WorldWideScience

Sample records for care practice patterns

  1. Predictors of Practice Patterns for Lymphedema Care Among Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Joanne C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Mei R. Fu

    2012-01-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurs...

  2. Practice Patterns in the Care of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Ujash; Wasserstein, David; Moineddin, Rahim; Jenkinson, Richard; Kreder, Hans; Jaglal, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of level I evidence supporting non-operative management (focused on early range of motion and weight bearing) of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Despite this emerging evidence, there have been very few studies evaluating its uptake. Our primary objective was to determine whether the findings from a landmark trial assessing the optimal management strategy for acute Achilles tendon ruptures influenced the practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada over a 12-year time period. As a second objective we examined whether patient and provider predictors of surgical repair utilization differed before and after dissemination of the landmark trial results. Methods: Using provincial health administrative databases, we identified Ontario residents ≥ 18 years of age with an acute Achilles tendon rupture from April 2002 to March 2014. The proportion of surgically repaired ruptures was calculated for each calendar quarter and year. A time series analysis using an interventional autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to determine whether changes in the proportion of surgically repaired ruptures were chronologically related to the dissemination of results from a landmark trial by Willits et al. (first quarter, 2009). Spline regression was then used to independently identify critical time-points of change in the surgical repair rate to confirm our findings. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess for differences in patient (baseline demographics) and provider (hospital type) predictors of surgical repair utilization before and after the landmark trial. Results: In 2002, ˜19% of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Ontario were surgically repaired, however, by 2014 only 6.5% were treated operatively. A statistically significant decrease in the rate of surgical repair (p < 0.001) was observed after the results from a landmark trial were presented at a major

  3. Patterns and Determinants of Essential Newborn Care Practices in Rural Areas of Northern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahama Saaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to understand the patterns and determinants of three essential newborn care practices: safe cord care, optimal thermal care, and neonatal feeding practices. Methods. A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 404 lactating mothers who have delivered a live baby at home within the past one year prior to the study. Results. Overall, the prevalence of essential newborn practices on safe cord care and optimal thermal care was exceptionally low. Of the 404 newborns, only 0.2% (1 had safe cord care, 5.2% (21 optimal thermal care, and 50.2% (203 were considered to have had adequate neonatal feeding. In logistic regression analysis, the main predictors of good neonatal feeding were maternal age, timing of the first antenatal care (ANC, and maternal knowledge of newborn danger signs. Women who could mention at least 4 danger signs of the neonate were 4 times more likely to give good neonatal feeding to their babies (AOR = 4.7, Cl: 2.43–9.28, P<0.001. Conclusion. Evidence from this study strongly suggests that the expected essential newborn care practices are not available to a substantial number of the newborns. Efforts should therefore be made by the Ghana Health Service (GHS to expand essential newborn care interventions beyond institutional level into the communities.

  4. Practice patterns of physiotherapists in neonatal intensive care units: A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Chokshi, Tejas; Alaparthi, Gopala Krishna; Krishnan, Shyam; Vaishali, K; Zulfeequer, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine practice pattern of physiotherapists in the neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) in India with regards to cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular physiotherapy. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted across India, in which 285 questionnaires were sent via e-mail to physiotherapists working in neonatal intensive care units. Results: A total of 139 completed questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 48.7%, with a majority of responses from Kar...

  5. Pre- and postdoctoral dental education compared to practice patterns in special care dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subar, Paul; Chávez, Elisa M; Miles, Jeffrey; Wong, Allen; Glassman, Paul; Labarre, Eugene

    2012-12-01

    There has been limited research into the impact of predoctoral experiences and postdoctoral general dentistry residencies on the practice patterns of dentists in the care of patients with special or complex needs. This study was undertaken to determine if educational experiences with special populations had a relationship to practice patterns after graduation or residency. University of the Pacific alumni who graduated between 1997 and 2007 were surveyed regarding their pre- and postdoctoral dental education and their practice patterns for the care of patients categorized as medically compromised, frail elders, and developmentally disabled. Definitions for each patient category were provided. Alumni were asked about their practice setting and postdoctoral education. Thirty-one percent (n=526) of those surveyed responded. Regression analyses showed respondents not in private practice were more likely to have completed a postdoctoral general dentistry program (Advanced Education in General Dentistry or General Practice Residency) after dental school compared to respondents in private practice (pspecial needs populations appear to have a relationship to graduates' practice setting and patient population. PMID:23225681

  6. Using the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to identify practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehler, Gregory P; Funderburk, Jennifer S; King, Paul R; Wade, Michael; Possemato, Kyle

    2015-12-01

    Primary care-mental health integration (PC-MHI) is growing in popularity. To determine program success, it is essential to know if PC-MHI services are being delivered as intended. The investigation examines responses to the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to explore PC-MHI provider practice patterns. Latent class analysis was used to identify clusters of PC-MHI providers based on their self-report of adherence on the PPAQ. Analysis revealed five provider clusters with varying levels of adherence to PC-MHI model components. Across clusters, adherence was typically lowest in relation to collaboration with other primary care staff. Clusters also differed significantly in regard to provider educational background and psychotherapy approach, level of clinic integration, and previous PC-MHI training. The PPAQ can be used to identify PC-MHI provider practice patterns that have relevance for future clinical effectiveness studies, development of provider training, and quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26622911

  7. Intensive Care in India: The Indian Intensive Care Case Mix and Practice Patterns Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Amin, Pravin R.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Kapadia, Farhad N.; Todi, Subhash; Sahu, Samir; Govil, Deepak; Chawla, Rajesh; Kulkarni, Atul P.; Samavedam, Srinivas; Jani, Charu K.; Rungta, Narendra; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Mehta, Sujata; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Hegde, Ashit; Bande, BD; Dhanuka, Sanjay; Singh, Virendra; Tewari, Reshma; Zirpe, Kapil; Sathe, Prachee

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To obtain information on organizational aspects, case mix and practices in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Patients and Methods: An observational, 4-day point prevalence study was performed between 2010 and 2011 in 4209 patients from 124 ICUs. ICU and patient characteristics, and interventions were recorded for 24 h of the study day, and outcomes till 30 days after the study day. Data were analyzed for 4038 adult patients from 120 ICUs. Results: On the study day, mean age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were 54.1 ± 17.1 years, 17.4 ± 9.2 and 3.8 ± 3.6, respectively. About 46.4% patients had ≥1 organ failure. Nearly, 37% and 22.2% patients received mechanical ventilation (MV) and vasopressors or inotropes, respectively. Nearly, 12.2% patients developed an infection in the ICU. About 28.3% patients had severe sepsis or septic shock (SvSpSS) during their ICU stay. About 60.7% patients without infection received antibiotics. There were 546 deaths and 183 terminal discharges (TDs) from ICU (including left against medical advice or discharged on request), with ICU mortality 729/4038 (18.1%). In 1627 patients admitted within 24 h of the study day, the standardized mortality ratio was 0.67. The APACHE II and SOFA scores, public hospital ICUs, medical ICUs, inadequately equipped ICUs, medical admission, self-paying patient, presence of SvSpSS, acute respiratory failure or cancer, need for a fluid bolus, and MV were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: The high proportion of TDs and the association of public hospitals, self-paying patients, and inadequately equipped hospitals with mortality has important implications for critical care in India.

  8. Patterns of warfarin use and subsequent outcomes in atrial fibrillation in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewen E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Edward Ewen,1 Zugui Zhang,1 Teresa A Simon,2 Paul Kolm,1 Xianchen Liu,3,4 William S Weintraub11Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, USA; 2Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA; 3Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Pfizer, Groton, CT, USABackground: Warfarin is recommended for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation. However, it is often underutilized and inadequately managed in actual clinical practice.Objectives: To examine the patterns of warfarin use and their relationship with stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation patients in community-based primary care practices.Design: Retrospective longitudinal cohort study.Participants: A total of 1141 atrial fibrillation patients were selected from 17 primary care practices with a shared electronic medical record and characterized by stroke risk, potential barriers to anticoagulation, and comorbid conditions.Main measures: Duration and number of warfarin exposures, interruptions in warfarin exposure > 45 days, stroke, and bleeding events.Results: Among 1141 patients with a mean age of 70 years (standard deviation 13.3 and mean follow-up of 3.4 years (standard deviation 3.0, 764 (67% were treated with warfarin. Warfarin was discontinued within 1 year in 194 (25.4%, and 349 (45.7% remained on warfarin at the end of follow-up. Interruptions in warfarin use were common, occurring in 32.6% (249 of 764 of patients. Those with two or more interruptions were younger and at lower baseline stroke risk when compared to those with no interruptions. There were 76 first strokes and 73 first-bleeding events in the follow-up period. When adjusted for baseline stroke risk, time to warfarin start, and total exposure time, two or more interruptions in warfarin use was associated with an increased risk of stroke (relative risk, 2.29; 95% confidence interval: 1.29–4.07. There was no significant association between warfarin interruptions and bleeding events

  9. Patterns of warfarin use and subsequent outcomes in atrial fibrillation in primary care practices

    OpenAIRE

    Ewen E; Zhang Z; Simon TA; Kolm P; Liu X; Weintraub WS

    2012-01-01

    Edward Ewen,1 Zugui Zhang,1 Teresa A Simon,2 Paul Kolm,1 Xianchen Liu,3,4 William S Weintraub11Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, USA; 2Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA; 3Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Pfizer, Groton, CT, USABackground: Warfarin is recommended for stroke prevention in high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation. However, it is often underutilized and inadequately managed in actual clinical practice.Objectives: To examine the pat...

  10. Significant Improvements in the Practice Patterns of Adult Related Donor Care in US Transplantation Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthias, Chloe; Shaw, Bronwen E; Kiefer, Deidre M; Liesveld, Jane L; Yared, Jean; Kamble, Rammurti T; D'Souza, Anita; Hematti, Peiman; Seftel, Matthew D; Norkin, Maxim; DeFilipp, Zachariah; Kasow, Kimberly A; Abidi, Muneer H; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Nirali N; Anderlini, Paolo; Diaz, Miguel A; Malone, Adriana K; Halter, Joerg P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Paul V

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% of US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the Joint Accreditation Committee-International Society for Cellular Therapy and European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation standards resulting from the CIBMTR study would have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, we conducted a follow-up survey of US transplantation centers to assess practice changes since 2007, and to investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. A total of 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of RD transplantations in the United States, responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P management does not meet international donor care standards, however. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are made. PMID:26597080

  11. Physiotherapy practice patterns in Intensive Care Units of Nepal: A multicenter survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Baidya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: As physiotherapy (PT is a young profession in Nepal, there is a dearth of insight into the common practices of physiotherapists in critical care. Aims: To identify the availability of PT services in Intensive Care Units (ICUs and articulate the common practices by physiotherapists in ICUs of Nepal. Settings and Design: All tertiary care hospitals across Nepal with ICU facility via an exploratory cross-sectional survey. Subjects and Methods: An existing questionnaire was distributed to all the physiotherapists currently working in ICUs of Nepal with 2 years of experience. The survey was sent via E-mail or given in person to 86 physiotherapists. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive and inferential statistics according to nature of data. Results: The response rate was 60% (n = 52. In the majority of hospitals (68%, PT service was provided only after a physician consultation, and few hospitals (13% had established hospital criteria for PT in ICUs. Private hospitals (57.1% were providing PT service in weekends compared to government hospitals (32.1% (P = 0.17. The likelihood of routine PT involvement varied significantly with the clinical scenarios (highest 71.2% status cerebrovascular accident, lowest 3.8% myocardial infarction, P < 0.001. The most preferred PT treatment was chest PT (53.8% and positioning (21.2% while least preferred was therapeutic exercise (3.8% irrespective of clinical scenarios. Conclusions: There is a lack of regular PT service during weekends in ICUs of Nepal. Most of the cases are treated by physiotherapists only after physician's referral. The preferred intervention seems to be limited only to chest PT and physiotherapists are not practicing therapeutic exercise and functional mobility training to a great extent.

  12. Patterns of Care outcome Studies: results of the national practice in adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Patterns of Care Study reviewed the processes and outcome of 682 patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radiation therapy from 1973-1976. The study and patient sampling were designed to reflect a valid representation of how prostate cancer is treated by radiation oncologists in the United States. The outcome results represent national benchmarks. The three year actuarial survival was 91% for Stage A, 88% for Stage B, and 76% for Stage C. Stage, grade, elevated serum acid phosphatase, Karnofsky performance status, previous hormonal therapy, age, and prior transurethral resection were identified by multivariate regression analysis to be important independent prognostic variables. Local control was related to the dose of the primary site, paraprostatic region, and pelvic sidewall. Major complications occurred in 9% of patients with Stage A, 2% of Stage B, and 6% with Stage C disease. Complications were related to dose and treatment technique. The Patterns of Care Process Survey identified that only 60% of patients surveyed had the necessary pretreatment evaluation studies required for best current management of adenocarcinoma of the prostate

  13. Impact of dialysis practice patterns on outcomes in acute kidney injury in Intensive Care Unit

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    Rajeev A Annigeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recent advances in dialysis therapy have made an impact on the clinical practice of renal replacement therapy (RRT in acute kidney injury (AKI in Intensive Care Unit (ICU. We studied the impact of RRT practice changes on outcomes in AKI in ICU over a period of 8 years. Subjects and Methods: AKI patients requiring RRT in ICU referred to a nephrologist during two different periods (period-1: Between May 2004 and May 2007, n = 69; period-2: Between August 2008 and May 2011, n = 93 were studied. The major changes in the dialysis practice during the period-2, compared to period-1 were introduction of prolonged intermittent RRT (PIRRT, early dialysis for metabolic acidosis, early initiation of RRT for anuria and positive fluid balance and use of bicarbonate-based fluids for continuous RRT (CRRT instead of lactate buffer. The primary study outcome was 28-day hospital mortality. Results: The mean age was 53.8 ± 16.1 years and 72.6% were male. Introduction of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction in utilization of CRRT during period-2 (from 85.5% to 53.7%. The overall mortality was high (68% but was significantly reduced during period-2 compared to period-1 (59% vs. 79.7%, P = 0.006. Metabolic acidosis but not the mode of RRT, was the significant factor which influenced mortality. Conclusions: Adaption of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction of utilization of CRRT. The mortality rate was significantly reduced during the period of adaption of PIRRT, possibly due to early initiation of RRT in the latter period for indications such as anuria and metabolic acidosis.

  14. Caring finance practices

    OpenAIRE

    Staveren, Irene

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe 2008 financial crisis has demonstrated the failure of both utilitarian and deontological ethics in finance. Alternatives do not need to be created from nothing, because the crisis itself has stimulated the emergence of ethically sound finance practices from within the sector. This article presents two cases of such alternatives, which can be understood as caring finance. Caring finance is built around more personal relationships, responsibility, and risk reduction. The example...

  15. Pattern and predictors of maternal care-seeking practices for severe neonatal jaundice in Nigeria: a multi-centre survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ezeaka, Chinyere V; Ugwu, Rosemary O; Mukhtar-Yola, Mariya; Ekure, Ekanem N; Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2014-01-01

    Background Nigeria is frequently associated with disproportionately high rates of severe neonatal jaundice (NNJ) underpinned by widespread Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Timely and appropriate treatment of NNJ is crucial for preventing the associated morbidity and neuro-developmental sequelae. Since mothers are likely to be the first mostly to observe the onset of severe illness in their newborns, we set out to identify the pattern and predictors of maternal care-seeking...

  16. New health professional practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celentano, D D

    1978-10-01

    Career patterns and practice correlates of 143 New Health Professionals (NHPs) educated at one institution are studied to determine similarities among different types of practitioners (Health Associates and Nurse Practitioners). Employment since graduation has been high with low job turnover. Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are found most often in metropolitan areas, while over 50 per cent of Health Associates (HAs) are employed in rural settings. More NPs work in hospitals than HAs, who have a higher rate of employment in private practices, HAs are also involved in a wider range of medical specialties than NPs. In terms of patient care, HAs see more patients than NPs and also have larger primary care caseloads. From a functional perspective, only minimal differences are found in comparing the activities of the practitioners. Most NHPs have high job satisfaction, although HAs anticipate a high rate of job turnover; no differences were found in levels of perceived responsibility nor in the amount of supervision in patient care. Although there were only small differences in the activities of the two groups, numerous contextual and practice correlates were found to differentiate the NHPs, a finding which argues against the current practice of conceptualizing NHPs as a single group. PMID:29997

  17. Assessing the link between health care utilisation in general practice and morbidity patterns in the elderly in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Anders; Kristensen, Troels; Ranstad, Karin;

    Objectives: The objective is to describe and analyze the prevalence of comorbidity and multimorbidity among older people with extensive and complex care needs. Next, the main objective is to present and discuss papers on the association between healthcare utilisation in general practice and...... important areas of healthcare utilisation in general practice in the Nordic countries. In the future, this demand for healthcare services among the elderly is expected to increase. For instance, it is likely that people live longer and advanced technologies continue to be developed, affecting demand and...... diabetes). Today we have limited information on the need for social services and health care services for the elderly in the Nordic countries. There is a need for improved understanding of variation in healthcare utilization and methods to measure the actual need for healthcare services among older...

  18. Pregnancy and care practices

    OpenAIRE

    ARÉVALO SÁNCHEZ, ELIZABETH

    2010-01-01

    The purposeofthisresearch istovalue thecarepractices that mothers perform on themselves and on the baby to whom she is going to give birth. 150 pregnant women that go to the Centro Operativo Local Engativá medical facility, registered on project 7317: "Preganant Families: healthy and desired babies of the Administrative DepartmentofSocialWellbeing", using a quantitative and descriptive methodology. We applied the "Instrument to value those care practices that are performed on themselves and o...

  19. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Patterns Regarding Eye Donation, Eye Banking and Corneal Transplant in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamahantesh. M. Bijapur

    2015-10-01

    .6%, Pamphlets (59.2%, Friends (57.8%, Radio (52.7%, posters (51.3%, nursing and other staff (47.8% and others (25.5%. Of those 888 willing to donate 95.2% (845 subjects would be doing as a noble deed, 745 (83.9% for pleasure to help blind, 690 (77.7% were motivated by the idea of giving vision to someone after their death. Of 212 unwilling, 178 participants (83.9% disliked the idea of body being tampered with and 124 participants (58.5% had objection by family members. Conclusion: The reasons for not donating need to be considered while creating awareness about eye donation in the community. Knowledge, attitude and practice in the context of eye donation may not complement each other and need to be addressed to bring about a change in patterns observed.

  20. Family practice in Ontario: How physician demographics affect practice patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Norton, Peter G.; Dunn, Earl V.; Bed, Liane Soberman

    1994-01-01

    As the demographics of practising physicians change, especially as the number of women doctors in an area increases, it is important that those planning for the provision of medical care in the future understand the relationships between the demographics and changes in practice patterns.

  1. Aspects of stoma care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    A survey of stoma care in general practice is reported. It demonstrates a wide diversity in the patterns of care provided to ostomates, with only half of the general practitioners reporting regular follow-up by a member of the health care team. Dealing with appliance difficulties was found to be an aspect of stoma care in which a majority of general practitioners have little confidence. The district nurse and stoma nurse are considered to be the most valuable sources of back-up. It is suggest...

  2. Physiotherapy for patients with lateral ankle sprains: a prospective survey of practice patterns in Dutch primary health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roebroeck, M.E.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bosveld, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study is to describe treatment patterns by Dutch physiotherapists for patients with lateral ankle sprains, and to compare them with assumptions on expected treatment that are derived from the literature. For this purpose, data of 251 patients with a sprain of the ankle were compared

  3. Physiotherapy for patients with lateral ankle sprains: a prospective survey of practice patterns in Dutch primary health care.

    OpenAIRE

    Roebroeck, M.E.; Dekker, J; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bosveld, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study is to describe treatment patterns by Dutch physiotherapists for patients with lateral ankle sprains, and to compare them with assumptions on expected treatment that are derived from the literature. For this purpose, data of 251 patients with a sprain of the ankle were compared with a reference group of 16,823 patients with different medical diagnoses. Data concerned patient characteristics, treatment sessions, goals pursued (defined in terms of impairments and disabilit...

  4. Caring finance practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe 2008 financial crisis has demonstrated the failure of both utilitarian and deontological ethics in finance. Alternatives do not need to be created from nothing, because the crisis itself has stimulated the emergence of ethically sound finance practices from within the sector. This ar

  5. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  6. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  7. A retrospective analysis of practice patterns in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections at three Canadian tertiary care centres

    OpenAIRE

    John M Conly; Stiver, H. Grant; Weiss, Karl A.; Becker, Debbie L; Rosner, Andrew J; Miller, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are increasingly being encountered and pose an increasing burden to the health care system in Canada.OBJECTIVE: To elucidate and characterize the factors influencing the current MRSA treatment patterns in patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) before linezolid became available on the Canadian market.METHODS: A retrospective study collected demographic, treatment and resource use data on patients hospitali...

  8. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  9. Best practice eye care models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar M Qureshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the launching of Global Initiative, VISION 2020 "the Right to Sight" many innovative, practical and unique comprehensive eye care services provision models have evolved targeting the underserved populations in different parts of the World. At places the rapid assessment of the burden of eye diseases in confined areas or utilizing the key informants for identification of eye diseases in the communities are promoted for better planning and evidence based advocacy for getting / allocation of resources for eye care. Similarly for detection and management of diabetes related blindness, retinopathy of prematurity and avoidable blindness at primary level, the major obstacles are confronted in reaching to them in a cost effective manner and then management of the identified patients accordingly. In this regard, the concept of tele-ophthalmology model sounds to be the best solution. Whereas other models on comprehensive eye care services provision have been emphasizing on surgical output through innovative scales of economy that generate income for the program and ensure its sustainability, while guaranteeing treatment of the poorest of the poor.

  10. Primary care practice composition in 34 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Heinemann, Stephanie; Greß, Stefan; Schäfer, Willemijn

    2015-01-01

    Health care needs in the population change through ageing and increasing multimorbidity. Primary health care might accommodate to this through the composition of practices in terms of the professionals working in them. The aim of this article is to describe the composition of primary care practices

  11. The Patterns of Care Survey of radiation therapy in localized prostate cancer: Similarities between the practice nationally and in minority-rich areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Over the last two decades, the chance for the cure of localized prostate cancer by radiation has been improved by the widespread use of PSA for early detection and by a number of technical advances in treatment delivery. This study was designed to determine whether the stage of presentation and the quality of radiation treatment delivered are comparable between Caucasian and minority patients nationally and within minority-rich areas. Methods and Materials: A random survey conducted for the Patterns of Care Study in Radiation Oncology of 80 facilities treating patients with radiation in the USA. Of these, 67 comprise the 'National Survey' and 13 a 'Minority-Rich' survey (>40% of treated patients are minorities). Nine hundred twenty-six men with localized prostate cancer were treated in 1994. Five hundred ninety-five were in the national and 331 in the minority-rich survey. The main outcome measures were the clinical features of Caucasian and minority men at presentation and technical characteristics of the treatment delivered to them. Results: African-American men presented with more advanced disease (higher-presenting PSA and T-stage) than Caucasians in both the national and the minority-rich surveys. Hispanics also presented with later disease and could be grouped with African-American men rather than Caucasians. Overall the stage and PSA at presentation was earlier than seen in the previous Patterns of Care Study survey of 1989. The quality of treatment delivered has improved since 1989, with no distinction seen between those facilities sampled nationally and those within minority-rich areas. Conclusion: African-American and Hispanic men with prostate cancer present for therapy at a later stage than Caucasian men, but when they do, the treatment received is of comparable quality

  12. Cancer patients' use of family practice and secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Kjeldgaard, Anette Hvenegaard; Olesen, Frede;

    recently diagnosed with cancer and among previous cancer patients. Materials and methods: In a nationwide database in Denmark (population 5.5 million) all contacts to the health care system are registered. We describe the pattern of contact with all parts of the health care system for a) the total...... who have recently undergone treatment and patients in the survivorship phase of cancer use different parts of the health care system, and how much they use FP. Information about this will enable us to discuss the need for shared care, integrated care and information exchange and create a platform for......Aims: We know that in Denmark some 90% of citizens have contact with family practice (FP) during a year and around 40% has contact with secondary care.  This demands efforts to create integrated and shared care. The aim of this study is to document the pattern of contacts with FP among patients...

  13. The care work of general practice receptionists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwelt, Pat M; Kearns, Robin A; Cairns, Isobel R

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION The care work of general practice receptionists has received limited research attention, despite receptionists position at the beginning of patients' journeys in many health care systems. We examine receptionists' perceptions of their work and the opportunities and constraints they experience in caring for patients while providing administrative support to practices. METHODS Data were collected in focus group interviews with 32 receptionists from urban and rural general practices in the Auckland and Northland regions of New Zealand. We employed tools from inductive thematic analysis and Straussian grounded theory in interpreting the data. FINDINGS We found that the way receptionists identified with a caring role strongly challenged the pejorative view of them in public discourse. Receptionists provide care in two key ways: for the practice and for patients. The juggling they do between the demands of the practice and of patients creates considerable work tensions that are often invisible to other staff members. CONCLUSION Receptionists have a critical role as the first step in the patient care pathway, bridging health care system and community. For general practice to be patient-centred and improve accessibility for the most vulnerable, the care work of receptionists must be considered core. KEYWORDS Receptionists; general practice; care; New Zealand. PMID:27477554

  14. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  15. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday...... lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for...

  16. [Practice of hypnosis in the nurse care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrot, Georges Lambert

    2014-12-01

    Hypnosis is practicing in hospital, especially in palliative care and in pain consultation. This technique is used in a well-defined field by doctors, psychologists and caregivers, all specificially trained. PMID:25710997

  17. Beliefs and practices in health care

    OpenAIRE

    MELGUIZO HERRERA, ESTELA; ALZATE POSADA, MARTHA LUCÍA

    2010-01-01

    The objective is to review the concepts of beliefs and practices of health care as cultural expressions in order to highlight to caregivers the necessary aspects for them to provide a culturally consistent care, a more human and effective one. From the conception of culture as a human creation which influences and shapes people's beliefs and practices, some definitions of the concepts as of social psicology, anthropology, sociology and transcultural nursing aspects are revised. We found that ...

  18. Transpersonal caring: a nursing practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Kubsch, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Watson's carative factors offer general guidance to nurses but do not specify explicit nursing actions. On the basis of a qualitative analysis of clinical stories written by registered nurses, a transpersonal caring intervention guideline was developed. The protocol will assist nurses in using caring more intentionally and effectively in practice. PMID:19411996

  19. Ethical Practice Under Accountable Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Abraham D; Bhandary, Asha; Rizzo, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are a key mechanism of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). ACOs will influence incentives for providers, who must understand these changes to make well-considered treatment decisions. Our paper defines an ethical framework for physician decisions and action within ACOs. Emerging ethical pressures providers will face as members of an ACO were classified under major headings representing three of the four principles of bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, and justice (no novel conflicts with non-maleficence were identified). Conflicts include a bias against transient populations, a motive to undertreat conditions lacking performance measures, and the mandate to improve population health incentivizing life intrusions. After introducing and explaining each conflict, recommendations are offered for how providers ought to precede in the face of novel ethical choices. Our description of novel ethical choices will help providers know what to expect and our recommendations can guide providers in choosing well. PMID:26002491

  20. From theory to practice: identifying authentic opinion leaders to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B A; Hawks, J W; Davis, R

    2000-07-01

    Diffusion of Innovations and Opinion Leader theories can be translated into practical applications to improve health care delivery and financial performance by applying them to influence referral patterns and decrease variations in care. Health care organizations can rapidly spread "better practices" to their practicing physicians by understanding the social and communication networks that are naturally developed by those practitioners. Physicians view this diffusion process as promoting autonomy, and as a legitimate approach to adoption of information needed in daily practice. PMID:18540342

  1. Integrating wound care research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath M

    2007-10-01

    The process of integrating wound care research into clinical practice incorporates research methodology--i.e., the standardized practices, procedures, and rules by which research is performed--and an evidence-based approach. Using examples from the literature and clinician experience treating pressure ulcers in a 32-bed regional spinal cord injury unit in a tertiary referral center in Cleveland, Ohio, the authors describe this process and review the challenges faced by an interdisciplinary skin care team tasked with implementing evidence-based care. Additional considerations include determining the amount of current wound care that is evidence-based and whether wound prevention and care outcomes are improved through the use of evidence-based medicine. Five years after establishing the skin care team and implementing evidence-based care, improvements in care processes and short-term outcomes--specifically, pressure ulcer prevention and treatment protocols including documentation--have been realized. Studies to ascertain the effects of these changes on long-term outcomes are planned. PMID:17978411

  2. Laravel design patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Kilicdagi, Arda

    2014-01-01

    This book is a practical guide packed with clear examples that will help you get to grips with the best practices in Laravel design patterns to create advanced web applications. This book is intended for web application developers working with Laravel who want to increase the efficiency of their web applications. It assumes that you have some experience with the Laravel PHP framework and are familiar with coding OOP methods.

  3. A practice-centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palla Shana L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions to change practice patterns among health care professionals have had mixed success. We tested the effectiveness of a practice centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices. Methods A multifaceted intervention was conducted among primary care practice in North Carolina. All practices designated two individuals to serve as domestic violence resources persons, underwent initial training on screening for domestic violence, and participated in 3 lunch and learn sessions. Within this framework, practices selected the screening instrument, patient educational material, and content best suited for their environment. Effectiveness was evaluated using a pre/post cross-sectional telephone survey of a random selection of female patients from each practice. Results Seventeen practices were recruited and fifteen completed the study. Baseline screening for domestic violence was 16% with a range of 2% to 49%. An absolute increase in screening of 10% was achieved (range of increase 0 to 22%. After controlling for clustering by practice and other patient characteristics, female patients were 79% more likely to have been screened after the intervention (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.43–2.23. Conclusion An intervention that allowed practices to tailor certain aspects to fit their needs increased screening for domestic violence. Further studies testing this technique using other outcomes are needed.

  4. Chronicles of a primary care practice pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman CR

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Freeman,1 W Neil Cottrell,1 Greg Kyle,2 Ian D Williams,3 Lisa M Nissen11School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia; 3Camp Hill Healthcare, Camp Hill, Brisbane, AustraliaBackground: In 2009, a pharmacist commenced working in a nondispensing role at a primary care medical center located in a metropolitan suburb of Brisbane, Australia. Research into the role and function of a practice pharmacist in this setting is still in its infancy.Methods: Ethnographic methods were used over a 3-month period to record activities undertaken by the practice pharmacist on a daily basis.Results: During the 3-month period, 296 hours of activity were documented. Activities the practice pharmacist performed most frequently included medication review, “pharmaceutical opinion,” student supervision, drug information, and administrative tasks.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the broad range of activities which were conducted by a practice pharmacist in the primary care setting as part of a multidisciplinary team.Keywords: practice pharmacist, general practice, integration, medical center

  5. Caring around the Clock: rounding in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Marie

    A large acute trust in the East Midlands looked to the US to inform its implementation of hourly rounding, otherwise known as intentional rounding. A combination of transformational leadership and meaningful interactions form the basis of a new approach to rounding--Caring around the Clock. The trust piloted the concept on 10 wards with results showing a 32% reduction in call lights. The successful change in practice required an investment in staff education to equip staff with the necessary skills. The trust is currently rolling out Caring around Hourly rounding can reducethe Clock to 79 inpatient wards. PMID:23342834

  6. Django design patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ravindran, Arun

    2015-01-01

    If you want to learn how best to utilize commonly found patterns and learn best practices in developing applications with Django, this is the book for you. This book, like Django itself, is accessible to amateur and professional developers alike and assumes little in the way of prior experience. Although written for Python 3, the majority of the code in this book works in Python 2 or can be easily translated.

  7. ISBI Practice Guidelines for Burn Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbi Practice Guidelines Committee

    2016-08-01

    Practice guidelines (PGs) are recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries, and are designed to define optimal evaluation and management. The first PGs for burn care addressed the issues encountered in developed countries, lacking consideration for circumstances in resource-limited settings (RLS). Thus, the mission of the 2014-2016 committee established by the International Society for Burn Injury (ISBI) was to create PGs for burn care to improve the care of burn patients in both RLS and resource-abundant settings. An important component of this effort is to communicate a consensus opinion on recommendations for burn care for different aspects of burn management. An additional goal is to reduce costs by outlining effective and efficient recommendations for management of medical problems specific to burn care. These recommendations are supported by the best research evidence, as well as by expert opinion. Although our vision was the creation of clinical guidelines that could be applicable in RLS, the ISBI PGs for Burn Care have been written to address the needs of burn specialists everywhere in the world. PMID:27542292

  8. Improving Prescribing Practices in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Atle Fretheim; Oxman, Andrew D.; Kari Håvelsrud; Shaun Treweek; Kristoffersen, Doris T; Arild Bjørndal

    2006-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. An important issue in health care is “getting research into practice,” in other words, making sure that, when evidence from research has established the best way to treat a disease, doctors actually use that approach with their patients. In reality, there is often a gap between evidence and practice.   An example concerns the treatment of people who have high blood pressure (hypertension) and/or high cholesterol. These are common conditions, and both increase the ...

  9. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Patients with Prostate Cancer in Japan. Changing Trends in National Practice between 1996-98 and 1999-2001. Patterns of Care Study for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the changing trends of standards and practices for postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for patients with prostate cancer in Japan. The Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) conducted a national survey in 84 institutions from 1996 to 1998 (PCS96-98) and 76 institutions from 1999 to 2001 (PCS99-01). Detailed information relevant to RT was collected on a total of 169 patients (64 from 1996 to 1998 and 105 from 1999 to 2001) with prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The fraction of clinical T3-4 tumours before prostatectomy decreased from 63% in the period 1996-98 to 26% in the period 1999-2001 (P=0.0004). The pre-RT prostate-specific antigen level was significantly lower in 1999-2001 than in 1996-98 (P=0.0002). We did not find a significant difference in the percentage of patients who received pelvic irradiation in the time periods between PCS96-98 and PCS99-01 (P=0.18). Although the median radiation doses of 60 Gy were not changed between the surveys, various doses (from 20 to 74.6 Gy) were delivered to the prostatic bed. In the 1999-2001 survey, 73 of 105 patients received a median dose of 56 Gy in an adjuvant setting, while the other 32 received a median dose of 60 Gy in a salvage setting (P=0.0015). These data suggest that consensus has not been reached on the practice and management of postoperative RT for patients with prostate cancer in Japan. (author)

  10. [Oral health care practices in Abidjan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba, M; Guinan, J C; Sangare, A; Da-Danho, V; Bakayoko-Ly, R

    2004-09-01

    Abidjan, the economical capital of Ivory Coast has a CAO of 2.7 with index O practically nil. The professional density is one surgeon for 12.000 inhabitants. Abidjan population, despite the requirements in increasing care has not recourse to the dental surgeons for their assumption of responsibility. The general objective of our study is to describe the therapeutic itinerary in odonto-stomatology of the Abidjan population. We have realised a questionnaire survey beside of population sample. The results show that 25 per cent of our population gives up care despite the presence of pain or embarrassment. Our study has allowed highlighting all the other recourses to the care. Indeed, the people who give up the care have much other recourse which has be identified in order of importance: the modern and traditional self-medication. Let us note in our study, that the choice of dental surgeon knows a constant evolution from the first to the third recourse. The lack of financial means constitutes however the first obstacle at the accessibility to the oral care in Ivory Coast. PMID:15900823

  11. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women’s preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  12. Client Involvement in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone;

    2013-01-01

    ‘Client involvement’ has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how ‘client involvement’ is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse ‘client involvement’ in practise seen......, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: ‘Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care’; ‘Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life......’; ‘Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting’; and ‘Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life’. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which...

  13. Translating person-centered care into practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided...... managing ambivalence. IIS and GSD were based on grounded theories, and MI was intuitively developed. All apply processes and strategies to advance professionals' communication skills and engagement; GSD includes context-specific reflection sheets. All offer training programs; MI and GSD include fidelity...

  14. Changing policies, changing patterns of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Szebehely, Marta

    2012-01-01

    continued the generous provision of home care. This article focuses on the implication of such diverse policies for the provision and combination of formal and informal care resources for older people. Using data from Level of Living surveys (based on interviews with a total of 1,158 individuals aged 67......Despite pursuing the policy of ageing in place, the two Nordic countries of Denmark and Sweden have taken diverse roads in regard to the provision of formal, public tax-financed home care for older people. Whilst Sweden has cut down home care and targeted services for the most needy, Denmark has...... countries tax-funded home care is used across social groups but targeting of resources at the most needy in Sweden creates other inequalities: Older people with shorter education are left with no one to resort to but the family, whilst those with higher education purchase help from market providers...

  15. A decision-support system for the analysis of clinical practice patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Balas, E A; Li, Z. R.; Mitchell, J. A.; Spencer, D. C.; Brent, E; Ewigman, B G

    1994-01-01

    Several studies documented substantial variation in medical practice patterns, but physicians often do not have adequate information on the cumulative clinical and financial effects of their decisions. The purpose of developing an expert system for the analysis of clinical practice patterns was to assist providers in analyzing and improving the process and outcome of patient care. The developed QFES (Quality Feedback Expert System) helps users in the definition and evaluation of measurable qu...

  16. Market Model of Care and Transnational Care Practices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhde, Zuzana

    Berlin: Fridrich Ebert Stiftung, 2015 - (Magbunduku, E.), s. 7-15 [Global Care Chains: Why should we care?. Berlin (DE), 22.10.2014-23.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : care * migration * gender Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.fes.de/GPol/pdf/Global_Care_Chains_Conference_Reader2015.pdf

  17. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  18. Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program: impact on patterns of terminal cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Bruera, E; Neumann, C M; Gagnon, B.; Brenneis, C; Kneisler, P; Selmser, P; J Hanson

    1999-01-01

    The Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program was established in July 1995 to measure the access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care services, decrease the number of cancer-related deaths in acute care facilities and increase the participation of family physicians in the care of terminally ill patients. In this retrospective study the authors compared the pattern of care and site of deaths before establishment of the program (1992/93) and during its second year of operation (1...

  19. Habitat workshops: Knowledge, care and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Glenn Russell

    One commonly expressed goal of environmental education (EE) is to create positive attitudes. The dominant approaches emphasize factual information, assuming that attitudes will result, but results are mixed. I investigate conceptions of attitude, the psychology of attitude and how attitudes are learned. I also examine recent scholarship describing learning and teaching, since EE literature does not draw upon many of these ideas. I consider applications of these two perspectives to public schools while working within mainstream (Tbilisi) EE guidelines. It turns out to be important to identify specific, concrete objects and behaviours as targets for attitudes. "Environment" is general and abstract. Strongly related to attitudes, but little discussed, is the self-concept, which influences what one thinks, feels and does. I found that goals about attitudes can be more precisely phrased in terms of care, a positive concern for or interest in an object. I conclude that affective EE goals can be achieved through thoughtful and self-reflective care about local habitats and the species and individuals that inhabit them. Psychologists note that people are better able to manage their knowledge, to transfer ideas to new contexts, and to identify and solve problems if they learn within a group participating in realistic projects. Such interactions also integrate knowledge, skills and attitudes related to the group's work. Building on the Community of Learners model of teaching, I offer a framework for EE curriculum called Habitat Workshops. Its goals are knowledge of, care about and problem solving practices with habitats. Habitat Workshops engage classroom communities in the design and creation of local habitats within a group narrative of care and understanding. They involve both school subject knowledge as well as habitat-specific problems and responses that reflect real-world environmental issues. Habitat Workshops can be simple or progressively more complex. I provide an

  20. Under-forest Breeding Pattern and the Practice Form

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Zhong-ming

    2012-01-01

    Through the development in recent years, China's under-forest breeding pattern can be divided into four kinds of practice form of under-forest breeding pattern (the pattern of breeding driven by leading enterprises; the pattern of breeding driven by intermediary economic organizations; the pattern of breeding driven by the professional wholesale market; the pattern of breeding driven by the modern animal husbandry demonstration areas), according to difference in the main body participating in...

  1. From Practice Culture to Patient Outcomes: Improving Primary Care Through Interdisciplinary Health Care Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Grace, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2011, a large integrated healthcare organization implemented a primary care team redesign in five pilot practices to improve the delivery of patient-centered chronic illness care and augment the physician-medical assistant dyads by adding two new primary care team roles for each practice - a nurse care manager (NCM) and a patient health coach (PHC). This work examines three aspects of implementing the care team redesign: 1) The facilitators and barriers of implementation, 2) Th...

  2. Security patterns in practice designing secure architectures using software patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Buglioni, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Learn to combine security theory and code to produce secure systems Security is clearly a crucial issue to consider during the design and implementation of any distributed software architecture. Security patterns are increasingly being used by developers who take security into serious consideration from the creation of their work. Written by the authority on security patterns, this unique book examines the structure and purpose of security patterns, illustrating their use with the help of detailed implementation advice, numerous code samples, and descriptions in UML. Provides

  3. CPC Initiative - Participating Primary Care Practices

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative is a multi-payer initiative fostering collaboration between public and private health care payers to strengthen...

  4. How does an integrated primary care approach for patients in deprived neighbourhoods impact utilization patterns? An explorative study

    OpenAIRE

    Dionne S Kringos; van den Broeke, Jennifer R.; van der Lee, Arnold P. M.; Plochg, Thomas; Stronks, Karien

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore changes in utilization patterns for general practice (GP) and hospital care of people living in deprived neighbourhoods when primary care providers work in a more coherent and coordinated manner by applying an integrated approach. Methods We compared expected (based on consumption patterns of a health insurers’ total population) and actual utilization patterns in a deprived Dutch intervention district in the city of Utrecht (Overvecht) with control districts 1 (Noordwest...

  5. Under-forest Breeding Pattern and the Practice Form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhong-ming

    2012-01-01

    Through the development in recent years, China’s under-forest breeding pattern can be divided into four kinds of practice form of under-forest breeding pattern (the pattern of breeding driven by leading enterprises; the pattern of breeding driven by intermediary economic organizations; the pattern of breeding driven by the professional wholesale market; the pattern of breeding driven by the modern animal husbandry demonstration areas), according to difference in the main body participating in signing the operation contract in breeding pattern. In the production practice of under-forest breeding pattern, the most widely used and successful pattern is the pattern of breeding driven by leading enterprises and its derivative forms.

  6. Quality of diabetes care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    van Bruggen, J.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a quality incentive is expected to ensue from improved collaboration between healthcare professionals. Whether this view is supported by sufficient evidence is, however, questionable. Therefore, the first study included in this thesis is a systematic review of studies on the effects of sharing and delegating diabetes care tasks. It became apparent that sharing and delegating care tasks can improve the process of care and glycaemic control. Sharing or delegating care, howev...

  7. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  8. Sharing best practice in stoma care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willams, Julia

    A problem shared is a problem halved; a very poignant proverb that forms the essence of this year's World Council of Enterostomal Therapists (WCET) UK conference in Coventry. Sharing experiences from practice is invalid if clinical practice is to grow and develop. It raises awareness, offering the opportunity to question and review practice. Sharing practice offers opportunities to enquiring minds. PMID:19797996

  9. Management practices and the quality of care in cardiac units

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, K. John; Lindrooth, Richard C; Wholey, Douglas R; Maddox, Thomas M.; Bloom, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Importance:- To improve the quality of health care, many researchers have suggested that health care institutions adopt management approaches that have been successful in the manufacturing and technology sectors. However, relatively little information exists about how these practices are disseminated in hospitals and whether they are associated with better performance. Objectives:- To describe the variation in management practices among a large sample of hospital cardiac care units; asses...

  10. A systematic review of best practices in HIV care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Geoffrey; Mill, Judy; Chaw-Kant, Jean; Caine, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Best practices in HIV care have the potential to improve patient outcomes and inform practice. We conducted a systematic review of best practices in HIV care that were published from 2003 to 2013. Practices that demonstrated success in achieving desired results based on their objectives were included in the review. Two themes emerged from the eight articles reviewed: (a) the importance of linking newly diagnosed people living with HIV to care and (b) the role of integrated and comprehensive service provision in improving patient outcomes. Inconsistencies in reporting and arbitrary use of the term “best practices” were hurdles in this review. PMID:27152102

  11. Evidence of care comprehensiveness in the practice of nursing staff in oncology palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva; Marléa Chagas Moreira; Joséte Luzia Leite; Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to identify evidences of comprehensive care in the professional practice of the nursing staff in the context of oncology palliative care. In this descriptive, qualitative study, seven nurses and four nursing technicians were interviewed. Thematic analysis resulted two thematic units: Evidences of comprehensive care in the practice of the nursing professionals and teamwork as the premise of comprehensive care. The nursing staff’s actions are based on communication, converging...

  12. From parallel practice to integrative health care: a conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hara Dennis

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Integrative health care" has become a common term to describe teams of health care providers working together to provide patient care. However this term has not been well-defined and likely means many different things to different people. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for describing, comparing and evaluating different forms of team-oriented health care practices that have evolved in Western health care systems. Discussion Seven different models of team-oriented health care practice are illustrated in this paper: parallel, consultative, collaborative, coordinated, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and integrative. Each of these models occupies a position along the proposed continuum from the non-integrative to fully integrative approach they take to patient care. The framework is developed around four key components of integrative health care practice: philosophy/values; structure, process and outcomes. Summary This framework can be used by patients and health care practitioners to determine what styles of practice meet their needs and by policy makers, healthcare managers and researchers to document the evolution of team practices over time. This framework may also facilitate exploration of the relationship between different practice models and health outcomes.

  13. Practicing Self-Care for Nurses: A Nursing Program Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Cynthia A

    2014-01-01

    Self-care is imperative to personal health, sustenance to continue to care for others, and professional growth. This article briefly reviews stressors common to students and nurses and the importance of practicing self-care to combat stress and promote health in practice. Florida Atlantic University offers a course for all levels of undergraduate nursing students called Caring for Self. The course, supported by principles of Adult Learning Theory, focuses on guiding the nurse to practice and model self-care. The author describes the evolution of this self-care initiative by discussing the needs assessment, course description and strategies, examples of course activities, and an exemplar of student impact. The conclusion offers discussion of challenges and lessons noted by faculty and students. PMID:26824151

  14. Care in Practice. On Normativity, Concepts, and Boundaries.

    OpenAIRE

    Mol, Annemarie; Moser, Ingunn; Piras, Enrico Maria; Turrini, Mauro; Pols, Jeanette; Zanutto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    In recent years many STS scholars have dealt with care practices in dif¬ferent fields. Starting from Care in Practice. On Tinkering in Clinics, Homes and Farms [Transcript-Verlag, Bielefield, 2010, 325 pp.], a book edited by Annemarie Mol, Ingunn Moser and Jeannette Pols, this debate aims to discuss the meaning and de-velopment of the concept of care and its accomplishment in practice. Mauro Turrini, Enrico Maria Piras and Alberto Zanutto wrote two commentaries on the book, while the editors ...

  15. Meaning and practice of palliative care for hospitalized older adults with life limiting illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Bethel Ann; Norton, Sally A; Schmitt, Madeline H; Quill, Timothy E; Metzger, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC) and end-of-life (EOL) services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences) and identification of the underlying structure and communication patterns of PC consultation services common to them. Conclusions. Consistent with reports by other researchers, study data support the need to move beyond equating PC with hospice or EOL care and the notion that EOL is a well-demarcated period of time before death. If professional health care providers assume that PC services are limited to assisting with and helping patients and families prepare for dying, they miss opportunities to provide care considered important to older individuals confronting life-limiting illnesses. PMID:21584232

  16. Patterns, principles, and practices of domain-driven design

    CERN Document Server

    Millett, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Methods for managing complex software construction following the practices, principles and patterns of Domain-Driven Design with code examples in C# This book presents the philosophy of Domain-Driven Design (DDD) in a down-to-earth and practical manner for experienced developers building applications for complex domains. A focus is placed on the principles and practices of decomposing a complex problem space as well as the implementation patterns and best practices for shaping a maintainable solution space. You will learn how to build effective domain models through the use of tactical pat

  17. Dentists’ practice patterns regarding caries prevention: results from a dental practice-based research network

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Yoko; Kakudate, Naoki; Sumida, Futoshi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Gordan, Valeria V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) quantify dentists' practice patterns regarding caries prevention and (2) test the hypothesis that certain dentists' characteristics are associated with these practice patterns. Design The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey. Participants The study queried dentists who worked in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan, which seeks to engage d...

  18. Caring for older adults: practice guided by Watson's caring-healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernick, Laurie

    2004-04-01

    Caring for older people and listening attentively to what they say about themselves and their varied health situations, especially in relation to quality of life and peace of mind, body, and soul, are important matters to nurses aligned with Watson's caring-healing theory. Assumptions and key concepts of Watson's framework are described with examples that illustrate how a nursing framework has shaped the author's advanced nursing practice. Some of the key concepts discussed include intersubjectivity, transpersonal caring, spirituality, and caring moments. Watson's framework of caring-healing is shown to inform practice, education, and research. PMID:15090087

  19. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  20. Pain care for patients with epidermolysis bullosa: best care practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Good, Julie; Harrop, Emily; Liossi, Christina; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Martinez, Anna E; Maxwell, Lynne G; Stanko-Lopp, Danette

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a group of rare disorders that have multi-system effects and patients present with a number of both acute and chronic pain care needs. Effects on quality of life are substantial. Pain and itching are burdensome daily problems. Experience with, and knowledge of, the best pain and itch care for these patients is minimal. Evidence-based best care practice guidelines are needed to establish a base of knowledge and practice for practitioner...

  1. Patterns of cancer occurrence in a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atla Bhagyalakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The current study mainly summarizes the different patterns of cancer incidence in the tertiary care centre region. Cancer incidence is increasing gradually among the population and there is raise of cancer incidence in females compared to their counterparts. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2153-2163

  2. Intensive care nurses′ opinions and practice for oral care of mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Oral care is an essential aspect of critical care nursing. However, no study has been published on oral care practice of Iranian and Asian nurses. The majority of published studies were conducted in western and European countries. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the nurses′ opinions and practice about oral care in patients under mechanical ventilation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 130 intensive care nurses from 6 intensive care units in the university hospitals of Iran. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was used to gather the data and charts of 45 patients were evaluated. Statistical analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis are presented. Results: Oral care obtained the 7 th rank in prority and a mean score of 5.7 on a scale of 1-10. More than 21% of subjects did not perform oral care in their usual duties. High load of writing tasks and personnel shortages were the major barriers to oral care. Only 20% of the patients′ charts contained a report on oral care. Conclusions: Nurses did not consider oral care in intensive care patients as a high priority. This result highlights the need to continue education programs on oral care for improving the knowledge and attitude of intensive care nurses with respect to oral care.

  3. [Chronic pruritus : Care in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ständer, S; Ständer, H F; Steinke, S; Bruland, P; Dugas, M; Augustin, M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pruritus is a highly prevalent, multifactorial symptom requiring extensive diagnostics, treatment and consideration of accompanying symptoms (reduced quality of life, sleep disorders, psychic factors). Patient care is thus complex and requires consideration of individual treatment goals. Patients indicate their wish for a symptom-free life an explanation of the causes and a trustful physician-patient relationship. The targeted use of questionnaires is thus advisable in order to structurally survey the history, pruritus intensity, quality of life and treatment progression. Nevertheless, there are many administrative and economical hurdles in the health care system to overcome in order to provide patients with chronic pruritus the best possible care, also per the recommended guidelines. The development of specialized centers and training courses for medical practitioners is thus urgently needed. PMID:27316924

  4. [The elderly care practices of indigenous-performance of health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissardo, Leidyani Karina; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Carreira, Lígia

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to understand the care practices of health professionals who assist the elderly Kaingang. It is a qualitative study, supported in ethnography, conducted by ten professionals working in primary health care in the indigenous land of Faxinal, Paraná, Brazil. The data was collected from November 2010 to February 2012 by participant observation and interviews, and analyzed based on the Transcultural Care Theory. Was identified the preoccupation of the carers practices with the medication and immunization, as well as traditional medical care. To achieve these, care professionals had strategies that implemented maintenance of older people in care. We conclude that cultural values and integrate scientific need assistance to improve the health of elderly indigenous. PMID:25590882

  5. Narratives and communication in health care practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mariann B.

    2014-01-01

    The article concerns the issue: How to deal with the increasing challenges of communication in the health care sector? On the one hand, it focuses on how to include the patient’s and relatives´ perspectives. On the other hand, it focuses on the existential/spiritual perspective which is now...... included in various official visions papers and recommendations. The main question is pedagogical: How do practitioners in the health sector i.e. in nursing deal with these perspectives? The materials are the Danish Health Board´s program of rehabilitation and palliative care, data from a focus group study...

  6. Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis;

    2010-01-01

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices...... suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies....

  7. Nutritional practices in full-day-care pre-schools.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, A

    2011-06-01

    Full-day-care pre-schools contribute significantly to the nutritional intake and acquisition of dietary habits of the pre-school child. The present study investigated nutritional practices in full-day-care pre-schools in Dublin, Ireland, aiming to determine the nutritional support that pre-school managers deem necessary, thereby facilitating the amelioration of existing pre-school nutritional training and practices.

  8. Health care practices in ancient Greece: The Hippocratic ideal

    OpenAIRE

    Kleisiaris, Christos F.; Sfakianakis, Chrisanthos; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Asclepius and Hippocrates focused medical practice on the natural approach and treatment of diseases, highlighting the importance of understanding the patient’s health, independence of mind, and the need for harmony between the individual, social and natural environment, as reflected in the Hippocratic Oath. The aim of this study was to present the philosophy of care provision in ancient Greece and to highlight the influence of the Hippocratic ideal in modern health care practices. A literatu...

  9. Comparison of medical care in prison and in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, E.

    1984-01-01

    The medical care of prisoners "declaring sick" to the medical officer and hospital officers in Bedford Prison was surveyed and compared with the medical care given to the medical officer's patients in general practice. The consultation rate of prisoners was higher than that of patients in the practice. Part of this increase was because household remedies were not available to prisoners except through the prison medical service and part may also have been due to the stresses of life in prison....

  10. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students in a tertiary care medical college, West Bengal

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, I.; Bhadury, T

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is a widely prevalent practice in India. It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are the future medical practitioners. Aim: To assess the pattern of self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students. Settings and Design: Tertiary care medical college in West Bengal, India. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among the undergraduate medical students. Results: Out of 500 students of the ...

  11. Appcelerator Titanium patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Pollentine, Boydlee

    2013-01-01

    The book takes a step-by-step approach to help you understand CommonJS and Titanium architecture patterns, with easy to follow samples and plenty of in-depth explanations If you're an existing Titanium developer or perhaps a new developer looking to start off your Titanium applications "the right way", then this book is for you. With easy to follow examples and a full step-by-step account of architecting a sample application using CommonJS and MVC, along with chapters on new features such as ACS, you'll be implementing enterprise grade Titanium solutions in no time. You should have some JavaSc

  12. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients...... with type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action...

  13. Ethics and Maternity Care: From Principles to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lothian, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, the associate editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education (JPE) discusses the decision to devote an issue of JPE to the ethics of childbirth and maternity care. The current crisis in maternity care mandates a careful look at the ethical principles that provide the foundation for practice. The contents of this special issue include: a broad overview of ethics of childbearing, historical perspectives and contemporary understanding of informed decision making, the ethical issues...

  14. Growing Your Business by Adapting Employer Child Care Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Becky

    2012-01-01

    As an early childhood professional for 30 years operating both traditional and employer child care programs, the author believes that traditional center owners and operators have an opportunity to grow their business, serve more children and families, and stay relevant for future workforce needs by integrating employer child care practices into…

  15. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY... guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities... been studying unused pharmaceutical disposal practices at health care facilities, prompted by...

  16. Health care practices in ancient Greece: The Hippocratic ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleisiaris, Christos F; Sfakianakis, Chrisanthos; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V

    2014-01-01

    Asclepius and Hippocrates focused medical practice on the natural approach and treatment of diseases, highlighting the importance of understanding the patient's health, independence of mind, and the need for harmony between the individual, social and natural environment, as reflected in the Hippocratic Oath. The aim of this study was to present the philosophy of care provision in ancient Greece and to highlight the influence of the Hippocratic ideal in modern health care practices. A literature review was carried out using browser methods in international databases. According to the literature, "healthy mind in a healthy body" was the main component of the Hippocratic philosophy. Three main categories were observed in the Hippocratic provision of care: health promotion, interventions on trauma care, and mental care and art therapy interventions. Health promotion included physical activity as an essential part of physical and mental health, and emphasized the importance of nutrition to improve performance in the Olympic Games. Interventions on trauma care included surgical practices developed by Hippocrates, mainly due to the frequent wars in ancient Greece. Mental care and art therapy interventions were in accordance with the first classification of mental disorders, which was proposed by Hippocrates. In this category music and drama were used as management tools in the treatment of illness and in the improvement of human behavior. The role of Asclepieion of Kos was highlighted which clearly indicates a holistic health care model in care provision. Finally, all practices regarded detailed recordings and evaluation of information within the guidelines. The Hippocratic philosophy on health care provision focused on the holistic health care model, applying standards and ethical rules that are still valid today. PMID:25512827

  17. Naturopathy and the Primary Care Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Sara A.; Gutknecht, Nancy C.

    2010-01-01

    Naturopathy is a distinct type of primary care medicine that blends age-old healing traditions with scientific advances and current research. It is guided by a unique set of principles that recognize the body's innate healing capacity, emphasize disease prevention, and encourage individual responsibility to obtain optimal health. Naturopathic treatment modalities include diet and clinical nutrition, behavioral change, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, botanical medicine, physical medicine, pharmaceut...

  18. Challenges of providing HIV care in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Christy E; de Wit, John B F; Crooks, Levinia; Reynolds, Robert H; Canavan, Peter G; Kidd, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    As the management of HIV changes and demand for HIV health services in primary care settings increases, new approaches to engaging the general practice workforce with HIV medicine are required. This paper reports on qualitative research conducted with 47 clinicians who provide HIV care in general practice settings around Australia, including accredited HIV s100 prescribers as well as other GPs and general practice nurses. Balanced numbers of men and women took part; less than one-quarter were based outside of urban metropolitan settings. The most significant workforce challenges that participants said they faced in providing HIV care in general practice were keeping up with knowledge, navigating low caseload and regional issues, balancing quality care with cost factors, and addressing the persistent social stigma associated with HIV. Strategic responses developed by participants to address these challenges included thinking more creatively about business and caseload planning, pursuing opportunities to share care with specialist clinicians, and challenging prejudiced attitudes amongst patients and colleagues. Understanding and supporting the needs of the general practice workforce in both high and low HIV caseload settings will be essential in ensuring Australia has the capacity to respond to emerging priorities in HIV prevention and care. PMID:24581265

  19. Academic-practice partnerships to promote evidence-based practice in long-term care: oral hygiene care practices as an exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Eleanor Schildwachter; Lekan, Deborah; Hebert, Catherine; Leatherwood, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Learning in practice disciplines suffers when gaps exist between classroom instruction and students' observations of routine clinical practices.(1) Academic institutions, therefore, have a strong interest in fostering the rapid and effective translation of evidence-based care techniques into routine practice. Long-term care (LTC) practice sites are particularly vulnerable to gaps between classroom teaching and how daily care is implemented, owing to the recent rapid advances in the scientific bases of care for frail older adults, the relative isolation of most LTC sites from academic settings,(2) and the relatively small number of registered nurses (RNs) available in LTC settings who can facilitate translation of research-based practices into care.(3) The aim of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility and value of an academic practice partnership to implement evidence-based approaches to solving resident care problems in LTC, as many scientifically proven practices hold promise for improving resident outcomes yet adoption is often slow.(4) We developed and implemented a clinical practice improvement process, based on diffusion of innovations theory and research,(5-8) to serve as a new model of academic-practice collaboration between a university school of nursing, LTC facility management and direct-care staff, as a means of developing high quality clinical sites for student rotations. The goal was to implement a sustainable evidence-based oral care program as an exemplar of how scientific evidence can be translated into LTC practice. This project focused on oral hygiene because the staff was dissatisfied with their existing resident oral care program, and an evidence-base for oral care in LTC existed that had not yet been incorporated into care routines. This article describes a systematic, replicable process for linking advanced practice registered nurse expertise with staff insights about care systems to reduce the gap between teaching and practice in

  20. Palliative care in Enugu, Nigeria: Challenges to a new practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C Onyeka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyone, young and old, male and female, rich and poor, should have access to excellent care during the course of a serious illness and at the end of life. Therefore, a denial of such care becomes an infringement of the individual′s human rights. Because of the efforts of pioneers in this field of Medicine in Africa and beyond, both living and immortalized, we can now say that palliative care in the African context is affordable and achievable. In this article, some of the challenges faced in setting up and running a new palliative care practice in an emerging and developing economy are examined.

  1. Health Literacy in Primary Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Lauren; Salzman, Brooke; Snyderman, Danielle

    2015-07-15

    Health literacy includes a set of skills needed to make appropriate health decisions and successfully navigate the health care system. These skills include reading, writing, numeracy, communication, and, increasingly, the use of electronic technology. National data indicate that more than one-third of U.S. adults have limited health literacy, which contributes to poor health outcomes and affects patient safety, and health care access and quality. Although there are a number of tools that screen for limited health literacy, they are primarily used for research. Routinely screening patients for health literacy has not been shown to improve outcomes and is not recommended. Instead, multiple professional organizations recommend using universal health literacy precautions to provide understandable and accessible information to all patients, regardless of their literacy or education levels. This includes avoiding medical jargon, breaking down information or instructions into small concrete steps, limiting the focus of a visit to three key points or tasks, and assessing for comprehension. Additionally, printed information should be written at or below a fifth- to sixth-grade reading level. Visual aids, graphs, or pictures can enhance patient understanding, as can more concrete presentation of numerical information. PMID:26176370

  2. Determinants of Health and Pediatric Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew F; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Cox, Joanne E; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Grace, Aimee M; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri E; Lobach, Katherine S; Ma, Christine T; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberly D; Sadof, Matthew D; Shah, Anita N; Fierman, Arthur H

    2016-03-01

    More than 20% of children nationally live in poverty. Pediatric primary care practices are critical points-of-contact for these patients and their families. Practices must consider risks that are rooted in poverty as they determine how to best deliver family-centered care and move toward action on the social determinants of health. The Practice-Level Care Delivery Subgroup of the Academic Pediatric Association's Task Force on Poverty has developed a roadmap for pediatric providers and practices to use as they adopt clinical practice redesign strategies aimed at mitigating poverty's negative impact on child health and well-being. The present article describes how care structures and processes can be altered in ways that align with the needs of families living in poverty. Attention is paid to both facilitators of and barriers to successful redesign strategies. We also illustrate how such a roadmap can be adapted by practices depending on the degree of patient need and the availability of practice resources devoted to intervening on the social determinants of health. In addition, ways in which practices can advocate for families in their communities and nationally are identified. Finally, given the relative dearth of evidence for many poverty-focused interventions in primary care, areas that would benefit from more in-depth study are considered. Such a focus is especially relevant as practices consider how they can best help families mitigate the impact of poverty-related risks in ways that promote long-term health and well-being for children. PMID:26933205

  3. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergård, Jens

    2012-01-01

    challenges. Practice units are fairly small: close to 2 GPs per unit plus nurses and secretaries. The units are fully computerized, that is, with computer-based patient records and submission of prescriptions digitally to pharmacies etc. Over the past few years a decrease in solo practices has been seen and......General practice is the corner stone of Danish primary health care. General practitioners (GPs) are similar to family physicians in the United States. On average, all Danes have 6.9 contacts per year with their GP (in-person, telephone, or E-mail consultation). General practice is characterized by...... postgraduate education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new...

  4. Universal Design Patterns for stoma care away-from-home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Meester

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Accommodating the real diversity of user populations,including those with physical and / or mental impairments and functional limitations, requires a large amount of designinformation in connection with human dis-abilities(limitations and possibilities. In order to collect andorganise this information for designers and decision makers, Universal Design Patterns (UD Patterns offer descriptive information about, on the one hand, CONFLICTS between users and built environments, and on the other hand,empirically evident design RESOLUTIONS. Directcollaboration with users / experts was tested in thedevelopment of a specific UD Pattern for a (Semi- ambulant accessible toilet for personal care, with specific emphasis onstoma-care in public facilities. The paper illustrates howpeople with ostomies and care-givers communicate with researchers, and how relevant design information is extracted and structured. On a more general level, results show how environment-related dimensions of human functioning differ from medical aspects, and how direct involvement of end-users enriches the content of design information.

  5. Care Utilization Patterns and Diabetes Self-Management Education Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tammie M; Richards, Jennifer; Churilla, James R

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Previous studies have shown that receiving diabetes self-management education (DSME) is associated with increased care utilization. However, the relationship between DSME duration and care utilization patterns remains largely unexamined. Our purpose is to characterize DSME duration and examine the relationship between DSME duration and clinical- and self-care utilization patterns. Methods. The study sample included 1,446 adults who were ≥18 years of age, had diabetes, and had participated in the 2008 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Clinical- and self-care outcomes were derived using responses to the survey's diabetes module and were based on minimum standards of care established by the American Diabetes Association. The outcomes examined included self-monitoring of blood glucose at least once per day; receiving at least one eye exam, one foot exam, A1C tests, and an influenza vaccination in the past year; and ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccination. DSME duration was categorized as no DSME, >0 to 10 hours. Results. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, compared to those who did not receive DSME, those who had 4-10 or 10+ hours of DSME were more likely to receive two A1C tests (odds ratio [95% CI] 2.69 [1.30-5.58] and 2.63 [1.10-6.31], respectively) and have a pneumococcal vaccination (1.98 [1.03-3.80] and 1.92 [1.01-3.64], respectively). Those receiving 10+ hours of DSME were 2.2 times (95% CI 1.18-4.09) as likely to have an influenza vaccination. Conclusion. These data reveal a positive relationship between DSME duration and utilization of some diabetes clinical care services. PMID:26300613

  6. Determinants of infant care practices in Minangkabau ethnic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masrul

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Child care practices are important for a growth and development, and are influenced by cultural determinants. Indicators of infant care practices have not been determinated for the Minangkabau ethnic group. Objective To determine indicators of infant care among a Minangkabau ethnic community. Methods A cross-sectional study was done in Solok, West Sumatera, a region populated by largely Minangkabau ethnic groups. Infants feeing care (IFC, infant health care (IHC, infant clean care (ICC, and infant psychosocial stimulation care (IPSC were the components of infant care used as indicators. Data on these four components were obtained through interviews with parents and direct observation. A score was assigned to each component. We used the confirmatory factors analysis (CFA method to determine whether the indicators were valid in the studied population. Results We enrolled 417 infants in the study, with a mean age of 8.7 months, and 51.6% were female. IFC scores were fair in 72.7%, high in 20.4%, and low in 6.7%. IHC scores were poor in 25.7%, fair in 58.8%, and good in 15.5%. ICC scores were poor in 0.7%, fair in 42.2%, and good in 58.1%. IPSC scores were poor in 10.6%, fair in 84.9%, and high in 4.5%. On CFA, ICC contributed least to the indicator model (l:0.5 and 0.47, respectively. Goodness of fit of the to the model (l:0.5 and 0.46, respectively. Goodness of fit of the model was good (P>0.005. Root mean square error apporximation was 0.9 Conclusions Infant clean care was the most significant contributor to the infant care practice indicator in the Minangkabau ethnic community. Similar studies need to be done in other Indonesian ethnic groups.

  7. Mind-body practices in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoul, Alejandro; Milbury, Kathrin; Sood, Anil K; Prinsloo, Sarah; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item distress thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25325936

  8. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  9. Research in Review: Driving Critical Care Practice Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Elizabeth; McNeill, Margaret; Munro, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    During the past year, studies were published that will lead to practice change, address challenges at the bedside, and introduce new care strategies. This article summarizes some of this important work and considers it in the context of previous research and practice. Examples of research-based practice changes include the performance and assessment of septic shock resuscitation, and the integration of tourniquets and massive transfusions in civilian trauma. Care challenges addressed include ethical considerations in light of the Ebola epidemic, infection prevention associated with chlorhexidine bathing, bedside alarm management, evidence to enhance moral courage, and interventions to mitigate thirst in critically ill patients. Research that portends future care includes a discussion of fecal microbiota transplant for patients with refractory infection with refractory infection with Clostridium difficile. PMID:26724298

  10. Process of diffusing cancer survivorship care into oncology practice

    OpenAIRE

    Tessaro, Irene; Campbell, Marci K.; Golden, Shannon; Gellin, Mindy; McCabe, Mary; Syrjala, Karen; Ganz, Patricia A.; Jacobs, Linda; Baker, Scott; Miller, Kenneth D.; Rosenstein, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The LIVESTRONG Centers of Excellence were funded to increase the effectiveness of survivorship care in oncology practice. This study describes the ongoing process of adopting and implementing survivorship care using the framework of the diffusion of innovation theory of change. Primary data collection included telephone interviews with 39 members from the eight centers and site visits. Organizational characteristics, overall progress, and challenges for implementation were collected from prop...

  11. Adoption of hand hygiene practices among health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    P. A. Archanalakshmi; Meriton Stanly A.; Christina Mary Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hand hygiene is the most important measure to avoid the transmission of harmful germs and prevent health care-associated infections. Hand washing with plain soap removes loose transient flora even though it does not remove pathogens from the hands of healthcare workers. Proper hand hygiene is cheap, most effective, easiest and foremost method of reducing health care associated infections. This study was carried out to know the present status of hand hygiene practices and the barri...

  12. Care Practice #2: Freedom of Movement Throughout Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Shilling, Teri; Romano, Amy M.; DiFranco, Joyce T.

    2007-01-01

    This updated edition of Care Practice Paper #2 presents the evidence for the benefits of allowing freedom of movement in labor. Physiologic and anatomical principles that support the benefits of movement are explained. The authors review common obstacles to movement in labor, including the routine use of interventions that inhibit women's ability to walk or change position. Women are encouraged to plan to be active in labor and to select care providers and birth settings that provide the full...

  13. Instruction of pattern recognition by MATLAB practice 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the pattern recognition by MATLAB practice. It includes possibility and limit of AI, introduction of pattern recognition a vector and matrix, basic status and a probability theory, a random variable and probability distribution, statistical decision theory, data-mining, gaussian mixture model, a nerve cell modeling such as Hebb's learning rule, LMS learning rule, genetic algorithm, dynamic programming and DTW, HMN on Markov model and HMM's three problems and solution, introduction of SVM with KKT condition and margin optimum, kernel trick and MATLAB practice.

  14. Percutaneous Liver Biopsy Practice Patterns Among Canadian Hepatologists

    OpenAIRE

    Aljawad, Mohammed; Yoshida, Eric M; Uhanova, Julia; Marotta, Paul; Chandok, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Percutaneous liver biopsy (PLB) is the standard procedure to obtain histological samples essential for the management of various liver diseases. While safe, many hepatologists no longer perform their own PLBs; the reasons for this practice shift are unknown.OBJECTIVE: To describe the attitudes, practice patterns and barriers to PLB among hepatologists in Canada.METHODS: A survey was distributed to all hepatologists in Canada.RESULTS: Thirty-two of 40 (80%) hepatologists completed ...

  15. Objectively Measured Activity Patterns among Adults in Residential Aged Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Reid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the feasibility of using the activPAL3TM activity monitor, and, to describe the activity patterns of residential aged care residents. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Randomly selected aged care facilities within 100 km of the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Participants: Ambulatory, older (≥60 years residential aged care adults without cognitive impairment. Measurements: Feasibility was assessed by consent rate, sleep/wear diary completion, and through interviews with staff/participants. Activity patterns (sitting/lying, standing, and stepping were measured via activPAL3TM monitors worn continuously for seven days. Times spent in each activity were described and then compared across days of the week and hours of the day using linear mixed models. Results: Consent rate was 48% (n = 41. Activity patterns are described for the 31 participants (mean age 84.2 years who provided at least one day of valid monitor data. In total, 14 (45% completed the sleep/wear diary. Participants spent a median (interquartile range of 12.4 (1.7 h sitting/lying (with 73% of this accumulated in unbroken bouts of ≥30 min, 1.9 (1.3 h standing, and 21.4 (36.7 min stepping during their monitored waking hours per day. Activity did not vary significantly by day of the week (p ≥ 0.05; stepping showed significant hourly variation (p = 0.018. Conclusions: Older adults in residential aged care were consistently highly sedentary. Feasibility considerations for objective activity monitoring identified for this population include poor diary completion and lost monitors.

  16. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. PMID:26411818

  17. Newborn care practices and home-based postnatal newborn care programme – Mewat, Haryana, India, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latika Nath Sinha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the Home Based Postnatal Newborn Care programme by Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs under the National Rural Health Mission was initiated in 2011 to reduce neonatal mortality rates (NMRs. ASHAs get cash incentives for six postnatal home visits for newborn care. We studied newborn care practices among mothers in Mewat, Haryana, having a high NMR and determined risk factors for unsafe practices and described the knowledge and skills of ASHAs during home visits. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among mothers who had delivered a child during the previous seven months using cluster sampling. We interviewed mothers and ASHAs in the selected subcentres using semi–structured questionnaires on the six safe newborn care practices, namely safe breastfeeding, keeping cord and eyes clean, wrapping baby, kangaroo care, delayed bathing and hand washing. Results: We interviewed 320 mothers, 61 ASHAs and observed 19 home visits. Overall, 60% of mothers adopted less than three safe practices. Wrapping newborns (96% and delayed bathing (64% were better adopted than cord care (49%, safe breastfeeding (48%, hand washing (30%, kangaroo care (20% and eye care (9%. Cultural beliefs and traditional birth attendants influenced the mother’s practices. The lack of supervision by auxiliary nurse midwives (ANM, delayed referral and transportation were the other challenges. Conclusion: Knowledge–practice gaps existed among mothers counselled by ASHAs. Poor utilization of reproductive and child health services decreased opportunities for ASHA–mother dialogue on safe practices. Recommendations included training ANMs, training TBAs as ASHAs, innovative communication strategies for ASHAs and improved referral system.

  18. Newborn care practices in an urban slum of Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahi Manju

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite efforts by government and other agencies, neonatal morbidity and mortality continues to be high in India. Among other reasons, newborn care practices are major contributors for such high rates. AIMS: To find out the newborn care practices including delivery practices, immediate care given after birth and breast-feeding practices in an urban slum of Delhi. SETTINGS AND DESIGN : Community based, cross-sectional survey in a resettlement colony (a type of urban slum. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Semi-structured, pre-tested schedule was used to interview 82 mothers of newborns in the study area. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : Data was analyzed using Epi - info version 6.04. Fischer exact test and c2 test were applied. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION : More than half i.e. 26 (56.1% of home deliveries, which were mostly conducted by dais (24, 91.3% or relatives in 4 (8.7% of home deliveries. Bathing the baby immediately after birth was commonly practiced in 38 (82.6% of home deliveries. Finger was used to clean the air passage in most of the home deliveries (29, 63%. About 61% (28 of home delivered newborns were not weighed at birth. Rooming in was practiced in majority of the cases. A few of home delivered neonates (12 were given injection tetanus toxoid by unqualified practitioners. Use of clip, band or sterile thread to tie the cord and no application to the cord was significantly higher in institutional deliveries. Breast milk as the first feed was significantly more in institutional deliveries. There is an urgent need to reorient health care providers and to educate mothers on clean delivery practices and early neonatal care.

  19. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.; Jensen, M.S.; Roslind, K.; Nielsen, L.M.; Lange, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  20. Determinants of nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiddink, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to analyze nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians (PCPs), their nutritional attitudes and knowledge and their interest in the role of nutrition in health and disease. A second objective was to identify the determinants of nutrition guidance practices as well as their working mechanism. In addition one study is described, on consumers expectations of such nutrition guidance.The consumer study revealed that PCPs appeared to be...

  1. Leadership practice as interaction in primary care emergency team training

    OpenAIRE

    Brandstorp, Helen; Kirkengen, Anna Luise; Sterud, Birgitte; Haugland, Bjørgun; Halvorsen, Peder Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The present study, framed as critical action research, aimed at contributing to the improvement of training emergency teams in primary care. The first author was a participating observer in local simulation sessions performed by 10 different teams. Leadership practice as interaction was analysed in three types of communicative spaces: in the review and debriefing sessions; in the author group; and in focus groups involving local stakeholders. The teams practiced both designated and distribute...

  2. Usage pattern of personal care products in California households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangmei May; Bennett, Deborah H; Ritz, Beate; Cassady, Diana L; Lee, Kiyoung; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2010-11-01

    Given the concern over the potential for health risks associated with certain ingredients (e.g., phthalates) in personal care products, usage patterns of ∼30 types of personal care products (e.g., shampoo, sunscreen, fragrance, etc.) were collected in 604 California households through a telephone interview. Preferences in selecting products, e.g., scented or unscented, aerosol, and brand loyalty, were also investigated. Participants were recruited in three age groups, children (mostly preschoolers), their parents, and adults age 55 or older. Use frequencies of various product types varied by sex, age group, race, education, and climatic region. Product use by parent and child from the same household were correlated. Use frequencies of products in the same class (e.g., skincare) were moderately correlated, which may impact aggregate exposures. Use frequencies observed in this study were generally in the same range as those reported in the EPA Exposure Factor Handbook, but we found differences for some individual products. Our study provides additional data on population-based usage patterns of a large collection of commonly used personal care products pertaining to several age groups and socio-demographic strata. This information will be valuable for exposure and risk assessments. PMID:20696198

  3. [Clinical practice guidelines and primary care. SESPAS report 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza, Gerardo; Bañeres, Joaquim; Gracia, Francisco Javier

    2012-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are intended to serve as a bridge between the decision levels and the sources of knowledge, giving decision makers the best synthesis of scientific evidence and an analysis of context, to provide elements of judgement and to transfer scientific knowledge into clinical practice. However, the actual impact on health care is variable and effectiveness in changing medical practice, moderate. Qualitative and quantitative studies show that most primary care physicians consider that the guides are a valuable source of advice and training and a kind of improving the quality of healthcare. However, they underline its rigidity, the difficulty to apply to individual patients and that their main goal is to reduce healthcare costs. In Spain, there are several experiences as GuíaSalud in developing clinical practice guidelines aimed specifically at primary care. However, the proper implementation of a clinical practice guideline includes not only the quality and thoroughness of the evidence, but the credibility of professionals and organizations and other contextual factors such as characteristics of patients, providers and organizations or systems. An important step in future research is to develop a better theoretical understanding of organizational change that is required for management and professionals to give appropriate guidance to the implementation of the clinical practice guidelines. PMID:21993072

  4. Minimally invasive follicular carcinoma: predictors of vascular invasion and impact on patterns of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredo, Paolo; Jillard, Christa; Thomas, Samantha; Scheri, Randall P; Sosa, Julie Ann; Roman, Sanziana

    2016-01-01

    Some studies have reported that minimally invasive follicular carcinoma (MIFC) with vascular invasion is associated with compromised prognosis, leading to an ongoing debate regarding extent of surgery for MIFC. Our goal was to identify predictors of vascular invasion and determine its impact on patterns of care. Adult patients with MIFC were culled from the National Cancer Database, 2010-2011, and segregated according to the presence/absence of capsular or vascular invasion. Variables of interest were examined using Chi-square and student's t tests. Multivariate analysis was performed with logistic regression. A total of 617 patients with MIFC were identified: 54% with capsular invasion only and 46% with vascular invasion. Demographic characteristics were similarly distributed between the two groups. Tumor size was larger in patients with vascular invasion (mean = 35.7 vs. 29.2 mm capsular invasion only, p standardization of practice patterns and improvement in quality of care. PMID:26077949

  5. Social Pattern Of Seeking Medical Care In Rural Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakroo P L

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt has been made to assess the perception and management of sickness among rural population in Haryana State. The relationship between medical care seeking behaviour with dependency scale and skepticism about medical care scale has also been explained. The dependency scale measures the degree of dependence on others for management of sickness and the skepticism scale highlights the degree of reliance on other systems of medicine than modern medical care for treatment of sickness in a person (Edward Suchman1995. This study is based on 273 households drawn from three villages of Beri Block in Rohtak District. Out of the 34 villages in block, one village named as PHC village was selected having institutional facility of primary health center and from it 10 percent of the total households were drawn on simple random sampling basis. The two other villages named as non PHC villages were drawn form those villages which were around 10-15 kilometers away from any health facility and out of these villages 50 percent of the households were selected. Information from all householders were collected through interview schedules. An attempt has also been made to establish a pattern of seeking medical care in terms of the socio-economic classification of villagers as well as its caste structure

  6. The quality of COPD care in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Rasmussen, Finn Vejlø; Borgeskov, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in a large sample of general practices in Denmark. We focussed on whether participation by general practitioners (GPs) in an educational programme could enhance the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and staging of the disease and improve adherence...

  7. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  8. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  9. Values and Ethics in Child and Youth Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras

    2008-01-01

    The implications of the practitioner's personal values are explored in relation to the professional issues of child and youth care practice. Values are inevitably a component of decision-making and therefore are integrally connected to ethics in the field. The prevalence of subjectivity over objectivity is emphasized in relation to in-the-moment…

  10. Results of the 03-05 patterns of care study nationwide survey for small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) conducted a third nationwide survey of care process for patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer (PCS 03-05). The PCS investigated changes in the care process including continuous technical evolution in radiotherapy as compared with preceding surveys (PCS 95-97, PCS 99-01) and assessed their influence on early outcome. PCS 99-01 showed that evidence based practice pattern had well penetrated into clinical practice. PCS 03-05 demonstrated several changes in patterns of radiotherapy. Decrease in the use of twice-daily radiotherapy did not influence early outcome. Results support the general consideration that technical evolution in radiotherapy has essential role in the era of intensive chemoradiation for small cell lung cancer. (author)

  11. Involvement of the Client in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Kjær, Lone; Præstegaard, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    one client, his cohabitant family and the involved healthcare professionals. Results: Client involvement in home care service is shown within the constructed categories: The schism between wishing for and actually being helped; The chronological order can be negotiated; not the content; Liberal...... business gives the client full influence into the treatment and the therapist gold; and Converting a home to at working place and a home. Client involvement in practice seems to be very limited. Conclusion: All in all, involvement of clients in home care service seems to be more of a political illusion......Background: Through the last 35 years, ‘client involvement’ has been a mantra within health policies, education curriculums and health care institutions, yet very little is known about how ‘client involvement’ is practiced in the meetings with clients and health professionals. Aim: To analyse and...

  12. A Model for Implementing Integrative Practice in Health Care Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Patterson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been increased awareness and use of complementary/alternative therapies (CAM in many countries without the health care infrastructure to support it. The National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine referred to the combining of mainstream medical therapies and CAM as integrative medicine. The creation of integrative health care teams will definitely result in redefining roles, but more importantly in a change in how services are delivered. The purpose of this paper is to describe a model of the necessary health care agency resources to support an integrative practice model. A logic model is used to depict the findings of a review of current evidence. Logic models are designed to show relationships between the goals of a program or initiative, the resources to achieve desired outputs and the activities that lead to outcomes. The four major resource categories necessary for implementing integrative care are within the domains of a professional and research development, b health human resource planning, c regulation and legislation and d practice and management in clinical areas. It was concluded that the system outcomes from activities within these resource categories should lead to freedom of choice in health care; a culturally sensitive health care system and a broader spectrum of services for achieving public health goals.

  13. Tracing detached and attached care practices in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soffer, Ann Katrine B.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of skills labs in Danish nursing education can, in itself, be viewed as a complexity. The students are expected to eventually carry out their work in a situated hospital practice, but they learn their professional skills in a different space altogether, detached and removed from...... as part of care practices of nurses rendering the ability to detach in engagement with patients a professional skill that students also need to learn. In the analysis to follow, attached and detached engagements are located on an equal plane by integrating both in to the same conceptual framework...... the hospitals and practicing on plastic dummies. Despite the apparent artificiality of the skills lab, this article will show that it is possible to analyse some of the fundamental aspects of care in nursing by ethnographically following this phenomenon of simulation-based training. These particular...

  14. Diabetes treatment patterns and goal achievement in primary diabetes care (DiaRegis) - study protocol and patient characteristics at baseline

    OpenAIRE

    Deeg Evelin; Plate Tanja; Krekler Michael; Gitt Anselm K; Binz Christiane; Bramlage Peter; Tschöpe Diethelm

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk for disease and treatment related complications after the initial approach of oral mono/dual antidiabetic therapy has failed. Data from clinical practice with respect to this patient group are however scarce. Therefore we set up a registry in primary care documenting the course and outcomes of this patient group. Methods Diabetes Treatment Patterns and Goal Achievement in Primary Diabetes Care (DiaRegis) is a prospecti...

  15. Everyday practice and unnoticed professional competence in day care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Warring, Niels; Nielsen, Birger Steen;

    In Denmark more than 9 out 10 children attend day care centers that are publicly funded and regulated. The main part of employees, the social educators, at day care centers have attended a 3½ years educational programme with both theoretical and practical elements. Nevertheless it has been hard...... for the social educators to get recognition for their professional competencies and the societal importance of their work. Neoliberal governance has imposed a lot of demands for documentation, evaluation etc., and a growing focus on children’s learning in day care centers has resulted in national goals...... hand it can tend to underestimate the value of a large part of their work which is embedded in what in the paper will be explored as unnoticed professional competences. Building on empirical results from research in day care centers based on mixed methods (observations, interviews and action research...

  16. Describing spatial pattern in stream networks: A practical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganio, L.M.; Torgersen, C.E.; Gresswell, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The shape and configuration of branched networks influence ecological patterns and processes. Recent investigations of network influences in riverine ecology stress the need to quantify spatial structure not only in a two-dimensional plane, but also in networks. An initial step in understanding data from stream networks is discerning non-random patterns along the network. On the other hand, data collected in the network may be spatially autocorrelated and thus not suitable for traditional statistical analyses. Here we provide a method that uses commercially available software to construct an empirical variogram to describe spatial pattern in the relative abundance of coastal cutthroat trout in headwater stream networks. We describe the mathematical and practical considerations involved in calculating a variogram using a non-Euclidean distance metric to incorporate the network pathway structure in the analysis of spatial variability, and use a non-parametric technique to ascertain if the pattern in the empirical variogram is non-random.

  17. Using Electronic Health Record Systems in Diabetes Care: Emerging Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, Tiffany C; Zheng, Kai; Lowery, Julie C; Souden, Maria; Keith, Rosalind

    2010-01-01

    While there has been considerable attention devoted to the deployment of electronic health record (EHR) systems, there has been far less attention given to their appropriation for use in clinical encounters - particularly in the context of complex, chronic illness. The Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA) has been at the forefront of EHR adoption and, as such, provides a unique opportunity to examine a mature EHR system in widespread use. Moreover, with a high prevalence of diabetes in its patient population, the VA provides a useful platform for examining EHR use in the context of chronic disease care. We conducted a sequential, exploratory qualitative study at two VA Medical Centers in the Midwest. First, we conducted observations of 64 clinical consultations with diabetes patients. These observations involved 31 different health care providers. Second, using insights from these observations, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 39 health care providers focusing on their use of information in diabetes patient care. Field notes and interview transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Our analysis generated several categories of EHR use in clinical encounters: priming, structuring, assessing, informing, and continuing. We also outline some mismatches between EHR system design and VA diabetes care practices. We conclude by discussing implications of these emergent system uses for improving the software design of EHRs to better support chronic disease care, as well as for our understanding of the integration of technologies in health care. PMID:25264545

  18. Health service utilization patterns of primary care patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laux Gunter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess factors associated with visits to GPs, orthopaedists, and non-physician practitioners of complementary medicine (alternative practitioners by primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA. Methods Cross-sectional survey among 1250 consecutively addressed patients from 75 primary care practices in Germany. All patients suffered from OA of the knee or hip according to ACR criteria. They received questionnaires collecting sociodemographic data, data about health service utilisation, prescriptions, comorbidities. They also included established instruments as the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS2-SF to assess disease-specific quality of life and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 to assess depression. Hierarchical stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to reveal significant factors influencing health service utilization. Results 1021 of 1250 (81.6% questionnaires were returned. Nonrespondents did not differ from participants. Factors associated with health service use (HSU varied between providers of care. Not being in a partnership, achieving a high score on the PHQ-9, increased pain severity reflected in the “symptom” scale of the AIMS2-SF, and an increased number of drug prescriptions predicted a high frequency of GP visits. The PHQ-9 score was also a predictor for visits to orthopaedists, as were previous GP contacts, a high score in the "symptom" scale as well as a high score in the "lower limb scale" of the AIMS2-SF. Regarding visits to alternative practitioners, a high score in the AIMS -"social" scale was a positive predictor as older people were less likely to visit them. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for awareness of psychological factors contributing to the use of health care providers. Addressing the revealed factors associated with HSU appropriately may lead to decreased health care utilization. But further research is needed to assess how this can be done

  19. Socioeconomic status and patterns of care in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study aims to explore any associations between socioeconomic factors and lung cancer management and outcome in the Australian setting. The study population consisted of patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer in 1996 who were living in the Northern Sydney Area Health Service (NSAHS) or South Western Sydney Area Health Service (SWSAHS). These two Area Health Services differ in socioeconomic profiles based on socioeconomic indexes for areas (SEIFA), median income, education level and unemployment rate. Data on patient demographics, tumour characteristics, management details, recurrence and survival were collected, and the patterns of care were analysed. Socioeconomic status indicators of the two Area Health Services were imputed from the Australian Bureau of Statistics data. There were 270 and 256 new cases of lung cancer identified in NSAHS and SWSAHS respectively. Patients in NSAHS were slightly older (median age 73 versus 68 years) and there was less male predominance. The stage distributions and performance status of the two cohorts were similar. There were no significant differences in the utilisation rates of different treatment modalities between the two areas: radiotherapy (54% in NSAHS and 55% in SWSAHS), chemotherapy (34% and 25%), surgery (26% and 21%) and no treatment (22% and 25%). The 5-year overall survival was slightly in favour of NSAHS (10.5% and 7.4%), but did not reach statistical significance. Despite differences in socioeconomic profiles between the two area health services, patients with lung cancer had similar patterns of care and survival

  20. Process of diffusing cancer survivorship care into oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessaro, Irene; Campbell, Marci K; Golden, Shannon; Gellin, Mindy; McCabe, Mary; Syrjala, Karen; Ganz, Patricia A; Jacobs, Linda; Baker, Scott; Miller, Kenneth D; Rosenstein, Donald L

    2013-06-01

    The LIVESTRONG Centers of Excellence were funded to increase the effectiveness of survivorship care in oncology practice. This study describes the ongoing process of adopting and implementing survivorship care using the framework of the diffusion of innovation theory of change. Primary data collection included telephone interviews with 39 members from the eight centers and site visits. Organizational characteristics, overall progress, and challenges for implementation were collected from proposals and annual reports. Creating an awareness of cancer survivorship care was a major accomplishment (relative advantage). Adoption depended on the fit within the cancer center (compatibility), and changed over time based on trial and error (trialability). Implementing survivorship care within the existing culture of oncology and breaking down resistance to change was a lengthy process (complexity). Survivorship care became sustainable as it became reimbursed, and more new patients were seen (observability). Innovators and early adopters were crucial to success. Diffusion of innovation theory can provide a strategy to evaluate adoption and implementation of cancer survivorship programs into clinical practice. PMID:24073165

  1. Improving haemophilia patient care through sharing best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moerloose, Philippe; Arnberg, Daniel; O'Mahony, Brian; Colvin, Brian

    2015-10-01

    At the 2014 Annual Congress of the European Haemophilia Consortium (EHC) held in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Pfizer initiated and funded a satellite symposium entitled: 'Improving Patient Care Through Sharing Best Practice'. Co-chaired by Brian Colvin (Pfizer Global Innovative Pharma Business, Rome, Italy) and Brian O'Mahony [President of the EHC, Brussels, Belgium], the symposium provided an opportunity to consider patient care across borders, to review how patient advocacy groups can successfully engage with policymakers in healthcare decision-making and to discuss the importance of patient involvement in data collection to help shape the future environment for people with haemophilia. Professor Philippe de Moerloose (University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine of Geneva, Switzerland) opened the session by discussing the gap between the haemophilia management guidelines and the reality of care for many patients living in Europe, highlighting the importance of sharing of best practice and building a network of treaters and patient organisations to support the improvement of care across Europe. Daniel Arnberg (SCISS AB, Hägersten, Sweden) reviewed the health technology assessment process conducted in Sweden, the first for haemophilia products, as a case study, focusing on the role of the patient organisation. Finally, Brian O'Mahony reflected on the central role of patients as individuals and also within patient organisations in shaping the future of haemophilia care. PMID:26338268

  2. Care ethics and the global practice of commercial surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jennifer A

    2010-09-01

    This essay will focus on the moral issues relating to surrogacy in the global context, and will critique the liberal arguments that have been offered in support of it. Liberal arguments hold sway concerning reproductive arrangements made between commissioning couples from wealthy nations and the surrogates from socioeconomically weak backgrounds that they hire to do their reproductive labor. My argument in this paper is motivated by a concern for controlling harms by putting the practice of globalized commercial surrogacy into the context of care ethics. As I will argue, the unstable situations into which children of global surrogacy arrangements are born is symbolic of the crisis of care that the practice raises. Using the Baby Manji case as my touch point, I will suggest that liberalism cannot address the harms experienced by Manji and children like her who are created through the global practice of assisted reproductive technology. I will argue that, if commissioning couples consider their proposed surrogacy contracts from a care ethics point of view, they will begin to think relationally about their actions, considering the practice from an ethical lens, not just an economic or contractual one. PMID:20690917

  3. Redesigning Health Care Practices to Address Childhood Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierman, Arthur H; Beck, Andrew F; Chung, Esther K; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Siegel, Benjamin; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Conroy, Kathleen; Federico, Steven G; Flanagan, Patricia J; Garg, Arvin; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Grace, Aimee M; Gross, Rachel S; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri; Kraft, Colleen; Kuo, Alice; Lewis, Gena; Lobach, Katherine S; Long, Dayna; Ma, Christine T; Messito, Mary; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberley R; Osman, Cynthia; Sadof, Matthew D; Schickedanz, Adam B; Cox, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Child poverty in the United States is widespread and has serious negative effects on the health and well-being of children throughout their life course. Child health providers are considering ways to redesign their practices in order to mitigate the negative effects of poverty on children and support the efforts of families to lift themselves out of poverty. To do so, practices need to adopt effective methods to identify poverty-related social determinants of health and provide effective interventions to address them. Identification of needs can be accomplished with a variety of established screening tools. Interventions may include resource directories, best maintained in collaboration with local/regional public health, community, and/or professional organizations; programs embedded in the practice (eg, Reach Out and Read, Healthy Steps for Young Children, Medical-Legal Partnership, Health Leads); and collaboration with home visiting programs. Changes to health care financing are needed to support the delivery of these enhanced services, and active advocacy by child health providers continues to be important in effecting change. We highlight the ongoing work of the Health Care Delivery Subcommittee of the Academic Pediatric Association Task Force on Child Poverty in defining the ways in which child health care practice can be adapted to improve the approach to addressing child poverty. PMID:27044692

  4. Knowledge, attitudes and practices in the provision of nutritional care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fletcher, Antoinette

    2012-02-01

    The nutritional care of patients is one of the primary responsibilities of all registered nurses (Persenius et al, 2008). A poor nutritional status can lead to malnutrition, which can have serious consequences for an individual\\'s quality of life (Field and Smith, 2008). This paper commences with an introduction to the concept of nutrition, provides an overview of nutritional guidelines and nutritional screening tools which identify those at risk of malnutrition. It reviews the literature on nurses\\' knowledge, attitudes and practices in the provision of nutritional care and debates challenges and opportunities encountered to help nurses ensure adequate patient nutrition.

  5. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Lambert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine general practice (GP care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts. Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for PD with/without agoraphobia. Follow-up measures recorded at 20 weeks/10 months following randomisation. Control arm, unrestricted routine GP care (practice appointments, referrals and prescriptions. Trial arm, occupational therapyled lifestyle treatment comprising lifestyle review of fluid intake, diet pattern, exercise, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Primary outcome measure: beck anxiety inventory. At baseline, participants attended 2-3 times more GP appointments than population average, reducing at 10 months to 1.6 times population average for routine GP care and 0.97 population average for lifestyle arm. At 10 months, 33% fewer referrals (6 referrals; 0 mental health than at baseline (9 referrals; 2 mental health were made for lifestyle arm patients compared with 42% increase (from 12 referrals; 8 mental health at baseline to 17 referrals; 7 mental health in GP care arm. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed most often. Benzodiazepines and beta-blockers were prescribed more often than tricyclic against current clinical guidelines. In conclusion, we found that PD patients at baseline were high healthcare resource users. Treatment in both study arms reduced resource use. Routine GP care requires further review for this patient group.

  6. Oncology Rehabilitation Provision and Practice Patterns across Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Canestraro, Alyssa; Nakhle, Anthony; Stack, Malissa; Strong, Kelly; Wright, Ashley; Beauchamp, Marla; Berg, Katherine; Brooks, Dina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Rehabilitation is increasingly recognized as an important therapeutic intervention for people with cancer. The main objective of this study was to explore the current practice pattern and provision of oncology rehabilitation in Canada. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional online survey was administered to Canadian facilities offering cancer treatment and/or listed as offering rehabilitation services during or after cancer treatment (cancer centres, rehabilitation hospitals, communi...

  7. Sending Expatriates to Japan? Executive staffing practice patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Ralf Bebenroth; Donghao Li

    2006-01-01

    Our empirical study provides the first insights of executive staffing practice patterns in foreign-owned multinational company (MNC) subsidiaries based in Japan. We explore determinants for parent country nationals (PCN) as top managing directors and - new in the International Human Resource Management (IHRM) literature - also the ratio of PCN found on the board (Ratio) and examine under which conditions they are prevalent in the subsidiaries. We sampled the full range of 3,241 foreign compan...

  8. Nonverbal Communication : Basic Principles and Practical Applications in Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    PATTERSON, Miles L.; 飯塚, 雄一; Miles L., PATTERSON; Yuichi, IIZUKA

    2006-01-01

    Nonverbal communication is a pervasive influence in every life. Furthermore, in most setting, nonverbal communication has a greater impact on interactions than does verbal communication. In this article, we first describe the basic processes involved in nonverbal communication and then briefly examine the factors affecting patterns of nonverbal communication - biology, culture, gender, and personality. Finally, we discuss the role of nonverbal communication in health care settings. Nonverbal ...

  9. Enteral nutrition practices in the intensive care unit: Understanding of nursing practices and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Babita Gupta; Pramendra Agrawal; Soni, Kapil D; Vikas Yadav; Roshni Dhakal; Shally Khurana; M C Misra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adequate nutritional support is important for the comprehensive management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Aim: The study was aimed to survey prevalent enteral nutrition practices in the trauma intensive care unit, nurses′ perception, and their knowledge of enteral feeding. Study Design: The study was conducted in the ICU of a level 1 trauma center, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The study design used an audit. Materials...

  10. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    postgraduate education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new...... is expected to accelerate, in part because of the GP age structure, with many GPs retiring and new GPs not wanting to practice alone. This latter workforce trend is pointing toward a new model with employed GPs, particularly in rural areas....

  11. Economies of scope in Danish primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Rose Olsen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We analyze total operating costs and activities in Danish General Practice units to assess whether there are unexploited economies of scope in the production of primary care services. Methods: We apply stochastic frontier analysis to derive cost functions and associated cost complementarities...... between GP services and overall economies of scope. Data: Cross-section data for a sample of 331 primary care practices with 1-8 GPs from the year 2006. This is a unique combined dataset consisting of survey and register data. Results: We find a trend towards cost complementarities between the production...... positive economies of scope in the production of GP services. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that there were overall economies of scope associated with the joint production of a) standard consultations, b) email/phone consultations and c) home visits. Cost complementarities between standard...

  12. The future of bereavement care in British general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, W R

    1997-06-01

    This paper discusses the future of bereavement care in British general practice by providing an insight into existing practice and then speculating on influences that may shape developments. There have been calls for the specialty to build on this traditional role and expand its bereavement service. Specific suggestions for the content of such a service are summarised. This emphasis reflects the increasing awareness in bereavement by other health organisations. This image of an expanding service needs to be contextualised within a primary care system that is feeling more pressurised due to increasing workload. This will continue to inhibit extensive service development. In addition it is important for the profession to consider the appropriateness of this activity. This complex debate has received little attention and research is required to inform and provide the necessary direction. PMID:9233164

  13. Practical relevance of pattern uniqueness in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, Paul T

    2013-09-10

    Uniqueness being unprovable, it has recently been argued that individualization in forensic science is irrelevant and, probability, as applied for DNA profiles, should be applied for all identifications. Critiques against uniqueness have omitted physical matching, a realistic and tangible individualization that supports uniqueness. Describing case examples illustrating pattern matches including physical matching, it is indicated that individualizations are practically relevant for forensic science as they establish facts on a definitive basis providing firm leads benefitting criminal investigation. As a tenet of forensic identification, uniqueness forms a fundamental paradigm relevant for individualization. Evidence on the indeterministic and stochastic causal pathways of characteristics in patterns available in the related fields of science sufficiently supports the proposition of uniqueness. Characteristics involved in physical matching and matching achieved in patterned evidence existing in the state of nature are not events amenable for counting; instead these are ensemble of visible units occupying the entire pattern area stretching the probability of re-occurrence of a verisimilitude pattern into infinity offering epistemic support to uniqueness. Observational methods are as respectable as instrumental or statistical methods since they are capable of generating results that are tangible and obviously valid as in physical matching. Applying the probabilistic interpretation used for DNA profiles to the other patterns would be unbefitting since these two are disparate, the causal pathways of the events, the loci, in the manipulated DNA profiles being determinable. While uniqueness enables individualizations, it does not vouch for eliminating errors. Instead of dismissing uniqueness and individualization, accepting errors as human or system failures and seeking remedial measures would benefit forensic science practice and criminal investigation. PMID:23849815

  14. Everyday practice and unnoticed professional competence in day care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Warring, Niels; Nielsen, Birger Steen;

    the social educators to get recognition for their professional competencies and the societal importance of their work. Neoliberal governance has imposed a lot of demands for documentation, evaluation etc., and a growing focus on children’s learning in day care centers has resulted in national goals...... other hand it can tend to underestimate the value of a large part of their work which is embedded in what in the paper will be explored as unnoticed professional competences. Building on empirical results from research in day care centers based on mixed methods (observations, interviews and action...... research based workshops) the paper will discuss work practice in an everyday life perspective. This perspective opens for understanding professional competence as part of creating coherence in children’s and families’ lives as well as during the day in the day care centers. It also opens for a discussion...

  15. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Ujwal Lakshman Yeole; Ankita Ramesh Chand; Nandi, Biplab B.; Pravin P Gawali; Adkitte, Roshan G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of t...

  16. Cultural Competence in Elderly Care within the Clinical Practice Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Dhadda, Sukdeep

    2014-01-01

    i Abstract  Aims: This study sought to assess the knowledge, skills, attitudes and practice of nurses towards the issue of culture, in order to assess their level of cultural competence (CC) and its impact upon healthcare provision within the speciality of elderly care.  Background: The UK continues to be an increasingly diverse and ageing population; hence, it is important that healthcare professionals become aware of the needs of older ethnic minority patients. CC is one approach...

  17. Best practice in primary care pathology: review 1

    OpenAIRE

    Smellie, W S A; Wilson, D; McNulty, C A M; Galloway, M. J.; Spickett, G A; Finnigan, D I; Bareford, D A; Greig, M A; Richards, J

    2005-01-01

    This first best practice review examines four series of common primary care questions in laboratory medicine, namely: (i) measurement and monitoring of cholesterol and of liver and muscle enzymes in patients in the context of lipid lowering drugs, (ii) diagnosis and monitoring of vitamin B12/folate deficiency, (iii) investigation and monitoring of paraprotein bands in blood, and (iv) management of Helicobacter pylori infection. The review is presented in a question–answer format, referenced f...

  18. Cultural care practices among mothers of nurslings with respiratory infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dayanne Rakelly de Oliveira; Gabriela Bezerra Dantas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To understand the cultural practices of care among mothers of infants with respiratory infection in a pediatric outpatient clinic, from the recognition of the importance of the use of traditional medicine in Brazil. Methods: We applied a descriptive and exploratory study, qualitative, with twenty-eight mothers of infants with respiratory infection seen at a referral center in the city of Barbalha - CE, Brazil. Data were collected between the monthsof November and December of 2010 t...

  19. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    OpenAIRE

    Viola Timm

    2015-01-01

    At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost...

  20. Provision of mental health care in general practice in Italy.

    OpenAIRE

    Tansella, M; Bellantuono, C

    1991-01-01

    The main features of the psychiatric system and of the general practice system in Italy since the psychiatric reform and the introduction of a national health service are briefly described. Research conducted in Italy confirms that a large proportion of patients seen by general practitioners have psychological disorders and that only some of those patients whose psychological problems are identified by general practitioners are referred to specialist psychiatric care. Thus, the need to identi...

  1. Reflective practice in contemporary child care social work

    OpenAIRE

    Ruch, Gillian Margaret

    2004-01-01

    In recent years there has been a steady increase in risk-averse, bureaucratic responses to the uncertainty, ambiguity and risk inherent in contemporary child care social work. This thesis argues that for these conditions to be effectively addressed professional responses are required that challenge the domination of ineffective bureaucratic approaches, which have as their primary objective the elimination of uncertainty and risk. The emergence of relationship-based practice is an approach to ...

  2. Privacy in practice: professional discourse about information control in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Denise L; Stablein, Timothy

    2016-04-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore different health care professionals' discourse about privacy - its definition and importance in health care, and its role in their day-to-day work. Professionals' discourse about privacy reveals how new technologies and laws challenge existing practices of information control within and between professional groups in health care, with implications not only for patient privacy, but also for the role of information control in professions more generally. Design/methodology/approach - The authors conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with n=83 doctors, nurses, and health information professionals in two academic medical centers and one veteran's administration hospital/clinic in the Northeastern USA. Interview responses were qualitatively coded for themes and patterns across groups were identified. Findings - The health care providers and the authors studied actively sought to uphold the protection (and control) of patient information through professional ethics and practices, as well as through the use of technologies and compliance with legal regulations. They used discourses of professionalism, as well as of law and technology, to sometimes accept and sometimes resist changes to practice required in the changing technological and legal context of health care. The authors found differences across professional groups; for some, protection of patient information is part of core professional ethics, while for others it is simply part of their occupational work, aligned with organizational interests. Research limitations/implications - This qualitative study of physicians, nurses, and health information professionals revealed some differences in views and practices for protecting patient information in the changing technological and legal context of health care that suggest some professional groups (doctors) may be more likely to resist such changes and others (health information professionals) will actively

  3. Educating advanced level practice within complex health care workplace environments through transformational practice development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sally; Jackson, Carrie; Webster, Jonathan; Manley, Kim

    2013-10-01

    Over the past 20 years health care reform has influenced the development of advanced level practitioner roles and expectations. How advanced level practitioners work to survive the highly stimulating, yet sometimes overwhelming aspects of balancing high quality provision with political reform agendas, amidst economic constraint is considered. Transformational approaches (encompassing education and practice led service development) can provide, promote and 'provoke' a harnessing of complex issues workplace environment to produce creative solutions. Transformational Practice Development provides a structured, rigorous, systematic approach that practitioners, teams and health care consumers alike can utilise to achieve skills and attributes needed for successful innovation. The authors present case study materials from action orientated locally delivered Practice Development, as a complex strategic intervention approach to influence and promote advanced level practice expertise. Initiated through facilitation of transformational leadership, and resultant team based improvements, we present how strategic collaborative processes can harness work chaos and complexity to provide sustainable and productive workplace cultures of effectiveness. PMID:23453607

  4. Modelling multiple hospital outcomes: the impact of small area and primary care practice variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdon Peter

    2006-11-01

    managerial terms, the analysis points to the utility of formal statistical analysis of hospitalisation rates as a prelude to non-statistical investigation of primary care resourcing and organisation. For example, there may be implications for the location of staff involved in community management of chronic conditions; health managers may also investigate whether some practices have unusual populations (homeless, asylum seekers, students that explain different hospital use patterns.

  5. Prevalence, determinants and patterns of multimorbidity in primary care: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepció Violan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Multimorbidity is a major concern in primary care. Nevertheless, evidence of prevalence and patterns of multimorbidity, and their determinants, are scarce. The aim of this study is to systematically review studies of the prevalence, patterns and determinants of multimorbidity in primary care. METHODS: Systematic review of literature published between 1961 and 2013 and indexed in Ovid (CINAHL, PsychINFO, Medline and Embase and Web of Knowledge. Studies were selected according to eligibility criteria of addressing prevalence, determinants, and patterns of multimorbidity and using a pretested proforma in primary care. The quality and risk of bias were assessed using STROBE criteria. Two researchers assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion (Kappa= 0.86. RESULTS: We identified 39 eligible publications describing studies that included a total of 70,057,611 patients in 12 countries. The number of health conditions analysed per study ranged from 5 to 335, with multimorbidity prevalence ranging from 12.9% to 95.1%. All studies observed a significant positive association between multimorbidity and age (odds ratio [OR], 1.26 to 227.46, and lower socioeconomic status (OR, 1.20 to 1.91. Positive associations with female gender and mental disorders were also observed. The most frequent patterns of multimorbidity included osteoarthritis together with cardiovascular and/or metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Well-established determinants of multimorbidity include age, lower socioeconomic status and gender. The most prevalent conditions shape the patterns of multimorbidity. However, the limitations of the current evidence base means that further and better designed studies are needed to inform policy, research and clinical practice, with the goal of improving health-related quality of life for patients with multimorbidity. Standardization of the definition and assessment of multimorbidity is essential in order to better understand this

  6. Radiotherapy skin care: A survey of practice in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The primary objective of the survey was to evaluate clinical skin care practice in radiotherapy departments across the United Kingdom. Methods and sample: A questionnaire containing sixty-one questions grouped into eight themed sections was developed and a link to an on-line survey, using the Survey Monkey™ tool, was e-mailed to all radiotherapy department managers in the United Kingdom (N = 67). Each recipient was invited to provide one response per department. Key results: Fifty-four departments responded within the allocated timeframe giving a final response rate of 81%. Products and their use for skin conditions varied and some outdated and unfounded practices were still being used which did not always reflect the current evidence base. The amount of data routinely collected on skin toxicity was limited making it difficult to quantify the extent of skin morbidity following radiotherapy. Conclusion: The survey demonstrated variability in skin care practice in radiotherapy departments across the UK, with limited practice based on evidence or on skin toxicity measurement and monitoring.

  7. Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Michael E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC practices. Methods This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30 were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources. Results Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening. Conclusions Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were

  8. Community-based care coordination: practical applications for childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Sally; Rosenthal, Michael; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Damitz, Maureen; Lara, Marielena; Mansfield, Carol; Matiz, Adriana; Nourani, Vesall; Peretz, Patricia; Persky, Victoria W; Valencia, Gilberto Ramos; Uyeda, Kimberly; Viswanathan, Meera

    2011-11-01

    Care coordination programs have been used to address chronic illnesses, including childhood asthma, but primarily via practice-based models. An alternative approach employs community-based care coordinators who bridge gaps between families, health care providers, and support services. Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN) sites developed community-based care coordination approaches for childhood asthma. Using a community-based care coordination logic model, programs at each site are described along with program operational statistics. Four sites used three to four community health workers (CHWs) to provide care coordination, whereas one site used five school-based asthma nurses. This school-based site had the highest caseload (82.5 per year), but program duration was 3 months with 4 calls or visits. Other sites averaged fewer cases (35 to 61 per CHW per year), but families received more (7 to 17) calls or visits over a year. Retention was 43% to 93% at 6 months and 24% to 75% at 12 months. Pre-post cross-site data document changes in asthma management behaviors and outcomes. After program participation, 93% to 100% of caregivers had confidence in controlling their child's asthma, 85% to 92% had taken steps to reduce triggers, 69% to 100% had obtained an asthma action plan, and 46% to 100% of those with moderate to severe asthma reported appropriate use of controller medication. Emergency department visits for asthma decreased by 36% to 63%, and asthma-related hospitalizations declined by 26% to 78%. More than three fourths had fewer school absences. In conclusion, MCAN community-based care coordination programs improved management behaviors and decreased morbidity across all sites. PMID:22068360

  9. Dentists' dietary perception and practice patterns in a dental practice-based research network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Dental caries are largely preventable, and epidemiological evidence for a relationship between diet and oral health is abundant. To date, however, dentists' perceptions about the role of diet and dentists' practice patterns regarding diet counseling have not been clarified.THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO: (1 examine discordance between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual provision of diet counseling to patients, and (2 identify dentists' characteristics associated with their provision of diet counseling.The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey in Japan.The study queried dentists working in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN, which aims to allow dentists to investigate research questions and share experiences and expertise (n = 282.Dentists were asked about their perceptions on the importance of diet and their practice patterns regarding diet counseling, as well as patient, practice, and dentist background data.The majority of participants (n = 116, 63% recognized that diet is "more important" to oral health. However, among participants who think diet is "more important" (n = 116, only 48% (n = 56 provide diet counseling to more than 20% of their patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that several variables were associated with providing diet counseling; dentist gender, practice busyness, percentage of patients interested in caries prevention, caries risk assessment, and percentage of patients who receive blood pressure screening.Some discordance exists between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual practice pattern regarding diet counseling to patients. Reducing this discordance may require additional dentist education, including nutritional and systemic disease concepts; patient

  10. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conway, R

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant\\'s confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant\\'s self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  11. Patterns of care in radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1974 the Patterns of Care Study began investigating radiation therapy of endometrial cancers in the United States. This endeavor required development of a methodology to survey the care of patients who had similar disease and who were treated at various institutions. Analysis of 919 questionnaires revealed a substantial difference nationwide in treatment approaches to this site. Outcome studies and ongoing research projects, combined with this survey of Patterns of Care, can provide a sound base for educational efforts to improve patient care

  12. Multivariate analysis of 2-DE protein patterns - Practical approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Jacobsen, Susanne; Grove, H.;

    2007-01-01

    , although different subsets of protein spots were selected. The explorative approach of using multivariate data analysis and variable selection in the analyses of 2-DEs seems to be promising as a fast, reliable and convenient way of screening and transforming many gel images into spot quantities.......Practical approaches to the use of multivariate data analysis of 2-DE protein patterns are demonstrated by three independent strategies for the image analysis and the multivariate analysis on the same set of 2-DE data. Four wheat varieties were selected on the basis of their baking quality. Two...

  13. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. H.; Cui, D. J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G. L.; Wang, X. Q.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage.

  14. Cultural care practices among mothers of nurslings with respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanne Rakelly de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the cultural practices of care among mothers of infants with respiratory infection in a pediatric outpatient clinic, from the recognition of the importance of the use of traditional medicine in Brazil. Methods: We applied a descriptive and exploratory study, qualitative, with twenty-eight mothers of infants with respiratory infection seen at a referral center in the city of Barbalha - CE, Brazil. Data were collected between the monthsof November and December of 2010 through semi-structured interview with a tape recorder. The speeches were analyzed by thematic-categorical analysis, which allowed the creation of four themes: cultural practices of care among mothers, sources of information on medicinal plants, modes of preparation of medicinal herbs and plants used by mothers. To ensure anonymity of participants, they received enumeration following the order of interviews. Results: The study showed that mothers make use of folk medicine, through the preparationof home remedies in order to treat and cure respiratory infections of their children; the leaking tea and herbal medicine are worth mentioning. Mothers place great confidence and give real meaning to the use of homemade preparations. It was observed that this knowledge comes from their mothers, grandparents, relatives and neighbors. Conclusion: Mothersattach great importance to popular practice, the traditional knowledge of relevant culturalvalue, as it is transmitted from generation to generation and has been rebuilt over time.

  15. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  16. Creating collaborative learning environments for transforming primary care practices now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William L; Cohen-Katz, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The renewal of primary care waits just ahead. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement and a refreshing breeze of collaboration signal its arrival with demonstration projects and pilots appearing across the country. An early message from this work suggests that the development of collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams may be essential for the success of the PCMH. Our focus in this article is on training existing health care professionals toward being thriving members of this transformed clinical care team in a relationship-centered PCMH. Our description of the optimal conditions for collaborative training begins with delineating three types of teams and how they relate to levels of collaboration. We then describe how to create a supportive, safe learning environment for this type of training, using a different model of professional socialization, and tools for building culture. Critical skills related to practice development and the cross-disciplinary collaborative processes are also included. Despite significant obstacles in readying current clinicians to be members of thriving collaborative teams, a few next steps toward implementing collaborative training programs for existing professionals are possible using competency-based and adult learning approaches. Grasping the long awaited arrival of collaborative primary health care will also require delivery system and payment reform. Until that happens, there is an abundance of work to be done envisioning new collaborative training programs and initiating a nation-wide effort to motivate and reeducate our colleagues. PMID:21299280

  17. Pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies: practice and research in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herborg, Hanne; Sørensen, Ellen Westh; Frøkjaer, Bente

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current status of Danish community pharmacy in both practice and research and discuss future trends. FINDINGS: Denmark has a social welfare system that provides health care, social services, and pensions to its population. Medical care and surgery are free. Prescription...... medicines are reimbursed by an average of 56%. Community pharmacies are privately owned, but the health authorities regulate drug prices and the number of pharmacies. At present, Denmark has 322 pharmacies, corresponding to 1 pharmacy per 16,700 inhabitants. All pharmacies provide prescription and over......-the-counter products, advice about medicine use, dose dispensing, generic substitutions, and administration of individual reimbursement registers. Except for very simple processes, compounding is centralized at 3 pharmacies. Many pharmacies offer measurement of blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol, and 60...

  18. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone;

    2012-01-01

    ‘Client involvement’ has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how ‘client involvement’ is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse ‘client involvement’ in practise seen......, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: ‘Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care’; ‘Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life......’; ‘Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting’; and ‘Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life’. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which...

  19. A preliminary survey of the practice patterns of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan Patricia A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Feldenkrais Method® of somatic education purports to guide people of varying ages and abilities to improve function. Many people choose this method to aid with recovery from injury, manage chronic conditions, or enhance performance even though limited research supporting its safety and effectiveness exists to guide decisions about use and referral. Very little information about practitioner characteristics and practice patterns is publicly available to assist researchers in the design of appropriate safety and effectiveness studies. The purpose of this study was to obtain an initial overview of the characteristics of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM. Methods Of 1300 certified Feldenkrais® practitioners at the time of the study, there were 1193 practitioners with email accounts who were sent invitations to complete a web-based survey. The survey inquired about practice locations, additional credentials, service patterns and workloads during the previous 3 months. Response rate and descriptive statistics were calculated. Results The survey had a 32.3% (385/1193 response rate. The top states in which responders practiced were California (n = 92 and New York (n = 44. Most responders did not hold other credentials as traditional health care providers or as complementary and alternative medicine providers. Among those who did, the most common credentials were physical therapist (n = 83 and massage therapist (n = 38. Just over a third of traditional health care providers only provided Feldenkrais lessons, compared to 59.3% of complementary and alternative providers. On average, responders saw 7.6 ± 8.1 (median = 5 clients per week for individual lessons, 8.4 ± 11.5 (median = 5 clients per week for group lessons, and 2.9 ± 3.9 (median = 2 new clients per month for individual lessons. Conclusions This preliminary survey of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioners indicated that most

  20. Estrogen formulations and beauty care practices in Japanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeda T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Takeda, Tze Fang Wong, Mari Kitamura, Nobuo YaegashiDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, JapanPurpose: Traditionally, oral estrogens have been used for hormone replacement therapy. However, in Japan, additional estrogen formulations have been used, including transdermal patches and transdermal gels. The latter have a unique commonality with cosmetics because both of them are applied to the skin. Beauty care is one of the most important lifestyle factors for women, and it has been reported that the amount of attention paid to beauty care has an effect in determining whether or not women will choose to undergo HRT during menopause. Therefore, our study focused on estrogen formulations and beauty care practices.Patients and methods: Fifty women who use hormone replacement therapy were recruited from the outpatient clinic of Tohoku University Hospital. They were treated with oral conjugated estrogen (n = 11, transdermal 17ß -estradiol patch (n = 11, and transdermal 17ß-estradiol gel (n = 28. They completed a questionnaire to assess their lifestyle (beauty care practices and exercise habits and their compliance. The transdermal gel users were further interviewed about their subjective impressions regarding “smell”, “sticky feeling”, “spreadability”, and “irritation” on the skin using a five-grade scale.Results: There were no differences in the usability of medicines and patient compliance among the estrogen formulations. We observed a positive tendency between the level of beauty care and transdermal gel use (P = 0.0645, ordinary logistic regression analysis. The gel users placed top priority on a lack of “sticky feeling” but the subjective impression regarding “sticky feeling” was worst among the four factors (P < 0.01, Steel–Dwass test. Correspondence analysis showed that the subjective impressions of transdermal gel corresponding to usability in the

  1. Pattern of drug eruptions in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: An adverse drug reaction is unintentional which occurs at doses used for prophylaxis, diagnosis or treatment. Objectives: To determine the frequency of various cutaneous drug eruptions that occur in patients in a tertiary care hospital setting. Patients and Methods: All patients with cutaneous drug eruptions seen at the Dermatology Department of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, over 6 months were enrolled and the pattern of drug eruptions like urticaria, angioedema, fixed drug eruption, maculopapular rash, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis etc. were recorded, along with drugs that caused it. Results:A total of 160 patients (86 males, 74 females) were included in the study. Mean age of patients was 30.7+-15.4 years. Major eruptions were fixed drug eruption (21.3%) followed by urticaria without angioedema (10%), maculopapular rash (9.3%), lichenoid drug eruption (8.7%), acneiform drug eruption (7.5%), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (6.9%), vesiculobullous eruption (5.6%), erythema multiforme and eczematous eruption (5% each). Common drugs causing eruptions were sulfonamides (16.3%), followed by NSAIDs (14.4%), herbal and homeopathic medications (12.5%), penicillins (9.3%), tetracyclines (8.7%), antituberculous drugs, cephalosporins and antiepileptics (6.3% each). Conclusion: Fixed drug eruption and urticaria without angioedema were commonest eruptions while, sulfonamides and NSAIDs were the major causative drugs. Policy message: Reporting of adverse drug reactions is not done in Pakistan and needs to be done in each hospital. (author)

  2. Antenatal care in practice: an exploratory study in antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessy Flora

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. Yet there are worrying gaps in knowledge of the quality of antenatal care provided in Tanzania. In particular, determinants of health workers' performance have not yet been fully understood. This paper uses ethnographic methods to document health workers' antenatal care practices with reference to the national Focused Antenatal Care guidelines and identifies factors influencing health workers' performance. Potential implications for improving antenatal care provision in Tanzania are discussed. Methods Combining different qualitative techniques, we studied health workers' antenatal care practices in four public antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania. A total of 36 antenatal care consultations were observed and compared with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Participant observation, informal discussions and in-depth interviews with the staff helped to identify and explain health workers' practices and contextual factors influencing antenatal care provision. Results The delivery of antenatal care services to pregnant women at the selected antenatal care clinics varied widely. Some services that are recommended by the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines were given to all women while other services were not delivered at all. Factors influencing health workers' practices were poor implementation of the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines, lack of trained staff and absenteeism, supply shortages and use of working tools that are not consistent with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Health workers react to difficult working conditions by developing informal practices as coping strategies or "street-level bureaucracy". Conclusions Efforts to improve antenatal care should address shortages of trained staff through expanding training opportunities, including health worker

  3. Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Growth and Morbidity Pattern in Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerti Swarnkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is dened as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn baby derived from practical similarities to marsupial care giving, proximately exclusive breastfeeding and early discharge from hospital. This concept was proposed as an alternative to conventional methods of care for low birth weight (LBW infants, and in replication to quandaries of earnest overcrowding in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. KMC essentially utilizes the mother as a natural incubator Aim and Objectives: The aim was to assess the feasibility, acceptability and the effectiveness of KMC in LBW infants. It avoids agitation routinely experienced in busy ward. Material and Methods: A pilot open-labeled quasi-randomised clinical trial was conducted in Level III NICU of a teaching institution. 60 newborn infants <2500 g, meeting inclusion criteria were alternatively randomised into two groups: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC and Conventional Methods of Care (CMC. Kangaroo mother care was practiced with minimum total period of eight hours a day intermittently for the intervention group while the controls remained in incubators or cots. Weight, head circumference, length, morbidity episodes, hospital stay, feeding patterns were monitored for all infants till postmenstrual age of 42 weeks in preterm babies or till a weight of 2500 g is achieved in term SGA babies. Results: The pilot study conrmed that trial processes were efcient, the intervention was acceptable (to mothers and nurses and that the outcome measures were appropriate; KMC babies achieved signicantly better growth at the end of the study (For preterm babies, weight, length and head circumference gain were signicantly higher in the KMC group (weight 19.28±2.9g/day, length 0.99±0.56cm/week and head circumference 0.72±0.07 cm/week than in the CMC group (P <0.001. A signicantly higher number of babies in the CMC group suffered from hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and

  4. Evidence of care comprehensiveness in the practice of nursing staff in oncology palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to identify evidences of comprehensive care in the professional practice of the nursing staff in the context of oncology palliative care. In this descriptive, qualitative study, seven nurses and four nursing technicians were interviewed. Thematic analysis resulted two thematic units: Evidences of comprehensive care in the practice of the nursing professionals and teamwork as the premise of comprehensive care. The nursing staff’s actions are based on communication, converging efforts, and forming a network with other professionals to meet the multiple needs of the individuals and their families in order to offer comfort and quality of life. Self-worth and self-perception of the nursing team should be encouraged as key elements in the dynamics and organization of the work, while the availability of resources is primordial to be able to apply the instruments of interaction and the organizational policy that supports being interdisciplinary and therefore complete and comprehensive. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16.i4.25700.

  5. [The use, care and policy of complementary and integrative practices in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contatore, Octávio Augusto; de Barros, Nelson Filice; Durval, Melissa Rossati; Barrio, Pedro Cristóvão Carneiro da Cunha; Coutinho, Bernardo Diniz; Santos, Júlia Amorim; do Nascimento, Juliana Luporini; Oliveira, Silene de Lima; Peres, Silvia Miguel de Paula

    2015-10-01

    The use of Complementary and Integrative Practices (CIP) is on the increase and its institutionalization in Primary Health Care (PHC) is a challenge. This article discusses the use, care, and policies of CIP at international and national levels found in the indexed literature. A review of the literature in PubMed/Medline and the Virtual Health Library was conducted using the key search words "Homeopathy", "Acupuncture", "Herbal Medicine", "Body Practices", "Primary Health Care" and other related terms in English, Spanish and Portuguese between 2002 and 2011. The use in the literature of CIP for the treatment of specific diseases from a biomedical perspective was observed, as well as evaluations of its use for the treatment of specific diseases focused on the reaction of the users and professionals and the analysis of the political, economic and social viability of CIP in health services. The conclusion drawn is that what is predominant in the literature is the quest for the scientific validation of CIP and a biomedical methodological bias in the designs of the studies, which does not contribute to clarifying the potential care of CIP in PHC. PMID:26465866

  6. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Timm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost in the vague, scientifically unrarified notions of spirituality that brace a general, undifferentiated worldwide metaphysical experience and disregard immense cultural, functional, geographic and performative distinctness, Catholic sacramental practices aimed at alleviating suffering and promoting healthy lifestyles are receiving only marginal mention in scientific literature(1, despite the fact that they make up daily reality in large parts of contemporary Europe and Latin America. Writing this editorial from the Northeast of Brazil, where traditional religious practice has sustained generations through the calamities of severe droughts, slavery, extreme poverty, high child mortality, failed political orders, and a harsh global economic reality, it is difficult to underestimate the power of sacramental experience to sustain a cultural identity. It was defined the concept of care of the sick in the context of the religious experience of the Northeast of Brazil which is historically relevant to health promotion. Until the emergence of national health care in the late nineteenth century, it was largely the order of the Franciscan friars that was charged with promoting healthy lives in the region. The Catholic concept of care that guided their efforts structures three procedural reality principles: the psychological reality of the transference to the person in one’s charge (care/caritas, the performative practice of religious sacrament such as the anointment

  7. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeria Jimenez-Baez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01. Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1 than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8. Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  8. Malaysian mothers' knowledge & practices on care of neonatal jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, N Y; Gan, C Y; Gian, Y W; Lim, K S L; Lim, M W; Krishna-Kumar, H

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the gaps of knowledge and practices of care of neonatal jaundice among Malaysian mothers. It was a cross sectional study of 400 mothers who attended the obstetric clinics or were admitted to the obstetric wards of a general hospital. They were surveyed with a structured set of questionnaire. The results showed that a majority (93.8%) of them knew about neonatal jaundice, and 71.7% knew that jaundice lasting more than 2 weeks was abnormal. However, only 34.3% of them were aware that jaundice appearing during the first 36 hours of life was abnormal. Less than 20% knew about glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and that fetal-maternal blood group differences could cause jaundice. Although 71.7% and 69.7%, respectively, of the mothers knew that severe jaundice could cause death and brain damage, only 38.4% of them were aware that severe jaundice could result in hearing impairment. A very low proportion (27.1%) of them was aware that putting jaundiced infants under the direct sun could result in dehydration and worsening of jaundice. Out of a maximum score of 15, the mean maternal knowledge score was 7.4 (95% confidence intervals: 7.1, 7.7). Majority (83.1%) of the multiparous mothers with a past history of having children developing neonatal jaundice (n = 154) practiced placing their infants under the direct sun. This study revealed that there was a wide knowledge gap among Malaysian mothers on care of neonatal jaundice. Placing infants under the direct sun was still a common practice. PMID:22111448

  9. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design: Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting: Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants: In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes: The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed ...

  10. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed for all 129 quali...

  11. Clinician Adoption Patterns and Patient Outcome Results in Use of Evidence-Based Nursing Plans of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Youn; Lang, Norma M.; Berg, Karen; Weaver, Charlotte; Murphy, Judy; Ela, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of safe, effective and appropriate health care is an imperative facing health care organizations globally. While many initiatives have been launched in a number of countries to address this need from a medical perspective, a similar focus for generating evidence-based nursing knowledge has been missing [1]. This paper reports on a collaborative evidence-based practice (EBP) research initiative that adds nursing knowledge into computerized care protocols. Here, a brief overview of the study’s aims, purpose and methodology is presented as well as results of data analysis and lessons learned. The research team examined nurses’ adoption patterns of EBP recommendations with respect to activity tolerance using four-month patient data collected from a pilot hospital. Study findings indicate a need for more focus on the system design and implementation process with the next rollout phase to promote evidence-based nursing practice. PMID:18693871

  12. Gender differences in the practice patterns of forensic psychiatry experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Marilyn; Recupero, Patricia R; Strong, David R; Gutheil, Thomas G

    2004-01-01

    In the past 25 years, the number of female forensic psychiatrists has increased dramatically. To assess whether there are gender differences in the practice patterns of forensic psychiatry experts, members of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law were surveyed during an annual business meeting. Women in the sample were shown to perform fewer categories of evaluation than men. Women were less likely than men to do criminal work, civil commitment/involuntary medication evaluations, and testamentary capacity evaluations, but there was no significant difference in the percentage of those performing some personal injury/disability/fitness for duty, custody, sexual harassment, or malpractice evaluations. Gender was not a significant factor in determining hourly rate. When subjects were asked to comment on whether they thought that gender was a factor in the selection of a forensic expert, 80 percent of the women, but only 41 percent of the men, believed that gender was a consideration. PMID:15515912

  13. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage

  14. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.H., E-mail: lindehua_cn@yahoo.com.cn [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Cui, D.J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G.L. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wang, X.Q. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage.

  15. Universal access to health care: a practical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, R M; Kuder, J M

    1993-01-01

    Policy disconnected from economic reality is bad policy. Neither government financed health insurance nor an employer mandated health insurance approach are in the national interest. Higher national priorities compel a reallocation of resources from consumption to investment. This need not, however, cause an abandonment of efforts to deal with the problems of the uninsured and other health reforms. Successful health care reform is achievable provided it is responsive to higher priorities for economic growth. A strong economy and the production of wealth are indispensable to economic justice. Toward this end, a program of universal access is proposed whereby families and individuals are required to pay for their own health insurance up to a fixed percentage of disposable personal income before public payments kick in. Government's chief role is to establish a standard package of cost-effective benefits to be offered by all insurance carriers, the cost of which is approximately 40 percent less than conventional insurance coverage because of the elimination of reimbursement for clinically non-efficacious and cost-ineffective services. Public financing is relegated to a residual role in which subsidies are targeted on the needy. Much of the momentum for cost control is transferred to consumers and private insurers, both of whom acquire a vested interest in obtaining value for money. Uniform rules for underwriting, eligibility, and enrollment practices guard against socially harmful practices such as experience rating and exclusion of preexisting conditions. The household responsibility and equity plan described herein could free up as much as $90 billion or more for public investment in economic growth and national debt reduction while assuring access to health care regardless of ability to pay. Economic revitalization will be assisted by changes in household savings. With health care no longer a free good and government social programs concentrated on the truly needy

  16. Pattern of nosocomial infection in two intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital in karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the pattern of nosocomial infections in two ICUs' of a teaching hospital in terms of frequency, common sites of infection, the pathogens involved and the antibiotic sensitivity patterns. It was conducted in two medical ICUs (Neurology and Nephrology) of a public tertiary care hospital. Data was collected prospectively on patients suspected to have developed nosocomial infection after 48 hours of admission to the ICU according to objective. There were 101 cases of suspected nosocomial infection out of a total of 254 patients. The frequency of nosocomial infection was 39.7%. UTI developed in 44.6%, while 27% had blood stream infection, and 21% had pneumonia. Each of the three major sites of infection was strongly associated with the use of invasive devices. Escherichia (E.) coli was the most common organism isolated followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella. E. coli and Klebsiella showed a maximum sensitivity to Imipenem followed by Tazocin (pipericillin + tazobactam). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to Amikacin and Fosfomycin. The high frequency of nosocomial infection suggests that more strict measures regarding invasive devices should be taken in future to control the infection and limit the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms. (author)

  17. Depression case management by practice nurses in primary care: an audit

    OpenAIRE

    Ekers, David; Wilson, Rea

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Depression is a common and debilitating condition. A body of evidence exists about improving depression outcomes in primary care, using collaborative care models. Such approaches, however, have not been routinely adopted within general practice settings. In this paper we outline the results of an audit of an enhanced care initiative that trained practice nurses to deliver such approaches.

  18. Patterns of health care utilization for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart WF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Walter F Stewart,1 Xiaowei Yan,1 Joseph A Boscarino,1 Daniel D Maeng,1 Jack Mardekian,2 Robert J Sanchez,3 Michael R Von Korff41Geisinger Center for Health Research, 2Pfizer, Inc., 3Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 4Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine if primary care patients with low back pain (LBP cluster into definable care utilization subgroups that can be explained by patient and provider characteristics.Materials and methods: Adult primary care patients with an incident LBP encounter were identified from Geisinger Clinic electronic health records over 5 years. Two-thirds of the cohort had only one to two encounters. Principal component analysis was applied to the data from the remaining one-third on use of ambulatory, inpatient, emergency department, and surgery care and use of magnetic resonance imaging, injections, and opioids in 12 months following the incident encounter. Groups were compared on demographics, health behaviors, chronic and symptomatic disease burden, and a measure of physician efficiency.Results: Six factors with eigenvalues >1.5 explained 71% of the utilization variance. Patient subgroups were defined as: 1–2 LBP encounters; 2+ surgeries; one surgery; specialty care without primary care; 3+ opioid prescriptions; laboratory dominant care; and others. The surgery and 3+ opioid subgroups, while accounting for only 10.4% of the cohort, had used disproportionately more magnetic resonance imaging, emergency department, inpatient, and injectable resources. The specialty care subgroup was characterized by heavy use of inpatient care and the lowest use of injectables. Anxiety disorder and depression were not more prevalent among the surgery patients than in the others. Surgery patients had features in common with specialty care patients, but were older, had higher prevalence of Fibromyalgia, and were associated primary care physicians with worse efficiency

  19. Who Enrolls Onto Clinical Oncology Trials? A Radiation Patterns of Care Study Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify factors significantly influencing accrual to clinical protocols by analyzing radiation Patterns of Care Study (PCS) surveys of 3,047 randomly selected radiotherapy (RT) patients. Methods and Materials: Patterns of Care Study surveys from disease sites studied for the periods 1992-1994 and 1996-1999 (breast cancer, n = 1,080; prostate cancer, n = 1,149; esophageal cancer, n = 818) were analyzed. The PCS is a National Cancer Institute-funded national survey of randomly selected RT institutions in the United States. Patients with nonmetastatic disease who received RT as definitive or adjuvant therapy were randomly selected from eligible patients at each institution. To determine national estimates, individual patient records were weighted by the relative contribution of each institution and patients within each institution. Data regarding participation in clinical trials were recorded. The factors age, gender, race, type of insurance, and practice type of treating institution (academic or not) were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Overall, only 2.7% of all patients were accrued to clinical protocols. Of these, 57% were enrolled on institutional review board-approved institutional trials, and 43% on National Cancer Institute collaborative group studies. On multivariate analysis, patients treated at academic facilities (p = 0.0001) and white patients (vs. African Americans, p = 0.0002) were significantly more likely to participate in clinical oncology trials. Age, gender, type of cancer, and type of insurance were not predictive. Conclusions: Practice type and race significantly influence enrollment onto clinical oncology trials. This suggests that increased communication and education regarding protocols, particularly focusing on physicians in nonacademic settings and minority patients, will be essential to enhance accrual

  20. Special features of general practice (primary care) and ethical implications.

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, J

    1980-01-01

    In all systems of health care there are certain essential levels of care and service. These take the form of self-care within the family unit; primary professional care by general medical nursing or social practitioners within a local neighbourhood; general specialist care in a district and super-specialist care in a region. Each of these has its own special roles and responsibilities and each is considered in this paper.

  1. Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Growth and Morbidity Pattern in Low Birth Weight Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Keerti Swarnkar; Jayanta Vagha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is dened as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn baby derived from practical similarities to marsupial care giving, proximately exclusive breastfeeding and early discharge from hospital. This concept was proposed as an alternative to conventional methods of care for low birth weight (LBW) infants, and in replication to quandaries of earnest overcrowding in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). KMC essentially...

  2. Do gender-dyads have different communication patterns? A comparative study in Western-European general practices

    OpenAIRE

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Van Dulmen, S.; Messerli-Rohrbach, V.; BENSING, J

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor-patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor-patient communication as well. This study examined (1) whether or not communication patterns of gender-dyads in general practice consultations differ across and between Western-European countries, and (2) if so, whether these differences continue to exist when controlling for pa...

  3. Do gender-dyads have different communication patterns? A comparative study in Western-European general practices

    OpenAIRE

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; van Dulmen, S.; Messerli-Rohrbach, V.; BENSING, J

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor–patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor–patient communication as well. This study examined (1)whether or not communication patterns of gender-dyads in general practice consultations differ across and between Western-European countries, and (2) if so, whether these differences continue to exist when controlling for pat...

  4. Do gender-dyads have different communication patterns?: a comparative study in Western-European general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; van Dulmen, S.; Messerli-Rohrbach, V.; BENSING, J

    2002-01-01

    From the viewpoint of quality of care, doctor-patient communication has become more and more important. Gender is an important factor in communication. Besides, cultural norms and values are likely to influence doctor-patient communication as well. This study examined (1) whether or not communication patterns of gender-dyads in general practice consultations differ across and between Western-European countries, and (2) if so, whether these differences continue to exist when controlling for pa...

  5. International Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Evidence-Based Practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the equivalence of multifraction and single-fraction (SF) radiotherapy for the palliation of painful bone metastases (BM). However, according to previous surveys, SF schedules remain underused. The objectives of this study were to determine the current patterns of practice internationally and to investigate the factors influencing this practice. Methods and Materials: The members of three global radiation oncology professional organizations (American Society for Radiology Oncology [ASTRO], Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology [CARO], Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists) completed an Internet-based survey. The respondents described what radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for 5 hypothetical cases describing patients with single or multiple painful BMs from breast, lung, or prostate cancer. Radiation oncologists rated the importance of patient, tumor, institution, and treatment factors, and descriptive statistics were compiled. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the Student t test for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of the use of SF radiotherapy. Results: A total of 962 respondents, three-quarters ASTRO members, described 101 different dose schedules in common use (range, 3 Gy/1 fraction to 60 Gy/20 fractions). The median dose overall was 30 Gy/10 fractions. SF schedules were used the least often by ASTRO members practicing in the United States and most often by CARO members. Case, membership affiliation, country of training, location of practice, and practice type were independently predictive of the use of SF. The principal factors considered when prescribing were prognosis, risk of spinal cord compression, and performance status. Conclusion: Despite abundant evidence, most radiation oncologists continue to prescribe multifraction schedules for patients who fit the eligibility criteria of

  6. FCA and pattern structures for mining care trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Buzmakov, Aleksey; Egho, Elias; Jay, Nicolas; Kuznetsov, Sergei O.; Napoli, Amedeo; Raïssi, Chedy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in the analysis of sequential data and we propose an original framework based on Formal Concept Analysis (FCA). For that, we introduce sequential pattern structures, an original specification of pattern structures for dealing with sequential data. Pattern structures are used in FCA for dealing with complex data such as intervals or graphs. Here they are adapted to sequences. For that, we introduce a subsumption operation for sequence comparison, based on subse...

  7. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Rodney A.

    2012-01-01

    Routine general practice (GP) care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP) study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD) patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts). Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental ...

  8. The IAIMS--an essential infrastructure for increasing the competitiveness of health care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, W W; Olsen, A J; Benner, S A; Blackwelder, M; Cooperstock, L; Paton, J A; Russell, F K; Van Hine, P

    1997-01-01

    The eighth annual workshop of the IAIMS Consortium was devoted to exploring how information technology might provide the tools to allow health care practices to compete in the new health care environment while maintaining independence. The options that were discussed included: optimizing care of the patient in the local setting; reducing practice overhead by improving efficiency and effectiveness; and finding innovative strategies for providing health care and new products. PMID:9067890

  9. Practice nurse involvement in primary care depression management: an observational cost-effectiveness analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Jodi; Haji Ali Afzali, Hossein; Beilby, Justin; Holton, Christine; Banham, David; Karnon, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background Most evidence on the effect of collaborative care for depression is derived in the selective environment of randomised controlled trials. In collaborative care, practice nurses may act as case managers. The Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP) aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative models of practice nurse involvement in a real world Australian setting. Previous analyses have demonstrated the value of high level practice nurse involvement in the manageme...

  10. Factors predicting team climate, and its relationship with quality of care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Eccles Martin P; Goh Teik T; Steen Nick

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of care in general practice may be affected by the team climate perceived by its health and non-health professionals. Better team working is thought to lead to higher effectiveness and quality of care. However, there is limited evidence available on what affects team functioning and its relationship with quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to explore individual and practice factors that were associated with team climate, and to explore the relatio...

  11. The emerging primary care workforce: preliminary observations from the primary care team: learning from effective ambulatory practices project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladden, Maryjoan D; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Fishman, Nancy W; Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Parchman, Michael; Wagner, Edward H

    2013-12-01

    Many primary care practices are changing the roles played by the members of their health care teams. The purpose of this article is to describe some of these new roles, using the authors' preliminary observations from 25 site visits to high-performing primary care practices across the United States in 2012-2013. These sites visits, to practices using their workforce creatively, were part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded initiative, The Primary Care Team: Learning From Effective Ambulatory Practices.Examples of these new roles that the authors observed on their site visits include medical assistants reviewing patient records before visits to identify care gaps, ordering and administering immunizations using protocols, making outreach calls to patients, leading team huddles, and coaching patients to set self-management goals. The registered nurse role has evolved from an emphasis on triage to a focus on uncomplicated acute care, chronic care management, and hospital-to-home transitions. Behavioral health providers (licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, or licensed counselors) were colocated and integrated within practices and were readily available for immediate consults and brief interventions. Physicians have shifted from lone to shared responsibility for patient panels, with other team members empowered to provide significant portions of chronic and preventive care.An innovative team-based primary care workforce is emerging. Spreading and sustaining these changes will require training both health professionals and nonprofessionals in new ways. Without clinical experiences that model this new team-based care and role models who practice it, trainees will not be prepared to practice as a team. PMID:24128622

  12. Gender bias in child care and child health: global patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Rohan; Jain, Snigdha; Lodha, Rakesh; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2014-04-01

    Gender-based discrimination is reported across the spectrum of paediatric healthcare including emergency, inpatient, outpatient and preventive care and is mostly reported from South Asia and China with sporadic reports from Africa and South America. Biases against young girls have been documented even in immunisation percentage, home food allocation, seeking medical care for childhood ailments and percentage of household healthcare expenditures allocated to them. Such gender discrimination in access to medical care is likely to have an influence on the overall health of female children. Over the last five decades, the under-5 sex ratios are worsening in India with declining number of girls. Deliberate parental neglect of girls' essential and life-saving medical care is also an important contributing factor apart from sex-selective abortions to the declining gender ratios. Corrective measures and focused action are needed. PMID:24344176

  13. The role of Advanced Practice Providers in interdisciplinary oncology care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rae Brana; McCoy, Kimberly

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) and Physician Assistants (PAs), generally referred to as Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), are fundamental to interdisciplinary oncology care. As the projected demand for oncology services is anticipated to outpace the supply of oncologists, APPs will become increasingly vital in the delivery of oncology care and services. The training, education, and scope of practice for APPs gives the interdisciplinary care team professionals that deliver high-quality clinical services and provide valuable contributions and leadership to health care quality improvement initiatives. Optimizing the integration of APPs in oncology care offers immense advantages towards improvement of clinical outcomes. PMID:27197514

  14. Patterns of health care utilization for low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart WF; Yan X; Boscarino JA; Maeng DD; Mardekian J; Sanchez RJ; Von Korff MR

    2015-01-01

    Walter F Stewart,1 Xiaowei Yan,1 Joseph A Boscarino,1 Daniel D Maeng,1 Jack Mardekian,2 Robert J Sanchez,3 Michael R Von Korff41Geisinger Center for Health Research, 2Pfizer, Inc., 3Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 4Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine if primary care patients with low back pain (LBP) cluster into definable care utilization subgroups that can be explained by patient and provider characteristics.Materials and m...

  15. Influence of pregnancy perceptions on patterns of seeking antenatal care among women in reproductive age of Masaka District, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atekyereza, Peter R; Mubiru, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    Maternal mortality remains a challenge in Sub-Saharan Africa including Uganda. Antenatal Care (ANC) is one of the recommended measures to improve maternal and child health. However, the influence of pregnancy definition and perception on patterns of seeking regular and timely antenatal care among women in the reproductive age group (15-49 years) is not known. The objectives of this study were to: (i) understand the women's social definitions and perceptions on their pregnancy; (ii) understand the socio-cultural beliefs related to pregnancy among women of the reproductive age group; and, (iii) examine the influence of social definitions, perceptions and beliefs about pregnancy on women's antenatal care seeking behaviour patterns to inform the decentralised health care delivery system in Uganda. A total of 45 women, mothers and expectant women who were purposively selected from Kimanya sub county of Masaka district in Uganda participated in the study. Ten key informant interviews and four Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were also conducted. Key findings indicate that the women's socio-definitions and perceptions of pregnancy influence their seeking behaviour on antenatal health care. To the women with a positive orientation towards antenatal care, pregnancy provides joy, happiness, pride, promotes their social status and safe-guards their marriage. Pregnancy is rewarding with care, love, support and gifts. Women who shun antenatal care perceive pregnancy to be a source of misery, sadness, pain and suffering. It is an uncomfortable and regrettable experience. Women also hold socio-cultural beliefs on pregnancy, which are culturally constructed and rooted in taboos, rituals and practices of their communities. It is therefore important to sensitise women and those who attend to them when they are pregnant to understand these perceptions and definitions to motivate them to seek antenatal and postnatal care for better maternal and child health. PMID:26891521

  16. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. METHODS: This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. RESULTS: Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  17. Improving Transitions of Care With an Advanced Practice Nurse: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Martha; Dorcy, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Gaps in complex oncology care coordination between inpatient and outpatient settings can result in treatment and monitoring delays and omissions, which can negatively affect patient outcomes. Gaps also exist for patients facing complex treatment modalities and collaborations between multiple care teams working at geographically distant sites. A pilot advanced practice nurse care coordinator 
(APNCC) role to coordinate these complex care transitions and implement processes for safer and more efficient care has shown promise.
. PMID:27206289

  18. HIV/aids related home based care practices among primary health care workers in Ogun state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Amoran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS is fast becoming a chronic disease with the advent of antiretroviral drugs, therefore making home based care key in the management of chronically ill HIV/AIDS patient. The objective of this study was to determine the perception and practice of health care workers on HIV/AIDS related home based care in the health facilities in Ogun state, Nigeria. Methods This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to obtain a representative sample of the primary health care workers in Ogun state. An interviewer administered structured questionnaire was administered by trained health workers to elicit the required information. Result A total of 350 health care workers were interviewed, 70% of the respondents could adequately describe the components of home based care. Only 38.7% were aware of the National guideline on home based care practices and 17.1% believe that home based care will not significantly improve the prognosis of PLWAs. Few 19.1% had ever been trained or ever involved 16.6% in home based care practices. Only 20 [5.7%] are involved on a weekly basis, 16 [4.6%] monthly and 22 [6.3%] quarterly. Reasons given for non implementation of home based care are inadequate number of healthcare workers 45%, lack of political will 24.4%, lack of implementation by facility managers 14% and inadequate funds 16.6%. Factors that were significantly associated with the practice of home based care were perception of its relevance in improving prognosis [OR = 54.21, C.I = 23.22-129.52] and presence of a support group in the facility [OR = 4.80, C.I = 2.40-9.57]. There was however no statistically significant relationship between adequate knowledge of home based care [OR = 0.78, C.I = 0.39-1.54] and previous training on home based care (OR = 1.43, C.I = 0.66-3.06]. Conclusion The practice of home based care for HIV/AIDS among the study population is low

  19. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting

  20. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal Lakshman Yeole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of the respondents were bachelors qualified, 15% were masters in physiotherapy with only 4% specialized in cardio-respiratory physiotherapy; 82% had <5 years experience in ICU. Almost 19% had not at all attended any seminars/workshops related to ICU management while 61% attended up to three within last 2 years. The availability of a physiotherapist during the night was affirmed by 63%, 58% responded initiation of physiotherapy to be "always physician referred" and 39% mentioned "physiotherapist initiated." Almost 80% performed chest wall techniques, 86% positioning, 27% postural drainage, 5% manual hyperinflation, 12% application of nebulizer, and 56% bedsores management. Only 5% reported involvement in ventilator setting, 11% had their opinion sought before weaning from ventilator, 29% practiced noninvasive ventilation, 11% were involved in decision-making for extubation and 44% reported involvement in patient family education. Conclusion: The study showed that physiotherapists among the responding ICUs surveyed lack in experience and updated knowledge. Physician reference is necessary to initiate physiotherapy and there exists no established criteria for physiotherapy treatment in ICU. All physiotherapists were routinely involved in chest physiotherapy, mobilization, and positioning.

  1. Different Patterns in Health Care Use Among Immigrants in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Nazmy; Artazcoz, Lucía

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyze the differences in the use of primary care (PC), hospital, and emergency services between people born in Spain and immigrants. Data were obtained from the 2006 Spanish National Health Survey. The sample was composed of individuals aged 16-64 years from Spain and the seven countries with most immigrants in Spain (n = 22,224). Hierarchical multiple logistic regression models were fitted. Romanian men were less likely to use health care at all levels compared to men from other countries. Women from Argentina, Bolivia and Ecuador reported a lower use of PC. Among women, there were no differences in emergency visits or hospitalizations between countries. Bolivian men reported more hospitalizations than Spanish men, whereas Argentinean men reported more emergency visits than their Spanish counterparts. In Spain, most immigrants made less than, or about the same use of health care services as the native Spanish population. PMID:25862208

  2. Universal Design Patterns for stoma care away-from-home

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk De Meester; Ann Heylighen; Evelien Verdonck; Hubert Froyen

    2009-01-01

    Accommodating the real diversity of user populations, including those with physical and/or mental impairments and functional limitations, requires a large amount of design information in connection with human dis-abilities(limitations and possibilities). In order to collect and organise this information for designers and decision makers, Universal Design Patterns(UD PAtterns) offer descriptive information about, on the one hand, CONFLICTS, between users and built environments, and on the othe...

  3. Patterns of uveitis in children presenting at a tertiary eye care centre in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Kannan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the patterns of uveitis in the paediatric age group in a referral eye care centre in south India. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients 15 years or younger with uveitis, examined in the year 2000, were included in this study. The uveitis was classified according to the anatomical site of ocular involvement and the most probable aetiological factor. The final diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations and results of specific laboratory investigations. Results: A total 31 (6.29% paediatric uveitis cases were seen among the 493 uveitic cases in the year 2000. The male: female ratio was 17:14. Anterior (9 cases, intermediate (9 cases and posterior uveitis (9 cases were seen in equal number. Four patients had panuveitis. Twenty-seven patients had visual acuity of 6/36 or better at presentation. Approximately 25% (8 of 31 patients had cataract secondary to inflammation. Immunosuppressives were administered in 4 patients and one patient required cataract surgery. Conclusion: Uveitis in children comprises approximately 6% of uveitis cases in a referral practice in south India. Anterior, intermediate and posterior uveitis are seen in equal numbers. We recommend that intermediate uveitis be ruled out in all cases of anterior uveitis by careful clinical evaluation including examination under anesthesia (EUA when required.

  4. A Descriptive Study of the Practice Patterns of Massage New Zealand Massage Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna M. Smith; Sullivan, S. John; Baxter, G David

    2011-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy has grown in popularity, yet little is known globally or in New Zealand about massage therapists and their practices. Purpose and Setting: The aims of this study were to describe the practice patterns of trained Massage New Zealand massage therapists in New Zealand private practice, with regard to therapist characteristics; practice modes and settings, and therapy characteristics; referral patterns; and massage therapy as an occupation. Research Design and Particip...

  5. Laparoscopy in Urology Practice at a Tertiary Care Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the results of laparoscopic procedures at a Urology - Nephrology tertiary care centre. Study Design: Case series / observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Kidney Centre Postgraduate Training Institute, Karachi, from August 2007 to March 2012. Methodology: Medical records of all planned laparoscopic surgery conducted during the study period were reviewed. Those cases which to open surgery were excluded. All were performed by a single surgeon, initially as supervised and later independently. Data was maintained for demographic data, procedure details, length of hospital stay, and complications including conversion to open surgeries. Data was analyzed through SPSS 17.0. Results: There were 36 planned laparoscopic surgeries in the specified period. Out of 36 cases, 8 were converted to open surgery. Those who underwent laparoscopic surgery include two diagnostic procedures and renal cyst deroofing each, four ureterolithotomy, nineteen simple nephrectomy and one radical nephrectomy. So in total 28 cases were performed on 15 females and 13 males with mean age of 33.01 A +- 10.9 years. The mean operative time was 216 A +- 100 minutes and mean length of hospital stay was as 2.7 A +- 1.04 days. There were 10 complications in 28 cases, majority being Clavien Grade II including 7% (2/28) blood transfusion. Conclusion: There are technical challenges in learning laparoscopy for practicing urologists. Following some learning model in a systematic manner will help surmounting the technical challenges in learning laparoscopy. (author)

  6. Enteral nutrition practices in the intensive care unit: Understanding of nursing practices and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adequate nutritional support is important for the comprehensive management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs. Aim: The study was aimed to survey prevalent enteral nutrition practices in the trauma intensive care unit, nurses′ perception, and their knowledge of enteral feeding. Study Design: The study was conducted in the ICU of a level 1 trauma center, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The study design used an audit. Materials and Methods: Sixty questionnaires were distributed and the results analyzed. A database was prepared and the audit was done. Results: Forty-two (70% questionnaires were filled and returned. A majority (38 of staff nurses expressed awareness of nutrition guidelines. A large number (32 of staff nurses knew about nutrition protocols of the ICU. Almost all (40 opined enteral nutrition to be the preferred route of nutrition unless contraindicated. All staff nurses were of opinion that enteral nutrition is to be started at the earliest (within 24-48 h of the ICU stay. Everyone opined that the absence of bowel sounds is an absolute contraindication to initiate enteral feeding. Passage of flatus was considered mandatory before starting enteral nutrition by 86% of the respondents. Everyone knew that the method of Ryle′s tube feeding in their ICU is intermittent boluses. Only 4 staff nurses were unaware of any method to confirm Ryle′s tube position. The backrest elevation rate was 100%. Gastric residual volumes were always checked, but the amount of the gastric residual volume for the next feed to be withheld varied. The majority said that the unused Ryle′s tube feed is to be discarded after 6 h. The most preferred (48% method to upgrade their knowledge of enteral nutrition was from the ICU protocol manual. Conclusion: Information generated from this study can be helpful in identifying nutrition practices that are lacking and may be used to review and revise enteral feeding

  7. Implementing change in primary care practices using electronic medical records: a conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gail W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementing change in primary care is difficult, and little practical guidance is available to assist small primary care practices. Methods to structure care and develop new roles are often needed to implement an evidence-based practice that improves care. This study explored the process of change used to implement clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in primary care practices that used a common electronic medical record (EMR. Methods Multiple conceptual frameworks informed the design of this study designed to explain the complex phenomena of implementing change in primary care practice. Qualitative methods were used to examine the processes of change that practice members used to implement the guidelines. Purposive sampling in eight primary care practices within the Practice Partner Research Network-Translating Researching into Practice (PPRNet-TRIP II clinical trial yielded 28 staff members and clinicians who were interviewed regarding how change in practice occurred while implementing clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and strokes. Results A conceptual framework for implementing clinical guidelines into primary care practice was developed through this research. Seven concepts and their relationships were modelled within this framework: leaders setting a vision with clear goals for staff to embrace; involving the team to enable the goals and vision for the practice to be achieved; enhancing communication systems to reinforce goals for patient care; developing the team to enable the staff to contribute toward practice improvement; taking small steps, encouraging practices' tests of small changes in practice; assimilating the electronic medical record to maximize clinical effectiveness, enhancing practices' use of the electronic tool they have invested in for patient care improvement; and providing feedback within a culture of

  8. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Janice

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta. Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education, environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work, and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit

  9. Care erosion in hospitals: Problems in reflective nursing practice and the role of cognitive dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; Timmins, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Care erosion - gradual decline in care level - is an important problem in health care today. Unfortunately, the mechanism whereby it occurs is complex and poorly understood. This paper seeks to address this by emphasising problems in reflective nursing practice. Critical reflection on quality of care which should drive good care instead spawns justifications, denial, and trivialisation of deficient care. This perpetuates increasingly poor care levels. We argue that cognitive dissonance theory provides a highly effective understanding of this process and suggest for this approach to be incorporated in all efforts to address care erosion. The paper includes a detailed discussion of examples and implications for practice, in particular the need to restore critical reflection in nursing, the importance of embracing strong values and standards, and the need for increased awareness of signs of care erosion. PMID:26733428

  10. Interprofessional Practice and Education in Health Care: Their Relevance to School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margison, Judith A.; Shore, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Calls for increased collaborative practices in school psychology parallel similar advances in the realm of health care. This article overviews the concepts associated with collaborative practice in school psychology and in health care (e.g., interaction, teamwork, and collaboration) and discusses how the literature emerging from interprofessional…

  11. Patterns of cancer occurrence in a tertiary care centre

    OpenAIRE

    Atla Bhagyalakshmi; Anem Venkatalakshmi; Regidi Subhash; Seeram Satish kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study is an attempt to know the incidence of cancer in a tertiary care centre. Statistics for all newly diagnosed cancer cases by correlation with factors like age, gender and organ systems involved with complete histopathological evaluation is presented. Emphasis is given to segregating each cancer and grouping them into their respective order for statistical analysis. Objectives of the study was to conduct a prospective statistical analysis, computing and comparing rates,...

  12. General practitioners (GPs) and palliative care: perceived tasks and barriers in daily practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, C.M.; Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Crul, B.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) play a crucial part in palliative care. The quality of care can be improved by investigating and addressing barriers perceived by GPs in daily practice. The aim of this study was to investigate GPs' task perception and barriers involved in palliative care. MET

  13. Patterns of Health Care Expenditures, Utilization and Demand for Medical Care in Sample Philippine Households

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista, Cristina M.

    1995-01-01

    Due to tight fiscal budget, health care planners have started to explore alternative financing mechanisms. These alternatives can be effectively implemented given thorough understanding of mechanisms that direct household demand for health care. This paper investigates the factors of households’ health seeking behavior to determine the implications for health care financing reforms. In addition, it looks into the responsiveness of households to changes in prices and income. Insights of househ...

  14. Empowering interventions in health and social care: recognition through 'ecologies of practice'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Pamela; Owen, Jenny

    2008-12-01

    This article considers findings from two recent qualitative studies in the UK, identifying parallels in the ways in which 'ecologies of practice' in two high-profile areas of health-related intervention underpin processes of empowerment and recognition. The first project focused on policy and practice in relation to teenage motherhood in a city in the North of England. The second project was part of a larger research programme, Changing Families, Changing Food, and investigated the ways in which 'family' is constructed through policy and practice interventions concerning food and health. While UK Government health policy stresses that health and social care agencies should 'empower' service users, it is argued here that this predominantly reflects a managerialist discourse, equating citizenship with individualised self-sufficiency in the 'public' sphere. Drawing critically on Honneth's politics of recognition (Honneth, A. (2001). Recognition or redistribution? Changing perspective on the moral order of society. Theory, Culture and Society, 18(2-3), 43-55.), we suggest that formal health policy overlooks the inter-subjective processes that underpin a positive sense of self, emphasising instead an individualised ontology. While some research has positioned practitioners as one-dimensional in their adherence to the current audit culture of the public sector in the UK, our study findings demonstrate how practitioners often circumvent audit-based 'economies of performance' with more flexible 'ecologies of practice.' The latter open up spaces for recognition through inter-subjective processes of identification between practitioners and service users. Ecologies of practice are also informed by practitioners' experiential knowledge. However, this process is largely unacknowledged, partly because it does not fall within a managerialist framework of 'performativity' and partly because it often reflects taken-for-granted, gendered patterns. It is argued here that a critical

  15. Adaptive practices in heart failure care teams: implications for patient-centered care in the context of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tait GR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Glendon R Tait,1 Joanna Bates,2 Kori A LaDonna,3 Valerie N Schulz,4 Patricia H Strachan,5 Allan McDougall,3 Lorelei Lingard3 1Department of Psychiatry and Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 2Centre for Health Education Scholarship, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, 3Centre for Education Research and Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 4Palliative Care, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, London; 5School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Heart failure (HF, one of the three leading causes of death, is a chronic, progressive, incurable disease. There is growing support for integration of palliative care’s holistic approach to suffering, but insufficient understanding of how this would happen in the complex team context of HF care. This study examined how HF care teams, as defined by patients, work together to provide care to patients with advanced disease. Methods: Team members were identified by each participating patient, generating team sampling units (TSUs for each patient. Drawn from five study sites in three Canadian provinces, our dataset consists of 209 interviews from 50 TSUs. Drawing on a theoretical framing of HF teams as complex adaptive systems (CAS, interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with constructivist grounded theory. Results: This paper centers on the dominant theme of system practices, how HF care delivery is reported to work organizationally, socially, and practically, and describes two subthemes: “the way things work around here”, which were commonplace, routine ways of doing things, and “the way we make things work around here”, which were more conscious, effortful adaptations to usual practice in response to emergent needs. An adaptive practice, often a small alteration to routine, could have amplified effects beyond those intended by the innovating team

  16. KNOWLEDGE AND PERCEPTION OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS TOWARDS CLEAN CARE PRACTICES IN A TERTIARY CARE HO SPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payghan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Ten to thirty percent of the patients admitted to hospitals in India acquire nosocomial infections as against 5% i n the developed world. The first and foremost principle of Universal Safety Precaution is “HANDWASHING”. But the Health Care Workers often forget to wash their hands before int eracting with the patient. Such contaminated hands plays major role in transmitting infections. HCWs are also at an increased risk of needle stick injuries. According to data fr om EPINet system, hospital workers incur approximately 30 needle stick injuries per 100 beds per year on average – an alarming figure by no exaggeration. (5 OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and perception of HCWs toward s hand hygiene and to know the incident of NSI and the fac tors associated with it. STUDY METHOD: Cross sectional study with purposive sampling was car ried out in a tertiary care hospital. Out of 275 participants 55 were doctors, 143 nurses and 77 i nterns. Self administered questionnaire was used to collect information. RESULTS : Ninety one percent doctors, 86% interns and 81% nurses had good knowledge about hand hygiene. 73% d octors, 61% interns and 56% nurses knew the duration required for hand rub. The main h indrance for not practicing hand hygiene was due to lack of resources (37%. Knowledge abou t recapping of the needle was poor and incident of injury due to needle stick was 50% amon g nurses. CONCLUSIONS : Study demonstrated adequate knowledge regarding hand hygi ene. The knowledge should be converted into practice. There is a need for educati onal programme about universal precautions especially about handling of the sharps

  17. Neonatal care practices in a tribal community of Odisha, India: a cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Chauhan, Abhimanyu S; Panda, Madhusmita; Swain, Subhashish; Hussain, Mohammad A

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal care practices have been shown to vary across tribal communities. This cross-sectional study was conducted in tribal block in Nabarangpur district of Odisha, India, to measure perinatal and antenatal practices by qualitative inquiries of 55 mothers who had babies aged breast-feeding and 'Budu practices' were common. Cultural issues, decision of family members and traditional beliefs still play a crucial role in shaping neonatal care practice in tribal communities. Awareness on child care, ethnographic understanding of health-seeking behavior of tribal community and mobilization of community by health workers can be useful in improving health status of mothers and newborn babies in tribal population. PMID:24519674

  18. Taking care: practice and philosophy of communication in a critical care follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Anthony; Harris, Wendy; Howell, David

    2013-06-01

    Human consciousness is inextricable from communication. The conditions of communication in the clinical context are defined by the caring intention and the unequal relationship, which imply special responsibilities on the part of the clinician. The conventional hermeneutic model of communication proposes a close examination of the context of the other, and an objective effort to get close to their consciousness by interpretation of their expressions. The clinician is supposed to lay aside subjective factors but make use of her/his clinical knowledge and skills. At University College Hospital Critical Care follow-up clinic, the communicative task involves history taking; partly by questionnaire and partly by attention to the patient's agenda - assessing needs, providing information and facilitating access to further help. In recent years the provision of Critical Care has become ever more complex, both in terms of the sophisticated medical and nursing techniques it can offer to patients and in the range of conditions it can undertake to treat. This range and complexity is reflected in the variety of problems and consequences that may be encountered at follow-up. Communicative techniques should take account of the emotional vulnerability of patients emerging from severe illness. Attentive listening should identify special anxieties, and care with phraseology aims to avoid further distress. Issues of memory, depression and trauma may be expected, and the interview technique must be flexible enough to offer emotional containment if need be. The consultation should be therapeutic in its conduct but should not embark upon actual psychotherapy or seek to dismantle the patient's defences. Contemporary hermeneutic perspectives emphasise the contextual situatedness of the clinician's consciousness, and propose a model of communication as 'blending of horizons' rather than as objective interpretation. Systems theory contributes to an understanding of the influence on

  19. Treatment planning for Hodgkin's Disease: a patterns of care study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To conduct a survey of the process of treatment planning for the radiation treatment of Hodgkin's Disease in the United States, and to compare survey results with consensus guidelines as determined by recognized experts. Methods and Materials: A consensus committee developed guidelines for the radiotherapeutic management of Hodgkin's Disease. A series of survey forms were designed to evaluate the standards of practice and compare these with the consensus guidelines. A total of 61 facilities divided evenly into the strata of academic, hospital based, and free standing had eligible Hodgkin's Disease cases. There were 275 eligible cases of Hodgkin's Disease evaluated. Data collected from the radiation oncology records included treatment-specific parameters such as energy, dose, blocking, and calculations, as well as treatment planning practices. Statistical analysis was performed on each data element and for all institution strata. Results: For a number of treatment parameters, there were some discrepancies noted between the current United States practice and the consensus guidelines. Some significant differences were found in practice between the stratified institution types. A representative sample of results are: the majority of Hodgkin's Disease patients are treated with x-ray energies in the recommended range, between 4 and 10 MV. Standard mantle (for upper extended field treatment) and modified spade (for lower extended field treatments) are the fields of choice for all types of facilities. The consensus guidelines recommended that dose calculations at multiple points be obtained; however, 15% of patients in the survey received only a single point calculation. Current irregular field dosimetry calculation software does not take account of inhomogeneities. Thirty percent of Hodgkin's Disease patients do not receive a gap calculation for the abutment of upper and lower extended fields. In 70% of treatment fields, no compensation is used. Very few patients

  20. Health care priority setting: principles, practice and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Cam

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health organizations the world over are required to set priorities and allocate resources within the constraint of limited funding. However, decision makers may not be well equipped to make explicit rationing decisions and as such often rely on historical or political resource allocation processes. One economic approach to priority setting which has gained momentum in practice over the last three decades is program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA. Methods This paper presents a detailed step by step guide for carrying out a priority setting process based on the PBMA framework. This guide is based on the authors' experience in using this approach primarily in the UK and Canada, but as well draws on a growing literature of PBMA studies in various countries. Results At the core of the PBMA approach is an advisory panel charged with making recommendations for resource re-allocation. The process can be supported by a range of 'hard' and 'soft' evidence, and requires that decision making criteria are defined and weighted in an explicit manner. Evaluating the process of PBMA using an ethical framework, and noting important challenges to such activity including that of organizational behavior, are shown to be important aspects of developing a comprehensive approach to priority setting in health care. Conclusion Although not without challenges, international experience with PBMA over the last three decades would indicate that this approach has the potential to make substantial improvement on commonly relied upon historical and political decision making processes. In setting out a step by step guide for PBMA, as is done in this paper, implementation by decision makers should be facilitated.

  1. The Profiles, Patterns, and Practices of Women Superintendents in Alabama's Public School Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Janine E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a profile that describes the patterns and practices of the 27 women who served as public school superintendents in Alabama during the 2006-2007 school year. This study explored the relationship between the profiles, patterns, and practices found in research and the manifestations in the lives and careers of…

  2. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods: TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results: Pharmacists are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team and play a key role in providing care to patients as they move between health care settings or from a health care setting to home. Pharmacists can participate in many aspects of the inpatient, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy practice settings to implement and ensure optimal TOC processes. This article describes establishing the pharmacist’s TOC role and practicing within multiple health care settings. In these models, pharmacists focus on medication reconciliation, discharge counseling, and optimization of medications. Additionally, a checklist has been created to assist other pharmacists in developing the pharmacist’s TOC roles in a practice environment or incorporating more TOC elements in their practice setting. Conclusion: Optimizing the TOC process, reducing medication errors, and preventing adverse events are important focus areas in the current health care system, as emphasized by The Joint Commission and other health care organizations. Pharmacists have the unique opportunity and skillset to develop and participate in TOC processes that will enhance medication safety and improve patient care.

  3. Caring Teaching as a Moral Practice: An Exploratory Study on Perceived Dimensions of Caring Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Gholami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caring teaching is a conceptual framework used to gain an insight into the moral aspect of teaching. Using a quantitative research approach, we studied 556 teachers in order to explore their perceived dimensions of caring teaching. Drawing on existing literature, we found that caring teaching has been elaborated in line with two broad concepts: personal care and academic care. Considering these concepts, we developed the Caring Teaching Scale with which we identified four dimensions of caring teaching: the nurturing of a student's character, didactical bias, awareness, and respectful didactics. A meta-analysis reflection suggests that the nurturing of students' characters and awareness represent personal care while didactical bias and respectful didactics call for academic care. Further analysis showed that these teachers attached more pedagogical value to personal care. Controlling for two demographic variables, we found statistically significant differences with regard to gender and caring teaching.

  4. Improving the quality of cardiovascular preventive care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we target cardiovascular preventive care from a continuous quality improvement point of view in a project called CARPE (CArdiovascular Risk reduction in Primary carE). We created a multifaceted intervention based on a ·quality cycle· and used outreach visitors for its implementation, since this approach has proven successful in modifying professional behavior. 13 In addressing prevention we considered Donebedian's model 14 to assess quality of care: i.e. we distingu...

  5. Medicine and health care: implications for health sciences library practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, A W; Schwarz, M R

    1986-01-01

    The American health care system is experiencing a period of unprecedented change. This paper identifies and discusses the major changes in patient care, research, control of the health care system, and medical education, and their implications for health sciences librarians. These changes have resulted in new demands for effective information delivery and a broader health sciences library clientele. There are both challenges and opportunities for health sciences librarians as they respond to ...

  6. Training the Eye Care Team: Principles and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant Garg; Snigdha Reddy; Chaitanya Nelluri

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial factors to make high quality eye care services available, accessible and affordable to all is the availability of appropriately trained human resources. Providing health through a health care team is a better and cost effective alternative. The concept of the team approach is based on the principles of working together; task shifting; and ensuring continuity of care. Composition of a team varies based on the community needs, population characteristics and disease burden. Bu...

  7. Emerging Themes in Residential Child and Youth Care Practice in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Garfat, Thom

    2003-01-01

    Child and Youth Care practice in North America is, as it should be, in constant evolution. A review of the literature, conversations about practice and participation in the activities of the field reveal certain treads or themes which reft.ect the state of the field at this particular point in time. This paper identifies and reft.ects on some of those that seem most relevant to contemporary Child and Youth Care practice in North America.

  8. Evidence based nursing practice : one exploratory study between different care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Rui Pedro Gomes; Martins, Alice; Peixoto, Maria José; Martins, Teresa; Barbieri, Maria do Céu; Carneiro, António Vaz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, the importance of a clinical practice based on the best available evidence justifies the development of investigation to construct a situational diagnosis that allows to identify in different contexts of care, barriers, attitudes and practices towards an evidence-based nursing. Objective: In this investigation we aim to identify barriers regarding the adoption of an Evidence Based Practice (EBP) in different care settings and describe the main nurse’s attitudes and pr...

  9. Does good practice organization improve the outcome of care for diabetic patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, N; R. Pickering

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Audit of diabetic care is becoming common in general practice. Most of this audit is concerned with structure and process; outcome audit is much more difficult to achieve. AIM: To determine whether the structure of general practice diabetic care influenced the process or outcome and whether efficiency of process predicted improved outcome. METHOD: Cross-sectional survey, by questionnaire and review of notes, among general practices in the East Dorset district, involving diabetic p...

  10. Care Seeking Patterns Among Women Who Have Experienced Gender-Based Violence in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Sonya; Seritan, Andreea L; Miller, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    This study explored patterns of abuse and care seeking among women victims of gender-based violence (GBV) in Afghanistan. Individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 Afghan women (M age = 19 years) living in a shelter for victims of GBV. Interviews were analyzed thematically. Participants reported experiencing multiple forms of abuse. The majority received medical treatment for abuse-related health concerns. However, less than half reported abuse to health care providers or were asked by health care providers about the context of their injuries. Strategies to improve health care responses to GBV are needed to ensure safety and support for Afghan women. PMID:26681300

  11. Meaning and Practice of Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults with Life Limiting Illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Bethel Ann Powers; Norton, Sally A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.; Quill, Timothy E.; Maureen Metzger

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC) and end-of-life (EOL) services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences) and identi...

  12. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1984-01-01

    A summary of a study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) is provided. The data covered aspects of recently graduated O.D.s' experience in obtaining a state license, becoming established in practice, and their practice characteristics. (Author/MLW)

  13. Direct observation of the nutrition care practices of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball LE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nutrition care refers to nutrition-related advice or counselling provided by health professionals in an attempt to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the practices of a sample of Australian general practitioners (GPs when providing nutrition care to adult patients. METHODS: Eighteen GPs (13 male, 5 female were observed by fourth-year medical students during their general practice rotation. Each GP was observed for five consultations that included nutrition care, totalling 90 observed consultations. In each consultation, students completed a 31-item nutrition care checklist of nutrition care practices that could feasibly occur in a standard consultation. Each practice was marked with either a ‘yes’ (completed, ‘no’ (did not complete or ‘completed by practice nurse prior to or after the consultation’. RESULTS: Twenty-eight nutrition care practices were observed at least once. The most frequently observed practices were measuring and discussing blood pressure (76.7%; n=69, followed by general questions about current diet (74.4%; n=67. Approximately half of the consultations included a statement of a nutrition-related problem (52.2%; n=47, and the provision of nutrition advice that focused on a nutrient (45.6%; n=41 or food group (52.2%; n=47. Consultations with male GPs, as well as GPs with more than 25 years of experience, were associated with an increased number of nutrition care practices per consultation. DISCUSSION: The GPs performed nutrition care practices in varying frequencies. Further research is required to identify the most effective GP nutrition care practices to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients.

  14. THE PRACTICE OF SELF-CARE BY TEACHING PROFESSIONAL NURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Cristina Bicudo de Souza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-care is a process cognitive, affective and behavioral in which the individual takes responsibility for his own life, conquering integrity in relationships with themselves and the world in which it is inserted. The nurse is teaching who prepares specifically the nurse who, among other duties, is responsible for the care in health care. However it is important to safeguard your health, take care of yourself and then you can take care of the next expressively. Objective: To identify how teachers professional nursing care for their health. Method: This was a qualitative-descriptive research technique used as the focus group was held in an undergraduate degree in nursing from an institution of Vale do Paraíba Paulista, with nurses teachers who teach in vocational education. Data collection was conducted between July and August 2011. Results: Application of focus group technique enabled the development of a process in which the understanding of participants' experiences, their own point of view and feelings of each, thinking collectively about a topic of daily facilitated group discussion and observation controversies. And yet, the development of central ideas found in the reports and direct observation involved. Final considerations: The reports and observations with the group led to perceive the involvement of teachers nurses regarding care of their families. Self-care corresponds to the physical and spiritual.

  15. Sustainable practice improvements: impact of the Comprehensive Advanced Palliative Care Education (CAPCE) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Diane; Hillier, Loretta M; Keat, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an education program designed to improve palliative care practice through the development of workplace hospice palliative care resources (PCRs), and its impact on knowledge transfer and longer-term changes to clinical practice. Evaluation methods included pre- and post-program questionnaires, and a survey of learners' (n=301) perceptions of program learning strategies. Interviews (n=21) were conducted with a purposeful sample of PCRs and representatives from their work sites. Ratings of the sessions indicated that they were relevant to learners' clinical practice. At follow up, the majority of learners (83%) continued to serve as PCRs. Many positive effects were identified, including enhanced pain and symptom management, staff education, and development of care policies and guidelines. Management support, particularly the prioritization of palliative care and staff development, were factors facilitating sustained implementation. These findings highlight the importance of multimodal learning strategies and supportive work environments in the development of PCRs to enhance palliative care practice. PMID:18251444

  16. Cross-sectorial cooperation and supportive care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Louise Hyldborg; Johnsen, Anna Thit; Ross, Lone;

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cancer care usually involves several health professionals from different parts of the health care system. Often, the GP has an important role. Patients’ experiences of continuity and support may be related to characteristics of health care, disease or patients. Objectives. To investig......Background. Cancer care usually involves several health professionals from different parts of the health care system. Often, the GP has an important role. Patients’ experiences of continuity and support may be related to characteristics of health care, disease or patients. Objectives. To...... cancer patients, a random sample of 1490 patients completed a validated questionnaire regarding patient experiences. A mixed methods approach was applied. Associations between patient experiences and background variables were analysed in ordinal logistic regression models and patients’ written comments...... were analysed qualitatively. Results. One-third of the patients evaluated the cooperation between hospitals and primary care as suboptimal. Younger patients and patients from the capital Copenhagen were most dissatisfied. A third had needed support from their GP, and 41% of these patients had not fully...

  17. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care. PMID:18663640

  18. Spirituality Self-Care Practices as a Mediator between Quality of Life and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    White, Mary L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a midrange theory, building on Orem’s self-care deficit nursing theory (SCDNT) to include constructs of religion, spirituality, and spiritual self‑care practices. This mid-range theory, White’s theory of spirituality and spiritual self-care (WTSSSC), was developed and tested as part of a larger study of African American patients with heart failure (HF). The aim of the study was to determine if spiritual self-care practices were mediating the relationsh...

  19. Intentionality and caring-healing consciousness: a practice of transpersonal nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jean

    2002-07-01

    This article explicates some theoretical and scientific dimensions of intentionality and consciousness as a framework for transpersonal nursing. New connections are made between noetic sciences and transpersonal caring theory, both of which cultivate intentionality as a form of focused consciousness as a formal field of study. What emerges is Intentional Transpersonal Caring, whereby intentionality, consciousness, and universal energy-field are posited as the foundation of a caring moment, potentiating healing for both practitioner and patient. The theoretical and scientific are translated into the practical by a series of practice guidelines that activate intentionality into a living theory of transpersonal caring-healing praxis. PMID:12060941

  20. Factors associated with the use of primary care services: the role of practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Rising demand for and costs of health care have led to an increasing role of practice nurses in primary care in many countries, including the United Kingdom. Previous research has explored how practice nurse care differs from that provided by general practitioners (GPs) in terms of costs and health outcomes, and has highlighted the importance of matching skills and experience with roles and responsibilities. However, there has been little research to compare the characteristics of patients seen by GPs and practice nurses in primary care. We aim to investigate the factors associated with the use of practice nurse visits, and to compare these with the factors associated with GP use. We jointly model the use of practice nurse and GP visits using a bivariate probit regression model with a large set of covariates taken from two rounds of the Health Survey for England (2001, 2002). We find that practice nurse use is associated with age and gender, health, socioeconomic and supply variables. There are differences in the factors associated with practice nurse and GP use. Chronically ill patients are more likely to see a practice nurse, while acute ill health has a stronger association with the probability of seeing the GP. Practice nurse use is also correlated with a narrower range of health conditions compared with GP use. We also found differences between practice nurse and GP visits with respect to the association with economic activity, ethnic group, number of children, degree of urbanisation, and distance to practice. PMID:20496159

  1. Genetic Assessment of Breast Cancer Risk in Primary Care Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Wylie; Culver, Julie; Pinsky, Linda; Hall, Sarah; Reynolds, Susan E; Yasui, Yutaka; Press, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Family history is increasingly important in primary care as a means to detect candidates for genetic testing or tailored prevention programs. We evaluated primary care physicians’ skills in assessing family history for breast cancer risk, using unannounced standardized patient visits to 86 general internists and family medicine practitioners in King County, WA. Transcripts of clinical encounters were coded to determine ascertainment of family history, risk assessment, and clinical follow-up. ...

  2. Managing dengue fever in primary care: A practical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lum, LCS; Ng, CJ; Khoo, EM

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a common cause of illness seen in primary care in the tropical and subtropical countries. An understanding of the course of disease progression, risk factors, recognition of the warning signs and look out for clinical problems during the different phases of the disease will enable primary care physicians to manage dengue fever in an appropriate and timely manner to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  3. Arteriovenous fistula: An evidence based practice in nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelia Prevyzi

    2013-01-01

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the most frequent form of vascular access for patients undergoing haemodialysis because it ensures good quality of dialysis and reduce haemodialysis mortality. For this reason, the nephrology nurse plays an important role in the appropriate care of fistula with a view to promoting the longevity and prevention of complications. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to investigate the role of Nephrology nurse in the appropriate care of fistula, promoting lon...

  4. European Cystic Fibrosis Society standards of care: best practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth, Alan R; Bell, Scott C; Bojcin, Snezana; Byron, Mandy; Duff, Alistair; Flume, Patrick; Kashirskaya, Nataliya; de Munck, Anne; Ratjen, Felix; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Southern, Kevin W; Taccetti, Giovanni; Ullrich, Gerald; Wolfe, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Specialised CF care has led to a dramatic improvement in survival in CF: in the last four decades, well above what was seen in the general population over the same period. With the implementation of newborn screening in many European countries, centres are increasingly caring for a cohort of patients who have minimal lung disease at diagnosis and therefore have the potential to enjoy an excellent quality of life and an even greater life expectancy than was seen previously. To allow high quali...

  5. Atrial fibrillation in a primary care practice: prevalence and management

    OpenAIRE

    Upshur Ross E; Ceresne Lance

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation is a common serious cardiac arrhythmia. Knowing the prevalence of atrial fibrillation and documentation of medical management are important in the provision of primary care. This study sought to determine the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in a primary care population and to identify and quantify the treatments being used for stroke prevention in this group of patients. Methods A prevalence study through chart audit was conducted in the family medici...

  6. Implementing collaborative care for depression treatment in primary care: A cluster randomized evaluation of a quality improvement practice redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Martin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analyses show collaborative care models (CCMs with nurse care management are effective for improving primary care for depression. This study aimed to develop CCM approaches that could be sustained and spread within Veterans Affairs (VA. Evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI uses QI approaches within a research/clinical partnership to redesign care. The study used EBQI methods for CCM redesign, tested the effectiveness of the locally adapted model as implemented, and assessed the contextual factors shaping intervention effectiveness. Methods The study intervention is EBQI as applied to CCM implementation. The study uses a cluster randomized design as a formative evaluation tool to test and improve the effectiveness of the redesign process, with seven intervention and three non-intervention VA primary care practices in five different states. The primary study outcome is patient antidepressant use. The context evaluation is descriptive and uses subgroup analysis. The primary context evaluation measure is naturalistic primary care clinician (PCC predilection to adopt CCM. For the randomized evaluation, trained telephone research interviewers enrolled consecutive primary care patients with major depression in the evaluation, referred enrolled patients in intervention practices to the implemented CCM, and re-surveyed at seven months. Results Interviewers enrolled 288 CCM site and 258 non-CCM site patients. Enrolled intervention site patients were more likely to receive appropriate antidepressant care (66% versus 43%, p = 0.01, but showed no significant difference in symptom improvement compared to usual care. In terms of context, only 40% of enrolled patients received complete care management per protocol. PCC predilection to adopt CCM had substantial effects on patient participation, with patients belonging to early adopter clinicians completing adequate care manager follow-up significantly more often than patients of

  7. HIV/aids related home based care practices among primary health care workers in Ogun state, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    E Amoran; O Ogunsola; O Salako; O Alausa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background HIV/AIDS is fast becoming a chronic disease with the advent of antiretroviral drugs, therefore making home based care key in the management of chronically ill HIV/AIDS patient. The objective of this study was to determine the perception and practice of health care workers on HIV/AIDS related home based care in the health facilities in Ogun state, Nigeria. Methods This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to obtain a...

  8. [A reflection upon an organizational system model for nursing care centered on best practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempfer, Silvana Silveira; Birolo, Ioná Vieira Bez; Meirelles, Betina Homer Schlindwein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2010-09-01

    This article aims at reflecting on nursing best practices and these practices as a perspective of systemizing care. Quality of nursing becomes evident from management practices instituted as a result of its development throughout time. Thinkers of the management area have really influenced nursing both at professional acting and theoretical basis levels. It is imperative that nursing comes closer to best practices, which are considered as a non linear manner of perceiving the world, where structuring of its actions is centered on complex perspective; the use of registers as a way for planning organization and care to take effect, as well as professional identification with issues that transcend personal care and are closer to universal ethics. Best practices are linked to social responsibility, sustainability and ecology as an essence of human actions to conduct management practices. PMID:21574344

  9. Impact of an Elective Course in Community and Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practices on Student Perception of Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kelli D; Maguire, Michelle; Bennett, Marialice S

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To determine the impact of an elective course on students' perception of opportunities and of their preparedness for patient care in community and ambulatory pharmacy settings. Design. Each course meeting included a lecture and discussion to introduce concepts and active-learning activities to apply concepts to patient care or practice development in a community or ambulatory pharmacy setting. Assessment. A survey was administered to students before and after the course. Descriptive statistics were used to assess student responses to survey questions, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze the improvement in student responses with an alpha level set at 0.05. Students felt more prepared to provide patient care, develop or improve a clinical service, and effectively communicate recommendations to other health care providers after course completion. Conclusion. This elective course equipped students with the skills necessary to increase their confidence in providing patient care services in community and ambulatory settings. PMID:27168617

  10. Gender and communication style in general practice: differences between women's health care and regular health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Bensing, J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: differences were investigated between general practitioners providing women's health care (4 women) and general practitioners providing regular health care (8 women and 8 men). Expectations were formulated on the basis of the principles of women's health care and literature about gender

  11. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide. Practical Oral Care for People with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Taking care of someone with a developmental disability requires patience and skill. As a caregiver, you know this as well as anyone does. You also know how challenging it is to help that person with dental care. It takes planning, time, and the ability to manage physical, mental, and behavioral problems. Dental care isn't always easy, but you can…

  12. Factors impacting on nurses' transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Saras

    2002-12-01

    Since nurse education moved to universities, a reoccurring concern of health consumers, health administrators, and some practising nurses is that nurses are not able to transfer the theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. Much has been written about this concern usually under the heading of the theory-practice gap. A common reason that has been highlighted as the cause of this gap is that the theoretical knowledge that nurses learn in academia is predicated on concepts such as humanism and holistic caring. In contrast, the bureaucratic organisation where nurses provide care tends to be based on management concepts where cost containment and outcome measures are more acceptable. Hence nurses' learned values of holistic caring are pitted against the reality of the practice setting. So what is this practice reality? This paper attempts to provide an insider view of why the theoretical knowledge of holistic care may be difficult to enact in the clinical setting. In-depth taped interviews with nurses and participant observation were conducted in acute care hospitals in Western Australia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The findings indicated that utilitarian nursing and role models had impacted on the transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. The paper outlines some measures that nurses themselves can undertake to ensure the narrowing of the theory-practice gap in this area. PMID:19036306

  13. Designing a technology enhanced practice for home nursing care of patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Gail R; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Or, Calvin K L; Carayon, Pascale; Grenier, Anne-Sophie; Brennan, Patricia F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the process we used to design the HeartCare website to support Technology Enhanced Practice (TEP) for home care nurses engaged in providing care for patients with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF). Composed of communication, information, and self-monitoring functions, the HeartCare website is aimed at supporting best practice nursing care for these patients. Its unique focus is professional practice, thus the scope of this project is greater and more abstract than those focusing on a task or set of activities. A modified macroergonomic analysis, design work system analysis, and focus groups utilizing participatory design methodology were undertaken to characterize the nursing practice model. Design of the HeartCare website required synthesizing the extant practice model and the agency's evidence-based heart failure protocols, identifying aspects of practice that could be enhanced by supporting technology, and delineation of functional requirements of the Enhanced HeartCare technology. Validation and refinement of the website and planning for user training activities will be accomplished through a two-stage usability testing strategy. PMID:16779013

  14. Contemporary practice patterns in the management of newly diagnosed hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    McAlister, F A; Teo, K. K.; Lewanczuk, R Z; G. Wells; Montague, T J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine what proportion of patients with hypertension are managed in accordance with guidelines established by the Canadian Hypertension Society. DESIGN: Retrospective medical record review. SETTING: Outpatients seen in primary care offices and internal medicine referral clinics in Edmonton. PATIENTS: All 969 adults who presented with a new diagnosis of essential hypertension from Sept. 1, 1993, to Dec. 31, 1995. OUTCOME MEASURES: Initial laboratory tests performed, advice con...

  15. Introduction of pattern recognition by MATLAB practice 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this book starts introduction and examples of pattern recognition. This book describes a vector and matrix, basic statistics and a probability distribution, statistical decision theory and probability density function, liner shunt, vector quantizing and clustering GMM, PCA and KL conversion, LDA, ID 3, a nerve cell modeling, HMM, SVM and Ada boost. It has direction of MATLAB in the appendix.

  16. New drugs in general practice: prescribing patterns and external influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis several studies are presented with the objective to detect and elucidate the patterns by which new drugs are prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, we studied the influences of medical specialists and community pharmacists as important factors on the GP's decision to

  17. Patterns of care for patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: experience from Australian sarcoma services

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Susie; Crowe, Philip; Gowda, Raghu; Joubert, Warren; Carey-Smith, Richard; Stalley, Paul; Desai, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data on the current management of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) in the Australian health care setting. This study utilised the Australian sarcoma database to evaluate the patterns of care delivered to patients with advanced STS at Australian sarcoma services. Methods Prospectively collected data from six sarcoma centres in Australia were sourced to identify patients diagnosed with advanced STS between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. Des...

  18. Morbidity Patterns and Health Care Seeking Behavior among Older Widows in India

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Gopal; Keshri, Kunal

    2014-01-01

    In the process of health transition, India is facing rapid pace of demographic aging. Rapid increase in older adult population posed serious concerns regarding health and health care utilization for them. However, very limited research documented resultant implications of demographic aging for health and health care use in the nexus of marital status and gender. With this perspective, the present study examined patterns in morbidity prevalence and health seeking behaviour among older widows i...

  19. Good clinical practice guidelines for care home residents with diabetes: an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A J

    2011-07-01

    A Task and Finish Group of Diabetes UK was convened over 14 months to undertake a systematic review of the original 1999 British Diabetic Association guidance on care home diabetes, incorporate new research findings and produce a set of recommendations that are evidenced-based, practical and implementable within UK care home settings. The anticipation of Diabetes UK is that these guidelines will represent a national policy of good clinical practice for diabetes care within care homes. This executive summary demonstrates how the full guidelines should provide a framework of assessment of the quality of diabetes care within care homes, for use by regulatory bodies who have responsibility for this provision of diabetes care. This document is primarily based on recommendations for adults living within British care home environments and its focus, by virtue of the nature and characteristics of residents, is on older adults. Improvements in diabetes care within residential and nursing homes are likely to follow a sustained commitment by health and social care professionals to ensure that the well-being of residents with diabetes is paramount, that high-quality policies of diabetes care are implemented and monitored and effective diabetes education is a mandatory and integral part of care home staff training. PMID:21672001

  20. Improving newborn care practices through home visits: lessons from Malawi, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Sitrin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nearly all newborn deaths occur in low- or middle-income countries. Many of these deaths could be prevented through promotion and provision of newborn care practices such as thermal care, early and exclusive breastfeeding, and hygienic cord care. Home visit programmes promoting these practices were piloted in Malawi, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Uganda. Objective: This study assessed changes in selected newborn care practices over time in pilot programme areas in four countries and evaluated whether women who received home visits during pregnancy were more likely to report use of three key practices. Design: Using data from cross-sectional surveys of women with live births at baseline and endline, the Pearson chi-squared test was used to assess changes over time. Generalised linear models were used to assess the relationship between the main independent variable – home visit from a community health worker (CHW during pregnancy (0, 1–2, 3+ – and use of selected practices while controlling for antenatal care, place of delivery, and maternal age and education. Results: There were statistically significant improvements in practices, except applying nothing to the cord in Malawi and early initiation of breastfeeding in Bangladesh. In Malawi, Nepal, and Bangladesh, women who were visited by a CHW three or more times during pregnancy were more likely to report use of selected practices. Women who delivered in a facility were also more likely to report use of selected practices in Malawi, Nepal, and Uganda; association with place of birth was not examined in Bangladesh because only women who delivered outside a facility were asked about these practices. Conclusion: Home visits can play a role in improving practices in different settings. Multiple interactions are needed, so programmes need to investigate the most appropriate and efficient ways to reach families and promote newborn care practices. Meanwhile, programmes must take advantage of

  1. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weijden Trudy

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of data from 83 health care professionals involved in diabetes care from 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands, with a total of 752 diabetes mellitus type II patients participating in an improvement study. We used self-reported measures of team climate (Team Climate Inventory and organizational culture (Competing Values Framework, and measures of quality of diabetes care and clinical patient characteristics from medical records and self-report. We conducted multivariate analyses of the relationship between culture, climate and HbA1c, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and a sum score on process indicators for the quality of diabetes care, adjusting for potential patient- and practice level confounders and practice-level clustering. Results A strong group culture was negatively associated to the quality of diabetes care provided to patients (β = -0.04; p = 0.04, whereas a more 'balanced culture' was positively associated to diabetes care quality (β = 5.97; p = 0.03. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate and clinical patient outcomes. Conclusion Although some significant associations were found between high quality diabetes care in general practice and different organizational cultures, relations were rather marginal. Variation in clinical patient outcomes could not be attributed to organizational culture or teamwork. This study therefore contributes to the discussion about the legitimacy of the widespread idea

  2. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students in a tertiary care medical college, West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is a widely prevalent practice in India. It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are the future medical practitioners. Aim: To assess the pattern of self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students. Settings and Design: Tertiary care medical college in West Bengal, India. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among the undergraduate medical students. Results: Out of 500 students of the institute, 482 consented for the study and filled in the supplied questionnaire. Fourteen incomplete questionnaires were excluded and the remaining 468 analyzed. It was found that 267 (57.05% respondents practiced self-medication. The principal morbidities for seeking self-medication included cough and common cold as reported by 94 students (35.21% followed by diarrhea (68 students (25.47%, fever (42 students (15.73%, headache (40 students (14.98% and pain abdomen due to heartburn/ peptic ulcer (23 students (8.61%. Drugs/ drug groups commonly used for self-medication included antibiotics (31.09% followed by analgesics (23.21%, antipyretics (17.98%, antiulcer agents (8.99%, cough suppressant (7.87%, multivitamins (6.37% and antihelminthics (4.49%. Among reasons for seeking self-medication, 126 students (47.19% felt that their illness was mild while 76 (28.46% preferred as it is time-saving. About 42 students (15.73% cited cost-effectiveness as the primary reason while 23 (8.62% preferred because of urgency. Conclusion: Our study shows that self-medication is widely practiced among students of the institute. In this situation, faculties should create awareness and educate their students regarding advantages and disadvantages of self-medication.

  3. Implementation as transfer between policy, research and practice in care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Niet, A. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health Services Research is policy related and results have an impact on practices. Implementation of research output into practices is performed with a variety of strategies. Type of policy intentions and research output create a specific context for implementation. The main question he

  4. Newborn care practices in rural Bangladesh: Implications for the adaptation of kangaroo mother care for community-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Erin C; Callaghan-Koru, Jennifer A; Al Mahmud, Abdullah; Shah, Rashed; Farzin, Azadeh; Cristofalo, Elizabeth A; Akhter, Sadika; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2014-12-01

    Bangladesh has one of the world's highest rates of low birth weight along with prevalent traditional care practices that leave newborns highly vulnerable to hypothermia, infection, and early death. We conducted formative research to explore existing newborn care practices in rural Bangladesh with an emphasis on thermal protection, and to identify potential facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for the community level delivery of kangaroo mother care (CKMC). Forty in-depth interviews and 14 focus group discussions were conducted between September and December 2012. Participants included pregnant women and mothers, husbands, maternal and paternal grandmothers, traditional birth attendants, village doctors, traditional healers, pharmacy men, religious leaders, community leaders, and formal healthcare providers. Audio recordings were transcribed and translated into English, and the textual data were analyzed using the Framework Approach. We find that harmful newborn care practices, such as delayed wrapping and early initiation of bathing, are changing as more biomedical advice from formal healthcare providers is reaching the community through word-of-mouth and television campaigns. While the goal of CKMC was relatively easily understood and accepted by many of the participants, logistical and to a lesser extent ideological barriers exist that may keep the practice from being adopted easily. Women feel a sense of inevitable responsibility for household duties despite the desire to provide the best care for their new babies. Our findings showed that participants appreciated CKMC as an appropriate treatment method for ill babies, but were less accepting of it as a protective method of caring for seemingly healthy newborns during the first few days of life. Participants highlighted the necessity of receiving help from family members and witnessing other women performing CKMC with positive outcomes if they are to adopt the behavior themselves. Focusing intervention

  5. Frailty in primary care: a review of its conceptualization and implications for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacas Alethea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Frail, older patients pose a challenge to the primary care physician who may often feel overwhelmed by their complex presentation and tenuous health status. At the same time, family physicians are ideally suited to incorporate the concept of frailty into their practice. They have the propensity and skill set that lends itself to patient-centred care, taking into account the individual subtleties of the patient's health within their social context. Tools to identify frailty in the primary care setting are still in the preliminary stages of development. Even so, some practical measures can be taken to recognize frailty in clinical practice and begin to address how its recognition may impact clinical care. This review seeks to address how frailty is recognised and managed, especially in the realm of primary care.

  6. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Claire; Hadley, Gina; Wee, Bee

    2015-09-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically significant benefits may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. The typical treatment vs. placebo comparison necessitated by 'gold standard' randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. The complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient's physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be difficult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. This review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. The future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a 'mixed methods approach' are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes. PMID:26487964

  7. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claire Visser; Gina Hadley; Bee Wee

    2015-01-01

    hTere has been a paradigm shitf in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically signiifcant beneifts may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. hTe typical treatmentvs. placebo comparison necessitated by ‘gold standard’ randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. hTe complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be diffcult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. hTis review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. hTe future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a ‘mixed methods approach’ are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes.

  8. Teaching professional health care practice: considering the elements of emotions and artistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    This commentary addresses the need to maintain a role for emotions and artistry in human services and health care practice and discusses some approaches to including these issues in teaching at the tertiary level. PMID:18241155

  9. Practical Approaches for Mining Frequent Patterns in Molecular Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulaerts, Stefan; Moens, Sandy; Engelen, Kristof; Berghe, Wim Vanden; Goethals, Bart; Laukens, Kris; Meysman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Pattern detection is an inherent task in the analysis and interpretation of complex and continuously accumulating biological data. Numerous itemset mining algorithms have been developed in the last decade to efficiently detect specific pattern classes in data. Although many of these have proven their value for addressing bioinformatics problems, several factors still slow down promising algorithms from gaining popularity in the life science community. Many of these issues stem from the low user-friendliness of these tools and the complexity of their output, which is often large, static, and consequently hard to interpret. Here, we apply three software implementations on common bioinformatics problems and illustrate some of the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as inherent pitfalls of biological data mining. Frequent itemset mining exists in many different flavors, and users should decide their software choice based on their research question, programming proficiency, and added value of extra features. PMID:27168722

  10. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs. PMID:25532924

  11. Impact of practice size on delivery of diabetes care before and after the Quality and Outcomes Framework implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Tahrani, Abd A.; McCarthy, Mary; Godson, Jojo; Taylor, Sarah; Slater, Helen; Capps, Nigel; Moulik, Probal; Macleod, Andrew F

    2008-01-01

    General practice characteristics are important for healthcare providers to maximise outcomes. Although different aspects of general practice characteristics have been studied previously, the impact of practice size on the delivery of care has been sparsely studied, particularly in relation to diabetes care. This brief report presents a longitudinal study in Shropshire (66 practices, 16 858 patients with diabetes) to assess the impact of practice size on diabetes care before and after implemen...

  12. Patient Perspectives on Improving Oral Health-Care Practices Among People Living with HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E.; McCluskey, Amanda; Guevara, Ernesto; Verdecias, Niko; Jeanty, Yves; DeMayo, Michael; Mofidi, Mahyar

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the impact on oral health-care knowledge, attitudes, and practices among 39 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) participating in a national initiative aimed at increasing access to oral health care. Personal values and childhood dental experiences, beliefs about the importance of oral health in relation to HIV health, and concerns for appearance and self-esteem were found to be determinants of oral health knowledge and practice. Program participation resulted i...

  13. Clinical Practice Guidelines as Instruments for Sound Health Care Priority Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Patrick R; Norheim, Ole F

    2015-11-01

    This editorial discusses the potential role that physician-authored clinical practice guidelines could play in health care priority setting decisions in the United States. We briefly review the challenges associated with increasingly obligate health care priority setting in the United States and discuss accountability for these decisions. We then propose a potential role for clinical practice guidelines in addressing these challenges, while considering the ethical foundations of such a proposal. PMID:26342516

  14. Practice-Based Discourse Analysis of Information Security Policy in Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Goldkuhl, Göran; Hedström, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Information security is an understudied area within electronic government. In this study, we examine the quality of information security policy design in health care. Employees cause a majority of the security breaches in health care, and many of them are unintentional. In order to support the formulation of practical, from the employees’ perspective, information security policies, we propose eight tentative quality criteria. These criteria were developed using practice-based discourse analys...

  15. Dental Care Knowledge and Practice of a Group of Health Workers in Benin City, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Amuh, VO; Okojie, OH; Ehizele, AO

    2014-01-01

    Background: The correlation between knowledge of dental care knowledge and its practice varies among the different health professionals. Aim: The aim of the following study is to assess the knowledge and practice of health workers in a private medical health facility on dental care. Subjects and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on the health workers in Faith Medical Center, Benin City, Nigeria. A self-administered questionnaire, containing 31 open and closed questi...

  16. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Gayle, Krystal A.T.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K.; Shelly R. McFarlane; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A.; Boyne, Michael S.; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates ...

  17. Practice patterns in FNA technique: A survey analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher; J; DiMaio; Jonathan; M; Buscaglia; Seth; A; Gross; Harry; R; Aslanian; Adam; J; Goodman; Sammy; Ho; Michelle; K; Kim; Shireen; Pais; Felice; Schnoll-Sussman; Amrita; Sethi; Uzma; D; Siddiqui; David; H; Robbins; Douglas; G; Adler; Satish; Nagula

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain fine needle aspiration(FNA) tech-niques by endosonographers with varying levels of ex-perience and environments.METHODS: A survey study was performed on United States based endosonographers. The subjects complet-ed an anonymous online electronic survey. The main outcome measurements were differences in needle choice, FNA technique, and clinical decision making among endosonographers and how this relates to years in practice, volume of EUS-FNA procedures, and prac-tice environment.RESULTS: A total of 210(30.8%) endosonographers completed the survey. Just over half(51.4%) identified themselves as academic/university-based practitioners. The vast majority of respondents(77.1%) identified themselves as high-volume endoscopic ultrasound(EUS)(> 150 EUS/year) and high-volume FNA(> 75 FNA/year) performers(73.3). If final cytology is non-diagnostic, high-volume EUS physicians were more likely than low volume physicians to repeat FNA with a core needle(60.5% vs 31.2%; P = 0.0004), and low volume physicians were more likely to refer patients for either surgical or percutaneous biopsy,(33.4% vs 4.9%, P < 0.0001). Academic physicians were more likely to repeat FNA with a core needle(66.7%) compared to community physicians(40.2%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: There is significant variation in EUS-FNA practices among United States endosonographers. Differences appear to be related to EUS volume and practice environment.

  18. Spirometry utilization in Ontario: practice patterns and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, B; Anderson, G; Dales, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe growth and regional variation in the use of spirometry (flow studies) in Ontario. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) fee-for-service billing data for spirometry from the 1989-90 to 1994-95 fiscal years. SETTING: Physicians' office practices in Ontario. OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of flow studies and associated expenditures, number and specialty of physicians performing flow studies and the distribution of their billings, number of studie...

  19. Health care costs, utilization and patterns of care following Lyme disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Adrion

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is the most frequently reported vector borne infection in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control have estimated that approximately 10% to 20% of individuals may experience Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome - a set of symptoms including fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and neurocognitive complaints that persist after initial antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease. Little is known about the impact of Lyme disease or post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms (PTLDS on health care costs and utilization in the United States.1 to examine the impact of Lyme disease on health care costs and utilization, 2 to understand the relationship between Lyme disease and the probability of developing PTLDS, 3 to understand how PTLDS may impact health care costs and utilization.This study utilizes retrospective data on medical claims and member enrollment for persons aged 0-64 years who were enrolled in commercial health insurance plans in the United States between 2006-2010. 52,795 individuals treated for Lyme disease were compared to 263,975 matched controls with no evidence of Lyme disease exposure.Lyme disease is associated with $2,968 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 2,807-3,128, p<.001 and 87% more outpatient visits (95% CI: 86%-89%, p<.001 over a 12-month period, and is associated with 4.77 times greater odds of having any PTLDS-related diagnosis, as compared to controls (95% CI: 4.67-4.87, p<.001. Among those with Lyme disease, having one or more PTLDS-related diagnosis is associated with $3,798 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 3,542-4,055, p<.001 and 66% more outpatient visits (95% CI: 64%-69%, p<.001 over a 12-month period, relative to those with no PTLDS-related diagnoses.Lyme disease is associated with increased costs above what would be expected for an easy to treat infection. The presence of PTLDS-related diagnoses after treatment is associated with significant health care costs and utilization.

  20. Withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care unit: guidance for practice

    OpenAIRE

    Laddie, J.; Craig, F; Brierley, J; Kelly, P; Bluebond-Langner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the work of one tertiary paediatric palliative care service in facilitating planned withdrawal of ventilatory support outside the intensive care setting, with the purpose of developing local guidance for practice. Methods Retrospective 10-year (2003–2012) case note review of intensive care patients whose parents elected to withdraw ventilation in another setting. Demographic and clinical data revealed common themes and specific incidents relevant to local guideline develop...

  1. Implementing New Practices: An Empirical Study of Organizational Learning in Hospital Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Anita L; Nembhard, Ingrid M.; Amy C. Edmondson

    2007-01-01

    This paper contributes to research on organizational learning by investigating specific learning activities undertaken by improvement project teams in hospital intensive care units and proposing an integrative model to explain implementation success. Organizational learning is important in this context because medical knowledge changes constantly and hospital care units must learn new practices if they are to provide high-quality care. To develop a model of factors affecting improvement proje...

  2. NICU nurses’ ambivalent attitudes in skin-to-skin care practice

    OpenAIRE

    Kymre, Ingjerd G.

    2014-01-01

    This article illuminates the essence of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses’ attitudes in skin-to-skin care (SSC) practice for preterm infants and their parents. Health care providers are in a unique position to influence the dynamic between infants and parents, and SSC affects both partners in the dyad. The design is descriptively phenomenological in terms of reflective lifeworld approach. Eighteen Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian nurses from NICUs offering varied possibilities and exte...

  3. How Do General Practitioners Conceptualise Advance Care Planning in Their Practice? A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    De Vleminck, Aline; Pardon, Koen; Beernaert, Kim; Houttekier, Dirk; Vander Stichele, Robert; Deliens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore how GPs conceptualise advance care planning (ACP), based on their experiences with ACP in their practice. Methods Five focus groups were held with 36 GPs. Discussions were analysed using a constant comparative method. Results Four overarching themes in the conceptualisations of ACP were discerned: (1) the organisation of professional care required to meet patients’ needs, (2) the process of preparing for death and discussing palliative care options, (3) the discussion of...

  4. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/objective: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs’ compliance with the Five A’s Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  5. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs' compliance with the Five A's Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  6. Universal precaution: practice among doctors in a tertiary care hospital in Manipur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chaudhuri

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Universal precaution practice was poor. Training of the health care workers, proper equipment supply, posters displaying guidelines and proper hospital policy of patient load management would help in improving the implementation of universal precaution thus restoring occupational safety of health care workers. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(2.000: 606-609

  7. Developmental Surveillance and Screening Practices by Pediatric Primary Care Providers: Implications for Early Intervention Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sallie; Qureshi, Rubab; Caldwell, Barbara Ann; Echevarria, Mercedes; Dubbs, William B.; Sullivan, Margaret W.

    2016-01-01

    This study used a survey approach to investigate current developmental surveillance and developmental screening practices by pediatric primary care providers in a diverse New Jersey county. A total of 217 providers were contacted with a final sample size of 57 pediatric primary care respondents from 13 different municipalities. Most providers…

  8. The Relationship between Practices and Child Care Providers' Beliefs Related to Child Feeding and Obesity Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between child care practices and child care provider knowledge and beliefs about their role in supporting children's healthful eating. Design: Longitudinal design using survey and observation data from baseline and year 1 of the Encouraging Healthy Activity and Eating in Childcare Environments (ENHANCE) pilot…

  9. Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braga Junqueira, A.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Terra Preta; Amazonian Dark Earths; Shifting cultivation; Homegardens; Intensification; Diversification; Smallholder farming. André Braga Junqueira (2015). Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns. PhD thesis, Wagening

  10. Chiropractic practice in the Danish public health care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie

    2009-01-01

    This commentary offers preliminary considerations around a phenomenological investigation of chiropractic services in a Danish public sector setting. In this narrative description, the main venue for chiropractic public (secondary) sector practice in the Danish context is briefly described and...

  11. Practices in primary health care oriented toward the harmful consumption of drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa da Veiga Coelho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the practices of primary care focused on the harmful consumption of drugs. Method This is a qualitative study, developed with a dialectical-critical approach. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews with 10 employees of a basic health unit (UBS. Results The demands are not accepted, and if they go beyond the barriers shaped by the historical absence of health care practices for drug users and moralistic and preconceived ideologies, they are not reinterpreted as health needs; practices that meet these demands and go beyond the barriers are poor; the functionalist approach, which explains drug use as a disease and considers drug users as deviants, supports the few existing practices. Conclusion primary health care is mistakenly focused on addiction; it lacks structural elements of the production process in health and internal dynamics of the working processes that would foster the development of collective practices.

  12. Health Care for Modern Families: Practical suggestions concerning care for families of gay men and lesbians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Olson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a first person perspective concerning how health care providers can better recognize modern families and improve health care for them, especially families founded by gay men and lesbians in U.S. culture. It interweaves information concerning the historical, legal, and economic situation impinging on gay men and lesbians while offering personal stories in dealing with health care professionals. The article references germane scholarly literature for further reading throughout.

  13. Sustaining Care: Cultivating Mindful Practice in Early Years Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    The practitioner's own self is a resource in early childhood education and care (ECEC). It is proposed that an experiential training focusing on the "professional self" helps to raise awareness of how psychological dispositions may impair or enhance quality of provision. A key concept in such training is emotional labour, explored with…

  14. Family Practice Perspectives on Psychiatric Care in the Northwest

    OpenAIRE

    Newbery, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The major effort in psychiatric care in the North is directed toward dealing with depression. The family physician has a key role to play in the therapy of depression, both as a counsellor and as a therapist, and perhaps more important, as a team member, fostering the development of community resources to deal with family breakdown, sexual abuse, and loss of personal spiritual values.

  15. Arteriovenous fistula: An evidence based practice in nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Prevyzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The arteriovenous fistula (AVF is the most frequent form of vascular access for patients undergoing haemodialysis because it ensures good quality of dialysis and reduce haemodialysis mortality. For this reason, the nephrology nurse plays an important role in the appropriate care of fistula with a view to promoting the longevity and prevention of complications. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to investigate the role of Nephrology nurse in the appropriate care of fistula, promoting longevity and reducing complications, based on scientific data and international guidelines. Material-Method: The methodology followed in this review relied on literatures reviews and investigative studies, which were carried out during the period 2000-2012 and international (Medline, PubMed, Cinahl and Greek databases (Iatrotek on the care and management of fistula in people undergoing chronic haemodialysis. Key-words were used: Arteriovenous fistula, cannulation techniques fistula, guidelines, vascular access, role of nurse. Results: The arteriovenous fistula (AVF is the life line for patients undergoing haemodialysis. For this reason, the appropriate care of fistula and its maintenance in a good condition plays an important role for patient΄s life. Conclusions: Nephrology nurse has a major role in the proper management of the fistula and the education of the patient. Additionally, there is a need for cooperation between all the members of the multidisciplinary team, which includes dialysis nurse, nefrologist, access surgeon, and radiologist, for the broader assessment of fistula and the prevention and timely treatment of any complications.

  16. Family practices registration networks contributed to primary care research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Grauw, W.J.C. de

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Family physicians (FP) play a key role in the diagnosis and treatment of health problems in the community and for evidence-based guidance clinical research must be based on primary care data. This paper analyses the state-of-the-art approaches to collection of data and the

  17. Sleep pattern and practice among adolescents school children in Nigerian secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Maduabuchi, Josephat Chinawa; Obu, Herbert Anayo; Chukwu, Barthlomew Friday; Aronu, Ann Ebele; Manyike, Pius Chukwuka; Chinawa, Awoere Tamunosiki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Some adolescents may have sleep disorder at some point during adolescence. Determining the pattern and practice of sleep among adolescents could be useful to establish a lasting sleep hygiene program among adolescents. The objectives of this study are to describe sleep pattern and practice among adolescent in Nigerian secondary schools. Methods Sleep habits were investigated using a random sampling of adolescents from secondary schools from February to April 2013. A self-administ...

  18. Human rights in patient care: a theoretical and practical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan; Ezer, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "human rights in patient care" refers to the application of human rights principles to the context of patient care. It provides a principled alternative to the growing discourse of "patients' rights" that has evolved in response to widespread and severe human rights violations in health settings. Unlike "patients' rights," which is rooted in a consumer framework, this concept derives from inherent human dignity and neutrally applies universal, legally recognized human rights principles, protecting both patients and providers and admitting of limitations that can be justified by human rights norms. It recognizes the interrelation between patient and provider rights, particularly in contexts where providers face simultaneous obligations to patients and the state ("dual loyalty") and may be pressured to abet human rights violations. The human rights lens provides a means to examine systemic issues and state responsibility. Human rights principles that apply to patient care include both the right to the highest attainable standard of health, which covers both positive and negative guarantees in respect of health, as well as civil and political rights ranging from the patient's right to be free from torture and inhumane treatment to liberty and security of person. They also focus attention on the right of socially excluded groups to be free from discrimination in the delivery of health care. Critical rights relevant to providers include freedom of association and the enjoyment of decent work conditions. Some, but not all, of these human rights correspond to rights that have been articulated in "patients' rights" charters. Complementary to—but distinct from—bioethics, human rights in patient care carry legal force and can be applied through judicial action. They also provide a powerful language to articulate and mobilize around justice concerns, and to engage in advocacy through the media and political negotiation. As "patients' rights" movements and

  19. Comparison between indigenous and Western postnatal care practices in Mopani District, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roinah N. Ngunyulu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postnatal care begins immediately after the expulsion of the placenta and continues for six to eight weeks post-delivery. High standard of care is required during the postnatal period because mothers and babies are at risk and vulnerable to complications related to postpartum haemorrhage and infections. Midwives and traditional birth attendants are responsible for the provision of postnatal care in different settings, such as clinics and hospitals, and homes.Methods: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research approach was followed in this study. Unstructured interviews were conducted with the traditional birth attendants. An integrated literature review was conducted to identify the Western postnatalcare practices. Tesch’s process was followed during data analysis.Findings: The following main categories were identified: similarities between indigenous and Western postnatal care practices, and differences between indigenous and Western postnatal care practices. Based on these findings, training of midwives and traditional birth attendants was recommended in order to empower them with knowledge and skills regarding the indigenous and Western postnatal care practices.Conclusions: It is evident that some indigenous postnatal care practices have adverse effects on the health of postnatal women and their newborn infants, but these are unknown to the traditional birth attendants. The employment of indigenous postnatal care practices by the traditional birth attendants is also influenced by their cultural beliefs, norms, values and attitudes. Therefore, there is an urgent need to train midwives and traditional birth attendants regarding the indigenous and Western postnatal care to improve the health of postnatal women and their babies.

  20. Prescription pattern of analgesic drugs for patients receiving Palliative Care in a Teaching Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishma Hydie Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The study shows that prescription pattern in palliative care unit of this hospital was in accordance with WHO pain management guidelines. The study showed the current trend in prescription of analgesic drugs in the teaching hospital where the study was conducted.

  1. Expressing best practices in (risk) analysis and testing of safety-critical systems using patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzner, Wolfgang; Sieverding, Sven; Kacimi, Omar;

    2014-01-01

    use. This paper introduces workflow patterns to describe such best practices in a systematic way that efficiently represents this know¬ledge, and also provides a way to relate different patterns, making them easier to identify and use, and cover as wide a range of experiences as possible. The value of...

  2. Stepped care vs. matched care for mood and anxiety disorders : a randomized trial in routine practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A; Tiemens, B; Hakkaart, L; Nolen, WA; Donker, MCH

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The effectiveness of two versions of stepped care [with either brief therapy (BT) or cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as a first step] is studied in comparison with the traditional matched care approach (CAU) for patients with mood and anxiety disorders. Method: A randomized trial was

  3. Estrogen formulations and beauty care practices in Japanese women

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda T; Wong TF; Kitamura M; Yaegashi N

    2012-01-01

    Takashi Takeda, Tze Fang Wong, Mari Kitamura, Nobuo YaegashiDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, JapanPurpose: Traditionally, oral estrogens have been used for hormone replacement therapy. However, in Japan, additional estrogen formulations have been used, including transdermal patches and transdermal gels. The latter have a unique commonality with cosmetics because both of them are applied to the skin. Beauty care is one of the most ...

  4. Infection Risk Reduction in the Intensive Care Nursery: A Review of Patient Care Practices That Impact the Infection Risk in Global Care of the Hospitalized Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrak, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk for developing an infection during their hospital stay in the neonatal intensive care unit. Increased risk occurs because of immaturity of the neonate's immune system, lower gestational age, severity of illness, surgical procedures, and instrumentation with life support devices such as vascular catheters. Neonates become colonized with bacteria prior to or at delivery and also during their hospital stay. They can then become infected with those bacteria if there is a breakdown in the primary defenses such as tissue injury due to skin breakdown, nasal erosion, or trauma to the respiratory tract. Neonates are also at high risk for bacterial translocation due to the altered permeability of the intestinal mucosa, loss of commensal flora, and bacterial overgrowth. The unit-based neonatal care team must implement global care delivery and safety practices, utilize published care guidelines, know and apply evidence-based practices from collaborative quality improvement efforts and other sources, and use auditing and monitoring practices that can identify risks and lead to better practice options to prevent infections. This article presents several aspects of global neonatal care delivery, including vascular access, which may reduce the risk of systemic infection during the hospitalization. PMID:27104605

  5. Journey toward a Patient-Centered Medical Home: Readiness for Change in Primary Care Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Christopher G; Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Green, Lee A.; Cohen, Genna R.; Koster, Christina R

    2011-01-01

    Context: Information is limited regarding the readiness of primary care practices to make the transformational changes necessary to implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. Using comparative, qualitative data, we provide practical guidelines for assessing and increasing readiness for PCMH implementation.

  6. Child Care Teachers' Beliefs and Practices regarding Socialization of Emotion in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hey Jun

    2005-01-01

    This study examines teachers' beliefs and their practices of emotional socialization in three child care centers. Interviews with teachers revealed that teachers shared some, but not all, of their beliefs with regard to their role in children's emotional development and views of their own socialization practices. The findings from classroom…

  7. Patient safety features are more present in larger primary care practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, S.; Hombergh, P. van den; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore whether specific characteristics of a general practice organization were associated with aspects of patient safety management. METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from 271 primary care practices, collected in 10 European countries. These data were collected by

  8. Training the eye care team: Principles and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial factors to make high quality eye care services available, accessible and affordable to all is the availability of appropriately trained human resources. Providing health through a health care team is a better and cost effective alternative. The concept of the team approach is based on the principles of working together; task shifting; and ensuring continuity of care. Composition of a team varies based on the community needs, population characteristics and disease burden. But for it to be effective, a team must possess four attributes - availability, competency, productivity, and responsiveness. Therefore, training of all team members and training the team to work together as a unit are crucial components in the success of this concept. Some of the critical attributes include: Training across the health spectrum through quality and responsive curricula administered by motivated teachers; accreditation of programs or institutions by national or international bodies; certification and recertification of team members; and training in working together as a team through inter- and intra- disciplinary workshops both during training and as a part of the job activity.

  9. [Ethics in clinical practice and in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintor, S; Mennuni, G; Fontana, M; Nocchi, S; Giarrusso, P; Serio, A; Fraioli, A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical ethics is the identification, analysis and solution of moral problems that can arise during the care of a patient. Given that when dealing with ethical issues in health care some risks will be encountered (talking about ethics in general, or as a problem overlapped with others in this area, or by delegation to legislative determinations) in the text certain important aspects of the topic are examined. First of all ethics as human quality of the relationship between people for the common good, especially in health services where there are serious problems like the life and the health. It is also necessary a "humanizing relationship" between those who work in these services in order to achieve quality and efficiency in this business. It is important a proper training of health professionals, especially doctors, so that they can identify the real needs and means of intervention. It is also important that scientific research must respect fundamental ethical assumptions. In conclusion, ethics in health care is not a simple matter of "cookbook" rules, but involves the responsibility and consciousness of individual operators. PMID:26378763

  10. The Influence of Advanced General Dentistry Training on Practice Patterns of Iowa Dental Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Aljernon J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study compared the practice patterns of 41 dentists with graduate training in general dentistry with those of 41 dentists without such training, in terms of number and types of procedures performed, patient characteristics, professional and community activities, and practice characteristics. Some differences were found, particularly in patient…

  11. Developing person-centred care: addressing contextual challenges through practice development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Brendan; Dewing, Jan; McCance, Tanya

    2011-05-01

    Developing person-centred care is not a one-time event; rather it requires a sustained commitment from organisations to the ongoing facilitation of developments, a commitment both in clinical teams and across organizations. Contextual factors pose the greatest challenge to person-centredness and the development of cultures that can sustain person-centred care. We will begin with a general comment on 'context' and its meaning before exploring three particular factors that influence the practice context, namely, workplace culture, learning culture, and the physical environment. Next we explore a particular approach to developing person-centred care through emancipatory practice development. We highlight the importance of facilitation through emancipatory practice development programmes and describe how person-centred care can be developed through the presentation of a case study that illustrates the principles and processes of emancipatory practice development as well as the outcomes achieved. We conclude with an application to clinical practice. A key consideration for all organisations in the development of person-centred care is to move from what we suggest are 'person-centred moments' (individual, ad hoc experiences of person-centredness) to 'person-centred care' as an underpinning culture of teams and organisations. PMID:22088152

  12. Delivering stepped care: an analysis of implementation in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards David A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United Kingdom, clinical guidelines recommend that services for depression and anxiety should be structured around a stepped care model, where patients receive treatment at different 'steps,' with the intensity of treatment (i.e., the amount and type increasing at each step if they fail to benefit at previous steps. There are very limited data available on the implementation of this model, particularly on the intensity of psychological treatment at each step. Our objective was to describe patient pathways through stepped care services and the impact of this on patient flow and management. Methods We recorded service design features of four National Health Service sites implementing stepped care (e.g., the types of treatments available and their links with other treatments, together with the actual treatments received by individual patients and their transitions between different treatment steps. We computed the proportions of patients accessing, receiving, and transiting between the various steps and mapped these proportions visually to illustrate patient movement. Results We collected throughput data on 7,698 patients referred. Patient pathways were highly complex and very variable within and between sites. The ratio of low (e.g., self-help to high-intensity (e.g., cognitive behaviour therapy treatments delivered varied between sites from 22:1, through 2.1:1, 1.4:1 to 0.5:1. The numbers of patients allocated directly to high-intensity treatment varied from 3% to 45%. Rates of stepping up from low-intensity treatment to high-intensity treatment were less than 10%. Conclusions When services attempt to implement the recommendation for stepped care in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines, there were significant differences in implementation and consequent high levels of variation in patient pathways. Evaluations driven by the principles of implementation science (such as targeted planning

  13. 'They think they can talk to nurses': practice nurses' views of their roles in caring for mental health problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Crosland, A; Kai, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care teams have been encouraged to develop the care they provide to patients with mental health problems, and a greater role for practice nurses has been advocated. However, little is known about practice nurses' current level of involvement or their perceived strengths and limitations in caring for patients' mental health problems. AIM: To describe practice nurses' current experiences of caring for patients with mental health problems and to explore their perceptions abou...

  14. Bridging Science and Practice to Improve Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdin, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    Replies to the comments by Tyron, Silverstein and Auerbach, and Raps on the author's original article. I was very pleased to read these comments about the priority of bridging research and clinical practice and to have the benefit of further perspectives on how this goal might be achieved. The article to which these comments were addressed…

  15. Self-care practices developed by pregnant women in a prenatal outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Riul da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this descriptive, cross-sectional, quantitative study was to examine self-care practices developed by pregnant women in a prenatal outpatient clinic. Ninety-nine pregnant women participated. The survey was conducted in a public outpatient clinic in Minas Gerais. A questionnaire was administered. The responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results indicated greater self-care in relation to consumption of toxic substances (alcohol and drugs, hygiene, rest and nutrition. Others, such as physical exercise, wearing sunscreen and breast care were not deemed as priorities by the participants. Most reported receiving self-care guidance from health professionals, especially physicians and nurses. Defining the nature of the theme could contribute to the reorganization of health services, in order to provide better strategies for delivering quality care to pregnant women, especially the development of educational practices. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i4.21779.

  16. Rehabilitation practice patterns for patients with heart failure: the Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    More countries around world have begun to use cardiac rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with chronic heart failure (HF). Asia is the largest continent in the world and, depending on its economy, culture, and beliefs, a given Asian country differs from Western countries as well as others in Asia. The cardiac rehabilitation practice patterns for patients with HF are somewhat different in Asia. In addition to the formal pattern of Western practice, it also includes special techniques and skills, such as Taiji, Qigong, and Yoga. This article describes cardiac rehabilitation patterns for patients with HF in most Asian countries and areas. PMID:25432478

  17. Awareness and Practice of Biomedical Waste Management Among Different Health Care Personnel at Tertiary Care Centre, Rajkot, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh K Chudasama

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bio medical waste collection and proper disposal has become a significant concern for both the medical and general community. Objective: To know the awareness and practice of biomedical waste management (BMW among health care personnel working at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The study was conducted from January 2013 to June 2013. It was a descriptive observational hospital based cross sectional study. Study participants included the resident and intern doctors, nursing staff, laboratory technicians, sanitary staff (ward boys, aaya and sweepers working in the P D U Government Medical College and Civil Hospital, Rajkot who are dealing with BMW. The study was conducted by using pretested, semi-structured pro forma. Results: Total 282 health care personnel participated, including 123 resident and intern doctors, 92 nursing personnel, 13 laboratory technicians and 54 sanitary staff. Only 44.3% study participants received training for bio medical waste management. Except for doctors (98.4%, awareness regarding identification and use of color coded bags as per BMW act, was very poor among health care personnel. Record keeping for injuries related to biomedical waste was very poor for all health care personnel. Significant number of paramedics maintained record of BMW at work place, practiced disinfection and segregation of BMW at work place, used personal protective measures while handling BMW. Significant number of resident and intern doctors practiced correct method for collecting sharps and needles than paramedical staff. Conclusion: Intensive training program at regular time interval and a system of monitoring and surveillance about practice of day to day BMW management should be evolved.

  18. Quality of care in family practice: does residency training make a difference?

    OpenAIRE

    Borgiel, A E; Williams, J I; Bass, M J; Dunn, E V; Evensen, M K; Lamont, C T; MacDonald, P J; McCoy, J M; Spasoff, R A

    1989-01-01

    As the proportion of physicians who enter residency training in family practice steadily increases, so does the need to evaluate the impact of their training and postgraduate education on the quality of care in their practices. We audited the practices of 120 randomly selected family physicians in Ontario, who were separated into four groups: nonmembers of the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), members of the CFPC with no certification in family medicine, certificated members with...

  19. Primary care for tinnitus: practice and opinion among GPs in England

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shunnar, Suliman K; Hoare, Derek J; Smith, Sandra; Gander, Phillip E.; Kang, Sujin; Fackrell, Kathryn; Hall, Deborah A

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aim and objective Effective tinnitus management starts with appropriate general practitioner (GP) triage, which in England can be guided by the Department of Health's Good Practice Guide (GPG). Despite the prevalence of the condition, there has never been a systematic survey of its management in primary care in England. We aimed to evaluate how people with tinnitus are assessed and managed in general practice, noting variation in practice across GPs and health authorities, and eval...

  20. Vaccine storage and handling. Knowledge and practice in primary care physicians' offices.

    OpenAIRE

    L. Yuan; Daniels, S.; Naus, M.; Brcic, B.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and practice of vaccine storage and handling in primary care physicians' offices. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted from August to December 1992. Staff responsible for vaccine storage were interviewed about their knowledge and practices of vaccine handling and storage. Refrigerators were inspected to document refrigerator temperature and vaccine storage conditions. SETTING: General and pediatric practices in 12 regions of Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: P...

  1. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-01-01

    of who were followed closely over an extended time period. Results. Through thematic analysis fi ve key concepts emerged about the social dynamics of hospital environments: practices of self; creating personal space; social recognition; negotiating space; and ambiguity of space and care. Through...... these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a fl ow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients ’ sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital...... space to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Discussion. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition of...

  2. Implementation of Patient-Centered Medical Homes in Adult Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Markovitz, Amanda R; Paustian, Michael L; Wise, Christopher G; El Reda, Darline K; Green, Lee A; Fetters, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    There has been relatively little empirical evidence about the effects of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation on patient-related outcomes and costs. Using a longitudinal design and a large study group of 2,218 Michigan adult primary care practices, our study examined the following research questions: Is the level of, and change in, implementation of PCMH associated with medical surgical cost, preventive services utilization, and quality of care in the following year? Results indicated that both level and amount of change in practice implementation of PCMH are independently and positively associated with measures of quality of care and use of preventive services, after controlling for a variety of practice, patient cohort, and practice environmental characteristics. Results also indicate that lower overall medical and surgical costs are associated with higher levels of PCMH implementation, although change in PCMH implementation did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:25861803

  3. Best Practices for Smoking Cessation Interventions in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew McIvor; John Kayser; Jean-Marc Assaad; Gerald Brosky; Penny Demarest; Philippe Desmarais; Christine Hampson; Milan Khara; Ratsamy Pathammavong; Robert Weinberg

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Canada, smoking is the leading preventable cause of premature death. Family physicians and nurse practitioners are uniquely positioned to initiate smoking cessation. Because smoking is a chronic addiction, repeated, opportunity-based interventions are most effective in addressing physical dependence and modifying deeply ingrained patterns of beliefs and behaviour. However, only a small minority of family physicians provide thorough smoking cessation counselling and less than on...

  4. Patterns of geographic mobility predict barriers to engagement in HIV care and antiretroviral treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barbara S; Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A; Khan, Shah Z; Garduño, L Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence. PMID:24839872

  5. Awareness and practices regarding bio-medical waste management among health care workers in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bhagawati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care institutions are generating large amount of Bio-Medical Waste (BMW, which needs to be properly segregated and treated. With this concern, a questionnaire based cross-sectional study was done to determine the current status of awareness and practices regarding BMW Management (BMWM and areas of deficit amongst the HCWs in a tertiary care teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. The correct responses were graded as satisfactory (more than 80%, intermediate (50–80% and unsatisfactory (less than 50%. Some major areas of deficit found were about knowledge regarding number of BMW categories (17%, mercury waste disposal (37.56% and definition of BMW (47%.

  6. Learning Patterns in Music Practice: Links between Disposition, Practice Strategies and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    StGeorge, Jennifer Mary; Holbrook, Allyson Patricia; Cantwell, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Research into musical practice has over recent decades focused on the technical and organisational strategies employed by novices and experts. What has been less studied are the background factors or influences on the quality of this music practice. Drawing on interview data collected from 66 children and adults from a mixed methods project, we…

  7. Multicultural health care in practice. An empirical exploration of multicultural care in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthuis, Gert; van Heteren, Godelieve

    2003-09-01

    This study presents a first assessment of the challenges faced by Dutch health care providers dealing with the increasing cultural diversity in Dutch society. Qualitative interviews with 24 Dutch caregivers and policy-makers point to a number of important difficulties encountered when confronted with the growing diversity of patient populations. The study focuses explicitly on the challenges health care providers perceive in their direct interactions with patients. On the basis of the observations of the 24 respondents five strategies were formulated to improve the delivery of care in a multicultural environment. Their findings were further evaluated by confronting the empirical data with care-ethical notions (attentiveness, responsibility, competence, and responsiveness) and intercultural communication-theory. PMID:14708932

  8. [The integrality of care and communicative actions in the cross-discipline practice in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirolo, Sueli Moreira; Ferraz, Clarice Aparecida; Gomes, Romeu

    2011-12-01

    Cross-disciplinary work in health is an important element to deliver comprehensive health care actions. The present study analyzed cross-disciplinary actions in intensive care according to Habermas. This case study was performed using a qualitative approach. The empiric material capture was collected by observing the setting and using semi-structured interviews with health workers. The information was analyzed using the meaning interpretation technique. The analysis revealed two thematic lines: individual instrumental care in view of the clinical inconstancy, and the collective care fragmented by functions. This result weakens the worker/worker and the worker/patient interactions and compromises the association between health actions. As it does not favor communicative actions, it becomes fragile and the strategic/instrumental action is evinced. PMID:22241198

  9. Radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Results and Implications of a national patterns-of-care study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This patterns-of-care study was performed to define the current clinical experience with radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in adults in Germany and to define open questions resulting from this study. Material and Methods: A standardized questionnaire was sent to 198 German radiotherapy institutions. Data about patient characteristics, stage of disease, practice and fractionation of radiotherapy, outcome of therapy, etc. were systematically evaluated. 123 of 198 institutions answered the complete questionnaire (62.1%). Results: Only 23 of the 123 institutions (18.7%) reported experience with radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis of adults. 18 institutions with 98 patients were evaluable. The majority of patients (72 of 98) was treated on a linear accelerator. The median single dose of radiotherapy was 2 Gy, while the median total dose was 24 Gy. 81 of 89 evaluable patients (91%) reached a local control of the treated lesion(s), 69 of those had a complete remission. Eight of 89 patients (9%) developed an in-field recurrence. 87.8% of patients experienced no acute and 97% of patients no late side effects of radiotherapy. Conclusion: Clinical experience with radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in adults in Germany is still very limited. Nevertheless, the clinical results - with high remission and local control rates - confirm the effectiveness of radiotherapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of this disease. Due to the small number of patients in this study despite higher incidence rates, the knowledge of this disease has to be multiplied in Germany. Future patients should be systematically included into a prospective radiotherapy registry. (orig.)

  10. A Practice Theory Approach to Understanding the Interdependency of Nursing Practice and the Environment Implications for Nurse-Led Care Delivery Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, M.(Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Germany); Feldman, MS

    2015-01-01

    Nursing has a rich knowledge base with which to develop care models that can transform the ways health is promoted and valued. However, theory linking the environment domain of the nursing metaparadigm with the real-world environments where nurses practice and patients experience their health care is tenuous. Practice theory is used to foreground the generative role of nursing practice in producing environments of care, providing the basis for a metaparadigm relational proposition explicitly ...

  11. Unsettling care: Troubling transnational itineraries of care in feminist health practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    Responding to the call by Maria Puig de la Bellacasa for Science and Technology Studies to take up 'matters of care', this article cautions against equating care with positive feelings and, in contrast, argues for the importance of grappling with the non-innocent histories in which the politics of care already circulates, particularly in transnational couplings of feminism and health. The article highlights these histories by tracing multiple versions of the politics of care in a select set of feminist engagements with the pap smear and cervical cancer. Drawing on postcolonial and indigenous feminist commitments, as well as amplifying Donna Haraway's call to 'stay with the trouble', the article seeks to disturb hegemonic histories and arrangements of race, colonialism, and political economy, while simultaneously valuing divergent multi-local itineraries as relevant to technoscientific matters of care. This call for a politics of 'unsettling' care strives to stir up and put into motion what is sedimented, while embracing the generativity of discomfort, critique, and non-innocence. PMID:26630818

  12. Integrating health care practices with the promotion of breastfeeding

    OpenAIRE

    Riccardo Davanzo; Pierpaolo Brovedani; Laura Travan

    2014-01-01

    Although breastfeeding is the normative standards for infant nutrition, exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge in the general population of newborns are still suboptimal. Besides many other psychological, social, economical, cultural factors, breastfeeding success is also significantly influenced by maternity practices that have the potential to foster or otherwise to hinder breastfeeding physiology during postpartum hospital stay. On their part, health professionals need to impr...

  13. The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study Brazil (CKDopps-Brazil: Design, data and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bueno de Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study (CKDopps is an international observational, prospective, cohort study involving patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stages 3-5 [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, with a major focus upon care during the advanced CKD period (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2]. During a 1-year enrollment period, each one of the 22 selected clinics will enroll up to 60 advanced CKD patients (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 and not dialysis-dependent and 20 earlier stage CKD patients (eGFR between 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m2. Exclusion criteria: age < 18 years old, patients on chronic dialysis or prior kidney transplant. The study timeline include up to one year for enrollment of patients at each clinic starting in the end of 2013, followed by up to 2-3 years of patient follow-up with collection of detailed longitudinal patient-level data, annual clinic practice-level surveys, and patient surveys. Analyses will apply regression models to evaluate the contribution of patient-level and clinic practice-level factors to study outcomes, and utilize instrumental variable-type techniques when appropriate. Conclusion: Launching in 2013, CKDopps Brazil will study advanced CKD care in a random selection of nephrology clinics across Brazil to gain understanding of variation in care across the country, and as part of a multinational study to identify optimal treatment practices to slow kidney disease progression and improve outcomes during the transition period to end-stage kidney disease.

  14. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described. PMID:26712302

  15. Adherence to diabetes care processes at general practices in the National Capital Region-Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopa Shivashankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the level of adherence to diabetes care processes, and associated clinic and patient factors at general practices in Delhi, India. Methods: We interviewed physicians (n = 23 and patients with diabetes (n = 406, and reviewed patient charts at general practices (government = 5; private = 18. We examined diabetes care processes, specifically measurement of weight, blood pressure (BP, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipids, electrocardiogram, dilated eye, and a foot examination in the last one year. We analyzed clinic and patient factors associated with a number of care processes achieved using multilevel Poisson regression model. Results: The average number of clinic visits per patient was 8.8/year (standard deviation = 5.7, and physicians had access to patient's previous records in only 19.7% of patients. Dilated eye exam, foot exam, and electrocardiogram were completed in 7.4%, 15.1%, and 29.1% of patients, respectively. An estimated 51.7%, 88.4%, and 28.1% had ≥1 measurement of HbA1c, BP, and lipids, respectively. Private clinics, physician access to patient's previous records, use of nonphysicians, patient education, and the presence of diabetes complication were positively associated with a number of care processes in the multivariable model. Conclusion: Adherence to diabetes care processes was suboptimal. Encouraging implementation of quality improvement strategies like Chronic Care Model elements at general practices may improve diabetes care.

  16. Trust and truth: uncertainty in health care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyreman, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Uncertainty is the ubiquitous presence across health care. It is usually understood in terms of decision making, 'knowing' the correct diagnosis or understanding how the human body works. Using the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Georges Canguilhem and Tim Ingold, I outline a story of journeying and habitation, and argue that while uncertainty for practitioners may be about enhancing theoretical knowledge, for patients it is about knowing how to act in a taken-for-granted and largely unconscious way in a world that has become uncertain, and in which the main tool of action, the human body, no longer functions with the certainty it once had. In this situation, the role of the practitioner is first and foremost to recognize the uncertainty that has emerged in the patient's 'habitation' and to reassure them by enabling them to have a new or restored confidence in their body so that they can act with certainty. PMID:25892075

  17. Prescription auditing and drug utilization pattern in a tertiary care teaching hospital of western UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroz Abidi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, a proper reporting of medication errors in the hospital is not available. Drugs worth crores of rupee are consumed every year but a substantial part of these drugs are irrationally prescribed. In order to promote rational drug usage standard policies on use of drugs must be set, and this can be done only after the current prescription practices have been audited. The prescriptions were analyzed based on the objectives of the study in order to promote rational use of drugs in a population. Methods: The study was carried out prospectively over a period of two months and 15 days in general medicine OPD of our tertiary care hospital. A specially designed performa was used with pre-inserted carbons. Results: Two hundred and thirty seven prescriptions were analyzed. Total no. of drugs in 237 prescriptions were 1001. Therefore average number of drugs/prescription is 4.22. Drugs were prescribed by generic names in 3.79% of cases, drugs on EDL are only 53.25% and fixed dose combinations are 26.87% of total drugs. Dosage forms used were mostly oral -93.51%. Injectables were only 6.19% and topical forms were least 0.299%. Doctors profile indicates that maximum number i.e. 93.67% were general practitioners. Basic information of patient was written in 72.57% prescriptions. Complete diagnoses were written in 70.04% prescriptions. Only 88.61% prescriptions were legible and only 76.79% prescriptions were complete in terms of dose, route, strength, frequency and dosage forms. Disease pattern seen was variable. Diseases of respiratory system were maximum 44.72 % followed by infectious and parasitic diseases - 16.03 % and diseases of digestive system - 13.92 %. The most common drug groups prescribed were NSAIDs± serratiopeptidases, antibiotics, antihistaminics, multivitamins, minerals, enzymes and expectorants & bronchodilators. The incidence of polypharmacy was also common with maximum number of drugs which were prescribed per prescription

  18. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  19. Using the ecology model to describe the impact of asthma on patterns of health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawn Barbara P

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma changes both the volume and patterns of healthcare of affected people. Most studies of asthma health care utilization have been done in selected insured populations or in a single site such as the emergency department. Asthma is an ambulatory sensitive care condition making it important to understand the relationship between care in all sites across the health service spectrum. Asthma is also more common in people with fewer economic resources making it important to include people across all types of insurance and no insurance categories. The ecology of medical care model may provide a useful framework to describe the use of health services in people with asthma compared to those without asthma and identify subgroups with apparent gaps in care. Methods This is a case-control study using the 1999 U.S. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Cases are school-aged children (6 to 17 years and young adults (18 to 44 years with self-reported asthma. Controls are from the same age groups who have no self-reported asthma. Descriptive analyses and risk ratios are placed within the ecology of medical care model and used to describe and compare the healthcare contact of cases and controls across multiple settings. Results In 1999, the presence of asthma significantly increased the likelihood of an ambulatory care visit by 20 to 30% and more than doubled the likelihood of making one or more visits to the emergency department (ED. Yet, 18.8% of children and 14.5% of adults with asthma (over a million Americans had no ambulatory care visits for asthma. About one in 20 to 35 people with asthma (5.2% of children and 3.6% of adults were seen in the ED or hospital but had no prior or follow-up ambulatory care visits. These Americans were more likely to be uninsured, have no usual source of care and live in metropolitan areas. Conclusion The ecology model confirmed that having asthma changes the likelihood and pattern of care for Americans

  20. Fostering the practice of rooming-in in newborn care

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Saurabh R; Prateek S Shrivastava; Jegadeesh Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    Practice of rooming-in meant that baby and mother stayed together in the same room day and night in the hospital, right from the time of delivery till the time of discharge. Adoption of rooming-in offers multiple benefits to the newborn, mother, and mother-child as a unit. It is a cost-effective approach wherefewer instruments are required and spares additional manpower. Rooming-in endeavors the opportunity to contribute signifi cantly in the child’s growth, development and survival by assist...

  1. The impact of a general practice group intervention on prescribing costs and patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Jane; Mathers, Nigel

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The formation of primary care groups (PCGs) and trusts (PCTs) has shifted the emphasis from individual practice initiatives to group-based efforts to control rising prescribing costs. However, there is a paucity of literature describing such group initiatives. We report the results of a multilevel group initiative, involving input from a pharmaceutical adviser, practice comparison feedback, and peer review meetings. AIM: To determine the impact of a prescribing initiative on the p...

  2. Radiation therapy for benign diseases: patterns of care study in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiotherapy of benign diseases is controversial and rarely applied in Anglo-American countries, whereas in other parts of the world it is commonly practiced for several benign disorders. Similar to a European survey, a pattern of care study was conducted in Germany. Method: Using a mailed questionnaire, radiation equipment, treatment indication, number of patients, and treatment concepts were assessed in 1994, 1995, and 1996 in 134 of 152 German institutions (88%): 22 in East and 112 in West Germany; 30 in university hospitals and 104 in community hospitals. Average numbers of each institution and of all institutions were analyzed for frequencies and ratios between regions and among institutions. Radiation treatment concepts were analyzed. Results: A mean of 2 (range 1-7) megavoltage and 1.4 (range 0-4) orthovoltage units were available per institution; 32 institutions (24%) had no orthovoltage equipment. A mean of 20,082 patients were treated annually: 456 (2%) for inflammatory diseases (221 hidradenitis, 78 local infection, 23 parotitis; 134 not specified) 12,600 (63%) for degenerative diseases (2711 peritendinitis humeroscapularis, 1555 epicondylitis humeri; 1382 plantar/dorsal heel spur; 2434 degenerative osteoarthritis; 4518 not specified); 927 (5%) for hyperproliferative diseases (146 Dupuytren's contracture, 382 keloids; 155 Peyronie's disease; 244 not specified); 1210 (6%) for functional disorders (853 Graves' orbitopathy; 357 not specified); and 4889 (24%) for other disorders (e.g., 3680 heterotopic ossification prophylaxis). In univariate analysis, there were geographic (West vs. East Germany) differences in using radiation therapy (RT) for inflammatory and degenerative disorders, and institutional differences (university versus community hospitals) in using RT for hyperproliferative and functional disorders (p < 0.05). The prescribed dose concepts were mostly in the low dose range, <10 Gy but varied widely and inconsistently within

  3. Practice related factors that may impact on postpartum care for mothers and infants in Australian general practice: a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Brodribb, Wendy E; Mitchell, Benjamin L; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-01-01

    Background While there is a significant focus on the health and well-being of women during pregnancy, labour and birth, much less emphasis is placed on the care of postpartum women and their infants in primary care following the birth. Some studies have investigated the role of GPs in postpartum care, and others examined facilitators and barriers to mothers accessing care. However there is little information available to investigate the effect of practice related factors on access to care of ...

  4. End-of-Life Care Patterns Associated with Pediatric Palliative Care among Children Who Underwent Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Christina K; Lehmann, Leslie; London, Wendy B; Guo, Dongjing; Sridharan, Madhumitha; Koch, Richard; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an intensive therapy offering the possibility of cure for life-threatening conditions but with risk of serious complications and death. Outcomes associated with pediatric palliative care (PPC) for children who undergo SCT are unknown. Therefore, we evaluated whether PPC consultation is associated with differences in end-of-life (EOL) care patterns for children who underwent SCT and did not survive. Medical records of children who underwent SCT at Boston Children's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for any indication from September 2004 to December 2012 and did not survive were reviewed. Child demographic and clinical characteristics and PPC consultation and EOL care patterns were abstracted. Children who received PPC (PPC group) were compared with those who did not (non-PPC group). Children who received PPC consultation (n = 37) did not differ from the non-PPC group (n = 110) with respect to demographic or clinical characteristics, except they were more likely to have undergone unrelated allogeneic SCT (PPC, 68%; non-PPC, 39%; P = .02) or to have died from treatment-related toxicity (PPC, 76%; non-PPC, 54%; P = .03). PPC consultation occurred at a median of .7 months (interquartile range [IQR], .4 to 4.2) before death. PPC consultations most commonly addressed goals of care/decision-making (92%), psychosocial support (84%), pain management (65%), and non-pain symptom management (70%). Prognosis discussions (ie, the likelihood of survival) occurred more commonly in the PPC group (PPC, 97%; non-PPC, 83%; P = .04), as did resuscitation status discussions (PPC, 88%; non-PPC, 58%; P = .002). These discussions also occurred earlier in the PPC group, for prognosis a median of 8 days (IQR, 4 to 26) before death compared with 2 days (IQR, 1 to 13) in the non-PPC group and for resuscitation status a median of 7 days (IQR, 3 to 18) compared with 2 days (IQR, 1 to 5) in the non-PPC group (P cure-oriented SCT setting, PPC

  5. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics. PMID:24761922

  6. Determining the relevance of a certification exam to home health care nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, D E

    1999-01-01

    Home health care is enjoying increased use and popularity. Unfortunately, in today's cost-cutting environment, home healthcare is also subject to increased scrutiny and inevitable reimbursement limitations. This is borne out by the impact on home healthcare as a result of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Berke (1998) reports that those at greatest risk for cutbacks in care are those that can least afford it--the oldest, sickest, poorest, and most frail. Compounding the financial dilemma that home health care clients face are multiple providers of care, an unrealistic media presentation of health care, and less time for anyone to provide psychosocial-focused care (Simmons, 1990). Home health care clients have a desperate need for an advocate to provide expert navigation through the health care system. Home health care providers are aware of and often responsible for bridging gaps in health, medical benefits, and social services. This article describes a process for determining the relevance of a certification to community nursing clinical practice--using the Advanced Certification in Continuity of Care (A-CCC) exam as the example. PMID:10695177

  7. Effect of the Uganda Newborn Study on care-seeking and care practices: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Waiswa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Care for women and babies before, during, and after the time of birth is a sensitive measure of the functionality of any health system. Engaging communities in preventing newborn deaths is a promising strategy to achieve further progress in child survival in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective: To assess the effect of a home visit strategy combined with health facility strengthening on uptake of newborn care-seeking, practices and services, and to link the results to national policy and scale-up in Uganda. Design: The Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST was a two-arm cluster-randomised controlled trial in rural eastern Uganda. In intervention villages volunteer community health workers (CHWs were trained to identify pregnant women and make five home visits (two during pregnancy and three in the first week after birth to offer preventive and promotive care and counselling, with extra visits for sick and small newborns to assess and refer. Health facility strengthening was done in all facilities to improve quality of care. Primary outcomes were coverage of key essential newborn care behaviours (breastfeeding, thermal care, and cord care. Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered as a clinical trial, number ISRCTN50321130. Results: The intervention significantly improved essential newborn care practices, although many interventions saw major increases in both arms over the study period. Immediate breastfeeding after birth and exclusive breastfeeding were significantly higher in the intervention arm compared to the control arm (72.6% vs. 66.0%; p=0.016 and 81.8% vs. 75.9%, p=0.042, respectively. Skin-to-skin care immediately after birth and cord cutting with a clean instrument were marginally higher in the intervention arm versus the control arm (80.7% vs. 72.2%; p=0.071 and 88.1% vs. 84.4%; p=0.023, respectively. Half (49.6% of the mothers in the intervention arm waited more than 24 hours to bathe the baby, compared to 35.5% in

  8. Older patients in the acute care setting: rural and metropolitan nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, M; Tong, S; Walsh, A

    2000-04-01

    Many studies reporting nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients in long-term care settings have used instruments designed for older people. However, nurses' attitudes toward older patients are not as positive as their attitudes toward older people. Few studies investigate acute care nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients. In order to address these shortcomings, a self-report questionnaire was developed to determine nurses' knowledge of, and attitudes and practices toward, older patients in both rural and metropolitan acute care settings. Rural nurses were more knowledgeable about older patients' activities during hospitalisation, the likelihood of them developing postoperative complications and the improbability of their reporting incontinence. Rural nurses also reported more positive practices regarding pain management and restraint usage. However, metropolitan nurses reported more positive attitudes toward sleeping medications, decision making, discharge planning and the benefits of acute gerontological units, and were more knowledgeable about older patients' bowel changes in the acute care setting. PMID:11111426

  9. Patient-Centered Care and Population Health: Establishing Their Role in the Orthopaedic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Jared L; Butler, Craig A; Page, Alexandra E

    2016-05-18

    As health care increasingly emphasizes high value, the terms "population health" and "patient-centered care" have become common, but their application is less clear. Patient-centered care encourages using data to optimize care for an individual. Population health offers a framework to consider how to efficiently and effectively manage a condition for a population, how prevention affects large groups, and the specific distribution of a given disorder. Integrating both concepts into practice can facilitate required outcome-measure reporting and potentially improve patient outcomes. Clinical practice guidelines and appropriate use criteria are examples of reconciliation of these topics. By embracing attempts to decrease variation in treating musculoskeletal disorders while personalizing delivery to individual patients, surgeons may benefit from the improvement of both efficiency and patient experience. PMID:27194502

  10. Practicing Differential Privacy in Health Care: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fida K. Dankar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Differential privacy has gained a lot of attention in recent years as a general model for the protection of personal information when used and disclosed for secondary purposes. It has also been proposed as an appropriate model for protecting health data. In this paper we review the current literature on differential privacy and highlight important general limitations to the model and the proposed mechanisms. We then examine some practical challenges to the application of differential privacy to health data. The most severe limitation is the theoretical nature of the privacy parameter epsilon. It has implications on our ability to quantify the level of anonymization that would be guaranteed to patients, as well as assessing responsibilities when a privacy breach occurs. The review concludes by identifying the areas that researchers and practitioners need to address to increase the adoption of differential privacy for health data.

  11. Fostering the practice of rooming-in in newborn care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh R. Shrivastava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Practice of rooming-in meant that baby and mother stayed together in the same room day and night in the hospital, right from the time of delivery till the time of discharge. Adoption of rooming-in offers multiple benefits to the newborn, mother, and mother-child as a unit. It is a cost-effective approach wherefewer instruments are required and spares additional manpower. Rooming-in endeavors the opportunity to contribute signifi cantly in the child’s growth, development and survival by assisting in timely initiation of breastfeeding. To ensure universal application of rooming-in in hospitals, a comprehensive and technically sound strategy should be formulated and implemented with active participation of healthcare professionals. Measures such as advocating institutional delivery through outreach awareness activities; adoption of baby-friendly hospital initiative; inculcating a sense of ownership among health professionals, can be strategically enforced for better maternal and child health related outcomes.

  12. Integrating health care practices with the promotion of breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Davanzo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although breastfeeding is the normative standards for infant nutrition, exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge in the general population of newborns are still suboptimal. Besides many other psychological, social, economical, cultural factors, breastfeeding success is also significantly influenced by maternity practices that have the potential to foster or otherwise to hinder breastfeeding physiology during postpartum hospital stay. On their part, health professionals need to improve their knowledge on lactation, to acquire better skills to manage breastfeeding problems and to commit themselves to prepare evidence based clinical protocols that support breastfeeding and the use of human milk. At the Institute for Maternal and Child Health in Trieste (Italy, we have developed two surveillance protocols related to situations that commonly challenge health professionals to give their qualified advice to the breastfeeding dyad. Particularly, we have documented the feasibility of a protocol on the management of skin to skin contact between mother and his/her newborn infant. This protocol is applied in the delivery room in the context of the prevention of sudden unexpected postnatal collapse. The second protocol refers to the management of early neonatal weight loss. Finally, we believe that combining an effective promotion of breastfeeding with good clinical practice is appropriated and safe and we recognize that both the competence and the attitude of staff have an essential role in the success of the initiation of breastfeeding. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  13. [Dietary patterns in menopausal women receiving outpatient care in Southern Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Maichelei; Mendes, Karina Giane; Canuto, Raquel; Garcez, Anderson da Silva; Theodoro, Heloísa; Rodrigues, Alice Dalpicolli; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-05-01

    The scope of this paper is to identify dietary patterns and the relationship with menopausal status. It involved a cross-sectional study with 646 women in outpatient care in southern Brazil. Dietary intake was assessed by a frequency questionnaire and five dietary patterns were identified by main component analysis. The menopausal status was classified as premenopausal, perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Five dietary patterns were identified: fruit and vegetables; Brazilian fare (rice, beans and milk); snacks (cake, burgers, pizza and sweetbread); health diet (fish, fruit juice, bread and vegetable soup), and regional (typical food in the Serra Gaucha, like red meat, pasta and yams). After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, there was no significant association between menopausal status and dietary patterns. Only age, education and income were associated with dietary patterns. Five dietary patterns that described the food consumption of the population studied were identified, which are similar to those indicated as ideal for the Brazilian population. The findings reveal that the dietary pattern of women in menopause are significantly influenced by age, education and income but are not influenced by the menopausal status per se. PMID:26017958

  14. Neonatal care in rural Karnataka: healthy and harmful practices, the potential for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleland John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every year four million babies die in the first month of life and a quarter of these take place in India. A package of essential newborn care practices exists, which has a proven impact on reducing mortality, and can be implemented in low resource settings. However, childbirth and the neonatal period are culturally important times, during which there is strong adherence to traditional practices. Successful implementation of the package therefore requires in-depth knowledge of the local context and tailored behaviour change communication. Methods This study was carried out in rural Karnataka, India. It uses quantitative data from a prospective survey following mothers through their experience of pregnancy and the postnatal period; and qualitative data from in depth interviews and focus group discussions conducted with mothers, grandmothers and birth attendants. It explores local newborn care practices and beliefs, analyses their harmful or beneficial characteristics and elucidates areas of potential resistance to behaviour change and implementation of the essential newborn care package. Results Findings show that many potentially harmful newborn care practices are being carried out in the study area, such as unhygienic cord cutting, delayed breastfeeding and early bathing. Some are more amenable to change than others, depending on the strength of the underlying beliefs, and acceptability of alternative care. However, movement away from traditional practices is already taking place, particularly amongst the more educated and better off, and there is a clear opportunity to broaden, direct and accelerate this process. Conclusion Community education should be a focus of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI program being implemented in Karnataka. The added capacity of the new Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs could enable more women to be reached. With

  15. Interprofessional practice in primary care: development of a tailored process model

    OpenAIRE

    Stans SEA; Stevens JGA; Beurskens AJHM

    2013-01-01

    Steffy EA Stans, JG Anita Stevens, Anna JHM Beurskens Research Center of Autonomy and Participation for Persons with a Chronic Illness, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands Purpose: This study investigated the improvement of interprofessional practice in primary care by performing the first three steps of the implementation model described by Grol et al. This article describes the targets for improvement in a setting for children with complex care needs (step 1), the...

  16. Oral self-care practices among university students in Port Harcourt, Rivers State

    OpenAIRE

    Braimoh Omoigberai Bashiru; Ilochonwu Nzube Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background: The maintenance of optimum oral health is dependent on the efficacy of oral self-care. The objective of the present study was to evaluate oral self-care practices and knowledge among non-medical students at the University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate students at the University of Port Harcourt Nigeria, in January, 2014. Self-administered questionnaire elicited information on demography, ...

  17. The effects of psychological treatment in primary care in Sweden—A practice-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Holmqvist, Rolf; Ström, Thomas; Foldemo, Anniqa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Practice-based studies have found substantial effects of psychological treatment in routine care, often equivalent between treatment methods. Factors that moderate treatment outcome may be important to assess. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcome in psychological treatment in primary care, and to compare outcome between the most frequently used methods. An additional aim was to study factors that might moderate outcome differences. Method: The Clinical ...

  18. Music therapists’ practice-based research in cancer and palliative care: Creative methods and situated findings

    OpenAIRE

    Philippa Barry; Clare O'Callaghan

    2009-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials are described as the gold standard in health care research, their superiority is being questioned in palliative care which is focused on addressing individualized needs to maximize life quality. We use creative practice-based research to examine the usefulness of our music therapy work amongst people with life threatening conditions. Examined voices include “collective” (patients, visitors, staff, and music therapist), "their” (patients or caregivers), "o...

  19. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Ambigga Krishnapillai S; Ramli Anis; Suthahar Ariaratnam; Tauhid Norlaili; Clearihan Lyn; Browning Colette

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restr...

  20. Roles, risks, and responsibilities in maternity care: trainees' beliefs and the effects of practice obstetric training.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, L F

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To document the content of practice obstetric vocational training, the beliefs of general practitioner trainees about the roles of midwives and general practitioners in maternity care, and the risks of providing such care; and to ascertain if undergoing such training affects their beliefs. DESIGN--Confidential postal questionnaire survey. SUBJECTS--Random one in four sample of all general practitioner trainees in the United Kingdom on vocational training schemes or in training pra...

  1. Hospice Utilization in Nursing Homes: Association With Facility End-of-Life Care Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.; Caprio, Thomas V.; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Hospice care provided to nursing home (NH) residents has been shown to improve the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care. However, hospice utilization in NHs is typically low. This study examined the relationship between facility self-reported EOL practices and residents’ hospice use and length of stay. Design: The study was based on a retrospective cohort of NH residents. Medicare hospice claims, Minimum Data Set, Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system and the Area Resour...

  2. Factors affecting the choice of treatment in occupational therapy practices in hospital-based care.

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G; Zee, J. van der

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this article was twofold: to describe the occurrence of treatment goals, health-care programmes and type of interventions chosen by occupational therapists; and to investigate relationships between treatment goals, health-care programmes and interventions. A survey on occupational therapy practice was carried out in The Netherlands. A registration form based on the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicapts (ICIDH) was filled out for 944 patients. This...

  3. Health Care providers and Teen Driving Safety: Topics Discussed and Educational Resources Used in Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Dellinger, Ann M; West, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death among teens. Health care providers have an opportunity to address what works to keep teens safe on the road during the patient visit. An online survey was conducted of 1088 health care providers who saw patients at or near driving age. The survey assessed which road safety topics were discussed and which types of educational products were used most often. Family and general practice physicians represented 44.3% of the sample, followed by pediatri...

  4. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Health Care Practices Relating to Treatment of HIV in Vellore, India

    OpenAIRE

    Chomat, Anne Marie Belz; Wilson, Ira B.; Wanke, Christine A; Selvakumar, A.; John, K. R.; Isaac, Rita

    2009-01-01

    In India, little is known about health care-seeking behavior among HIV-infected individuals. Similarly, little is known about how HIV is being treated in the community, in particular by Indian Systems of Medicine (ISM) providers. Therefore, while ART implementation programs continue to expand, it is important to determine whether the knowledge, attitudes, and treatment practices of HIV-infected individuals and their health care providers are aligned with current treatment recommendations. We ...

  5. Violence prevention and management in acute psychiatric care: aspects of nursing practice

    OpenAIRE

    Björkdahl, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The general aim of this thesis was to explore and evaluate different aspects of nursing practice in relation to prediction, prevention and management of patient violence in acute psychiatric care. The specific aims were: to evaluate the short-term predictive capacity of the violence risk assessment instrument Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC) when used by nurses in a psychiatric intensive care unit (study I), to compare the occurrences of coercive interventions and violence-rel...

  6. Frailty in primary care: a review of its conceptualization and implications for practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lacas Alethea; Rockwood Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Frail, older patients pose a challenge to the primary care physician who may often feel overwhelmed by their complex presentation and tenuous health status. At the same time, family physicians are ideally suited to incorporate the concept of frailty into their practice. They have the propensity and skill set that lends itself to patient-centred care, taking into account the individual subtleties of the patient's health within their social context. Tools to identify frailty in the pri...

  7. Pattern of adverse reactions of antipsychotics in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Meenakshy T. Viswanathan; Asha Sisupalan; Vidhukumar Karunakaran

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to analyse the pattern of adverse drug reactions (ADR) of antipsychotics among patients attending the psychiatry outpatient department of a tertiary care centre. Methods: Patients attending the psychiatry outpatient department who have been on treatment with one or more antipsychotics for more than 6 weeks were included in the study. Details about the prescription given in the previous appointment were collected. Various adverse effects associated with...

  8. Prescription pattern of fixed dose drug combination in cardiology department in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Pramod Kumar Manjhi; Lalit Mohan; Manish Kumar; Harihar Dikshit; Singh, B. P.; Anuj Kumar Pathak; Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: A cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity globally. The drastic change in the lifestyle of population during 21st century has had a great impact on health especially cardiovascular diseases. Objective of this study was to assess the prescription pattern of fixed dose drug combinations (FDCs) in the department of cardiology in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The prescriptions of 210 patients suffered by cardiovascular disorders...

  9. Disparities in Patterns of Health Care Travel Among Inpatients Diagnosed With Congestive Heart Failure, Florida, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Peng; Xierali, Imam M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a major public health problem in the United States and is a leading cause of hospitalization in the elderly population. Understanding the health care travel patterns of CHF patients and their underlying cause is important to balance the supply and demand for local hospital resources. This article explores the nonclinical factors that prompt CHF patients to seek distant instead of local hospitalization. Methods Local hospitalization was defined as...

  10. Factors influencing tobacco use treatment patterns among Vietnamese health care providers working in community health centers

    OpenAIRE

    Shelley, Donna; Tseng, Tuo-Yen; Pham, Hieu; Nguyen, Linh; Keithly, Sarah; Stillman, Frances; Nguyen, Nam

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost half of adult men in Viet Nam are current smokers, a smoking prevalence that is the second highest among South East Asian countries (SEAC). Although Viet Nam has a strong public health delivery system, according to the 2010 Global Adult Tobacco Survey, services to treat tobacco dependence are not readily available to smokers. The purpose of this study was to characterize current tobacco use treatment patterns among Vietnamese health care providers and factors influencing adh...

  11. Patient referral patterns and the spread of hospital-acquired infections through national health care networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Tjibbe Donker; Jacco Wallinga; Hajo Grundmann

    2010-01-01

    Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2...

  12. Patient Referral Patterns and the Spread of Hospital-Acquired Infections through National Health Care Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Donker, Tjibbe; Wallinga, Jacco; Grundmann, Hajo

    2010-01-01

    Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2...

  13. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Franco Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages. A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3% working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%; about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05. Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3% or only toothbrushes (28.2% with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3% to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01. Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05. However, most professionals (56.4% reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs.

  14. An Innovative Model for the Provision of Practice Learning Opportunities in Family and Child Care: Newry Student Unit, Southern Health and Social Care Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Marion; Hayes, David

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the work of Newry Student Unit, which operates in the Southern Health and Social Care Trust. The background to the unit is outlined and its development is discussed in the context of practice learning provision in Northern Ireland. The operation of the unit in providing Family and Child Care practice learning opportunities…

  15. Incorporating Palliative Care Concepts Into Nutrition Practice: Across the Age Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Denise Baird; Olfson, Kristina; Goldman, Babak; Barrocas, Albert; Wesley, John R

    2016-06-01

    A practice gap exists between published guidelines and recommendations and actual clinical practice with life-sustaining treatments not always being based on the patient's wishes, including the provision of nutrition support therapies. Closing this gap requires an interdisciplinary approach that can be enhanced by incorporating basic palliative care concepts into nutrition support practice. In the fast-paced process of providing timely and effective medical treatments, communication often suffers and decision making is not always reflective of the patient's quality-of-life goals. The current healthcare clinical ethics model does not yet include optimum use of advance directives and early communication between patients and family members and their healthcare providers about treatment choices, including nutrition support. A collaborative, proactive, integrated process in all healthcare facilities and across levels of care and age groups, together with measurable sustained outcomes, shared best practices, and preventive ethics, will be needed to change the culture of care. Implementation of a better process, including basic palliative care concepts, requires improved communication skills by healthcare professionals. Formalized palliative care consults are warranted early in complex cases. An education technique, as presented in this article, of how clinicians can engage in critical and crucial conversations early with patients and family members, by incorporating the patient's values and cultural and religious diversity in easily understood language, is identified as an innovative tool. PMID:26888858

  16. Patient referral patterns and the spread of hospital-acquired infections through national health care networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2004 to measure the connectedness between hospitals. This allowed us to reconstruct the network of hospitals in the Netherlands. We used mathematical models to assess the effect of different patient referral patterns on the potential spread of hospital-acquired infections between hospitals, and between categories of hospitals (University medical centers, top clinical hospitals and general hospitals. University hospitals have a higher number of shared patients than teaching or general hospitals, and are therefore more likely to be among the first to receive colonized patients. Moreover, as the network is directional towards university hospitals, they have a higher prevalence, even when infection control measures are equally effective in all hospitals. Patient referral patterns have a profound effect on the spread of health care-associated infections like hospital-acquired MRSA. The MRSA prevalence therefore differs between hospitals with the position of each hospital within the health care network. Any comparison of MRSA rates between hospitals, as a benchmark for hospital hygiene, should therefore take the position of a hospital within the network into account.

  17. Applying organizational science to health care: a framework for collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Alan W; DiazGranados, Deborah; Mazmanian, Paul E; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2013-07-01

    Developing interprofessional education (IPE) curricula that improve collaborative practice across professions has proven challenging. A theoretical basis for understanding collaborative practice in health care settings is needed to guide the education and evaluation of health professions trainees and practitioners and support the team-based delivery of care. IPE should incorporate theory-driven, evidence-based methods and build competency toward effective collaboration.In this article, the authors review several concepts from the organizational science literature and propose using these as a framework for understanding how health care teams function. Specifically, they outline the team process model of action and planning phases in collaborative work; discuss leadership and followership, including how locus (a leader's integration into a team's usual work) and formality (a leader's responsibility conferred by the traditional hierarchy) affect team functions; and describe dynamic delegation, an approach to conceptualizing escalation and delegation within health care teams. For each concept, they identify competencies for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors to aid in the development of innovative curricula to improve collaborative practice. They suggest that gaining an understanding of these principles will prepare health care trainees, whether team leaders or members, to analyze team performance, adapt behaviors that improve collaboration, and create team-based health care delivery processes that lead to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:23702530

  18. Public health nurses' primary health care practice: strategies for fostering citizen participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Megan; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Edwards, Nancy; Young, Linda M

    2009-01-01

    Citizen participation is heralded as a critical element of community health programs that emphasize empowerment and health promotion strategies. Although there is a growing body of research on public health nurses' primary health care practice, few studies have described how public health nurses foster citizen participation. This article presents findings from an interpretive qualitative study of public health nurses' perceptions of their role in fostering citizen participation in an eastern Canadian province at a time of significant health care restructuring. The findings from this study clearly profile public health nurses as integral to the practice of fostering citizen participation. PMID:19177270

  19. Geriatric simulation: practicing management and leadership in care of the older adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sally; Overstreet, Maria

    2015-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients age 65 and older account for 43% of hospital days. The complexity of caring for older adults affords nursing students opportunities to assess, prioritize, intervene, advocate, and experience being a member of an interdisciplinary health care team. However, these multifaceted hospital experiences are not consistently available for all students. Nursing clinical simulation (NCS) can augment or replace specific clinical hours and provide clinically relevant experiences to practice management and leadership skills while caring for older adults. This article describes a geriatric management and leadership NCS. PMID:25999076

  20. Comparison of Healthcare Quality Outcomes Between Accountable Care Organizations and Physician Group Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhchain; Khosla, Sandeep; Sethi, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) were created under the Affordable Care Act to deliver better quality of care at reduced cost compare with the traditional fee-for-service model. But their effectiveness in achieving healthcare quality metrics is unclear. We analyzed ACO and physician group practice (PGP) performance rates for the single coronary artery disease measure and four diabetes mellitus measures now publicly reported on the Medicare Physician Compare Web site for program year 2012. There was no statistically significant difference in reported quality measures between ACOs and PGPs. Our study shows that PGPs can achieve outcomes at par with ACOs. PMID:26223106

  1. Symptoms in patients receiving palliative care: a study on patient-physician encounters in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Borgsteede, S.D.; Deliens, L.; Beentjes, B.; Schellevis, F.; Stalman, W.A.B.; van Eijk, J T. M; Wal, G. van der

    2007-01-01

    Most people with an incurable disease prefer to stay and die at home, cared for by their general practitioner (GP). This paper aims at describing the prevalence of symptoms in patients receiving palliative care at home. Within the framework of a nation wide survey of general practice in the Netherlands, GPs received a questionnaire for all patients who died within the 1-year survey period to determine whether patients received palliative care (n = 2,194). The response rate was 73% (n = 1,608)...

  2. Practicing radiation oncology today - Part I: Meeting the challenge of managed care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The change in health care delivery is forcing radiation oncologists to examine every aspect of how they organize themselves, deliver care, evaluate the quality of that care, and how they are reimbursed for this process. While managed care has been implicated as the new paradigm that will change the way that health care is delivered, the authors maintain that outcomes research may be just as important a stimulus for change. This course will attempt to examine how managed care and outcomes research are impacting upon radiation oncology practice, and what radiation oncologists can do to maintain patient care standards. This course will introduce certain concepts that will be discussed in subsequent courses on Informatics and Evaluating New Technology. Topics Covered: 1. The Managed Care Nomenclature Explained: HMO's, PPO's, POS's, Carve-Outs 2. Outcomes Research: What it can and cannot do 3. Moving from QA to CQI to Benchmarking 4. Using Analytical Tools to Evaluate Capital Purchases and Operational Requirements 5. Evaluating Staffing Needs: Traditional jobs, Cross-training, Outsourcing, Physician extenders 6. Introduction to Evaluation of Technology 7. Introduction to Evaluation of Informatics 8. Potential gains from Shared Services 9. Networking vs. Mergers vs. Oncology IPA's vs. MSO's 10. Evaluating Managed Care Strategies and Contracts

  3. The practice of nurses caring for families of pediatric inpatients in light of Jean Watson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Rodrigues dos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To know the facilities and the difficulties of nurses in caring practice of hospitalized children’s families in the light of Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Method It was used the descriptive qualitative approach. The data collection was conducted in three stages: presentation of theoretical content; engagement with families in the light of Watson’s theory; and semi-structured interview with 12 pediatric nurses. The interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis, being possible to form three themes: Recognizing a framework for care; Considering the institutional context; and Challenges in family’s relationship. Results The theory favored reflections about self, about the institutions and about nurses’ relationship with the family of the child, normalized by a consciousness toward caring attitudes. Conclusion In this process, it is imperative that nurses recognize the philosophical-theoretical foundations of care to attend the child’s family in hospital.

  4. A qualitative evaluation of the impact of a palliative care course on preregistration nursing students’ practice in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Bassah, Nahyeni; Cox, Karen; Seymour, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Current evidence suggests that palliative care education can improve preregistration nursing students’ competencies in palliative care. However, it is not known whether these competencies are translated into students’ practice in the care of patients who are approaching the end of life. This paper seeks to contribute to the palliative care evidence base by examining how nursing students in receipt of education report transfer of learning to practice, and what the barriers and facil...

  5. An Investigation of the Perceptions and Practices of Nursing Students Regarding Spirituality and Spiritual Care

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    Asli Kalkim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine Turkish nursing students’ knowledge, practices and perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care and to investigate the relationship between their perceptions and their demographics. This study was a descriptive survey conducted at a nursing school providing degree-level education in the city of Manisa, in the western part of Turkey. The sample of the study consisted of the 400 nursing students. A nursing student sociodemographic form, a form on nursing students’ knowledge and practices of spirituality and spiritual care, and the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale were used to collect the data. Half of the students could meet patients’ or individuals’ spiritual needs, and the spiritual care that they gave was most frequently listening, empathy, and psychological support. The research findings were that nursing students’ perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care were “sufficiently” although not “very sufficiently” defined. Being female, being in the second year of education and seeing spiritual care education as necessary were determinants of their perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care.

  6. Health needs assessment in primary care: the evolution of a practical public health approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, A; McKeown, K; Crowther, A

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of the paper is to place health needs assessment in its primary care context. This is a dynamic context where changes in policies, staff roles and patient expectations have all to be considered. Given this complexity and the variations between practices, it is necessary to help primary health care teams (PHCTs) to understand their stage of development and how this will directly affect any health needs assessment. The technical and methodological aspects of health needs assessment have been explored and described by others, and that work will not be duplicated here. This paper reviews the health needs assessment (HNA) work of the Ribblesdale Total Purchasing Project (RTPP) and then sets this review against the political, organisational, professional and practical pressures that currently confront primary care. Out of this analysis emerges a diagnostic and development tool which links together, and emphasises the intimate relationships between, five stages of development needed for effective primary care-oriented health needs assessment work. The emphasis is on understanding the place of health needs assessment within the general processes and systems of the primary health care team. The paper concludes by suggesting ways in which public health practitioners and specialists might approach the task of supporting and influencing the evolution of the recently proposed Primary Care Groups and Primary Care Trusts. The overall intention of the article is to stimulate debate and action. PMID:9629025

  7. Awareness and pattern of utilizing family planning services among women attending urban health care center Azizabad Sukkur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess level of awareness and pattern of utilizing family planning services among women (15-49 years) of reproductive age at Urban Health Center, Azizabad Sukkur, Sindh. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2005 at Urban Health Care Center Azizabad Sukkur. Two hundred women of reproductive age group were interviewed by using a pre tested semi structured questionnaire visiting the health care center during the study period. Information was obtained after taking informed consent regarding socio demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitude and pattern of utilizing family planning services. The data was entered and analyzed by using statistical package SPSS version 13. About 75% of women and 42.5% husbands were found illiterate, 85% women were housewives, 69.5% were married before 18 years of age and 54% had nuclear family. Regarding desired number of children women responded one child (3%), 2-3 children (11%), 4-5 (37.5%), more than five children (36%), 5.5% said that children are God gifted and 7% did not answer. About 60% of women reported use of at least one contraceptive method and 40% had never used any contraceptive method. The women who received counseling from the health care provider were 48.5% and only 6% received information through media. Religious prohibition, shortage of female staff and cost of family planning contraceptive methods were the main reasons identified for not utilizing contraceptive methods. The unsatisfactory variables were long waiting hours at the center, non-availability of contraceptive, shortage of the female staff and cost. Limited number of women was aware and practice contraception in the area and utilization of family planning services were low. The efforts should be made for providing information to couple and improving quality of family planning services in the area. (author)

  8. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT)3 receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  9. Paediatric day-case neurosurgery in a resource challenged setting: Pattern and practice

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    Afolabi Muyiwa Owojuyigbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been generally observed that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment especially if discharged same day after surgery. This is probably due to the fact that children generally tend to feel more at ease in the home environment than in the hospital setting. Only few tertiary health institutions provide routine day-case surgery for paediatric neurosurgical patients in our sub-region. Objective: To review the pattern and practice of paediatric neurosurgical day-cases at our hospital. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of all paediatric day-case neurosurgeries carried out between June 2011 and June 2014. Results: A total of 53 patients (34 males and 19 females with age ranging from 2 days to 14 years were seen. Majority of the patients (77.4% presented with congenital lesions, and the most common procedure carried out was spina bifida repair (32% followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion (26.4% for hydrocephalus. Sixty-eight percentage belonged to the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 2, whereas the rest (32% belonged to class 1. General anaesthesia was employed in 83% of cases. Parenteral paracetamol was used for intra-operative analgesia for most of the patients. Two patients had post-operative nausea and vomiting and were successfully managed. There was no case of emergency re-operation, unplanned admission, cancellation or mortality. Conclusion: Paediatric day-case neurosurgery is feasible in our environment. With careful patient selection and adequate pre-operative preparation, good outcome can be achieved.

  10. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Blanchard Valley Health Systems, Findlay, Ohio (United States); Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Linden, Yvette van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Arnalot, Palmira Foro [Parc de Salut Mar. Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona (Spain); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [AP-HP Hopital Henri-Mondor, Universite Paris Est Creteil, Creteil (France); Maranzano, Ernesto [' S. Maria' Hospital, Terni (Italy); Liu, Rico [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Wong, Kam-Hung [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wong, Lea-Choung [National University Cancer Institute (Singapore); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT){sub 3} receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  11. Improper sharp disposal practices among diabetes patients in home care settings: Need for concern?

    OpenAIRE

    Anindo Majumdar; Jayaprakash Sahoo; Gautam Roy; Sadishkumar Kamalanathan

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, outbreaks of blood-borne infections have been reported from assisted living facilities, which were traced back to improper blood glucose monitoring practices. Needle-stick injuries have been implicated in many such cases. This directly raises concerns over sharp disposal practices of diabetic patients self-managing their condition in home care settings. With India being home to a huge diabetic population, this issue, if neglected, can cause substantial damage to the healt...

  12. Homeopathic medical practice for anxiety and depression in primary care: the EPI3 cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Abenhaim, Lucien; Massol, Jacques; Guillemot, Didier; Avouac, Bernard; Duru, Gerard; Lert, France; Magnier, Anne-Marie; Rossignol, Michel; Rouillon, Frederic; Begaud, Bernard; ,

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to compare utilization of conventional psychotropic drugs among patients seeking care for anxiety and depression disorders (ADDs) from general practitioners (GPs) who strictly prescribe conventional medicines (GP-CM), regularly prescribe homeopathy in a mixed practice (GP-Mx), or are certified homeopathic GPs (GP-Ho). Methods This was one of three epidemiological cohort studies (EPI3) on general practice in France, which included GPs and their patients ...

  13. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE DOCTORS AND NURSES IN HYPERTENSION OF PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Gandeh, Mohammad B.S.; Milaat, Waleed A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the status of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of doctors and nurses in Primary Health Care (PHC) centers with regard to hypertension in pregnancy and to identify factors associated with KAP in Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Methodology: Using a self-administered comprehensive questionnaire, all available doctors and nurses in PHC centers of the Al-Khobar area were approached to determine their knowledge, attitude and practice in hypertension during pregnancy. Questionnai...

  14. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    OpenAIRE

    Sen S.; Bowen JF; Ganetsky VS; Hadley D; Melody K; Otsuka S; Vanmali R; Thomas T

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC) models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods: TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results: Pharmacists are...

  15. Identifying low-value clinical practices in critical care medicine: protocol for a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Niven, Daniel J; McCormick, T Jared; Straus, Sharon E; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jeffs, Lianne P.; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing unnecessary, low-value clinical practice (ie, de-adoption) is key to improving value for money in healthcare, especially among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) where resource consumption exceeds other medical and surgical populations. Research suggests that low-value clinical practices are common in medicine, however systematically and objectively identifying them is a widely cited barrier to de-adoption. We will conduct a scoping review to identify low-v...

  16. Ownership and rent-seeking behavior in specialty health care practices

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Friesner; Chris Stevens

    2007-01-01

    Specialty health care practices are unique in that they exhibit a wide range of ownership types, from large corporations controlled by third parties to those directly owned by practitioners (physicians, therapists, etc.). Many of these practices also employ licensed assistants whose labor is partially substitutable with those of the practitioners. This paper presents a theoretical model that examines the impact that different levels of ownership have on rent-seeking behavior and efficiency wi...

  17. Integrating substance abuse care with community diabetes care: implications for research and clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghitza UE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Udi E Ghitza,1 Li-Tzy Wu,2 Betty Tai11Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Cigarette smoking and alcohol use are prevalent among individuals with diabetes in the US, but little is known about screening and treatment for substance use disorders in the diabetic population. This commentary discusses the scope and clinical implications of the public health problem of coexisting substance use and diabetes, including suggestions for future research. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, and is associated with many severe health complications like cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney damage, and limb amputations. There are an estimated 24 million adults in the US with type 2 diabetes. Approximately 20% of adults aged 18 years or older with diabetes report current cigarette smoking. The prevalence of current alcohol use in the diabetic population is estimated to be around 50%–60% in epidemiological surveys and treatment-seeking populations. Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in a dose-dependent manner and is an independent modifiable risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic patients with an alcohol or other drug use disorder show a higher rate of adverse health outcomes. For example, these patients experience more frequent and severe health complications as well as an increased risk of hospitalization, and require longer hospital stays. They are also less likely to seek routine care for diabetes or adhere to diabetes treatment than those without an alcohol or other drug use disorder. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Mental Health Parity Act and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 provide opportunities for facilitating integration of

  18. Interprofessional practice in primary care: development of a tailored process model

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    Stans SEA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steffy EA Stans, JG Anita Stevens, Anna JHM Beurskens Research Center of Autonomy and Participation for Persons with a Chronic Illness, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands Purpose: This study investigated the improvement of interprofessional practice in primary care by performing the first three steps of the implementation model described by Grol et al. This article describes the targets for improvement in a setting for children with complex care needs (step 1, the identification of barriers and facilitators influencing interprofessional practice (step 2, and the development of a tailored interprofessional process model (step 3. Methods: In step 2, thirteen qualitative semistructured interviews were held with several stakeholders, including parents of children, an occupational therapist, a speech and language therapist, a physical therapist, the manager of the team, two general practitioners, a psychologist, and a primary school teacher. The data were analyzed using directed content analysis and using the domains of the Chronic Care Model as a framework. In step 3, a project group was formed to develop helpful strategies, including the development of an interprofessional process through process mapping. Results: In step 2, it was found that the most important barriers to implementing interprofessional practice related to the lack of structure in the care process. A process model for interprofessional primary care was developed for the target group. Conclusion: The lack of a shared view of what is involved in the process of interprofessional practice was the most important barrier to its successful implementation. It is suggested that the tailored process developed, supported with the appropriate tools, may provide both professional staff and their clients, in this setting but also in other areas of primary care, with insight to the care process and a clear representation of "who should do what, when, and how." Keywords

  19. Evidence-based practice in health and social care: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Annette; Albarran, John W; Means, Robin I; Mitchell, Theresa; Stewart, Mary C

    2002-11-01

    This paper explores evidence-based practice (EBP) in health and social care in the UK from the individual perspectives of professionals in physiotherapy, midwifery, nursing and social care. The present interest in EBP emerges as a natural derivative of contemporary economic, social and political trends and concerns. There is optimism and broad acceptance of the overall philosophy of EBP and each profession demonstrates a concerted organisational attempt to bridge the research--practice divide. This includes the interpretation of research outcomes in the form of practice guidelines, protocols and standards. However, adherence to these is poor and resistance to EBP is growing. This is attributed to practical and philosophical tensions common to all of the professions. These include the continued dominance of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the hierarchy of evidence. RCTs often fail to capture the multi-faceted individualistic nature of health and social care interactions or the development of qualitative methodologies within the professions. Concern is expressed that professional autonomy and the art of practice will be eroded by the enforcement of guidelines and protocols. EBP is currently located within individual professions rather than the broader context of interprofessional practice. The future of EBP is dependent, at least in part, on educational initiatives, organisational commitment and support, patient/client involvement and the development of a broader interprofessional perspective. PMID:12487842

  20. Gender, health and health care in general practice: a comparison between women's health care and regular health care = Sekse, gezondheid en gezondheidszorg in de huisartspraktijk: een vergelijking tussen vrouwengezondheidszorg en reguliere gezondheidszorg.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den

    1996-01-01

    Differences in health care provision to female patients were investigated between general practitioners (GPs) providing women's health care in the Aletta practice (4 women) and GPs providing regular health care (23 women and 27 men). Women's health care is based on the following principles: 1) con

  1. Gender, health and health care in general practice: a comparison between women's health care and regular health care = Sekse, gezondheid en gezondheidszorg in de huisartspraktijk: een vergelijking tussen vrouwengezondheidszorg en reguliere gezondheidszorg: samenvatting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den

    1996-01-01

    Differences in health care provision to female patients were investigated between general practitioners (GPs) providing women's health care in the Aletta practice (4 women) and GPs providing regular health care (23 women and 27 men). Women's health care is based on the following principles: 1) consi

  2. Regional differences in practice patterns and associated outcomes for upper tract urothelial carcinoma in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael; Kassouf, Wassim; Rendon, Ricardo; Bell, David; Izawa, Jonathan; Chin, Joseph; Kapoor, Anil; Matsumoto, Edward; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Saad, Fred; Lacombe, Louis; Fradet, Yves; Fairey, Adrian; Jacobson, Niels-Eric; Drachenberg, Darryl; Cagiannos, Ilias; So, Alan; Black, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We delineated Canadian regional differences in practice patterns in the management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) after nephroureterectomy and relate these to patient outcomes. Methods: A database was created with 1029 patients undergoing radical nephroureterectomy for UTUC between 1994 and 2009 at 10 Canadian centres. Demographic, clinical and pathological variables were collected from chart review. Practice pattern variables were defined as: open versus laparoscopic nephroureterectomy, management strategy for the distal ureter, performance of lymphadenectomy and administration of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The outcome measures were overall (OS), disease-specific (DSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The centres were divided into three regions (West, Central, East). Cox proportional multivariable linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between regional differences in practice patterns and clinical outcomes. Results: There was a significant difference in practice patterns between regions within Canada for: time from diagnosis to surgery (p = 0.001), type of surgery (open vs. laparoscopic, p < 0.01) and method of management of the distal ureter (p = 0.001). As well, there were significant differences in survival between regions across Canada: 5-year OS (West 70%, Central 81% and East 62%, p < 0.0001) and DSS (West=79%, Central=85%, East=75%, p = 0.007) were significantly different, but there was no difference in RFS (West 47%, Central 48%, East 46%, p = 0.88). Multivariable linear regression analysis demonstrated that the differences in survival were independent of region OS (p = 0.78), DSS (p = 0.30) or RFS (p = 0.43). Conclusion: There is significant disparity in practice patterns between regions within Canada, but these do not appear to have an effect on survival. We believe that the variability in practice is a reflection of the lack of standardized treatments for UTUC and underlines the need for

  3. Assessing screening practices among health care workers at a tertiary-care hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil

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    Ana Claudia Gonçalves-Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the extent to which screening procedures (with and without evidence of effectiveness are practiced among health care workers at a tertiary-care hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: From February 2001 to September 2003, a cross-sectional study involving physicians, nurses and nursing assistants (aged 40 to 69 years was carried out at a tertiary-care hospital in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Subjects were interviewed using a questionnaire that addresses 17 procedures with grades of recommendation of A, B, C, D or E, in accordance with the 1996 United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines for routine screening. RESULTS: Of the 333 health care workers included, 228 (68.5% were female. The mean age was 48.8 (SD 6.6 years. Most subjects had undergone screening for hypertension (blood pressure measurement and lipid abnormalities (cholesterol testing. Screening for breast and cervical cancer was common among females. Resting electrocardiography, serum glucose testing, urine tests, chest X-rays and serum prostate-specific antigen testing were also quite common. However, only 6 (1.8% of the subjects had undergone screening for colorectal cancer (fecal occult blood test or sigmoidoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: A sizeable proportion of health care workers underwent screening procedures that are not recommended or for which there was insufficient evidence of a benefit. Conversely, certain recommended procedures were performed on a small proportion of such workers. These results indicate that the Brazilian National Ministry of Health must develop nationwide evidence-based screening recommendations and disseminate such recommendations among health care professionals in Brazil.

  4. A randomised controlled trial of caseload midwifery care: M@NGO (Midwives @ New Group practice Options

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    Tracy Sally K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia has an enviable record of safety for women in childbirth. There is nevertheless growing concern at the increasing level of intervention and consequent morbidity amongst childbearing women. Not only do interventions impact on the cost of services, they carry with them the potential for serious morbidities for mother and infant. Models of midwifery have proliferated in an attempt to offer women less fragmented hospital care. One of these models that is gaining widespread consumer, disciplinary and political support is caseload midwifery care. Caseload midwives manage the care of approximately 35-40 a year within a small Midwifery Group Practice (usually 4-6 midwives who plan their on call and leave within the Group Practice. We propose to compare the outcomes and costs of caseload midwifery care compared to standard or routine hospital care through a randomised controlled trial. Methods/design A two-arm RCT design will be used. Women will be recruited from tertiary women's hospitals in Sydney and Brisbane, Australia. Women allocated to the caseload intervention will receive care from a named caseload midwife within a Midwifery Group Practice. Control women will be allocated to standard or routine hospital care. Women allocated to standard care will receive their care from hospital rostered midwives, public hospital obstetric care and community based general medical practitioner care. All midwives will collaborate with obstetricians and other health professionals as necessary according to the woman's needs. Discussion Data will be collected at recruitment, 36 weeks antenatally, six weeks and six months postpartum by web based or postal survey. With 750 women or more in each of the intervention and control arms the study is powered (based on 80% power; alpha 0.05 to detect a difference in caesarean section rates of 29.4 to 22.9%; instrumental birth rates from 11.0% to 6.8%; and rates of admission to neonatal intensive

  5. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families. PMID:25397338

  6. Practice patterns of naturopathic physicians: results from a random survey of licensed practitioners in two US States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Michael J

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the growing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM by consumers in the U.S., little is known about the practice of CAM providers. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the practice patterns of naturopathic physicians in Washington State and Connecticut. Methods Telephone interviews were conducted with state-wide random samples of licensed naturopathic physicians and data were collected on consecutive patient visits in 1998 and 1999. The main outcome measures were: Sociodemographic, training and practice characteristics of naturopathic physicians; and demographics, reasons for visit, types of treatments, payment source and visit duration for patients. Result One hundred and seventy practitioners were interviewed and 99 recorded data on a total of 1817 patient visits. Naturopathic physicians in Washington and Connecticut had similar demographic and practice characteristics. Both the practitioners and their patients were primarily White and female. Almost 75% of all naturopathic visits were for chronic complaints, most frequently fatigue, headache, and back symptoms. Complete blood counts, serum chemistries, lipids panels and stool analyses were ordered for 4% to 10% of visits. All other diagnostic tests were ordered less frequently. The most commonly prescribed naturopathic therapeutics were: botanical medicines (51% of visits in Connecticut, 43% in Washington, vitamins (41% and 43%, minerals (35% and 39%, homeopathy (29% and 19% and allergy treatments (11% and 13%. The mean visit length was about 40 minutes. Approximately half the visits were paid directly by the patient. Conclusion This study provides information that will help other health care providers, patients and policy makers better understand the nature of naturopathic care.

  7. Patterns of care and course of symptoms in palliative radiotherapy. A multicenter pilot study analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oorschot, Birgitt van [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuler, Michael [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Psychotherapy and Medical Psychology; Simon, Anke [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schleicher, Ursula [Center for Radiotherapy, Dueren (Germany); Geinitz, Hans [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate patterns of care as well as effectiveness and side effects of palliative treatment in four German radiation oncology departments. All referrals in four German radiation oncology departments (two university hospitals, one academic hospital, one private practice) were prospective documented for 1 month in 2008 (2 months at one of the university hospitals). In palliatively irradiated patients, treatment aims and indications as well as treated sites and fractionation schedules were recorded. In addition, symptoms and side effects were analyzed with standardized questionnaires before and at the end of radiotherapy. During the observation period, 603 patients underwent radiation therapy in the four centers and 153 (24%, study popu-lation) were treated with palliative intent. Within the study, patients were most frequently treated for bone (34%) or brain (27%) metastases. 62 patients reported severe or very severe pain, 12 patients reported severe or very severe dyspnea, 27 patients reported neurological deficits or signs of cranial pressure, and 43 patients reported a poor or very poor sense of well-being. The most frequent goals were symptom relief (53%) or prevention of symptoms (46%). Life prolongation was intended in 37% of cases. A wide range of fractionation schedules was applied with total doses ranging from 3-61.2 Gy. Of the patients, 73% received a slightly hypofractionated treatment schedule with doses of > 2.0 Gy to ? 3.0 Gy per fraction and 12% received moderate to highly hypofractionated therapy with doses of > 3.0 Gy to 8.0 Gy. Radiation therapy led to a significant improvement of well-being (35% of patients) and reduction of symptoms, especially with regard to pain (66%), dyspnea (61%), and neurological deficits (60%). Therapy was very well tolerated with only 4.5% grade I or II acute toxicities being observed. Unscheduled termination was observed in 19 patients (12%). Palliative radiation therapy is effective in reducing symptoms, increases

  8. Patterns of care and course of symptoms in palliative radiotherapy. A multicenter pilot study analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate patterns of care as well as effectiveness and side effects of palliative treatment in four German radiation oncology departments. All referrals in four German radiation oncology departments (two university hospitals, one academic hospital, one private practice) were prospective documented for 1 month in 2008 (2 months at one of the university hospitals). In palliatively irradiated patients, treatment aims and indications as well as treated sites and fractionation schedules were recorded. In addition, symptoms and side effects were analyzed with standardized questionnaires before and at the end of radiotherapy. During the observation period, 603 patients underwent radiation therapy in the four centers and 153 (24%, study popu-lation) were treated with palliative intent. Within the study, patients were most frequently treated for bone (34%) or brain (27%) metastases. 62 patients reported severe or very severe pain, 12 patients reported severe or very severe dyspnea, 27 patients reported neurological deficits or signs of cranial pressure, and 43 patients reported a poor or very poor sense of well-being. The most frequent goals were symptom relief (53%) or prevention of symptoms (46%). Life prolongation was intended in 37% of cases. A wide range of fractionation schedules was applied with total doses ranging from 3-61.2 Gy. Of the patients, 73% received a slightly hypofractionated treatment schedule with doses of > 2.0 Gy to ? 3.0 Gy per fraction and 12% received moderate to highly hypofractionated therapy with doses of > 3.0 Gy to 8.0 Gy. Radiation therapy led to a significant improvement of well-being (35% of patients) and reduction of symptoms, especially with regard to pain (66%), dyspnea (61%), and neurological deficits (60%). Therapy was very well tolerated with only 4.5% grade I or II acute toxicities being observed. Unscheduled termination was observed in 19 patients (12%). Palliative radiation therapy is effective in reducing symptoms, increases

  9. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  10. Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices. Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz-Rashid, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The "Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices" report describes the outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village program in Sacramento, California. Serna Village is a supportive housing program serving homeless families. Outcomes from the program illustrate that it is possible to end…

  11. Knowledge of Child Abuse and Reporting Practices among Early Care and Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinehart, Laura; Kenny, Maureen C.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess child abuse knowledge and reporting practices of a diverse sample of early care and education (ECE) practitioners. One hundred and thirty-seven practitioners in the state of Florida completed the "Early Childhood Educators Child Abuse Questionnaire." Results revealed that only a minority of participants have…

  12. A computer based, automated analysis of process and outcomes of diabetic care in 23 GP practices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hill, F

    2012-02-01

    The predicted prevalence of diabetes in Ireland by 2015 is 190,000. Structured diabetes care in general practice has outcomes equivalent to secondary care and good diabetes care has been shown to be associated with the use of electronic healthcare records (EHRs). This automated analysis of EHRs in 23 practices took 10 minutes per practice compared with 15 hours per practice for manual searches. Data was extracted for 1901 type II diabetics. There was valid data for >80% of patients for 6 of the 9 key indicators in the previous year. 543 (34%) had a Hba1c > 7.5%, 142 (9%) had a total cholesterol >6 mmol\\/l, 83 (6%) had an LDL cholesterol >4 mmol\\/l, 367 (22%) had Triglycerides > 2.2 mmol\\/l and 162 (10%) had Blood Pressure > 160\\/100 mmHg. Data quality and key indicators of care compare well with manual audits in Ireland and the U.K. electronic healthcare records and automated audits should be a feature of all chronic disease management programs.

  13. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric care at a tertiary referral hospital in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyashadzaishe Mafirakureva, N.; Mberi, Y.T.; Khoza, S.; Mvere, D.A.; Emmanuel, J.C.; Postma, M.J.; Van Hulst, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusions are an essential element of obstetric care and may have a role in reducing maternal mortality, if used appropriately. Monitoring of transfusion practices provides information on current and future needs of blood. It may also lead to rational use of blood transfusions.

  14. Compassion Fatigue Risk and Self-Care Practices among Residential Treatment Center Childcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Callum D.; Ecklund, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Exploration of the presence of risk for compassion fatigue among residential childcare workers (RCW) at residential treatment facilities and the relationship between self-care practices and compassion fatigue were explored. Using the Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL-R III) to assess compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion…

  15. Family Child Care Learning Environments: Caregiver Knowledge and Practices Related to Early Literacy and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Beth M.; Morse, Erika E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a stratified-random survey of family child care providers' backgrounds, caregiving environments, practices, attitudes, and knowledge related to language, literacy, and mathematics development for preschool children. Descriptive results are consistent with prior studies suggesting that home-based providers are…

  16. Cerebral aneurysm treatment in India: Results of a national survey regarding practice patterns in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Ambekar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the prevailing practice patterns in the management of IAs in India. Surgical clipping is the preferred treatment of choice for anterior circulation aneurysms and EVT for aneurysms along the posterior circulation. Corticosteroids and prophylactic "triple-H" therapy are still used by a large proportion of physicians.

  17. Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Braga Junqueira, A.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Terra Preta; Amazonian Dark Earths; Shifting cultivation; Homegardens; Intensification; Diversification; Smallholder farming. André Braga Junqueira (2015). Anthropogenic soils in central Amazonia: farmers’ practices, agrobiodiversity and land-use patterns. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands, with summary in English, 163 pp. Rural Amazonia is increasingly experiencing environmental and socio-economic changes that directly affect smallholder farmers, with ...

  18. Drug utilization pattern in acute coronary syndrome at tertiary care hospital: a prospective cross-sectional observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen Choudhary; Jitendra M. Agrawal; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Varsha J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To study the pattern of utilization of drug in the patients of Acute Coronary Syndrome at tertiary care hospital. Methods: Prospective cross-sectional observational drug utilization study was conducted in patients of acute coronary syndrome admitted in ICCU, for the period of two months. Data was collected in preformed Case record form. Analysis was done by using drug use indicators, demographic pattern, morbidity pattern of disease, pattern of drug use. Data analysed using Mic...

  19. The early Browning: Pastoral care in a pluralistic age and the method of practical moral inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hestenes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The past president of the International Academy of Practical Theology, Prof. Donald Browning, has written books and articles across a wide variety of topics concerning the correlation of many great fields of knowledge, including theology, psychology, philosophy, sociology, practical theology, ethics, family therapy and ecology over the past 40 years. Prof. Browning passed away on 03 June 2010. This left the author of this article with a desire to begin to reassess some of Browning’s earlier reflections regarding his vision of pastoral care in a pluralistic age and the importance of his method of practical moral inquiry.

  20. Health Care Workers' Beliefs and Practices Around Pap Screening for Adolescents Seeking Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabzdyl, Elizabeth; Engstrom, Janet L; McFarlin, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents often avoid seeing a health care provider to obtain contraception because they do not want to undergo a pelvic exam and Pap screening for fear of stress, pain or embarrassment. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to study health care workers, attitudes and beliefs about Pap screening and to educate them on the latest evidence-based guidelines, with the hope of ultimately decreasing unnecessary screening. Results showed a modest reduction in the frequency of Pap screening; however, many adolescents continued to undergo unnecessary Pap screening. The reluctance of health care workers to change their practice demonstrates the need for better methods of translating evidence-based guidelines into practice. PMID:26058904

  1. Evaluation of practices in mental health care in the Brazilian Northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria Aparecida Alves Sobreira; Ximenes, Verônica Morais

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a qualitative evaluation of mental health services, having as a goal to understand in what measure the care practices of a community mental health service in Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil), have an impact in the strengthening of people diagnosed with mental disorders. Interviews were made mediated by self-photography, a focus group, and in-depth interviews, organizing the contents in categories obtained by the critical hermeneutics method. The results indicate that those care practices promote strengthening processes, because care is not limited in its activities, and is respectful of the existential territory supporting the expressions of pain, of discontent, of the possibility of being and, wishing for different things, and are distanced from the ideology of submission and resignation. PMID:26697903

  2. Mini Review of Integrated Care and Implications for Advanced Practice Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Diana; Startsman, Laura F.; Perraud, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Literature related to primary care and behavioral health integration initiatives is becoming abundant. The United States’ 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act included provisions encouraging increased collaboration of care for individuals with behavioral and physical health service needs in the public sector. There is relatively little known of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs) roles with integrating primary and behavioral healthcare. The goal of this review article is to: (a) define integration of physical and behavioral healthcare and potential models; (b) answer the question as to what are effective evidence based models/strategies for integrating behavioral health and primary care; (c) explore the future role and innovations of APRNs in the integration of physical and behavioral healthcare. Results: The evidence- based literature is limited to three systematic reviews and six randomized controlled trials. It was difficult to generalize the data and the effective integration strategies varied from such interventions as care management to use of sertraline to depression management and to access. There were, though, implications for the integrated care advanced practice nurse to have roles inclusive of competencies, leadership, engagement, collaboration and advocacy. PMID:27347258

  3. Exploring the gap between rhetoric and reality in dementia care in Australia: could practice documents help bridge the great divide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturato, Lorraine; Moyle, Wendy; Steel, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Quality of care, and indeed, quality of life, for people living with dementia in long-term care is often underpinned by philosophies of care, such as person-centred care and relationship-centred care. The translation of these philosophies into practice is influenced by a range of individual and organizational features, including the context in which such care occurs. Within modern care organizations, the context of care is evidenced through organizational documents. This study sought to identify the key documents guiding dementia care within one large Australian long-term care organization and to explore points of consistency and tension within the documented system of care. Results highlight a lack of consistency and clarity in the philosophy of dementia care and a disconnection between the key documents guiding practice. This disconnection creates tension for clinicians and carers, and may contribute to the gap between rhetoric and reality in dementia care. This study suggests that a congruent documented dementia system can help bridge the gap between espoused philosophies of care and everyday care practices. PMID:24336772

  4. Quality of hypertension care in the family practice center, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahia M Al-Khaldi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypertension (HTN is a common health problem in Saudi Arabia. Good control depends on the quality of care, which should be supervised and monitored regularly through clinical audit. Aims: The objective of this study was to assess the quality of HTN care at Al-Manhal Family Practice, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia. Settings and Design: This study was conductedin 2009 at Al-Manhal Family Practice, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: Medical records of all hypertensive patients were extracted and reviewed using master sheets. Assessment of processes and outcomes of HTN care were based on the standards of quality assurance manual issuedby the Ministry of Health. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were entered and analyzed by SPPS, version 15. Relevant statistical tests were used accordingly and the P-value was considered significant when it was less than 0.05. Results: A total of 295 medical records were reviewed and assessed. Most patients were Saudi, married, and about 50% were educated. Two-hundred and thirty-one records were assessed for processes and outcomes of HTN care. Weight measurement and physical examination were carried out for 99% and 97% of the patients, respectively. For 53% of the patients, blood was checked for glucose and kidney function and a lipid profile was done. More than two-thirds of the patients were overweight and obese while 46% had diabetes. Less than one half of the patients had good control of HTN. Conclusions: By most standards, quality of HTN care in Al-Manhal Family Practice was unsatisfactory. Most of the patients had comorbidities and poor HTN control. Essential facilities should be provided to the practice to optimize HTN care and to improve the degree of control.

  5. Specialist pediatric palliative care prescribing practices: A large 5-year retrospective audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuja Damani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a gradual increasing trend in childhood cancers in India and pediatric palliative care in India is an emerging specialty. Prescribing pain and symptom control drugs in children with cancer requires knowledge of palliative care formulary, dosing schedules, and prescription guidelines. This study is a retrospective audit of prescribing practices of a specialist palliative care service situated in a tertiary cancer center. Methods: A total of 1135 medication records of children receiving specialist pediatric palliative care services were audited for 5 years (2010-2014 to evaluate prescribing practices in children with advanced cancer. Results: A total of 51 types of drugs were prescribed with an average of 4.2 drugs per prescription. 66.9% of the prescriptions had paracetamol, and 33.9% of the prescriptions had morphine. Most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prescribed was ibuprofen (23.9%, and more than 50% of the prescriptions had aperients. The most commonly prescribed aperient was a combination of liquid paraffin and sodium-picosulfate. Dexamethasone was prescribed in 51.9% of patients and in most cases this was part of oral chemotherapy regimen. Generic names in prescription were used only in 33% of cases, and adverse effects of the drugs were documented in only 9% of cases. In 25% of cases, noncompliance to the WHO prescription guidelines was seen, and patient compliance to prescription was seen in 40% of cases. Conclusions: Audit of the prescribing practices in specialist pediatric palliative care service shows that knowledge of pediatric palliative care formulary, rational drug use, dosing, and prescribing guidelines is essential for symptom control in children with advanced life-limiting illness. Noncompliance to WHO prescribing guidelines in one fourth of cases and using nongeneric names in two-thirds of prescription indicates poor prescribing practices and warrants prescriber education. Prescription

  6. The Current Landscape of Transitions of Care Practice Models: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester-Eyeguokan, Charmaine D; Pincus, Kathleen J; Patel, Roshni S; Reitz, Shirley J

    2016-01-01

    Transitions of care (TOC) are a set of actions to ensure patient coordination and continuity of care as patients transfer between different locations or levels. During transitions associated with chronic or acute illness, vulnerable patients may be placed at risk with fragmented systems compromising their health and safety. In addition, poor care transitions also have an enormous impact on health care spending. The primary objective of this scoping review is to summarize the current landscape of practice models that deliver TOC services in the United States. The secondary objective is to use the information to characterize the current state of best practice models. A search of the PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, National Center for Biotechnology Information at the U.S. National Library of Medicine, and Cochrane Library databases (January 1, 2000-April 13, 2015) for articles pertaining to TOC models, limited to U.S. studies published in the English language with human subjects, gleaned 1362 articles. An additional 26 articles were added from the gray literature. Articles meeting inclusion criteria underwent a second review and were categorized into four groups: background information, original TOC research articles not evaluating practice model interventions, original TOC research articles describing practice models, and systematic or Cochrane reviews. The reviewers met weekly to discuss the challenges and resolve disagreements regarding literature reviews with consensus before progressing. A total of 188 articles describing TOC practice models met the inclusion criteria. Despite the strengths of several quality TOC models, none satisfied all the components recommended by leading experts. Multimodal interventions by multidisciplinary teams appear to represent a best practice model for TOC to improve patient outcomes and reduce readmissions, but one size does not fit all

  7. Pattern discovery in critical alarms originating from neonates under intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohan; van Pul, Carola; Atallah, Louis; Feijs, Loe; Van Huffel, Sabine; Andriessen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Patient monitoring generates a large number of alarms, the vast majority of which are false. Excessive non-actionable medical alarms lead to alarm fatigue, a well-recognized patient safety issue. While multiple approaches to reduce alarm fatigue have been explored, patterns in alarming and inter-alarm relationships, as they manifest in the clinical workspace, are largely a black-box and hamper research efforts towards reducing alarms. The aim of this study is to detect opportunities to safely reduce alarm pressure, by developing techniques to identify, capture and visualize patterns in alarms. Nearly 500 000 critical medical alarms were acquired from a neonatal intensive care unit over a 20 month period. Heuristic techniques were developed to extract the inter-alarm relationships. These included identifying the presence of alarm clusters, patterns of transition from one alarm category to another, temporal associations amongst alarms and determination of prevalent sequences in which alarms manifest. Desaturation, bradycardia and apnea constituted 86% of all alarms and demonstrated distinctive periodic increases in the number of alarms that were synchronized with nursing care and enteral feeding. By inhibiting further alarms of a category for a short duration of time (30 s/60 s), non-actionable physiological alarms could be reduced by 20%. The patterns of transition from one alarm category to another and the time duration between such transitions revealed the presence of close temporal associations and multiparametric derangement. Examination of the prevalent alarm sequences reveals that while many sequences comprised of multiple alarms, nearly 65% of the sequences were isolated instances of alarms and are potentially irreducible. Patterns in alarming, as they manifest in the clinical workspace were identified and visualized. This information can be exploited to investigate strategies for reducing alarms. PMID:27027383

  8. Primary health care and general practice--a comparison between Australia and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee-Ming Khoo; Kidd, Michael Richard

    2002-01-01

    The Australian and Malaysian systems of general practice were examined and compared. The issues of similarity and difference identified are discussed in this paper. Quality clinical practice and the importance of compulsory vocational training prior to entry into general practice and continuing professional development is one important area. A move towards preventive health care and chronic disease management was observed in both countries. Practice incentive programmes to support such initiatives as improved rates of immunisation and cervical smear testing and the implementation of information technology and information management systems need careful implementation. The Medicare system used in Australia may not be appropriate for general practitioners in Malaysia and, if used, a pharmaceutical benefit scheme would also need to be established. In both countries the corporatisation of medical practice is causing concern for the medical profession. Rural and aboriginal health issues remain important in both countries. Graduate medical student entry is an attractive option but workforce requirements mean that medical education will need individual tailoring for each country. Incorporating nurses into primary health care may provide benefits such as cost savings. The integration model of community centres in Malaysia involving doctors, nurses and allied health professionals, such as physiotherapists, in a single location deserves further examination. PMID:12862408

  9. Tailoring intervention procedures to routine primary health care practice; an ethnographic process evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruijnzeels Marc

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tailor-made approaches enable the uptake of interventions as they are seen as a way to overcome the incompatibility of general interventions with local knowledge about the organisation of routine medical practice and the relationship between the patients and the professionals in practice. Our case is the Quattro project which is a prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases in high-risk patients in primary health care centres in deprived neighbourhoods. This programme was implemented as a pragmatic trial and foresaw the importance of local knowledge in primary health care and internal, or locally made, guidelines. The aim of this paper is to show how this prevention programme, which could be tailored to routine care, was implemented in primary care. Methods An ethnographic design was used for this study. We observed and interviewed the researchers and the practice nurses. All the research documents, observations and transcribed interviews were analysed thematically. Results Our ethnographic process evaluation showed that the opportunity of tailoring intervention procedures to routine care in a pragmatic trial setting did not result in a well-organised and well-implemented prevention programme. In fact, the lack of standard protocols hindered the implementation of the intervention. Although it was not the purpose of this trial, a guideline was developed. Despite the fact that the developed guideline functioned as a tool, it did not result in the intervention being organised accordingly. However, the guideline did make tailoring the intervention possible. It provided the professionals with the key or the instructions needed to achieve organisational change and transform the existing interprofessional relations. Conclusion As tailor-made approaches are developed to enable the uptake of interventions in routine practice, they are facilitated by the brokering of tools such as guidelines. In our study, guidelines facilitated

  10. Pattern of obstetrics complication among pregnant females admitted in a tertiary care centre in central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manik S. Shirpurkar

    2015-04-01

    Background: About half a million women die every year of causes related to pregnancy and child birth. Complication can arise at any time during pregnancy; child birth and post natal period and in absence of intervention, there is a high feto - maternal morbidity and mortality. Aim:- To study the pattern of obstetrics complication among antenatal patients coming to a tertiary care centre. Material and Methods:- A cross sectional study was conducted among 102 antenatal women admitted in intensive care unit of our institute during July 2014 to November 2014. Data regarding maternal socio-demographic profile and antenatal profile was collected. Result:- Out of total 102 women included in the study. 95(93% were registered and 7 were unregistered women. 88(86.4% women had 3 or more antenatal visit, of which 3(2.9% were unregistered women. 82(80.3% women had blood Hb% <11; of which 7 (6.8% were unregistered women. Out of total 102 women, 64(62.7% women were having complications related to abnormal labour; 34(33.3% obstetrical disorder, 21(20.5% Hypertensive disorder. Because of multi-disciplinary team approach at our institute, no maternal mortality was reported among the antenatal women admitted during this period in our institute. Conclusion:- All women need access to antenatal care; institutional delivery and post partum care. Complication arises at any time in absence of intervention. Multidisciplinary team approach along with intensive care specialist and anaesthesiologists can bring optimum care and thereby help in reducing maternal mortality. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 338-343

  11. Perceptions and practices of Angolan health care professionals concerning intimate partner violence against women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Edna de Fátima Gonçalves Alves do; Ribeiro, Adalgisa Peixoto; Souza, Edinilsa Ramos de

    2014-06-01

    This was a qualitative exploratory study with the objective of identifying perceptions and practices among health professionals in Angola concerning intimate partner violence against women. Semi-structured interviews were held with a senior health administrator, head nurses, medical directors, psychologists, and nurse technicians in three national hospitals in the capital city of Luanda. The perceptions of Angolan health professionals towards violence against women are marked by the cultural construction of woman's social role in the family and the belief in male superiority and female weakness. Despite their familiarity with the types of violence and the consequences for physical and mental health, the health professionals' practices in providing care for women in situations of violence focus on the treatment of physical injuries, overlooking the subjectivity and complexity of these situations. Recent inclusion of the issue in public policies is reflected in health professionals' practices and raises challenges for the health sector in caring for women in situations of violence. PMID:25099046

  12. The danish model for improvement of diabetes care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henrik; Christensen, René Depont; Thomsen, Janus Laust;

    2012-01-01

    /L and not receiving lipid-lowering treatment. Conclusions. Structured collection of electronic data from general practice and feedback with reports on quality of care for diabetes patient seems to give a significant reduction in proportion of patients with no medical treatment over one year for...... individually for each practice on the basis of the accumulated data and are available online only for the specific practice. Objective. To describe the development of the quality of care concerning drug prescriptions for diabetes patients listed with GPs using the Data Capture module. Methods. In a cohort...... study, among 8320 registered patients with diabetes, we analyzed the change in the proportion of medication for uncontrolled cases of diabetes. Results. From 2009 to 2010, there was an absolute risk reduction of 1.35% (0.89-1.81: P <0.001) in proportion of persons not in antidiabetic medication despite...

  13. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations. PMID:27111680

  14. Certification of health care organisations, assessment of professional practices and external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, accreditation of health care organisations (HCOs) is mandatory every 4 years. It is based on a systemic approach and, since 2004, includes professional practice appraisal (EPP) against good practice guidelines. However, following an incident in Epinal, a new quality assurance criterion was introduced in 2007 for external radiotherapy (ERT) on top of the annual inspection of patient radiation protection by the Nuclear Safety Authority. In the accreditation procedure starting January 2010, ERT work organisation will come under 'high-risk activity' (criterion 26b) and radio-vigilance will be included in the adverse events reporting system (8i). In addition, ERT will have to comply with many generic criteria on quality and safety improvement. For example, practice appraisal of all clinical activities will become routine. Thus, besides self-assessment against criteria 26b and 8i, ERT professionals will have report the impact of their quality improvement actions on patient care. They will be able to freely choose the area for improvement, as long as it is in line with the HCO's overall quality and safety plan. In oncology, multidisciplinary team meetings for deciding on the treatment plan, as well as mortality and morbidity meetings providing feedback, are compulsory (28a). Appraisal of appropriateness of care (28b) and indicator-based practice appraisal (28c) complete the process. In conclusion, the generic practice appraisal approach that is part of the French HCO accreditation procedure can contribute toward improving health care and education, but it has not been designed for in-depth assessment of complex, multidisciplinary clinical practice such as ERT. Such assessment requires a specific clinical audit and specialized auditors. (authors)

  15. Newborn care practices among slum dwellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh: a quantitative and qualitative exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Karar Zunaid

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urbanization is occurring at a rapid pace, especially in low-income countries. Dhaka, Bangladesh, is estimated to grow to 50 million by 2015, with 21 million living in urban slums. Although health services are available, neonatal mortality is higher in slum areas than in urban non-slum areas. The Manoshi program works to improve maternal, newborn, and child health in urban slums in Bangladesh. This paper describes newborn care practices in urban slums in Dhaka and provides program recommendations. Methods A quantitative baseline survey was conducted in six urban slum areas to measure newborn care practices among recently delivered women (n = 1,256. Thirty-six in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore newborn care practices among currently pregnant women (n = 18 and women who had at least one delivery (n = 18. Results In the baseline survey, the majority of women gave birth at home (84%. Most women reported having knowledge about drying the baby (64%, wrapping the baby after birth (59%, and cord care (46%. In the in-depth interviews, almost all women reported using sterilized instruments to cut the cord. Babies are typically bathed soon after birth to purify them from the birth process. There was extensive care given to the umbilical cord including massage and/or applying substances, as well as a variety of practices to keep the baby warm. Exclusive breastfeeding was rare; most women reported first giving their babies sweet water, honey and/or other foods. Conclusion These reported newborn care practices are similar to those in rural areas of Bangladesh and to urban and rural areas in the South Asia region. There are several program implications. Educational messages to promote providing newborn care immediately after birth, using sterile thread, delaying bathing, and ensuring dry cord care and exclusive breastfeeding are needed. Programs in urban slum areas should also consider interventions to improve

  16. Improving Integrated Care: Modelling the performance of an online community of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Díaz-Chao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article aims to confirm the following core hypothesis: a Community of Practice’s use of a Web 2.0 platform for communication between primary and hospital care leads to improved primary care and fewer hospital referrals. This core hypothesis will be corroborated by testing a further five partial hypotheses that complete the main hypothesis being estimated.Methods: An ad-hoc questionnaire was designed and sent to a sample group of 357 professionals from the Badalona-Sant Adrià de Besòs Primary Care Service in Catalonia, Spain, which includes nine primary care centres and three specialist care centres. The study sample was formed by 159 respondents. The partial least squares methodology was used to estimate the model of the causal relationship and the proposed hypotheses.Results: It was found that when healthcare staff used social networks and information and communication technologies professionally, and the more contact hours they have with patients, the more a Web 2.0 platform was likely to be used for communication between primary and hospital care professionals. Such use led to improved primary care and fewer hospital referrals according to the opinions of health professionals on its use.Conclusions: The research suggests that the efficiency of medical practice is explained by the intensity of Web 2.0 platform use for communication between primary and specialist care professionals. Public policies promoting the use of information and communication technologies in communities of practice should go beyond the technological dimension and consider other professional, organisational and social determinants.

  17. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MATERNAL CARE PRACTICES IN TRIBAL AREA AND URBAN SLUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolli Sree Karuna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mothers and children constitute the major proportion of our population. At the same time these two groups are very vulnerable and require sp ecial attention in health care. 1 In spite of progress in health care delivery, there are variations in utilization of the health services in urban slums, rural and tribal areas. Therefore in this context, an attempt was made to compare the health care practices of mothers in tribal area and urban slums. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is a community based cross sectional study conducted among mothers with living infants residing in tribal area and urban slums. After the survey and collection, from 606 mothers, comprising 305 from tribal a rea and 301 from urban slums through self administered questionnaire which covered socio - demographic profile, antenatal care, postnatal care and family planning methods, the data was analyzed using SPSS, 12. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: In urban slums 42% of wo men are approaching private practitioners for antenatal care whereas 87% of tribal women are depending on government health centers for antenatal care. With regards to intranatal care, 70% of women in tribal areas delivered at their homes where as 80% of d eliveries in urban slums were also home deliveries. Spacing is less than a year in 61% of tribal and 37% of urban population. The antenatal care is being provided mainly by private institutions and government hospitals in urban areas. In tribal areas women are approaching health centers for antenatal care. Most of the deliveries in the study population are home deliveries . Utilization of family planning services is very low in both the groups.

  18. Maternal care practices among the ultra poor households in rural Bangladesh: a qualitative exploratory study

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    Choudhury Nuzhat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many studies have been carried out to learn about maternal care practices in rural areas and urban-slums of Bangladesh, none have focused on ultra poor women. Understanding the context in which women would be willing to accept new practices is essential for developing realistic and relevant behaviour change messages. This study sought to fill in this knowledge gap by exploring maternal care practices among women who participated in a grant-based livelihood programme for the ultra poor. This is expected to assist the designing of the health education messages programme in an effort to improve maternal morbidity and survival towards achieving the UN millennium Development Goal 5. Methods Qualitative method was used to collect data on maternal care practices during pregnancy, delivery, and post-partum period from women in ultra poor households. The sample included both currently pregnant women who have had a previous childbirth, and lactating women, participating in a grant-based livelihood development programme. Rangpur and Kurigram districts in northern Bangladesh were selected for data collection. Results Women usually considered pregnancy as a normal event unless complications arose, and most of them refrained from seeking antenatal care (ANC except for confirmation of pregnancy, and no prior preparation for childbirth was taken. Financial constraints, coupled with traditional beliefs and rituals, delayed care-seeking in cases where complications arose. Delivery usually took place on the floor in the squatting posture and the attendants did not always follow antiseptic measures such as washing hands before conducting delivery. Following the birth of the baby, attention was mainly focused on the expulsion of the placenta and various maneuvres were adapted to hasten the process, which were sometimes harmful. There were multiple food-related taboos and restrictions, which decreased the consumption of protein during

  19. An evaluation of gender equity in different models of primary care practices in Ontario

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    Russell Grant

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization calls for more work evaluating the effect of health care reforms on gender equity in developed countries. We performed this evaluation in Ontario, Canada where primary care models resulting from reforms co-exist. Methods This cross sectional study of primary care practices uses data collected in 2005-2006. Healthcare service models included in the study consist of fee for service (FFS based, salaried, and capitation based. We compared the quality of care delivered to women and men in practices of each model. We performed multi-level, multivariate regressions adjusting for patient socio-demographic and economic factors to evaluate vertical equity, and adjusting for these and health factors in evaluating horizontal equity. We measured seven dimensions of health service delivery (e.g. accessibility and continuity and three dimensions of quality of care using patient surveys (n = 5,361 and chart abstractions (n = 4,108. Results Health service delivery measures were comparable in women and men, with differences ≤ 2.2% in all seven dimensions and in all models. Significant gender differences in the health promotion subjects addressed were observed. Female specific preventive manoeuvres were more likely to be performed than other preventive care. Men attending FFS practices were more likely to receive influenza immunization than women (Adjusted odds ratio: 1.75, 95% confidence intervals (CI 1.05, 2.92. There was no difference in the other three prevention indicators. FFS practices were also more likely to provide recommended care for chronic diseases to men than women (Adjusted difference of -11.2%, CI -21.7, -0.8. A similar trend was observed in Community Health Centers (CHC. Conclusions The observed differences in the type of health promotion subjects discussed are likely an appropriate response to the differential healthcare needs between genders. Chronic disease care is non equitable in FFS but

  20. Patterns of Long Term Care in 29 European countries: evidence from an exploratory study

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    Damiani Gianfranco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenges posed by the rapidly ageing population, and the increased preponderance of disabled people in this group, coupled with the rising level of public expenditure required to service the complex organization of long term care (LTC delivery are causing increased pressure on LTC systems in Europe. A pan-European survey was carried out to evaluate whether patterns of LTC can be identified across Europe and what are the trends of the countries along them. Methods An ecological study was conducted on the 27 EU Member States plus Norway and Iceland, referring to the period 2003-2007. Several variables related to organizational features, elderly needs and expenditure were drawn from OECD Health Data and the Eurostat Statistics database and combined using Multiple Factor Analysis (MFA. Results Two global Principal Components were taken into consideration given that their expressed total variance was greater than 60%. They were interpreted according to the higher (more than 0.5 positive or negative correlation coefficients between them and the original variables; thus patterns of LTC were identified. High alignment between old age related expenditure and elderly needs characterizes Nordic and Western European countries, the former also having a higher level of formal care than the latter. Mediterranean as well as Central and South Eastern European countries show lower alignment between old age related expenditure and elderly needs, coupled with a level of provision of formal care that is around or slightly above the average European level. In the dynamic comparison, linear, stable or unclear trends were shown for the studied countries. Conclusions The analysis carried out is an explorative and descriptive study, which is an attempt to reveal patterns and trends of LTC in Europe, allowing comparisons between countries. It also stimulates further researches with lower aggregated data useful to gain meaningful policy

  1. Child and Adult Care Food Program: Meal Pattern Revisions Related to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-25

    This final rule updates the meal pattern requirements for the Child and Adult Care Food Program to better align them with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, as required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. This rule requires centers and day care homes participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program to serve more whole grains and a greater variety of vegetables and fruit, and reduces the amount of added sugars and solid fats in meals. In addition, this final rule supports mothers who breastfeed and improves consistency with the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children and with other Child Nutrition Programs. Several of the changes are extended to the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and Special Milk Program. These changes are based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, science-based recommendations made by the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), cost and practical considerations, and stakeholder's input. This is the first major revision of the Child and Adult Care Food Program meal patterns since the Program's inception in 1968. These improvements to the meals served in the Child and Adult Care Food Program are expected to safeguard the health of young children by ensuring healthy eating habits are developed early, and improve the wellness of adult participants. PMID:27116762

  2. Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern of Blood Isolates of Acinetobacter Species in a Tertiary Care Hospital: A Retrospective Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    P. S. Shareek; Sureshkumar, D; Ramgopalakrishnan; Ramasubramanian, V.; K. A. Ghafur; M. A. Thirunarayanan

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter bacterium is one of the major causes of sepsis in ICUs in tertiary care hospitals in India. In this report we describe the antibiotic sensitivity patterns of Acinetobacter species isolated from blood over a one year period at a tertiary care hospital. Approach: We retrospectively analyzed the sensitivity pattern of Acinetobacter species isolated from blood during the period 1/6/2010 to 31/5/2011. Isolation and identification were performed...

  3. In-Training Practice Patterns of Combined Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine Residents, 2003-2007

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    Todd A Templeman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study seeks to evaluate the practice patterns of current combined emergency medicine/internal medicine (EM/IM residents during their training and compare them to the typical practice patterns of EM/IM graduates. We further seek to characterize how these current residents perceive the EM/IM physician’s niche. Methods: This is a multi-institution, cross-sectional, survey-based cohort study. Between June 2008 and July 2008, all 112 residents of the 11 EM/IM programs listed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were contacted and asked to complete a survey concerning plans for certification, fellowship, and practice setting. Results: The adjusted response rate was 71%. All respondents anticipated certifying in both specialties, with 47% intending to pursue fellowships. Most residents (97% allotted time to both EM and IM, with a median time of 70% and 30%, respectively. Concerning academic medicine, 81% indicated intent to practice academic medicine, and 96% planned to allocate at least 10% of their future time to a university/academic setting. In evaluating satisfaction, 94% were (1 satisfied with their residency choice, (2 believed that a combined residency will advance their career, and (3 would repeat a combined residency if given the opportunity. Conclusion: Current EM/IM residents were very content with their training and the overwhelming majority of residents plan to devote time to the practice of academic medicine. Relative to the practice patterns previously observed in EM/IM graduates, the current residents are more inclined toward pursuing fellowships and practicing both specialties. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:530–536.

  4. Process of care and preliminary outcome in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer: results of the 1995-1997 patterns of care study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the practice process using the national average (Na); to compare differences in the process of care by age group; and to provide a preliminary outcome data for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: The Patterns of Care Study conducted a nationwide survey of the care process for Stage I-III small-cell lung cancer in Japan. Patients were divided into three age groups: <65 years (younger group, n = 73); between 65 and 74 years (intermediate group, n = 81); and ≥75 years (elderly group, n = 20). Results: The NA for the total dose was 49.0 Gy, and for use of photon energy ≥6 MV, chemotherapy, and prophylactic cranial irradiation was 77.3%, 93.2%, and 1.69%, respectively. Age stratification had no impact on the variables of radiotherapy (RT) such as total dose and field size. Only 37% of patients received chemotherapy and thoracic RT concurrently. The proportion of patients who received chemotherapy and RT concurrently was 44%, 27%, and 25% of the younger, intermediate, and elderly groups, respectively (p = 0.029). Etoposide and cisplatin were less frequently used in the elderly group (≥75 years old). Overall survival at 3 years for the entire group was 26%. The 3-year survival rate was 30% in the younger group, 28% in the intermediate group, and 9% in the elderly group. Variables found to have a significant impact on survival by multivariate analysis were the use of chemotherapy (p = 0.030), age (p 0.032), and T stage (p = 0.042). Conclusion: Calculated NAs showed that the results of clinical study had favorably penetrated into the practice process in Japan. The results demonstrated that patient age significantly influenced the process of chemotherapy such as the use of etoposide and cisplatin for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer in Japan. More concurrent chemotherapy and thoracic RT and the application of prophylactic cranial irradiation for complete responders need to be investigated in the future

  5. Prescribing pattern of general practitioners for osteoarthritis in primary care settings in Bolu, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to assess the drug preferences of primary care physicians for osteoarthritis (OA) in comparison with the current guidelines and their reflections in the cost of prescriptions. Data were collected from all primary health care centers in Bolu, Turkey during from November 2002 from patient polyclinic logbooks. Drugs prescribed were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutical Chemical Classification system for comparison purposes. Gender, age and health insurance of patients were analyzed for drug preferences and costs. Forty-eight primary care physicians prescribed 1047 drugs for 507 OA patients with total cost of $10,254. Anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products were the leading group accounting for 59.6% of the prescribed drugs, and 84.1% of the total expenditure. Paracetamol, the most commonly recommended in the guidelines, constituted 6.9% of all prescribed drugs and 0.9% of the total cost. Drug preferences showed a statistical difference among the health insurance types while drugs cost showed statistical significance among the gender and health insurance types. Cyclooygenase-2-specific inhibitors were the most commonly prescribed subgroup, constituting 23.2% of prescribed drugs and 62.6% of the total expenditure. Paracetamol in practice was not the first-line drug preferred by primary care physicians. Drug prescription data showed that the preference of drugs was affected by health insurance types and the gender of patients in favor of expensive new drugs. There is a need for improvement of drug prescriptions to reflect current recommendations and guidelines. (author)

  6. Self-Management Goal Setting: Identifying the Practice Patterns of Community-Based Physical Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Karen; Bourret, Drew; Khan, Usman; Truong, Henry; Nixon, Stephanie; Shaw, James; McKay, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the collaborative goal-setting practices of community-based physical therapists trained in a self-management (SM) approach who work with clients with chronic conditions and to describe clients' goal-achievement rates. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for 296 randomly selected home-care clients from July 2009 through July 2010 using a chart-abstraction form created to capture demographic data and information related to goal setting and achievement. Data ...

  7. Towards a Pattern-Driven Topical Ontology Modeling Methodology in Elderly Care Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan; de Baer, Peter; Zhao, Gang; Meersman, Robert; Pudkey, Kevin

    This paper presents a pattern-driven ontology modeling methodology, which is used to create topical ontologies in the human resource management (HRM) domain. An ontology topic is used to group concepts from different contexts (or even from different domain ontologies). We use the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) as the resource to create the topical ontologies in this paper. The methodology is implemented in a tool called PAD-ON suit. The paper approach is illustrated with a use case from elderly care homes in UK.

  8. Ultrasound findings in critical care patients: the "liver sign" and other abnormal abdominal air patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahine, Joseph; Giard, Annie; Chagnon, David-Olivier; Denault, André

    2016-12-01

    In critical care patients, point of care abdominal ultrasound examination, although it has been practiced for over 30 years, is not as widespread as its cardiac or pulmonary counterparts. We report two cases in which detection of air during abdominal ultrasound allowed the early detection of life-threatening pathologies. In the first case, a patient with severe Clostridium difficile was found to have portal venous gas but its significance was confounded by a recent surgery. Serial ultrasonographic exams triggered a surgical intervention. In the second case, we report what we call the "liver sign" a finding in patients with pneumoperitoneum. These findings, all obtained prior to conventional abdominal imaging, had immediate clinical impact and avoided unnecessary delays and radiation. Detection of abdominal air should be part of the routine-focused ultrasonographic exam and for critically ill patients an algorithm is proposed. PMID:26968407

  9. Self-Care Practices for Common Colds by Primary Care Patients: Study Protocol of a European Multicenter Survey-The COCO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltermann, Birgitta M; Gerasimovska-Kitanovska, Biljana; Thielmann, Anika; Chambe, Juliette; Lingner, Heidrun; Pirrotta, Enzo; Buczkowski, Krzysztof; Tekiner, Selda; Czachowski, Slawomir; Edirne, Tamer; Zielinski, Andrzej; Yikilkan, Hülya; Koskela, Tuomas; Petrazzuoli, Ferdinando; Hoffman, Robert D; Petek Šter, Marija; Guede Fernández, Clara; Uludağ, Ayşegül; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Mevsim, Vildan; Kreitmayer Pestic, Sanda

    2015-01-01

    Background. Self-care for common colds is frequent, yet little is known about the spectrum, regional differences, and potential risks of self-care practices in patients from various European regions. Methods/Design. We describe the study protocol for a cross-sectional survey in 27 primary care centers from 14 European countries. At all sites, 120 consecutive adult patients, who visit their general practitioner for any reason, filled in a self-administered 27-item questionnaire. This addresses patients' self-care practices for common colds. Separately, the subjective level of discomfort when having a common cold, knowing about the diseases' self-limited nature, and medical and sociodemographic data are requested. Additionally, physicians are surveyed on their use of and recommendations for self-care practices. We are interested in investigating which self-care practices for common colds are used, whether the number of self-care practices used is influenced by knowledge about the self-limited nature of the disease, and the subjective level of discomfort when having a cold and to identify potential adverse interactions with chronic physician-prescribed medications. Further factors that will be considered are, for example, demographic characteristics, chronic conditions, and sources of information for self-care practices. All descriptive and analytical statistics will be performed on the pooled dataset and stratified by country and site. Discussion. To our knowledge, COCO is the first European survey on the use of self-care practices for common colds. The study will provide new insight into patients' and general practitioners' self-care measures for common colds across Europe. PMID:26421048

  10. Self-Care Practices for Common Colds by Primary Care Patients: Study Protocol of a European Multicenter Survey—The COCO Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltermann, Birgitta M.; Gerasimovska-Kitanovska, Biljana; Thielmann, Anika; Chambe, Juliette; Lingner, Heidrun; Pirrotta, Enzo; Buczkowski, Krzysztof; Tekiner, Selda; Czachowski, Slawomir; Edirne, Tamer; Zielinski, Andrzej; Yikilkan, Hülya; Koskela, Tuomas; Petrazzuoli, Ferdinando; Hoffman, Robert D.; Petek Šter, Marija; Guede Fernández, Clara; Uludağ, Ayşegül; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Mevsim, Vildan; Kreitmayer Pestic, Sanda

    2015-01-01

    Background. Self-care for common colds is frequent, yet little is known about the spectrum, regional differences, and potential risks of self-care practices in patients from various European regions. Methods/Design. We describe the study protocol for a cross-sectional survey in 27 primary care centers from 14 European countries. At all sites, 120 consecutive adult patients, who visit their general practitioner for any reason, filled in a self-administered 27-item questionnaire. This addresses patients' self-care practices for common colds. Separately, the subjective level of discomfort when having a common cold, knowing about the diseases' self-limited nature, and medical and sociodemographic data are requested. Additionally, physicians are surveyed on their use of and recommendations for self-care practices. We are interested in investigating which self-care practices for common colds are used, whether the number of self-care practices used is influenced by knowledge about the self-limited nature of the disease, and the subjective level of discomfort when having a cold and to identify potential adverse interactions with chronic physician-prescribed medications. Further factors that will be considered are, for example, demographic characteristics, chronic conditions, and sources of information for self-care practices. All descriptive and analytical statistics will be performed on the pooled dataset and stratified by country and site. Discussion. To our knowledge, COCO is the first European survey on the use of self-care practices for common colds. The study will provide new insight into patients' and general practitioners' self-care measures for common colds across Europe. PMID:26421048

  11. Practice innovation: the need for nimble data platforms to implement precision oncology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfiky, Aymen; Zhang, Dongyang; Krishnan Nair, Hari K

    2015-01-01

    Given the drive toward personalized, value-based, and coordinated cancer care delivery, modern knowledge-based practice is being shaped within the context of an increasingly technology-driven healthcare landscape. The ultimate promise of 'precision medicine' is predicated on taking advantage of the range of new capabilities for integrating disease- and individual-specific data to define new taxonomies as part of a systems-based knowledge network. Specifically, with cancer being a constantly evolving complex disease process, proper care of an individual will require the ability to seamlessly integrate multi-dimensional 'omic' and clinical data. Importantly, however, the challenges of curating knowledge from multiple dynamic data sources and translating to practice at the point-of-care highlight parallel needs. As patients, caregivers, and their environments become more proactive in clinical care and management, practical success of precision medicine is equally dependent on the development of proper infrastructures for evolving data integration, platforms for knowledge representation in a clinically-relevant context, and implementation within a provider's work-life and workflow. PMID:26321084

  12. Denture care practice among patients attending the prosthetic clinic in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde Joshua Ogunrinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good denture care practice by individuals using Removable Partial Denture (RPD is an important component of oral health measures. An assessment of denture care practice of such individuals by dental care practitioners is necessary. Objective : To evaluate the denture care practice among prosthetics patients attending a tertiary Hospital Dental Centre in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to obtain information from RPD wearers that were willing to participate. The questionnaire assessed among other things, patients′ bio-data, frequency, techniques and device used for cleaning their dentures. Data was analyzed using Chi-square test (P < 0.05. Results: One hundred and ninety eight denture wearers consisting of 100 (50.5% males and 98 (49.5% females participated in the study. Majority 110 (55.6% cleaned their dentures once daily and toothbrush and pastes were used by 105 (53% of the participants. More than 70% of the respondents removed their dentures at night. One hundred and sixty-six (83.8% visited the dentist only when they needed treatment. There was a statistical significant relationship between frequency and technique of cleaning denture, and denture cleanliness (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that once daily cleaning of dentures and cleaning the denture with rest of the teeth are ineffective in prevention of plaque accumulation.

  13. THE EVALUATION OF THE FAMILY MEDICINE PRACTICE EFFECTS ON HEALTH CARE EXPENDITURES IN TURKEY

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    Sinan AYTEKİN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Family Medicine is an important practice in terms of producing preventive medicine sensation in individuals and following health care system. The pilot application was launched in Düzce/Türkiye in 2005. The purpose of the study is to examine whether there is a differences between the application numbers to the hospitals and health expenditures before and after the prevalence of the family medicine practice.Statistical data about health care and insurance are assembled for 2009 and 2010 based on Medula data published by Social Security Institution. Then, the number of prescriptions, prescribed amounts, the number of consultsto hospitals and the amount of invoice of consults to hospitals were compared for these years. First of all, the Shapiro-Wilk test was applied to the data. Normally distributed data were analyzed with paired t-test.Non-normal distributed data were analyzed with the Wilcoxon Signed sign test. As a result of the analysis, the difference between health care expenditures and the number of consultation to hospitals provedto be statistically significant before and after the prevalence of the family medicine practice. Reasons for these differences were examined with the help of the tables. After commissioning of patient referral application, health care expenditures are considered to decrease and to reach the real level.

  14. Establishing a methodology for development and dissemination of nursing evidence-based practice to promote quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Carol J

    2011-01-01

    Reducing nursing practice variance by standardization of practice guidelines based on supportive literature has demonstrated improvements in the quality of patient care and positive patient outcomes. The challenge is to link the bedside nurse providing nursing care to subject matter experts well-versed in the critical analysis of clinical practice recommendations. This article discusses the restructuring of nursing research departments within Army healthcare facilities to facilitate nursing practice based on supportive evidence and the development of a senior nursing leadership practice council to support dissemination of approved nursing practice guidelines across all Army inpatient medical facilities. PMID:22124871

  15. Application and adaptation of Symphonology Bioethical Theory (SBT in pastoral care practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Khechane

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In an environment which is ethically and from a human rights point of view overly sensitive and in which interculturism is becoming more and more a norm, pastoral care practitioners need to be committed to providing services that are ethical, intercultural and respecting of patients’ rights. This article demonstrates how application of the Symphonology Bioethical Theory (SBT as the framework for practice in pastoral care and counselling can help Pastoral Care Practitioners (PCP to be ethical while upholding patients’ human rights, and it can also help to bridge the intercultural chasm while simultaneously explaining the rationale for the practice. Symphonology is a context-driven, ethical decision- making model guiding holistic interaction between patients and PCPs. The Symphonological decision-making matrix is based on a practitioner-patient agreement for pastoral care that emphasizes patient preferences, pastoral psychological and theological knowledge, the pastoral care content and the context of the situation. The goal of the PCP is to ethically incarnate the divine presence and thus to bring about hope and emancipation to the patient using the bioethical standards of autonomy, freedom, objectivity, self-assertion, benevolence and fidelity.

  16. South Vietnamese Rural Mothers' Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice in Child Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thac, Dinh; Pedersen, Freddy Karup; Thuong, Tang Chi; Lien, Le Bich; Ngoc Anh, Nguyen Thi; Phuc, Nguyen Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    A study of 600 rural under-five mothers' knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) in child care was performed in 4 southern provinces of Vietnam. The mothers were randomly selected and interviewed about sociodemographic factors, health seeking behaviour, and practice of home care of children and neonates. 93.2% of the mothers were literate and well-educated, which has been shown to be important for child health care. 98.5% were married suggesting a stable family, which is also of importance for child health. Only 17.3% had more than 2 children in their family. The mother was the main caretaker in 77.7% of the families. Only 1% would use quacks as their first health contact, but 25.2% would use a private clinic, which therefore eases the burden on the government system. Nearly 69% had given birth in a hospital, 27% in a commune health station, and only 2.7% at home without qualified assistance. 89% were giving exclusive breast feeding at 6 months, much more frequent than in the cities. The majority of the mothers could follow IMCI guideline for home care, although 25.2% did not deal correctly with cough and 38.7% did not deal correctly with diarrhoea. Standard information about Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) based home care is still needed. PMID:26881233

  17. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Krystal A T; Tulloch Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K; McFarlane, Shelly R; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A; Boyne, Michael S; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-10-12

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90%) reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. Approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82%) or leather shoes (64%), fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%), and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. In conclusion, approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided. PMID:24765484

  18. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal A.T. Gayle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90% reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. In conclusion, approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82% or leather shoes (64%, fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%, and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. Approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  19. Systematic review of studies of quality of clinical care in general practice in the UK, Australia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Seddon, M; Marshall, M.; Campbell, S; Roland, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—Little is known about the quality of clinical care provided outside the hospital sector, despite the increasingly important role of clinical generalists working in primary care. In this study we aimed to summarise published evaluations of the quality of clinical care provided in general practice in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand.

  20. Comparison of domiciliary and institutional delivery-care practices in rural Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Sharad D; Iyengar, Kirti; Suhalka, Virendra; Agarwal, Kumaril

    2009-04-01

    A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess key practices and costs relating to home- and institutional delivery care in rural Rajasthan, India. One block from each of two sample districts was covered (estimated population--279,132). Field investigators listed women who had delivered in the past three months and contacted them for structured case interview. In total, 1947 (96%) of 2031 listed women were successfully interviewed. An average of 2.4 and 1.7 care providers attended each home- and institutional delivery respectively. While 34% of the women delivered in health facilities, modem care providers attended half of all the deliveries. Intramuscular injections, intravenous drips, and abdominal fundal pressure were widely used for hastening delivery in both homes and facilities while post-delivery injections for active management of the third stage were administered to a minority of women in both the venues. Most women were discharged prematurely after institutional delivery, especially by smaller health facilities. The cost of accessing home-delivery care was Rs 379 (US$ 8) while the mean costs in facilities for elective, difficult vaginal deliveries and for caesarean sections were Rs 1336 (US$ 30), Rs 2419 (US$ 54), and Rs 11,146 (US$ 248) respectively. Most families took loans at high interest rates to meet these costs. It is concluded that widespread irrational practices by a range of care providers in both homes and facilities can adversely affect women and newborns while inadequate observance of beneficial practices and high costs are likely to reduce the benefits of institutional delivery, especially for the poor. Government health agencies need to strengthen regulation of delivery care and, especially, monitor perinatal outcomes. Family preference for hastening delivery and early discharge also require educational efforts. PMID:19489423

  1. Development and Implementation of the Advanced Practice Nurse Worldwide With an Interest in Geriatric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougère, Bertrand; Morley, John E; Decavel, Frédérique; Nourhashémi, Fati; Abele, Patricia; Resnick, Barbara; Rantz, Marilyn; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Moyle, Wendy; Pédra, Maryse; Chicoulaa, Bruno; Escourrou, Emile; Oustric, Stéphane; Vellas, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Many countries are seeking to improve health care delivery by reviewing the roles of health professionals, including nurses. Developing new and more advanced roles for nurses could improve access to care in the face of a limited or diminishing supply of doctors and growing health care demand. The development of new nursing roles varies greatly from country to country. The United States and Canada established "nurse practitioners" (NPs) in the mid-1960s. The United Kingdom and Finland also have a long experience in using different forms of collaboration between doctors and nurses. In other countries, such as Australia, NPs were endorsed more recently in 2000. In France, Belgium, or Singapore, the formal recognition of advanced practice nurses is still in its infancy, whereas in other countries, such as Japan or China, advanced practice nurses are not licensed titles. The aims of this article were to define precisely what is meant by the term "advanced practice nurse (APN)," describe the state of development of APN roles, and review the main factors motivating the implementation of APN in different countries. Then, we examine the main factors that have hindered the development of APN roles. Finally, we explain the need for advanced practice roles in geriatrics. PMID:27321868

  2. Effective Clinical Practices in Managed Care Findings From Ten Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Felt-Lisk; Kleinman, Lawrence C.

    2000-01-01

    Presents findings from a study designed to look at how some of the nation's high-performing HMOs have achieved their success. Notes that delivering high-quality care is a driving force for nearly all of the plans studied, as is a culture of respect for clinicians. For printed copies call The Commonwealth Fund at (888) 777-2744, ask for publication number 427. The plan-specific summary reports are also available in a volume titled "Effective Clinical Practices in Managed Care: Ten Case Studies...

  3. Postoperative radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. Results of the 1995-1997 patterns of care process survey in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine the average national practice of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for uterine cervical cancer in Japan. The Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) reviewed the process of care employed for 455 uterine cervical cancer patients who were treated with surgery followed by postoperative RT during 1995-1997. Cases with missing data were excluded from calculations of percentage and significance for each of the surveyed items. According to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages, 198 patients (45%) were in stage I, 52 patients (12%) were in stage IIA, 146 patients (33%) were in stage IIB and 46 patients (10%) were in stage III/IVA. The most common surgical procedure among the patients was radical hysterectomy (73%). Three hundred and seventy patients (82%) were treated with external beam RT (ERT) alone, and 74 patients (17%) were treated with a combination of ERT and intracavitary RT (ICRT). A midline block was used for the pelvic field in 63 patients (14%). Only seven patients (2%) were treated with extended field ERT. Pelvic ERT was most often performed using anterior posterior-posterior anterior (AP-PA) opposed fields for 431 patients (97%). A majority of the patients (312 patients, 70%) were treated with a total dose of 45.0-50.4 Gy for ERT. Chemotherapy (CT) was administered to 178 patients (40%), neoadjuvant preoperative CT was administered to 80 patients (22%) and concurrent CT with postoperative RT was administered to 29 patients (8%). This PCS established the national practice average of postoperative RT for uterine cervical cancer. Follow-up studies need to be conducted to determine whether the observed differences in treatment processes affect outcomes. (author)

  4. Type 2 diabetes–related foot care knowledge and foot self-care practice interventions in the United States: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timethia Bonner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this systematic literature review is to review published studies on foot care knowledge and foot care practice interventions as part of diabetic foot care self-management interventions. Methods: Medline, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched. References from the included studies were reviewed to identify any missing studies that could be included. Only foot care knowledge and foot care practice intervention studies that focused on the person living with type 2 diabetes were included in this review. Author, study design, sample, intervention, and results were extracted. Results: Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria and were classified according to randomized controlled trial (n=9, survey design (n=13, cohort studies (n=4, cross-sectional studies (n=2, qualitative studies (n=2, and case series (n=1. Improving lower extremity complications associated with type 2 diabetes can be done through effective foot care interventions that include foot care knowledge and foot care practices. Conclusion: Preventing these complications, understanding the risk factors, and having the ability to manage complications outside of the clinical encounter is an important part of a diabetes foot self-care management program. Interventions and research studies that aim to reduce lower extremity complications are still lacking. Further research is needed to test foot care interventions across multiple populations and geographic locations.

  5. Type 2 diabetes–related foot care knowledge and foot self-care practice interventions in the United States: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Timethia; Foster, Margaret; Spears-Lanoix, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this systematic literature review is to review published studies on foot care knowledge and foot care practice interventions as part of diabetic foot care self-management interventions. Methods Medline, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched. References from the included studies were reviewed to identify any missing studies that could be included. Only foot care knowledge and foot care practice intervention studies that focused on the person living with type 2 diabetes were included in this review. Author, study design, sample, intervention, and results were extracted. Results Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria and were classified according to randomized controlled trial (n=9), survey design (n=13), cohort studies (n=4), cross-sectional studies (n=2), qualitative studies (n=2), and case series (n=1). Improving lower extremity complications associated with type 2 diabetes can be done through effective foot care interventions that include foot care knowledge and foot care practices. Conclusion Preventing these complications, understanding the risk factors, and having the ability to manage complications outside of the clinical encounter is an important part of a diabetes foot self-care management program. Interventions and research studies that aim to reduce lower extremity complications are still lacking. Further research is needed to test foot care interventions across multiple populations and geographic locations. PMID:26899439

  6. Designing Social Interfaces Principles, Patterns, and Practices for Improving the User Experience

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    Crumlish, Christian

    2009-01-01

    From the creators of Yahoo!'s Design Pattern Library, Designing Social Interfaces provides you with more than 100 patterns, principles, and best practices, along with salient advice for many of the common challenges you'll face when starting a social website. Designing sites that foster user interaction and community-building is a valuable skill for web developers and designers today, but it's not that easy to understand the nuances of the social web. Now you have help. Christian Crumlish and Erin Malone share hard-won insights into what works, what doesn't, and why. You'll learn how to bala

  7. Skin care in nursing: A critical discussion of nursing practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Surber, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Skin (self-)care is part of human life from birth until death. Today many different skin care practices, preferences, traditions and routines exist in parallel. In addition, preventive and therapeutic skin care is delivered in nursing and healthcare by formal and informal caregivers. The aim of this contribution is a critical discussion about skin care in the context of professional nursing practice. An explicit skin assessment using accurate diagnostic statements is needed for clinical decision making. Special attention should be paid on high risk skin areas, which may be either too dry or too moist. From a safety perspective the protection and maintenance of skin integrity should have the highest priority. Skin cleansing is the removal of unwanted substances from the skin surface. Despite cleansing efficacy soap, other surfactants and water will inevitably always result in the destruction of the skin barrier. Thousands of products are available to hydrate, moisturize, protect and restore skin properties dependent upon their formulation and the concentration of ingredients. These products intended to left in contact with skin exhibit several actions on and in the skin interfering with skin biology. Unwanted side effects include hyper-hydration and disorganization of lipid bilayers in the stratum corneum, a dysfunctional barrier, increased susceptibility to irritants and allergies, and increases of skin surface pH. Where the skin barrier is impaired appropriate interventions, e.g. apply lipophilic products in sufficient quantity to treat dry skin or protect the skin from exposure to irritants should be provided. A key statement of this contribution is: every skin care activity matters. Every time something is placed on the skin, a functional and structural response is provoked. This response can be either desired or undesired, beneficial or harmful. The choice of all skin care interventions in nursing and healthcare practice must be based on an accurate assessment

  8. An Assessment of the Breastfeeding Practices and Infant Feeding Pattern among Mothers in Mauritius

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    Ashmika Motee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper breastfeeding practices are effective ways for reducing childhood morbidity and mortality. While many mothers understand the importance of breastfeeding, others are less knowledgeable on the benefits of breastfeeding and weaning. The aim in here is to assess breastfeeding pattern, infant formula feeding pattern, and weaning introduction in Mauritius and to investigate the factors that influence infant nutrition. 500 mothers were interviewed using a questionnaire which was designed to elicit information on infant feeding practices. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS (version 13.0, whereby chi-square tests were used to evaluate relationships between different selected variables. The prevalence of breastfeeding practice in Mauritius has risen from 72% in 1991 to 93.4% as found in this study, while only 17.9% breastfed their children exclusively for the first 6 months, and the mean duration of EBF (exclusive breastfeeding is 2.10 months. Complementary feeding was more commonly initiated around 4–6 months (75.2%. Despite the fact that 60.6% of mothers initiate breastfeeding and 26.1% of mothers are found to breastfeed up to 2 years, the practice of EBF for the first 6 months is low (17.9%. Factors found to influence infant feeding practices are type of delivery, parity, alcohol consumption, occupation, education, and breast problems.

  9. Clinician Adoption Patterns and Patient Outcome Results in Use of Evidence-Based Nursing Plans of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Youn; Lang, Norma M.; Berg, Karen; Weaver, Charlotte; Murphy, Judy; Ela, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of safe, effective and appropriate health care is an imperative facing health care organizations globally. While many initiatives have been launched in a number of countries to address this need from a medical perspective, a similar focus for generating evidence-based nursing knowledge has been missing [1]. This paper reports on a collaborative evidence-based practice (EBP) research initiative that adds nursing knowledge into computerized care protocols. Here, a brief overview of the...

  10. General practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy: an examination of clustering within practices and prediction of patient-rated quality of care

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    Thapar Ajay K

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is wide variation in the quality of care provided by primary care practices to individuals with chronic illnesses. Individual doctor attitudes and interest have been demonstrated to influence patient outcomes in some instances. Given the trend towards larger practices and part-time working, continuity of care is likely to fall and thus practice-based rather than individual general practitioner attributes and attitudes are likely to become increasingly important. The aim in this paper was to examine the extent to which individual general practitioner (G.P. attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and predict patient-rated quality of care. Methods The sample consisted of 1255 people with active epilepsy (a recent seizure or on anti-convulsant medication for epilepsy and 199 GPs from 82 general practices. Measures of GP attitudes (a 17-item GP attitudes questionnaire and patient-rated quality of epilepsy care were obtained. 1210 individuals completed initial questionnaires and 975 patients filled in final questionnaires one year later. Responses were achieved from 64 practices (83% of total and 115 GPs (60% of total. Results 2 main factors were found to underlie GP attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy and these demonstrated clustering within practices "epilepsy viewed as a primary care responsibility" (Eigenvalue 3.98, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC 0.40, and "medication skills"(Eigenvalue 2.74, ICC 0.35. GP-rated scores on "epilepsy care being a primary care responsibility" were a significant predictor of patient-rated quality of GP care (p = 0.031. Other contributory factors were seizure frequency (p = 0.044, and patient-rated "shared decision making" (p = 0.022. Conclusion Specific general practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and are significantly associated with patient-rated quality of epilepsy care. It is important to take

  11. Re-engineering the primary care practice to eliminate adult immunization disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, George; Strothers, Harry S; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2005-01-01

    Traditional "one-patient-at-a-time," doctor-centered primary care practice models do not achieve optimal immunization rates for pneumonia and influenza, in part because of time pressures and competing demands from a burgeoning list of clinical guidelines. Some widely used quality improvement methods (physician education, provider feedback, academic detailing, etc.) have only a modest and short-lived impact on improving immunization rates. Evidence is mounting that practices can substantially improve immunization rates by changing practice systems and processes with standing orders and algorithms, expanded nurse decision-making, patient education and incentives, and partnerships with community-based pharmacies. Quality-focused, constantly-learning practices that cultivate a culture of excellence will be most effective in adopting such changes. PMID:15945363

  12. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of bacterial pathogens in the intensive care unit of Fatmawati Hospital, Indonesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maksum Radji; Siti Fauziah; Nurgani Aribinuko

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the sensitivity pattern of bacterial pathogens in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care of Fatmawati Hospital Jakarta Indonesia. Methods: A cross sectional retrospective study of bacterial pathogen was carried out on a total of 722 patients that were admitted to the ICU of Fatmawati Hospital Jakarta Indonesia during January 2009 to March 2010. All bacteria were identified by standard microbiologic methods, and their antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion method. Results: Specimens were collected from 385 patients who were given antimicrobial treatment, of which 249 (64.68%) were cultured positive and 136 (35.32%) were negative. The most predominant isolate was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (26.5%) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) (15.3%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (14.9%). P. aeruginosa isolates showed high rate of resistance to cephalexin (95.3%), cefotaxime (64.1%), and ceftriaxone (60.9%). Amikacin was the most effective (84.4%) antibiotic against P. aeruginosa followed by imipenem (81.2%), and meropenem (75.0%). K. pneumoniae showed resistance to cephalexin (86.5%), ceftriaxone (75.7%), ceftazidime (73.0%), cefpirome (73.0%) and cefotaxime (67.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Most bacteria isolated from ICU of Fatmawati Hospital Jakarta Indonesia were resistant to the third generation of cephalosporins, and quinolone antibiotics. Regular surveillance of antibiotic susceptibility patterns is very important for setting orders to guide the clinician in choosing empirical or directed therapy of infected patients.

  13. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: Managing transitions of care following Stroke, Guidelines Update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jill I; O'Connell, Colleen; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Booth, Rhonda; Boyle, Rosemary; Cheung, Donna; Cooper, Nancy; Corriveau, Helene; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Dulude, Annie; Flaherty, Patti; Glasser, Ev; Gubitz, Gord; Hebert, Debbie; Holzmann, Jacquie; Hurteau, Patrick; Lamy, Elise; LeClaire, Suzanne; McMillan, Taylor; Murray, Judy; Scarfone, David; Smith, Eric E; Shum, Vivian; Taylor, Kim; Taylor, Trudy; Yanchula, Catherine; Teasell, Robert; Lindsay, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. For patients, families and caregivers, this can be a difficult time of adjustment. The 2016 update of the Canadian Managing Transitions of Care following Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations appropriate for use by clinicians who provide care to patients following stroke across a broad range of settings. The focus of these recommendations is on support, education and skills training for patients, families and caregivers; effective discharge planning; interprofessional communication; adaptation in resuming activities of daily living; and transition to long-term care for patients who are unable to return to or remain at home. Unlike other modules contained in the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations (such as acute inpatient care), many of these recommendations are based on consensus opinion, or evidence level C, highlighting the absence of conventional evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials) in this area of stroke care. The quality of care transitions between stages and settings may have a direct impact on patient and family outcomes such as coping, readmissions and functional recovery. While many qualitative and non-controlled studies were reviewed, this gap in evidence combined with the fact that mortality from stoke is decreasing and more people are living with the effects of stroke, underscores the need to channel a portion of available research funds to recovery and adaptation following the acute phase of stroke. PMID:27443991

  14. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambigga, Krishnapillai S; Ramli, Anis Safura; Suthahar, Ariaratnam; Tauhid, Norlaili; Clearihan, Lyn; Browning, Colette

    2011-01-01

    Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restructuring of the health care system, development of comprehensive benefit packages for older people under the national health financing scheme, training of the primary care workforce, effective use of electronic medical records and clinical guidelines; and empowering older people and their caregivers with knowledge, skills and positive attitudes to ageing and self care. Ultimately, family medicine specialists must become the agents for change to lead multidisciplinary teams and work with various agencies to ensure that better coordination, continuity and quality of care are eventually delivered to older patients across time and settings. PMID:21385446

  15. Bridging the gap in ageing: Translating policies into practice in Malaysian Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambigga Krishnapillai S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Population ageing is poised to become a major challenge to the health system as Malaysia progresses to becoming a developed nation by 2020. This article aims to review the various ageing policy frameworks available globally; compare aged care policies and health services in Malaysia with Australia; and discuss various issues and challenges in translating these policies into practice in the Malaysian primary care system. Fundamental solutions identified to bridge the gap include restructuring of the health care system, development of comprehensive benefit packages for older people under the national health financing scheme, training of the primary care workforce, effective use of electronic medical records and clinical guidelines; and empowering older people and their caregivers with knowledge, skills and positive attitudes to ageing and self care. Ultimately, family medicine specialists must become the agents for change to lead multidisciplinary teams and work with various agencies to ensure that better coordination, continuity and quality of care are eventually delivered to older patients across time and settings.

  16. Caring for insiderness”: Phenomenologically informed insights that can guide practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Todres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the “insider” perspective has been a pivotal strength of qualitative research. Further than this, within the more applied fields in which the human activity of “caring” takes place, such understanding of “what it is like” for people from within their lifeworlds has also been acknowledged as the foundational starting point in order for “care” to be caring. But we believe that more attention needs to be paid to this foundational generic phenomenon: what it means to understand the “insiderness” of another, but more importantly, how to act on this in caring ways. We call this human phenomenon “caring for insiderness.” Drawing on existing phenomenological studies of marginal caring situations at the limits of caring capability, and through a process of phenomenologically oriented reflection, we interrogated some existential themes implicit in these publications that could lead to deeper insights for both theoretical and applied purposes. The paper provides direction for practices of caring by highlighting some dangers as well as some remedies along this path.

  17. Market-based reforms in health care are both practical and morally sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James Stacey

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the free-market provision of health care is both practical and morally sound, and is superior in both respects to its provision by the State. The State provision of health care will be inefficient compared to its free-market alternative. It will thus provide less health care to persons for the same amount of expenditure, and so save fewer lives and alleviate less suffering for two reasons: state actors have no incentive to husband their resources effectively, and that in a non-market setting, special interest groups can capture resources through lobbying, perverting them away from their efficient allocation. Given these considerations of efficiency a utilitarian should morally prefer the free-market provision of health care to its State-based rival. Furthermore, even if one is not a utilitarian, the free-market provision of health care will be more morally sound than its State-based alternative because it will likely better respect the autonomy of persons, and will better refrain from imposing values upon persons. With these points in hand, I address two prominent objections to a free market system of health care. PMID:23061582

  18. The impact of case mix on timely access to appointments in a primary care group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Asli; Balasubramanian, Hari

    2013-06-01

    At the heart of the practice of primary care is the concept of a physician panel. A panel refers to the set of patients for whose long term, holistic care the physician is responsible. A physician's appointment burden is determined by the size and composition of the panel. Size refers to the number of patients in the panel while composition refers to the case-mix, or the type of patients (older versus younger, healthy versus chronic patients), in the panel. In this paper, we quantify the impact of the size and case-mix on the ability of a multi-provider practice to provide adequate access to its empanelled patients. We use overflow frequency, or the probability that the demand exceeds the capacity, as a measure of access. We formulate problem of minimizing the maximum overflow for a multi-physician practice as a non-linear integer programming problem and establish structural insights that enable us to create simple yet near optimal heuristic strategies to change panels. This optimization framework helps a practice: (1) quantify the imbalances across physicians due to the variation in case mix and panel size, and the resulting effect on access; and (2) determine how panels can be altered in the least disruptive way to improve access. We illustrate our methodology using four test practices created using patient level data from the primary care practice at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. An important advantage of our approach is that it can be implemented in an Excel Spreadsheet and used for aggregate level planning and panel management decisions. PMID:23076360

  19. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices towards Pharmacovigilance and Adverse Drug Reactions in health care professional of Tertiary Care Hospital, Bhavnagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Mukeshkumar B Vora

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are adverse consequences of drug therapy. ADRs are representing a major concern of health systems in terms of early recognition, proper management and prevention. Under reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs is a common problem in Pharmacovigilance programs. Poor perceptions of doctors about ADRs and risk management have contributed to high rate of ADR under-reporting in India. Underreporting has also been attributed to lack of time to doctor, misconceptions about spontaneous reporting and lack of information on how to report, where to report and a lack of availability of report forms, and also physicians' attitudes to ADRs. The objective of our study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP of health care professional towards Pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care hospital, Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaires based study was carried out in Post graduate students and faculties of tertiary care hospital attached with Govt. Medical College, Bhavnagar, Gujarat. Post graduate students and faculties of different clinical subjects working in the tertiary care teaching hospital, Bhavnagar, Gujarat (India were enrolled and present throughout in study. 22 questionnaires about knowledge, attitude and practices towards ADRs and Pharmacovigilance were developed and peer viewed of all questionnaires by expert faculties from Pharmacology department. We were contacted directly to post graduate students and faculties of respective clinical department, questionnaires were distributed, 30 minutes time given to filled form. Any clarification and extra time was needed, provided to them. The filled KAP questionnaires were analyzed in question wise and their percentage value was calculated by using Microsoft excel spread sheet and online statistical software. Results: In study, postgraduate residents (n=81 and faculties (n=63 from different clinical

  20. Care-seeking patterns for fatal non-communicable diseases among women of reproductive age in rural northwest Bangladesh

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    Sikder Shegufta S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though non-communicable diseases contribute to an increasing share of the disease burden in South Asia, health systems in most rural communities are ill-equipped to deal with chronic illness. This analysis seeks to describe care-seeking behavior among women of reproductive age who died from fatal non-communicable diseases as recorded in northwest rural Bangladesh between 2001 and 2007. Methods This analysis utilized data from a large population-based cohort trial in northwest rural Bangladesh. To conduct verbal autopsies of women who died while under study surveillance, physicians interviewed family members to elicit the biomedical symptoms that the women experienced as well as a narrative of the events leading to deaths. We performed qualitative textual analysis of verbal autopsy narratives for 250 women of reproductive age who died from non-communicable diseases between 2001 and 2007. Results The majority of women (94% sought at least one provider for their illnesses. Approximately 71% of women first visited non-certified providers such as village doctors and traditional healers, while 23% first sought care from medically certified providers. After the first point of care, women appeared to switch to medically certified practitioners when treatment from non-certified providers failed to resolve their illness. Conclusions This study suggests that treatment seeking patterns for non-communicable diseases are affected by many of the sociocultural factors that influence care seeking for pregnancy-related illnesses. Families in northwest rural Bangladesh typically delayed seeking treatment from medically certified providers for NCDs due to the cost of services, distance to facilities, established relationships with non-certified providers, and lack of recognition of the severity of illnesses. Most women did not realize initially that they were suffering from a chronic illness. Since women typically reached medically certified