one particular procedure, the purpose of th article is to help pharmacists understand the differences between quality control, quality assurance, and quality improvement. PMID:23966522

  10. Quality improvement in the care of live liver donors: implementation of the Designated Donor Nurse Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe Rudow, Dianne; Cabello, Charlotte C; Rivellini, Denise

    2010-12-01

    Publications on living donor liver transplant have focused on the medical aspects of donor selection, postoperative management, surgical procedures, and outcomes, but little attention has been given to the nursing implications for care of live liver donors during their inpatient stay. Donor advocates from various disciplines are involved during the initial education and evaluation, but most care after surgery is delivered by an inpatient medical team and bedside nursing staff who are not as familiar with the donor and concepts related to donor advocacy. In an effort to improve the overall donor experience and provide safe, high-quality care to patients undergoing elective partial hepatectomy, our academic medical center began a quality improvement project focused on improving the inpatient stay. Inpatient nursing standards and policies and procedures were developed to ensure that consistent care is delivered. However, the infrequency of living donor liver transplantation makes it nearly impossible to have all transplant program staff on a nursing unit be "experts" on donor care. Therefore, our center determined that, similar to the Independent Donor Advocacy Team, a transplant program needs live donor champions on the nursing unit to mirror the goals of the team. To that end, we developed the concept of the Designated Donor Nurse to care for and advocate for live liver donors during the inpatient stay and also to serve as a resource to their colleagues. PMID:21265291

  11. Clinical audit, a valuable tool to improve quality of care: General methodology and applications in nephrology

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Pasquale; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation and improvement of quality of care provided to the patients are of crucial importance in the daily clinical practice and in the health policy planning and financing. Different tools have been developed, including incident analysis, health technology assessment and clinical audit. The clinical audit consist of measuring a clinical outcome or a process, against well-defined standards set on the principles of evidence-based medicine in order to identify the changes needed to improve t...

  12. Improving the quality of palliative care for ambulatory patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian; Aslaksen, Aslak

    2005-01-01

    PROBLEM: Most patients with advanced lung cancer currently receive much of their health care, including chemotherapy, as outpatients. Patients have to deal with the complex and time consuming logistics of ambulatory cancer care. At the same time, members of staff often waste considerable time and...... energy in organisational aspects of care that could be better used in direct interaction with patients. DESIGN: Quality improvement study using direct observation and run and flow charts, and focus group meetings with patients and families regarding perceptions of the clinic and with staff regarding...... satisfaction with working conditions. SETTING: Thoracic oncology outpatient clinic at a Norwegian university hospital where patients receive chemotherapy and complementary palliative care. KEY MEASURES FOR IMPROVEMENT: Waiting time and time wasted during consultations; calmer working situation at the clinic...

  13. The new health-care quality: value, outcomes, and continuous improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S J; Lanning, J A

    1991-01-01

    No longer convinced that their viewpoint on quality is the only one, different stakeholders in the health-care arena are sharing perspectives to piece together the quality picture. Although still preoccupied with the cost of health care, purchasers are concerned about value--efficiency, appropriateness, and effectiveness--as well as price. Faced with evidence of medically unnecessary procedures and unexamined medical theory, practitioners are searching for appropriateness guidelines, useful outcome measures, and methods to elicit informed patient preferences about elective surgeries. Underlying this search for reliable indicators of quality--now expanded to include patient satisfaction--is a new interest in the Japanese notion of "Kaizen" or continuous quality improvement. The end product of this ferment may determine whether good medicine drives out the bad--or vice versa. PMID:10118887

  14. Evolution and Initial Experience of a Statewide Care Transitions Quality Improvement Collaborative: Preventing Avoidable Readmissions Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axon, R Neal; Cole, Laura; Moonan, Aunyika; Foster, Richard; Cawley, Patrick; Long, Laura; Turley, Christine B

    2016-02-01

    Increasing scrutiny of hospital readmission rates has spurred a wide variety of quality improvement initiatives. The Preventing Avoidable Readmissions Together (PART) initiative is a statewide quality improvement learning collaborative organized by stakeholder organizations in South Carolina. This descriptive report focused on initial interventions with hospitals. Eligible participants included all acute care hospitals plus home health organizations, nursing facilities, hospices, and other health care organizations. Measures were degree of statewide participation, curricular engagement, adoption of evidence-based improvement strategies, and readmission rate changes. Fifty-nine of 64 (92%) acute care hospitals and 9 of 10 (90%) hospital systems participated in collaborative events. Curricular engagement included: webinars and coaching calls (49/59, 83%), statewide in-person meetings (35/59, 59%), regional in-person meetings (44/59, 75%), and individualized consultations (46/59, 78%). Among 34 (58%) participating hospitals completing a survey at the completion of Year 1, respondents indicated complete implementation of multidisciplinary rounding (58%), post-discharge telephone calls (58%), and teach-back (32%), and implementation in process of high-quality transition records (52%), improved discharge summaries (45%), and timely follow-up appointments (39%). A higher proportion of hospitals had significant decreases (≥10% relative change) in all-cause readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (55.6% vs. 30.4%, P=0.01), heart failure (54.2% vs. 31.7%, P=0.09), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (41.7% vs. 33.3%, P=0.83) between 2011-2013 compared to earlier (2009-2011) trends. Focus on reducing readmissions is driving numerous, sometimes competing, quality improvement initiatives. PART successfully engaged the majority of acute care facilities in one state to harmonize and accelerate adoption of evidence-based care transitions strategies. PMID:26102592

  15. Implementing collaborative care for depression treatment in primary care: A cluster randomized evaluation of a quality improvement practice redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Martin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analyses show collaborative care models (CCMs with nurse care management are effective for improving primary care for depression. This study aimed to develop CCM approaches that could be sustained and spread within Veterans Affairs (VA. Evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI uses QI approaches within a research/clinical partnership to redesign care. The study used EBQI methods for CCM redesign, tested the effectiveness of the locally adapted model as implemented, and assessed the contextual factors shaping intervention effectiveness. Methods The study intervention is EBQI as applied to CCM implementation. The study uses a cluster randomized design as a formative evaluation tool to test and improve the effectiveness of the redesign process, with seven intervention and three non-intervention VA primary care practices in five different states. The primary study outcome is patient antidepressant use. The context evaluation is descriptive and uses subgroup analysis. The primary context evaluation measure is naturalistic primary care clinician (PCC predilection to adopt CCM. For the randomized evaluation, trained telephone research interviewers enrolled consecutive primary care patients with major depression in the evaluation, referred enrolled patients in intervention practices to the implemented CCM, and re-surveyed at seven months. Results Interviewers enrolled 288 CCM site and 258 non-CCM site patients. Enrolled intervention site patients were more likely to receive appropriate antidepressant care (66% versus 43%, p = 0.01, but showed no significant difference in symptom improvement compared to usual care. In terms of context, only 40% of enrolled patients received complete care management per protocol. PCC predilection to adopt CCM had substantial effects on patient participation, with patients belonging to early adopter clinicians completing adequate care manager follow-up significantly more often than patients of

  16. Organization Complexity and Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Quality Improvement Culture Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; Canamucio, Anne; Lempa, Michele; Yano, Elizabeth M; Long, Judith A

    2016-03-01

    This study examined how aspects of quality improvement (QI) culture changed during the introduction of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient-centered medical home initiative and how they were influenced by existing organizational factors, including VHA facility complexity and practice location. A voluntary survey, measuring primary care providers' (PCPs') perspectives on QI culture at their primary care clinics, was administered in 2010 and 2012. Participants were 320 PCPs from hospital- and community-based primary care practices in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio. PCPs in community-based outpatient clinics reported an improvement in established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation from 2010 to 2012. However, their peers in hospital-based clinics did not report any significant improvements in QI culture. In both years, compared with high-complexity facilities, medium- and low-complexity facilities had better scores on the scales assessing established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation. PMID:25414376

  17. Integrated Care for Older Adults Improves Perceived Quality of Care : Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Embrace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbroek, Ronald J; Kremer, Hubertus P H; Spoorenberg, Sophie L W; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Wynia, Klaske

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: All community-living older adults might benefit from integrated care, but evidence is lacking on the effectiveness of such services for perceived quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of Embrace, a community-based integrated primary care service, on perceived quality of care.

  18. Improving health care quality and safety: the role of collective learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer SJ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sara J Singer,1–4 Justin K Benzer,4–6 Sami U Hamdan4,6 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 4Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; 5VISN 17 Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans, Waco, TX, USA; 6Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Despite decades of effort to improve quality and safety in health care, this goal feels increasingly elusive. Successful examples of improvement are infrequently replicated. This scoping review synthesizes 76 empirical or conceptual studies (out of 1208 originally screened addressing learning in quality or safety improvement, that were published in selected health care and management journals between January 2000 and December 2014 to deepen understanding of the role that collective learning plays in quality and safety improvement. We categorize learning activities using a theoretical model that shows how leadership and environmental factors support collective learning processes and practices, and in turn team and organizational improvement outcomes. By focusing on quality and safety improvement, our review elaborates the premise of learning theory that leadership, environment, and processes combine to create conditions that promote learning. Specifically, we found that learning for quality and safety improvement includes experimentation (including deliberate experimentation, improvisation, learning from failures, exploration, and exploitation, internal and external knowledge acquisition, performance monitoring and comparison, and training. Supportive learning environments are characterized by team characteristics like psychological

  19. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  20. Collaborative Depression Care in a Safety Net Medical Home: Facilitators and Barriers to Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price-Haywood, Eboni G; Dunn-Lombard, Donisha; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Lefante, John J

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about how to integrate primary care with mental/behavioral services outside of clinical trials. The authors implemented a collaborative care model (CCM) for depression in a safety net patient-centered medical home. The model focused on universal screening for symptoms, risk stratification based on symptom severity, care management for intensive follow-up, and psychiatry consultation. CCM increased rates of primary care physician encounters, timely follow-up for monitoring symptoms of depression, and documentation of treatment response. Contextual factors that facilitated or hindered practice redesign included clinic leadership, quality improvement culture, staffing, technology infrastructure, and external incentives/disincentives for organizational change. (Population Health Management 2016;19:46-55). PMID:26087153

  1. Improving surgeon wellness: The second victim syndrome and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmon, Louis M; Heiss, Kurt

    2015-12-01

    Improving quality of care logically involves optimizing the duty-readiness and well-being of the healthcare provider. Medical errors and poor outcomes adversely impact the involved providers, especially surgeons, as well as the patients and their families. Unfortunately our current system does little to support these "second victims" who experience various degrees of emotional and psychological stresses including confusion, loss of confidence, and debilitating anxiety. These factors contribute to the alarmingly high rates of professional "burnout," substance abuse, and suicide of healthcare providers as well as increase the likelihood of subsequent medical errors. Mindful efforts to improve the healthcare culture and develop personal support systems can help surgeons become more resilient, provide higher quality patient care, and have longer productive professional lives. Institutional support systems are also necessary to assist "second victims" to recover from the impact of an adverse patient event. PMID:26653167

  2. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, pcollaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  3. Aiming to improve the quality of primary mental health care: developing an intervention for underserved communities

    OpenAIRE

    Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Burroughs, Heather; Hibbert, Derek; Gask, Linda; Beatty, Susan; Gravenhorst, Katja; Waheed, Waquas; Kovandžić, Marija; Gabbay, Mark; Dowrick, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to improve the quality of primary mental healthcare in underserved communities through involvement with the wider primary care team members and local community agencies. Methods We developed training intended for all GP practice staff which included elements of knowledge transfer, systems review and active linking. Seven GP Practices in four localities (North West England, UK) took part in the training. Qualitative evaluation was conducted using thirtee...

  4. Improving health care quality through culturally competent physicians: leadership and organizational diversity training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin B Horwitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Irwin B Horwitz1, Marilyn Sonilal2, Sujin K Horwitz31Cameron School of Business, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, USA; 2School of Public Health, University of Texas, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: The growing diversity of the population has resulted in substantial challenges for the US health care system. A substantial body of evidence has identified significant disparities in health care among culturally and ethnically diverse patients, irrespective of income, that negatively affects such factors as diagnostic precision, quality of care, adherence to healing protocols, and overall treatment outcomes. Diversity has also been shown to compromise the functionality of health care teams that are increasingly comprised of members with culturally different backgrounds, in which diversity produces misunderstanding and conflict. Many of the problems stem from a lack of cultural competence among both physicians and teams under their supervision. To reduce the numerous problems resulting from inadequate cultural competence among health care professionals, this article examines ways in which the issues of diversity can be effectively addressed in health care institutions. It is advocated that physicians adopt a proactive transformational leadership style to manage diversity because of its emphasis on understanding and aligning follower values which lie at the heart of diversity-related misunderstandings. It is also held that for leadership training among physicians to be fully effective, it should be integrated with organizational-wide diversity programs. By doing so, the complimentary effect could result in comprehensive change, resulting in substantial improvements in the quality of health care for all patients.Keywords: leadership, diversity, health care, disparities, medical education

  5. The Role of the Psychosocial Dimension in the Improvement of Quality of Care: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makivić Irena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our systematic review was to analyse the published literature on the psychosocial dimension of care in family medicine and its relationship with quality of care. We wanted to find out whether there is any evidence on the psychosocial approach in (family medicine. The recommended bio-psycho-social approach, besides the biomedical model of illness, takes into account several co-influencing psychological, sociological and existential factors. An online search of nine different databases used Boolean operators and the following selection criteria: the paper contained information on the holistic approach, quality indicators, family medicine, patient-centred care and/or the bio-psycho-social model of treatment. We retrieved 743 papers, of which 36 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Including the psychosocial dimension in patient management has been found to be useful in the prevention and treatment of physical and psychiatric illness, resulting in improved social functioning and patient satisfaction, reduced health care disparities, and reduced annual medical care charges. The themes of patient-centred, behavioural or psychosocial medicine were quite well presented in several papers. We could not find any conclusive evidence of the impact of a holistic biopsycho-social-approach. Weak and variable definitions of psychosocial dimensions, a low number of welldesigned intervention studies, and low numbers of included patients limited our conclusions.

  6. Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Tablet-Based Application to Improve Quality of Care in Child Mental Health Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Bunnell, Brian E.; Andrews III, Arthur R; Tatiana M. Davidson; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Soltis, Kathryn; Yarian, Caleb; Chu, Brian; Adams, Zachary W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children need access to high quality mental health care. Effective treatments now exist for a wide range of mental health conditions. However, these interventions are delivered with variable effectiveness in traditional mental health service settings. Innovative solutions are needed to improve treatment delivery quality and effectiveness. Objective The aim of this study was to develop a scalable, sustainable technology-based approach to improve the quality of care in child mental h...

  7. Delivery of maternal health care in Indigenous primary care services: baseline data for an ongoing quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwedza Ru K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous populations have disproportionately high rates of adverse perinatal outcomes relative to other Australians. Poorer access to good quality maternal health care is a key driver of this disparity. The aim of this study was to describe patterns of delivery of maternity care and service gaps in primary care services in Australian Indigenous communities. Methods We undertook a cross-sectional baseline audit for a quality improvement intervention. Medical records of 535 women from 34 Indigenous community health centres in five regions (Top End of Northern Territory 13, Central Australia 2, Far West New South Wales 6, Western Australia 9, and North Queensland 4 were audited. The main outcome measures included: adherence to recommended protocols and procedures in the antenatal and postnatal periods including: clinical, laboratory and ultrasound investigations; screening for gestational diabetes and Group B Streptococcus; brief intervention/advice on health-related behaviours and risks; and follow up of identified health problems. Results The proportion of women presenting for their first antenatal visit in the first trimester ranged from 34% to 49% between regions; consequently, documentation of care early in pregnancy was poor. Overall, documentation of routine antenatal investigations and brief interventions/advice regarding health behaviours varied, and generally indicated that these services were underutilised. For example, 46% of known smokers received smoking cessation advice/counselling; 52% of all women received antenatal education and 51% had investigation for gestational diabetes. Overall, there was relatively good documentation of follow up of identified problems related to hypertension or diabetes, with over 70% of identified women being referred to a GP/Obstetrician. Conclusion Participating services had both strengths and weaknesses in the delivery of maternal

  8. Improved results in paediatric diabetes care using a quality registry in an improvement collaborative: a case study in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Peterson

    Full Text Available Several studies show that good metabolic control is important for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In Sweden, there are large differences in mean haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c in different hospitals and difficulties implementing national guidelines in everyday practice. This study shows how the participation in an improvement collaborative could facilitate improvements in the quality of care by paediatric diabetes teams. The Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry, SWEDIABKIDS was used as a tool and resource for feedback and outcome measures.Twelve teams at paediatric diabetes centres, caring for 30% (2302/7660 of patients in Sweden, participated in an 18-month quality improvement program. Each team defined treatment targets, areas needing improvement, and action plans. The main outcome was the centre patients' mean HbA1c levels, but other clinical variables and change concepts were also studied. Data from the previous six months were compared with the first six months after starting the program, and the long-term follow up after another eleven months.All centres reduced mean HbA1c during the second and third periods compared with the first. The mean reduction for all was 3·7 mmol/mol (p<0.001, compared with non-participating centres who improved their mean HbA1c with 1·7 mmol/mol during the same period. Many of the participating centres reduced the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia and/or ketoacidosis, and five centres reached their goal of ensuring that all patients had some sort of physical activity at least once weekly. Change concepts were, for example, improved guidelines, appointment planning, informing the patients, improving teamwork and active use of the registry, and health promotion activities.By involving paediatric diabetes teams in a quality improvement collaborative together with access to a quality register, the quality of paediatric diabetes care can improve, thereby contributing to a reduced risk of late

  9. The effect of a national ambulance Quality Improvement Collaborative on performance in care bundles for acute myocardial infarction and stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Shaw, Deborah; Essam, Nadya; Togher, Fiona; Davy, Zowie; Spaight, Anne; Dewey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: National ambulance service indicators showed considerable variation in care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. We aimed to improve reliability of pre-hospital care processes for these conditions using a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC). The QIC involved educating ambulance staff in Quality Improvement (QI) methods, and the use of plan-do-study-act cycles (PDSA) to implement changes. Ambulance staff were provided with feedback on the effect of the PDSA cycles ...

  10. [Improving quality of end-of-life care. A possible and necessary change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Massimo; Beccaro, Monica; Di Leo, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the phases of development and assessment of a continuous quality improvement program focused on hospital end-of-life care for cancer patients. Although most patients would like to die at home, a high proportion still die in hospital. Many studies showed non appropriate end-of-life care for patients dying in hospital and their families. During the last years, a number of hospital end-of-life pathways have been developed but only partially assessed. Among the different care pathways the most structured and proficient seems to be the Liverpool Care Pathway for the dying patient (LCP). Although it is currently in use in over 20 countries, evidence for its effectiveness are weak. The Medical Research Council framework has been used for designing the process of implementation and assessment of the Italian LCP Program for cancer patients dying in hospital. In the first step (preclinical and phase I) results from literature review have been used to develop the Italian version of the Program. Subsequently, LCP-I Program has been piloted in the Medical and Respiratory Disease wards of the "Villa Scassi Hospital" of Genoa by a Palliative Care Team (phase I-II). The implementation process has been assessed with a mixed model. Focus groups, performed on samples of doctors and nurses before and after the implementation of the LCP-I, showed a perception of effectiveness of the Program, particularly in pain management and in communication with patients and their families. Quantitative analyses, performed on consecutive series of cancer deaths before and after the introduction of the Program, allowed to test process and outcomes measures for assessing the quality of end-of-life care. According to the results from the previous phases, a cluster randomised trial was designed with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of the LCP-I Program in improving quality of end-of-life care (phase III). This study is ongoing and final results will be available by 2012. In

  11. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdanović, Darko; Koncar, Miroslav; Kojundzić, Vinko; Jezidzić, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1) to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2) to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS) on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution. PMID:18005567

  12. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Gvozdanovi_

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1 to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2 to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  13. What are the effective ways to translate clinical leadership into health care quality improvement?

    OpenAIRE

    McSherry, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert McSherry,1 Paddy Pearce2 1School of Health and Social Care, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, 2PKP Consulting, Yarm, United Kingdom Abstract: The presence and/or absence of effective leaders in health care can have a stark consequence on the quality and outcomes of care. The delivery of safe, quality, compassionate health care is dependent on having effective clinical leaders at the frontline. In light of the Kirkup and Francis reports, this article explores some ways of translat...

  14. Benchmarking Is Associated With Improved Quality of Care in Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hermans, Michel; Elisaf, Moses; Michel, Georges; Muls, Erik; Nobels, Frank; Vandenberghe, Hans; Brotons, Carlos; OPTIMISE International Steering Committee

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess prospectively the effect of benchmarking on quality of primary care for patients with type 2 diabetes by using three major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors as critical quality indicators. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Primary care physicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes in six European countries were randomized to give standard care (control group) or standard care with feedback benchmarked against other centers in each country (benchmarking group). In both...

  15. The Strengthening Families Initiative and Child Care Quality Improvement: How Strengthening Families Influenced Change in Child Care Programs in One State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne; Klerman, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study investigated how the Strengthening Families through Early Care and Education initiative in Illinois (SFI) influenced change in 4 child care programs. Findings indicate that SFI influenced quality improvements through 4 primary pathways: (a) Learning Networks, (b) the quality of training, (c) the engagement of program…

  16. Leveraging Trainees to Improve Quality and Safety at the Point of Care: Three Models for Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Faherty, Laura; Mate, Kedar S; Moses, James M

    2016-04-01

    Trainees, as frontline providers who are acutely aware of quality improvement (QI) opportunities and patient safety (PS) issues, are key partners in achieving institutional quality and safety goals. However, as academic medical centers accelerate their initiatives to prioritize QI and PS, trainees have not always been engaged in these efforts. This article describes the development of an organizing framework with three suggested models of varying scopes and time horizons to effectively involve trainees in the quality and safety work of their training institutions. The proposed models, which were developed through a literature review, expert interviews with key stakeholders, and iterative testing, are (1) short-term, team-based, rapid-cycle initiatives; (2) medium-term, unit-based initiatives; and (3) long-term, health-system-wide initiatives. For each, the authors describe the objective, scope, duration, role of faculty leaders, steps for implementation in the clinical setting, pros and cons, and examples in the clinical setting. There are many barriers to designing the ideal training environments that fully engage trainees in QI/PS efforts, including lack of protected time for faculty mentors, time restrictions due to rotation-based training, and structural challenges. However, one of the most promising strategies for overcoming these barriers is integrating QI/PS principles into routine clinical care. These models provide opportunities for trainees to successfully learn and apply quality and safety principles to routine clinical care at the team, unit, and system level. PMID:26535866

  17. Measuring Quality Across Three Child Care Quality Rating and Improvement Systems: Findings from Secondary Analyses.

    OpenAIRE

    Lizabeth Malone; Gretchen Kirby; Pia Caronongan; Kimberly Boller; Kathryn Tout

    2011-01-01

    This report presents findings from an exploratory analysis of administrative data from three QRISs. The analyses examine the prevalence of quality components across centers and how they combine to result in an overall rating level and to predict observed quality.

  18. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic ...

  19. How Well Is Quality Improvement Described in the Perioperative Care Literature? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emma L.; Lees, Nicholas; Martin, Graham; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality improvement (QI) approaches are widely used across health care, but how well they are reported in the academic literature is not clear. A systematic review was conducted to assess the completeness of reporting of QI interventions and techniques in the field of perioperative care. Methods Searches were conducted using Medline, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care database, and PubMed. Two independent reviewers used the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist, which identifies 12 features of interventions that studies should describe (for example, How: the interventions were delivered [e.g., face to face, internet]), When and how much: duration, dose, intensity), to assign scores for each included article. Articles were also scored against a small number of additional criteria relevant to QI. Results The search identified 16,103 abstracts from databases and 19 from other sources. Following review, full-text was obtained for 223 articles, 100 of which met the criteria for inclusion. Completeness of reporting of QI in the perioperative care literature was variable. Only one article was judged fully complete against the 11 TIDieR items used. The mean TIDieR score across the 100 included articles was 6.31 (of a maximum 11). More than a third (35%) of the articles scored 5 or lower. Particularly problematic was reporting of fidelity (absent in 74% of articles) and whether any modifications were made to the intervention (absent in 73% of articles). Conclusions The standard of reporting of quality interventions and QI techniques in surgery is often suboptimal, making it difficult to determine whether an intervention can be replicated and used to deliver a positive effect in another setting. This suggests a need to explore how reporting practices could be improved. PMID:27066922

  20. Improving the quality of workers' compensation health care delivery: the Washington State Occupational Health Services Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickizer, T M; Franklin, G; Plaeger-Brockway, R; Mootz, R D

    2001-01-01

    This article has summarized research and policy activities undertaken in Washington State over the past several years to identify the key problems that result in poor quality and excessive disability among injured workers, and the types of system and delivery changes that could best address these problems in order to improve the quality of occupational health care provided through the workers' compensation system. Our investigations have consistently pointed to the lack of coordination and integration of occupational health services as having major adverse effects on quality and health outcomes for workers' compensation. The Managed Care Pilot Project, a delivery system intervention, focused on making changes in how care is organized and delivered to injured workers. That project demonstrated robust improvements in disability reduction; however, worker satisfaction suffered. Our current quality improvement initiative, developed through the Occupational Health Services Project, synthesizes what was learned from the MCP and other pilot studies to make delivery system improvements. This initiative seeks to develop provider incentives and clinical management processes that will improve outcomes and reduce the burden of disability on injured workers. Fundamental to this approach are simultaneously preserving workers' right to choose their own physician and maintaining flexibility in the provision of individualized care based on clinical need and progress. The OHS project then will be a "real world" test to determine if aligning provider incentives and giving physicians the tools they need to optimize occupational health delivery can demonstrate sustainable reduction in disability and improvements in patient and employer satisfaction. Critical to the success of this initiative will be our ability to: (1) enhance the occupational health care management skills and expertise of physicians who treat injured workers by establishing community-based Centers of Occupational

  1. Nine states' use of collaboratives to improve children's health care quality in medicaid and CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devers, Kelly J; Foster, Leslie; Brach, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    We examine quality improvement (QI) collaboratives underway in 9 states participating in the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) Quality Demonstration Grant Program. A total of 147 diverse, child-serving practices were participating in the collaboratives. We conducted 256 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders from March to August 2012-2 years into the 5-year demonstration projects-and analyzed states' grant applications, operating plans, and progress reports. The collaboratives have multiple complex aims. In addition to developing patient-centered medical home (PCMH) capability, some states use collaboratives to familiarize practices with CMS's Initial Core Set of Children's Health Care Quality Measures, practice-level quality measurement, and improving QI knowledge and skills. The duration of the collaboratives is longer than other well-known collaborative models. Collaboratives also vary in their methods for targeting areas for improvement and strategies for motivating practice recruitment and engagement. States also vary with respect to the other strategies they use to support QI and PCMH development. All states supplement the collaboratives with practice facilitation; the majority utilized practice-level parent engagement, but only 4 used workforce augmentation (ie, providing care coordinators and QI specialists). Practice staff highly valued aspects of the collaboratives and supplemental strategies, including the opportunity to work with experts and other child-serving practices; states' efforts to provide stipends and align demonstration efforts with other professional requirements or programs; receipt of relevant, customized QI materials; opportunities to learn how care coordinators or QI specialists might work in their practice without the risk of hiring them; and satisfaction from learning more about quality measures, QI concepts and techniques, critical medical home components, and how to identify PCMH capacity and

  2. [Quality of health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, J L; De Melo, P C

    2000-01-01

    Quality assurance is a relatively recent concern but already plays a major role in health care management and provision. Quality involves the definition of a comprehensive programme tailored by realistic and effective objectives and norms that include the structured review of procedures (namely clinical audits) and the use of up-to-date protocols. The involvement and motivation of health professionals, together with an adequate internal and external communication strategy, play a key role in the planning and application of these programmes. The use of programmed assessment, based on a solid knowledge of current practice, should have practical implications, optimising procedures in order to improve the quality of care. This commitment towards quality in health care should go far beyond governmental policy and should have clear support from health professionals. PMID:11234496

  3. Improving palliative care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Sue

    2009-05-01

    Any service improvement project requires planning, action and evaluation. Using a recognised quality improvement framework can offer a structured approach to implementing and assessing changes to patient care. This article describes how use of the Deming Cycle has helped to identify nurses\\' learning needs.

  4. An innovative telemedicine knowledge translation program to improve quality of care in intensive care units: protocol for a cluster randomized pragmatic trial

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto Ruxandra; Hales Brigette; Dainty Katie; Scales Damon C; Fowler Robert A; Adhikari Neill KJ; Zwarenstein Merrick

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There are challenges to timely adoption of, and ongoing adherence to, evidence-based practices known to improve patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU). Quality improvement initiatives using a collaborative network approach may increase the use of such practices. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel knowledge translation program for increasing the proportion of patients who appropriately receive the following six evidence-based care practices: ve...

  5. The Effectiveness of Coursework and Onsite Coaching at Improving the Quality of Care in Infant-Toddler Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Amanda J.; Green, Sheridan; Koehn, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: This study evaluated the effectiveness of 2 professional development interventions aimed at improving the quality of care provided by caregivers in ordinary infant-toddler child care settings, both center- and home-based. In all, 183 participants in a community college course on infant-toddler theory and practice, an in-service…

  6. [The transformation of the healthcare model in Catalonia to improve the quality of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrosa, Josep Maria; Guarga, Àlex; Brosa, Francesc; Jiménez, Josep; Robert, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The changes taking place in western countries require health systems to adapt to the public's evolving needs and expectations. The healthcare model in Catalonia is undergoing significant transformation in order to provide an adequate response to this new situation while ensuring the system's sustainability in the current climate of economic crisis. This transformation is based on converting the current disease-centred model which is fragmented into different levels, to a more patient-centred integrated and territorial care model that promotes the use of a shared network of the different specialities, the professionals, resources and levels of care, entering into territorial agreements and pacts which stipulate joint goals or objectives. The changes the Catalan Health Service (CatSalut) has undergone are principally focused on increasing resolution capacity of the primary level of care, eliminating differences in clinical practice, evolving towards more surgery-centred hospitals, promoting alternatives to conventional hospitalization, developing remote care models, concentrating and organizing highly complex care into different sectors at a territorial level and designing specific health codes in response to health emergencies. The purpose of these initiatives is to improve the effectiveness, quality, safety and efficiency of the system, ensuring equal access for the public to these services and ensuring a territorial balance. These changes should be facilitated and promoted using several different approaches, including implementing shared access to clinical history case files, the new model of results-based contracting and payment, territorial agreements, alliances between centres, harnessing the potential of information and communications technology and evaluation of results. PMID:26711056

  7. Care articulation by the Family Physician: improvement in the quality of life in terminal patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe Cavadas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to the definition of the role of the Family Physician (FP presented in the statement of the European Wonca 2002, one of her/his features is the ability of coordination of care, and management of the interface with other specialties. However, there are serious problems of coordination between the levels of assistance, as showed by the discontinuity of care when patients are hospitalized. With the aim of raising awareness and analyze a particular case of interface between the Primary Health Care (PHC and Hospital, and how important is the success of a good collaboration, this case is reported. Description of case: Male, 50 years old, caucasian race, inserted into a nuclear family in the stage VI Duvall’s cycle. A gastric adenocarcinoma by his FP was diagnosed at 49 years old. The patient was referenced to urgent consultation of general surgery. With various surgical complications he had a long internment. A poorly differentiated and infiltrating gastric carcinoma at the stage T3 N1 Mx, with poor prognosis, was confirmed. There was serious lack of interface and gaps in information between the hospital and the PHC. There was a bad care of the patient, with worsening of his condition. At the insistence of the FP, the articulation becomes effective and there was improved in quality of care and of the general condition of the patient. Conclusion: A proper interface and coordination of care contributed to better quality of life and satisfaction of patients, with positive repercussions for their families, to health professionals involved and to the National Health Service. The completion of the FP core competencies will only be possible when his/her proper function will be recognized and known by all the other health professionals.Note: The speciality physician denomination changes according to the country; in Brazil, it receives the name of Medicina de Família e Comunidade. In Portugal, country of the author of this paper

  8. Do hospitalist physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery? A systematic review of process, efficiency and outcome measures

    OpenAIRE

    Glazier Richard H; White Heather L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite more than a decade of research on hospitalists and their performance, disagreement still exists regarding whether and how hospital-based physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery. This systematic review summarizes the findings from 65 comparative evaluations to determine whether hospitalists provide a higher quality of inpatient care relative to traditional inpatient physicians who maintain hospital privileges with concurrent outpatient practices. M...

  9. How Would Programs Rate under California's Proposed Quality Rating and Improvement System? Evidence from Statewide and County Data on Early Care and Education Program Quality. Documented Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, Lynn A.; Zellman, Gail L.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the California Early Learning Quality Improvement System (CAEL QIS) Advisory Committee recommended a structure for a voluntary quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) that could apply to the state's 11,000 licensed centers and 36,600 licensed family child care homes (FCCHs). The proposed design consisted of an unweighted block system…

  10. Application of evidence-based urology in improving quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, Arabind; Dorairajan, L. N.; Kumar, Santosh

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine requires use of the best available evidence for optimal patient care. Increasingly scarce resources and escalating demands on time have led to emphasis on effective treatment. Opinion is slowly yielding to high-quality existent evidence. It is important that urologists adapt to these changes for them to deliver optimum care to the patients. This article discusses the levels of evidence, the nature of desirable evidence, means of assessing quality of clinical trials and...

  11. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Clarke, Siân E; Lal, Sham; Hansen, Kristian S; Magnussen, Pascal; LaRussa, Philip

    2016-01-01

    private health sector in Uganda. METHODS: A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop characteristics, training of staff in management of pneumonia, availability of guidelines and basic equipment......OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the......, available antibiotics, knowledge on treatment of pneumonia in children aged <5 years. The main study outcome was the proportion of private health facilities prescribing an antibiotic. RESULTS: A total of 170 registered drug shops were surveyed between August and October 2014. The majority of drug shops, 93...

  12. Improving lung cancer outcomes by improving the quality of surgical care

    OpenAIRE

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.; D’Amico, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the most important curative treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer, but variations in short- and long-term surgical outcomes jeopardize the benefit of surgery for certain patients, operated on by certain types of surgeons, at certain types of institutions. We discuss current understanding of surgical quality measures, and their role in promoting understanding of the causes of outcome disparities after lung cancer surgery. We also discuss the use of minima...

  13. What drives quality improvement in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care: process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihat, Akin; de Lusignan, Simon; Thomas, Nicola; Tahir, Mohammad Aumran; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study is a process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) study, comparing audit-based education (ABE) and sending clinical guidelines and prompts (G&P) with usual practice, in improving systolic blood pressure control in primary care. This evaluation aimed to explore how far clinical staff in participating practices were aware of the intervention, and why change in practice might have taken place. Setting 4 primary care practices in England: 2 received ABE, and 2 G&P. We purposively selected 1 northern/southern/city and rural practice from each study arm (from a larger pool of 132 practices as part of the QICKD trial). Participants The 4 study practices were purposively sampled, and focus groups conducted with staff from each. All staff members were invited to attend. Interventions Focus groups in each of 4 practices, at the mid-study point and at the end. 4 additional trial practices not originally selected for in-depth process evaluation took part in end of trial focus groups, to a total of 12 focus groups. These were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework approach. Results 5 themes emerged: (1) involvement in the study made participants more positive about the CKD register; (2) clinicians did not always explain to patients that they had CKD; (3) while practitioners improved their monitoring of CKD, many were sceptical that it improved care and were more motivated by pay-for-performance measures; (4) the impact of study interventions on practice was generally positive, particularly the interaction with specialists, included in ABE; (5) the study stimulated ideas for future clinical practice. Conclusions Improving quality in CKD is complex. Lack of awareness of clinical guidelines and scepticism about their validity are barriers to change. While pay-for-performance incentives are the main driver for change, quality improvement interventions can have a complementary influence. PMID:27053264

  14. Cohorting Dengue Patients Improves the Quality of Care and Clinical Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy C S Lum

    2015-06-01

    shock. The highest haematocrit was significantly higher post-intervention but the lowest total white cell counts and platelet counts remained unchanged. A significant and progressive reduction in the use of platelet transfusions occurred, from 21.7% pre-intervention to 14.6% in 2005 and 5.2% in 2006 post-intervention, p<0.001. Likewise, the use of plasma transfusion decreased significantly from 6.1% pre-intervention to 4.0% and 1.6% in the post-intervention years of 2005 and 2006 respectively, p<0.001. The duration of intravenous fluid therapy decreased from 3 days pre-intervention to 2.5 days (p<0.001 post-intervention; the length of hospital stay reduced from 4 days pre- to 3 days (p<0.001 post-intervention and the rate of intensive care admission from 5.8% pre to 2.6% and 2.5% post-intervention, p = 0.005.Cohorting adult dengue patients under a dedicated and trained team of doctors and nurses led to a substantial improvement in quality of care and clinical outcome.

  15. Alzheimer's Association Quality Care Campaign and professional training initiatives: improving hands-on care for people with dementia in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elizabeth; Reed, Peter

    2009-04-01

    In the U.S.A., direct care workers and licensed practical nurses are the professionals who provide the most hands-on care to people with dementia in nursing homes and residential care facilities--yet they do not receive adequate training in dementia care. Dementia care training needs to be universal with all disciplines at all levels of care. Even though there is variability on recommended hours and content, most studies emphasize the importance of dementia care training as a distinct component of required training for any professional or paraprofessional working in long-term care. In 2005, the Alzheimer's Association launched its Quality Care Campaign to improve dementia care through state and federal advocacy; consumer education and empowerment; and staff training. This paper describes the effectiveness of Alzheimer's Association training as measured by knowledge gained and providers' intention to change their behavior immediately after attending the training.Overall, findings indicated that the participants responded positively to evidence-based training in dementia care that emphasized the importance of (i) leadership, (ii) team communication and collaboration, (iii) support and empowerment of direct care staff, (iv) awareness and practice of specific dementia care issues, (v) resident and family involvement in care, and (vi) professional self-care. PMID:19288968

  16. Supporting employees' work-family needs improves health care quality: Longitudinal evidence from long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Kelly, Erin L; Bacic, Janine; DePasquale, Nicole; Hurtado, David; Kossek, Ellen; Sembajwe, Grace

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed qualitative and quantitative data from U.S.-based employees in 30 long-term care facilities. Analysis of semi-structured interviews from 154 managers informed quantitative analyses. Quantitative data include 1214 employees' scoring of their supervisors and their organizations on family supportiveness (individual scores and aggregated to facility level), and three outcomes: (1), care quality indicators assessed at facility level (n = 30) and collected monthly for six months after employees' data collection; (2), employees' dichotomous survey response on having additional off-site jobs; and (3), proportion of employees with additional jobs at each facility. Thematic analyses revealed that managers operate within the constraints of an industry that simultaneously: (a) employs low-wage employees with multiple work-family challenges, and (b) has firmly institutionalized goals of prioritizing quality of care and minimizing labor costs. Managers universally described providing work-family support and prioritizing care quality as antithetical to each other. Concerns surfaced that family-supportiveness encouraged employees to work additional jobs off-site, compromising care quality. Multivariable linear regression analysis of facility-level data revealed that higher family-supportive supervision was associated with significant decreases in residents' incidence of all pressure ulcers (-2.62%) and other injuries (-9.79%). Higher family-supportive organizational climate was associated with significant decreases in all falls (-17.94%) and falls with injuries (-7.57%). Managers' concerns about additional jobs were not entirely unwarranted: multivariable logistic regression of employee-level data revealed that among employees with children, having family-supportive supervision was associated with significantly higher likelihood of additional off-site jobs (RR 1.46, 95%CI 1.08-1.99), but family-supportive organizational climate was associated with lower likelihood

  17. Improving the Quality of Workers' Compensation Health Care Delivery: The Washington State Occupational Health Services Project

    OpenAIRE

    Wickizer, Thomas M.; Franklin, Gary; Plaeger-Brockway, Roy; Mootz, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers and health policy analysts in Washington State set out to determine the extent to which administrative process changes and delivery system interventions within workers' compensation affect quality and health outcomes for injured workers. This research included a pilot project to study the effects of providing occupationally focused health care through managed care arrangements on health outcomes, worker and employer satisfaction, and medical and disability costs. Based on the resu...

  18. Improving quality for maternal care - a case study from Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Ioana; Paily, VP; Sadanandan, Rajeev; Cluzeau, Françoise; Beena, M; Nair, Rajasekharan; Newbatt, Emma; Ghosh, Sujit; Sandeep, K; Chalkidou, Kalipso

    2016-01-01

    Background: The implementation of maternal health guidelines remains unsatisfactory, even for simple, well established interventions. In settings where most births occur in health facilities, as is the case in Kerala, India, preventing maternal mortality is linked to quality of care improvements. Context: Evidence-informed quality standards (QS), including quality statements and measurable structure and process indicators, are one innovative way of tackling the guideline implementation gap. Having adopted a zero tolerance policy to maternal deaths, the Government of Kerala worked in partnership with the Kerala Federation of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (KFOG) and NICE International to select the clinical topic, develop and initiate implementation of the first clinical QS for reducing maternal mortality in the state. Description of practice: The NICE QS development framework was adapted to the Kerala context, with local ownership being a key principle. Locally generated evidence identified post-partum haemorrhage as the leading cause of maternal death, and as the key priority for the QS. A multidisciplinary group (including policy-makers, gynaecologists and obstetricians, nurses and administrators) was established. Multi-stakeholder workshops convened by the group ensured that the statements, derived from global and local guidelines, and their corresponding indicators were relevant and acceptable to clinicians and policy-makers in Kerala. Furthermore, it helped identify practical methods for implementing the standards and monitoring outcomes. Lessons learned: An independent evaluation of the project highlighted the equal importance of a strong evidence-base and an inclusive development process. There is no one-size-fits-all process for QS development; a principle-based approach might be a better guide for countries to adapt global evidence to their local context.

  19. Improving quality for maternal care - a case study from Kerala, India [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Vlad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of maternal health guidelines remains unsatisfactory, even for simple, well established interventions. In settings where most births occur in health facilities, as is the case in Kerala, India, preventing maternal mortality is linked to quality of care improvements. Context: Evidence-informed quality standards (QS, including quality statements and measurable structure and process indicators, are one innovative way of tackling the guideline implementation gap. Having adopted a zero tolerance policy to maternal deaths, the Government of Kerala worked in partnership with the Kerala Federation of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (KFOG and NICE International to select the clinical topic, develop and initiate implementation of the first clinical QS for reducing maternal mortality in the state. Description of practice: The NICE QS development framework was adapted to the Kerala context, with local ownership being a key principle. Locally generated evidence identified post-partum haemorrhage as the leading cause of maternal death, and as the key priority for the QS. A multidisciplinary group (including policy-makers, gynaecologists and obstetricians, nurses and administrators was established. Multi-stakeholder workshops convened by the group ensured that the statements, derived from global and local guidelines, and their corresponding indicators were relevant and acceptable to clinicians and policy-makers in Kerala. Furthermore, it helped identify practical methods for implementing the standards and monitoring outcomes. Lessons learned: An independent evaluation of the project highlighted the equal importance of a strong evidence-base and an inclusive development process. There is no one-size-fits-all process for QS development; a principle-based approach might be a better guide for countries to adapt global evidence to their local context.

  20. Student evaluation of a primary care clerkship: quality assurance and identification of potential for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmel Wolfgang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, like many other countries, general practice clerkships have only recently become mandatory during medical education. The biggest challenges for the organisation of such clerkships are achieving a minimum level of standardisation, and developing and maintaining a system of quality assurance. The aim of this study is to assess the instructional quality in teaching practices using a benchmark system. Methods Before commencing, students anonymously assessed the importance of core aspects of the mandatory primary care clerkship. After the clerkship, they evaluated learning opportunities and teaching performance. Based on this data, a benchmark system was developed to identify areas of strength and weakness for all practices as well as individual teaching practices. Results A total of 695 students evaluated 97 general practices belonging to a teaching network. Prior to the clerkship, most students considered recognition of frequent diseases (85% and communication skills (65% the most important learning goals. After the clerkship, nearly 90% of students confirmed that the general practitioner (GP was good or excellent at teaching these two goals but only two-thirds thought the GP's teaching performance good or excellent in preventive medicine and screening. In an exemplary analysis, we identified the 2 best and the 2 worst practices that consistently received scores far above or below average, respectively. Conclusion We were able to identify areas of weakness in teaching and identified specific GPs who did not meet the students' needs and expectations. This evaluation seems to be a useful quality assurance tool to identify the potential for improvement and faculty development.

  1. A Blueprint for Early Care and Education Quality Improvement Initiatives. Publication #2015-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tout, Kathryn; Epstein, Dale; Soli, Meg; Lowe, Claire

    2015-01-01

    As Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) continue to launch and mature across states, questions emerge from stakeholders about how to design and implement effective quality improvement (QI) initiatives that accompany a QRIS. Funders, policymakers, and program developers with limited resources are looking to invest in activities that will…

  2. Quality improvement as an investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, William B

    2002-01-01

    Health care organizations are experiencing increasing internal and external pressures to improve the quality of care that they provide. However, there is not a framework that can be used to help understand the value of quality improvement projects and to prioritize competing projects. By understanding the current processes, costs and outcomes of care, enumerating the costs and benefits of change, anticipating the timing of the costs and benefits, and performing a financial analysis, quality improvement efforts can be evaluated as investments. Only by understanding and adapting to the financial environments in which health care organizations operate can continuous quality improvement in health care succeed. PMID:12512466

  3. Diabetes care may be improved with Steno Quality Assurance Tool--a self-assessment tool in diabetes management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Nielsen, Annemette Anker; Binder, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: To evaluate if improvements in the quality of diabetes care in Indian clinics can be obtained by simple self-surveillance PC-based software. METHOD: Nineteen Indian diabetes clinics were introduced to the principles of quality assurance (QA), and to a software program, the Steno Quality...... patients (baseline) and 4440 (follow-up). The average examination frequency per clinic of the following indicators increased significantly: lipid examination (72-87%) (p=0.007), foot examination (80-94%) (p=0.02), HbA1c investigation (59-77%) (p=0.006), and urine albumin excretion investigation (72-87%) (p.......002). CONCLUSION: Quality of diabetes care can be improved by applying SQAT, a QA self-surveillance software that enables documentation of changes in process and outcome indicators....

  4. Palliative home care intervention to improve the quality of life of women with advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of life is affected frequently observed in women with advanced breast cancer and is considered a leading indicator of effectiveness of palliative care. A descriptive, quasi-experimental study is presented ex-ante / ex-post, by applying open-ended interviews to explore the effects on the processes of adaptation of each patient and a self-administrable scale identified specific dimensions of quality of life, satisfaction with care and overall quality of life. The intervention was performed palliative home care to 52 women, according to the damages identified in the baseline diagnosis. The overall strategy included four steps: clinical and socio-demographic characterization of women; identification of the effects on the processes of adaptation by the theoretical model of Roy and dimensions of quality of life frequently affected, to design individually oriented actions on the drive shaft of Nursing Interventions Classification and evaluation of results intervention. The dimensions achieved higher frequency of involvement were: behavior, physical symptoms, pain interference and leisure activities, social life and family. Data were analyzed with qualitative methodologies and uni and multivariate statistical processing. After the intervention favorable changes in adaptive processes and dimensions of quality of life were observed; well as in the assessment of overall satisfaction with life. It was interesting that the dimensions of satisfaction assessed at the end of the intervention obtained an unfavorable assessment, outcome associated with sociodemographic variables. (author)

  5. An innovative telemedicine knowledge translation program to improve quality of care in intensive care units: protocol for a cluster randomized pragmatic trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Ruxandra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are challenges to timely adoption of, and ongoing adherence to, evidence-based practices known to improve patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU. Quality improvement initiatives using a collaborative network approach may increase the use of such practices. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel knowledge translation program for increasing the proportion of patients who appropriately receive the following six evidence-based care practices: venous thromboembolism prophylaxis; ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention; spontaneous breathing trials; catheter-related bloodstream infection prevention; decubitus ulcer prevention; and early enteral nutrition. Methods and design We will conduct a pragmatic cluster randomized active control trial in 15 community ICUs and one academic ICU in Ontario, Canada. The intervention is a multifaceted videoconferenced educational and problem-solving forum to organize knowledge translation strategies, including comparative audit and feedback, educational sessions from content experts, and dissemination of algorithms. Fifteen individual ICUs (clusters will be randomized to receive quality improvement interventions targeting one of the best practices during each of six study phases. Each phase lasts four months during the first study year and three months during the second. At the end of each study phase, ICUs are assigned to an intervention for a best practice not yet received according to a random schedule. The primary analysis will use patient-level process-of-care data to measure the intervention's effect on rates of adoption and adherence of each best practice in the targeted ICU clusters versus controls. Discussion This study design evaluates a new system for knowledge translation and quality improvement across six common ICU problems. All participating ICUs receive quality improvement initiatives during every study phase, improving buy-in. This study design

  6. Do hospitalist physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery? A systematic review of process, efficiency and outcome measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glazier Richard H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite more than a decade of research on hospitalists and their performance, disagreement still exists regarding whether and how hospital-based physicians improve the quality of inpatient care delivery. This systematic review summarizes the findings from 65 comparative evaluations to determine whether hospitalists provide a higher quality of inpatient care relative to traditional inpatient physicians who maintain hospital privileges with concurrent outpatient practices. Methods Articles on hospitalist performance published between January 1996 and December 2010 were identified through MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index, CINAHL, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and a hand-search of reference lists, key journals and editorials. Comparative evaluations presenting original, quantitative data on processes, efficiency or clinical outcome measures of care between hospitalists, community-based physicians and traditional academic attending physicians were included (n = 65. After proposing a conceptual framework for evaluating inpatient physician performance, major findings on quality are summarized according to their percentage change, direction and statistical significance. Results The majority of reviewed articles demonstrated that hospitalists are efficient providers of inpatient care on the basis of reductions in their patients' average length of stay (69% and total hospital costs (70%; however, the clinical quality of hospitalist care appears to be comparable to that provided by their colleagues. The methodological quality of hospitalist evaluations remains a concern and has not improved over time. Persistent issues include insufficient reporting of source or sample populations (n = 30, patients lost to follow-up (n = 42 and estimates of effect or random variability (n = 35; inappropriate use of statistical tests (n = 55; and failure to adjust for established confounders (n = 37. Conclusions Future research should include

  7. Assessing organizational readiness for depression care quality improvement: relative commitment and implementation capability

    OpenAIRE

    Rubenstein, Lisa V; Danz, Marjorie S; Crain, A. Lauren; Glasgow, Russell E.; Whitebird, Robin R.; Solberg, Leif I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a major cause of morbidity and cost in primary care patient populations. Successful depression improvement models, however, are complex. Based on organizational readiness theory, a practice’s commitment to change and its capability to carry out the change are both important predictors of initiating improvement. We empirically explored the links between relative commitment (i.e., the intention to move forward within the following year) and implementation capability. Me...

  8. Health information systems and physician quality: role of the American board of pediatrics maintenance of certification in improving children's health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A second revolution in quality is occurring in US health care, as profound as the Flexner revolution almost 100 years ago. Systems issues are the basis for most of the concern, but physician quality and professional development are also important. Specialty board certification and maintenance of certification are key drivers of professional development and improvement of care. Physicians are now required to document that they can assess and improve quality of care. Functional health information systems are essential for this process. PMID:19088225

  9. Closing the delivery gaps in pediatric HIV care in Togo, West Africa: using the care delivery value chain framework to direct quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Kevin; Schechter, Jennifer; Dey, Monica; Braganza, Sandra; Rhatigan, Joseph; Houndenou, Spero; Gbeleou, Christophe; Palerbo, Emmanuel; Tchangani, Elfamozo; Lopez, Andrew; Bensen, Emily; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2016-03-01

    Providing quality care for all children living with HIV/AIDS remains a global challenge and requires the development of new healthcare delivery strategies. The care delivery value chain (CDVC) is a framework that maps activities required to provide effective and responsive care for a patient with a particular disease across the continuum of care. By mapping activities along a value chain, the CDVC enables managers to better allocate resources, improve communication, and coordinate activities. We report on the successful application of the CDVC as a strategy to optimize care delivery and inform quality improvement (QI) efforts with the overall aim of improving care for Pediatric HIV patients in Togo, West Africa. Over the course of 12 months, 13 distinct QI activities in Pediatric HIV/AIDS care delivery were monitored, and 11 of those activities met or exceeded established targets. Examples included: increase in infants receiving routine polymerase chain reaction testing at 2 months (39-95%), increase in HIV exposed children receiving confirmatory HIV testing at 18 months (67-100%), and increase in patients receiving initial CD4 testing within 3 months of HIV diagnosis (67-100%). The CDVC was an effective approach for evaluating existing systems and prioritizing gaps in delivery for QI over the full cycle of Pediatric HIV/AIDS care in three specific ways: (1) facilitating the first comprehensive mapping of Pediatric HIV/AIDS services, (2) identifying gaps in available services, and (3) catalyzing the creation of a responsive QI plan. The CDVC provided a framework to drive meaningful, strategic action to improve Pediatric HIV care in Togo. PMID:27391996

  10. Voluntary peer review as innovative tool for quality improvement in the intensive care unit – a retrospective descriptive cohort study in German intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpf, Oliver; Bloos, Frank; Bause, Hanswerner; Brinkmann, Alexander; Deja, Maria; Marx, Gernot; Kaltwasser, Arnold; Dubb, Rolf; Muhl, Elke; Greim, Clemens-A.; Weiler, Norbert; Chop, Ines; Jonitz, Günther; Schaefer, Henning; Felsenstein, Matthias; Liebeskind, Ursula; Leffmann, Carsten; Jungbluth, Annemarie; Waydhas, Christian; Pronovost, Peter; Spies, Claudia; Braun, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Quality improvement and safety in intensive care are rapidly evolving topics. However, there is no gold standard for assessing quality improvement in intensive care medicine yet. In 2007 a pilot project in German intensive care units (ICUs) started using voluntary peer reviews as an innovative tool for quality assessment and improvement. We describe the method of voluntary peer review and assessed its feasibility by evaluating anonymized peer review reports and analysed the thematic clusters highlighted in these reports. Methods: Retrospective data analysis from 22 anonymous reports of peer reviews. All ICUs – representing over 300 patient beds – had undergone voluntary peer review. Data were retrieved from reports of peers of the review teams and representatives of visited ICUs. Data were analysed with regard to number of topics addressed and results of assessment questionnaires. Reports of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT reports) of these ICUs are presented. Results: External assessment of structure, process and outcome indicators revealed high percentages of adherence to predefined quality goals. In the SWOT reports 11 main thematic clusters were identified representative for common ICUs. 58.1% of mentioned topics covered personnel issues, team and communication issues as well as organisation and treatment standards. The most mentioned weaknesses were observed in the issues documentation/reporting, hygiene and ethics. We identified several unique patterns regarding quality in the ICU of which long-term personnel problems und lack of good reporting methods were most interesting Conclusion: Voluntary peer review could be established as a feasible and valuable tool for quality improvement. Peer reports addressed common areas of interest in intensive care medicine in more detail compared to other methods like measurement of quality indicators. PMID:25587245

  11. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until

  12. A multi-faceted intervention to implement guideline care and improve quality of care for older people who present to the emergency department with falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagree Yusuf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines recommend that older people should receive multi-factorial interventions following an injurious fall however there is limited evidence that this is routine practice. We aimed to improve the delivery of evidence based care to patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED following a fall. Methods A prospective before and after study was undertaken in the ED of a medium-sized hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Participants comprised 313 community-dwelling patients, aged 65 years and older, presenting to ED as a result of a fall. A multi-faceted strategy to change practice was implemented and included a referral pathway, audit and feedback and additional falls specialist staff. Key measures to show improvements comprised the proportion of patients reviewed by allied health, proportion of patients referred for guideline care, quality of care index, all determined by record extraction. Results Allied health staff increased the proportion of patients being reviewed from 62.7% in the before period to 89% after the intervention (P Conclusions A multi-faceted change strategy was associated with an improvement in allied health in ED prioritizing the review of ED fallers as well as subsequent referral for comprehensive geriatric care. The processes of multi-disciplinary care also improved, indicating improved care received by the patient.

  13. What is Good Quality of Health Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magne Nylenna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A diversity of definitions of quality exists, that frequently contain aspects of complexity, relativity and subjectivity. This paper provides an overview of key components in the quality debate within health care, including different perspectives and dimensions of the quality of care. Definitions of the quality of health care reflect the characteristics of health services, and are useful for measurements and quality improvement. Over time the patient perspective of quality has gotten increasing weight, and in quality improvement there has been a shift from individual responsibility for doctors and health care personnel to systems thinking. We argue that the quality approach in health care should be more standardized and that health care-specific definitions of quality should be used when the relationship between physician professionalism and quality is investigated.Keywords: quality, health care, systems thinking, patient perspective, outcome, indicator, measurement, improvement.

  14. Video laryngoscopy in pre-hospital critical care – a quality improvement study

    OpenAIRE

    Rhode, Marianne Grønnebæk; Vandborg, Mads Partridge; Bladt, Vibeke; Rognås, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-hospital endotracheal intubation is challenging and repeated endotracheal intubation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether the introduction of the McGrath MAC video laryngoscope as the primary device for pre-hospital endotracheal intubation could improve first-pass success rate in our anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital critical care services. We also investigated the incidence of failed pre-hospital endotracheal intubation, the use of...

  15. Quality Rating Improvement System "for" Early Care "and" Education: Development, Implementation, Evaluation and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianping; Ma, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Quality Rating Improvement System (QRIS) has gained national momentum. The authors first present a national scene of QRIS and then use Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County as a case study to illustrate a number of things. First, they look at the logic model behind the QRIS. Next, they review the design and implementation of the QRIS in…

  16. How can we improve outcomes for patients and families under palliative care? implementing clinical audit for quality improvement in resource limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Selman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach. The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step.

  17. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic health records and mobile health applications. Such technologies can be harnessed to improve patient safety; however, if not used properly they can negatively impact on patient safety. In this issue we focus on advances in training that can improve patient safety and the optimal use of new technologies in healthcare. For example, use of clinical simulations and online computer based training can be employed both to facilitate learning about new clinical discoveries as well as to integrate technology into day to day healthcare practices. In this issue we are publishing papers that describe advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve patient safety as it relates to the use of educational technologies, health information technology and on-line health resources. In addition, in the special issue we describe new approaches to training and patient safety including, online communities, clinical simulations, on-the-job training, computer based training and health information systems that educate about and support safer patient care in real-time (i.e. when health professionals are providing care to patients. These educational and technological initiatives can be aimed at health professionals (i.e. students and those who are currently working in the field. The outcomes of this work are significant as they lead to safer care for patients and their family members. The issue has both theoretical and applied papers that describe advances in patient

  18. Automatic quality improvement reports in the intensive care unit: One step closer toward meaningful use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadzko, Mikhail A; Thongprayoon, Charat; Ahmed, Adil; Tiong, Ing C; Li, Man; Brown, Daniel R; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the feasibility and validity of electronic generation of quality metrics in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: This minimal risk observational study was performed at an academic tertiary hospital. The Critical Care Independent Multidisciplinary Program at Mayo Clinic identified and defined 11 key quality metrics. These metrics were automatically calculated using ICU DataMart, a near-real time copy of all ICU electronic medical record (EMR) data. The automatic report was compared with data from a comprehensive EMR review by a trained investigator. Data was collected for 93 randomly selected patients admitted to the ICU during April 2012 (10% of admitted adult population). This study was approved by the Mayo Clinic Institution Review Board. RESULTS: All types of variables needed for metric calculations were found to be available for manual and electronic abstraction, except information for availability of free beds for patient-specific time-frames. There was 100% agreement between electronic and manual data abstraction for ICU admission source, admission service, and discharge disposition. The agreement between electronic and manual data abstraction of the time of ICU admission and discharge were 99% and 89%. The time of hospital admission and discharge were similar for both the electronically and manually abstracted datasets. The specificity of the electronically-generated report was 93% and 94% for invasive and non-invasive ventilation use in the ICU. One false-positive result for each type of ventilation was present. The specificity for ICU and in-hospital mortality was 100%. Sensitivity was 100% for all metrics. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates excellent accuracy of electronically-generated key ICU quality metrics. This validates the feasibility of automatic metric generation. PMID:27152259

  19. Improving the quality of obstetric care for women with obstructed labour in the national referral hospital in Uganda: lessons learnt from criteria based audit

    OpenAIRE

    Kayiga, Herbert; Ajeani, Judith; Kiondo, Paul; Kaye, Dan K

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructed labour remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality whose complications can be reduced with improved quality of obstetric care. The objective was to assess whether criteria-based audit improves quality of obstetric care provided to women with obstructed labour in Mulago hospital, Uganda. Methods Using criteria-based audit, management of obstructed labour was analyzed prospectively in two audits. Six standards of care were compared. An initial audit of 180 pa...

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of a tailored multifaceted performance feedback intervention to improve the quality of care: protocol for a cluster randomized trial in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westert Gert P

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feedback is potentially effective in improving the quality of care. However, merely sending reports is no guarantee that performance data are used as input for systematic quality improvement (QI. Therefore, we developed a multifaceted intervention tailored to prospectively analyzed barriers to using indicators: the Information Feedback on Quality Indicators (InFoQI program. This program aims to promote the use of performance indicator data as input for local systematic QI. We will conduct a study to assess the impact of the InFoQI program on patient outcome and organizational process measures of care, and to gain insight into barriers and success factors that affected the program's impact. The study will be executed in the context of intensive care. This paper presents the study's protocol. Methods/design We will conduct a cluster randomized controlled trial with intensive care units (ICUs in the Netherlands. We will include ICUs that submit indicator data to the Dutch National Intensive Care Evaluation (NICE quality registry and that agree to allocate at least one intensivist and one ICU nurse for implementation of the intervention. Eligible ICUs (clusters will be randomized to receive basic NICE registry feedback (control arm or to participate in the InFoQI program (intervention arm. The InFoQI program consists of comprehensive feedback, establishing a local, multidisciplinary QI team, and educational outreach visits. The primary outcome measures will be length of ICU stay and the proportion of shifts with a bed occupancy rate above 80%. We will also conduct a process evaluation involving ICUs in the intervention arm to investigate their actual exposure to and experiences with the InFoQI program. Discussion The results of this study will inform those involved in providing ICU care on the feasibility of a tailored multifaceted performance feedback intervention and its ability to accelerate systematic and local quality

  1. Can Ranking Hospitals on the Basis of Patients' Travel Distances Improve Quality of Care?

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Daniel P.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional outcomes report cards-- public disclosure of information about the patient-background-adjusted health outcomes of individual hospitals and physicians -- may help improve quality, but they may also encourage providers to "game" the system by avoiding sick and/or seeking healthy patients. In this paper, I propose an alternative approach: ranking hospitals on the basis of the travel distances of their Medicare patients. At least in theory, a distance report card could dominate conve...

  2. Improving Palliative Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social,...

  3. Defining Quality Child Care: Multiple Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrist, Amanda W.; Thompson, Stacy D.; Norris, Deborah J.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple perspectives regarding the definition of quality child care, and how child care quality can be improved, were examined using a focus group methodology. Participants were representatives from stakeholder groups in the child care profession, including child care center owners and directors (3 groups), parents (3 groups), child caregivers (3…

  4. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases.Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level.Method: A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility.Results: There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes.Conclusions: A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  5. Quality improvement techniques to improve patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E Joseph; Guo, Kristina L

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes several approaches for implementing quality improvement initiatives to improve patient satisfaction, which enables health-care organizations to position themselves for success in today's global and increasingly competitive environment. Specifically, measuring the views of patients, improving patient satisfaction through a community-wide effort, and using a Six Sigma program are discussed. Each of these programs can be an effective mechanism for quality improvement. A key component to quality improvement techniques involves collaborative efforts by all health-care professionals and managers as they seek to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:15552388

  6. Primary care quality management in Uzbekistan.

    OpenAIRE

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Baymirova, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Uzbek government has a central role in primary care quality management. On paper, many quality management structures and procedures exist. Now, primary care practice should follow, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – has shown. The results have been published in a WHO report. With donor support, quality improvement in primary care is a national priority. Many laws, decrees and orders deal with the improvement of (primary) health care service...

  7. “Making a difference” – Medical students’ opportunities for transformational change in health care and learning through quality improvement projects

    OpenAIRE

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Bac, Martin; Hugo, Jannie; Sandars, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality improvement is increasingly becoming an essential aspect of the medical curriculum, with the intention of improving the health care system to provide better health care. The aim of this study was to explore undergraduate medical students’ experiences of their involvement in quality improvement projects during a district health rotation. Methods Student group reports from rotations in learning centres of the University of Pretoria in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa were an...

  8. Measuring quality of maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Katherine J; Draycott, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Health-care organisations are required to monitor and measure the quality of their maternity services, but measuring quality is complex, and no universal consensus exists on how best to measure it. Clinical outcomes and process measures that are important to stakeholders should be measured, ideally in standardised sets for benchmarking. Furthermore, a holistic interpretation of quality should also reflect patient experience, ideally integrated with outcome and process measures, into a balanced suite of quality indicators. Dashboards enable reporting of trends in adverse outcomes to stakeholders, staff and patients, and they facilitate targeted quality improvement initiatives. The value of such dashboards is dependent upon high-quality, routinely collected data, subject to robust statistical analysis. Moving forward, we could and should collect a standard, relevant set of quality indicators, from routinely collected data, and present these in a manner that facilitates ongoing quality improvement, both locally and at regional/national levels. PMID:25913563

  9. Improving Palliative Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual distress. Furthermore, data show that PC continues to be underutilized and inaccessible, and current innovative models of integrating PC into standard cancer care lack uniformity. The aim of this article is to address the existing barriers in implementing PC into our cancer care delivery system and discuss how the oncology advanced practice nurse plays an essential role in providing high-quality cancer care. We also review the IOM recommendations; highlight the work done by the National Consensus Project in promoting quality PC; and discuss a National Cancer Institute-funded program project currently conducted at a National Comprehensive Cancer Center, "Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptoms Concerns in Lung Cancer," which serves as a model to promote high-quality care for patients and their families. PMID:26114013

  10. Potential access to primary health care: what does the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement data show?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Fronteira, Inês Santos Estevinho; Coêlho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Claudia Santos; Brandão, Isabel Cristina Araújo; Yamamura, Mellina; Maroto, Renata Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the influence of contextual indicators on the performance of municipalities regarding potential access to primary health care in Brazil and to discuss the contribution from nurses working on this access. Method: a multicenter descriptive study based on secondary data from External Evaluation of the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement in Primary Care, with the participation of 17,202 primary care teams. The chi-square test of proportions was used to verify differences between the municipalities stratified based on size of the coverage area, supply, coordination, and integration; when necessary, the chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher's exact test were employed. For the population variable, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. Results: the majority of participants were nurses (n=15.876; 92,3%). Statistically significant differences were observed between the municipalities in terms of territory (p=0.0000), availability (p=0.0000), coordination of care (p=0.0000), integration (p=0.0000) and supply (p=0.0000), verifying that the municipalities that make up area 6 tend to have better performance in these dimensions. Conclusion: areas 4,5 and 6 performed better in every analyzed dimension, and the nurse had a leading role in the potential to access primary health care in Brazil. PMID:26959332

  11. Investigating organizational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organizational culture, professional involvement and the quality of care in European hospitals: the 'Deepening our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe (DUQuE' project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitals in European countries apply a wide range of quality improvement strategies. Knowledge of the effectiveness of these strategies, implemented as part of an overall hospital quality improvement system, is limited. Methods/Design We propose to study the relationships among organisational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organisational culture, professionals' involvement with the quality of hospital care, including clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient involvement. We will employ a cross-sectional, multi-level study design in which patient-level measurements are nested in hospital departments, which are in turn nested in hospitals in different EU countries. Mixed methods will be used for data collection, measurement and analysis. Hospital/care pathway level constructs that will be assessed include external pressure, hospital governance, quality improvement system, patient empowerment in quality improvement, organisational culture and professional involvement. These constructs will be assessed using questionnaires. Patient-level constructs include clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient involvement, and will be assessed using audit of patient records, routine data and patient surveys. For the assessment of hospital and pathway level constructs we will collect data from randomly selected hospitals in eight countries. For a sample of hospitals in each country we will carry out additional data collection at patient-level related to four conditions (stroke, acute myocardial infarction, hip fracture and delivery. In addition, structural components of quality improvement systems will be assessed using visits by experienced external assessors. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and graphical representations and methods for data reduction, classification techniques and psychometric analysis, before moving to bi-variate and multivariate analysis. The latter will be conducted

  12. Improving the interface between primary and secondary care: a statement from the European Working Party on Quality in Family Practice (EQuiP)

    OpenAIRE

    Kvamme, O; Olesen, F.; Samuelsson, M

    2001-01-01

    A group from the European Working Party on Quality in Family Practice (EQuiP), working with over 20 European colleges of primary care, has assessed what, in their view, is needed to improve the quality of care at the interface between general practice and specialists. Experiences and ideas from a wide range of people were gathered through focused group discussions. From these it was clear that, for real improvement at the interface of care, changes are needed in the system of care and in the ...

  13. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until now, only noncontrolled studies on the effects of implementation of the RAI have been carried out. Desing/methods: Quasi-experimental; intervention wards with RAI compared with wards with no interv...

  14. Interactive Dissemination: Engaging Stakeholders in the Use of Aggregated Quality Improvement Data for System-Wide Change in Australian Indigenous Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Laycock, Alison; Bailie, Jodie; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrating theory when developing complex quality improvement interventions can help to explain clinical and organizational behavior, inform strategy selection, and understand effects. This paper describes a theory-informed interactive dissemination strategy. Using aggregated quality improvement data, the strategy seeks to engage stakeholders in wide-scale data interpretation and knowledge sharing focused on achieving wide-scale improvement in primary health-care quality. Methods ...

  15. Do strategies to improve quality of maternal and child health care in lower and middle income countries lead to improved outcomes? A review of the evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Dettrick

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Efforts to scale-up maternal and child health services in lower and middle income countries will fail if services delivered are not of good quality. Although there is evidence of strategies to increase the quality of health services, less is known about the way these strategies affect health system goals and outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to examine this relationship. METHODS: We undertook a search of MEDLINE, SCOPUS and CINAHL databases, limiting the results to studies including strategies specifically aimed at improving quality that also reported a measure of quality and at least one indicator related to health system outcomes. Variation in study methodologies prevented further quantitative analysis; instead we present a narrative review of the evidence. FINDINGS: Methodologically, the quality of evidence was poor, and dominated by studies of individual facilities. Studies relied heavily on service utilisation as a measure of strategy success, which did not always correspond to improved quality. The majority of studies targeted the competency of staff and adequacy of facilities. No strategies addressed distribution systems, public-private partnership or equity. Key themes identified were the conflict between perceptions of patients and clinical measures of quality and the need for holistic approaches to health system interventions. CONCLUSION: Existing evidence linking quality improvement strategies to improved MNCH outcomes is extremely limited. Future research would benefit from the inclusion of more appropriate indicators and additional focus on non-facility determinants of health service quality such as health policy, supply distribution, community acceptability and equity of care.

  16. Urinary incontinence in extended care facilities: a literature review and proposal for continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavner, K

    1998-12-01

    Despite inconsistencies in the literature regarding research design, definitions, outcomes measures, and maintenance programs, the majority of continence experts have accepted prompted voiding as a successful method for decreasing urinary incontinence in extended care facilities. Research findings to date lack a consistent definition of urinary incontinence, and no objective outcomes measures are available to evaluate the success of an intervention. Furthermore, maintenance of an intervention is often not included in the research design. The findings to date suggest that prompted voiding programs in extended care facilities can help decrease cost of care and dependence, increase self esteem, increase dignity, maintain skin health, and increase satisfaction with care among significant others. Implications for research include developing more structured approaches to maintaining continence, comprehensive training programs for extended care facility staff at all levels, and realistic maintenance protocols for interventions used to maintain continence. PMID:10026548

  17. Reducing unnecessary hospital days to improve quality of care through physician accountability: a cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caminiti Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 20% of hospital bed use is inappropriate, implying a waste of resources and the increase of patient iatrogenic risk. Methods This is a cluster, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, carried out in a large University Hospital of Northern Italy, aiming to evaluate the effect of a strategy to reduce unnecessary hospital days. The primary outcome was the percentage of patient-days compatible with discharge. Among secondary objectives, to describe the strategy’s effect in the long-term, as well as on hospital readmissions, considered to be a marker of the quality of hospital care. The 12 medical wards with the longest length of stay participated. Effectiveness was measured at the individual level on 3498 eligible patients during monthly index days. Patients admitted or discharged on index days, or with stay >90 days, were excluded. All ward staff was blinded to the index days, while staff in the control arm and data analysts were blinded to the trial’s objectives and interventions. The strategy comprised the distribution to physicians of the list of their patients whose hospital stay was compatible with discharge according to a validated Delay Tool, and of physician length of stay profiles, followed by audits managed autonomously by the physicians of the ward. Results During the 12 months of data collection, over 50% of patient-days were judged to be compatible with discharge. Delays were mainly due to problems with activities under medical staff control. Multivariate analysis considering clustering showed that the strategy reduced patient-days compatible with discharge by 16% in the intervention vs control group, (OR=0.841; 95% CI, 0.735 to 0.963; P=0.012. Follow-up at 1 year did not yield a statistically significant difference between the percentages of patient-days judged to be compatible with discharge between the two arms (OR=0.818; 95% CI, 0.476 to 1.405; P=0.47. There was no significant difference in 30-day

  18. Quality assurance in the ambulatory care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, R D

    1989-01-01

    One of the most utilitarian developments in the field of quality assurance in health care has been the introduction of industrial concepts of quality management. These concepts, coupled with buyer demand for accountability, are bringing new perspectives to health care quality assurance. These perspectives provide a new view of quality assurance as a major responsibility and strategic opportunity for management; a competitive and marketable commodity; and a method of improving safety, effectiveness, and satisfaction with medical care. PMID:10313405

  19. 落实优质护理提高呼吸内科护理质量%Implementing High Quality Care to Improve the Quality of Care in Department of Respiratory Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈心容; 何剑

    2012-01-01

    Refer to the first batch of high quality care demonstration ward experience, the paper summed up the practice of quality of care in department of respiratory medicine from seven aspects including developing activity plans f reforming the scheduling mode, strengthening the nurse - patient communication, implementation of basic nursing care and specialist care, strengthening health education management and improvement of the performance appraisal system.%参照第一批优质护理服务示范病房工作经验,从制定活动计划、改变排班模式、加强护患沟通、落实基础护理、落实专科护理、强化健康教育管理、完善绩效考核制度等7方面,总结了呼吸内科开展优质护理服务的主要做法.

  20. Improving health care quality through culturally competent physicians: leadership and organizational diversity training

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin B. Horwitz; Marilyn Sonilal; Sujin K Horwitz

    2011-01-01

    Irwin B Horwitz1, Marilyn Sonilal2, Sujin K Horwitz31Cameron School of Business, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, USA; 2School of Public Health, University of Texas, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: The growing diversity of the population has resulted in substantial challenges for the US health care system. A substantial body of evidence has identified significant disparities in health care among culturally and ethnically diverse patients, irrespective of income, that negatively affects such f...

  1. A “best practices” strategy to improve quality in Medicaid managed care plans

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Karen L.; Baron, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Medicaid managed care is delivered through organizations operating in very heterogeneous environments that confront similar barriers to success. Because Medicaid managed care is implemented differently in each state, health plans have been isolated from each other and have not had an opportunity to learn how others may have surmounted commonly encountered barriers. After interviewing Medicaid health plan medical directors, we developed a learning collaborative model based on shared categories...

  2. 刍议如何提高护士护理质量%Discussion on How to Improve the Quality of Nursing Care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄慧明

    2013-01-01

    医院护士的护理质量的高低直接影响到医疗质量,也直接影响到医院的声誉。而护士的护理质量则是由护士的综合素质所决定的,因此要想提高医院的护士护理质量,就要提高护士的综合素质。%Hospital nurses directly af ects the quality of care to the medical quality,but also directly af ect the hospital's reputation.The quality of care for nurses by nurses is the overal quality of the decision,so in order to improve the quality of care hospital nurse,it is necessary to improve the overal quality of nurses.

  3. Does a competitive voucher program for adolescents improve the quality of reproductive health care? A simulated patient study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorter Anna C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about how sexual and reproductive (SRH health can be made accessible and appropriate to adolescents. This study evaluates the impact and sustainability of a competitive voucher program on the quality of SRH care for poor and underserved female adolescents and the usefulness of the simulated patient (SP method for such evaluation. Methods 28,711 vouchers were distributed to adolescents in disadvantaged areas of Managua that gave free-of-charge access to SRH care in 4 public, 10 non-governmental and 5 private clinics. Providers received training and guidelines, treatment protocols, and financial incentives for each adolescent attended. All clinics were visited by female adolescent SPs requesting contraception. SPs were sent one week before, during (with voucher and one month after the intervention. After each consultation they were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Twenty-one criteria were scored and grouped into four categories. Clinics' scores were compared using non-parametric statistical methods (paired design: before-during and before-after. Also the influence of doctors' characteristics was tested using non-parametric statistical methods. Results Some aspects of service quality improved during the voucher program. Before the program started 8 of the 16 SPs returned 'empty handed', although all were eligible contraceptive users. During the program 16/17 left with a contraceptive method (p = 0.01. Furthermore, more SPs were involved in the contraceptive method choice (13/17 vs.5/16, p = 0.02. Shared decision-making on contraceptive method as well as condom promotion had significantly increased after the program ended. Female doctors had best scores before- during and after the intervention. The improvements were more pronounced among male doctors and doctors older than 40, though these improvements did not sustain after the program ended. Conclusion This study illustrates provider

  4. A public-private trauma center network in Florida harnesses data to improve care quality for an aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVernay, Christina

    2013-12-01

    As the US population ages, trauma systems face new challenges in addition to the long-standing problem of access. Patients ages sixty-five and older are more likely than younger patients to fall and suffer serious injury or death as a result. This older patient population, when compared with younger cohorts, suffers higher mortality rates, has more comorbidities-diabetes, cancer, and heart conditions being the more serious among them-and takes more medications, which can complicate treatment. The University of South Florida (USF) Medical School and the HCA hospital system have partnered to create a network of five trauma centers in underserved areas of the state to increase access to trauma care for all Floridians while maintaining a special focus on geriatric trauma care. Collecting and analyzing data for improving care quality and undertaking research is a central aim of the partnership. Based on their research findings, trauma surgeons in the USF/HCA Trauma Network have identified best practices and codified them in standard operating procedures. PMID:24301397

  5. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY): impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Lindsay A; Huisingh, Carrie E; McGwin, Gerald; Mennemeyer, Stephen T; Bregantini, Mary; Patel, Nita; Saaddine, Jinan; Crews, John E; Girkin, Christopher A; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of the education program of the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY) telemedicine program on at-risk patients’ knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care as well as to assess patient satisfaction with EQUALITY. Patients and methods New or existing patients presenting for a comprehensive eye exam (CEE) at one of two retail-based primary eye clinics were enrolled based on ≥1 of the following at-risk criteria for glaucoma: African Americans ≥40 years of age, Whites ≥50 years of age, diabetes, family history of glaucoma, and/or preexisting diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 651 patients were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered prior to the patients’ CEE and prior to the patients receiving any of the evidence-based eye health education program; a follow-up questionnaire was administered 2–4 weeks later by phone. Baseline and follow-up patient responses regarding knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care were compared using McNemar’s test. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of patient-level characteristics with improvement in knowledge and attitudes. Overall patient satisfaction was summarized. Results At follow-up, all patient responses in the knowledge and attitude domains significantly improved from baseline (P≤0.01 for all questions). Those who were unemployed (odds ratio =0.63, 95% confidence interval =0.42–0.95, P=0.026) or had lower education (odds ratio =0.55, 95% confidence interval =0.29–1.02, P=0.058) were less likely to improve their knowledge after adjusting for age, sex, race, and prior glaucoma diagnosis. This association was attenuated after further adjustment for other patient-level characteristics. Ninety-eight percent (n=501) of patients reported being likely to have a CEE within the next 2 years, whereas 63% (n=326) had a CEE in the previous 2 years. Patient satisfaction with EQUALITY was high (99

  6. Improving the quality of geriatric nursing care: enduring outcomes from the geriatric nursing education consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Wilson, Laurie Dodge; Stanley, Joan; Watman, Rachael; Shire, Amy; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Mezey, Mathy

    2014-01-01

    The nation's aging demography, few nursing faculty with gerontological nursing expertise, and insufficient geriatric content in nursing programs have created a national imperative to increase the supply of nurses qualified to provide care for older adults. Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium (GNEC), a collaborative program of the John A. Hartford Foundation, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the New York University (NYU) Nursing Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, was initiated to provide faculty with the necessary skills, knowledge, and competency to implement sustainable curricular innovations in care of older adults. This article describes the background, step-by-step process approach to the development of GNEC evidence-based curricular materials, and the dissemination of these materials through 6-, 2-, and a half-day national Faculty Development Institutes (FDIs). Eight hundred eight faculty, representing 418 schools of nursing, attended. A total of 479 individuals responded to an evaluation conducted by Baruch College that showed faculty feasibility to incorporate GNEC content into courses, confidence in teaching and incorporating content, and overall high rating of the GNEC materials. The impact of GNEC is discussed along with effects on faculty participants over 2 years. Administrative- and faculty-level recommendations to sustain and expand GNEC are highlighted. PMID:25455325

  7. Improved quality of care for patients undergoing an abdominoperineal excision for rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkerink, G.M.J.; Buijs, E.F.; Ruijter, W. de; Rosman, C.; Sietses, C.; Strobel, R.; Heisterkamp, J.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Bremers, A.J.A.; Wilt, J.H.W. de

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: New diagnostics, the emergence of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant treatments have improved outcome for patients with rectal cancer. Patients with distal rectal cancer undergoing an abdominoperineal excision seem to do worse compared to those treated with sphinctersparing tech

  8. Designing a multifaceted quality improvement intervention in primary care in a country where general practice is seeking recognition: the case of Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoffers Henri E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality Improvement Interventions require significant financial investments, and therefore demand careful consideration in their design in order to maximize potential benefits. In this correspondence we present the methodological approach of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention aiming to improve quality of care in primary care, properly tailored for a country such as Cyprus where general practice is currently seeking recognition. Methods Our methodological approach was focused on the design of an open label, community-based intervention controlled trial using all patients from two urban and two rural public primary care centers diagnosed with hypertension and type II diabetes mellitus. The design of our intervention was grounded on a strong theoretical framework that included the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology, and the Chronic Care Model, which synthesize evidence-based system changes in accordance with the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Theory of Reasoned Action. The primary outcome measure was improvement in the quality of care for two chronic diseases evaluated through specific clinical indicators, as well as the patient satisfaction assessed by the EUROPEP questionnaire and additional personal interviews. Results We designed a multifaceted quality improvement intervention model, supported by a varying degree of scientific evidence, tailored to local needs and specific country characteristics. Overall, the main components of the intervention were the development and adoption of an electronic medical record and the introduction of clinical guidelines for the management of the targeted chronic diseases facilitated by the necessary model of organizational changes. Conclusion Health planners and policy makers need to be aware of the potential use of certain theoretical models and applied methodology as well as inexpensive tools that may be suitably tailored to the local needs, in order to

  9. Navigator Approach to Improve Quality of Care for Vulnerable Populations in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rebeca; Ferreira-Pinto, João; Loza, Oralia

    2015-01-01

    For nearly 30 years, Programa Compañeros Inc (Compañeros) has worked in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, to ensure that vulnerable populations can exercise their rights to receive HIV and substance abuse prevention and treatment services. Compañeros staff has worked to ameliorate the negative results that limit access to care to the most vulnerable individuals: those who are poor, homeless, sex workers, addicted, and others whose life context put them at greater risk for being infected with HIV. With support from the MAC AIDS Foundation, Compañeros has expanded its capacity to deliver services to persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and to HIV-vulnerable populations. This short communication describes findings from an internal evaluation conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the MAC AIDS-funded navigator-based program implemented at Compañeros. PMID:26242198

  10. Measuring and improving quality of care in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, Douglas W

    2013-05-01

    The Donabedian definition of quality—structure, process, and outcome—provides a useful framework. A relentless focus on measuring process adherence and outcome is critical. Systemic improvements usually require teams to plan and to implement them. The lean or Toyota production system for process improvement is one useful method of organizing work, although different approaches are often necessary at the physician, practice unit, and statewide level. Challenges include scalability of the change (ie, rolling them out across the institution or system), tailoring the information technology tools, and building systems for sustainability. PMID:23942492

  11. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

  12. Quality of diabetes care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    van Bruggen, J.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a quality incentive is expected to ensue from improved collaboration between healthcare professionals. Whether this view is supported by sufficient evidence is, however, questionable. Therefore, the first study included in this thesis is a systematic review of studies on the effects of sharing and delegating diabetes care tasks. It became apparent that sharing and delegating care tasks can improve the process of care and glycaemic control. Sharing or delegating care, howev...

  13. Investigating organizational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organizational culture, professional involvement and the quality of care in European hospitals: the 'Deepening our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe (DUQuE)' project.

    OpenAIRE

    Groene, O.; Klazinga, N; Wagner, C.; Arah, OA; Thompson, A; Bruneau, C.; Suñol, R.; Deepening our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe Res

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals in European countries apply a wide range of quality improvement strategies. Knowledge of the effectiveness of these strategies, implemented as part of an overall hospital quality improvement system, is limited.

  14. Progressive Mobility Protocol Reduces Venous Thromboembolism Rate in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Kathryn; Rivet, Josh; Flici, Richelle; Harvey, Ellen; Hamill, Mark; Hundley, Douglas; Holland, Katelyn; Hubbard, Sandra; Trivedi, Apurva; Collier, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) trauma population is at high risk for complications associated with immobility. The purpose of this project was to compare ICU trauma patient outcomes before and after implementation of a structured progressive mobility (PM) protocol. Outcomes included hospital and ICU stays, ventilator days, falls, respiratory failure, pneumonia, or venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the preintervention cohort, physical therapy (PT) consults were placed 53% of the time. This rose to more than 90% during the postintervention period. PT consults seen within 24 hr rose from a baseline 23% pre- to 74%-94% in the 2 highest compliance postintervention months. On average, 40% of patients were daily determined to be too unstable for mobility per protocol guidelines-most often owing to elevated intracranial pressure. During PM sessions, there were no adverse events (i.e., extubation, hypoxia, fall). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes between the 2 cohorts regarding hospital and ICU stays, average ventilator days, mortality, falls, respiratory failure, or pneumonia overall or within ventilated patients specifically. There was, however, a difference in the incidence of VTE between the preintervention cohort (21%) and postintervention cohort (7.5%) (p = .0004). A PM protocol for ICU trauma patients is safe and may reduce patient deconditioning and VTE complications in this high-risk population. Multidisciplinary commitment, daily protocol reinforcement, and active engagement of patients/families are the cornerstones to success in this ICU PM program. PMID:27618376

  15. A case study approach to understand how quality improvement methods led to improvements in primary care for insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Tilling, Michelle; Togher, Fiona; Davy, Zowie; Dyas, Jane; Middleton, Hugh; Orner, Roderick

    2011-01-01

    Context: The Resources for Effective Sleep Treatment (REST) project was conducted in Lincolnshire, UK from 2007-2010. Its aim was to develop and evaluate new approaches to implementing sleep assessment methods and non-pharmacological treatments for insomnia into routine general practice. Problem: Sleep problems are common affecting 30% of the population in the previous year. Many insomnia sufferers present to general practice but patients and clinicians feel that primary care management sh...

  16. Policies to improve end-of-life decisions in Flemish hospitals: communication, training of health care providers and use of quality assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Noortgate Nele; Pasman H Roeline W; Vander Stichele Robert H.; D'Haene Ina; Bilsen Johan; Mortier Freddy; Deliens Luc

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence and implementation of institutional end-of-life policies has been comprehensively studied in Flanders, Belgium, a country where euthanasia was legalised in 2002. Developing end-of-life policies in hospitals is a first step towards improving the quality of medical decision-making at the end-of-life. Implementation of policies through quality assessments, communication and the training and education of health care providers is equally important in improving ac...

  17. Improving health care quality for racial/ethnic minorities: a systematic review of the best evidence regarding provider and organization interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarth Carole

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite awareness of inequities in health care quality, little is known about strategies that could improve the quality of healthcare for ethnic minority populations. We conducted a systematic literature review and analysis to synthesize the findings of controlled studies evaluating interventions targeted at health care providers to improve health care quality or reduce disparities in care for racial/ethnic minorities. Methods We performed electronic and hand searches from 1980 through June 2003 to identify randomized controlled trials or concurrent controlled trials. Reviewers abstracted data from studies to determine study characteristics, results, and quality. We graded the strength of the evidence as excellent, good, fair or poor using predetermined criteria. The main outcome measures were evidence of effectiveness and cost of strategies to improve health care quality or reduce disparities in care for racial/ethnic minorities. Results Twenty-seven studies met criteria for review. Almost all (n = 26 took place in the primary care setting, and most (n = 19 focused on improving provision of preventive services. Only two studies were designed specifically to meet the needs of racial/ethnic minority patients. All 10 studies that used a provider reminder system for provision of standardized services (mostly preventive reported favorable outcomes. The following quality improvement strategies demonstrated favorable results but were used in a small number of studies: bypassing the physician to offer preventive services directly to patients (2 of 2 studies favorable, provider education alone (2 of 2 studies favorable, use of a structured questionnaire to assess adolescent health behaviors (1 of 1 study favorable, and use of remote simultaneous translation (1 of 1 study favorable. Interventions employing more than one main strategy were used in 9 studies with inconsistent results. There were limited data on the costs of these

  18. Enhancing quality improvement team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosel, D; Shamp, M J

    1993-01-01

    Quality improvement teams are different from other work groups in their purpose, leadership, membership, training, procedures, and dynamics. To have effective quality improvement teams, health care organizations must focus on six key process variables, with particular attention to group dynamics. Quality improvement teams progress through the "traditional" stages of team development--forming, storming, norming, and performing--with a "special stage" of closing. Within each stage, there are two core dimensions--team process ("relationship" issues) and the project itself ("task" issues)--and critical tasks that need to be performed by the Quality Council, team members, team leader, and the facilitator. PMID:10130709

  19. A cluster randomized trial of standard quality improvement versus patient-centered interventions to enhance depression care for African Americans in the primary care setting: study protocol NCT00243425

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghods Bri K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies document disparities in access to care and quality of care for depression for African Americans. Research suggests that patient attitudes and clinician communication behaviors may contribute to these disparities. Evidence links patient-centered care to improvements in mental health outcomes; therefore, quality improvement interventions that enhance this dimension of care are promising strategies to improve treatment and outcomes of depression among African Americans. This paper describes the design of the BRIDGE (Blacks Receiving Interventions for Depression and Gaining Empowerment Study. The goal of the study is to compare the effectiveness of two interventions for African-American patients with depression--a standard quality improvement program and a patient-centered quality improvement program. The main hypothesis is that patients in the patient-centered group will have a greater reduction in their depression symptoms, higher rates of depression remission, and greater improvements in mental health functioning at six, twelve, and eighteen months than patients in the standard group. The study also examines patient ratings of care and receipt of guideline-concordant treatment for depression. Methods/Design A total of 36 primary care clinicians and 132 of their African-American patients with major depressive disorder were recruited into a cluster randomized trial. The study uses intent-to-treat analyses to compare the effectiveness of standard quality improvement interventions (academic detailing about depression guidelines for clinicians and disease-oriented care management for their patients and patient-centered quality improvement interventions (communication skills training to enhance participatory decision-making for clinicians and care management focused on explanatory models, socio-cultural barriers, and treatment preferences for their patients for improving outcomes over 12 months of follow

  20. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry - a tool for improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of dementia patients in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Religa

    Full Text Available The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se. The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes.The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007-2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses.

  1. Retaining caregivers, improving care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodwell, Wendy; Dent, Sara; Grant, Tracie; Hammerly, Milt; Mamula, Jeanie

    2006-01-01

    Text Summary In 2004, Centura Health's long-term care centers took part in a pilot project, sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, called "Improving Nursing Home Culture through Workforce Retention." A 30-member team comprising Centura leaders and long-term facility staff looked at Centura's eight participating facilities through residents' and employees' eyes. The goal of the team's reflection and subsequent changes was to create a culture in which decisions are focused on resident care and organizational policies are based on respect for employees. At the end of the first year, residents seemed happier and employee satisfaction and involvement increased at all eight Centura facilities. PMID:16519278

  2. A Patient-Centered Primary Care Practice Approach Using Evidence-Based Quality Improvement: Rationale, Methods, and Early Assessment of Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rubenstein, Lisa V.; Stockdale, Susan E.; Sapir, Negar; Altman, Lisa; Dresselhaus, Timothy; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Vivell, Susan; Ovretveit, John; Hamilton, Alison B.; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Healthcare systems and their primary care practices are redesigning to achieve goals identified in Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) models such as Veterans Affairs (VA)’s Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT). Implementation of these models, however, requires major transformation. Evidence-Based Quality Improvement (EBQI) is a multi-level approach for supporting organizational change and innovation spread. OBJECTIVE To describe EBQI as an approach for promoting VA’s PACT a...

  3. Using mixed methods for evaluating the effect of a quality improvement collaborative for management of sleep problems presenting to primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Tilling, Michelle; Ward, Kate; Togher, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Context This improvement project was set in Lincolnshire, a large rural county in the East Midlands with high prescribing rates of hypnotic drugs compared with the rest of England. Eight general practices volunteered to participate in a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) designed to improve management of sleep problems in patients presenting to primary care. Problem Sleep problems are common affecting around 40% of adults in the UK. Insomnia has considerable resource implicati...

  4. Does a competitive voucher program for adolescents improve the quality of reproductive health care? A simulated patient study in Nicaragua.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, L.E.; Gorter, A.C.; Kester, A.D.M.; Knottnerus, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Little is known about how sexual and reproductive (SRH) health can be made accessible and appropriate to adolescents. This study evaluates the impact and sustainability of a competitive voucher program on the quality of SRH care for poor and underserved female adolescents and the usefuln

  5. Applicability of two brief evidence-based interventions to improve sleep quality in inpatient mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niet, Gerrit; Tiemens, Bea; van Achterberg, Theo; Hutschemaekers, Giel

    2011-10-01

    The present study explored the applicability of two brief evidence-based interventions to improve sleep quality in inpatient psychiatry. The study involved three comparable admission wards of a psychiatric hospital. Stimulus control was introduced at the first ward, and music-assisted relaxation at the second. At the third ward, no intervention was introduced. A mixed-method study was employed. We found that nurses share the opinion that both interventions can be applied, but patients are hard to motivate. They perceived the lack of available time, busyness at the ward, and the lack of cooperation of patients as the main obstacles. The perception of a successful implementation is correlated with the perception of gained attention for sleep problems, the perception of increased care options, and the impression of effectiveness. Qualitative data showed that the effectiveness of the interventions was compromised by operational issues, commitment issues, adaptation to contextual limitations, and conflicting individual beliefs. We concluded that music-assisted relaxation is applicable in inpatient psychiatry. The application of stimulus control met with insurmountable operational issues. The nursing team is a very important factor for the implementation of evidence-based interventions at ward level. The lack of a shared urge for change and responsibility for continuity are important factors contributing to failure. PMID:21418492

  6. Hospice enrollment saves money for Medicare and improves care quality across a number of different lengths-of-stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amy S; Deb, Partha; Du, Qingling; Aldridge Carlson, Melissa D; Morrison, R Sean

    2013-03-01

    Despite its demonstrated potential to both improve quality of care and lower costs, the Medicare hospice benefit has been seen as producing savings only for patients enrolled 53-105 days before death. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, 2002-08, and individual Medicare claims, and overcoming limitations of previous work, we found $2,561 in savings to Medicare for each patient enrolled in hospice 53-105 days before death, compared to a matched, nonhospice control. Even higher savings were seen, however, with more common, shorter enrollment periods: $2,650, $5,040, and $6,430 per patient enrolled 1-7, 8-14, and 15-30 days prior to death, respectively. Within all periods examined, hospice patients also had significantly lower rates of hospital service use and in-hospital death than matched controls. Instead of attempting to limit Medicare hospice participation, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services should focus on ensuring the timely enrollment of qualified patients who desire the benefit. PMID:23459735

  7. Patient Empowerment Improved Perioperative Quality of Care in Cancer Patients Aged ≥ 65 Years - A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Schmidt

    functional capacity measured by the Timed Up and Go-test by multiple robust regressions.Patient empowerment through information booklet and diary keeping did not shorten the postoperative LOS in elderly onco-surgical patients, but improved quality of care regarding postoperative pain. Postoperative length of stay is influenced by pre-operative nutritional state, pre-operative functional impairment, severity of surgery, and length of anesthesia.Clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier NCT01278537.

  8. Perceptions of women, nurses, midwives and doctors about the use of video during birth to improve quality of care : focus group discussions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lonkhuijzen, L.; Groenewout, M.; Schreuder, A.; Zeeman, G.; Scherpbier, A.; Aukes, L.; van den Berg, P.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: van Lonkhuijzen L, Groenewout M, Schreuder A, Zeeman G, Scherpbier A, Aukes L, van den Berg P. Perceptions of women, nurses, midwives and doctors about the use of video during birth to improve quality of care: focus group discussions. BJOG 2011; DOI:10.1111/j.1471-0528.201

  9. Effect of pay for performance to improve quality of maternal and child care in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Das, A.; Gopalan, SS; Chandramohan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pay for Performance (P4P) mechanisms to health facilities and providers are currently being tested in several low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to improve maternal and child health (MCH). This paper reviews the existing evidence on the effect of P4P program on quality of MCH care in LMICs. Methods A systematic review of literature was conducted according to a registered protocol. MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Embase were searched using the key words maternal care, quality of c...

  10. The dynamic system of parental work of care for children with special health care needs: A conceptual model to guide quality improvement efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hexem Kari R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The work of care for parents of children with complex special health care needs may be increasing, while excessive work demands may erode the quality of care. We sought to summarize knowledge and develop a general conceptual model of the work of care. Methods Systematic review of peer-reviewed journal articles that focused on parents of children with special health care needs and addressed factors related to the physical and emotional work of providing care for these children. From the large pool of eligible articles, we selected articles in a randomized sequence, using qualitative techniques to identify the conceptual components of the work of care and their relationship to the family system. Results The work of care for a child with special health care needs occurs within a dynamic system that comprises 5 core components: (1 performance of tasks such as monitoring symptoms or administering treatments, (2 the occurrence of various events and the pursuit of valued outcomes regarding the child's physical health, the parent's mental health, or other attributes of the child or family, (3 operating with available resources and within certain constraints (4 over the passage of time, (5 while mentally representing or depicting the ever-changing situation and detecting possible problems and opportunities. These components interact, some with simple cause-effect relationships and others with more complex interdependencies. Conclusions The work of care affecting the health of children with special health care needs and their families can best be understood, studied, and managed as a multilevel complex system.

  11. Quality of acute stroke care improvement framework for the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry: facilitating policy and system change at the hospital level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2006-12-01

    The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry prototypes baseline data collection demonstrated a significant gap in the use of evidenced-based interventions. Barriers to the use of these interventions can be characterized as relating to lack of knowledge, attitudes, and ineffective behaviors and systems. Quality improvement programs can address these issues by providing didactic presentations to disseminate the science and peer interactions to address the lack of belief in the evidence, guidelines, and likelihood of improved patient outcomes. Even with knowledge and intention to provide evidenced-based care, the absence of effective systems is a significant behavioral barrier. A program for quality improvement that includes multidisciplinary teams of clinical and quality improvement professionals has been successfully used to carry out redesign of stroke care delivery systems. Teams are given a methodology to set goals, test ideas for system redesign, and implement those changes that can be successfully adapted to the hospital's environment. Bringing teams from several hospitals together substantially accelerates the process by sharing examples of successful change and by providing strategies to support the behavior change necessary for the adoption of new systems. The participation of many hospitals also creates momentum for the adoption of change by demonstrating observable and successful improvement. Data collection and feedback are useful to demonstrate the need for change and evaluate the impact of system change, but improvement occurs very slowly without a quality improvement program. This quality improvement framework provides hospitals with the capacity and support to redesign systems, and has been shown to improve stroke care considerably, when coupled with an Internet-based decision support registry, and at a much more rapid pace than when hospitals use only the support registry. PMID:17178313

  12. Cardiovascular disease prevention in rural Nigeria in the context of a community based health insurance scheme: QUality Improvement Cardiovascular care Kwara-I (QUICK-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alli Shade

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are a leading contributor to the burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries. Guidelines for CVD prevention care in low resource settings have been developed but little information is available on strategies to implement this care. A community health insurance program might be used to improve patients' access to care. The operational research project "QUality Improvement Cardiovascular care Kwara - I (QUICK-I" aims to assess the feasibility of CVD prevention care in rural Nigeria, according to international guidelines, in the context of a community based health insurance scheme. Methods/Design Design: prospective observational hospital based cohort study. Setting: a primary health care centre in rural Nigeria. Study population: 300 patients at risk for development of CVD (patients with hypertension, diabetes, renal disease or established CVD who are enrolled in the Hygeia Community Health Plan. Measurements: demographic and socio- economic data, physical and laboratory examination, CVD risk profile including screening for target organ damage. Measurements will be done at 3 month intervals during 1 year. Direct and indirect costs of CVD prevention care will be estimated. Outcomes: 1 The adjusted cardiovascular quality of care indicator scores based on the "United Kingdom National Health Services Quality and Outcome Framework". 2 The average costs of CVD prevention and treatment per patient per year for patients, the clinic and the insurance company. 3 The estimated net health care costs of standard CVD prevention care per quality-adjusted life year gained. Analysis: The primary outcomes, the score on CVD quality indicators and cost data will be descriptive. The quality scores and cost data will be used to describe the feasibility of CVD prevention care according to international guidelines. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be done using a Markov model. Discussion Results of QUICK-I can

  13. Development of a standardized process improvement protocol to address elevated health care-associated infection rates on an incented quality scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegge, Jeanne A; Gase, Kathleen A; Hopkins-Broyles, Diane; Leone, Carole L; Trovillion, Ellen W; Babcock, Hilary M

    2014-02-01

    This practice forum report details a standardized improvement process that was created both to improve patient outcomes related to various hospital-acquired infections and to address leadership concerns related to incented quality metrics. A 3-year retrospective review identified common issues to guide future interventions and confirmed that this methodology reduced the rate of recurrent infections across the health care system. Process tool samples are provided. PMID:24485374

  14. The art of communication: strategies to improve efficiency, quality of care and patient safety in the emergency department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practice of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) has been supported by wonderful advancements in diagnostic testing, particularly in medical imaging. One of the most remarkable has been CT, which has arguably become our most valuable diagnostic tool in the emergency department (ED). PEM specialists have grown increasingly aware of quality and safety concerns in the care of children in emergency medical settings, spurred in part by a rapid growth in ED utilization and significant overcrowding. In the midst of this comes the revelation that one of our most valued diagnostic tools might place our youngest patients at a significant risk for the development of fatal cancer. This article reinforces the fundamental importance of communication and teamwork as a means to promote patient care quality and safety in the ED, and it offers partnership strategies for PEM and pediatric radiology specialists to consider as they address these important concerns. (orig.)

  15. Primary care quality management in Slovenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Bulc, M.

    2008-01-01

    Of all GPs in Slovenia 86% are not interested in activities to systematically improve care. A clear national quality policy, further education for care managers and financial incentives for GPs could change the picture, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO

  16. Tracking the Quality of Care for Sick Children Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling: Targeting Improvements of Health Services in Jigawa, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Oladele, Edward Adekola; Ormond, Louise; Adeyemi, Olusegun; Patrick, David; Okoh, Festus; Oresanya, Olusola Bukola; Valadez, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    Background In Nigeria, 30% of child deaths are due to malaria. The National Malaria Control Program of Nigeria (NMCP) during 2009 initiated a program to improve the quality of paediatric malaria services delivered in health facilities (HF). This study reports a rapid approach used to assess the existing quality of services in Jigawa state at decentralised levels of the health system. Methods NMCP selected Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) to identify the variation in HF service quality am...

  17. The PAMINO-project: evaluating a primary care-based educational program to improve the quality of life of palliative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engeser Peter

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of palliative patients challenges the health care system in both quantity and quality. Especially the role of primary care givers needs to be strengthened to provide them with the knowledge and the confidence of applying an appropriate end-of-life care to palliative patients. To improve health care services for palliative patients in primary care, interested physicians in and around Heidelberg, Germany, are enabled to participate in the community-based program 'Palliative Medical Initiative North Baden (PAMINO' to improve their knowledge in dealing with palliative patients. The impact of this program on patients' health and quality of life remains to be evaluated. Methods/Design The evaluation of PAMINO is a non-randomized, controlled study. Out of the group of primary care physicians who took part in the PAMINO program, a sample of 45 physicians and their palliative patients will be compared to a sample of palliative patients of 45 physicians who did not take part in the program. Every four weeks for 6 months or until death, patients, physicians, and the patients' family caregivers in both groups answer questions to therapy strategies, quality of life (QLQ-C15-PAL, POS, pain (VAS, and burden for family caregivers (BSFC. The inclusion of physicians and patients in the study starts in March 2007. Discussion Although participating physicians value the increase in knowledge they receive from PAMINO, the effects on patients remain unclear. If the evaluation reveals a clear benefit for patients' quality of life, a larger-scale implementation of the program is considered. Trial registration: The study was registered at ‘current controlled trials (CCT’, registration number: ISRCTN78021852.

  18. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the “costly” crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system. PMID:25056441

  19. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the "costly" crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system. PMID:25056441

  20. A cluster-randomised trial of staff education to improve the quality of life of people with dementia living in residential care: the DIRECT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Beer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Dementia In Residential care: EduCation intervention Trial (DIRECT was conducted to determine if delivery of education designed to meet the perceived need of GPs and care staff improves the quality of life of participants with dementia living in residential care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted in 39 residential aged care facilities in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. 351 care facility residents aged 65 years and older with Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 24, their GPs and facility staff participated. Flexible education designed to meet the perceived needs of learners was delivered to GPs and care facility staff in intervention groups. The primary outcome of the study was self-rated quality of life of participants with dementia, measured using the QOL-Alzheimer's Disease Scale (QOL-AD at 4 weeks and 6 months after the conclusion of the intervention. Analysis accounted for the effect of clustering by using multi-level regression analysis. Education of GPs or care facility staff did not affect the primary outcome at either 4 weeks or 6 months. In a post hoc analysis excluding facilities in which fewer than 50% of staff attended an education session, self-rated QOL-AD scores were 6.14 points (adjusted 95%CI 1.14, 11.15 higher at four-week follow-up among residents in facilities randomly assigned to the education intervention. CONCLUSION: The education intervention directed at care facilities or GPs did not improve the quality of life ratings of participants with dementia as a group. This may be explained by the poor adherence to the intervention programme, as participants with dementia living in facilities where staff participated at least minimally seemed to benefit. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12607000417482.

  1. The effectiveness of computer reminders versus postal reminders for improving quality assessment for point-of-care testing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, Volkert; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Reventlow, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the relative effectiveness of electronic and postal reminders for increasing adherence to the quality assurance programme for the international normalized ratio (INR) point-of-care testing (POCT) device inprimary care. Methods: All 213...... (Postal) if they did not perform a split test to check the quality of their INR POCT for each calendar month. The adherence of the practices was tracked during the subsequent 8 months subdivided into two 4-month periods both without intervention. Outcomes were measures of split test procedure adherence....... Results: Both interventions were associated with an increase in adherence to the split test procedure – a factor 6.00 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.46–7.72] and 8.22 [95% CI5.87–11.52] for ComRem and Postal, respectively – but there is no evidence that one of the interventions was more effective than...

  2. Applicability of two brief evidence-based interventions to improve sleep quality in inpatient mental health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, G.J. De; Tiemens, B.G.; Achterberg, T. van; Hutschemaekers, G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored the applicability of two brief evidence-based interventions to improve sleep quality in inpatient psychiatry. The study involved three comparable admission wards of a psychiatric hospital. Stimulus control was introduced at the first ward, and music-assisted relaxation at

  3. The effectiveness of computer reminders for improving quality assessment for point-of-care testing in general practice - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Reventlow, Susanne;

    2013-01-01

    for improving adherence to a quality assessment scheme for point-of-care testing in general practice. METHOD: The study was conducted as a randomized controlled crossover trial among general practices in the Capital Region of Denmark. The intervention consisted of sending computer reminders (Com...... reminders on adherence to the quality assessment scheme for point-of-care testing. Thus, computer reminders seem to be useful for supporting the implementation of relatively simple procedures for quality and safety. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: http://NCT01152177.......Rem) to practices not adhering to the guideline recommendations of split testing for hemoglobin and glucose. Practices were randomly allocated into two groups. During the first follow-up period, one of the groups received the ComRem intervention together with the general implementation activities (GIA), while...

  4. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part II. Quality-improvement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    The success of quality-improvement projects relies heavily on both project design and the metrics chosen to assess change. In Part II of this three-part American Thoracic Society Seminars series, we begin by describing methods for determining which data to collect, tools for data presentation, and strategies for data dissemination. As Avedis Donabedian detailed a half century ago, defining metrics in healthcare can be challenging; algorithmic determination of the best type of metric (outcome, process, or structure) can help intensive care unit (ICU) managers begin this process. Choosing appropriate graphical data displays (e.g., run charts) can prompt discussions about and promote quality improvement. Similarly, dashboards/scorecards are useful in presenting performance improvement data either publicly or privately in a visually appealing manner. To have compelling data to show, ICU managers must plan quality-improvement projects well. The second portion of this review details four quality-improvement tools-checklists, Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen. Checklists have become commonplace in many ICUs to improve care quality; thinking about how to maximize their effectiveness is now of prime importance. Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen are techniques that use multidisciplinary teams to organize thinking about process improvement, formalize change strategies, actualize initiatives, and measure progress. None originated within healthcare, but each has been used in the hospital environment with success. To conclude this part of the series, we demonstrate how to use these tools through an example of improving the timely administration of antibiotics to patients with sepsis. PMID:24601668

  5. How to Begin a Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Samuel A; Harel, Ziv; McQuillan, Rory; Weizman, Adam V; Thomas, Alison; Chertow, Glenn M; Nesrallah, Gihad; Bell, Chaim M; Chan, Christopher T

    2016-05-01

    Quality improvement involves a combined effort among health care staff and stakeholders to diagnose and treat problems in the health care system. However, health care professionals often lack training in quality improvement methods, which makes it challenging to participate in improvement efforts. This article familiarizes health care professionals with how to begin a quality improvement project. The initial steps involve forming an improvement team that possesses expertise in the quality of care problem, leadership, and change management. Stakeholder mapping and analysis are useful tools at this stage, and these are reviewed to help identify individuals who might have a vested interest in the project. Physician engagement is a particularly important component of project success, and the knowledge that patients/caregivers can offer as members of a quality improvement team should not be overlooked. After a team is formed, an improvement framework helps to organize the scientific process of system change. Common quality improvement frameworks include Six Sigma, Lean, and the Model for Improvement. These models are contrasted, with a focus on the Model for Improvement, because it is widely used and applicable to a variety of quality of care problems without advanced training. It involves three steps: setting aims to focus improvement, choosing a balanced set of measures to determine if improvement occurs, and testing new ideas to change the current process. These new ideas are evaluated using Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, where knowledge is gained by testing changes and reflecting on their effect. To show the real world utility of the quality improvement methods discussed, they are applied to a hypothetical quality improvement initiative that aims to promote home dialysis (home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis). This provides an example that kidney health care professionals can use to begin their own quality improvement projects. PMID:27016497

  6. QUARITE (quality of care, risk management and technology in obstetrics: a cluster-randomized trial of a multifaceted intervention to improve emergency obstetric care in Senegal and Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaye Alioune

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal and perinatal mortality are major problems for which progress in sub-Saharan Africa has been inadequate, even though childbirth services are available, even in the poorest countries. Reducing them is the aim of two of the main Millennium Development Goals. Many initiatives have been undertaken to remedy this situation, such as the Advances in Labour and Risk Management (ALARM International Program, whose purpose is to improve the quality of obstetric services in low-income countries. However, few interventions have been evaluated, in this context, using rigorous methods for analyzing effectiveness in terms of health outcomes. The objective of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the ALARM International Program (AIP in reducing maternal mortality in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Secondary goals include evaluation of the relationships between effectiveness and resource availability, service organization, medical practices, and satisfaction among health personnel. Methods/Design This is an international, multi-centre, controlled cluster-randomized trial of a complex intervention. The intervention is based on the concept of evidence-based practice and on a combination of two approaches aimed at improving the performance of health personnel: 1 Educational outreach visits; and 2 the implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews. The unit of intervention is the public health facility equipped with a functional operating room. On the basis of consent provided by hospital authorities, 46 centres out of 49 eligible were selected in Mali and Senegal. Using randomization stratified by country and by level of care, 23 centres will be allocated to the intervention group and 23 to the control group. The intervention will last two years. It will be preceded by a pre-intervention one-year period for baseline data collection. A continuous clinical data collection system has been set up in all

  7. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety: a cross-sectional survey in the private sector in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mbonye, AK; Buregyeya, E.; Rutebemberwa, E.; Clarke, SE; Lal, S; Hansen, KS; Magnussen, P; LaRussa, P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the private health sector in Uganda. Methods A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop charact...

  8. The effect of a complementary e-learning course on implementation of a quality improvement project regarding care for elderly patients: a stepped wedge trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van de Steeg Lotte

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium occurs frequently in elderly hospitalised patients and is associated with higher mortality, increased length of hospital stay, functional decline, and admission to long-term care. Healthcare professionals frequently do not recognise delirium, indicating that education can play an important role in improving delirium care for hospitalised elderly. Previous studies have indicated that e-learning can provide an effective way of educating healthcare professionals and improving quality of care, though results are inconsistent. Methods and design This stepped wedge cluster randomised trial will assess the effects of a complementary delirium e-learning course on the implementation of quality improvement initiative, which aims to enhance the recognition and management of delirium in elderly patients. The trial will be conducted in 18 Dutch hospitals and last 11 months. Measurements will be taken in all participating wards using monthly record reviews, in order to monitor delivered care. These measurements will include the percentage of elderly patients who were screened for the risk of developing delirium, use of the Delirium Observation Screening scale, use of nursing or medical interventions, and the percentage of elderly patients who were diagnosed with delirium. Data regarding the e-learning course will be gathered as well. These data will include user characteristics, information regarding use of the course, delirium knowledge before and after using the course, and the attitude and intentions of nurses concerning delirium care. Setting The study will be conducted in internal medicine and surgical wards of eighteen hospitals that are at the beginning stages of implementing the Frail Elderly Project in the Netherlands. Discussion Better recognition of elderly patients at risk for delirium and subsequent care is expected from the introduction of an e-learning course for nurses that is complementary to an existing quality

  9. Evidence from district level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Rehana A; Lassi, Zohra S; Das, Jai K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-09-01

    District level healthcare serves as a nexus between community and district level facilities. Inputs at the district level can be broadly divided into governance and accountability mechanisms; leadership and supervision; financial platforms; and information systems. This paper aims to evaluate the effectivness of district level inputs for imporving maternal and newborn health. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined district level interventions and included 47 systematic reviews. Evidence suggests that supervision positively influenced provider's practice, knowledge and client/provider satisfaction. Involving local opinion leaders to promote evidence-based practice improved compliance to the desired practice. Audit and feedback mechanisms and tele-medicine were found to be associated with improved immunization rates and mammogram uptake. User-directed financial schemes including maternal vouchers, user fee exemption and community based health insurance showed significant impact on maternal health service utilization with voucher schemes showing the most significant positive impact across all range of outcomes including antenatal care, skilled birth attendant, institutional delivery, complicated delivery and postnatal care. We found insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of electronic health record systems and telemedicine technology to improve maternal and newborn health specific outcomes. There is dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of district level inputs to improve maternal newborn health outcomes. Future studies should evaluate the impact of supervision and monitoring; electronic health record and tele-communication interventions in low-middle-income countries. PMID:25208460

  10. Using patients’ experiences to identify priorities for quality improvement in breast cancer care: patient narratives, surveys or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsianakas Vicki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients’ experiences have become central to assessing the performance of healthcare systems worldwide and are increasingly being used to inform quality improvement processes. This paper explores the relative value of surveys and detailed patient narratives in identifying priorities for improving breast cancer services as part of a quality improvement process. Methods One dataset was collected using a narrative interview approach, (n = 13 and the other using a postal survey (n = 82. Datasets were analyzed separately and then compared to determine whether similar priorities for improving patient experiences were identified. Results There were both similarities and differences in the improvement priorities arising from each approach. Day surgery was specifically identified as a priority in the narrative dataset but included in the survey recommendations only as part of a broader priority around improving inpatient experience. Both datasets identified appointment systems, patients spending enough time with staff, information about treatment and side effects and more information at the end of treatment as priorities. The specific priorities identified by the narrative interviews commonly related to ‘relational’ aspects of patient experience. Those identified by the survey typically related to more ‘functional’ aspects and were not always sufficiently detailed to identify specific improvement actions. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that whilst local survey data may act as a screening tool to identify potential problems within the breast cancer service, they do not always provide sufficient detail of what to do to improve that service. These findings may have wider applicability in other services. We recommend using an initial preliminary survey, with better use of survey open comments, followed by an in-depth qualitative analysis to help deliver improvements to relational and functional aspects of patient

  11. Patient-centered cancer treatment planning: improving the quality of oncology care. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Erin P; Ganz, Patricia A; Murphy, Sharon B; Nass, Sharyl J; Ferrell, Betty R; Stovall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop on patient-centered cancer treatment planning, with the aim of raising awareness about this important but often overlooked aspect of cancer treatment. A primary goal of patient-centered treatment planning is to engage patients and their families in meaningful, thorough interactions with their health care providers to develop an accurate, well-conceived treatment plan, using all available medical information appropriately while also considering the medical, social, and cultural needs and desires of the patient and family. A cancer treatment plan can be shared among the patient, family, and care team in order to facilitate care coordination and provide a roadmap to help patients navigate the path of cancer treatment. There are numerous obstacles to achieving patient-centered cancer treatment planning in practice. Some of these challenges stem from the patient and include patients' lack of assertiveness, health literacy, and numeracy, and their emotional state and concurrent illnesses. Others are a result of physician limitations, such as a lack of time to explain complex information and a lack of tools to facilitate treatment planning, as well as insensitivity to patients' informational, cultural, and emotional needs. Potential solutions to address these obstacles include better training of health care providers and patients in optimal communication and shared decision making, and greater use of support services and tools such as patient navigation and electronic health records. Other options include greater use of quality metrics and reimbursement for the time it takes to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan. PMID:22128118

  12. IMPROVING CONCEPTUAL DESIGN QUALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bush, Stuart; Robotham, Antony John

    This paper will consider how Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) processes can be used to improve the design quality of products at the concept stage. We appreciate that both QFD and DFMA are techniques that have been used for some time by mature product...... quality is maintained in design project work. The projects described have been carried out with products manufactured by small to medium sized enterprises (SME's), where we have found significant opportunities for product improvement. The quantitative nature of DFMA analysis results allows the novice...... continuous improvement of their products. However, we consider that if novice designers are able to successfully utilise design tools like QFD and DFMA and achieve improvements in design quality, then SME’s have no excuses for ignoring the benefits they could bring to their own product development activity....

  13. Quality improvement - the future begins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comprehensive quality improvement program of the Florida Power and Light Co. is described: management commitment, quality improvement process, quality improvement teams, policy development, and quality in daily work are discussed

  14. Measuring team factors thought to influence the success of quality improvement in primary care: a systematic review of instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Sue E; Bosch, Marije; Buchan, Heather; Green, Sally E

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring team factors in evaluations of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) may provide important information for enhancing CQI processes and outcomes; however, the large number of potentially relevant factors and associated measurement instruments makes inclusion of such measures challenging. This review aims to provide guidance on the selection of instruments for measuring team-level factors by systematically collating, categorizing, and reviewing quantitative self-report instr...

  15. Results of a sector-wide quality improvement initiative for substance-abuse care: an uncontrolled before-after study in Catalonia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colom Joan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health Department of the Regional Government of Catalonia, Spain, issued a quality plan for substance abuse centers. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the impact of a multidimensional quality improvement initiative in the field of substance abuse care and to discuss potentials and limitations for further quality improvement. Methods The study uses an uncontrolled, sector-wide pre-post design. All centers providing services for persons with substance abuse issues in the Autonomous Community of Catalonia participated in this assessment. Measures of compliance were developed based on indicators reported in the literature and by broad stakeholder involvement. We compared pre-post differences in dimension-specific and overall compliance-scores using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures and the Friedman statistic. We described the spread of the data using the inter-quartile range and the Fligner-Killen statistic. Finally, we adjusted compliance scores for location and size using linear and logistic regression models. Results We performed a baseline and follow up assessment in 22 centers for substance abuse care and observed substantial and statistically significant improvements for overall compliance (pre: 60.9%; post: 79.1% and for compliance in the dimensions 'care pathway' (pre: 66.5%; post: 83.5% and 'organization and management' (pre: 50.5%; post: 77.2%. We observed improvements in the dimension 'environment and infrastructure' (pre: 81.8%; post: 95.5% and in the dimension 'relations and user rights' (pre: 66.5%; post: 72.5%; however, these were not statistically significant. The regression analysis suggests that improvements in compliance are positively influenced by being located in the Barcelona region in case of the dimension 'relations and user rights'. Conclusion The positive results of this quality improvement initiative are possibly associated with the successful involvement of stakeholders, the consciously

  16. Quality in Child Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERS Spectrum, 1998

    1998-01-01

    A significant correlation exists between quality child care and outcomes. Quality-related outcomes include cooperative play, sociability, creativity, ability to solve social conflicts, self-control, and language and cognitive development. Legislatures and agencies should strengthen standards; require initial and ongoing staff training; recruit,…

  17. System level action required for wide-scale improvement in quality of primary healthcare: synthesis of feedback from an interactive process to promote dissemination and use of aggregated quality of care data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie eBailie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThere is an enduring gap between recommended practice and care that is actually delivered; and there is wide variation between primary healthcare (PHC centres in delivery of care. Where aspects of care are not being done well across a range of PHC centres, this is likely due to inadequacies in the broader system. This paper aims to describe stakeholders’ perceptions of the barriers and enablers to addressing gaps in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander chronic illness care and child health, and to identify key drivers for improvement.MethodsThis paper draws on data collected as part of a large scale continuous quality improvement project in Australian Indigenous PHC settings. We undertook a qualitative assessment of stakeholder feedback on the main barriers and enablers to addressing gaps in care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and in chronic illness care. Themes on barriers and enablers were further analysed to develop a ‘driver diagram’, an improvement tool used to locate barriers and enablers within causal pathways, (as primary and secondary drivers, enabling them to be targeted by tailored interventions. ResultsWe identified five primary drivers and eleven secondary drivers of high quality care, and associated strategies that have potential for wide-scale implementation to address barriers and enablers for improving care. Perceived barriers to addressing gaps in care included both health system and staff attributes. Primary drivers were: staff capability to deliver high quality care; availability and use of clinical information systems and decision support tools; embedding of quality improvement processes and data driven decision making; appropriate and effective recruitment and retention of staff; and community capacity, engagement and mobilisation for health. Suggested strategies included mechanisms for increasing clinical supervision and support, staff retention, reorientation of service

  18. Improved wound care product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care product comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care product,and a methodof treating an infected wound....

  19. Improving Palliative Care Team Meetings: Structure, Inclusion, and "Team Care".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Caitlin W; Kelly, Brittany; Skarf, Lara Michal; Tellem, Rotem; Dunn, Kathleen M; Poswolsky, Sheila

    2016-07-01

    Increasing demands on palliative care teams point to the need for continuous improvement to ensure teams are working collaboratively and efficiently. This quality improvement initiative focused on improving interprofessional team meeting efficiency and subsequently patient care. Meeting start and end times improved from a mean of approximately 9 and 6 minutes late in the baseline period, respectively, to a mean of 4.4 minutes late (start time) and ending early in our sustainability phase. Mean team satisfaction improved from 2.4 to 4.5 on a 5-point Likert-type scale. The improvement initiative clarified communication about patients' plans of care, thus positively impacting team members' ability to articulate goals to other professionals, patients, and families. We propose several recommendations in the form of a team meeting "toolkit." PMID:25794871

  20. Policies to improve end-of-life decisions in Flemish hospitals: communication, training of health care providers and use of quality assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noortgate Nele

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and implementation of institutional end-of-life policies has been comprehensively studied in Flanders, Belgium, a country where euthanasia was legalised in 2002. Developing end-of-life policies in hospitals is a first step towards improving the quality of medical decision-making at the end-of-life. Implementation of policies through quality assessments, communication and the training and education of health care providers is equally important in improving actual end-of-life practice. The aim of the present study is to report on the existence and nature of end-of-life policy implementation activities in Flemish acute hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional mail survey was sent to all acute hospitals (67 main campuses in Flanders (Belgium. The questionnaire asked about hospital characteristics, the prevalence of policies on five types of end-of-life decisions: euthanasia, palliative sedation, alleviation of symptoms with possible life-shortening effect, do-not-resuscitate decision, and withdrawing or withholding of treatment, the internal and external communication of these policies, training and education on aspects of end-of-life care, and quality assessments of end-of-life care on patient and family level. Results The response rate was 55%. Results show that in 2007 written policies on most types of end-of-life decisions were widespread in acute hospitals (euthanasia: 97%, do-not-resuscitate decisions: 98%, palliative sedation: 79%. While standard communication of these policies to health care providers was between 71% and 91%, it was much lower to patients and/or family (between 17% and 50%. More than 60% of institutions trained and educated their caregivers in different aspects on end-of-life care. Assessment of the quality of these different aspects at patient and family level occurred in 25% to 61% of these hospitals. Conclusions Most Flemish acute hospitals have developed a policy on end-of-life practices

  1. Primary health care quality and diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues Gonçalves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association between primary health care (PHC quality and diabetes mellitus (DM management in adult patients living within the catchment area of PHC services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional, population-based study of adults reporting known diabetes. Quality of PHC was assessed through the Primary Care Assesment Tool (PCATool-Brazil. Statistical analyses were performed with Poisson regression with robust variance. Results: Of the 3,014 adults interviewed, 205 (6.8% reported having diabetes; of these, 64.4% were women and 68.3% were white. Regarding PHC score of the health service attended, people with diabetes that were classified with a high PHC score, presented longer duration of disease (10.9 vs 8.4 anos, p=0.03 and greater frequency of diabetes-related complications (75.3% vs 58.8%, p=0.02. Regarding the proportion of respondents with good glycemic control, no significant difference between groups was found (31.7% vs 38%, p=0.3. In the multivariate analysis, services with a high PHC score presented a better profile of care for the prevention of the main comorbidities – greater blood pressure assessment (PR=1.07; CI95% 1.01-1.14, lipid profile request (PR=1.23; CI95% 1.09-1.39, counseling for physical activity (PR=1.50; CI95% 1.21-1.86, foot examination (PR=2.08; CI95% 1.54-2,81, and counseling for foot care (PR=1.37; CI95% 1.18-1.59. Conclusion: High PHC score services showed better performance in the management of diabetes and care for more complicated patients, but they did not differ significantly from lower PHC score services in terms of patients’ glycemic control.

  2. Quality of care indicators in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetter, P; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; Haustermans, K; Jouret-Mourin, A; Kartheuser, A; Laurent, S; Mollet, G; Nagy, N; Scalliet, P; Van Cutsem, E; Van Den Eynde, M; Van de Stadt, J; Van Eycken, E; Van Laethem, J L; Vindevoghel, K; Penninckx, F

    2011-09-01

    Quality of health care is a hot topic, especially with regard to cancer. Although rectal cancer is, in many aspects, a model oncologic entity, there seem to be substantial differences in quality of care between countries, hospitals and physicians. PROCARE, a Belgian multidisciplinary national project to improve outcome in all patients with rectum cancer, identified a set of quality of care indicators covering all aspects of the management of rectal cancer. This set should permit national and international benchmarking, i.e. comparing results from individual hospitals or teams with national and international performances with feedback to participating teams. Such comparison could indicate whether further improvement is possible and/or warranted. PMID:22103052

  3. Prehospital quality improvement: past , present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2015-01-01

    This keynote lecture describes developments in prehospital and ambulance quality improvement in the UK. Firstly it maps progress in the past decade focussing on the national structures for research and audit, the development of clinical indicators and the use of quality improvement methods to advance performance in key areas of clinical practice. Secondly, it discusses key areas of interest for current improvement studies. Finally it presents future research likely to affect quality of care a...

  4. Quality improvement within nonprofit social service providers

    OpenAIRE

    Neubeck, Truls

    2016-01-01

    As a relatively new phenomenon in 2009, Swedish nonprofit social service providers proposed quality improvement as a way to reduce mistakes, use resources more effectively and meet the needs and expectations of clients in a better way. Although similar experiences have been studied in health care, the transfer of quality improvement to nonprofit social services gives a possibility for more knowledge on what enables, and constrains, systematic quality improvement in this specific context. This...

  5. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  6. How can clinicians measure safety and quality in acute care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, Peter J; Nolan, Thomas; Zeger, Scott; Miller, Marlene; Rubin, Haya

    2011-03-01

    The demand for high quality care is increasing and warranted. Evidence suggests that the quality of care in hospitals can be improved. The greatest opportunity to improve outcomes for patients over the next quarter century will probably come not from discovering new treatments but from learning how to deliver existing effective therapies. To improve, caregivers need to know what to do, how they are doing, and be able to improve the processes of care. The ability to monitor performance, though challenging in healthcare, is essential to improving quality of care. We present a practical method to assess and learn from routine practice. Methods to evaluate performance from industrial engineering can be broadly applied to efforts to improve the quality of healthcare. One method that may help to provide caregivers frequent feedback is time series data--ie, results are graphically correlated with time. Broad use of these tools might lead to the necessary improvements in quality of care. PMID:23451357

  7. Practical Approaches to Quality Improvement for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aine Marie; Cronin, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Continuous quality improvement is a fundamental attribute of high-performing health care systems. Quality improvement is an essential component of health care, with the current emphasis on adding value. It is also a regulatory requirement, with reimbursements increasingly being linked to practice performance metrics. Practice quality improvement efforts must be demonstrated for credentialing purposes and for certification of radiologists in practice. Continuous quality improvement must occur for radiologists to remain competitive in an increasingly diverse health care market. This review provides an introduction to the main approaches available to undertake practice quality improvement, which will be useful for busy radiologists. Quality improvement plays multiple roles in radiology services, including ensuring and improving patient safety, providing a framework for implementing and improving processes to increase efficiency and reduce waste, analyzing and depicting performance data, monitoring performance and implementing change, enabling personnel assessment and development through continued education, and optimizing customer service and patient outcomes. The quality improvement approaches and underlying principles overlap, which is not surprising given that they all align with good patient care. The application of these principles to radiology practices not only benefits patients but also enhances practice performance through promotion of teamwork and achievement of goals. PMID:26466176

  8. Measuring Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care: Interrupted Time Series Analysis of Door-to-Needle Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Margreet van Dishoeck

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, early treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA improves functional outcome by effectively reducing disability and dependency. Timely thrombolysis, within 1 h, is a vital aspect of acute stroke treatment, and is reflected in the widely used performance indicator ‘door-to-needle time' (DNT. DNT measures the time from the moment the patient enters the emergency department until he/she receives intravenous rtPA. The purpose of the study was to measure quality improvement from the first implementation of thrombolysis in stroke patients in a university hospital in the Netherlands. We further aimed to identify specific interventions that affect DNT. Methods: We included all patients with acute ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to a large university hospital in the Netherlands between January 2006 and December 2012, and focused on those treated with thrombolytic therapy on admission. Data were collected routinely for research purposes and internal quality measurement (the Erasmus Stroke Study. We used a retrospective interrupted time series design to study the trend in DNT, analyzed by means of segmented regression. Results: Between January 2006 and December 2012, 1,703 patients with ischemic stroke were admitted and 262 (17% were treated with rtPA. Patients treated with thrombolysis were on average 63 years old at the time of the stroke and 52% were male. Mean age (p = 0.58 and sex distribution (p = 0.98 did not change over the years. The proportion treated with thrombolysis increased from 5% in 2006 to 22% in 2012. In 2006, none of the patients were treated within 1 h. In 2012, this had increased to 81%. In a logistic regression analysis, this trend was significant (OR 1.6 per year, CI 1.4-1.8. The median DNT was reduced from 75 min in 2006 to 45 min in 2012 (p Conclusion and Implications: The DNT steadily improved from the first implementation of thrombolysis. Specific

  9. Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeid, Muzdalifat; Muganyizi, Projestine; Mpembeni, Rose; Darj, Elisabeth; Axemo, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background Sexual violence against women and children in Tanzania and globally is a human rights violation and a developmental challenge. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of training health professionals on rape management. The specific objectives were to evaluate the changes of knowledge and attitudes toward sexual violence among a selected population of health professionals at primary health care level. Design A quasi-experimental design using cross-sectional surveys was conducted to evaluate health care workers’ knowledge, attitude, and clinical practice toward sexual violence before and after the training program. The study involved the Kilombero (intervention) and Ulanga (comparison) districts in Morogoro region. A total of 151 health professionals at baseline (2012) and 169 in the final assessment (2014) participated in the survey. Data were collected using the same structured questionnaire. The amount of change in key indicators from baseline to final assessment in the two areas was compared using composite scores in the pre- and post-interventions, and the net intervention effect was calculated by the difference in difference method. Results Overall, there was improved knowledge in the intervention district from 55% at baseline to 86% and a decreased knowledge from 58.5 to 36.2% in the comparison area with a net effect of 53.7% and a p-value less than 0.0001. The proportion of participants who exhibited an accepting attitude toward violence declined from 15.3 to 11.2% in the intervention area but increased from 13.2 to 20.0% in the comparison area. Conclusions Training on the management of sexual violence is feasible and the results indicate improvement in healthcare workers’ knowledge and practice but not attitudes. Lessons learned from this study for successful replication of such an intervention in similar settings require commitment from those at strategic level within the health service to ensure that adequate resources are

  10. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with better outcomes in diabetes care. Quality management was measured with newly developed questionnaires about organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, q...

  11. Can clinical use of Social Media improve quality of care in mental Health? A Health Technology Assessment approach in an Italian mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Wilma Angela; Nollo, Giandomenico; Pace, Nicola; Torri, Emanuele

    2015-09-01

    Clinical use of modern Information and Communication Technologies such as Social Media (SM) can easily reach and empower groups of population at risk or affected by chronic diseases, and promote improvement of quality of care. In the paper we present an assessment of SM (i.e. e-mails, websites, on line social networks, apps) in the management of mental disorders, carried out in the Mental Health Service of Trento (Italy) according to Health Technology Assessment criteria. A systematic review of literature was performed to evaluate technical features, safety and effectiveness of SM. To understand usage rate and attitude towards new social technologies of patients and professionals, we performed a context analysis by a survey conducted over a group of 88 psychiatric patients and a group of 35 professionals. At last, we made recommendations for decision makers in order to promote SM for the management of mental disorders in a context of prioritization of investments in health care. PMID:26417743

  12. Social media: opportunities for quality improvement and lessons for providers-a networked model for patient-centered care through digital engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornkessel, Alexandra; Furberg, Robert; Lefebvre, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Social media brings a new dimension to health care for patients, providers, and their support networks. Increasing evidence demonstrates that patients who are more actively involved in their healthcare experience have better health outcomes and incur lower costs. In the field of cardiology, social media are proposed as innovative tools for the education and update of clinicians, physicians, nurses, and medical students. This article reviews the use of social media by healthcare providers and patients and proposes a model of "networked care" that integrates the use of digital social networks and platforms by both patients and providers and offers recommendations for providers to optimize their use and understanding of social media for quality improvement. PMID:24947833

  13. A review on laboratory tests’ utilization: A trigger for cutting costs and quality improvement in health care settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidani, Zahra; Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Farrokhian, Alireza; Haghighat, Masomeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Considering the role of laboratory tests as a central part of controlling health expenditure, this study intends to investigate laboratory tests overutilization in Iran to pave the way for future interventions. Methods: Inappropriate laboratory utilization was reviewed in a cross-sectional survey through the retrospective analysis of 384 medical records at a tertiary center. To pave the way for future intervention, overutilization tests were classified into two categories, inappropriate and inefficient, and then they were analyzed. Frequency analysis was used to analysis patient’s age, gender, hospital wards, length of stay, and diagnosis as well as inappropriate test and inefficient tests. Results: A total of 143 (1.50 %) of the tests were inefficient and was ordered due to laboratory errors including hemolysis, inefficient sampling, or absurd results. 2522 (26.40%) of the tests were inappropriate and stem from failure to meet medical/clinical appropriateness criteria. Conclusion: Whereas, inappropriate test ordering was more frequent than inefficient tests, the initial improvement strategy should focus on physicians’ test ordering behavior through conducting proper teaching strategies, ongoing audit and educational feedback, implementing health information technology tools and employing laboratory practice guidelines (LPGs) and testing algorithms. Conducting continuous quality improvement cycle for laboratory services and training of personnel involved in blood sampling is recommended for inefficient tests. PMID:27493909

  14. Assessing the Quality of Diabetic Patients Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the actions of family doctors and nurses in this area is an indispensable requisite in order to achieve a comprehensive health care. Objective: to assess the quality of health care provided to diabetic patients by the family doctor in Abreus health area. Methods: a descriptive and observational study based on the application of tools to assess the performance of family doctors in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the five family doctors consultation in Abreus health area from January to July 2011 was conducted. The five doctors working in these consultations, as well as the 172 diabetic patients were included in the study. At the same time, 172 randomly selected medical records were also revised. Through observation, the existence of some necessary material resources and the quality of their performance as well as the quality of medical records were evaluated. Patient criteria served to assess the quality of the health care provided. Results: scientific and technical training on diabetes mellitus has been insufficient; the necessary equipment for the appropriate care and monitoring of patients with diabetes is available; in 2.9% of medical records reviewed, interrogation appears in its complete form including the complete physical examination in 12 of them and the complete medical indications in 26. Conclusions: the quality of comprehensive medical care to diabetic patients included in the study is compromised. Doctors interviewed recognized the need to be trained in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes in order to improve their professional performance and enhance the quality of the health care provided to these patients.

  15. Tracking the quality of care for sick children using lot quality assurance sampling: targeting improvements of health services in Jigawa, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Adekola Oladele

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Nigeria, 30% of child deaths are due to malaria. The National Malaria Control Program of Nigeria (NMCP during 2009 initiated a program to improve the quality of paediatric malaria services delivered in health facilities (HF. This study reports a rapid approach used to assess the existing quality of services in Jigawa state at decentralised levels of the health system. METHODS: NMCP selected Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS to identify the variation in HF service quality among Senatorial Districts (SD. LQAS was selected because it was affordable and could be used by local health workers (HW in a population-based survey. NMCP applied a 2-stage LQAS using a structured Rapid Health Facility Assessment (R-HFA tool to identify high and low performing SD for specified indicators. FINDINGS: LQAS identified variations in HF performance (n = 21 and enabled resources to be targeted to address priorities. All SD exhibited deficient essential services, supplies and equipment. Only 9.7% of HF had Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies and other first-line treatments for childhood illnesses. No SD and few HF exhibited adequate HW performance for the assessment, treatment or counselling of sick children. Using the IMCI algorithm, 17.5% of HW assessed the child's vaccination status, 46.8% assessed nutritional status, and 65.1% assessed children for dehydration. Only 5.1% of HW treatments were appropriate for the assessment. Exit interviews revealed that 5.1% of caregivers knew their children's illness, and only 19.9% could accurately describe how to administer the prescribed drug. CONCLUSION: This R-HFA, using LQAS principles, is a rapid, simple tool for assessing malaria services and can be used at scale. It identified technical deficiencies that could be corrected by improved continuing medical education, targeted supervision, and recurrent R-HFA assessments of the quality of services.

  16. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  17. Quality indicators for primary care mental health services

    OpenAIRE

    Shield, T; Campbell, S; Rogers, A; Worrall, A; Chew-Graham, C; Gask, L

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To identify a generic set of face valid quality indicators for primary care mental health services which reflect a multi-stakeholder perspective and can be used for facilitating quality improvement.

  18. Measuring the Multifaceted Nature of Infant and Toddler Care Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Peter L.; Kriener-Althen, Kerry; Marcella, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: The quality of group care infants and toddlers experience relates to their concurrent and later development. Recent quality improvement initiatives point to the need for ecologically valid measures that assess the multifaceted nature of child care quality. In this article, we present the psychometric properties of an infant and…

  19. Peer-to-peer nursing rounds and hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence in a surgical intensive care unit: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Alyson Dare; Moorer, Amanda; Makic, MaryBeth Flynn

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a quality improvement project in order to evaluate the effect of nurse-to-nurse bedside "rounding" as a strategy to decrease hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) in a surgical intensive care unit. We instituted weekly peer-to-peer bedside skin rounds in a 17-bed surgical intensive care unit. Two nurses were identified as skin champions and trained by the hospital's certified WOC nurse to conduct skin rounds. The skin champion nurses conducted weekly peer-to-peer rounds that included discussions about key elements of our patients' skin status including current Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk score, and implementation of specific interventions related to subscale risk assessment. If a pressure ulcer was present, the current action plan was reevaluated for effectiveness. Quarterly HAPU prevalence studies were conducted from January 2008 to December 2010. Nineteen patients experienced a HAPU: 17 were located on the coccyx and 2 on the heel. Ten ulcers were classified as stage II, 3 PU were stage IV, 5 were deemed unstageable, and 1 was classified as a deep tissue injury. The frequency of preventive interventions rose during our quality improvement project. Specifically, the use of prevention surfaces increased 92%, repositioning increased 30%, nutrition interventions increased 77%, and moisture management increased 100%. Prior to focused nursing rounds, the highest HAPU prevalence rate was 27%. After implementing focused nursing rounds, HAPU rates trended down and were 0% for 3 consecutive quarters. PMID:22415120

  20. Improving care efficiency in a radiotherapy center using Lean philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Trilling, Lorraine; Pellet, Bertrand; Delacroix, Sabine; Colella Fleury, Hélène; Marcon, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In the field of health care, as in production or services, there is a need for tailor made methodology to help managers improving quality of care as well as efficiency of the organization. Quality Improvement (QI) has become a major preoccupation in the current context where hospitals and health care services need to provide a high level of care and a welcoming environment for patients while reducing costs and maintaining a pleasant work atmosphere for staff. In this paper we present how, wit...

  1. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  2. Improving care for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Colin

    2008-09-01

    A report about the health care of people with learning disability published by a UK charity concluded that this group was discriminated against and that healthcare professionals had a poor understanding of their needs. A case report of a young person with cerebral palsy is used here to demonstrate good practice in the care of children with learning disabilities. The careful development over time of individualised solutions makes a difference to the quality of life for children and families. Improved understanding through education as well as collaborative working and family participation will help ensure that children and young people receive the range of services they require. PMID:18808052

  3. Modalities of hemodialysis: Quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Karkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis (HD treatment had, over many years, improved the survival rate of patients with end-stage renal disease. However, standard or conventional HD prescription is far from being optimal in replacing the function of normal kidneys. Its unphysiologic clearance pattern and inability to remove all types and sizes of uremic toxins results in inter- and intra-dialysis complications and an unacceptably high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Efficiency of HD can be improved by increasing blood and dialysate flow rates, dialyzer size and surface area and duration and frequency of dialysis sessions. Home HD, where short daily or long slow nocturnal HD sessions can conveniently be performed, provides an excellent option for quality of life improvement and reduction in morbidity and mortality. Recent innovations in the specifications of HD machines and improvement in dialysis membranes characteristics and water treatment technology paved the way for achieving quality HD. These advancements have resulted in efficient implementation of adsorption, diffusion and/or convection principles using adsorption HD, hemofiltration, hemodiafiltration (HDF and online HDF modalities in order to achieve optimum HD. Implementation of these innovations resulted in better quality care achievements in clinical practice and reduction in morbidity and mortality rates among HD patients.

  4. 糖尿病护理小组对提高糖尿病护理质量的影响研究%The Influence of Diabetes care team to improve the quality of diabetes care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐丽萍

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析研究糖尿病护理小组对提高糖尿病护理质量的影响,旨在提高糖尿病患者的护理质量。方法该院于2014年1月开始建立糖尿病护理小组,选取该院2014年1月—8月收治的糖尿病患者85例,作为观察组,进行护理探究。另外,选取去年同期收治的糖尿病患者85例,作为对照组。回顾性分析其临床资料及诊治经过,对比两组患者血糖控制情况及护理满意度。结果糖尿病护理小组成立后,观察组85例患者,各项指标均有很大程度的改善,评分较治疗前比较显著提高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。且组间比较来看,观察组改善情况显著优于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。满意度调查方面,观察组临床总满意度为95.3%,显著高于对照组的80.0%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论成立糖尿病护理小组,可有效提高了糖尿病患者的临床护理质量,增加各科室护理人员糖尿病护理知识,改善糖尿病患者生活质量,临床意义重大,应广泛在临床护理中应用。%Objective To analyze the impact of diabetes research diabetes care team to improve the quality of care, aimed at im-proving the quality of care for patients with diabetes. Methods: The hospital in January 2014 to start building diabetes care team, our hospital from January 2014 to August 2014 were treated 85 cases of diabetes, as the observation group, nursing explore. Also, choose the same period last year admitted 85 cases of diabetes [as a control group Given group name], as a control group. A retro-spective analysis of the clinical data and treatment after comparing two groups of patients with blood glucose control and nursing satisfaction. Results Diabetes Care Group was established in the observation group 85 patients, before improving the indicators are to a large extent, the scores improved significantly compared with treatment comparison, the

  5. Quality Indicators for Hospital Care: Reliability and validity

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Hospital quality indicators are widely implemented for purposes such as accountability, transparency and the overarching aim of quality improvement. However, it is not clear whether currently used hospital quality indicators actually reflect quality of care. The aim of this thesis was to expand our knowledge on how to measure quality of hospital care with the focus on external comparison. I specifically investigated reliability and validity as these are key aspects of...

  6. The QICKD study protocol: a cluster randomised trial to compare quality improvement interventions to lower systolic BP in chronic kidney disease (CKD in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    du Bois Elizabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a relatively newly recognised but common long-term condition affecting 5 to 10% of the population. Effective management of CKD, with emphasis on strict blood pressure (BP control, reduces cardiovascular risk and slows the progression of CKD. There is currently an unprecedented rise in referral to specialist renal services, which are often located in tertiary centres, inconvenient for patients, and wasteful of resources. National and international CKD guidelines include quality targets for primary care. However, there have been no rigorous evaluations of strategies to implement these guidelines. This study aims to test whether quality improvement interventions improve primary care management of elevated BP in CKD, reduce cardiovascular risk, and slow renal disease progression Design Cluster randomised controlled trial (CRT Methods This three-armed CRT compares two well-established quality improvement interventions with usual practice. The two interventions comprise: provision of clinical practice guidelines with prompts and audit-based education. The study population will be all individuals with CKD from general practices in eight localities across England. Randomisation will take place at the level of the general practices. The intended sample (three arms of 25 practices powers the study to detect a 3 mmHg difference in systolic BP between the different quality improvement interventions. An additional 10 practices per arm will receive a questionnaire to measure any change in confidence in managing CKD. Follow up will take place over two years. Outcomes will be measured using anonymised routinely collected data extracted from practice computer systems. Our primary outcome measure will be reduction of systolic BP in people with CKD and hypertension at two years. Secondary outcomes will include biomedical outcomes and markers of quality, including practitioner confidence in managing CKD. A small

  7. The use of Health Care Financing Administration data for the development of a quality improvement project on the treatment of anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, P W; Greer, J; Jencks, S

    1994-08-01

    The Health Care Financing Administration maintains a wide array of data systems that are essential to the functioning of the Medicare program. These data, collected and maintained for the purposes of ensuring entitlements and payment for services, also can be used to monitor programmatic changes and to define potential problem areas. The end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Program Management and Medical Information System (PMMIS) is a subset of the larger Medicare statistical system. It is a historic record of all Medicare ESRD beneficiaries dating back to 1978. Basic Medicare enrollment information on ESRD beneficiaries is enhanced with the addition of information on the cause of renal failure, type of dialysis therapy, transplantation history, and cause of death. The ESRD PMMIS has been put to a number of uses in the past decade or so, ranging from basic descriptive epidemiology to analyses of mortality rates to assessments of programmatic issues such as the composite rate and dialyzer reuse. Because of the limited clinical detail in the PMMIS, there are many specific questions that cannot be adequately addressed. With approval of the Food and Drug Administration and Medicare coverage of erythropoietin, a erythropoietin monitoring system was developed to assess utilization trends of this anemia control drug. Within a few months it became evident that dosing levels for erythropoietin were much lower than expected from the clinical trials. Following a change in the payment method from a fixed amount to one based on dose level, dosing has increased markedly. However, hematocrit levels still remain below optimal levels. This lack of hematocrit response has led the Health Care Financing Administration, in concert with the renal community, to target anemia control as a potential health care quality improvement project. This paper presents an example of the type of data presentation that can be derived from the current PMMIS. The Health Standards and Quality Bureau has made

  8. Evidence from facility level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Jai K; Kumar, Rohail; Salam, Rehana A; Lassi, Zohra S; Zulfiqar A Bhutta

    2014-01-01

    Most of the maternal and newborn deaths occur at birth or within 24 hours of birth. Therefore, essential lifesaving interventions need to be delivered at basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care facilities. Facilities provide complex interventions including advice on referrals, post discharge care, long-term management of chronic conditions along with staff training, managerial and administrative support to other facilities. This paper reviews the effectiveness of facility level inputs...

  9. Self care integrative treatment demonstrated in rural community setting improves health related quality of life of lymphatic filariasis patients in endemic villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggithaya, Madhur Guruprasad; Narahari, Saravu R; Vayalil, Sudha; Shefuvan, Mohammed; Jacob, Neethu K; Sushma, Kandathu Valappil

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed impact of community based self care integrative treatment provided through mass camps in villages of three districts of Kerala, India endemic for lymphatic filariasis (LF). Two most endemic Primary Health centres (PHCs) were selected from each of the three districts, where maximum concentration of LF patients is recorded. Fourteen one day LF camps, each attended by 30-40 patients were conducted. Trained Accredited Social Health Activists encouraged LF patients to attend camps. Skin wash and drying, care of bacterial entry points using dermatology drugs, and simple yoga and breathing exercises were demonstrated in these camps. Patients were advised to continue these self care activities daily at home for six months. The quality of life (QoL) of LF patients was determined for Indian life style domains using validated and pretested specific questionnaire (LF-specific QoL questionnaire-LFSQQ). It addressed conditions and state of individuals with reference to LF. The questionnaire had 7 domains and each domain consisted of a series of questions with likert scale (no problem, mild, moderate, severe, most severe). 446 patients attended one day camps to get training on integrative self care treatment. 425 patients (95.3%) were followed up after six months and QoL was reassessed. Each patient's QoL in mobility, self care, usual activity, pain and discomfort and social relationship significantly improved (P value change. The disease burden, for the purpose of the study was measured by asking questions about history of painful redness, swelling and cellulitis of legs (filarial fever), foul smell (odor), itching (eczema/discharge from limb), wound (non healing ulcer) and weight/size of the limb. The difference in disease burden as recorded during the sixth month follow up was measured using dependent t test, reduced significantly (P value <0.01) in 409 (96.2%) patients. 103 (24.2%) patients experienced fever during follow up. Severity of inflammatory

  10. 护理层级管理在提高临床护理服务质量中的作用分析%Care Level Management Role in Improving Quality of Care in Clinical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪慧英

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析护理层级管理在提高临床护理服务质量中的作用。方法选取2012年5月-2014年5月在该院工作的54名护理人员作为研究对象,其中2012年5月-2013年4月在岗的26名护理人员为对照组,2013年5月-2014年5月在岗的28名护理人员为观察组。对照组护理人员未采用护理层级管理模式对患者实施护理,观察组护理人员均采用护理层级管理模式对患者实施护理,对比两组院内感染情况、护理服务质量及患者对护理服务的满意率。结果观察组院内感染情况、护理服务质量及患者对护理服务的满意率优于对照组,两组数据组间差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论采用护理层级管理模式实施护理能减少患者出现院内感染,提高临床护理服务质量及患者对护理服务的满意率。%Objective To analyze the role of nursing in improving clinical care level management of quality of service. Methods May 2012- May 2014 in the hospital 54 nurses working as a research object, which in May 2012-April 2013 in the post of the 26 nurses for the control group, in May 2013-May 2014 in the post of the 28 nurses in the observation group. Nursing care in the control group did not use hierarchical management model of care for patients with the observa-tion group care nurses are used to implement hierarchical management model of care for patients, comparing two groups of nosocomial infection, satisfaction and quality of care patients care. Results The nosocomial infection, quality of care and patient satisfaction rate for care than the control group, the difference between the two data sets were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The use of nursing care hierarchical management model implemented to reduce nosocomial infections in patients, improve clinical care and patient satisfaction rate the quality of service for care services.

  11. Atrial fibrillation care improvement collaborative

    OpenAIRE

    Robelia, Paul; Kopecky, Stephen; Thacher, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cardiac arrhythmia. Many patients with new onset or recurrent AF present to the emergency department and are subsequently admitted to the hospital and seen by cardiology specialists for follow up. In an attempt to address this high utilization of acute health care resources, reduce costs, and improve patient care, our institution instituted a collaborative project between the departments of emergency medicine, cardiology, family medicine, and...

  12. Managed care opportunities for improving asthma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan D

    2011-04-01

    Uncontrolled asthma is an enormous burden in terms of the propensity to reach asthma control in the future, direct and indirect costs, and health-related quality of life. The complex pathophysiology, treatment, and triggers of asthma warrant a unified, yet targeted, approach to care. No single factor is fully responsible for poor control. Complicating the problem of asthma control is adherence to long-term controller medications. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) established several key points for asthma control, and developed classifications for asthma control and recommended actions for treatment. All parties involved in the management of asthma, including physicians, pharmacists, nurses, patients, family members, and insurance companies, need to be aware of the NAEPP guidelines. To determine if the goals of asthma therapy are being met, assessment of asthma outcomes is necessary. Unfortunately, some measures may get overlooked, and patient-reported outcomes (as assessed by the validated control instruments) are not often collected during routine examinations. The Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measure for asthma may be used to quantify asthma care, but there is evidence that it does not fully capture the goals of asthma management. Most well-designed, education-based interventions are considered good value for money, but it can be difficult to put into practice such policy interventions. An optimal managed care plan will adhere to known evidence-based guidelines, can measure outcomes, is targeted to the patient's risk and impairment, and can adapt to changes in our understanding of asthma and its treatment. PMID:21761959

  13. ‘Tempos’ management in primary care: a key factor for classifying adverse events, and improving quality and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Amalberti, R.; Brami, J

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of time management in safe and efficient medicine is important but poorly incorporated into the taxonomies of error in primary care. This paper addresses the lack of time management, presenting a framework integrating five time scales termed ‘Tempos’ requiring parallel processing by GPs: the disease's tempo (unexpected rapid evolutions, slow reaction to treatment); the office's tempo (day-to-day agenda and interruptions); the patient's tempo (time to express symptoms, comp...

  14. Cancer registries can provide evidence-based data to improve quality of care and prevent cancer deaths

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchardy Magnin, Christine; Rapiti Aylward, Elisabetta; Benhamou, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Today, many countries are increasing their efforts to ensure that all cancer patients receive the best possible care. Population-based cancer registries have adapted their registration to collect additional clinical variables to provide clinicians with unbiased population data on cancer treatment and survival. Taking several examples of epidemiological cancer research performed at the Geneva Cancer Registry, we aim to illustrate how cancer registries oversee the treatment and outcomes of canc...

  15. Next-generation long-term transplant clinics: improving resource utilization and the quality of care through health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioth, M J; Warner, J; Savani, B N; Jagasia, M

    2016-01-01

    By the year 2020, potentially one-half a million hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients will need long-term follow-up care to address not only chronic GvHD but also multiple other late consequences of transplant. Despite this increase in patients, there will not be a concomitant increase in the HCT workforce. Thus, the future of long-term patient management will require a new 'next-generation' clinical model that utilizes technological solutions to make the care of the HCT patient efficient, safe and cost-effective. Guideline-based decision support will be embedded in clinical workflows. Documentation requirements will be reduced as automated data collection from electronic medical records (EMRs) will populate registries and provide feedback for a rapid learning health system. Interoperable EMRs will disseminate treatment protocols to multiple care providers in a distributed long-term clinic model, such that providers outside of the transplant center can provide services closer to the patient. Patients will increase their participatory role through patient portals and mobile devices. At Vanderbilt, we have responded to some of these future challenges by embedding guideline-based decision support, structuring clinical documentation and being early adopters of communication technology. This manuscript describes the current state of some of these innovations, and a vision for the future of the long-term transplant clinic. PMID:26367235

  16. Next generation long term transplant clinics: Improving resource utilization and the quality of care through health information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioth, Matthew J; Warner, Jeremy; Savani, Bipin N; Jagasia, Madan

    2016-01-01

    By the year 2020, potentially one half million hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients will need long-term follow up care to address not only chronic GvHD but also multiple other late consequences of transplant. Despite this increase in patients, there will not be a concomitant increase in the HCT workforce. Thus the future of long-term patient management will require a new “next-generation” clinical model that utilizes technological solutions to make the care of the HCT patient efficient, safe, and cost-effective. Guideline-based decision support will be embedded in clinical workflows. Documentation requirements will be reduced as automated data collection from electronic medical records (EMRs) will populate registries and provide feedback for a rapid learning health system. Interoperable EMRs will disseminate treatment protocols to multiple care providers in a distributed long-term clinic model, such that providers outside of the transplant center can provide services closer to the patient. Patients will increase their participatory role through patient portals and mobile devices. At Vanderbilt, we have responded so some of these future challenges by embedding guideline-based decision support, structuring clinical documentation, and being early adopters of communication technology. This manuscript describes the current state of some of these innovations, and a vision for the future of the long-term transplant clinic. PMID:26367235

  17. Quality Indicators for Hospital Care : Reliability and validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Fischer (Claudia)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Hospital quality indicators are widely implemented for purposes such as accountability, transparency and the overarching aim of quality improvement. However, it is not clear whether currently used hospital quality indicators actually reflect quality of care. The aim of

  18. IS TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT/ CONTINOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT OR QUALITY ASSURANCE APPLICABLE IN HEALTH SERVICES?

    OpenAIRE

    Sidin, Andi Indahwaty

    2015-01-01

    In modern society, people are likely to be consumerism. They tend to be concerned about the quality of goods or services. In the same way, health care had to pay attention as the patients seem to be familiarized with health services quality. Health care has tried to adapt TQM/Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) as well as Quality Assurance (QA) which is also adapted from manufacturing. However, some characteristics in the health industry are dissimilar to manufacturing. It can be explained ...

  19. Indicators for quality of hospital care: Beyond the numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Dishoeck, Anne-Margreet

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis addresses two major topics in measuring, comparing and improving quality of care. We found considerable influence of random variation and case-mix in comparing hospitals using performance indicators. Although we found a significant relation between outcome and care processes, chance variation is the major limitation for the interpretability of indicators used for quality measurement or quality improvement. Like a one hand clock, we roughly know what time i...

  20. Assesment of interprofessional training methodology in professional education as a potential tool to improve patient safety and quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Yashwant; Groshev, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Systematic current literature analysis: Does interprofessional training significantly improve the team communication? - Team member awareness (pre-and post-training survey scores) - Communication Does interprofessional training significantly improve healthcare safety? - Morbidity/mortality - Adverse events (nosocomial infections, serious safety events) - Hospital stay (in-patient setting)

  1. How health policy influences quality of care in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lisa A; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2009-08-01

    The primary focus of child health policy for the last twenty years has been on improving health care coverage and access. More recently, the focus has shifted to include not only coverage, but also the quality of the care received. This article describes some "voltage drops" in health care that impede delivery of high quality health care. The growing emphasis on quality is reflected in provisions of the new Child Health Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) legislation. In addition to providing funding for health coverage for over four million more children, it also includes the most significant federal investment in pediatric quality to date. PMID:19660643

  2. A web-based laboratory information system to improve quality of care of tuberculosis patients in Peru: functional requirements, implementation and usage statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yale Gloria

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients in resource-poor settings experience large delays in starting appropriate treatment and may not be monitored appropriately due to an overburdened laboratory system, delays in communication of results, and missing or error-prone laboratory data. The objective of this paper is to describe an electronic laboratory information system implemented to alleviate these problems and its expanding use by the Peruvian public sector, as well as examine the broader issues of implementing such systems in resource-poor settings. Methods A web-based laboratory information system "e-Chasqui" has been designed and implemented in Peru to improve the timeliness and quality of laboratory data. It was deployed in the national TB laboratory, two regional laboratories and twelve pilot health centres. Using needs assessment and workflow analysis tools, e-Chasqui was designed to provide for improved patient care, increased quality control, and more efficient laboratory monitoring and reporting. Results Since its full implementation in March 2006, 29,944 smear microscopy, 31,797 culture and 7,675 drug susceptibility test results have been entered. Over 99% of these results have been viewed online by the health centres. High user satisfaction and heavy use have led to the expansion of e-Chasqui to additional institutions. In total, e-Chasqui will serve a network of institutions providing medical care for over 3.1 million people. The cost to maintain this system is approximately US$0.53 per sample or 1% of the National Peruvian TB program's 2006 budget. Conclusion Electronic laboratory information systems have a large potential to improve patient care and public health monitoring in resource-poor settings. Some of the challenges faced in these settings, such as lack of trained personnel, limited transportation, and large coverage areas, are obstacles that a well-designed system can overcome. e-Chasqui has the

  3. Many quality measurements, but few quality measures assessing the quality of breast cancer care in women: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Li; Morrison Andra; Sampson Margaret; Brouwers Melissa; Graham Ian D; Lewin Gabriela; Mamaladze Vasil; Schachter Howard M; O'Blenis Peter; Garritty Chantelle

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Breast cancer in women is increasingly frequent, and care is complex, onerous and expensive, all of which lend urgency to improvements in care. Quality measurement is essential to monitor effectiveness and to guide improvements in healthcare. Methods Ten databases, including Medline, were searched electronically to identify measures assessing the quality of breast cancer care in women (diagnosis, treatment, followup, documentation of care). Eligible studies measured adhere...

  4. Agency for quality and accreditation of the health care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Zisovska, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    The Agency ensures quality and safety in health care through the process of accreditation and re-accreditation of the health care facilities. The Agency develops, revise and improves the standards of the health care in HC facilities, monitors the implementation of the standards and facilitates the preparedness of the HC facility for successful external assessment.

  5. Prevention of pressure ulcers in patients with hip fractures : Definition, measurement and improvement of the quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Gunningberg, Lena

    2000-01-01

    The aims of the present thesis were to survey the prevalence and incidence ofpressure ulcers in patients with hip fracture and to investigate nursing staffknowledge and documentation regarding pressure ulcer prevention for the samepatient group. Another aim was to test the effect of three preventive interventions:risk assessment and pressure ulcer grading, a pressure-reducing mattress and aneducational programme. Experimental, comparative and descriptive designs wereused and quality improveme...

  6. Evaluation of a training program for health care workers to improve the quality of care for rape survivors: a quasi-experimental design study in Morogoro, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Abeid, Muzdalifat; Muganyizi, Projestine; Mpembeni, Rose; Darj, Elisabeth; Axemo, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual violence against women and children in Tanzania and globally is a human rights violation and a developmental challenge.Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of training health professionals on rape management. The specific objectives were to evaluate the changes of knowledge and attitudes toward sexual violence among a selected population of health professionals at primary health care level.Design: A quasi-experimental design using cross-sectional survey...

  7. Turning Disaster into an Opportunity for Quality Improvement in Essential Intrapartum and Newborn Care Services in the Philippines: Pre- to Posttraining Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Castillo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. On 8 November 2013, supertyphoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines, severely disrupting health service delivery. Reestablishment of essential services for birthing mothers and their newborns became high priority. Methodology. Following a baseline assessment, an Essential Intrapartum and Newborn Care (EINC training package was implemented and posttraining assessments (1 and 3 months after training were undertaken. Results. Baseline assessments (n=56 facilities revealed gaps in provider’s skill and shortage of life-saving commodities. Facilities lacked newborn bags/masks (9%, towels (6%, and magnesium sulfate (39%. Service providers lacked skills in partograph use (54%, antenatal steroid (44% use, and breastfeeding initiation (50%. At 3 months after training (n=51 facilities, dramatic increases in correct partograph use (to 92%, antenatal steroid use (to 98%, breastfeeding initiation (to 86%, kangaroo mother care (to 94%, availability of magnesium sulfate (to 94%, and bag/masks (to 88% were documented. Gaps persisted for skills in assisted vaginal delivery and removal of placental fragments. Conclusion. Health services were severely disrupted after supertyphoon Haiyan. Our study demonstrates that essential birthing services and quality improvements to strengthen local health systems can be restored in a timely manner even in immediate postdisaster settings.

  8. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Poots, Alan J; Woodcock, Thomas; Vaughan, Louella; Bell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effec...

  9. [How to write, how to implement and how to evaluate a practice guideline in order to improve quality of care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, L; Lefort, C; Terrien, N

    2012-11-01

    Initiatives of clinical practices improvement have been gradually developing in France for 20 years. Nevertheless, effective implementation of change is still difficult for numerous reasons. The use of clinical practices guidelines is one of the different ways of improvement. It is however necessary to adapt these national guidelines to the specificities of the hospital and the team, to ensure implementation and appropriation by the professionals. These recommendations are thus translated into applicable and concrete standard operating procedures. These documents have to be built by and for the concerned professionals. They are also communication and training tools, precise, directive, uniform in terms of presentation and attractive visually. Once drafted, they have to be distributed widely to the professionals to facilitate implementation. The simple distribution of the recommendations is insufficient to modify the clinical practices and require association of several methods of promotion for an optimal appropriation. How then to make sure of their effective use? Practices evaluation is one of the steps of continuous professional development, including continuous training and analysis of clinical practices by using methods promoted by the "Haute Autorité de santé". One of them is the clinical audit; use of method assessing non-pertinent treatment is interesting too. Analysis of the non-conformities and gaps between theory and practice allows identifying various possible causes (professional, institutional, organizational or personal) in order to implement corrective action plans, in a logic of continuous improvement. PMID:23039956

  10. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY): impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Lindsay A Rhodes,1 Carrie E Huisingh,1 Gerald McGwin Jr,1,2 Stephen T Mennemeyer,3 Mary Bregantini,4 Nita Patel,4 Jinan Saaddine,5 John E Crews,5 Christopher A Girkin,1 Cynthia Owsley11Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, 2Department of Epidemiology, 3Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 4Prevent Blindness, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Vision Health Initiative, Division of Diabetes Translation, Cente...

  11. To strengthen management, to improve the quality of nursing care%加强护理管理,提高护理质量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋贤竹

    2009-01-01

    目的:探讨影响护理安全的因素及其预防方法.方法:通过开展安全教育、规范管理制度等措施加强护理安全管理.结果:护理工作面广、琐碎复杂、存在不安全因素较多,直接影响患者疾病的康复,从细节上落实护理安全管理,保证患者的安全.结论:护理人员在实际工作中应加强工作责任心,预防不安全隐患,提高护理质量.%Objective:Nursing safety management is to ensure the quality of nursing, preventing and reducing is medical accidents and medical remedy the important link of the points.Methods:Through education and standardized management system safety measures to enhance safety management.Results:The nurse face,trivial,unsafe factors exist complex,directly affects patients recover from the disease,the implementation details,ensure the safety management of nursing care of patients.Conclusion:The nursing staff in actual work should strengthen the responsibility,prevent not safe hidden trouble,improve the quality of nursing.

  12. Preanalytical quality improvement : in quality we trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Becan-McBride, Kathleen; Behulova, Darina; Bowen, Raffick A.; Church, Stephen; Delanghe, Joris; Grankvist, Kjell; Kitchen, Steve; Nybo, Mads; Nauck, Matthias; Nikolac, Nora; Palicka, Vladimir; Plebani, Mario; Sandberg, Sverre; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    Total quality in laboratory medicine should be defined as the guarantee that each activity throughout the total testing process is correctly performed, providing valuable medical decision-making and effective patient care. In the past decades, a 10-fold reduction in the analytical error rate has bee

  13. Deficiencies in the Quality of Diabetes Care

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Baiju R.; Hux, Janet E.; Laupacis, Andreas; Zinman, Bernard; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2007-01-01

    The quality of diabetes care delivered to patients falls below the expectations of practice guidelines and clinical trial evidence. Studies in many jurisdictions with varying health care systems have shown that recommended processes of care occur less often than they should; hence, outcomes of care are inadequate. Many studies comparing care between specialists and generalists have found that specialists are more likely to implement processes of care. However, this provides little insight int...

  14. The Quality of Cancer Care Initiative in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Wouters, Michel W. J. M.; Jansen-Landheer, Marlies L. E. A.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2007 the Dutch Cancer Society formed a `Quality of Cancer Care? taskforce comprising medical specialists, from all disciplines involved in the care for cancer patients. This taskforce was charged with the evaluation of quality of cancer care in the Netherlands and the development of strategies for improvement. Objective The experts first focused on the relation between procedural volume and patient outcome and later aimed to i...

  15. Carepaths: a framework for quality patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The goals of a carepath are to provide a framework for quality patient care, enhance collaborative practice, improve resource utilization, and increase patient satisfaction. Carepaths are designed to move the patient toward specific clinical outcomes, which have been defined by a multidisciplinary team. Carepaths enhance the quality improvement process by tracking clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this report is to share the 1996 results of our breast cancer carepath. Methods: In 1994 the multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee of the Division of Radiation Oncology constructed a carepath for women with breast cancer receiving breast or chest wall radiation. Eleven clinical outcomes were defined which reflected the educational and selfcare focus of the carepath. Recording on the carepath of patient attainment of the outcomes was done by the RN, RTT and MD. Patient satisfaction tools were designed by the quality improvement committee in conjunction with the Department of Marketing Support. Each patient was given a written survey at two points along the carepath: post simulation and post treatment. Results: Ninety-five women were placed on the breast carepath in 1996. Outcomes were reviewed for 40 of these carepaths. The return rate of patient satisfaction surveys post simulation and post treatment approached 99%. Overall satisfaction was high with 76% of patients feeling 'very satisfied' with the simulation process and 93% 'very satisfied' with the treatment experience. Common themes noted in anecdotes related to comfort and privacy issues. Conclusions: Based on our experience, carepaths facilitated the structuring of a comprehensive and collaborative approach to patient care. Strategies for process improvement were guided by the ongoing surveillance of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

  16. Effective Marketing of Quality Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Bettye M.; Boyd, Harper W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Identifies negative public and professional attitudes that lie beneath the contemporary negative image of quality child care. Argues that concepts and principles of marketing are appropriate for influencing parents to choose high quality services and helping ensure that supplementary care is of sufficient quality to enhance, not inhibit, the…

  17. Can the availability of unrestricted financial support improve the quality of care of thalassemics in a center with limited resources? A single center study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prantar Chakrabarti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive management of thalassemia demands a multidisciplinary approach, sufficient financial resources, carefully developed expertise of the care givers, as well as significant compliance on the patients’ part. Studies exploring the utility of unrestricted financing within the existing infrastructure, for the management of thalassemia, particularly in the context of a developing country, are scarce. This study aimed to assess the impact of sponsored comprehensive care compared to the routine care of thalassemics provided at Institute of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Kolkata, India. Two hundred and twenty patients were selected for the study and distributed in two arms. Regular monthly follow up was done including a Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL assessment with SF 36 v2 (validated Bengali version. Patients receiving sponsored comprehensive care showed a significant improvement in the mean hemoglobin levels and decrease in mean ferritin. HRQoL assessment revealed a better score in the physical domain though the mental health domain score was not significantly better at nine months. Unrestricted financial support in the form of comprehensive care has a positive impact on the thalassemia patients in a developing country not only in terms of clinical parameters but also in health related quality of life. 地中海贫血症的综合管理需要多学科的研究方法、充足的财政资源,护理人员应具备丰富的专业知识,并且患者应尽可能服从安排。探讨现有基础设施内无限制财政支持的实用性和地中海贫血症管理(尤其是在发展中国家)的研究甚少。 此研究旨在评估与印度加尔各答血液及输血医学会提供的地中海贫血症常规护理相比,综合护理对患者的影响 。 此研究筛选了 220名患者,并分为两组进行研究。每月定期跟进两组患者情况,包括使用第2版SF 36(经验证的孟加拉语版本)进行

  18. Oversight on the borderline: Quality improvement and pragmatic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Brickman, Andrew L; Capron, Alexander; Ford, Daniel E; Gombosev, Adrijana; Greene, Sarah M; Iafrate, R Peter; Kolaczkowski, Laura; Pallin, Sarah C; Pletcher, Mark J; Staman, Karen L; Vazquez, Miguel A; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    Pragmatic research that compares interventions to improve the organization and delivery of health care may overlap, in both goals and methods, with quality improvement activities. When activities have attributes of both research and quality improvement, confusion often arises about what ethical oversight is, or should be, required. For routine quality improvement, in which the delivery of health care is modified in minor ways that create only minimal risks, oversight by local clinical or administrative leaders utilizing institutional policies may be sufficient. However, additional consideration should be given to activities that go beyond routine, local quality improvement to first determine whether such non-routine activities constitute research or quality improvement and, in either case, to ensure that independent oversight will occur. This should promote rigor, transparency, and protection of patients' and clinicians' rights, well-being, and privacy in all such activities. Specifically, we recommend that (1) health care organizations should have systematic policies and processes for designating activities as routine quality improvement, non-routine quality improvement, or quality improvement research and determining what oversight each will receive. (2) Health care organizations should have formal and explicit oversight processes for non-routine quality improvement activities that may include input from institutional quality improvement experts, health services researchers, administrators, clinicians, patient representatives, and those experienced in the ethics review of health care activities. (3) Quality improvement research requires review by an institutional review board; for such review to be effective, institutional review boards should develop particular expertise in assessing quality improvement research. (4) Stakeholders should be included in the review of non-routine quality improvement and quality improvement-related research proposals. Only by doing

  19. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  20. Development and testing of the Dementia Symptom Management at Home (DSM-H) program: An interprofessional home health care intervention to improve the quality of life for persons with dementia and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Abraham A; Guan, Carrie; Cortes, Tara; Galvin, James E

    2016-01-01

    Home health care agencies are increasingly taking care of sicker, older patients with greater comorbidities. However, they are unequipped to appropriately manage these older adults, particular persons living with dementia (PLWD). We therefore developed the Dementia Symptom Management at Home (DSM-H) Program, a bundled interprofessional intervention, to improve the care confidence of providers, and quality of care delivered to PLWD and their caregivers. We implemented the DSM-H with 83 registered nurses, physical therapists, and occupational therapists. Overall, there was significant improvement in pain knowledge (5.9%) and confidence (26.5%), depression knowledge (14.8%) and confidence (36.1%), and neuropsychiatric symptom general knowledge (16.8%), intervention knowledge (20.9%), attitudes (3.4%) and confidence (27.1%) at a statistical significance of (P < .0001). We also found significant differences between disciplines. Overall, this disseminable program proved to be implementable and improve clinician's knowledge and confidence in caring for PLWD, with the potential to improve quality of care and quality of life, and decrease costs. PMID:26922312

  1. Medicaid Adult Health Care Quality Measures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act (Section 1139B) requires the Secretary of HHS to identify and publish a core set of health care quality measures for adult Medicaid...

  2. Strong Primary Care is that one which has instruments that allow measuring the quality it offers (to improve it continuously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Gérvas

    2013-10-01

    de la de Estonia (país báltico, ex república soviética de la extinta dictadura comunista: en el primer caso logran realizarse plenamente, mientras que en el segundo quedan socialmente relegados2;• El aumento de las expectativas sociales en lo que respecta a salud y bienestar vital. Los individuos y poblaciones han visto cambios casi “milagrosos”, como una apendicitis intervenida quirúrgicamente y de forma indolora, o una crisis de depresión grave curada con la medicación correspondiente, o la vacuna infantil contra el sarampión, y por todo ello es fácil que esperen la progresiva eliminación de todo dolor, sufrimiento y enfermedad, e, incluso, la inmortalidad. Siguiendo esta lógica, lo que se espera es la juventud eterna. También han visto la transformación en la oferta de servicios, que se vuelven más inmediatos y accesibles; por ejemplo, el servicio a domicilio abarca desde libros comprados por Internet a comida encargada por teléfono. En esta lógica resulta absurda la existencia de “colas” (“listas de espera” para ser atendido en el sistema sanitario, o incluso el hecho de tener que desplazarse para recibir tales servicios.Los cambios señalados (y otros muchos más exigen la mejora en la respuesta sanitaria. Sobre todo, “piden” una Atención Primaria fuerte1,3. Tal Atención Primaria tiene instrumentos para medir la calidad de los servicios que ofrece y así poder introducir los cambios precisos con los que dar respuestas apropiadas a problemas cada vez más complejos. Barbara Starfield destacó en este campo, de elaboración de conceptos, medidas e instrumentos, para medir la calidad de los servicios prestados en Atención Primaria. Por ejemplo con el “Primary Care Assessment Tool” (PCATool4. Un buen ejemplo es el presente número de la “Revista de la Sociedad Brasileña de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria”, donde se presentan los resultados prácticos de su aplicación en Brasil. Con ello se demuestra que la Atenci

  3. Improving Demand-oriented Quality Care in Family Planning--A Review of Practice and Experience in Family Planning Programme of Qianjiang, Hubei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-yuan LIAO; Meng-ye PENG; Er-sheng GAO

    2003-01-01

    @@ With the mainstreaming being the demand from the people at reproductive age, we systematically analyzed the ideas and ways to implement quality care (QC) in family planning (FP) in Qianjiang, including advocating the conception of quality care, carrying out health education and counseling, strengthening capacity building of service system and reforming measurement of the evaluation and other aspects. The demand-oriented QC in FP has met personalized and verified demands from people of reproductive age satisfactorily, and kept the fertility rate at a lower level while uplifting satisfaction of the public. The demand-oriented QC in FP in Qianjiang county proved to be a successful and great worth practice.

  4. Improvement of clinical quality indicators through reorganization of the acute care by establishing an emergency department-a register study based on data from national indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Maria Søe; Mattsson, N.; Jørsboe, H. B.

    2014-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of acute care in a re-organized ED based on national indicator project data in a pre and post reorganizational setting. Methods: Quasi experimental design was used to examine the effect of the health care quality in relation to the reorganization of...... an ED. Patients admitted at Nykobing Falster Hospital in 2008 or 2012 were included in the study and data reports from the national databases (RKKP) regarding stroke, COPD, heart failure, bleeding and perforated ulcer or hip fracture were analysed. Holbk Hospital works as a control hospital. Chi...

  5. Current concept review: quality and process improvement in orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinney SJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Pinney,1 Alexandra E Page,2 David S Jevsevar,3 Kevin J Bozic4 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St Mary's Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Orthopaedic Surgery, AAOS Health Care Systems Committee, San Diego, CA, USA; 3Department of Orthopaedics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth University, Hanover, NH, USA; 4Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School at the University of Texas, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: Multiple health care stakeholders are increasingly scrutinizing musculoskeletal care to optimize quality and cost efficiency. This has led to greater emphasis on quality and process improvement. There is a robust set of business strategies that are increasingly being applied to health care delivery. These quality and process improvement tools (QPITs have specific applications to segments of, or the entire episode of, patient care. In the rapidly changing health care world, it will behoove all orthopedic surgeons to have an understanding of the manner in which care delivery processes can be evaluated and improved. Many of the commonly used QPITs, including checklist initiatives, standardized clinical care pathways, lean methodology, six sigma strategies, and total quality management, embrace basic principles of quality improvement. These principles include focusing on outcomes, optimizing communication among health care team members, increasing process standardization, and decreasing process variation. This review summarizes the common QPITs, including how and when they might be employed to improve care delivery. Keywords: clinical care pathway, musculoskeletal care, outcomes, quality management, six sigma, lean thinking

  6. Analysing Maternal Employment and Child Care Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Akgündüz, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    The contributions in this thesis revolve around mothers' employment and child care quality. The first topic of interest is how mothers' employment is affected by modern child care services and parental leave entitlements. There is already an extensive literature on the effects of modern social policies such as child care services and parental leave entitlements. A related second topic is how child care quality is produced and influenced by policy measures. Positive findings from the UK and US...

  7. Quality systems in Dutch health care institutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Casparie, Anton; Sluijs, Emmy; Wagner, Cordula; de Bakker, Dinny

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of quality systems in Dutch health care was supervised by a national committee during 1990-1995. To monitor the progress of implementation a large survey was conducted in the beginning of 1995. The survey enclosed all subsectors in health care. A postal questionnaire-derived from the European Quality Award-was sent to 1594 health care institutions; the response was 74%. The results showed that in 13% of the institutions a coherent quality system had been implemented. These ...

  8. Reduced HIV symptoms and improved health-related quality of life correlate with better access to care for HIV-1 infected women: the ELLA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Baran

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Global HIV-1 prevalence is 35.3 million [1]; women comprise >50% of those infected. The majority of women may lack regular care and only one-fourth are virologically suppressed [2]. ELLA is a cross-sectional, non-interventional study conducted across Europe, Latin America, Canada and Asia that describes barriers to care for HIV-infected women and associations with disease stage, symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Methods: HIV-infected women eligible for ELLA (≥18 years completed: Barrier to Care Scale (BACS comprising 12 items in four domains (Index range 0–12, Overall range 1–4, greater=more barriers, Overall score ≥2 considered severe; AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG Health Status Assessment comprising 21 items assessing 9 HRQoL domains (range 0–100, greater=better; and ACTG Symptom Distress Module comprising 20 symptoms rated on bother (range 0–4, greater=more bother. Healthcare providers documented medical history and HIV clinical data. Correlations of BACS response and last reported VL/CD4 count with HIV symptoms and HRQoL were analyzed. Spearman rank order was used to test correlations with statistical significance set at p50 years; 47.7% education <12 years; 36% unemployed; 82.9% urban residence. HIV was acquired heterosexually in 83.0%; 88.2% of subjects were on ART; 57.5% had VL<50 c/ml; mean CD4 was 540.5 c/µL. Mean [SD] BACS Index and Overall scores were 6.19 [3.47] (N=1818 and 2.09 [0.71] (N=1922, respectively. Stigma was a prominent barrier. Lower (better BACS Index and Overall scores correlated with better HRQoL on all nine domains (p<0.0001. Lower VL and greater CD4 count were both correlated with better HRQoL for eight of nine domains (p<0.04, p≤0.0002, respectively excepting pain. Lower BACS Index and Overall scores correlated with fewer symptom count and less symptom bother (p<0.0001. Fewer symptom count and less symptom bother correlated with better HRQoL on all nine domains (p<0

  9. Health Care Quality and Economic Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Jappelli, Tullio; Pistaferri, Luigi; Weber, Guglielmo

    2004-01-01

    We argue that health care quality has an important impact on economic inequality and on saving behaviour. We exploit district-wide variability in health care quality provided by the Italian universal public health system to identify the effect of quality on income inequality, health inequality and precautionary saving. We find that in lower quality districts there is greater income and health dispersion and higher precautionary saving. The analysis carries important insights for the ongoing d...

  10. The effect of a complementary e-learning course on implementation of a quality improvement project regarding care for elderly patients: a stepped wedge trial

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Steeg Lotte; Langelaan Maaike; Ijkema Roelie; Wagner Cordula

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Delirium occurs frequently in elderly hospitalised patients and is associated with higher mortality, increased length of hospital stay, functional decline, and admission to long-term care. Healthcare professionals frequently do not recognise delirium, indicating that education can play an important role in improving delirium care for hospitalised elderly. Previous studies have indicated that e-learning can provide an effective way of educating healthcare professionals and ...

  11. Is health care ready for Six Sigma quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, M R

    1998-01-01

    Serious, widespread problems exist in the quality of U.S. health care: too many patients are exposed to the risks of unnecessary services; opportunities to use effective care are missed; and preventable errors lead to injuries. Advanced practitioners of industrial quality management, like Motorola and General Electric, have committed themselves to reducing the frequency of defects in their business processes to fewer than 3.4 per million, a strategy known as Six Sigma Quality. In health care, quality problems frequently occur at rates of 20 to 50 percent, or 200,000 to 500,000 per million. In order to approach Six Sigma levels of quality, the health care sector must address the underlying causes of error and make important changes: adopting new educational models; devising strategies to increase consumer awareness; and encouraging public and private investment in quality improvement. PMID:9879303

  12. 落实优质护理提升服务质量%Implementing High Quality Care to Improve Service Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉莲; 刘红梅; 苟宁

    2012-01-01

    从改革护理管理体制,建立长效激励机制;改革护理工作模式,全面落实责任制整体护理;加强服务内涵建设,全面改善患者服务体验;构建科学管理机制,提高护理管理水平;建立多元化培训体系,强化护理队伍建设等方面,全面落实了优质护理,使患者、护士、医生及医院满意度显著提高.实践证明,开展优质护理不仅有利于护理质量的持续改进,也有利于整体医疗质量的全面提升.%We built up perfect and scientific management mechanisms, nursing staff increases effect incentive mechanism, job connotation construction mechanism, the diversified nursing team training mechanism, logistics guarantee mechanism etc. By reforming nursing management system and the nursing job pattern, we practiced the high quality nursing serves in all —direction. As a result, the patients', nurses', doctors' and our hospital's satisfaction degree increased evidently. It was proved that, the high grade nursing service was beneficial not only to nursing job, but also to the overall medical quality.

  13. Current status of quality evaluation of nursing care through director review and reflection from the Nursing Quality Control Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xia; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The quality evaluation of nursing care is a key link in medical quality management. It is important and worth studying for the nursing supervisors to know the disadvantages during the process of quality evaluation of nursing care and then to improve the whole nursing quality. This study was to provide director insight on the current status of quality evaluation of nursing care from Nursing Quality Control Centers (NQCCs). Material and Methods: This qualitative study used a sample ...

  14. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield

  15. System-Level Action Required for Wide-Scale Improvement in Quality of Primary Health Care: Synthesis of Feedback from an Interactive Process to Promote Dissemination and Use of Aggregated Quality of Care Data

    OpenAIRE

    Bailie, Jodie; Laycock, Alison; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is an enduring gap between recommended practice and care that is actually delivered; and there is wide variation between primary health care (PHC) centers in delivery of care. Where aspects of care are not being done well across a range of PHC centers, this is likely due to inadequacies in the broader system. This paper aims to describe stakeholders’ perceptions of the barriers and enablers to addressing gaps in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander chronic illne...

  16. Measuring the quality of long-term care in England

    OpenAIRE

    Malley, Juliette

    2010-01-01

    Improving the quality of long-term care has been central to the agenda of successive UK Governments since the late 1980s and a number of mechanisms have been introduced to achieve this end. The quality assurance framework that exists in England is comprehensive and supported by legislation. It is also supported by a number of national quality measures, including performance indicators from administrative systems to user surveys and composite measures of quality. There is close interaction ...

  17. A collaborative quality improvement model and electronic community of practice to support sepsis management in emergency departments: investigating care harmonization for provincial knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kendall; Marsden, Julian; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Novak Lauscher, Helen; Kamal, Noreen; Stenstrom, Rob; Sweet, David; Goldman, Ran D; Innes, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Emergency medicine departments within several organizations are now advocating the adoption of early intervention guidelines for patients with the signs and symptoms of sepsis. This proposed research will lead to a comprehensive understanding of how diverse emergency department (ED) sites across British Columbia (BC), Canada, engage in a quality improvement collaborative to lead to improvements in time-based process measures and clinical outcomes for septic patients in EDs. To address the challenge of sepsis management, in 2007, the BC Ministry of Health began working with emergency health professionals, including health administrators, to establish a provincial ED collaborative: Evidence to Excellence (E2E). The E2E initiative employs the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) model and is supported by a Web-based community of practice (CoP) in emergency medicine. It aims to (1) support clinicians in accessing and applying evidence to clinical practice in emergency medicine, (2) support system change and clinical process improvement, and (3) develop resources and strategies to facilitate knowledge translation and process improvement. Improving sepsis management is one of the central foci of the E2E initiative. The primary purpose of our research is to investigate whether the application of sepsis management protocols leads to improved time-based process measures and clinical outcomes for patients presenting to EDs with sepsis. Also, we seek to investigate the implementation of sepsis protocols among different EDs. For example: (1) How can sepsis protocols be harmonized among different EDs? (2) What are health professionals' perspectives on interprofessional collaboration with various EDs? and (3) What are the factors affecting the level of success among EDs? Lastly, working in collaboration with the BC Ministry of Health as our policy-maker partner, the research will investigate how the demonstrated efficacy of this research can be applied on a provincial and

  18. Quality in the provision of headache care. 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Michele; Perera, Suraj; Loder, Elizabeth;

    2012-01-01

    37 evaluated processes of headache care. Most were relevant only to specific populations of patients and to care delivered in high-resource settings. Indicators had been used to describe overall quality of headache care at a national level, but not systematically applied to the evaluation and......Widely accepted quality indicators for headache care would provide a basis not only for assessment of care but also, and more importantly, for its improvement. The objective of the study was to identify and summarize existing information on such indicators: specifically, did indicators exist, how...... had they been developed, what aspects of headache care did they relate to and how and with what utility were they being used? A systematic review of the medical literature was performed. A total of 32 articles met criteria for inclusion. We identified 55 existing headache quality indicators of which...

  19. IMPROVING CONCEPTUAL DESIGN QUALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bush, Stuart; Robotham, Antony John

    1999-01-01

    designer to identify clear targets for design improvement and to measure the effectiveness of any new solution, whilst attention to QFD ensures customer requirements are still being satisfied.Often, SME's are not aware of many of the best design practices and so are not able to meet the demand for...

  20. Management practices and the quality of care in cardiac units

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, K. John; Lindrooth, Richard C; Wholey, Douglas R; Maddox, Thomas M.; Bloom, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Importance:- To improve the quality of health care, many researchers have suggested that health care institutions adopt management approaches that have been successful in the manufacturing and technology sectors. However, relatively little information exists about how these practices are disseminated in hospitals and whether they are associated with better performance. Objectives:- To describe the variation in management practices among a large sample of hospital cardiac care units; asses...

  1. NETWORKS AND QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag Hadžistević

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Tools used in the past to analyze business value creation, such as value chain and process models, are simply too slow, inadequate, or inappropriate to address this new level of business complexity. In stead of that, company has to find way to create quality management system in a multi-layered supply chain. The problem can be solved by networking in the cluster. Cluster can be known as a competitive cooperation in the purpose to gain higher level of competitiveness and success. Bat there is another problem: Organization of the production process in a company is extremely complex process itself, and when we transfer it to the cluster level, we get a complex task which is difficult to solve. For that purpose, this paper analyses the conditions and possibilities that would enable those structures to adapt to changes in the surroundings - flexibility and management adequacy of production and organizational structures - by creating network value system.

  2. Assuring quality care: measuring and monitoring the caring process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammentorp, W; Bock, W; Irrgang, S; Gossett, K

    1988-01-01

    Everyone interested in the quality of the human services agrees that it should be largely determined by the interaction between the client and their caregivers. Unfortunately, this exchange has proven to be very difficult to measure in an accurate and timely manner. The resulting uncertainty has prevented smooth adaptation of the caring process to client needs; it has also made it virtually impossible for managers to devise workable quality control systems. This paper describes the use of miniaturized barcode technology for collection of real-time data at the point of care. With the addition of laptop computers, this technology provides for immediate feedback of information to address quality issues in care planning and management. The data bases produced by this system are sources of documentation for quality assurance as well as a dynamic foundation for quality control. PMID:10291607

  3. Big data analytics to improve cardiovascular care: promise and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsfeld, John S; Joynt, Karen E; Maddox, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    The potential for big data analytics to improve cardiovascular quality of care and patient outcomes is tremendous. However, the application of big data in health care is at a nascent stage, and the evidence to date demonstrating that big data analytics will improve care and outcomes is scant. This Review provides an overview of the data sources and methods that comprise big data analytics, and describes eight areas of application of big data analytics to improve cardiovascular care, including predictive modelling for risk and resource use, population management, drug and medical device safety surveillance, disease and treatment heterogeneity, precision medicine and clinical decision support, quality of care and performance measurement, and public health and research applications. We also delineate the important challenges for big data applications in cardiovascular care, including the need for evidence of effectiveness and safety, the methodological issues such as data quality and validation, and the critical importance of clinical integration and proof of clinical utility. If big data analytics are shown to improve quality of care and patient outcomes, and can be successfully implemented in cardiovascular practice, big data will fulfil its potential as an important component of a learning health-care system. PMID:27009423

  4. Quality registers in professional health care educations: knowledge gaps and proposed actions:

    OpenAIRE

    Nordin Annika M. M.; Ernsäter Torie Palm; Bergman Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The use of quality registers has increased rapidly in Sweden and they are identified as beneficial for health care competitiveness. A quality register is a structured gathering of patient information, to improve health care. However, the introduction of quality registers in health care organisations presupposes that employees know how to use them in quality improvement. Disconnections, or knowledge gaps, concerning quality registers hamper the possibilities to take adv...

  5. Scaling up the Quality of Care Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XieZhenming

    2005-01-01

    Like the pilot project, the scaling up of the quality of care approach is also new in China and requires continued research anct explorauon, in July 2003, the National Population and Family Planning Commission (NPFPC) drew on the experience of scaling up the quality of care project and decided to launch a campaign to select and commend model counties (cities/districts) in implementing the project in order to set an example for different regions with different economies and ensure the quality of care approach is adequately applied.

  6. Pet food: quality and quality improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Cipollini, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Today’s pet food industry is growing rapidly, with pet owners demanding high-quality diets for their pets. The primary role of diet is to provide enough nutrients to meet metabolic requirements, while giving the consumer a feeling of well-being. Diet nutrient composition and digestibility are of crucial importance for health and well being of animals. A recent strategy to improve the quality of food is the use of “nutraceuticals” or “Functional foods”. At the moment, probiotics...

  7. Measuring improvement in populations: implementing and evaluating successful change in lung cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xinhua; Klesges, Lisa M; Smeltzer, Mathew P.; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care in lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and in the United States, is a major public health challenge. Such improvement requires accurate and meaningful measurement of quality of care. Preliminary indicators have been derived from clinical practice guidelines and expert opinions, but there are few standard sets of quality of care measures for lung cancer in the United States or elsewhere. Research to develop validated evidence-based quality of care...

  8. Quality and Profitability improvement by Technical Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Srivastava S. B.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed for finding the Quality and Profitability Improvement by Technical Audit, through a case study and further establishing the relationship between the product quality, profitability and technical audit. Quality audit generates the report of non conformance which basically represents the deviation from committed quality of products, or in short, it may be called as postmortem of product quality. By virtue of quality audit, the commitment, implementation and follow up for product quality are aligned. This delivers a good quality of product to the customers and thus the customer is benefited. In industries, Quality Inspectors are giving their decision for quality of product in two categories, "ACCEPTED" or "REJECTED". The accepted products are coming to the customers and the rejected products become the burden / problem to the manufacturers.If accepted product quantity is within the “NORMS”, no one cares regarding the rejected product quantities, what so ever. When the rejected product quantity increases beyond the “NORMS”, the analysis process starts to find out the reasons of rejections. Sometimes, it becomes too late to search out the reasons of rejections and survival of the industry becomes a problem. By technical audit and audit report implementation such type of conditions can be avoided and controlled.Basically, Quality is the function of Man, Machine, Materials, Methods, Movement, Manufacturing Processes, Monitoring and Management (8 M’s. If the technicality of 8 M’s is corrected by Technical Audit, the product quality will improve automatically and the profitability of the organization will improve. In short it can be solicited that if 8 M’s are all right, the product quality and profitability will automatically be set right. This may become an important aspect in the scenario of Indian Industries. The findings are supported by a case study of a Process Plant (Slag Dryer of a reputed Indian Industry.

  9. Designing a quality improvement intervention: a systematic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bokhoven, M.A. van; Kok, G.; Van der Weijden, T.

    2003-01-01

    

 Most quality improvement or change management interventions are currently designed intuitively and their results are often disappointing. While improving the effectiveness of interventions requires systematic development, no specific methodology for composing intervention strategies and programmes is available. This paper describes the methodology of systematically designing quality of care improvement interventions, including problem analysis, intervention design and pretests. Several the...

  10. Racial/Ethnic Discrimination in Health Care: Impact on Perceived Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; De Alba, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to report receipt of lower quality of health care; however, the mediators of such patient reports are not known. Objectives To determine (1) whether racial disparities in perceptions of quality of health care are mediated by perceptions of being discriminated against while receiving medical care and (2) whether this association is further mediated by patient sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, and patient satisfaction across racial/ethnic groups. Research Design A cross-sectional analysis of a population-based sample of California adults responding to the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between perceived discrimination and perceived quality of health care after adjusting for patient characteristics and reports of access to care. Main Results A total of 36,831 respondents were included. African Americans (68.7%) and Asian/Pacific Islanders (64.5%) were less likely than non-Hispanic whites (72.8%) and Hispanics (74.9%) to rate their health care quality highly. African Americans (13.1%) and Hispanics (13.4%) were the most likely to report discrimination, followed by Asian/Pacific Islanders (7.3%) and non-Hispanic whites (2.6%). Racial/ethnic discrimination in health care was negatively associated with ratings of health care quality within each racial/ethnic group, even after adjusting for sociodemographic variables and other indicators of access and satisfaction. Feeling discriminated against fully accounted for the difference in low ratings of quality care between African Americans and whites, but not for other racial/ethnic minorities. Conclusions Patient perceptions of discrimination may play an important, yet variable role in ratings of health care quality across racial/ethnic minority groups. Health care institutions should consider how to address this patient concern as a part of routine quality improvement. PMID

  11. Improving Customer Service in Elderly Care

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The elderly care sector is increasingly facing more competition and demanding customers. This leads to a growing pressure on elderly care home providers to find new and improved solutions that will enhance their level of customer service. The will ensure that the elderly service provider is remaining competitive in the elderly care service marketplace. The purpose of this thesis is to identify areas for improvements and propose implementable solutions for enhancing the elderly care custom...

  12. Monitoring and improving care in thoracic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Numan, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Quality of Care (QoC) plays a central role in the way healthcare is delivered. In the world of thoracic surgery for lung cancer, surgeons are faced with complex and sometimes high-risk surgical resections on an aging patient population with an increasing incidence of frail physical health. This increasing complexity demands a multidisciplinary approach rearranging pre-, peri- and postoperative care in a way safety, efficiency and high quality are guaranteed. The safety and quality of healthca...

  13. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance. PMID:23903945

  14. Molecular imaging in quality health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quality Health Care results from applying fundamental basic science and preclinical concepts as well as novel technologies to patient care within specific socio-economic frameworks. Cancer mortality has improved recently but outcomes of cancer patients are still unacceptably poor. Molecular Imaging has the potential to improve the outcome of cancer patients in several ways. In the preclinical setting, high resolution molecular imaging devices designed for small animal research have developed into valuable tools for drug evaluation and imaging probe design. These have enabled us to study drug effects in vivo by monitoring longitudinally their effects on tumor cell metabolism or proliferation. The success of Imatinib in treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) has demonstrated that targeted drugs can induce remarkable tumor responses and may even cure cancer patients. Targeted drugs have been used for treating various common solid human tumors, including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and non-small cell lung cancer. However, diverse signaling pathways are involved in the development and progression of these genetically heterogeneous diseases. Consequently, inhibition of one specific pathway is likely to be efficacious in only in small subsets of patients with specific histological tumor types. It is unlikely that a single 'blockbuster' drug can be effective for all patients with a 'common' tumor. Rather, it will be necessary to develop multiple targeted drugs even for patients that share a single histologically defined tumor type. The inevitable consequence is a decreased revenue/cost ratio for the industry and increasing costs for patients and health care systems. It is therefore of paramount importance to identify drug failure as early as possible in preclinical and clinical trials. Human studies with positron emission tomography (PET) with molecular imaging probes targeting physiological processes such as

  15. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Quality of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Sanders, Mechelle R

    2016-01-01

    The annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports document widespread and persistent racial and ethnic disparities. These disparities result from complex interactions between patient factors related to social disadvantage, clinicians, and organizational and health care system factors. Separate and unequal systems of health care between states, between health care systems, and between clinicians constrain the resources that are available to meet the needs of disadvantaged groups, contribute to unequal outcomes, and reinforce implicit bias. Recent data suggest slow progress in many areas but have documented a few notable successes in eliminating these disparities. To eliminate these disparities, continued progress will require a collective national will to ensure health care equity through expanded health insurance coverage, support for primary care, and public accountability based on progress toward defined, time-limited objectives using evidence-based, sufficiently resourced, multilevel quality improvement strategies that engage patients, clinicians, health care organizations, and communities. PMID:26789384

  16. Quality of newborn care at birth

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, AJ; Marchant, T

    2014-01-01

    Quality of care can be measured by seeing if skilled birth attendants use simple approaches to save lives. Skilled birth attendants range from trained community health workers to nurses, doctors and midwives. Findings from three low-income settings show quality of care for the newborn is low even when a skilled birth attendant is at the mother’s side during birth. Source: 2012 Baseline survey data, the IDEAS project, based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Funded by the...

  17. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-01-01

    -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS) at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1). Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA) especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our coun...

  18. Analysing Maternal Employment and Child Care Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akgündüz, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    The contributions in this thesis revolve around mothers' employment and child care quality. The first topic of interest is how mothers' employment is affected by modern child care services and parental leave entitlements. There is already an extensive literature on the effects of modern social polic

  19. Rice Quality Improvement in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1. Demand for high quality rice in China Rice is the leading cereal crop that contributes about 40% of the national grain production in China. The total output and areas rank the first and the second position in the world, respectively. In recent years, rice production grows steadily, but the quality improvement has been lagged and the quality becomes a limiting factor. As the grain supply exceeding the demand and the grain price plummeted, the State Council put forward expanding China′ s ongoing reform of the grain distribution system in 1998. Along with the foodstuff circulating system reform and market driving, the structure of rice production is adjusted,the planting acreage of early indica rice with poor quality decreased, and that of japonica rice in north China with good quality increased. With the challenge of China joining the WTO, Chinese government starts to pay premium on good quality rice.

  20. An electronic dashboard to improve nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yung-Ming; Hii, Joshua; Chan, Katherine; Sardual, Robert; Mah, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    With the introduction of CPOE systems, nurses in a Singapore hospital were facing difficulties monitoring key patient information such as critical tasks and alerts. Issues include unfriendly user interfaces of clinical systems, information overload, and the loss of visual cues for action due to paperless workflows. The hospital decided to implement an interactive electronic dashboard on top of their CPOE system to improve visibility of vital patient data. A post-implementation survey was performed to gather end-user feedback and evaluate factors that influence user satisfaction of the dashboard. Questionnaires were sent to all nurses of five pilot wards. 106 valid responses were received. User adoption was good with 86% of nurses using the dashboard every shift. Mean satisfaction score was 3.6 out of 5. User satisfaction was strongly and positively correlated to the system's perceived impact on work efficiency and care quality. From qualitative feedback, nurses generally agreed that the dashboard had improved their awareness of critical patient issues without the hassle of navigating a CPOE system. This study shows that an interactive clinical dashboard when properly integrated with a CPOE system could be a useful tool to improve daily patient care. PMID:23920542

  1. Social support during intensive care unit stay might improve mental impairment and consequently health-related quality of life in survivors of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Deja, Maria; Denke, Claudia; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Schröder, Jürgen; Pille, Christian E; Hokema, Frank; Falke, Konrad J; Kaisers, Udo

    2006-01-01

    Introduction We investigated health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and persistent symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in long-term survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We wished to evaluate the influence of PTSD on HRQoL and to investigate the influence of perceived social support during intensive care unit (ICU) treatment on both PTSD symptoms and HRQoL. Methods In ARDS patients we prospectively measured HRQoL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form; SF-...

  2. 基层医院提高基础护理质量的管理策略%Management strategies of improving the quality of basic nursing care in the grass - roots hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑珊红

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the management strategies of improving the quality of basic nursing care in the grass -roots hospital. Methods: The new strategies of basic nursing care was applied to 40 patients in the observation group in accordance with the requirements of high quality nursing engineering and basic nursing care was given to the 40 patients in the control group by following the traditional method of nursing care management. The quality of nursing care, patient's satisfaction and complaints, adverse events and the rate of nosocomial infection were analyzed in both groups. Results: The quality of basic nursing care and patient's satisfaction was significantly higher and the number of complaints, adverse events and the rate of noscomial infection were obviously fewer and lower in the observation group than those in the control group ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusion: The effective quality control strategies of basic nursing care are the effective measures to improve the quality of basic nursing care.%目的:探讨基层医院提高基础护理质量的管理对策.方法:将观察组40例患者按照优质护理服务工程要求,实施新的基础护理质量控制策略,强化落实基础护理.将对照组40例按照传统的护理管理方法实施基础护理.分析两组患者基础护理质量、护理工作满意度、护理投诉、不良事件、医院感染率等情况.结果:实验组基础护理质量、患者满意度明显高于对照组,护理投诉和不良事件例数、医院感染率明显低于对照组(P<0.05).结论:有效的基础护理质量控制策略,是提高基础护理质量的有效措施.

  3. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.; Jensen, M.S.; Roslind, K.; Nielsen, L.M.; Lange, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  4. Trends in quality of care among patients with incident heart failure in Denmark 2003-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Nakano; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard;

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of heart failure (HF) is complex and the prognosis remains serious. A range of strategies is used across health care systems to improve the quality of care for HF patients. We present results from a nationwide multidisciplinary initiative to monitor and improve the quality of care and...

  5. Strategy to Support Improvement of Healthcare Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing. Andrea Zejdlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the latest market-based solutions to the rising costs and quality gaps in health care is pay for performance. Pay for performance is the use of financial incentives to promote the delivery of designated standards of care. It is an emerging movement in health insurance (initially in Britain and United States. Providers under this arrangement are rewarded for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services. This is a fundamental change from fee for service payment.Also known as "P4P" or “value-based purchasing,” this payment model rewards physicians, hospitals, medical groups, and other healthcare providers for meeting certain performance measures for quality and efficiency. Disincentives, such as eliminating payments for negative consequences of care (medical errors or increased costs, have also been proposed. In the developed nations, the rapidly aging population and rising health care costs have recently brought P4P to the forefront of health policy discussions. Pilot studies underway in several large healthcare systems have shown modest improvements in specific outcomes and increased efficiency, but no cost savings due to added administrative requirements. Statements by professional medical societies generally support incentive programs to increase the quality of health care, but express concern with the validity of quality indicators, patient and physician autonomy and privacy, and increased administrative burdens. This article serves as an introduction to pay for performance. We discuss the goals and structure of pay for performance plans and their limitations and potential consequences in the health care area.

  6. [Toward a high quality glaucoma care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Kenji

    2012-03-01

    The following studies were performed to solve current problems in glaucoma care and to pursue quality glaucoma care. Using a scanning peripheral anterior chamber depth analyzer that we developed, we: 1) conducted cross-sectional screening for eyes with angle closure; 2) examined longitudinal changes in anterior chamber depth and occurrence rates of primary angle closure in local senior residents; 3) investigated the significance of the anterior chamber and the angle of eyes with open angle glaucoma; and 4) looked into possible applications of anterior chamber depth and the angle in routine examinations. We investigated the effects of retinal glial cells and optic nerve astrocytes on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and neurite growth using a culture system. We also identified candidate genies of retinal glial cells and optic nerve astrocytes affecting RGC survival and neurite growth using microarray and siRNA systems. SRC, a membrane-associated 60-kDa tyrosine kinase, is reported to be involved in neuron death and neurite growth. We developed two types of gene-targeted mice in which we modified the status of SRC phosphorylation. We compared RGC survival and neurite growth by conducting in vivo and in vitro experiments. Adherence is currently a very important issue in the field of glaucoma. We developed a nm thick and composed of 21.5 chitosan-sodium alginate pairs. IOP reduction and its duration, as well as adverse effects, were investigated. In addition, we established and evaluated a support system for glaucoma care in an effort to promote participation of glaucoma patients in glaucoma care using information and communication technology. This system improved the literacy of glaucoma patients as well as glaucoma medical therapy. At the same time, in order to ably provide glaucoma care given the increase in the number of glaucoma patients and the shortage of glaucoma specialists, a tele-medicine system for ophthalmology was developed, in which ophthalmologists

  7. Quality of care in Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Govind; K; Makharia

    2014-01-01

    Crohn’s disease(CD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the intestine. Overall, healthcare delivery for patients with CD is not optimal at the present time and therefore needs improvement. There are evidences which suggest that there is a variation in the care provided to patients with CD by the inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) experts and community care providers. The delivery of healthcare for patients with CD is often complex and requires coordination between gastroenterologists/IBD specialist, gastrointestinal surgeon, radiologists and IBD nurses. In order to improve the quality of health care for patients with CD, there is need that we focus on large-scale, system-wide changes including creation of IBD comprehensive care units, provision to provide continuous care, efforts to standardize care, and education of the community practitioners.

  8. IMPROVING QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN PANIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Petroman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumers of panification products (as well as consumers of any other type of product or service are concerned about the quality of the products they purchase. Implementing the quality management system in the food industry is not compulsory, but it can bring about numerous, palpable benefits, particularly in reducing the amount of acryl amide. It is a modern system allowing the management analysis aiming at checking and reaching the goals to define new objectives, and the continuous improvement of the quality of processes and products.

  9. Bedside Reporting: Protocols for Improving Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Teresa D; Howell, Teresa L

    2015-12-01

    Bedside reporting continues to gain much attention and is being investigated to support the premise that "hand-off" communications enhance efficacy in delivery of patient care. Patient inclusion in shift reports enhances good patient outcomes, increased satisfaction with care delivery, enhanced accountability for nursing professionals, and improved communications between patients and their direct care providers. This article discusses the multiple benefits of dynamic dialogue between patients and the health care team, challenges often associated with bedside reporting, and protocols for managing bedside reporting with the major aim of improving patient care. Nursing research supporting the concept of bedside reporting is examined. PMID:26596661

  10. 42 CFR 416.43 - Conditions for coverage-Quality assessment and performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... patient safety by using quality indicators or performance measures associated with improved health... outcomes, patient safety, and quality of care. (2) Performance improvement activities must track adverse... track quality indicators, adverse patient events, infection control and other aspects of...

  11. Practice of High-Quality Care to Improve the Quality of Pediatric Out-Patient Infusion%践行优质护理提高儿科门诊输液质量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛倩; 张玉莲; 张西嫔

    2012-01-01

    如何在门诊开展优质护理是值得探讨的课题.主要从以下几方面实行了优质护理:组织学习,认真领会优质护理精神;改革护理服务模式,落实区域责任包干制;改革护士排班模式,明确职责;落实基础护理;建立健全绩效考核制度等.%How to carry out high - quality care in outpatient is a worth discussing topic* High - quality care was implemented mainly from the following aspects: organizational learning to seriously understand the quality care mentally; reform of the care model v and the implementation of regional responsibility contract system; reform of the nurse scheduling model, and a clear mandate; the implementation of basic nursing care; establishment of a sound performance appraisal system.

  12. Developing Strategies to Improve Advance Care Planning in Long Term Care Homes: Giving Voice to Residents and Their Family Members

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Ramsbottom; Mary Lou Kelley

    2014-01-01

    Long term care (LTC) homes, also known as residential care homes, commonly care for residents until death, making palliative care and advance care planning (ACP) important elements of care. However, limited research exists on ACP in LTC. In particular, research giving voice to family members and substitute decision makers is lacking. The objective of this research was to understand experiences, perspectives, and preferences to guide quality improvement of ACP in LTC. This qualitative descript...

  13. Evaluating the effectiveness of a multifaceted, multilevel continuous quality improvement program in primary health care: developing a realist theory of change

    OpenAIRE

    Schierhout, Gill; Hains, Jennifer; Si, Damin; Kennedy, Catherine; Cox, Rhonda; Kwedza, Ru; O’Donoghue, Lynette; Fittock, Marea; Brands, Jenny; Lonergan, Katherine; Dowden, Michelle; Bailie, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation in effectiveness of continuous quality improvement (CQI) interventions between services is commonly reported, but with little explanation of how contextual and other factors may interact to produce this variation. Therefore, there is scant information available on which policy makers can draw to inform effective implementation in different settings. In this paper, we explore how patterns of change in delivery of services may have been achieved in a diverse range of health...

  14. Health care in China: improvement, challenges, and reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Rao, Keqin; Wu, Sinan; Liu, Qian

    2013-02-01

    Over the past 2 decades, significant progress has been made in improving the health-care system and people's health conditions in China. Following rapid economic growth and social development, China's health-care system is facing new challenges, such as increased health-care demands and expenditure, inefficient use of health-care resources, unsatisfying implementation of disease management guidelines, and inadequate health-care insurance. Facing these challenges, the Chinese government carried out a national health-care reform in 2009. A series of policies were developed and implemented to improve the health-care insurance system, the medical care system, the public health service system, the pharmaceutical supply system, and the health-care institution management system in China. Although these measures have shown promising results, further efforts are needed to achieve the ultimate goal of providing affordable and high-quality care for both urban and rural residents in China. This article not only covers the improvement, challenges, and reform of health care in general in China, but also highlights the status of respiratory medicine-related issues. PMID:23381317

  15. Quality Improvement Practices and Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens J.; Hartz, Ove; Edgeman, Rick L.

    1998-01-01

    The following article, "Quality Improvement Practices and Trends in Denmark," is the first in a series of papers arranged for and co-authored by Dr. Rick L. Edgeman. Rick is a member of QE's Editorial Board and is on sabbatical from Colorado State University. During the year, Rick and his family...... visiting professor, as well as key individuals from various industries. In addition to the above activities, Rick will be working with the European Foundation for Quality Management on their "European Master's Programme in Total Quality Management." That program involves a consortium of European...... universities. Rick has begun the process of developing a comparable consortium of American universities for the same purpose-- an activity which is cosponsored by the Education Division of the American Society for Quality (ASQ)....

  16. How to improve patient care by learning from mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mike

    2013-02-01

    Mistakes made in healthcare settings and the challenges to staff that arise from them can harm service users, consume time and money, and often receive bad publicity. However, by learning from these mistakes and meeting these challenges, practitioners can improve the quality of the care they provide. This article explores what is meant by mistakes and challenges in the context of health care. It suggests that front line managers are best placed to prevent and learn from mistakes, and thereby improve care for patients. PMID:23516729

  17. Quality Improvement Practices and Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens J.; Hartz, Ove; Edgeman, Rick L.

    1998-01-01

    The following article, "Quality Improvement Practices and Trends in Denmark," is the first in a series of papers arranged for and co-authored by Dr. Rick L. Edgeman. Rick is a member of QE's Editorial Board and is on sabbatical from Colorado State University. During the year, Rick and his family...... universities. Rick has begun the process of developing a comparable consortium of American universities for the same purpose-- an activity which is cosponsored by the Education Division of the American Society for Quality (ASQ)....

  18. Adherence and quality of care in IBD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle; Julsgaard, Mette; Vestergaard, Thea;

    2016-01-01

    different aspects of adherence and to identify predictors of non-adherence, including the quality of care, for outpatients with IBD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous electronic questionnaire was used to investigate different aspects of adherence, the quality of care, patient involvement and shared...... decision making among 377 IBD outpatients. RESULTS: Three hundred (80%) filled in the questionnaire. The overall adherence rate was 93%. Young age (< 35 years old) and smoking were significantly associated with non-adherence (prevalence odds ratio (POR) 2.98, 95% CI 1.04-8.52, p < 0.05 and POR 3.88, 95% CI...

  19. Indicators for quality of hospital care : Beyond the numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Dishoeck (Anne-Margreet)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis addresses two major topics in measuring, comparing and improving quality of care. We found considerable influence of random variation and case-mix in comparing hospitals using performance indicators. Although we found a significant relation between outcome

  20. The quality of COPD care in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Rasmussen, Finn Vejlø; Borgeskov, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in a large sample of general practices in Denmark. We focussed on whether participation by general practitioners (GPs) in an educational programme could enhance the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and staging of the disease and improve adherence...

  1. A Model to Improve the Quality Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan GOKKAYA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this paper is to present a solution who can improve product qualityfollowing the idea: “Unlike people who have verbal skills, machines use "sign language"to communicate what hurts or what has invaded their system’. Recognizing the "signs"or symptoms that the machine conveys is a required skill for those who work withmachines and are responsible for their care and feeding. The acoustic behavior of technical products is predominantly defined in the design stage, although the acoustic characteristics of machine structures can be analyze and give a solution for the actual products and create a new generation of products. The paper describes the steps intechnological process for a product and the solution who will reduce the costs with the non-quality of product and improve the management quality.

  2. Engaging Clinical Nurses in Quality Improvement Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-10-01

    Clinical nurses have the knowledge and expertise required to provide efficient and proficient patient care. Time and knowledge deficits can prevent nurses from developing and implementing quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. This article reviews a process for professional development of clinical nurses that helped them to define, implement, and analyze quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. The purpose of this project was to educate advanced clinical nurses to manage a change project from inception to completion, using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) Change Acceleration Process as a framework. One-to-one mentoring and didactic in-services advanced the knowledge, appreciation, and practice of advanced practice clinicians who completed multiple change projects. The projects facilitated clinical practice changes, with improved patient outcomes; a unit cultural shift, with appreciation of quality improvement and evidence-based projects; and engagement with colleagues. Project outcomes were displayed in poster presentations at a hospital exposition for knowledge dissemination. PMID:26430867

  3. Health care and the quality of life: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C A

    1989-10-01

    The increasing requirement for evaluation of health care, either for purposes of quality assurance or deciding resource distribution issues, has brought into question a number of ideas concerning the aims of the health care enterprise. This article suggests that the ultimate aim is to improve the quality of life, and examines the feasibility of adopting this as an evaluation criterion. Difficulties concerning the concept and definition of the quality of life are outlined, and a plea made for the adoption of the broadest possible therapeutic aims. Social indicators and subjective evaluations are considered in turn as measures of the quality of life, and their inadequacies and strengths exposed. Relationships between the measures are discussed, and their uses outlined. It is finally suggested that nurses should participate in the formulation of quality of life concepts and evaluations which reflect the values which underpin their own practice. PMID:2681314

  4. Comparative analysis of quality assurance in health care delivery and higher medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Busari, Jamiu O

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in higher medical education involves the development, sustenance, improvement, and evaluation of the standard of training of medical professionals. In health care delivery, QA focuses on guaranteeing and maintaining a high standard of the service provided in different health care systems. When the service delivered by the care provider is in accordance with what the recipients of health care expect, then quality in health care is considered to be present. There are seve...

  5. Instruments to measure patient experience of health care quality in hospitals: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Beattie, Michelle; Lauder, William; Atherton, Iain; Murphy, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving and sustaining the quality of care in hospitals is an intractable and persistent challenge. The patients’ experience of the quality of hospital care can provide insightful feedback to enable clinical teams to direct quality improvement efforts in areas where they are most needed. Yet, patient experience is often marginalised in favour of aspects of care that are easier to quantify (for example, waiting time). Attempts to measure patient experience have been hindered by a ...

  6. Prevention Health Care Quality in America: Findings From the First National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Kelley

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ released in December 2003 the first National Healthcare Quality Report (NHQR and National Healthcare Disparities Report (NHDR on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1,2. In this commentary, we summarize the main findings of the reports on preventive care for both primary prevention of disease and secondary prevention of increasing acuity of existing disease and discuss the implications for quality measurement and improvement efforts. Federal partners within the U.S. health care system have recently focused on increasing the use of preventive care services. Tommy G. Thompson, Secretary of Health and Human Services, issued a challenge in April 2003 at the launch of the Steps to a HealthierUS national initiative: "Approximately 95% of the $1.4 trillion that we spend as a nation on health goes to direct medical services, while approximately 5% is allocated to preventing disease and promoting health. This approach is equivalent to waiting for your car to break down before you take it in for maintenance. By changing the way we view our health, the Steps initiative helps move us from a disease care system to a true health care system." (3 Good quality preventive care holds the promise of greatly reducing the nation’s health care costs and overall burden of disease. Numerous studies and reports have examined the general quality of preventive care services in the United States (4-7. Others have explored the performance of the U.S. health care system in delivering specific preventive care services such as immunizations (8,9, cancer screening (10-12, and cholesterol and blood pressure screening (13-15. The NHQR and NHDR provide the first national baseline views of the quality of health care services and of differences in how at-risk groups in America use the services. The reports provide one of the broadest examinations to date of prevention health care quality for the nation and

  7. Integrating Comprehensive Reform with Quality of Care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Xianyang City is located in the center of northwest China's Shaanxi Province. In 2001, it was designated as one of the pilot cities for comprehensive reform of family planning work initiated by the National Population and Family Planning Commission. This has provided a good opportunity for the city to better implement the quality of care approach.

  8. Impact of a continuous education program on the quality of assistance offered by intensive care physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Walkyria Araújo Macedo; Rossetti, Heloisa Baccaro; Araújo, Abigail; Spósito Júnior, José Jonas; Salomão, Hellen; Mattos, Simone Siqueira; Rabelo, Melina Vieira; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of quality indicators and adverse events registering in the quality assessment of intensive care physiotherapy and to evaluate the impact of implementing protocolized care and professional training in the quality improvement process. Methods A prospective before-after study was designed to assess 15 indicators of the quality of care. Baseline compliance and adverse events were collected before and after the implementation of treatment protocols and staff trainin...

  9. Quality Reforms in Danish Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Despite relatively generous coverage of the over-65 population, Danish home help services receive regular criticism in the media and public opinion polls. Perhaps as a consequence, reforms of Danish home care policy for senior citizens have placed strong emphasis on quality since the 1990s. This...... reform strategy represents a shift from the welfare state modernisation program of the 1980s, which built mainly on economic strategies of cost-efficiency and New Public Management (NPM) princi-ples, including contract management and performance management. Recent reforms have instead attempted to...... increase the overall quality of care by increasing the transparency at the political, administrative and user levels. However, reforms have revolved around conflicting principles of standardisation and the individualisation of care provision and primarily succeeded in increasing the political and ad-ministrative...

  10. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and construct...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test...

  12. Incorporating health care quality into health antitrust law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Helen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antitrust authorities treat price as a proxy for hospital quality since health care quality is difficult to observe. As the ability to measure quality improved, more research became necessary to investigate the relationship between hospital market power and patient outcomes. This paper examines the impact of hospital competition on the quality of care as measured by the risk-adjusted mortality rates with the hospital as the unit of analysis. The study separately examines the effect of competition on non-profit hospitals. Methods We use California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD data from 1997 through 2002. Empirical model is a cross-sectional study of 373 hospitals. Regression analysis is used to estimate the relationship between Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG risk-adjusted mortality rates and hospital competition. Results Regression results show lower risk-adjusted mortality rates in the presence of a more competitive environment. This result holds for all alternative hospital market definitions. Non-profit hospitals do not have better patient outcomes than investor-owned hospitals. However, they tend to provide better quality in less competitive environments. CABG volume did not have a significant effect on patient outcomes. Conclusion Quality should be incorporated into the antitrust analysis. When mergers lead to higher prices and lower quality, thus lower social welfare, the antitrust challenge of hospital mergers is warranted. The impact of lower hospital competition on quality of care delivered by non-profit hospitals is ambiguous.

  13. Integration of quality improvement and cost-efficiency through industrial improvement techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Vink, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Jasper P Vink,1 Maxime T Rigaudy,1,2 Karl O Elmqvist11Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London, London, 2Hull York Medical School, York, UKIn this journal, Crema and Verbano1 discussed the importance of defining quality of health care and how quality can be improved through various industrial instruments and techniques. Quality of health care is a heavily debated topic that requires a wide scope of considerations across the many stakeholders of the health system. We acknowled...

  14. Mozambican midwives' views on barriers to quality perinatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Karen Odberg; Johansson, Eva; Pelembe, Maria de Fatima M; Dgedge, Clemencia; Christensson, Kyllike

    2006-02-01

    Our purpose in this study was to explore the midwives' perception of factors obstructing or facilitating their ability to provide quality perinatal care at a central labor ward in Maputo. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 midwives and were analyzed according to grounded theory technique. Barriers to provision of quality perinatal care were identified as follows: (i) the unsupportive environment, (ii) nonempowering and limited interaction with women in labor, (iii) a sense of professional inadequacy and inferiority, and (iv) nonappliance of best caring practices. A model based on the midwives' reflections on barriers to quality perinatal care and responses to these were developed. Actions aimed at overcoming the barriers were improvising and identifying areas in need of change. Identified evading actions were holding others accountable and yielding to dysfunction and structural control. In order to improve perinatal care, the midwives need to see themselves as change agents and not as victims of external and internal causal relationships over which they have no influence. It is moreover essential that the midwives chose actions aiming at overcoming barriers to quality perinatal care instead of choosing evading actions, which might jeopardize the health of the unborn and newborn infant. We suggest that local as well as national education programs need to correspond with existing reality, even if they provide knowledge that surpasses the present possibilities in practice. Quality of intrapartum and the immediate newborn care requires a supportive environment, however, which in the context of this study presented such serious obstacles that they need to be addressed on the national level. Structural and administrative changes are difficult to target as these depend on national organization of maternal health care (MHC) services and national health expenditures. PMID:16484159

  15. Quality of Care for Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Chan, Leighton; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Huff, Edwin D.; Hart, L. Gary

    2010-01-01

    Background: In the mid-1990s, significant gaps existed in the quality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care between rural and urban hospitals. Since then, overall AMI care quality has improved. This study uses more recent data to determine whether rural-urban AMI quality gaps have persisted. Methods: Using inpatient records data for 34,776…

  16. Improving Compliance with NICE Guidelines on Parkinson's isease: A Quality Improvement Study

    OpenAIRE

    Agha, Riaz; Edison, Eric; Fielder Camm, Christian; Cheng, Lisa; Gajendragadkar, Pushpaj; Borland, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease can progressively affect daily function and multidisciplinary teamwork is essential to provide high quality care. The National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued guidelines regarding diagnosis, follow-up, and multidisciplinary care. This quality improvement project sought to measure and improve the compliance of service provision against the guidelines. In total, 3 audit cycles were completed. Each audit involved reviewing notes of patients attending...

  17. Reliability of medical audit in quality assessment of medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camacho Luiz Antonio Bastos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical audit of hospital records has been a major component of quality of care assessment, although physician judgment is known to have low reliability. We estimated interrater agreement of quality assessment in a sample of patients with cardiac conditions admitted to an American teaching hospital. Physician-reviewers used structured review methods designed to improve quality assessment based on judgment. Chance-corrected agreement for the items considered more relevant to process and outcome of care ranged from low to moderate (0.2 to 0.6, depending on the review item and the principal diagnoses and procedures the patients underwent. Results from several studies seem to converge on this point. Comparisons among different settings should be made with caution, given the sensitivity of agreement measurements to prevalence rates. Reliability of review methods in their current stage could be improved by combining the assessment of two or more reviewers, and by emphasizing outcome-oriented events.

  18. Toward a 21st Century Quality-Measurement System for Managed-Care Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Armstead, Rodney C.; Elstein, Paul; Gorman, John

    1995-01-01

    As the Nation's largest managed-care purchaser, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is working to develop a uniform data and performance-measurement system for all enrollees in managed-care plans. This effort will ultimately hold managed-care plans accountable for continuous improvement in the quality of care they provide and will provide information to consumers and purchasers to make responsible managed-care choices. The effort entails overhauling peer review organization (PRO) ...

  19. Power Quality Improvement Using UPQC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kalaipriya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the power quality improvement using UPQC. UPQC consists of series inverter, shunt inverter and capacitance. Every inverter connected with pulse generator for switching on. UPQC is especially obtained to resolve different kind of power quality drawback like reactive power compensation, voltage interruption and harmonics. DVR is connected in series to deliver the active and reactive power to distribution network. DC-link capacitors stay high as a result of the DVR needs a minimum amount of DC-link voltage to compensate sag. So, DC –link voltage is connected with PV module to reduce the cost. Design of UPQC device with multi-bus system obtained using MATLAB/SIMULINK and simulation results are mentioned to support the developed conception.

  20. 持续质量改进理论在妇幼保健院处方点评中的应用%Application of Continuous Quality Improvement Theory in Prescription Comments in Maternal and Children Health Care Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳; 朱华威

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the application of continuous quality improvement theory in prescription comments in outpatient department of maternal and child health care hospital. METHODS: Based on PDCA cycle method, the outpatient prescriptions were commented in respects of Plan, Do, Check and Action. We conducted continuous quality management, found out the specific performance of the unqualified prescription, analyzed the possible causes, made improvement plan and achieved goal, cleared and defined responsible person. We took a random sample of 1 800 outpatient prescriptions within 9 months after continuous quality improvement (200 prescriptions each month), and calculated the monthly qualified rate of prescription. RESULTS: The qualified rate of outpatient prescriptions had been improved from 55% before quality improvement to 60% , 65% , 85% , 86% , 88%, 90%, 95%, 99% and 99% from Jan. To Sept. After quality improvement (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Application of continuous quality improvement in the comments of outpatient prescription can effectively improve the quality of outpatient prescription and rational drug use.%目的:探讨持续质量改进理论在妇幼保健院门诊处方点评中的应用.方法:基于PDCA循环法,对门诊处方点评工作采取计划、执行、检查和行动4个阶段的过程管理,通过找出不合格处方的表现、分析原因、制定改进措施及目标、明确责任人进行持续质量改进.随机抽取改进后9个月的门诊处方1800张(每月200张)统计每月处方合格率.结果:门诊处方合格率由改进前的55%提高到改进后1-9月的60%、65%、85%、86%、88%、90%、95%、99%、99%(P<0.05).结论:在门诊处方点评中引进持续质量改进管理方法,提高了门诊处方的质量,促进了合理用药.

  1. A comparative study of total quality management of health care system in India and Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari Gorji, Ali Morad; Farooquie, Jamal A

    2011-01-01

    Background Total quality management (TQM) has a great potential to address quality problems in a wide range of industries and improve the organizational performance. The growing need to take initiatives by hospitals in countries like India and Iran to improve the service quality and reduce wastage of resources has inspired the authors to develop a survey instrument to measure health care quality and performance in the two countries. Methods Based on the Baldrige health care criteria for perfo...

  2. A comparative study of total quality management of health care system in India and Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari Gorji Ali; Farooquie Jamal A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Total quality management (TQM) has a great potential to address quality problems in a wide range of industries and improve the organizational performance. The growing need to take initiatives by hospitals in countries like India and Iran to improve the service quality and reduce wastage of resources has inspired the authors to develop a survey instrument to measure health care quality and performance in the two countries. Methods Based on the Baldrige health care criteria ...

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Usefulness of Mobile Text Phone Messages to Improve the Quality of Care of HIV and AIDS Patients in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Lange, Innocent; Fon, Peter Nde; Nguedia Assob, Jules Clement; Tanue, Elvis Asangbeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: HIV and AIDS are major public health problems in the world and Africa. In Cameroon, the HIV prevalence is 5.1%. Cellphones have been found to be useful in the provision of modern health care services using short message services (SMS). This study assessed the effectiveness of SMS in improving the adherence of people living with HIV and AIDS to their treatment and care in Cameroon. Methods: This intervention study used a randomized controlled trial design. Ninety participants seeking treatment at the Nkwen Baptist Health Center were recruited between August and September 2011 using a purposive sampling method. They were randomly allocated into the intervention and control groups, each containing 45 participants. In the intervention group, each participant received four SMSs per week at equal intervals for four weeks. The patients were investigated for adherence to ARVs by evaluating the number of times treatment and medication refill appointments were missed. Data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire before and after intervention and analysed on STATA. Results: The baseline survey indicated that there were 55(61.1%) females and 35(38.9%) males aged 23 - 62 years; the mean age was 38.77 ± 1.08. Most participants were teachers [12 (13.3%)], farmers [11 (12.2%)], and businessmen [24 (26.7%)]. Adherence to ARVs was 64.4% in the intervention group and 44.2% in the control group (p = 0.05). 2(4.4%) patients in the control group failed to respect their drug refill appointments while all the 45(100%) participants in the intervention group respected their drug refill appointments. 54.17% of married people and 42.9% of the participants with primary and secondary levels of education missed their treatment. Key reasons for missing treatment were late home coming (54%), forgetfulness (22.5%), and travelling out of station without medication (17.5%). Other factors responsible for non-adherence included involvement in outdoor business (60

  4. Changing education to improve patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, D.

    2001-01-01

    Health professionals need competencies in improvement skills if they are to contribute usefully to improving patient care. Medical education programmes in the USA have not systematically taught improvement skills to residents (registrars in the UK). The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recently developed and begun to deploy a competency based model for accreditation that may encourage the development of improvement skills by the 100 000 residents in accredited ...

  5. Using implementation science to improve urologic oncology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Sales, Anne E

    2016-09-01

    There are many gaps between recommended urologic cancer care and real-world practice. Although we increasingly define these quality gaps because of our growing health services research capacity in urologic oncology, we often fall short in translating these findings into effective interventions and strategies to reduce gaps in care. In this article, we highlight implementation research as a logical next step for translating our health services research findings into effective individual and organizational behavior change strategies to improve quality of care. We explain how implementation research focuses on different, upstream outcomes from our clinical outcomes to get the right care to the right patient at the right time. Lastly, we share information about resources and training for those interested in learning more about this emerging, transdisciplinary field. PMID:27401405

  6. Spirometry in Primary Care: An Analysis of Spirometry Test Quality in a Regional Primary Care Asthma Program

    OpenAIRE

    Licskai, Christopher J; Todd W Sands; Lisa Paolatto; Ivan Nicoletti; Madonna Ferrone

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care office spirometry can improve access to testing and concordance between clinical practice and asthma guidelines. Compliance with test quality standards is essential to implementation.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of spirometry performed onsite in a regional primary care asthma program (RAP) by health care professionals with limited training.METHODS: Asthma educators were trained to perform spirometry during two 2 h workshops and supervised during up to six patien...

  7. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina,1,2 Ángel Belenguer-Varea,1,2 Eduardo Rovira,1,2 David Cuesta-Peredó1,21Geriatric Medicine Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Universitario de la Ribera, 2Medical School, Universidad Católica de Valencia San vicente Mártir, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements i...

  8. 基于服务质量差距模型改进医疗护理服务质量%Based on service quality gap model to improve medical care service Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶小红; 时维东

    2011-01-01

    基于服务质量差距模型理论,分析了在医疗护理服务质量中差距产生的原因.就弥合这些差距,从了解患者实际期望、制订合理服务标准、强化服务质量水平、规范服务营销行为4个方面提出了建议,旨在通过重视需求、尊重患者、有效沟通、合理营销改进医疗护理质量,使医院提高服务质量更具针对性、科学性和有效性.%Based on service quality gap model theory, the causes of gap in medical and nursing service quality were analyzed. To bridge these gap, suggestions were proposed from four aspects of understanding patients'actual expectations, developing reasonable service standards, improving service quality levels,and specifying service marketing behaviors which aimed at improving medical and nursing quality by emphasizing demands, respecting patients, effective communication, and reasonable marketing,so as to make the efforts of service quality improvement more purposeful,scientific and effective.

  9. Quality improvement in large healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höög, Elisabet; Lysholm, Jack; Garvare, Rickard; Weinehall, Lars; Nyström, Monica Elisabeth

    2016-03-21

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the obstacles and challenges associated with organizational monitoring and follow-up (M & F) processes related to health care quality improvement (QI) and development. Design/methodology/approach - A longitudinal case study of a large health care organization during a system-wide QI intervention. Content analysis was conducted of repeated interviews with key actors and archival data collected over a period of four years. Findings - The demand for improved M & F strategies, and what and how to monitor were described by the respondents. Obstacles and challenges for achieving M & F strategies that enables system-wide and coherent development were found in three areas: monitoring, processing, and feedback and communication. Also overarching challenges were found. Practical implications - A model of important aspects of M & F systems is presented that can be used for analysis and planning and contribute to shared cognition of such systems. Approaches for systematic analysis and follow-up of identified problems have to be developed and fully incorporated in the organization's measurement systems. A systematic M & F needs analytic and process-oriented competence, and this study highlights the potential in an organizational function with capacity and mandate for such tasks. Originality/value - Most health care systems are flooded with a vast amount of registers, records, and measurements. A key issue is how such data can be processed and refined to reflect the needs and the development process of the health care system and how rich data can be used for improvement purposes. This study presents key organizational actor's view on important factors to consider when building a coherent organizational M & F strategy. PMID:26964854

  10. Trading emissions improve air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While admitting sharply contrasting views exist, James M. Lents of the South Coast Air Quality Management District in southern California sees emissions trading open-quotes as a lifesaver for our troubled planet.close quotes He explains: open-quotes If political support for the environment is to be maintained, we must seek the most economical and flexible means of pursuing cleanup. At present, market incentives and emissions trading represent our best hope.close quotes Lents is putting his money where his pen is. The air quality management district he heads plans to use market incentives, including emissions trading, to reduce air pollution in the notoriously dirty southern California area. When the system goes into operation in 1994, he estimates it will save southern California businesses more than $400 million a year in compliance costs, while also making major improvements in the region's air quality. If the idea works there, why won't it work elsewhere, even on a global scale, Lents asks? He believes it will. But open-quotes the ultimate success of emissions-trading programs, whether regional, national, or international in scope, lies in the proof that they're actually achieving reductions in harmful emissions,close quotes he emphasizes. open-quotes These reductions must be real and verifiable to satisfy the Clean Air Act and a skeptical public.close quotes

  11. Improving Depression Care Through an Online Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Melissa; Wiest, Dawn; Qaseem, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide, and many internists diagnose and treat depression. This study aimed to examine the impact of a practice improvement intervention on screening and managing patients with depression in primary care. This pre-post study design included a physician practice survey designed to capture what the physicians believed they were doing in practice, a chart audit tool to capture what physicians were actually doing in practice, and an intervention that included an evidence-based educational program, online toolkit, and practice improvement coaching conference calls that promoted group learning. Following completion of the intervention, participants increasingly used the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 to detect, diagnose, and gauge treatment success for depression and reported increased use of guidelines and team-based care. Although barriers to improving depression care exist, this study suggests that evidence-based quality improvement programs can positively affect practice. PMID:25351473

  12. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective. PMID:27453745

  13. Using Quality Function Deployment to Improve Reference Services Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Pao-Long Chang; Pao-Nuan Hsieh

    1996-01-01

    Much research has been conducted regarding how reference librarians can evaluate and improve the quality of the answers they provide to users' inquiries. There has been considerably less discussion, however, concerning how to improve the quality of the delivery of those answers, and to upgrade the overall quality of reference services as a whole. Suggestions for improving the quality of service contained within the business literature may be applied to improve library services as well. In thi...

  14. Monitoring and improving care in thoracic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Numan

    2016-01-01

    Quality of Care (QoC) plays a central role in the way healthcare is delivered. In the world of thoracic surgery for lung cancer, surgeons are faced with complex and sometimes high-risk surgical resections on an aging patient population with an increasing incidence of frail physical health. This incr

  15. 'Wading through treacle': quality improvement lessons from the frontline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roueche, Alice; Hewitt, Jocelyn

    2012-03-01

    In a time of financial uncertainty and structural reform, the National Health Service (NHS) in England needs clinical leadership to help improve the quality of patient care. Increasingly, leadership development is being targeted at doctors in postgraduate training to help prepare them for their future leadership roles as consultants and general practitioners. However, there is a risk that we are missing an opportunity here by failing to recognise the role that doctors in training can play now, during their training. As our frontline clinicians they have a unique view of the health service and the inefficiencies therein. The London Deanery has been running an educational programme called Beyond Audit to provide doctors in training with quality improvement skills. During this programme we have been given a unique insight into NHS systems as viewed by junior doctors. They have identified a wide range of small system problems that, when combined, result in large-scale inefficiency and prevent the delivery of high quality patient care. These problems they identify have implications for cost, efficiency, patient safety, team-working and patient experience. Any attempt to improve the quality of care delivered in the NHS needs to look at the system from the point of view of those delivering the care, including our doctors in postgraduate training. By empowering them to make improvements to the systems that they see, there is the potential to make significant improvement in the quality of patient care that they deliver. PMID:22198901

  16. Carefree in child care ?: child wellbeing, caregiving quality, and intervention programs in center-based child care

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Claudia Denise

    2014-01-01

    The use of center child care in Western countries has increased over the last three decades and is nowadays the most frequently used type of non-parental care for children aged zero to four (OECD, 2013). The aim of the current dissertation is to shed more light on indicators of child care quality in center child care and to answer the question whether narrow-focused caregiver interventions are effective in improving child care quality. The reported meta-analysis shows that narrow-focus interv...

  17. Quality improvement capacity: a survey of hospital quality managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, A R; Majewski, C; Victor, J C; Baker, G R

    2010-02-01

    Background Skilled managers are an important component of quality improvement (QI) infrastructure, but there has been little evaluation of QI infrastructure, which is needed to guide enhancement of this capacity. Methods Quality managers at 97 acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, were surveyed by mail to describe how their roles were integrated with QI performance objectives. Binary and scaled responses were analysed quantitatively, and open-ended responses were analysed thematically. Results The response rate was 79.4%. Many QI managers were new to their role and had no support staff despite responsibility for multiple portfolios. Respondents thought that QI objectives should be less reactive to hospital executives or boards, adverse events or demands from government and accreditation bodies, and recommended that dedicated QI managers proactively apply explicit strategic plans and engage executives and clinicians. Findings were consistent regardless of rank, staffing or hospital type. Those with master's training and greater experience were more involved in strategic planning, data analysis and communication. Conclusions QI is not well resourced in most acute care hospitals in Ontario. To develop QI capacity, investment and QI training may be required. Research should empirically establish objective performance measures of QI capacity to guide investment and evaluation. PMID:20172879

  18. Closing The Gap: Improving Trauma Care On The Ukrainian Battlefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Stephen K; Jones, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Since early 2014, Ukraine has been involved in a violent social and political revolution that has taken more than 7,000 lives. Many of these deaths were due to limited field medical care and prolonged evacuation times because the Ukrainian military has been slow to adopt standard combat medical processes. We deployed with the US Army's 173rd Airborne Brigade to train soldiers in the National Guard of Ukraine (NGU) on combat first aid. We discovered that a major deficiency limiting the quality of trauma care and evacuation is an endemic lack of prior coordination and planning. The responsibility for this coordination falls on military leaders; therefore, we delivered medical operations training to officers of the NGU unit and observed great improvement in medical care sustainment. We recommend systematic leader education in best medical practices be institutionalized at all levels of the Ukrainian Army to foster sustained improvement and refinement of trauma care. PMID:27045509

  19. From Perspectives of the Elderly: Quality of care in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian R. Woods

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews state-of-the-art findings on care and quality from published research from 2003-2014 in Germany, specifically from the perspective of the elderly. It is based on a larger project on care and quality in Germany that was funded by the Hans Böckler Foundation. The study provides a much needed overview of current issues on quality and care in light of increased pressure to address care and changes in German social policy. Although quality also encompasses conditions for professional care work and informal carers, this article focuses on the elderly as recipients of care, their perspectives and the ways in which they are involved in their care. Research on care quality from the perspective of the elderly is highlighted in the following themes: 1 the rights of the elderly to quality care 2 elderly perception of satisfaction and quality of outcomes of care, 3 documentation of care as quality control and time, 4 active aging and 5 equality of access. Results show that long-term care rights are more clearly defined and expanded, but enforcement problems are present. Satisfaction with care is traced to good communication with carers, but time for care is scarce. Active aging has become a central focus of care and more research on equal access is needed. The article outlines strengths and weaknesses in German quality care provision as well as learning effects for other countries.

  20. Solutions to Improve Educational Management Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezan Jahanian; Masoomeh Motahari

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, enhancing the quality in educational systems of different countries has gained especial importance and stand. Improving utilizing and increasing the quality in our country’s educational system is felt too. One of the utilizing factors in education system is to improve the educational management quality.In this article, effective factors in educational management quality and one of its improving solutions, thorough management quality, is analyzed.

  1. A comprehensive model of cooperation between caregivers related to quality of care.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, W.J.; Vermeij, D.J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The system and delivery of health care tend to suffer from fragmentation, resulting in discontinuous and costly care. Local cooperation between caregivers is essential to achieve appropriate, timely, continuous and efficient care. The article develops a general comprehensive patient-centered model of quality of care related to local cooperation between caregivers. The model can be used in quality improvement and research. The proposed model: Within the framework of Donabedian's tr...

  2. Quality improvement 101 for surgeons: Navigating the alphabet soup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santore, Matthew T; Islam, Saleem

    2015-12-01

    It is a fundamental value of the surgical profession to improve care for its patients. In the last 100 years, the principles of prospective quality improvement have started to work their way into the traditional method of retrospective case review in morbidity and mortality conference. This article summarizes the history of "improvement science" and its intersection with the field of surgery. It attempts to clarify the principles and jargon that may be new or confusing to surgeons with a different vocabulary and experience. This is done to bring the significant power and resources of improvement science to the traditional efforts to improve surgical care. PMID:26653158

  3. Improving Health and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Improving Health and Quality of Life On this Page Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Support ... and improve their ability to function and their quality of life. Doctors may refer some of their CFS patients ...

  4. San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund is a competitive grant program that is helping implement TMDLs to improve water quality, protect wetlands, and...

  5. CARE - curriculum quality analysis and impact review of European ECEC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente; Iannone, Rosa Lisa

    to child outcomes including cognitive, language, social and emotional and educational development, as well as more general indicators of leaning and well-being. Research, mostly from the US, suggests that life-chances and child development are dependent on the quality of educational opportunities...... it is possible to identify different ways for improving ECEC quality, both structurally and processually. We know from research, that processual quality, e.g. positive interactions between children and adults, is the most important factor to improving child outcomes in general and for socially...... disadvantaged children in particular. Results from this review showed that several initiatives have been taken to raise professionals' knowledge and skills, and overall competences to implement high quality interventions in day care. However findings also showed that resources and support at the policy or...

  6. Reductions in inpatient mortality following interventions to improve emergency hospital care in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, M.; Spry, E.; Daoh, K.; Baion, D.; Skordis-Worrall, J

    2012-01-01

    Background The demand for high quality hospital care for children in low resource countries is not being met. This paper describes a number of strategies to improve emergency care at a children's hospital and evaluates the impact of these on inpatient mortality. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of improving emergency care is estimated. Methods and Findings A team of local and international staff developed a plan to improve emergency care for children arriving at The Ola During Children's H...

  7. The quality of childbirth care in China: women’s voices: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Raven, Joanna; van den Broek, Nynke; TAO, FANGBIAO; Kun, Huang; Tolhurst, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of improved utilisation of health care and outcomes, rapid socio-economic development and health system reform in China, it is timely to consider the quality of services. Data on quality of maternal health care as experienced by women is limited. This study explores women’s expectations and experiences of the quality of childbirth care in rural China. Methods Thirty five semi-structured interviews and five focus group discussions were conducted with 69 women who had ...

  8. Quality of care for patients with sexually transmitted diseases in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Faxelid, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    QUALITY OF CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASESIN ZAMBIA Elisabeth Faxelid Factors which have implications for STD care in Zambia have been described andanalysed in order to find strategies for quality improvements. A total of 684 patients with STD were interviewed about health seeking behaviour,sex partners, and satisfaction with quality of care. The male patients had had moresex partners than the female patients, but both groups knew the identity pa...

  9. End-user perspectives on e-commerce and health care web site quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rouge, Cynthia; De Leo, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    We explore and compare the importance of various quality dimensions for health care and e-commerce web sites. The results show that the importance of various quality attributes for all except four of ten quality dimensions studied differ between health care and e-commerce web sites. These results can help health care managers to improve and/or to guide the design of their web sites. PMID:18998907

  10. Rationale, design and conduct of a comprehensive evaluation of a primary care based intervention to improve the quality of life of osteoarthritis patients. The PraxArt-project: a cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN87252339

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muth Christiane

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA has a high prevalence in primary care. Conservative, guideline orientated approaches aiming at improving pain treatment and increasing physical activity, have been proven to be effective in several contexts outside the primary care setting, as for instance the Arthritis Self management Programs (ASMPs. But it remains unclear if these comprehensive evidence based approaches can improve patients' quality of life if they are provided in a primary care setting. Methods/Design PraxArt is a cluster randomised controlled trial with GPs as the unit of randomisation. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of a comprehensive evidence based medical education of GPs on individual care and patients' quality of life. 75 GPs were randomised either to intervention group I or II or to a control group. Each GP will include 15 patients suffering from osteoarthritis according to the criteria of ACR. In intervention group I GPs will receive medical education and patient education leaflets including a physical exercise program. In intervention group II the same is provided, but in addition a practice nurse will be trained to monitor via monthly telephone calls adherence to GPs prescriptions and advices and ask about increasing pain and possible side effects of medication. In the control group no intervention will be applied at all. Main outcome measurement for patients' QoL is the GERMAN-AIMS2-SF questionnaire. In addition data about patients' satisfaction (using a modified EUROPEP-tool, medication, health care utilization, comorbidity, physical activity and depression (using PHQ-9 will be retrieved. Measurements (pre data collection will take place in months I-III, starting in June 2005. Post data collection will be performed after 6 months. Discussion Despite the high prevalence and increasing incidence, comprehensive and evidence based treatment approaches for OA in a primary care setting are neither established nor

  11. Influence of structural features on portuguese toddler child care quality

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela Pessanha; Cecília Aguiar; Joaquim Bairrão

    2007-01-01

    Whereas child care quality has been extensively studied in the U.S., there is much less information about the quality of child care in other countries.With one of the highest maternal employment rates in Europe, it is important to examine child care in Portugal. Thirty toddler classrooms in child care centers were observed. The purpose of this studywas to determine whether structural features account for overall toddler child care quality. Results showed younger and better-paid teach...

  12. Early stage cervical cancer : quality of cancer care and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, Quirine Dionne

    2007-01-01

    To improve quality of cancer care treatment-related information is needed. This could be acquired by registries. Since January 1984, the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) collects prospectively more than 200 relevant clinical and pathological parameters of women with cervical cancer treated in

  13. Blending Key Ingredients to Assure Quality in Home Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Deloris G.

    1986-01-01

    Careful staff selection, training, and review are among the methods the author recommends to home care agencies striving to provide top-notch services. Discusses measuring the quality of care employees are providing, accreditation, and the benefits of accreditation. (CT)

  14. Helping You Choose Quality Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health Care Behavioral Health Care Critical Access Hospitals Home Care (+ Pharmacy) Hospital Laboratory Nursing Care Center International Accreditation Accreditation Top Spots What ...

  15. Defining quality improvement in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William J; Moran, John W; Corso, Liza C; Beitsch, Leslie M; Bialek, Ronald; Cofsky, Abbey

    2010-01-01

    Many industries commonly use quality improvement (QI) techniques to improve service delivery and process performance. Yet, there has been scarce application of these proven methods to public health settings and the public health field has not developed a set of shared principles or a common definition for quality improvement. This article discusses a definition of quality improvement in public health and describes a continuum of quality improvement applications for public health departments. Quality improvement is a distinct management process and set of tools and techniques that are coordinated to ensure that departments consistently meet the health needs of their communities. PMID:20009636

  16. How to Sustain Change and Support Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Samuel A; McQuillan, Rory; Harel, Ziv; Weizman, Adam V; Thomas, Alison; Nesrallah, Gihad; Bell, Chaim M; Chan, Christopher T; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-05-01

    To achieve sustainable change, quality improvement initiatives must become the new way of working rather than something added on to routine clinical care. However, most organizational change is not maintained. In this next article in this Moving Points in Nephrology feature on quality improvement, we provide health care professionals with strategies to sustain and support quality improvement. Threats to sustainability may be identified both at the beginning of a project and when it is ready for implementation. The National Health Service Sustainability Model is reviewed as one example to help identify issues that affect long-term success of quality improvement projects. Tools to help sustain improvement include process control boards, performance boards, standard work, and improvement huddles. Process control and performance boards are methods to communicate improvement results to staff and leadership. Standard work is a written or visual outline of current best practices for a task and provides a framework to ensure that changes that have improved patient care are consistently and reliably applied to every patient encounter. Improvement huddles are short, regular meetings among staff to anticipate problems, review performance, and support a culture of improvement. Many of these tools rely on principles of visual management, which are systems transparent and simple so that every staff member can rapidly distinguish normal from abnormal working conditions. Even when quality improvement methods are properly applied, the success of a project still depends on contextual factors. Context refers to aspects of the local setting in which the project operates. Context affects resources, leadership support, data infrastructure, team motivation, and team performance. For these reasons, the same project may thrive in a supportive context and fail in a different context. To demonstrate the practical applications of these quality improvement principles, these principles are

  17. Quality indicators for international benchmarking of mental health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Richard C; Mattke, Soeren; Somekh, David;

    2006-01-01

    To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data.......To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data....

  18. Data Mining Consulting Improve Data Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xingsen; Shi, Yong; Li, Jun; Zhang, Peng

    2007-01-01

    Data are important for making decisions. However, the quality of the data affects the quality of decisions. Data mining as one of the most important sources of knowledge needs high quality data to mine, but there are not enough good quality data in many enterprises. By analyzing the reasons for low data quality systematically, a new method called data mining consulting for improving data quality has been established. It defines data quality in a wider sense from the view of data mining, finds...

  19. Asan Medical Information System for Healthcare Quality Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Woo Sung; Lee, Jae Ho; Min, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun Ja; Lee, Yong Su; Lee, Young Ha; Nam, Sang Woo; Eo, Gi Seung; Seo, Sook Gyoung; Nam, Mi Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This purpose of this paper is to introduce the status of the Asan Medical Center (AMC) medical information system with respect to healthcare quality improvement. Methods Asan Medical Information System (AMIS) is projected to become a completely electronic and digital information hospital. AMIS has played a role in improving the health care quality based on the following measures: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, privacy, and security. Results AMI...

  20. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part VII: Lower Costs and Higher Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine report entitled The Health Care Imperative: Lowering Costs and Improving Outcomes discussed numerous ways to decrease costs in the health care system without decreasing quality. The use of evidence-based medicine, eliminating wasteful spending such as needlessly high administrative costs, having more preventive services, having a better reimbursement system that emphasized quality, developing a less fragmented and more efficient medical delivery system, having more transparency for patients on the outcomes of different providers, having greater health care literacy for patients, and eliminating fraud were some of the recommendations. The total savings from eliminating unnecessary health care costs was estimated to be over 3 quarters of a trillion dollars each year. PMID:26545019

  1. Evaluation of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD: Information and health education feedback for improving clinical monitoring and quality-of-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferro Juan J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a health problem that is becoming increasingly attended-to in Primary Care (PC. However, there is a scarcity of health-care programs and studies exploring the implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG. The principal objective of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients to improve the grade of clinical control and the quality-of-life (QoL of the patients via a feedback on their state-of-health. A training plan for the health-care professionals is based on CPG and health education. Method/Design Multi-centred, before-after, quasi experimental, prospective study involving an intervention group and a control group of individuals followed-up for 12 months. The patients receive attention from urban and semi-urban Primary Care Centres (PCC within the administrative area of the Costa de Ponent (near Barcelona. All the pacients corresponding to the PCC of one sub-area were assigned to the intervention group and patients from the rest of sub-areas to the group control. The intervention includes providing data to the health-care professionals (clinician/nurse derived from a clinical history and an interview. A course of training focused on aspects of CPG, motivational interview and health education (tobacco, inhalers, diet, physical exercise, physiotherapy. The sample random includes a total of 801 patients (≥ 40 years of age, recorded as having COPD, receiving attention in the PCC or at home, who have had at least one clinical visit, and who provided written informed consent to participation in the study. Data collected include socio-demographic characteristics, drug treatment, exacerbations and hospital admissions, evaluation of inhaler use, tobacco consumption and life-style and health-care resources consumed. The main endpoints are dyspnoea, according to the modified scale of the Medical

  2. Comparative Quality Indicators for Hospital Choice: Do General Practitioners Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrua, Marie; Sicotte, Claude; Lalloué, Benoît; Minvielle, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Context The strategy of publicly reporting quality indicators is being widely promoted through public policies as a way to make health care delivery more efficient. Objective To assess general practitioners’ (GPs) use of the comparative hospital quality indicators made available by public services and the media, as well as GPs’ perceptions of their qualities and usefulness. Method A telephone survey of a random sample representing all self-employed GPs in private practice in France. Results A large majority (84.1%–88.5%) of respondents (n = 503; response rate of 56%) reported that they never used public comparative indicators, available in the mass media or on government and non-government Internet sites, to influence their patients’ hospital choices. The vast majority of GPs rely mostly on traditional sources of information when choosing a hospital. At the same time, this study highlights favourable opinions shared by a large proportion of GPs regarding several aspects of hospital quality indicators, such as their good qualities and usefulness for other purposes. In sum, the results show that GPs make very limited use of hospital quality indicators based on a consumer choice paradigm but, at the same time, see them as useful in ways corresponding more to the usual professional paradigms, including as a means to improve quality of care. PMID:26840429

  3. Evidence-Based Practice and Quality Improvement in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakas, Karen; Smith, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, nursing education has experienced several significant changes in response to challenges faced by healthcare organizations. Accrediting organizations have called for improved quality and safety in care, and the Institute of Medicine has identified evidence-based practice and quality improvement as 2 core competencies to include in the curricula for all healthcare professionals. However, the application of these competencies reaches far beyond the classroom setting. For nurses to possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to apply evidence-based practice and quality improvement to the real-world setting, academic-clinical institution partnerships are vital. PMID:27465447

  4. Improving childhood nutrition and wellness in South Africa: involving mothers/caregivers of malnourished or HIV positive children and health care workers as co-designers to enhance a local quality improvement intervention

    OpenAIRE

    van Deventer, Claire; Robert, Glenn Brian; Wright, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background: A significant proportion of children admitted to a hospital in a South African sub-district in 2010 were severely malnourished and - when concurrently HIV positive - were not correctly initiated on antiretroviral therapy.Audit data over a subsequent four year period revealed that 60 % of malnourished children admitted to the hospital were HIV positive. To supplement an ongoing local quality improvement (QI) intervention addressing poor nutritional outcomes in children in this sett...

  5. Defining Access to Health Care: Evidence on the Importance of Quality and Distance in Rural Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Klemick, Heather; Leonard, Kenneth L; Masatu, Melkiory C.

    2008-01-01

    We examine the implications of health seeking behavior on access to quality health care using a unique dataset that combines a household survey from rural Tanzania with the location and quality of all health facilities available to households. Patients do not always visit the nearest facility, but choose from among multiple facilities, improving the quality of care they receive by bypassing low quality facilities. Recognizing this behavior alters the projected benefits to health interventions...

  6. Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Fermon, Béatrice; Joël, Marie-Eve

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance policies for long-term care in France are founded on a law passed in 2002, but the organisation of the system is still underway. It is principally based on a legal framework that sets out requirements for quality monitoring and quality improvement. Quality assessment is related to outcomes, indicators and guidelines. It pertains to formal care and is related to administrative authorisation and financial conditions. In the public sector, the aim is to develop continuous quali...

  7. Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union.

    OpenAIRE

    Fermon, Béatrice; Joël, Marie-Eve

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance policies for long-term care in France are founded on a law passed in 2002, but the organisation of the system is still underway. It is principally based on a legal framework that sets out requirements for quality monitoring and quality improvement. Quality assessment is related to outcomes, indicators and guidelines. It pertains to formal care and is related to administrative authorisation and financial conditions. In the public sector, the aim is to develop continuous quali...

  8. Quality control circle care in improving the application of the success rate of breastfeeding%品管圈护理在提高母乳喂养成功率中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐彦梅

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨品管圈活动在提高母乳喂养成功率中的应用。方法:成立品管圈活动小组,并对产科病区住院分娩的产妇进行随机分组:一组为对照组,按产科护理常规进行护理,指导相关知识;另一组为观察组,成立品管圈小组对孕产妇进行护理。结果:观察组与对照组产妇在出院时母乳喂养相关知识知晓率分别是100%、80.24%,母乳喂养成功率分别是80.86%、61.72%,产妇乳房胀痛发生率分别是26.54%、59.88%。观察组产妇母乳喂养技巧正确掌握情况明显高于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:品管圈活动能明显提高母乳喂养的成功率,值得推广。%ObjectiveTo explore quality control activities in the application of improve the success rate of breastfeeding.Methods Set up quality management circle activity group, and the maternity ward in the hospital childbirth puerpera were randomly assigned: a group for the control group, according to obstetric care routine care, guidance related knowledge; Another group as the observation group, set up quality management circle group of maternal care.Results Observing group and control group in the hospital maternal breastfeeding knowledge awareness were 100%, 80.24%, breastfeeding success rate were 80.86%, 61.72%, the incidence of maternal breast tenderness is 26.54%, 59.88% respectively. Maternal breastfeeding skills correctly grasp situation observation group was obviously higher than that of control group, difference has statistical significance (P < 0.05).Conclusions Quality management circle activity can significantly improve the success rate of the breastfeeding is worth promoting.

  9. Quality of diabetes care in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bruggen, J.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a quality incentive is expected to ensue from improved collaboration between healthcare professionals. Whether this view is supported by sufficient evidence is, however, questionable. Therefore, the first study included in this thesis is a systematic review of studies on the effe

  10. Quality improvement through the paradigm of learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hafford-Letchfield, Trish; Lavender, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - If we are to achieve meaningful participation and co-production for older people in care, more radical approaches are required. This project explores an innovation where older people using social care were matched to community based learning mentors to develop partnerships within which learning interventions were facilitated. We explore how the concept of learning might be used as a paradigm to raise the quality of care in institutionalised settings using a co-productive and relati...

  11. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Susan J; Laetitia C. Rispel; Loveday Penn-Kekana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective: This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods: During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospital...

  12. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Susan J; Laetitia C. Rispel; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals.Objective: This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals.Methods: During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals ...

  13. The effect of a complementary e-learning course on implementation of a quality improvement project regarding care for elderly patients: a stepped wedge trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, L. van de; Langelaan, M.; IJkema, R.; Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Delirium occurs frequently in elderly hospitalised patients and is associated with higher mortality, increased length of hospital stay, functional decline, and admission to long-term care. Healthcare professionals frequently do not recognise delirium, indicating that education can play a

  14. Analyzing and Improving Data Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Buccella, Agustina; Cechich, Alejandra; Domingo, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    Data quality is a research area strongly investigated during the 90’s. However, few companies in Argentina apply data quality methodologies or tools during the analysis, design or implementation phases of software development process. Developers generally use techniques to design systems such as UML without considering mechanisms for future data quality problems. In this work we propose a methodology in which the data quality is an essential part of the whole software development process. Ear...

  15. Towards improvement in quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This first document in the series of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) Technical Notes is a general guideline for the establishment of effective quality assurance procedures at nuclear facilities. It sets out primary requirements such as quality objectives, methods for measuring the effectiveness of the quality assurance programme, priority of activities in relation to importance of safety of items, motivation of personnel

  16. New health care law may spell opportunity for quality managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    New health care law emphasizes quality, safety, and efficiency. Pay-for-performance emphasis requires attention of quality managers. Many quality provisions will not kick in for several years. PMID:20491197

  17. Caring for quality of care: symbolic violence and the bureaucracies of audit

    OpenAIRE

    Emmerich, Nathan; Swinglehurst, Deborah; Maybin, Jo; Park, Sophie; Quilligan, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Background This article considers the moral notion of care in the context of Quality of Care discourses. Whilst care has clear normative implications for the delivery of health care it is less clear how Quality of Care, something that is centrally involved in the governance of UK health care, relates to practice. Discussion This paper presents a social and ethical analysis of Quality of Care in the light of the moral notion of care and Bourdieu’s conception of symbolic violence. We argue that...

  18. Quality indicators in breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Turco, M Rosselli; Ponti, A; Bick, U; Biganzoli, L; Cserni, G; Cutuli, B; Decker, T; Dietel, M; Gentilini, O; Kuehn, T; Mano, M P; Mantellini, P; Marotti, L; Poortmans, P; Rank, F; Roe, H; Scaffidi, E; van der Hage, J A; Viale, G; Wells, C; Welnicka-Jaskiewicz, M; Wengstöm, Y; Cataliotti, L

    2010-09-01

    To define a set of quality indicators that should be routinely measured and evaluated to confirm that the clinical outcome reaches the requested standards, Eusoma has organised a workshop during which twenty four experts from different disciplines have reviewed the international literature and selected the main process and outcome indicators available for quality assurance of breast cancer care. A review of the literature for evidence-based recommendations have been performed by the steering committee. The experts have identified the quality indicators also taking into account the usability and feasibility. For each of them it has been reported: definition, minimum and target standard, motivation for selection and level of evidence (graded according to AHRO). In overall 17 main quality indicators have been identified, respectively, 7 on diagnosis, 4 on surgery and loco-regional treatment, 2 on systemic treatment and 4 on staging, counselling, follow-up and rehabilitation. Breast Units in Europe are invited to comply with these indicators and monitor them during their periodic audit meetings. PMID:20675120

  19. Quality Aspects of Maternal Health Care in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Urassa, David Paradiso

    2004-01-01

    This thesis assesses some indicators of quality for maternity care in Tanzania, using antenatal management of anaemia and hypertension and emergency obstetric care as focal points. The care of pregnant women consecutively enrolled in antenatal care (n=379) was observed and compared with quality standard criteria. From a tertiary level labour ward 741 cases of eclampsia were identified and their antenatal care analyzed. A health systems analysis was performed for 205 cases of pregnancy complic...

  20. Quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, WY; Lam, CLK; Lo, SV

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature regarding quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics with specific attention to the quality indicators for fall prevention, continence care, pulmonary rehabilitation, mental health, pharmaceutical care, and wound care services. Data sources Literature search from 1990 to 2010 including Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database, RAND (Research and Development) Corporation Health Database, the ACOVE (Assessing the Care of Vulnerab...

  1. A conceptual model for assessing quality of care for patients boarding in the emergency department: structure-process-outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan W; Singer, Sara J; Sun, Benjamin C; Camargo, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Many believe that the "boarding" of emergency department (ED) patients awaiting inpatient beds compromises quality of care. To better study the quality of care of boarded patients, one should identify and understand the mechanisms accounting for any potential differences in care. This paper presents a conceptual boarding "structure-process-outcome" model to help assess quality of care provided to boarded patients and to aid in recognizing potential solutions to improve that quality, if it is deficient. The goal of the conceptual model is to create a practical framework on which a research and policy agenda can be based to measure and improve quality of care for boarded patients. PMID:21496148

  2. A Systems Approach to Improving Rural Care in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Byam, Patrick; Alpern, Rachelle; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Zerihun, Abraham; Abeb, Yigeremu; Leslie A Curry

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple interventions have been launched to improve the quality, access, and utilization of primary health care in rural, low-income settings; however, the success of these interventions varies substantially, even within single studies where the measured impact of interventions differs across sites, centers, and regions. Accordingly, we sought to examine the variation in impact of a health systems strengthening intervention and understand factors that might explain the variation i...

  3. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities. PMID:23568381

  4. Nursing Special Check in Pain Continuous Improvement in the Quality of Care%护理专项检查在疼痛护理质量持续改进中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凤玲

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of treatments applied special inspection commission of pain in the quality of care.Methods Develop a special checklist pain care in accordance with the relevant standards and requirements, by hand from pain pain assessment, treatment and care measures, knowledge of missionary pain, pain records, nurses pain related knowledge mastery, team management, pain postoperative pain nursing special inspection.Results Pain assessment, treatment and care measures, pain knowledge missionary, pain records, nurses pain related knowledge mastery, pain management team qualified rate from 47%, 58%, 5%, 28%, 54%, 23% upgrade to 97%, 98%, 99%, 95%, 96%, 97%.ConclusionNursing special inspection, pain care quality improvement has been sustained and effective.%目的:探讨护理专项检查在提升疼痛护理质量的应用效果。方法依照相关标准与要求制定疼痛护理专项检查表,由专人从疼痛评估、治疗及护理措施、疼痛知识宣教、疼痛记录、护理人员疼痛相关知识掌握程度、疼痛团队管理等方面进行术后疼痛护理专项检查。结果疼痛评估、治疗及护理措施、疼痛知识宣教、疼痛记录、护理人员疼痛相关知识掌握程度、疼痛团队管理合格率分别从47%、58%、52%、28%、54%、23%提升到97%、98%、99%、95%、96%、97%。结论通过护理专项检查,疼痛护理质量得到了持续有效改进。

  5. Improving patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care through quality control circle activities%开展品管圈活动提升门诊手术患者满意度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 白晓霞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of quality control circle (QCC) activities on patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care.Methods The operating room nursing staff formed a QCC,delved into problems affecting patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care,and formulated solutions to the problems through brainstorming.They put forward improvement schemes and put them into practice.Results Patient overall satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care increased from (6.80 ± 0.57) points before QCC activities to (7.41±0.44) points after the activities,with significant difference found in the scores (P<0.01).Nurses' consciousness in participating nursing management,and job satisfaction were enhanced,and staff's enthusiasm,creativity,and initiative were fully exercised.Conclusion QCC activities help improve quality of ambulatory surgical care and patient satisfaction.%目的 探讨品管圈活动用于提升门诊手术患者满意度的效果.方法 由手术室一线护理人员组成品管圈小组,通过脑力激荡,讨论分析门诊手术患者满意度不高的原因,制订相应的整改措施并组织实施.结果 门诊手术患者总体满意度由活动前(6.80±0.57)分提高到活动后的(7.41±0.44)分,效果显著(P<0.01);护理人员参与护理管理的意识和工作满足感增强,护理人员的积极性、创造性、主动性得到充分发挥.结论 品管圈活动的开展,有利于提高门诊手术服务质量、提升门诊手术患者满意度.

  6. Voltage Quality Improvement Using Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Galzina

    2015-06-01

    This paper briefly shows the methods of power quality improvement, and then the results of on-site power quality measurements in the grid before and after the connection of the solar photovoltaic system.

  7. Physical Activity Improves Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Physical activity improves quality of life Updated:Mar 2,2015 Do you want to ... illnesses and diseases associated with aging and maintains quality of life and independence longer for seniors So why not ...

  8. Assessment of the Quality of Delivered Care for Iranian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis by Using Comprehensive Quality Measurement Model in Health Care (CQMH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Karimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of care has become increasingly critical in the evaluation of healthcare and healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess quality of delivered care among patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a model of Comprehensive Quality Measurement in Health Care (CQMH. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 172 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA who were received care from private clinics of Isfahan University of medical sciences in 2013. CQMH questionnaires were used for assessing the quality of care. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows. Results: The mean scores of Quality Index, Service Quality (SQ, Technical Quality (TQ, and Costumer Quality (CQ were 72.70, 79.09, 68.54 and 70.25 out of 100, respectively. For CQ only 19.8% of participations staying the course of action even under stress and financial constraints, there is a significant gap between what RA care they received with what was recommended in the guideline for TQ. Scores of service quality was low in majority of aspects especially in "availability of support group" section. Conclusion: Study shows paradoxical findings and expresses that quality scores of service delivery for patients with arthritis rheumatoid from patient's perspective is relatively low. Therefore, for fixing this paradoxical problem, improving the participation of patients and their family and empowering them for self-management and decision should be regarded by health systems.

  9. Systematic Quality Improvement in Medicine: Everyone Can Do It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Zeidel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review, written from the perspective of a physician-leader who has fostered the development of comprehensive quality improvement efforts at two academic medical centers, I review the need for improvement, some conceptual barriers that must be overcome, the goals of a comprehensive quality improvement (QI effort, some of the results we have obtained, and some observations on how to develop a culture of continuous improvement in an academic medical center. The mandate for quality improvement is clear; current healthcare is wasteful and error-prone, leading to excessive morbidity and mortality and unsustainably high costs. Successful quality improvement requires the abandonment of two paradigms: the craft model of medical practice and the notion that many forms of harm to patients are not preventable. I will describe how dramatic improvement has been achieved in reducing, by up to 10-fold, rates of central line infections, ventilator-associated pneumonias, peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients, and mortality due to cardiac arrest in hospital. I will describe as well how these methods can improve access to out-patient clinics dramatically and enhance the reliability and safety of hand-offs between covering physicians. To develop and maintain systematic quality improvement in all phases of medical care we must articulate a culture in which: everyone working at the medical center makes improvements every day; front-line staff, who know best how the work is done, are empowered to improve the processes of care; and multidisciplinary teams create the protocols that reduce variation that is due to physician preference, leaving only the variation required by the individual needs of patients. I will review as well the crucial elements of education of trainees and faculty members needed to guide and sustain a culture of quality. Finally, I will add some observations on how oversight boards and medical center leaders can help create

  10. Combining business process and data discovery techniques for analyzing and improving integrated care pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Poelmans; G. Dedene; G. Verheyden; H. van der Mussele; S. Viaene; E. Peters

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals increasingly use process models for structuring their care processes. Activities performed to patients are logged to a database but these data are rarely used for managing and improving the efficiency of care processes and quality of care. In this paper, we propose a synergy of process min

  11. Improving the Quality of Electric Energy to Electric Arc Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian-Ioan Toma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of power quality problems created by an electric arc furnace (EAF with eccentric bottom tap (EBT at power system. The analysis have been done to EAF of 100 t capacity used for steel melting. Experimental results show this EAF is substantial source of electric disturbances, such as voltage fluctuations, flicker, harmonics, and unbalance between phases. Improvement of the quality of electric energy at EAF imposes a careful technical and economical analysis. Of all possible solutions for improvement of the power quality for an EAF (passive filter, STATCOM or SVC, SVC is the ideal solution.

  12. eHealth and quality in health care: implementation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossebaard, Hans C; Van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2016-06-01

    The use of information and communication technologies in health and health care could improve healthcare quality in many ways. Today's evidence base demonstrates the (cost-)effectiveness of online education, self-management support and tele-monitoring in several domains of health and care. While new results gradually provide more evidence for eHealth's impact on quality issues, now is the time to come to grips with implementation issues. Documented drawbacks such as low acceptance, low adoption or low adherence need our attention today to make the most of eHealth' potential. Improvement science is beginning to deliver the tools to address these persistent behavioural and cultural issues. The ceHRes Roadmap, for instance, is a plural and pragmatic approach that includes users' needs. It is now imperative to improve our implementation strategies in order to scale up eHealth technologies. This will accelerate the much needed transformation of our healthcare systems and sustain access, affordability and quality for all in the near future. PMID:27029590

  13. Systems for Quality Assurance in Mental Health Services: A Strategy for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, William F.; Morgan-Williams, Gale

    1987-01-01

    Discusses need for systems-based approach to quality assurance in mental health services, which can provide useful information to administrators and practitioners as they work to maintain or improve quality of care provided to patients. Introduces generic model for monitoring and evaluating quality of care and discusses potential barriers to its…

  14. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT THROUGH INTEGRATION OF QUALITY TOOLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between major quality tools such as quality function development (QFD),failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), design of experiments (DOE) and statistical process control (SPC) is analyzed through an extensive review of the literature and the concurrent quality engineering philosophy, and a basic structure for the integration of quality tools is presented. An integrated quality management system (IQMS) is developed using C++ Builder, nmning in the Windows 2000 Server environment with the basic internet connections, and SQL Server 2000 as the platform for developing the database. An illustrative example applying IQMS to the continuous quality improvement for a crane equipment manufacturing is reported. The result shows that the application of IQMS can optimize the process of design and manufacturing, shorten the cycle time of product, reduce the cost, and realize quality improvement continuously. The proposed integrated framework with IQMS is believed to be applicable to continuous quality improvement in many manufacturing companies.

  15. The process of managerial control in quality improvement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovensky, D J; Fottler, M D

    1994-11-01

    The fundamental intent of strategic management is to position an organization with in its market to exploit organizational competencies and strengths to gain competitive advantage. Competitive advantage may be achieved through such strategies as low cost, high quality, or unique services or products. For health care organizations accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, continually improving both processes and outcomes of organizational performance--quality improvement--in all operational areas of the organization is a mandated strategy. Defining and measuring quality and controlling the quality improvement strategy remain problematic. The article discusses the nature and processes of managerial control, some potential measures of quality, and related information needs. PMID:10138526

  16. The Impact of Financial Incentives on Quality of Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Dudley, R. Adams; Miller, Robert H.; Korenbrot, Tamir Y.; Luft, Harold S

    1998-01-01

    Purchasers of health care could offer financial incentives to plans or providers in order to increase quality. Unfortunately, the current health care market, in which quality is rarely measured and there is no risk adjustment, actively discourages both plans and providers from maximizing quality, resulting in a poor overall level of quality, both in fee-for-service arrangements and health maintenance organizations. Health plans and providers will not focus on quality until mechanisms to corre...

  17. A systems approach to improving rural care in Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth H Bradley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple interventions have been launched to improve the quality, access, and utilization of primary health care in rural, low-income settings; however, the success of these interventions varies substantially, even within single studies where the measured impact of interventions differs across sites, centers, and regions. Accordingly, we sought to examine the variation in impact of a health systems strengthening intervention and understand factors that might explain the variation in impact across primary health care units. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a mixed methods positive deviance study of 20 Primary Health Care Units (PHCUs in rural Ethiopia. Using longitudinal data from the Ethiopia Millennium Rural Initiative (EMRI, we identified PHCUs with consistently higher performance (n = 2, most improved performance (n = 3, or consistently lower performance (n = 2 in the provision of antenatal care, HIV testing in antenatal care, and skilled birth attendance rates. Using data from site visits and in-depth interviews (n = 51, we applied the constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis to identify key themes that distinguished PHCUs with different performance trajectories. Key themes that distinguished PHCUs were 1 managerial problem solving capacity, 2 relationship with the woreda (district health office, and 3 community engagement. In higher performing PHCUs and those with the greatest improvement after the EMRI intervention, health center and health post staff were more able to solve day-to-day problems, staff had better relationships with the woreda health official, and PHCU communities' leadership, particularly religious leadership, were strongly engaged with the health improvement effort. Distance from the nearest city, quality of roads and transportation, and cultural norms did not differ substantially among PHCUs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Effective health strengthening efforts may require intensive

  18. Evaluating the Quality of the Child Care in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujala, Eeva; Fonsen, Elina; Elo, Janniina

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of the early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality in Finland. The study is based on the paradigm of inclusionary quality and the assessment is based on the quality evaluation model. The parents and teachers assess the quality to be good. The strength of the quality was the effect…

  19. Community Partners in Care: Leveraging Community Diversity to Improve Depression Care for Underserved Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Mendel, Peter; Dixon, Elizabeth; Jones, Andrea; Masongsong, Zoe; Wells, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that the quality and outcomes of depression treatment for adults can be substantially improved through “collaborative care” programs. However, there is a lack of resources required to implement such programs in vulnerable communities. Our paper examines the planning phase of the Community Partners in Care (CPIC) initiative, which addresses this problem through a unique approach in which academic institutions partner directly with a wide range of community-based and service o...

  20. Data quality review during prenatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia Maria Mendes Vasconcelos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review the quality of prenatal care data registered by the professionals from the Family Health Strategy (ESF in Jericoacoara city – Ceara State – Brazil. Methods: This was a quantitative and documental study, in which were analyzed 71 obstetric records of pregnant women who underwent prenatal care in 2006. The studied variables comprised those obtained by data quality review of standard obstetric records regarding to socioeconomic aspects, family history, personal and obstetric and the data related to current pregnancy. Results: Among the 71 obstetric records reviewed, in 70 of them (98.6%, the socioeconomic data were completed satisfactorily. The data concerning the history of familiar and personal morbidity, besides obstetric and gynecological history of the pregnant women were 100% (71 complete. Referring to the data of current pregnancy collected during the anamnesis of the first medical appointment, it was detected that 47 (66.2% were filled in properly, while in 24 (33.8% of them there were missing important data, such as height and weight of the pregnant women. From all obstetric records, in only 60 (84.5% there were the registers of all laboratory tests compulsory for the first trimester of pregnancy and it’s highlighted that only 43 (60.6% of the records were filled in properly regarding the lab tests of the third trimester. It was yet verified that in only 6 (8.5% of the records there was information related to the curve of uterine height/gestational age. Conclusion: In this study, the adequate filling of obstetric records was observed, although we found a great number of lack or of incomplete registers in the topic related to the graphs of height/weight and the curve of uterine height/ gestational age.

  1. 38 CFR 51.120 - Quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.120 Quality of care. Each resident...) The resident environment remains as free of accident hazards as is possible; and (2) Each...

  2. Patients’ perceptions of actual care conditions and patient satisfaction with care quality in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis

    2012-01-01

    There are theoretical and methodological difficulties in measuring the concepts of quality of care and patient satisfaction, and the conditions associated with these concepts. A theoretical framework of patient satisfaction and a theoretical model of quality of care have been used as the theoretical basis in this thesis. Aim. The overall aim was to describe and explore relationships between person-related conditions, external objective care conditions, patients’ perceptions of quality of care...

  3. LEVEL OF WAGES OF THE STAFF AND THE QUALITY OF PATIENT CARE: A COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC

    OpenAIRE

    Chirkov Vitaliy Anatolievich; Breusov Aleksey Vasilievich

    2013-01-01

    In work are presented the main results received during social and hygienic research, directed on studying and comparison of level of a salary of the medical personnel of a number of treatment-and-prophylactic establishments of the Moscow region and quality of the medical care rendered to patients are presented. Estimating results of examination of quality of medical care in the studied medical institutions from medical insurance companies, it should be noted that improvements of quality of me...

  4. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient: QUOTE Cataract Questionnaire.

    OpenAIRE

    Nijkamp, M D; Sixma, H.J.; Afman, H.; Hiddema, F; Koopmans, S.A.; Borne, B. van den; Hendrikse, F.; Nuijts, R M M A

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the potential of a questionnaire (QUOTE Cataract) to measure quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients in quality-assurance or improvement programs. SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, University Hospital Groningen, Groningen, and Rotterdam Eye Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. METHODS: Cataract patients (N = 540) who had cataract surgery 2 to 8 months previously rated 31 quality-of-care aspects in terms of ...

  5. Resources for Effective Sleep Treatment (REST): case study of engaging general practice teams to improve the quality of care for patients presenting with sleep problems

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Tilling, Michelle; Togher, Fiona; Orner, Roderick; Ward, Katy; Dewey, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Sleep problems are common with perceptions that management should be improved in general practice. There is considerable evidence of underuse of sleep assessment tools and psychological treatments such as cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBTi), continuing evidence of inappropriate long term prescribing of hypnotics and a perception of poor practice among patients and practitioners. The Resources for Effective Sleep Treatment (REST) project aimed to study new approa...

  6. Blueprint for action: steps toward a high-quality, high-value maternity care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angood, Peter B; Armstrong, Elizabeth Mitchell; Ashton, Diane; Burstin, Helen; Corry, Maureen P; Delbanco, Suzanne F; Fildes, Barbara; Fox, Daniel M; Gluck, Paul A; Gullo, Sue Leavitt; Howes, Joanne; Jolivet, R Rima; Laube, Douglas W; Lynne, Donna; Main, Elliott; Markus, Anne Rossier; Mayberry, Linda; Mitchell, Lynn V; Ness, Debra L; Nuzum, Rachel; Quinlan, Jeffrey D; Sakala, Carol; Salganicoff, Alina

    2010-01-01

    Childbirth Connection hosted a 90th Anniversary national policy symposium, Transforming Maternity Care: A High Value Proposition, on April 3, 2009, in Washington, DC. Over 100 leaders from across the range of stakeholder perspectives were actively engaged in the symposium work to improve the quality and value of U.S. maternity care through broad system improvement. A multi-disciplinary symposium steering committee guided the strategy from its inception and contributed to every phase of the project. The "Blueprint for Action: Steps Toward a High Quality, High Value Maternity Care System", issued by the Transforming Maternity Care Symposium Steering Committee, answers the fundamental question, "Who needs to do what, to, for, and with whom to improve the quality of maternity care over the next five years?" Five stakeholder workgroups collaborated to propose actionable strategies in 11 critical focus areas for moving expeditiously toward the realization of the long term "2020 Vision for a High Quality, High Value Maternity Care System", also published in this issue. Following the symposium these workgroup reports and recommendations were synthesized into the current blueprint. For each critical focus area, the "Blueprint for Action" presents a brief problem statement, a set of system goals for improvement in that area, and major recommendations with proposed action steps to achieve them. This process created a clear sightline to action that if enacted could improve the structure, process, experiences of care, and outcomes of the maternity care system in ways that when anchored in the culture can indeed transform maternity care. PMID:20123180

  7. Why we need interprofessional education to improve the delivery of safe and effective care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Reeves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education (IPE is an activity that involves two or more professions who learn interactively together to improve collaboration and the quality of care. Research has continually revealed that health and social care professionals encounter a range of problems with interprofessional coordination and collaboration which impact on the quality and safety of care. This empirical work resulted in policymakers across health care education and practice to invest in IPE to help resolve this collaborative failures. It is anticipated that IPE will provide health and social care professionals with the abilities required to work together effectively in providing safe high quality care to patients. Through a discussion of a range of key professional, educational and organization issues related to IPE, this paper argues that this form of education is an important strategy to improve the delivery of safe and effective care

  8. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denton E

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Eve Denton,1 Matthew Conron2 1Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Department, Alfred Hospital, 2Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. Keywords: lung cancer, multidisciplinary care, mortality, tumor board

  9. Strategy to Support Improvement of Healthcare Quality.

    OpenAIRE

    Ing. Andrea Zejdlova

    2013-01-01

    One of the latest market-based solutions to the rising costs and quality gaps in health care is pay for performance. Pay for performance is the use of financial incentives to promote the delivery of designated standards of care. It is an emerging movement in health insurance (initially in Britain and United States). Providers under this arrangement are rewarded for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services. This is a fundamental change from fee for service payment.Al...

  10. Rethinking Quality and Improvement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Don

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to critically review dominant conceptions of and approaches to quality in higher education. It suggests an alternative approach with potential to shift the focus of quality activities from accountability and control to improvement. Design/methodology/approach: The applicability and limits of quality concepts…

  11. The Impact of Child Care Subsidy Use on Child Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Rebecca M; Johnson, Anna; Rigby, Elizabeth; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the federal government allotted $7 billion in child care subsidies to low-income families through the state-administered Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), now the government's largest child care program (US DHHS, 2008). Although subsidies reduce costs for families and facilitate parental employment, it is unclear how they impact the quality of care families purchase. This study investigates the impact of government subsidization on parents' selection of child care quality using multivariate regression and propensity score matching approaches to account for differential selection into subsidy receipt and care arrangements. Data were drawn from the Child Care Supplement to the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (CCS-FFCWS), conducted in 2002 and 2003 in 14 of the 20 FFCWS cities when focal children were 3 years old (N = 456). Our results indicate that families who used subsidies chose higher quality care than comparable mothers who did not use subsidies, but only because subsidy recipients were more likely to use center-based care. Subgroup analyses revealed that families using subsidies purchased higher-quality home-based care but lower-quality center-based care than comparable non-recipients. Findings suggest that child care subsidies may serve as more than a work support for low-income families by enhancing the quality of nonmaternal care children experience but that this effect is largely attributable to recipients' using formal child care arrangements (versus kith and kin care) more often than non-recipients. PMID:21874092

  12. Is Health Care Ready for Six Sigma Quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Chassin, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Serious, widespread problems exist in the quality of U.S. health care: too many patients are exposed to the risks of unnecessary services; opportunities to use effective care are missed; and preventable errors lead to injuries. Advanced practitioners of industrial quality management, like Motorola and General Electric, have committed themselves to reducing the frequency of defects in their business processes to fewer than 3.4 per million, a strategy known as Six Sigma Quality. In health care,...

  13. Monitoring quality in Medicaid managed care: Accomplishments and challenges at the year 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Felt-Lisk, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the major developments during the late 1990s in quality monitoring for Medicaid managed care and offers an assessment of major challenges faced at the year 2000. We highlight the dramatic increase in activities to ensure and improve quality in Medicaid managed care. Prior to these developments, little was known about the actual level of quality of care. Thus, a major accomplishment of the late 1990s is that we now know more about quality, through some key indicators, and th...

  14. Understanding organizational and cultural premises for quality of care in nursing homes: an ethnographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Background Internationally, there are concerns about the quality of care in nursing homes. The concept of ‘corporate culture’ as an internal variable could be seen as the means to improve quality of care and quality of life for the residents. The aim of this article was to describe the nursing home culture from the staff’s perspective and to include how the residents describe quality of care. Methods An ethnographic design was employed. A purposive sample of four municipal public nursing home...

  15. Point-of-care technology: integration for improved delivery of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Debbie; Buckner, Martha

    2014-01-01

    The growing complexity of technology, equipment, and devices involved in patient care delivery can be staggering and overwhelming. Technology is intended to be a tool to help clinicians, but it can also be a frustrating hindrance if not thoughtfully planned and strategically aligned. Critical care nurses are key partners in the collaborations needed to improve safety and quality through health information technology (IT). Nurses must advocate for systems that are interoperable and adapted to the context of care experiences. The involvement and collaboration between clinicians, information technology specialists, biomedical engineers, and vendors has never been more relevant and applicable. Working together strategically with a shared vision can effectively provide a seamless clinical workflow, maximize technology investments, and ultimately improve patient care delivery and outcomes. Developing a strategic integrated clinical and IT roadmap is a critical component of today's health care environment. How can technology strategy be aligned from the executive suite to the bedside caregiver? What is the model for using clinical workflows to drive technology adoption? How can the voice of the critical care nurse strengthen this process? How can success be assured from the initial assessment and selection of technology to a sustainable support model? What is the vendor's role as a strategic partner and "co-caregiver"? PMID:24896558

  16. Tennessee Star-Quality Child Care Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Tennessee's Star-Quality Child Care Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  17. Medicaid and the Cost of Improving Access to Nursing Home Care

    OpenAIRE

    Gertler, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper I show that the Medicaid program can improve the access of financially indigent patients to nursing home care by raising the rate of return paid on Medicaid patients' care, but only at the cost of lower quality of care. To quantify the policy tradeoff, I derive expressions for the elasticity of access with respect to total Medicaid expenditures and the elasticity of access with respect to quality. These elasticities expressions are complicated by the fact that Medicaid payment f...

  18. The Impact Of Medicare ACOs On Improving Integration And Coordination Of Physical And Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Catherine A; Henke, Rachel M; Crable, Erica; Hohlbauch, Andriana; Cummings, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) model holds the promise of reducing costs and improving the quality of care by realigning payment incentives to focus on health outcomes instead of service volume. One key to managing the total cost of care is improving care coordination for and treatment of people with behavioral health disorders. We examined qualitative data from ninety organizations participating in Medicare ACO demonstration programs from 2012 through 2015 to determine whether and how they focused on behavioral health care. These ACOs had mixed degrees of engagement in improving behavioral health care for their populations. The biggest challenges included a lack of behavioral health care providers, data availability, and sustainable financing models. Nonetheless, we found substantial interest in integrating behavioral health care into primary care across a majority of the ACOs. PMID:27385242

  19. Techniques to improve technological and sanitary quality

    OpenAIRE

    David, C.; Celette, F.; Abecassis, J; Carcea, M.; Dubois, D.; Friedel, J.K.; Hellou, G.; Jeuffroy, M.-H.; Mäder, P; Thomsen, I.K.

    2012-01-01

    Agronomical ways for better quality and safety Choice of cultivar is an efficient way to obtain higher grain quality. Intercropping legumes (grain or forage) improves weed competition and N availability for wheat crop or succeeding crop. Green manure can be an effective alternative to farmyard manure. Fertilization with readily available nitrogen improves yield and quality when water is available. Reduced tillage affects soil fertility and wheat yield but has little effects on grain qualit...

  20. Quality improvement practices and trends in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Hartz, Ove; Edgeman, Rick L.

    It is now well known that the history of quality improvement is neither uniquely American, nor uniquely Japanese, although the contributions from these two nations have received more attention perhaps than those originating elsewhere. This is the first in a series of articles intended to increase...... awareness of quality improvement practices and trends in various European nations, with particular emphasis on western Europe and Scandinavia. Herein the recent history of quality improvement in Denmark is explored and the quality improvement efforts in two Danish companies are chronicled. It is hoped that...... taken in its entirety, this series of articles will contribute to understanding both the rich fabric of European quality improvement that is independent of national boundaries and the colorful national fibers of which the fabric is made....

  1. Measuring quality in maternal-newborn care: developing a clinical dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Ann E; Dunn, Sandra I; Fell, Deshayne B; Harrold, Joann; Walker, Mark C; Kelly, Sherrie; Smith, Graeme N

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy, birth, and the early newborn period are times of high use of health care services. As well as opportunities for providing quality care, there are potential missed opportunities for health promotion, safety issues, and increased costs for the individual and the system when quality is not well defined or measured. There has been a need to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure quality care within the provincial maternal-newborn system. We also wanted to provide automated audit and feedback about these KPIs to support quality improvement initiatives in a large Canadian province with approximately 140 000 births per year. We therefore worked to develop a maternal-newborn dashboard to increase awareness about selected KPIs and to inform and support hospitals and care providers about areas for quality improvement. We mapped maternal-newborn data elements to a quality domain framework, sought feedback via survey for the relevance and feasibility of change, and examined current data and the literature to assist in setting provincial benchmarks. Six clinical performance indicators of maternal-newborn quality care were identified and evidence-informed benchmarks were set. A maternal-newborn dashboard with "drill down" capacity for detailed analysis to enhance audit and feedback is now available for implementation. While audit and feedback does not guarantee individuals or institutions will make practice changes and move towards quality improvement, it is an important first step. Practice change and quality improvement will not occur without an awareness of the issues. PMID:23343794

  2. Hospital implementation of health information technology and quality of care: are they related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restuccia Joseph D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, there has been considerable effort to promote the use of health information technology (HIT in order to improve health care quality. However, relatively little is known about the extent to which HIT implementation is associated with hospital patient care quality. We undertook this study to determine the association of various HITs with: hospital quality improvement (QI practices and strategies; adherence to process of care measures; risk-adjusted inpatient mortality; patient satisfaction; and assessment of patient care quality by hospital quality managers and front-line clinicians. Methods We conducted surveys of quality managers and front-line clinicians (physicians and nurses in 470 short-term, general hospitals to obtain data on hospitals’ extent of HIT implementation, QI practices and strategies, assessments of quality performance, commitment to quality, and sufficiency of resources for QI. Of the 470 hospitals, 401 submitted complete data necessary for analysis. We also developed measures of hospital performance from several publicly data available sources: Hospital Compare adherence to process of care measures; Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR file; and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems HCAHPS® survey. We used Poisson regression analysis to examine the association between HIT implementation and QI practices and strategies, and general linear models to examine the relationship between HIT implementation and hospital performance measures. Results Controlling for potential confounders, we found that hospitals with high levels of HIT implementation engaged in a statistically significant greater number of QI practices and strategies, and had significantly better performance on mortality rates, patient satisfaction measures, and assessments of patient care quality by hospital quality managers; there was weaker evidence of higher assessments of patient care quality by

  3. Understanding uptake of continuous quality improvement in Indigenous primary health care: lessons from a multi-site case study of the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togni Samantha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimentation with continuous quality improvement (CQI processes is well underway in Indigenous Australian primary health care. To date, little research into how health organizations take up, support, and embed these complex innovations is available on which services can draw to inform implementation. In this paper, we examine the practices and processes in the policy and organisational contexts, and aim to explore the ways in which they interact to support and/or hinder services' participation in a large scale Indigenous primary health care CQI program. Methods We took a theory-driven approach, drawing on literature on the theory and effectiveness of CQI systems and the Greenhalgh diffusion of innovation framework. Data included routinely collected regional and service profile data; uptake of tools and progress through the first CQI cycle, and data collected quarterly from hub coordinators on their perceptions of barriers and enablers. A total of 48 interviews were also conducted with key people involved in the development, dissemination, and implementation of the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD project. We compiled the various data, conducted thematic analyses, and developed an in-depth narrative account of the processes of uptake and diffusion into services. Results Uptake of CQI was a complex and messy process that happened in fits and starts, was often characterised by conflicts and tensions, and was iterative, reactive, and transformational. Despite initial enthusiasm, the mixed successes during the first cycle were associated with the interaction of features of the environment, the service, the quality improvement process, and the stakeholders, which operated to produce a set of circumstances that either inhibited or enabled the process of change. Organisations had different levels of capacity to mobilize resources that could shift the balance toward supporting implementation. Different forms of

  4. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A. M. M.; Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses’ satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive screening indicators and nurse-perceived quality of care. Methods To calculate a composite performance score for each of six Dutch non-university teaching hospitals, the percentage scores of the public...

  5. Developing Strategies to Improve Advance Care Planning in Long Term Care Homes: Giving Voice to Residents and Their Family Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Ramsbottom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term care (LTC homes, also known as residential care homes, commonly care for residents until death, making palliative care and advance care planning (ACP important elements of care. However, limited research exists on ACP in LTC. In particular, research giving voice to family members and substitute decision makers is lacking. The objective of this research was to understand experiences, perspectives, and preferences to guide quality improvement of ACP in LTC. This qualitative descriptive study conducted 34 individual semistructured interviews in two LTC homes, located in Canada. The participants were 31 family members and three staff, consisting of a front line care worker, a registered nurse, and a nurse practitioner. All participants perceived ACP conversations as valuable to provide “resident-centred care”; however, none of the participants had a good understanding of ACP, limiting its effectiveness. Strategies generated through the research to improve ACP were as follows: educating families and staff on ACP and end-of-life care options; better preparing staff for ACP conversations; providing staff skills training and guidelines; and LTC staff initiating systematic, proactive conversations using careful timing. These strategies can guide quality improvement of palliative care and development of ACP tools and resources specific to the LTC home sector.

  6. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Chenoweth, Lynn; Cunich, Michelle; Kendig, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Background A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care − CLiAC) was developed to improve managers’ leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australi...

  7. Health Care Quality, Economic Inequality, and Precautionary Saving

    OpenAIRE

    Tullio Jappelli; Luigi Pistaferri; Guglielmo Weber

    2006-01-01

    We argue that health care quality has an important impact on economic inequality and on saving behaviour. We exploit district-wide variability in health care quality provided by the Italian universal public health system to identify the effect of quality on income inequality, health inequality and precautionary saving. We find that in lower quality districts there is greater income and health dispersion and higher precautionary saving. The analysis carries important insights for the ongoing d...

  8. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  9. TECHNOLOGICAL MEASURES TO IMPROVE AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCT QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Gladkov, V.; Kruglov, S.

    2010-01-01

    The paper examines the basic technological measures aimed at improving product quality in automotive industry. While paying due attention to solving organizational and technological problems, including the development of certification systems for production processes, it is also necessary to improve the technical standards of specific technologies, equipment and materials as they largely determine product quality. Special emphasis is given to the importance of improving the production of auto...

  10. Global initiatives for improving hospital care for children: state of the art and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Harry; Duke, Trevor; Weber, Martin; English, Mike; Carai, Susanne; Tamburlini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Deficiencies in the quality of health care are major limiting factors to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health. Quality of patient care in hospitals is firmly on the agendas of Western countries, but has been slower to gain traction in developing countries, despite evidence that there is substantial scope for improvement, that hospitals have a major role in child survival and that inequities in quality may be as important as inequities in access. Th...

  11. Global initiatives for improving hospital care for children: State of the art and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Harry; Duke, Trevor; Weber, Martin; English, Mike; Carai, Susanne; Tamburlini, Giorgio; Pediat Hosp Improvement Grp

    2008-01-01

    Deficiencies in the quality of health care are major limiting factors to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health. Quality of patient care in hospitals is firmly on the agendas of Western countries but has been slower to gain traction in developing countries, despite evidence that there is substantial scope for improvement, that hospitals have a major role in child survival, and that inequities in quality may be as important as inequities in access. Th...

  12. Can Technology Improve the Quality of Colonoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurthi, Selvi; Ross, William A; Raju, Gottumukkala S

    2016-07-01

    In order for screening colonoscopy to be an effective tool in reducing colon cancer incidence, exams must be performed in a high-quality manner. Quality metrics have been presented by gastroenterology societies and now include higher adenoma detection rate targets than in the past. In many cases, the quality of colonoscopy can often be improved with simple low-cost interventions such as improved procedure technique, implementing split-dose bowel prep, and monitoring individuals' performances. Emerging technology has expanded our field of view and image quality during colonoscopy. We will critically review several technological advances in the context of quality metrics and discuss if technology can really improve the quality of colonoscopy. PMID:27255334

  13. Communication and Culture in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Boundary Production and the Improvement of Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Haas, Barbara; Cuthbertson, Brian H; Amaral, Andre C; Coburn, Natalie; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-06-01

    This ethnography explores communication around critically ill surgical patients in three surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in Canada. A boundary framework is used to articulate how surgeons', intensivists', and nurses' communication practices shape and are shaped by their respective disciplinary perspectives and experiences. Through 50 hours of observations and 43 interviews, these health care providers are found to engage in seven communication behaviors that either mitigate or magnify three contested symbolic boundaries: expertise, patient ownership, and decisional authority. Where these boundaries are successfully mitigated, experiences of collaborative, high-quality patient care are produced; by contrast, boundary magnification produces conflict and perceptions of unsafe patient care. Findings reveal that high quality and safe patient care are produced through complex social and cultural interactions among surgeons, intensivists, and nurses that are also expressions of knowledge and power. This enhances our understanding of why current quality improvement efforts targeting communication may be ineffective. PMID:26481945

  14. The impact of leadership qualities on quality management improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Radoslaw Wolniak

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the importance of leadership is considered more and more often in quality management. The need of an appropriate leader has been already emphasized in ISO 9000 standards, in TQM philosophy as well as in different models of improvement which are used in the methodologies of prizing quality. Yet, it is in the concept of TQL where the attitude based on the need of leadership in an organization has achieved its best-developed, full shape. On the basis of the conducted studies, the following publication presents the analysis of the dependence between leadership qualities of managers and the improvement of quality management. There has been an attempt to define the qualities, which a manager being responsible for quality management, should have.

  15. The impact of leadership qualities on quality management improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslaw Wolniak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the importance of leadership is considered more and more often in quality management. The need of an appropriate leader has been already emphasized in ISO 9000 standards, in TQM philosophy as well as in different models of improvement which are used in the methodologies of prizing quality. Yet, it is in the concept of TQL where the attitude based on the need of leadership in an organization has achieved its best-developed, full shape. On the basis of the conducted studies, the following publication presents the analysis of the dependence between leadership qualities of managers and the improvement of quality management. There has been an attempt to define the qualities, which a manager being responsible for quality management, should have.

  16. Quality-control analytical methods: continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venti, Eden M

    2006-01-01

    It is vital that all compounding pharmacies have a continuous quality improvement program in place by way of standard operating procedures to assure that patients receive high-quality preparations. The program should take into consideration any federal and state regulatory requirements, as well as professional association expectations. Quality control measurements and regular review of those measurements are the foundations of a good quality plan. All pharmacy personnel should be aware of the importance of reporting potential internal quality concerns or problems and should be encouraged to do so without fear of repercussions. Ideally, an error-free compounding pracitice would be the goal. Since this is not practical, quality issues should not be viewed as problems, but as opportunities to improve compounding practices by correcting, before they become pervasive, the processes used in the preparation of prescriptions. PMID:23974418

  17. The meaning of quality of care in home care settings: older lesbian and bisexual women's perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorovich, Alisa

    2016-03-01

    Research suggests that the experience of being a lesbian or bisexual woman influences women's interactions with health care providers, and their perception of the quality of care. Limited research to date, however, has examined how ageing and sexuality mediates women's experiences of quality, when accessing health care in the community. To fill a gap in the literature, this study investigated older lesbian and bisexual women's perspectives on the meaning of quality of care in the context of receiving home care services. This was a qualitative single case study. Sixteen participants, aged 55-72 from Ontario, Canada, participated in semi-structured interviews between 2011 and 2012. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. The interview data were analysed using iterative thematic analysis and guided by a feminist ethic of care perspective. Participants described quality of care in ways that were in line with a feminist ethic of care; that is, they wanted care providers to be responsive and attentive to their needs, to involve them in the caring process and to demonstrate respect and caring. Participants also indicated that providers' comfort with, and knowledge of, sexual diversity was important for enabling quality of care. These findings deepen our understanding of how to support quality of care for this population through changes to provider education and training, and health policy. PMID:25919504

  18. Study protocol: national research partnership to improve primary health care performance and outcomes for Indigenous peoples

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott Robyn; Thompson Sandra; Weeramanthri Tarun; Connors Christine; Anderson Ian; Nagel Tricia; Scrimgeour David J; Rowley Kevin; Semmens James; Shannon Cindy; Si Damin; Bailie Ross; Burke Hugh; Moore Elizabeth; Leon Dallas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Strengthening primary health care is critical to reducing health inequity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. The Audit and Best practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE) project has facilitated the implementation of modern Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) approaches in Indigenous community health care centres across Australia. The project demonstrated improvements in health centre systems, delivery of primary care services and in patient intermedia...

  19. Implementation and quality monitoring of e-communication across health care sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Anne; Qvist, Peter

    quality monitoring of specified quality standards. Objective: To monitor the implementation and quality of the Sam:Bo e-communication Method: An explicit audit performed in all local municipalities and at selected hospital departments from all hospital units in the Region of Southern Denmark. The audit......: Results from this audit will identify challenges in e-communication across health care sectors and provide knowledge of the implementation and quality of the Sam:Bo e-communication. Points for discussion: How to improve quality of care using e-communication in general practice in the handover of patients...

  20. Ten tips for incorporating scientific quality improvement into everyday work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Don

    2011-04-01

    Healthcare personnel often find it challenging to incorporate disciplined quality improvement into their daily work. Planning, managing and completing improvement projects with sufficient rigour to generate credible evidence and potentially publishable knowledge are even more difficult. Nonetheless, careful set-up and agile leveraging of existing resources and expertise can lead to surprisingly robust results. Project designs that integrate data collection with the work itself are especially helpful. Although the general perception is that top-flight journals are loath to publish the results of quality improvement work, accumulating experience suggests that this hurdle can be overcome. The Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence guidelines provide a promising framework for crafting publications that can meet the exacting standards of peer-reviewed journals. PMID:21450777

  1. Continuous quality improvement of colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariusz; Madalinski

    2013-01-01

    Quality assurance is a key issue in colorectal cancer screening, because effective screening is able to improve primary prevention of the cancer. The quality measure may be described in terms:how well the screening test tells who truly has a disease (sensitivity) and who truly does not have a disease (specificity). This paper raises concerns about identification of the optimal screening test for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy vs flexible sigmoidoscopy in colorectal cancer screening has been a source of ongoing debate. A multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing flexible sigmoidoscopy with usual care showed that flexible sigmoidoscopy screening is able to diminish the incidence of distal and proximal colorectal cancer, and also mortality related to the distal colorectal cancer. However, colonoscopy provides a more complete examination and remains the more sensitive exam than flexible sigmoidoscopy. Moreover, colonoscopy with polypectomy significantly reduces colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer-related mortality in the general population. The article considers the relative merits of both methods and stresses an ethical aspect of patient’s involvement in decision-making. Patients should be informed not only about tests tolerability and risk of endoscopy complications, but also that different screening tests for bowel cancer have different strength to exclude colonic cancer and polyps. The authorities calculate effectiveness and costs of the screening tests, but patients may not be interested in statistics regarding flexible sigmoidoscopy screening and from an ethical point of view, they have the right to chose colonoscopy, which is able to exclude a cancer and precancerous lesions in the whole large bowel.

  2. Molecular imaging in quality health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quality health care results from translating fundamental bench discoveries and making them available to patients. During the past decade, 'molecular imaging' has emerged both as a new tool/technology and as a research and clinical discipline. Molecular imaging is an interdisciplinary approach involving biologists, physicists, physicians, mathematicians, conventional chemists, radiochemists and other specialists who have joined forces for better understanding and visualizing of both normal physiological processes and the molecular processes preceding the morphological manifestations of disease in vivo. Molecular imaging has been defined as 'non-invasive, quantitative, and repetitive imaging of targeted macromolecules and biological processes in living organisms' or as 'the visual representation, characterization, and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and sub-cellular levels within intact living organisms'. Weissleder defined molecular imaging in the most simple terms as 'studying diseases non-invasively at the molecular level'. Regardless of these semantic differences molecular imaging can contribute significantly to the preclinical and clinical drug and disease evaluation process. It is interesting to note, that despite major advances in imaging technology, cancer mortality has remained largely unchanged over the last three decades. Imaging has thus far enabled us to look through a magnifying glass at disease processes but has failed to dramatically influence disease outcomes. Emerging data suggest that molecular PET imaging is about to change this situation. High resolution molecular imaging devices designed for small animal research have developed into valuable tools for drug evaluation and imaging probe design. These include microPET, microCT, microMRI and optical imaging devices. These have enabled us to study drug effects in vivo by monitoring longitudinally their effects on tumour cell metabolism or proliferation. The only

  3. Partnering health disparities research with quality improvement science in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, K Casey; Raphael, Jean L

    2015-02-01

    Disparities in pediatric health care quality are well described in the literature, yet practical approaches to decreasing them remain elusive. Quality improvement (QI) approaches are appealing for addressing disparities because they offer a set of strategies by which to target modifiable aspects of care delivery and a method for tailoring or changing an intervention over time based on data monitoring. However, few examples in the literature exist of QI interventions successfully decreasing disparities, particularly in pediatrics, due to well-described challenges in developing, implementing, and studying QI with vulnerable populations or in underresourced settings. In addition, QI interventions aimed at improving quality overall may not improve disparities, and in some cases, may worsen them if there is greater uptake or effectiveness of the intervention among the population with better outcomes at baseline. In this article, the authors review some of the challenges faced by researchers and frontline clinicians seeking to use QI to address health disparities and propose an agenda for moving the field forward. Specifically, they propose that those designing and implementing disparities-focused QI interventions reconsider comparator groups, use more rigorous evaluation methods, carefully consider the evidence for particular interventions and the context in which they were developed, directly engage the social determinants of health, and leverage community resources to build collaborative networks and engage community members. Ultimately, new partnerships between communities, providers serving vulnerable populations, and QI researchers will be required for QI interventions to achieve their potential related to health care disparity reduction. PMID:25560436

  4. Knowledge sharing behaviour and intensive care nurse innovation: the moderating role of control of care quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Paunova, Minna; Egerod, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    of the questionnaire were used – one designed for nurse employees and the other for the managing nurse(s). An ordinary least squares regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. Results Different aspects of knowledge sharing affect innovation differently, depending on the strength of the control of care......Aims This study investigates the influence of intensive care unit nurses’ knowledge sharing behaviour on nurse innovation, given different conditions of care quality control. Background Health-care organisations face an increasing pressure to innovate while controlling care quality. We have little...... insight on how the control of care quality interacts with the knowledge sharing behaviour of intensive care nurses to affect their innovative behaviours. Methods We developed a multi-source survey study of more than 200 intensive care nurses at 22 intensive care units of 17 Danish hospitals. Two versions...

  5. Racial/Ethnic Discrimination in Health Care: Impact on Perceived Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkin, Dara H.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Alba, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to report receipt of lower quality of health care; however, the mediators of such patient reports are not known. Objectives To determine (1) whether racial disparities in perceptions of quality of health care are mediated by perceptions of being discriminated against while receiving medical care and (2) whether this association is further mediated by patient sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, and patient satisfaction across ra...

  6. Racial/Ethnic Discrimination in Health Care: Impact on Perceived Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkin, Dara H.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Alba, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to report receipt of lower quality of health care; however, the mediators of such patient reports are not known. To determine (1) whether racial disparities in perceptions of quality of health care are mediated by perceptions of being discriminated against while receiving medical care and (2) whether this association is further mediated by patient sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, and patient satisfaction across racial/ethnic groups....

  7. Age and gender as predictors of allied health quality stroke care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luker JA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Luker1, Julie Bernhardt2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers11International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and Stroke Division, Florey Neurosciences Institutes Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Improvement in acute stroke care requires the identification of variables which may influence care quality. The nature and impact of demographic and stroke-related variables on care quality provided by allied health (AH professionals is unknown.Aims: Our research explores the association of age and gender on an index of acute stroke care quality provided by AH professionals.Methods: A retrospective clinical audit of 300 acute stroke patients extracted data on AH care, patients' age and gender. AH care quality was determined by the summed compliance with 20 predetermined process indicators. Our analysis explored relationships between this index of quality, age, and gender. Age was considered in different ways (as a continuous variable, and in different categories. It was correlated with care quality, using gender-specific linear and logistic regression models. Gender was then considered as a confounder in an overall model.Results: No significant association was found for any treatment of age and the index of AH care quality. There were no differences in gender-specific models, and gender did not significantly adjust the age association with care quality.Conclusion: Age and gender were not predictors of the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients by AH professionals.Keywords: acute stroke, allied health, quality of care, age, gender

  8. Parent-Caregiver Communication and Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazvini, Alisa S.; Readdick, Christine, A.

    1994-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between parent-caregiver communication and child care quality in 12 child care centers representing different types of sponsorship. Compared to parents, caregivers rated all forms of parent-caregiver communication as more frequent and as more important. Frequency of parent-caregiver communication and quality of child…

  9. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part I: Five Pioneers in Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Five pioneers had a huge impact on the quality movement in health care in the United States. Ernest Codman contributed in many ways, including his focus on outcome analysis. Avidis Donabedian is known for his focus on the 3 domains of structure, process, and outcome in health care. Walter Shewhart is known especially for the control chart and early work on what W. Edwards Deming made into the PDSA cycle. Deming is also known for other contributions, including his 14 points of management, correcting system problems rather than blaming the workers, and his System of Profound Knowledge. Juran is known for the Pareto principle and his emphasis on customer satisfaction and addressing the human, not just statistical side, of quality improvement. PMID:26147460

  10. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alyeshmerni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA, and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act.

  11. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, R.A.M.M.; Brouwer, B.B.J.M. de; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what fa

  12. Marketing quality and value to the managed care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmirski, G

    1998-11-01

    Quantifying quality and marketing care delivery have been long-term challenges in the health care market. Insurers, employers, other purchasers of care, and providers face a constant challenge in positioning their organizations in a proactive, competitive niche. Tools that measure patient's self-reported perception of health care needs and expectations have increased the ability to quantify quality of care delivery. When integrated with case management and disease management strategies, outcomes reporting and variance analysis tracking can be packaged to position a provider in a competitive niche. PMID:10338715

  13. LONG-TERM CARE OF DEPENDENT ELDERLY AND QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Macková Marie

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the issue of long-term care of dependent elderly and quality of life of their carers. Elderly care has an impact on the quality of life of family members. The research was carried out through a questionnaire and interview. The quality of life was measured using the WHOQOL instrument. The research aimed to identify the current levels of family members’ quality of life and the factors influencing the quality of life thereof. The research findings showed a lower quality o...

  14. Improving the Quality of Imaging in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, C Craig; Castro, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Imaging is critical for the care of emergency department (ED) patients. However, much of the imaging performed for acute care today is overutilization, creating substantial cost without significant benefit. Further, the value of imaging is not easily defined, as imaging only affects outcomes indirectly, through interaction with treatment. Improving the quality, including appropriateness, of emergency imaging requires understanding of how imaging contributes to patient care. The six-tier efficacy hierarchy of Fryback and Thornbury enables understanding of the value of imaging on multiple levels, ranging from technical efficacy to medical decision-making and higher-level patient and societal outcomes. The imaging efficacy hierarchy also allows definition of imaging quality through the Institute of Medicine (IOM)'s quality domains of safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equitability and provides a foundation for quality improvement. In this article, the authors elucidate the Fryback and Thornbury framework to define the value of imaging in the ED and to relate emergency imaging to the IOM quality domains. PMID:26568040

  15. Power theories for improved power quality

    CERN Document Server

    Pasko, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Power quality describes a set of parameters of electric power and the load’s ability to function properly under specific conditions. It is estimated that problems relating to power quality costs the European industry hundreds of billions of Euros annually. In contrast, financing for the prevention of these problems amount to fragments of these costs. Power Theories for Improved Power Quality addresses this imbalance by presenting and assessing a range of methods and problems related to improving the quality of electric power supply. Focusing particularly on active compensators and the DSP based control algorithms, Power Theories for Improved Power Quality introduces the fundamental problems of electrical power. This introduction is followed by chapters which discuss: •‘Power theories’ including their historical development and application to practical problems, •operational principles of active compensator’s DSP control based algorithms using examples and results from laboratory research, and •t...

  16. Improving Diabetes Care for Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sei J; Jacobson, Margaret A; Johnston, C Bree

    2016-07-01

    Although type 2 diabetes guidelines recommend less aggressive glycemic control for patients with limited life expectancy, many hospice patients continue their glucose-lowering medications, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. Three common reasons for overly tight glycemic control in hospice patients include (1) discussions about reducing or stopping chronic medications are uncomfortable; (2) many patients and families believe that mild hyperglycemia can cause symptoms; and (3) until 2014, Healthcare Information and Data Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators for glycemic control included hospice patients. To address these issues, we recommend (1) providers discuss with patients and families upon hospice enrollment that diabetes medications can be reduced or discontinued as their life-limiting disease progresses; (2) keeping blood glucose levels between 200 and 300 mg/dL; and (3) educate providers that HEDIS measures now exclude hospice patients. Implementing these recommendations should decrease the risk of hypoglycemia in hospice patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:25852204

  17. Is the nursing process part of quality care?

    OpenAIRE

    Abaunza de González, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to answer the question: Is the nursing process part of quality care? In order to back the answer, it starts by mentioning several authors that have performed studies on the use of scientific methods, problem solving methods and the attention to care -innursing method and its relationship to the quality of service and the nursing care, while at the same time it introduces related experiences associated with NIPE research projects and related Groups with Dx, ...

  18. Who Provides Good Quality Prenatal Care in the Philippines?

    OpenAIRE

    Lavado, Rouselle F; Lagrada, Leizel P.; Ulep, Valerie Gilbert T.; Tan, Lester M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to illustrate the quality of prenatal care services provided by different health care providers. Section I presents the introduction and overview of the study. Section II discusses important information gathered during literature review which was organized into prenatal care and its benefits, recommended practice and discussion of quality of prenatal services. Sections III and IV present the detailed objectives and methodology adapted in the study. Section V discusses the ...

  19. Systems and processes that ensure high quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-10-01

    This is the second in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. It considers how the structures and processes for quality governance can affect an organisation's ability to be assured about the quality of care. Complex information systems and procedures can lead to poor quality care, but sound structures and processes alone are insufficient to ensure good governance, and behavioural factors play a significant part in making sure that staff are enabled to provide good quality care. The next article in this series looks at how the information reporting of an organisation can affect its governance. PMID:23252087

  20. Improving Quality Assurance in Australian Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Russell D.

    1995-01-01

    Origins of Australia's university quality improvement program are outlined, and its design is examined. Issues discussed include implications of the program for individual institutions, its proposed method of redistributing research funds, and potential problems associated with performance appraisal. (MSE)