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Sample records for care practice patterns

  1. Practice patterns in prescribing oral care products by dental practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena B. Abdrashitova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the practice patterns of dental practitioners in how they choose oral care products for prescriptions to their patients. One hundred seventy-three respondents were selected for a medico-sociological study. They were divided into 3 groups based on their work experience: less than 5 years (30.0%, 5–9 years (40.0% and 10–14 years (30.0%. The majority of respondents were dental therapists (71.0%, and the rest were paedodontists, dental surgeons, periodontists and orthodontists (11.0%, 7.0%, 4.0% and 1.0%, respectively. The study was conducted using a questionnaire specially developed by us, which consisted of 34 questions grouped into several domains. Analysis of the obtained results has shown that the majority of dental practitioners (88.7% were competent in prescribing oral care products. Professionals with work experience over 10 years often choose oral care products incorrectly; 80.6% of them believe that long-term use of personal oral care products containing antiseptic components affects the oral microbial flora, which suggests that it is necessary to amend the existing classification of toothpastes.

  2. Shifting patterns of practice: nurse practitioners in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rosemary

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to uncover patterns across nurse practitioner (NP) experiences that contribute to understanding their perceptions of managed care, how it affects daily practice, and how NPs respond to a changing managed care workplace. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 NPs representing primary care, specialty, and independent practices. Over an 18-month period, data collection and analysis occurred simultaneously using standard methods of purposive sampling, constant comparison, memoing, and member checks. This study illuminates the tension NPs experience between a business and a professional ethic and the strategies they use to reconcile this difference with core nursing values. Type of setting, workplace dynamics, and length of time in practice contributed to variation in NP perspectives.

  3. Practice Patterns, Attitudes, and Barriers to Palliative Care Consultation by Gynecologic Oncologists.

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    Buckley de Meritens, Alexandre; Margolis, Benjamin; Blinderman, Craig; Prigerson, Holly G; Maciejewski, Paul K; Shen, Megan J; Hou, June Y; Burke, William M; Wright, Jason D; Tergas, Ana I

    2017-09-01

    We sought to describe practice patterns, attitudes, and barriers to the integration of palliative care services by gynecologic oncologists. Members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology were electronically surveyed regarding their practice of incorporating palliative care services and to identify barriers for consultation. Descriptive statistics were used, and two-sample z-tests of proportions were performed to compare responses to related questions. Of the 145 respondents, 71% were attending physicians and 58% worked at an academic medical center. The vast majority (92%) had palliative care services available for consultation at their hospital; 48% thought that palliative care services were appropriately used, 51% thought they were underused, and 1% thought they were overused. Thirty percent of respondents thought that palliative care services should be incorporated at first recurrence, whereas 42% thought palliative care should be incorporated when prognosis for life expectancy is ≤ 6 months. Most participants (75%) responded that palliative care consultation is reasonable for symptom control at any stage of disease. Respondents were most likely to consult palliative care services for pain control (53%) and other symptoms (63%). Eighty-three percent of respondents thought that communicating prognosis is the primary team's responsibility, whereas the responsibilities for pain and symptom control, resuscitation status, and goals of care discussions were split between the primary team only and both teams. The main barrier for consulting palliative care services was the concern that patients and families would feel abandoned by the primary oncologist (73%). Ninety-seven percent of respondents answered that palliative care services are useful to improve patient care. The majority of gynecologic oncologists perceived palliative care as a useful collaboration that is underused. Fear of perceived abandonment by the patient and family members was identified as a

  4. Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Patients With Cervical Cancer (1999-2001): Patterns of Care Study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Kodaira, Takeshi; Shinoda, Atsunori; Uno, Takashi; Akino, Yuichi; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the patterns of definitive radiotherapy practice for patients with uterine cervical cancer from 1999 to 2001 in Japan. Methods and Materials: The Japanese Patterns of Care Study (JPCS) working group conducted a third extramural audit survey of 68 institutions and collected specific information on 324 cervical cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. Results: Almost all patients (96%) were treated with whole pelvic radiotherapy using opposing anteroposterior fields (87%). A midline block was used in 70% of the patients. Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) was applied in 82% of cases. Most patients (89%) were treated with high-dose rate (HDR) ICBT. Calculation of doses to organs at risk (ICRU 38) was performed for rectum in 25% of cases and for bladder in 18% of cases. Only 3% of patients were given intravenous conscious sedation during ICBT applicator insertions. The median total biologically effective dose at point A (EBRT+ICBT) was 74 Gy 10 in cases treated with HDR-ICBT. There was no significant difference in total biologically effective dose between stages. The median overall treatment time was 47 days. Concurrent chemoradiation was applied in 17% of patients. Conclusions: This study describes the general patterns of radiotherapy practice for uterine cervical cancer in Japan. Although methods of external radiotherapy seemed to be appropriate, there was room for improvement in ICBT practice, such as pretreatment. A substantial difference in total radiotherapy dose between Japan and the United States was observed

  5. Same organization, same electronic health records (EHRs) system, different use: exploring the linkage between practice member communication patterns and EHR use patterns in an ambulatory care setting

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    Leykum, Luci K; McDaniel, Reuben R

    2011-01-01

    Objective Despite efforts made by ambulatory care organizations to standardize the use of electronic health records (EHRs), practices often incorporate these systems into their work differently from each other. One potential factor contributing to these differences is within-practice communication patterns. The authors explore the linkage between within-practice communication patterns and practice-level EHR use patterns. Design Qualitative study of six practices operating within the same multi-specialty ambulatory care organization using the same EHR system. Semistructured interviews and direct observation were conducted with all physicians, nurses, medical assistants, practice managers, and non-clinical staff from each practice. Measurements An existing model of practice relationships was used to analyze communication patterns within the practices. Practice-level EHR use was defined and analyzed as the ways in which a practice uses an EHR as a collective or a group—including the degree of feature use, level of EHR-enabled communication, and frequency that EHR use changes in a practice. Interview and observation data were analyzed for themes. Based on these themes, within-practice communication patterns were categorized as fragmented or cohesive, and practice-level EHR use patterns were categorized as heterogeneous or homogeneous. Practices where EHR use was uniformly high across all users were further categorized as having standardized EHR use. Communication patterns and EHR use patterns were compared across the six practices. Results Within-practice communication patterns were associated with practice-level EHR use patterns. In practices where communication patterns were fragmented, EHR use was heterogeneous. In practices where communication patterns were cohesive, EHR use was homogeneous. Additional analysis revealed that practices that had achieved standardized EHR use (uniformly high EHR use across all users) exhibited high levels of mindfulness and

  6. Same organization, same electronic health records (EHRs) system, different use: exploring the linkage between practice member communication patterns and EHR use patterns in an ambulatory care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, Holly Jordan; Leykum, Luci K; McDaniel, Reuben R

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts made by ambulatory care organizations to standardize the use of electronic health records (EHRs), practices often incorporate these systems into their work differently from each other. One potential factor contributing to these differences is within-practice communication patterns. The authors explore the linkage between within-practice communication patterns and practice-level EHR use patterns. Qualitative study of six practices operating within the same multi-specialty ambulatory care organization using the same EHR system. Semistructured interviews and direct observation were conducted with all physicians, nurses, medical assistants, practice managers, and non-clinical staff from each practice. An existing model of practice relationships was used to analyze communication patterns within the practices. Practice-level EHR use was defined and analyzed as the ways in which a practice uses an EHR as a collective or a group-including the degree of feature use, level of EHR-enabled communication, and frequency that EHR use changes in a practice. Interview and observation data were analyzed for themes. Based on these themes, within-practice communication patterns were categorized as fragmented or cohesive, and practice-level EHR use patterns were categorized as heterogeneous or homogeneous. Practices where EHR use was uniformly high across all users were further categorized as having standardized EHR use. Communication patterns and EHR use patterns were compared across the six practices. Within-practice communication patterns were associated with practice-level EHR use patterns. In practices where communication patterns were fragmented, EHR use was heterogeneous. In practices where communication patterns were cohesive, EHR use was homogeneous. Additional analysis revealed that practices that had achieved standardized EHR use (uniformly high EHR use across all users) exhibited high levels of mindfulness and respectful interaction, whereas practices that

  7. Intensive Care in India: The Indian Intensive Care Case Mix and Practice Patterns Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Amin, Pravin R; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Kapadia, Farhad N; Todi, Subhash; Sahu, Samir; Govil, Deepak; Chawla, Rajesh; Kulkarni, Atul P; Samavedam, Srinivas; Jani, Charu K; Rungta, Narendra; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Mehta, Sujata; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Hegde, Ashit; Bande, B D; Dhanuka, Sanjay; Singh, Virendra; Tewari, Reshma; Zirpe, Kapil; Sathe, Prachee

    2016-04-01

    To obtain information on organizational aspects, case mix and practices in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs). An observational, 4-day point prevalence study was performed between 2010 and 2011 in 4209 patients from 124 ICUs. ICU and patient characteristics, and interventions were recorded for 24 h of the study day, and outcomes till 30 days after the study day. Data were analyzed for 4038 adult patients from 120 ICUs. On the study day, mean age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were 54.1 ± 17.1 years, 17.4 ± 9.2 and 3.8 ± 3.6, respectively. About 46.4% patients had ≥1 organ failure. Nearly, 37% and 22.2% patients received mechanical ventilation (MV) and vasopressors or inotropes, respectively. Nearly, 12.2% patients developed an infection in the ICU. About 28.3% patients had severe sepsis or septic shock (SvSpSS) during their ICU stay. About 60.7% patients without infection received antibiotics. There were 546 deaths and 183 terminal discharges (TDs) from ICU (including left against medical advice or discharged on request), with ICU mortality 729/4038 (18.1%). In 1627 patients admitted within 24 h of the study day, the standardized mortality ratio was 0.67. The APACHE II and SOFA scores, public hospital ICUs, medical ICUs, inadequately equipped ICUs, medical admission, self-paying patient, presence of SvSpSS, acute respiratory failure or cancer, need for a fluid bolus, and MV were independent predictors of mortality. The high proportion of TDs and the association of public hospitals, self-paying patients, and inadequately equipped hospitals with mortality has important implications for critical care in India.

  8. Physiotherapy practice patterns in Intensive Care Units of Nepal : A multicenter survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baidya, Sumana; Acharya, Ranjeeta S.; Coppieters, Michel W.

    2016-01-01

    Context: As physiotherapy (PT) is a young profession in Nepal, there is a dearth of insight into the common practices of physiotherapists in critical care. Aims: To identify the availability of PT services in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and articulate the common practices by physiotherapists in ICUs

  9. Random or predictable?: Adoption patterns of chronic care management practices in physician organizations.

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    Miake-Lye, Isomi M; Chuang, Emmeline; Rodriguez, Hector P; Kominski, Gerald F; Yano, Elizabeth M; Shortell, Stephen M

    2017-08-24

    Theories, models, and frameworks used by implementation science, including Diffusion of Innovations, tend to focus on the adoption of one innovation, when often organizations may be facing multiple simultaneous adoption decisions. For instance, despite evidence that care management practices (CMPs) are helpful in managing chronic illness, there is still uneven adoption by physician organizations. This exploratory paper leverages this natural variation in uptake to describe inter-organizational patterns in adoption of CMPs and to better understand how adoption choices may be related to one another. We assessed a cross section of national survey data from physician organizations reporting on the use of 20 CMPs (5 each for asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes). Item response theory was used to explore patterns in adoption, first considering all 20 CMPs together and then by subsets according to disease focus or CMP type (e.g., registries, patient reminders). Mokken scale analysis explored whether adoption choices were linked by disease focus or CMP type and whether a consistent ordering of adoption choices was present. The Mokken scale for all 20 CMPs demonstrated medium scalability (H = 0.43), but no consistent ordering. Scales for subsets of CMPs sharing a disease focus had medium scalability (0.4  0.5). Scales for CMP type consistently ranked diabetes CMPs as most adoptable and depression CMPs as least adoptable. Within disease focus scales, patient reminders were ranked as the most adoptable CMP, while clinician feedback and patient education were ranked the least adoptable. Patterns of adoption indicate that innovation characteristics may influence adoption. CMP dissemination efforts may be strengthened by encouraging traditionally non-adopting organizations to focus on more adoptable practices first and then describing a pathway for the adoption of subsequent CMPs. Clarifying why certain CMPs are "less adoptable" may also provide

  10. Development of clinical process measures for pediatric burn care: Understanding variation in practice patterns.

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    Kazis, Lewis E; Sheridan, Robert L; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Lee, Austin F; Liang, Matthew H; Ryan, Colleen M; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Lydon, Martha; Soley-Bori, Marina; Sonis, Lily A; Dore, Emily C; Palmieri, Tina; Herndon, David; Meyer, Walter; Warner, Petra; Kagan, Richard; Stoddard, Frederick J; Murphy, Michael; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2018-04-01

    There has been little systematic examination of variation in pediatric burn care clinical practices and its effect on outcomes. As a first step, current clinical care processes need to be operationally defined. The highly specialized burn care units of the Shriners Hospitals for Children system present an opportunity to describe the processes of care. The aim of this study was to develop a set of process-based measures for pediatric burn care and examine adherence to them by providers in a cohort of pediatric burn patients. We conducted a systematic literature review to compile a set of process-based indicators. These measures were refined by an expert panel of burn care providers, yielding 36 process-based indicators in four clinical areas: initial evaluation and resuscitation, acute excisional surgery and critical care, psychosocial and pain control, and reconstruction and aftercare. We assessed variability in adherence to the indicators in a cohort of 1,076 children with burns at four regional pediatric burn programs in the Shriners Hospital system. The percentages of the cohort at each of the four sites were as follows: Boston, 20.8%; Cincinnati, 21.1%; Galveston, 36.0%; and Sacramento, 22.1%. The cohort included children who received care between 2006 and 2010. Adherence to the process indicators varied both across sites and by clinical area. Adherence was lowest for the clinical areas of acute excisional surgery and critical care, with a range of 35% to 48% across sites, followed by initial evaluation and resuscitation (range, 34%-60%). In contrast, the clinical areas of psychosocial and pain control and reconstruction and aftercare had relatively high adherence across sites, with ranges of 62% to 93% and 71% to 87%, respectively. Of the 36 process indicators, 89% differed significantly in adherence between clinical sites (p measures represents an important step in the assessment of clinical practice in pediatric burn care. Substantial variation was observed

  11. Foods served in child care facilities participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program: Menu match and agreement with the new meal patterns and best practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to assess the agreement of posted menus with foods served to 3- to 5-year-old children attending federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)-enrolled facilities, and the degree to which the facilities met the new meal patterns and best practices. On-site observations and menu...

  12. Osteoporosis practice patterns in 2006 among primary care physicians participating in the NORA study.

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    Weiss, T W; Siris, E S; Barrett-Connor, E; Miller, P D; McHorney, C A

    2007-11-01

    This study investigated osteoporosis management trends from 1998 to 2006 among 808 primary care physicians involved in the US-based NORA (National Osteoporosis Risk Assessment) study. These results suggest some significant improvements in osteoporosis management over the past eight years. The purpose of this study was to investigate osteoporosis management trends among a large cohort of primary care physicians (PCPs) involved in the US-based NORA (National Osteoporosis Risk Assessment) study. In 2006, we undertook a resurvey of the 2,836 NORA PCPs who completed a baseline survey in 1998. Of the 2,199 PCPs for whom we had current contact information and who were still practicing, we collected usable surveys from 808 (37% response rate). From 1998 to 2006, more than double the percentage of NORA PCPs reported using BMDs "often" (35% vs. 87%). There was a doubling of the percentage of NORA PCPs who reported that a T-score of NORA PCPs who reported using bone turnover markers to screen, diagnosis, or monitor osteoporosis almost tripled (19% vs. 55%). The percentage of patients prescribed or recommended hormone therapy dropped sixfold (67% to 11%), and the percentage of patients prescribed bisphosphonates increased fourfold from 15% to 59%. These results suggest some significant improvements in osteoporosis management over the past eight years.

  13. Patterns of radiotherapy practice for patients with squamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A patterns of care study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eifel, Patricia J.; Owen, Jean; Stouffer, Nicole O.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of evolving technology and the influence of published findings from retrospective and prospective studies on the patterns of radiotherapy practice for patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Materials and Methods: 66 institutions were randomly selected for the National Survey (NS) from a master list of all radiation facilities in the United States, proportionally stratified according to practice type. To study the potential influence of patient ethnicity on practice patterns, 12 additional facilities were selected for a Minority-Rich Survey (MRS) from a list of institutions that reported a high proportion of minority patients in their census. Each facility submitted a list of patients treated in 1992-94 with radiation for squamous carcinoma of the cervix. Patients who had clinical evidence of distance metastases or who were treated with initial hysterectomy were excluded. Patients were randomly selected from each institution for review. A total of 601 patients' records were reviewed in the treating institution by one of two trained research associates. Information was recorded about patients' characteristics, diagnostic evaluation, tumor extent, treatment approach, and radiotherapy techniques. Results: Of 601 patients, 31%, 40%, 24% and 4% had FIGO Stage I, II, III, or IV disease, respectively. 79% of women had a Karnofsky status ≥90 and 76% had a pre-treatment Hgb ≥10. Black women tended to have lower hemoglobin levels and a poorer performance status than Hispanic or non-Hispanic white patients although the distribution of tumors according to FIGO stage was similar for women of different ethnic groups. Diagnostic work-up included a CT scan in (411(516)) patients for whom information was available (80%). Of these, 61 (15%) were interpreted as showing evidence of nodal metastasis in either the abdomen or pelvis. Lymphangiogram or MRI were obtained in only 4% and 5% of patients, respectively. 104 patients had surgical

  14. Foods Served in Child Care Facilities Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program: Menu Match and Agreement with the New Meal Patterns and Best Practices.

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    Dave, Jayna M; Cullen, Karen W

    2018-02-20

    To assess the agreement of posted menus with foods served to 3- to 5-year-old children attending federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)-enrolled facilities, and the degree to which the facilities met the new meal patterns and best practices. On-site observations and menu coding. Nine early care and education centers. Agreement of posted menus with foods served, and comparison of foods served and consumed with the new CACFP meal guidelines and best practices. Data were compiled for each meal (breakfast, lunch, and snacks). Frequencies and percentages of agreement with the posted menu (coded matches, substitutions, additions, and omissions) were calculated for each food component in the CACFP menu guidelines. Menu total match was created by summing the menu match plus acceptable substitutions. Menus were compared with the new CACFP meal guidelines and best practices. The match between the posted menus and foods actually served to children at breakfast, lunch, and snack was high when the acceptable menu substitutions were considered (approximately 94% to 100% total match). Comparing the menus with the new meal guidelines and best practices, the 1 guideline that was fully implemented was serving only unflavored, low-fat, or 1% milk; fruit and vegetable guidelines were partially met; fruit juice was not served often, nor were legumes; the guideline for 1 whole grain-rich serving/d was not met; and regular beef and full-fat cheese products were commonly served. Early care and education centers enrolled in CACFP provided meals that met the current CACFP guidelines. Some menu improvements are needed for the centers to meet the new guidelines and best practices. Copyright © 2018 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns of brachytherapy practice for patients with carcinoma of the cervix (1996-1999): A Patterns of Care Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Beth; Eifel, Patricia; Moughan, Jennifer; Rownd, Jason M.S.; Iarocci, Thomas; Owen, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To analyze the details of brachytherapy practice in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix in the United States between 1996 and 1999. Methods and Materials: Radiation facilities were selected from a stratified random sample. Patients were randomly selected from lists of eligible patients treated at each facility. A total of 442 patients' records were reviewed in 59 facilities to obtain data about patients' characteristics, evaluation, tumor extent, and treatment. National estimates were made using weights that reflected the relative contribution of each institution and of each patient within the sampled institutions. From our survey we estimate that 16,375 patients were treated in the United States during this study period. Unless otherwise specified, brachytherapy practice was based on the 408 patients who had their brachytherapy or all their treatment at the surveyed facility. Results: A total of 91.5% of patients underwent brachytherapy at the initial treating institution; 8.5% were referred to a second site for brachytherapy. Forty-two percent of U.S. facilities referred at least some patients to a second facility for brachytherapy. Of U.S. facilities that treated ≤2 eligible patients per year, 61% referred all of their patients to a second facility for brachytherapy or treated with external RT alone; none of the U.S. facilities with larger experience (>2 eligible patients per year) referred all their patients to a second facility for brachytherapy treatment, but 28% referred some patients to an outside facility for brachytherapy. Overall, 94% of patients who completed treatment with curative intent received brachytherapy. Of these patients who had brachytherapy, 77.8%, 13.3%, and 0.9%, respectively, were treated with low-dose-rate (LDR), high-dose-rate (HDR), or a combination of HDR and LDR brachytherapy; 7.9% had interstitial brachytherapy (5.7% LDR and 1.9% HDR, 0.3% mixed). In facilities that treated >2 patients per year, 15

  16. Primary care access for mental illness in Australia: Patterns of access to general practice from 2006 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Louise M; Walker, Jennie; Harrison, Christopher; Banfield, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    General practice has an important role within the Australian healthcare system to provide access to care and effective management of chronic health conditions. However, people with serious mental illness experience challenges associated with service access. The current paper seeks to examine drivers of access to general practice for people with common and serious mental disorders, compared with people who access care for type II diabetes, a common physical health problem managed in general practice. The Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) programme provides the most comprehensive and objective measurement of general practitioner activity in Australia. Using BEACH data, this study compared general practice encounters for depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and type II diabetes during a 10-year period between 2006 and 2016. Analysis revealed more frequent encounters for depression compared to anxiety, and a higher representation of women in encounters for bipolar disorder compared to men. The relationship between number of encounters and patient age was strongly associated with the life course and mortality characteristics associated with each disorder. The findings highlight specific challenges associated with access to primary care for people with serious mental illness, and suggest areas of focus to improve the ability of these patients to access and navigate the health system.

  17. Assessing the link between health care utilisation in general practice and morbidity patterns in the elderly in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Anders; Kristensen, Troels; Ranstad, Karin

    important areas of healthcare utilisation in general practice in the Nordic countries. In the future, this demand for healthcare services among the elderly is expected to increase. For instance, it is likely that people live longer and advanced technologies continue to be developed, affecting demand...... and diabetes). Today we have limited information on the need for social services and health care services for the elderly in the Nordic countries. There is a need for improved understanding of variation in healthcare utilization and methods to measure the actual need for healthcare services among older......Objectives: The objective is to describe and analyze the prevalence of comorbidity and multimorbidity among older people with extensive and complex care needs. Next, the main objective is to present and discuss papers on the association between healthcare utilisation in general practice...

  18. Improving dementia diagnosis and management in primary care: a cohort study of the impact of a training and support program on physician competency, practice patterns, and community linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathren, Christine R; Sloane, Philip D; Hoyle, Joseph D; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Kaufer, Daniel I

    2013-12-10

    Primary care physicians routinely provide dementia care, but may lack the clinical skills and awareness of available resources to provide optimal care. We conducted a community-based pilot dementia training intervention designed to both improve clinical competency and increase utilization of local dementia care services. Physicians (N = 29) and affiliated staff (N = 24) participated in a one-day training program on dementia screening, diagnosis and management that included direct engagement with local support service providers. Questionnaires about their dementia care competency and referral patterns were completed before and 6 months after the training intervention. Physicians reported significantly higher overall confidence in their dementia care competency 6 months post-training compared to pre-training. The largest reported improvements were in their ability to educate patients and caregivers about dementia and making appropriate referrals to community care services. Participants also reported markedly increased use of cognitive screening tools in providing care. Community service providers recorded approximately 160 physician-initiated referrals over a 2 year-period post-training, compared to few beforehand. Combining a targeted physician practice-based educational intervention with community service engagement improves dementia care competency in clinicians and promotes linkages between clinical and community dementia care providers.

  19. Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Patients With Cervical Cancer in Japan, 2003-2005: Changing Trends in the Pattern of Care Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Natsuo, E-mail: ntomita@aichi-cc.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Shinoda, Atsunori [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Uno, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The patterns of care study (PCS) of radiotherapy for cervical cancer in Japan over the last 10 years was reviewed. Methods and Materials: The Japanese PCS working group analyzed data from 1,200 patients (1995-1997, 591 patients; 1999-2001, 324 patients; 2003-2005, 285 patients) with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy in Japan. Results: Patients in the 2001-2003 survey were significantly younger than those in the 1999-2001 study (p < 0.0001). Histology, performance status, and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage were not significantly different among the three survey periods. Use of combinations of chemotherapy has increased significantly during those periods (1995-1997, 24%; 1999-2001, 33%; 2003-2005, 54%; p < 0.0001). The ratio of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy has also dramatically increased (1995-1997, 20%; 1999-2001, 54%; 2003-2005, 83%; p < 0.0001). As for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), the application rate of four-field portals has greatly increased over the three survey periods (1995-1997, 2%; 1999-2001, 7%; 2003-2005, 21%; p < 0.0001). In addition, the use of an appropriate beam energy for EBRT has shown an increase (1995-1997, 67%; 1999-2001, 74%; 2003-2005, 81%; p = 0.064). As for intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), an iridium source has become increasingly popular (1995-1997, 27%; 1999-2001, 42%; 2003-2005, 84%; p < 0.0001). Among the three surveys, the ratio of patients receiving ICBT (1995-1997, 77%; 1999-2001, 82%; 2003-2005, 78%) has not changed. Although follow-up was inadequate in each survey, no significant survival differences were observed (p = 0.36), and rates of late Grade 3 or higher toxicity were significantly different (p = 0.016). Conclusions: The Japanese PCS has monitored consistent improvements over the past 10 years in the application of chemotherapy, timing of chemotherapy, and EBRT methods. However, there is still room for improvement, especially in the clinical

  20. Care Aides' Relational Practices and Caring Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Elizabeth A; Spiers, Jude

    2016-11-01

    residents. 2. Describe how nursing home managers can empower care aides to provide care. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The current study was a qualitative focused ethnography aimed at exploring the complexities of care; working environments; and knowledge, skills, and efforts of care aides who work in nursing homes. Over the past decade, dramatic shifts in staffing patterns in Canadian nursing homes have transformed care aides' assistive and caring roles. Care aides are now the central and most accessible service providers to nursing home residents. In the current article, the authors (a) conceptualize care aide work as caring rather than caring activities, (b) explore relational care as a foundational and significant component of care aide work, (c) interpret care aides' relational care practices through the lens of Swanson's Middle Range Theory of Caring, and (d) describe how nursing home managers can empower care aides to do this work. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(11), 24-30.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Pregnancy and care practices

    OpenAIRE

    ARÉVALO SÁNCHEZ, ELIZABETH

    2010-01-01

    The purposeofthisresearch istovalue thecarepractices that mothers perform on themselves and on the baby to whom she is going to give birth. 150 pregnant women that go to the Centro Operativo Local Engativá medical facility, registered on project 7317: "Preganant Families: healthy and desired babies of the Administrative DepartmentofSocialWellbeing", using a quantitative and descriptive methodology. We applied the "Instrument to value those care practices that are performed on themselves and o...

  2. Anesthesiologists' practice patterns for treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ambulatory Post Anesthesia Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claybon Louis

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When patients are asked what they find most anxiety provoking about having surgery, the top concerns almost always include postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV. Only until recently have there been any published recommendations, mostly derived from expert opinion, as to which regimens to use once a patient develops PONV. The goal of this study was to assess the responses to a written survey to address the following questions: 1 If no prophylaxis is administered to an ambulatory patient, what agent do anesthesiologists use for treatment of PONV in the ambulatory Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU?; 2 Do anesthesiologists use non-pharmacologic interventions for PONV treatment?; and 3 If a PONV prophylaxis agent is administered during the anesthetic, do anesthesiologists choose an antiemetic in a different class for treatment? Methods A questionnaire with five short hypothetical clinical vignettes was mailed to 300 randomly selected USA anesthesiologists. The types of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for PONV treatment were analyzed. Results The questionnaire was completed by 106 anesthesiologists (38% response rate, who reported that on average 52% of their practice was ambulatory. If a patient develops PONV and received no prophylaxis, 67% (95% CI, 62% – 79% of anesthesiologists reported they would administer a 5-HT3-antagonist as first choice for treatment, with metoclopramide and dexamethasone being the next two most common choices. 65% (95% CI, 55% – 74% of anesthesiologists reported they would also use non-pharmacologic interventions to treat PONV in the PACU, with an IV fluid bolus or nasal cannula oxygen being the most common. When PONV prophylaxis was given during the anesthetic, the preferred PONV treatment choice changed. Whereas 3%–7% of anesthesiologists would repeat dose metoclopramide, dexamethasone, or droperidol, 26% (95% confidence intervals, 18% – 36% of practitioners would re

  3. Health care provider experience with canagliflozin in real-world clinical practice: favorability, treatment patterns, and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolge SC

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan C Bolge,1 Natalia M Flores,2 Shu Huang,3 Jennifer Cai1 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, 2Kantar Health, Foster City, CA, 3Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Purpose: This study describes how health care providers approach canagliflozin for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in the real world.Patients and methods: An Internet-based questionnaire was completed by 101 endocrinologists, 101 primary care physicians, and 100 nurse practitioners/physician assistants (NP/PAs. Health care providers were required to have experience prescribing or managing patients using canagliflozin to be included in the study. Health care providers compared canagliflozin with other T2DM medication classes on clinical characteristics, costs, and patient satisfaction. Confidence in canagliflozin was also measured. Health care providers reported their canagliflozin prescribing experience and good candidate characteristics for treatment. Finally, providers reported on patient outcomes among those receiving canagliflozin. All variables were compared across provider type.Results: Health care providers reported higher favorability for canagliflozin for blood pressure and body weight compared with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors and higher favorability for effect on blood pressure, body weight, treatment satisfaction, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c compared with sulfonylureas (SUs, with differences observed for effect on blood pressure. Health care providers reported being very/extremely confident (55%–74% with canagliflozin as a second- to fourth-line treatment. The top 3 characteristics reported by the providers, in terms of describing a good candidate for canagliflozin, include those concerned about their weight, insurance coverage/affordability, and avoiding injectable treatments. Finally, providers reported often/always observing patients’ lowering or controlling HbA1c (82%–88% and improvement in overall

  4. Clinical and resource utilization patterns in patients with refractory neuropathic pain prescribed pregabalin for the first time in routine medical practice in primary care settings in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Concepción; Navarro, Ana; Saldaña, María T; Masramón, Xavier; Pérez, María; Rejas, Javier

    2013-12-01

    To describe clinical and resource utilization patterns in patients with refractory neuropathic pain (NeP) who were prescribed pregabalin for the first time in routine medical practice in primary care settings. Post-hoc analysis of a 12-week prospective observational study including pregabalin naïve adult patients with refractory chronic NeP of at least 6-months duration. Self-reported pain intensity, disability, sleep disturbances, symptoms of anxiety and depression, disability, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), health care resource utilization, and corresponding costs were assessed in this post-hoc analysis. One thousand three hundred fifty-four patients were enrolled in the study, and three treatment groups were identified: (1) 598 patients replaced prior pain treatments with pregabalin as monotherapy; (2) 589 added pregabalin to their existing pain treatments; and (3) 167 other pain treatments were prescribed according with physician routine medical practice. Statistically significant differences were reported at baseline for intensity of pain, patient disability, severity of depressive symptoms, and HRQoL (P use of direct and indirect resources vs the other groups, resulting in significantly higher quarterly overall costs per patient: €2,397 (2,308), €2,470 (1,857), and €3,110 (2,496), respectively (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that primary care physicians chose pregabalin as an option for treating refractory patients who tended to have much more severe NeP profiles, costing society more than when they chose other therapeutic strategies not including pregabalin. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Practice patterns in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, L M; Herrarias, C T; Sebring, R H

    1998-01-01

    To determine practice patterns of office-based pediatricians and neonatologists in the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in healthy, term newborns during 1992, before the publication of the practice guideline for treatment of neonatal jaundice by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The survey was undertaken to inform the AAP's Subcommittee on Hyperbilirubinemia on current practices and to aid it in its preparation of the guidelines. It was also anticipated that this survey would serve as a basis for comparison for a second survey to be performed several years after the publication of the practice guidelines. A self-administered questionnaire describing a single case of a jaundiced, breastfed 36-hour-old healthy, full-term infant with a total serum bilirubin concentration of 11.0 mg/dL (188 microM/L) was sent to a random sample of 600 office-based pediatricians and 606 neonatologists who were members of the AAP. The final response rate was 74%. Respondents were asked to answer questions regarding treatment of the case based on their actual practices. Ranges of total serum bilirubin concentration were provided as possible answers to questions on initiation of phototherapy and exchange transfusion, and interruption of breastfeeding. Respondents were also queried about frequency of serum bilirubin testing, locations of phototherapy administration, and factors influencing their therapeutic decisions. Four hundred forty-two office-based pediatricians and 444 neonatologists completed the survey. There was a tendency for neonatologists to initiate both phototherapy and exchange transfusions at lower serum bilirubin concentrations than office-based general pediatricians. At a serum bilirubin of 13 to 19 mg/dL (222 to 325 microM/L), 54% of office-based pediatricians stated they would initiate phototherapy whereas 76% of neonatologists would do so. Forty percent of office-based practitioners said they would perform exchange transfusions at serum bilirubin levels

  6. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  7. Integrated care: theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jonathan; Checkland, Kath; Kristensen, Søren Rud

    2016-10-01

    'Integrated care' is pitched as the solution to current health system challenges. In the literature, what integrated care actually involves is complex and contested. Multi-disciplinary team case management is frequently the primary focus of integrated care when implemented internationally. We examine the practical application of integrated care in the NHS in England to exemplify the prevalence of the case management focus. We look at the evidence for effectiveness of multi-disciplinary team case management, for the focus on high-risk groups and for integrated care more generally. We suggest realistic expectations of what integration of care alone can achieve and additional research questions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Practical dignity in caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shotton, L; Seedhouse, D

    1998-05-01

    It is difficult to understand the meaning of 'dignity' in human rights, bioethics and nursing literature because the word is used so vaguely. Unless dignity's meaning is spelt out it can disappear beneath more tangible priorities. In this article we define dignity and show how this can help health workers to maintain the dignity of people in their care.

  9. Caring finance practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe 2008 financial crisis has demonstrated the failure of both utilitarian and deontological ethics in finance. Alternatives do not need to be created from nothing, because the crisis itself has stimulated the emergence of ethically sound finance practices from within the sector. This

  10. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  11. Hemodialysis practice patterns in the Russia Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), with international comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbov, Boris; Bieber, Brian; Andrusev, Anton; Tomilina, Natalia; Zemchenkov, Alexander; Zhao, Junhui; Port, Friedrich; Robinson, Bruce; Pisoni, Ronald

    2017-07-01

    There is little comparable information about hemodialysis (HD) practices in low- and middle income countries, including Russia. Evaluation of HD in Russia and its international comparisons could highlight factors providing opportunities for improvement. We examined treatment patterns for 481 prevalent HD patients in 20 Russian facilities, and compared them to contemporary data for 8512 patients from 311 facilities in seven European countries, Japan, and North America. Data were collected according to the uniform methodology of the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study, phase 5. Compared to other regions, Russian patients were younger (mean age 53.4 years), had a lower percent of males (52.5%), higher arteriovenous fistula use (89.7%), and longer treatment time (mean: 252 minutes, SD: 37 minutes). Mean single pool Kt/V was 1.49 (SD 0.58). Prescription of dialysate calcium 3.5 mEq/L and aluminum-based phosphate binders were high (15.2% and 17.6% of patients, respectively), while intravenous vitamin D and cinacalcet were low (3.3% and 2.2%, respectively). The percents with parathyroid hormone >600 pg/mL (30.9%) and serum phosphate >1.78 mmol/L (37.7%) were high. Use of erythropoetin stimulating agents (78%) was lower, but hemoglobin, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were generally comparable to North America and Europe. These detailed data for hemodialysis in Russia demonstrate that many practice patterns contrasted sharply to those in Europe, Japan, and North America, while other features were similar. Our analysis revealed several positive and some less favorable treatment patterns in Russia that represent opportunities for improving patient care and outcomes. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  12. The Patterns of Care Survey of radiation therapy in localized prostate cancer: Similarities between the practice nationally and in minority-rich areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietman, Anthony; Moughan, Jennifer; Owen, Jean; Hanks, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Over the last two decades, the chance for the cure of localized prostate cancer by radiation has been improved by the widespread use of PSA for early detection and by a number of technical advances in treatment delivery. This study was designed to determine whether the stage of presentation and the quality of radiation treatment delivered are comparable between Caucasian and minority patients nationally and within minority-rich areas. Methods and Materials: A random survey conducted for the Patterns of Care Study in Radiation Oncology of 80 facilities treating patients with radiation in the USA. Of these, 67 comprise the 'National Survey' and 13 a 'Minority-Rich' survey (>40% of treated patients are minorities). Nine hundred twenty-six men with localized prostate cancer were treated in 1994. Five hundred ninety-five were in the national and 331 in the minority-rich survey. The main outcome measures were the clinical features of Caucasian and minority men at presentation and technical characteristics of the treatment delivered to them. Results: African-American men presented with more advanced disease (higher-presenting PSA and T-stage) than Caucasians in both the national and the minority-rich surveys. Hispanics also presented with later disease and could be grouped with African-American men rather than Caucasians. Overall the stage and PSA at presentation was earlier than seen in the previous Patterns of Care Study survey of 1989. The quality of treatment delivered has improved since 1989, with no distinction seen between those facilities sampled nationally and those within minority-rich areas. Conclusion: African-American and Hispanic men with prostate cancer present for therapy at a later stage than Caucasian men, but when they do, the treatment received is of comparable quality

  13. Newborn care practices in rural Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam MT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Tajul Islam,1 Nazrul Islam,2 Yukie Yoshimura,1 Monjura Khatun Nisha,3 Nawzia Yasmin4 1Safe Motherhood Promotion Project, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b; 4Department of Public Health, State University of Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh Background: Neonatal mortality is high in Bangladesh. Most of the neonatal deaths are preventable through simple and cost-effective essential newborn care interventions. Studies to document the determinants of unhealthy newborn care practices are scarce. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the pattern of neonatal care practices and their determinants in rural Bangladesh. Methodology: This study is based on baseline data of a community-based intervention to assess impact of limited postnatal care services on maternal and neonatal health-seeking behavior. Data from 510 women, who had a live birth at home 1 year prior to survey, of six randomly selected unions of an Upazila (subdistrict were analyzed. Results: Majority of the respondents were at an age group of 20–34 years. Only 6% had delivery by skilled providers. Immediate drying and wrapping, and giving colostrums to newborns were almost universal. Unhealthy practices, like unclean cord care (42%, delayed initiation of breastfeeding (60%, use of prelacteals (36%, and early bathing (71% were very common. Muslims were more likely to give early bath (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 2.01; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13–3.59; P=0.018 and delay in initiating breastfeeding (adjusted OR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.18–1.78; P<0.001 to newborns. Practice of giving prelacteals was associated with teenage mothers (adjusted OR: 2.26; 95% CI: 1.19–4.28; P=0.013 and women’s lack of education (adjusted OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.46–4.77; P=0

  14. Practicing discernment: pastoral care in crisis situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    This article correlates a particular experience of providing pastoral care for a person in a crisis situation with a particular understanding of the practice of pastoral care. Through engaging in correlative practical theology, it highlights the need for practicing discernment when providing pastoral care for persons utilizing narratives to work through crisis situations.

  15. Laravel design patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Kilicdagi, Arda

    2014-01-01

    This book is a practical guide packed with clear examples that will help you get to grips with the best practices in Laravel design patterns to create advanced web applications. This book is intended for web application developers working with Laravel who want to increase the efficiency of their web applications. It assumes that you have some experience with the Laravel PHP framework and are familiar with coding OOP methods.

  16. Home hemodialysis: beliefs, attitudes, and practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanti, Anuradha; Morris, Julie; Stenvinkel, Peter; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-10-01

    There is increasing interest of the worldwide kidney community in home hemodialysis (HHD). This is due to emerging evidence of its superiority over conventional hemodialysis (HD), largely attributed to improved outcomes on intensive schedule HD, best deployed in patient's own homes. Despite published work in this area, universal uptake remains limited and reasons are poorly understood. All those who provide HD care were invited to participate in a survey on HHD, initiated to understand the beliefs, attitudes, and practice patterns of providers offering this therapy. The survey was developed and posted on the Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation-Educational (NDT-E) website. Two hundred and seventy-two responses were deemed suitable for complete analysis. It is apparent from the survey that there is great variability in the prevalence of HHD. Physicians have a great deal of interest in this modality, with majority viewing home as being the ideal location for the offer of intensive HD schedules (55%). A significant number (21%) feel intensive HD may be offered even outside the home setting. Those who offer this therapy do not see a financial disadvantage in it. Many units identify lack of appropriately trained personnel (35%) and funding for home adaptation (50.4%) as key barriers to widespread adoption of this therapy. Despite the interest and belief in this therapy among practitioners, HHD therapy is still not within reach of a majority of patients. Modifiable organizational, physician, and patient factors exist, which could potentially redefine the landscape of HHD provision. Well-designed systematic research of national and local barriers is needed to design interventions to help centers facilitate change. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  17. Islamic Cultures: Health Care Beliefs and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Charles

    1996-01-01

    Presents an overview of Islamic health care beliefs and practices, noting health-related social and spiritual issues, fundamental beliefs and themes in Islam, health care beliefs and practices common among Muslims, and health-affecting social roles among Muslims. Cultural, religious, and social barriers to health care and ways to reduce them are…

  18. Django design patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ravindran, Arun

    2015-01-01

    If you want to learn how best to utilize commonly found patterns and learn best practices in developing applications with Django, this is the book for you. This book, like Django itself, is accessible to amateur and professional developers alike and assumes little in the way of prior experience. Although written for Python 3, the majority of the code in this book works in Python 2 or can be easily translated.

  19. Mobile technology: streamlining practice and improving care

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The use of mobile phones in care delivery has the potential to improve the way in which care is delivered. When implemented effectively, mobile technologies can empower patients and enhance communication between patients and their health-care providers. When barriers are recognised and addressed, mobile technologies can change working lives, facilitating rapid access to information and supporting efficiency in practice.

  20. Primary Care Practice: Uncertainty and Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    I will focus my comments on uncertainty and surprise in primary care practices. I am a medical anthropologist by training, and have been a full-time researcher in family medicine for close to twenty years. In this talk I want to look at primary care practices as complex systems, particularly taking the perspective of translating evidence into practice. I am going to discuss briefly the challenges we have in primary care, and in medicine in general, of translating new evidence into the everyday care of patients. To do this, I will look at two studies that we have conducted on family practices, then think about how practices can be best characterized as complex adaptive systems. Finally, I will focus on the implications of this portrayal for disseminating new knowledge into practice.

  1. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A continuing education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers' practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods: Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence,…

  2. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, David J., E-mail: david.hoopes@wpafb.af.mil [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, WPAFB, OH (United States); Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick [Air Force Institute of Technology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Weed, Daniel [Clarian Healthcare, Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Hale, E. Ronald [Wright-Patterson Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < {+-}2.3% for patients and < {+-}5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  3. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopes, David J.; Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick; Weed, Daniel; Smith, Benjamin D.; Hale, E. Ronald; Johnstone, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women’s preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  4. Prescribing patterns for upper respiratory tract infections: a prescription-review of primary care practice in Kedah, Malaysia, and the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezal, Rabiatul Salmi; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Alrasheedy, Alian A; Saleem, Fahad; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Kamal, Mardhiyah; Mohd Din, Rosminah; Godman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to ascertain current prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) to address potential overuse. A retrospective analysis was conducted of all prescriptions for URTIs among 10 public primary healthcare centers in Kedah, Malaysia, from 1 January to 31 March 2014. A total of 123,524 prescriptions were screened and analyzed. Of these, 7129 prescriptions were for URTI, with 31.8% (n = 2269) containing antibiotics. Macrolides were the most commonly prescribed antibiotic, constituting 61% (n = 1403) of total antibiotics prescribed. There was a statistically significant association between different prescribers and diagnoses (p = 0.001) and a weak positive trend suggesting family medicine specialists are more competent in antibiotic prescribing, followed by medical officers and assistant medical officers (τ = 0.122). Prescribing practices of some prescribers were inconsistent with current guidelines encouraging resistance development. National antimicrobial stewardship programs and further educational initiatives are ongoing in Malaysia to improve antibiotic use.

  5. practice gap in critical care nursing students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guided reflection as a tool to deal with the theory– practice gap in critical care ... was used during semi-structured interviews during the data collection process. ... a description of incidents experienced, critical analysis of knowledge, critical ...

  6. Dentists’ practice patterns regarding caries prevention: results from a dental practice-based research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yoko; Kakudate, Naoki; Sumida, Futoshi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) quantify dentists' practice patterns regarding caries prevention and (2) test the hypothesis that certain dentists' characteristics are associated with these practice patterns. Design The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey. Participants The study queried dentists who worked in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan, which seeks to engage dentists in investigating research questions and sharing experiences and expertise (n=282). Measurement Dentists were asked about their practice patterns regarding caries preventive dentistry. Background data on patients, practice and dentist were also collected. Results 38% of dentists (n=72) provided individualised caries prevention to more than 50% of their patients. Overall, 10% of the time in daily practice was spent on caries preventive dentistry. Dentists who provided individualised caries prevention to more than 50% of their patients spent significantly more time on preventive care and less time on removable prosthetics treatment, compared to dentists who did not provide individualised caries prevention. Additionally, they provided oral hygiene instruction, patient education, fluoride recommendations, intraoral photographs taken and diet counselling to their patients significantly more often than dentists who did not provide individualised caries prevention. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that the percentage of patients interested in caries prevention and the percentage of patients who received hygiene instruction, were both associated with the percentage of patients who receive individualised caries prevention. Conclusions We identified substantial variation in dentists' practice patterns regarding preventive dentistry. Individualised caries prevention was significantly related to provision of other preventive services and to having a higher percentage

  7. Client Involvement in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone

    2013-01-01

    Client involvement’ has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how ‘client involvement’ is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse ‘client involvement’ in practise seen fr...... in public home-care practice remains limited...

  8. Diabetes care provision in UK primary care practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Hawthorne

    Full Text Available Although most people with Type 2 diabetes receive their diabetes care in primary care, only a limited amount is known about the quality of diabetes care in this setting. We investigated the provision and receipt of diabetes care delivered in UK primary care.Postal surveys with all healthcare professionals and a random sample of 100 patients with Type 2 diabetes from 99 UK primary care practices.326/361 (90.3% doctors, 163/186 (87.6% nurses and 3591 patients (41.8% returned a questionnaire. Clinicians reported giving advice about lifestyle behaviours (e.g. 88% would routinely advise about calorie restriction; 99.6% about increasing exercise more often than patients reported having received it (43% and 42% and correlations between clinician and patient report were low. Patients' reported levels of confidence about managing their diabetes were moderately high; a median (range of 21% (3% to 39% of patients reporting being not confident about various areas of diabetes self-management.Primary care practices have organisational structures in place and are, as judged by routine quality indicators, delivering high quality care. There remain evidence-practice gaps in the care provided and in the self confidence that patients have for key aspects of self management and further research is needed to address these issues. Future research should use robust designs and appropriately designed studies to investigate how best to improve this situation.

  9. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    Concern about obesity has prompted numerous public health campaigns that urge people to be more physically active. The campaigns often include normative statements and attempt to impose restrictions on individuals' lives without considering the complexities of daily life. We suggest that broadening...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday lives....... Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for public...

  10. Sexual practices and their development pattern among jimma university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambaw, Fentie; Mossie, Andualem; Gobena, Teshome

    2010-11-01

    Traditional views of sexual behaviors are frequently changing as the factors influencing them are changing. Therefore, assessing sexual practices that are not part of the tradition would be necessary. The objective of this study was to identify the types of sexual practices, their development pattern and how these development patterns expose students to sexually transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancy. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a sample of 1986 (1612 males, 365 females, and with 9 subjects' gender not indicated) Jimma university students in August 2009 with their age ranging from 17-45 years (median = 20). Quantitative data was collected using a piloted, precoded questionnaire and qualitative data was collected from six focus group discussions. Logistic regression and descriptive statistics were computed and qualitative findings were triangulated with quantitative findings. P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Practice of penile to vaginal intercourse, masturbation, kissing, oral sex, and anal sex were reported by 567 (28.9%), 688 (36.7%), 840 (42.4%), 179 (9.2%) and 83 (4.3%) of the respondents, respectively. Respondents had two years (one year with and one year without condom) of sexual experience before marriage. Sixty percent of those who had sexual experience were exposed to sexually transmitted infections and 46.6% were exposed to both unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Forty seven percent of those who practiced oral sex and 29% of those who practiced anal sex did not consider their acts as sexual intercourse. University students are high risk groups that need more focused research and concerted health care. The term 'sexual intercourse' should be consciously defined for its future use in Ethiopia. Furthermore, Service providers and researchers should address all types of sexual practices.

  11. Practice Patterns of Dentist Anesthesiologists in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrew S; Fischer, Michael W; Lang, Nicholas S; Cooke, Matthew R

    2018-01-01

    This study provides trends in the discipline of dental anesthesiology. A questionnaire-based survey was sent to 338 members of the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists to evaluate practice patterns. One focus of the study was modality of sedation/anesthesia used for dentistry in North America. Age, gender, years in practice, and geographic region of practice were also obtained. Data gathered from the returned questionnaires were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and then imported into JMP Statistical Discovery Software (v12.2 Pro) for descriptive analysis. A total of 112 surveys were completed electronically and 102 surveys were returned via post, for a total response rate of 63.3% ( N = 214). Data from this survey suggested a wide variation of therapeutic practices among dentist anesthesiologists in North America. Of the surveyed dentist anesthesiologists, 58.7% (SE = 4.2%) practice as mobile providers, 32.2% (SE = 3.1%) provide care in an academic environment, and 27.7% (SE = 2.8%) function as operator/anesthetists. The majority of anesthesia is provided for pediatric dentistry (47.0%, SE = 4.2%), oral and maxillofacial surgery (18.5%, SE = 3.9%), and special needs (16.7%, SE = 3.6%). Open-airway (58.7%, SE = 5.5%) sedation/anesthesia was the preferred modality of delivery, compared with the use of advanced airway (41.3%, SE = 4.6%). The demographics show diverse practice patterns of dentist anesthesiologists in multiple regions of the continent. Despite concerns regarding specialty recognition, reimbursement difficulties, and competition from alternative anesthesia providers, the overall perceptions of dentist anesthesiologists and the future of the field seem largely favorable.

  12. Practice patterns and organizational commitment of inpatient nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Janet; Brennan, Mary; Musil, Carol M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2016-07-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) deliver a wide array of healthcare services in a variety of settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the practice patterns and organizational commitment of inpatient NPs. A quantitative design was used with a convenience sample (n = 183) of NPs who attended the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) national conference. The NPs were asked to complete a demographic questionnaire, the Practice Patterns of Acute Nurse Practitioners tool and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Over 85% of inpatient practice time consists of direct and indirect patient care activities. The remaining nonclinical activities of education, research, and administration were less evident in the NP's workweek. This indicates that the major role of inpatient NPs continues to be management of acutely ill patients. Moderate commitment was noted in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Supportive hospital/nursing leadership should acknowledge the value of the clinical and nonclinical roles of inpatient NPs as they can contribute to the operational effectiveness of their organization. By fostering the organizational commitment behaviors of identification, loyalty, and involvement, management can reap the benefits of these professionally dedicated providers. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Nursing Practice in Primary Care and Patients' Experience of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Brault, Isabelle; Pineault, Raynald; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Prud'homme, Alexandre; D'Amour, Danielle

    2018-01-01

    Nurses are identified as a key provider in the management of patients in primary care. The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' experience of care in primary care as it pertained to the nursing role. The aim was to test the hypothesis that, in primary health care organizations (PHCOs) where patients are systematically followed by a nurse, and where nursing competencies are therefore optimally used, patients' experience of care is better. Based on a cross-sectional analysis combining organizational and experience of care surveys, we built 2 groups of PHCOs. The first group of PHCOs reported having a nurse who systematically followed patients. The second group had a nurse who performed a variety of activities but did not systematically follow patients. Five indicators of care were constructed based on patient questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariate linear mixed models with random intercepts and with patients nested within were used to analyze the experience of care indicators in both groups. Bivariate analyses revealed a better patient experience of care in PHCOs where a nurse systematically followed patients than in those where a nurse performed other activities. In multivariate analyses that included adjustment variables related to PHCOs and patients, the accessibility indicator was found to be higher. Results indicated that systematic follow-up of patients by nurses improved patients' experience of care in terms of accessibility. Using nurses' scope of practice to its full potential is a promising avenue for enhancing both patients' experience of care and health services efficiency.

  14. Security patterns in practice designing secure architectures using software patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Buglioni, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Learn to combine security theory and code to produce secure systems Security is clearly a crucial issue to consider during the design and implementation of any distributed software architecture. Security patterns are increasingly being used by developers who take security into serious consideration from the creation of their work. Written by the authority on security patterns, this unique book examines the structure and purpose of security patterns, illustrating their use with the help of detailed implementation advice, numerous code samples, and descriptions in UML. Provides

  15. A practice-centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palla Shana L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions to change practice patterns among health care professionals have had mixed success. We tested the effectiveness of a practice centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices. Methods A multifaceted intervention was conducted among primary care practice in North Carolina. All practices designated two individuals to serve as domestic violence resources persons, underwent initial training on screening for domestic violence, and participated in 3 lunch and learn sessions. Within this framework, practices selected the screening instrument, patient educational material, and content best suited for their environment. Effectiveness was evaluated using a pre/post cross-sectional telephone survey of a random selection of female patients from each practice. Results Seventeen practices were recruited and fifteen completed the study. Baseline screening for domestic violence was 16% with a range of 2% to 49%. An absolute increase in screening of 10% was achieved (range of increase 0 to 22%. After controlling for clustering by practice and other patient characteristics, female patients were 79% more likely to have been screened after the intervention (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.43–2.23. Conclusion An intervention that allowed practices to tailor certain aspects to fit their needs increased screening for domestic violence. Further studies testing this technique using other outcomes are needed.

  16. Patient stoma care: educational theory in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jenny

    Patients undergoing stoma formation encounter many challenges including psychosocial issues, relationship concerns and fear of leakage. Leakage, inappropriate product usage and poor patient adaptation post stoma formation has cost implications for the NHS. Developing good, practical stoma care skills has been identified as improving patient outcomes, promoting the provision of quality care and improving efficiency within the NHS. However, a thorough literature search indicated that there is little research available on patient stoma care education. This is considered surprising by Metcalf (1999), O'Connor (2005) and the author of this article. This article considers and adapts generic educational theory to make it pertinent to patient stoma care education in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  17. Translating person-centered care into practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided...... tools. CONCLUSION: Each approach has a primary application: MI, when ambivalence threatens positive change; IIS, when integrating newly diagnosed chronic conditions; and GSD, when problem solving is difficult, or deadlocked. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Professionals must critically consider the context...

  18. Assessment of pharmaceutical care practices of community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We undertook to assess the pharmaceutical care practices of community pharmacists in patients with co-morbidity of hypertension and diabetes in Delta State. A seventeen item questionnaire consisting of 5 points response scale was developed and administered to pharmacists in the community setting. The questionnaire ...

  19. Association of Group Prenatal Care in US Family Medicine Residencies With Maternity Care Practice: A CERA Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Wendy B; Tong, Sebastian T; LeFevre, Nicholas M

    2017-03-01

    Group prenatal care has been shown to improve both maternal and neonatal outcomes. With increasing adaption of group prenatal care by family medicine residencies, this model may serve as a potential method to increase exposure to and interest in maternity care among trainees. This study aims to describe the penetration, regional and program variations, and potential impacts on future maternity care practice of group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies. The CAFM Educational Research Alliance (CERA) conducted a survey of all US family medicine residency program directors in 2013 containing questions about maternity care training. A secondary data analysis was completed to examine relevant data on group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies and maternity care practice patterns. 23.1% of family medicine residency programs report provision of group prenatal care. Programs with group prenatal care reported increased number of vaginal deliveries per resident. Controlling for average number of vaginal deliveries per resident, programs with group prenatal care had a 2.35 higher odds of having more than 10% of graduates practice obstetrics and a 2.93 higher odds of having at least one graduate in the past 5 years enter an obstetrics fellowship. Residency programs with group prenatal care models report more graduates entering OB fellowships and practicing maternity care. Implementing group prenatal care in residency training can be one method in a multifaceted approach to increasing maternity care practice among US family physicians.

  20. A STUDY OF DISEASE PATTERN AND OUTCOME OF NEWBORNS ADMITTED TO NICU IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Saranappa; Madhu; Ritesh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Advances in perinatal and neonatal care have significantly reduced neonatal mortality rates and have benefited preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units. Analysis of care practices can provide insights into how care practices might be changed to improve outcomes. OBJECTIVE : 1. To study the disease pattern , outcome and factors contributing to mortality of the newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of a tertia...

  1. Design and application of a theory-based case/care management model for home care: advanced practice for nurses as care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Nancy A

    2002-01-01

    Case management has developed in a variety of health care, social service, and insurance industries. Its historical pattern of development has resulted in practices that are generally administrative and technical in nature as well as being relatively generic and often undifferentiated between being a role and process. Research over the last decade has resulted in the opportunity to move case management practice for home care into a structured theory-based model and practice. Design and implementation of a specialized advanced practice care management model reflective of care management research and theory design by British researchers is beginning to show clinical and systemic results that should be replicable in other regions.

  2. Practical multimodal care for cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Matthew; Hopkinson, Jane; Conibear, John; Reeves, Annie; Shaw, Clare; Fearon, Ken C H

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is common and reduces function, treatment tolerability and quality of life. Given its multifaceted pathophysiology a multimodal approach to cachexia management is advocated for, but can be difficult to realise in practice. We use a case-based approach to highlight practical approaches to the multimodal management of cachexia for patients across the cancer trajectory. Four cases with lung cancer spanning surgical resection, radical chemoradiotherapy, palliative chemotherapy and no anticancer treatment are presented. We propose multimodal care approaches that incorporate nutritional support, exercise, and anti-inflammatory agents, on a background of personalized oncology care and family-centred education. Collectively, the cases reveal that multimodal care is part of everyone's remit, often focuses on supported self-management, and demands buy-in from the patient and their family. Once operationalized, multimodal care approaches can be tested pragmatically, including alongside emerging pharmacological cachexia treatments. We demonstrate that multimodal care for cancer cachexia can be achieved using simple treatments and without a dedicated team of specialists. The sharing of advice between health professionals can help build collective confidence and expertise, moving towards a position in which every team member feels they can contribute towards multimodal care.

  3. Understanding practice patterns of glaucoma sub-specialists in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil S. Choudhari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To obtain information on the prevailing practice patterns of glaucoma specialists in India. METHODS: Glaucoma specialists attending the Annual Conference of the Glaucoma Society of India (GSI were surveyed. This survey, conducted in 2013, was based on an interactive audience response system. RESULTS: The information was obtained from 146 glaucoma specialists. Approximately half (n=83; 57% had ≥10y of experience in managing glaucoma and were in institutional practice (n=74, 51%. Goldmann applanation tonometry was preferred by 103 (72% specialists whilst n=25 (17.4% used non-contact tonometer. Indentation gonioscopy was favoured by two-thirds (n=90, 66% whereas stereoscopic optic disc examination and visual fields using Humphrey perimeter was performed by a majority of the specialists surveyed (n=115, 86% and n=114; 83% respectively. Nearly three quarter specialists (n=96; 72% preferred optical coherence tomography for imaging. The primary choice for treatment of angle closure disease and primary open angle glaucoma was laser (iridotomy, n=117; 93% and medical management (prostaglandin analogue, n=104; 78%, respectively. Approximately only a third of the specialists surveyed (n=37; 28% were performing both trabeculectomy and implantation of a glaucoma drainage device and about half (n=64; 47% were not operating on congenital glaucoma at all. CONCLUSION: This survey has found conformance with preferred practice patterns in several areas of diagnosis and management of glaucoma, but there was diversity in a few areas. The information is a significant step towards improvement of glaucoma care in India, including planning for future strategies.

  4. How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care: Four Patterns from the Canadian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeremy; Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie A; Morgan, Jeff; Adams, Krystyna

    2017-06-01

    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling across international borders with the intention of accessing medical care, paid for out-of-pocket. This practice has implications for preferential access to medical care for Canadians both through inbound and outbound medical tourism. In this paper, we identify four patterns of medical tourism with implications for preferential access to care by Canadians: (1) Inbound medical tourism to Canada's public hospitals; (2) Inbound medical tourism to a First Nations reserve; (3) Canadian patients opting to go abroad for medical tourism; and (4) Canadian patients traveling abroad with a Canadian surgeon. These patterns of medical tourism affect preferential access to health care by Canadians by circumventing domestic regulation of care, creating jurisdictional tensions over the provision of health care, and undermining solidarity with the Canadian health system.

  5. Translation of oral care practice guidelines into clinical practice by intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Freda DeKeyser; Ofra, Raanan; Khalaila, Rabia; Levy, Hadassa; Arad, Dana; Kolpak, Orly; Ben Nun, Maureen; Drori, Yardena; Benbenishty, Julie

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a change in the oral care practices of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses for ventilated patients after a national effort to increase evidence-based oral care practices. Descriptive comparison of ICU nurses in 2004-2005 and 2012. Two convenience national surveys of ICU nurses were collected in 2004-2005 (n = 218) and 2012 (n = 233). After the results of the initial survey were reported, a national effort to increase awareness of evidence-based oral care practices was conducted that included in-service presentations; publication of an evidence-based protocol in a national nursing journal; publication of the survey findings in an international nursing journal; and reports to the local press. A repeat survey was conducted 7 to 8 years later. The same survey instrument was used for both periods of data collection. This questionnaire included questions about demographic and personal characteristics and a checklist of oral care practices. Nurses rated their perceived priority level concerning oral care on a scale from 0 to 100. An evidence-based practice (EBP)[O4] score was computed representing the sum of 14 items related to equipment, solutions, assessments, and techniques associated with the evidence. The EBP score, priority score, and oral care practices were compared between the two samples. A regression model was built based on those variables that were associated with the EBP score in 2012. There was a statistically significant increase in the use of EBPs as shown by the EBP score and in the perceived priority level of oral care. Increased EBPs were found in the areas of teeth brushing and oral assessment. Decreases were found in the use of non-evidence-based practices, such as the use of gauze pads, tongue depressors, lemon water, and sodium bicarbonate. No differences were found in the use of chlorhexidine, toothpaste, or the nursing documentation of oral care practices. A multiple regression model was

  6. Culture care meanings, beliefs, and practices in Rural Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Gretchen

    2010-04-01

    This ethnonursing study explored the meanings, beliefs, and practices of care for rural Dominicans in the Dominican Republic. Leininger's culture care diversity and universality theory, ethnonursing, and four-phase analysis method guided the study. Interviews were conducted with 19 general and 10 key informants. Analysis of interviews revealed three main themes: (a) family presence is essential for meaningful care experiences and care practices, (b) respect and attention are central to the meaning of care and care practices, and (c) rural Dominicans value and use both generic (folk) and professional care practices. Implications and recommendations for nursing practice, education, and research are described.

  7. Changing policies, changing patterns of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Szebehely, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Despite pursuing the policy of ageing in place, the two Nordic countries of Denmark and Sweden have taken diverse roads in regard to the provision of formal, public tax-financed home care for older people. Whilst Sweden has cut down home care and targeted services for the most needy, Denmark has...... continued the generous provision of home care. This article focuses on the implication of such diverse policies for the provision and combination of formal and informal care resources for older people. Using data from Level of Living surveys (based on interviews with a total of 1,158 individuals aged 67...... countries tax-funded home care is used across social groups but targeting of resources at the most needy in Sweden creates other inequalities: Older people with shorter education are left with no one to resort to but the family, whilst those with higher education purchase help from market providers...

  8. Reshaping supervisory practice in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knollmueller, R N

    1988-06-01

    Reshaping supervisory practice in home care is not an if but a when issue. We need the best wisdom in how to reshape the practice so that it builds on the experience of the individual and the agency. It is time to deliberately plan to change from the paper-shuffling tendency among supervisors toward supporting more people-oriented activity and to rediscover the pivotal role that supervisors have in keeping a community healthy, staff stimulated, and the agency solvent. Some summary points to consider in reshaping supervisory practice include: (1) redefine supervision to reflect what is desired, needed, and possible, (2) recognize the contribution from change theory and apply it, (3) recapture the commitment and philosophy of supervision from the past, (4) reward the supervisor commensurate with the scope of practice expected, (5) reverse selection of supervisors from preservers of territory to manager as idea entrepreneur, (6) respond to varying and dynamic models of supervisory practice, (7) recharge the supervisor through timely in-service programs, continuing education, and formal academic study, (8) require educational content and practice from colleges and universities that stimulate creative supervisory skills and improve job satisfaction, (9) respect the work of the supervisor and provide appropriate support to achieve success, (10) reconsider current supervisory models and expand opportunities for professional growth among staff, and (11) reshape the supervisory role from one of controller to facilitator and innovator.

  9. Enhancing High Value Care in Gastroenterology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Katzka, David A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this review is to identify common areas in gastroenterology practice where studies performed provide an opportunity for enhancing value or lowering costs. We provide examples of topics in gastroenterology where clinicians could enhance value by either using less invasive testing, choosing a single best test, or by using patient symptoms to guide additional testing. The topics selected for review are selected in esophageal, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer; functional gastrointestinal diseases (irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth, constipation); immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases; and pancreaticobiliary pathology. We propose guidance to alter practice based on current evidence. These studies support the need to review current practice and to continue performing research to further validate the proposed guidance to enhance value of care in gastroenterology and hepatology. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Patterns, principles, and practices of domain-driven design

    CERN Document Server

    Millett, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Methods for managing complex software construction following the practices, principles and patterns of Domain-Driven Design with code examples in C# This book presents the philosophy of Domain-Driven Design (DDD) in a down-to-earth and practical manner for experienced developers building applications for complex domains. A focus is placed on the principles and practices of decomposing a complex problem space as well as the implementation patterns and best practices for shaping a maintainable solution space. You will learn how to build effective domain models through the use of tactical pat

  11. Appcelerator Titanium patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Pollentine, Boydlee

    2013-01-01

    The book takes a step-by-step approach to help you understand CommonJS and Titanium architecture patterns, with easy to follow samples and plenty of in-depth explanations If you're an existing Titanium developer or perhaps a new developer looking to start off your Titanium applications "the right way", then this book is for you. With easy to follow examples and a full step-by-step account of architecting a sample application using CommonJS and MVC, along with chapters on new features such as ACS, you'll be implementing enterprise grade Titanium solutions in no time. You should have some JavaSc

  12. Personalized health care: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyderman, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    The practice of medicine stands at the threshold of a transformation from its current focus on the treatment of disease events to an emphasis on enhancing health, preventing disease and personalizing care to meet each individual's specific health needs. Personalized health care is a new and strategic approach that is driven by personalized health planning empowered by personalized medicine tools, which are facilitated by advances in science and technology. These tools improve the capability to predict health risks, to determine and quantify the dynamics of disease development, and to target therapeutic approaches to the needs of the individual. Personalized health care can be implemented today using currently available technologies and know-how and thereby provide a market for the rational introduction of new personalized medicine tools. The need for early adoption of personalized health care stems from the necessity to reduce the egregious and wasteful burden of preventable chronic diseases, which is not effectively addressed by our current approach to care. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Identifying the factors influencing practice variation in thrombosis medicine: A qualitative content analysis of published practice-pattern surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeith, Leslie; Gonsalves, Carol

    2017-11-01

    Practice variation, the differences in clinical management between physicians, is one reason why patient outcomes may differ. Identifying factors that contribute to practice variation in areas of clinical uncertainty or equipoise may have implications for understanding and improving patient care. To discern what factors may influence practice variation, we completed a qualitative content analysis of all practice-pattern surveys in thrombosis medicine in the last 10years. Out of 2117 articles screened using a systematic search strategy, 33 practice-pattern surveys met eligibility criteria. Themes were identified using constant comparative analysis of qualitative data. Practice variation was noted in all 33 practice-pattern surveys. Contributing factors to variation included lack of available evidence, lack of clear and specific guideline recommendations, past experience, patient context, institutional culture and the perceived risk and benefit of a particular treatment. Additional themes highlight the value placed on expertise in challenging clinical scenarios, the complexity of practice variation and the value placed on minimizing practice variation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Determinants of practice patterns in pediatric UTI management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selekman, R E; Allen, I E; Copp, H L

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) affects 10% of girls and 3% of boys by age 16. Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Guidelines recommend urine testing prior to initiation of antibiotic treatment and the use of local antibiograms to guide empiric antibiotic therapy. Urine culture results not only provide the opportunity to halt empiric therapy if there is no bacterial growth, but also allow for tailoring of broad-spectrum therapy. Additionally, the use of antiobiograms improves empiric antibiotic selection based on local resistance patterns. However, execution of guideline recommendations has proved challenging. Understanding barriers in implementation is critical to developing targeted interventions aimed to improve adherence to these guidelines. The present study sought to investigate practice patterns and factors that influence urine testing and antibiogram use in the setting of empiric antibiotic treatment of UTI in children to ultimately improve adherence to UTI management guidelines. A random, national sample of physicians caring for children was surveyed from the American Medical Association Masterfile. Participants were queried regarding practice type, length of time in practice, factors influencing urine testing, urine specimen collection method, and antibiogram utilization. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with use of urine testing, bagged specimens, and antibiograms. Of respondents who acknowledged contact by surveyors, 47% completed the survey (n = 366). Most respondents (84%) obtain urinalysis and culture prior to treatment for UTI. Physicians report they would more likely order testing if the specimen were easier to collect (46%) and if results were available immediately (48%) (Table). Urine collection by bag was more common in circumcised boys (>30%) compared with girls (20%) and uncircumcised boys (20%) (P = 0.02). The most common reasons for collection by bag

  15. Fatherhood, gender equality and care practices in Italy and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosoni, Maria Letizia; Westerling, Allan

    2018-01-01

    in the chapter, by reviewing policies and secondary data analysis, will be: How are current political agendas and welfare services aimed at changing care patterns and gender equality in family life, and how are these policies and provisions transforming fatherhood and fathering practices? How are these new......A growing scientific literature suggests changes in fatherhood. However, the extent to which this indicates a shift away from male breadwinner model is under debate across Europe. Thus, it is interesting to reflect on how paternal practices and gender models are evolving. This contribution...... will address the debate about fatherhood and gender roles by comparing two countries, Italy and Denmark, marked by relevant differences in terms of policies and practices related to fatherhood and childcare. Yet both countries are still facing the work and family balance issue. The question addressed...

  16. Health promotion practices in primary care groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Ivonete Teresinha Schulter Buss; Alonso da Costa, Maria Fernanda Baeta Neves; Hermida, Patrícia Madalena Vieira; Marçal, Cláudia Cossentino Bruck; Antonini, Fabiano Oliveira; Cypriano, Camilla Costa

    2018-04-01

    This is a descriptive-exploratory study using a qualitative approach, conducted in ten municipalities in southern Brazil. Data were obtained by talking to 21 nurses from February to November 2012, through semi-structured interviews using questions to probe their health promotion practices. Data were analyzed through thematic analysis focused on health promotion concepts. We identified four themes about health promotion practices of family health nurses in Brazil: a) training of nurses for health promotion practice was weak; b) nurses formed health promotion groups around diseases and life stages; c) nurses formed groups to meet community needs; and d) nurses used health promotion techniques in group work. These family health nurses were somewhat aware of the importance of health promotion, and how to assist the population against various ailments using some health promotion strategies. The main weaknesses were the lack of understanding about health promotion concepts, and the difficulty of understanding the relevance of its practice, probably attributable to limitations in training. We conclude that primary care groups in Brazil's unified health system could do better in applying health promotion concepts in their practice.

  17. Practice pattern variation in surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijsselmuiden, M.N.; Detollenaere, R.J.; Kampen, M.Y.; Engberts, M.K.; Eijndhoven, H.W. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Practice pattern variation (PPV) is the difference in care that cannot be explained by the underlying medical condition. The aim of this study was to describe PPV among Dutch gynecologists regarding treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence (UI). MATERIALS AND

  18. Patterns of maternity care service utilization in Southern Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patterns of maternity care service utilization in Southern Ethiopia: Evidence from a community ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Result: The study revealed that only 26.1 % and 3.3% of the women received antenatal and ...

  19. Top studies relevant to primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Danielle; Kolber, Michael R; Korownyk, Christina; Lindblad, Adrienne J; Ramji, Jamil; Ton, Joey; Allan, G Michael

    2018-04-01

    To summarize 10 high-quality studies from 2017 that have strong relevance to primary care practice. Study selection involved routine literature surveillance by a group of primary care health professionals. This included screening abstracts of important journals and Evidence Alerts, as well as searching the American College of Physicians Journal Club. Topics of the 2017 articles include whether treating subclinical hypothyroidism improves outcomes or symptoms; whether evolocumab reduces cardiovascular disease as well as low-density lipoprotein levels; whether lifestyle interventions reduce medication use in patients with diabetes; whether vitamin D prevents cardiovascular disease, cancer, or upper respiratory tract infections; whether canagliflozin reduces clinical events in patients with diabetes; how corticosteroid injections affect knee osteoarthritis; whether drained abscesses benefit from antibiotic treatment; whether patients with diabetes benefit from bariatric surgery; whether exenatide reduces clinical events in patients with diabetes; and whether tympanostomy tubes affect outcomes in recurrent acute otitis media or chronic otitis media. We provide brief summaries, context where needed, and final recommendations for 10 studies with potential effects on primary care. We also briefly review 5 "runner-up" studies. Research from 2017 produced several high-quality studies in diabetes management. These have demonstrated benefit for alternative therapies and offered evidence not previously available. This year's selection of studies also provided information on a variety of conditions and therapies that are, or might become, more common in primary care settings. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  20. Pregnancy After Bariatric Surgery: National Survey of Obstetrician's Comfort, Knowledge, and Practice Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Marcela C; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Mcelwain, Cora-Ann; Volckmann, Eric T; Schulkin, Jay; Stuebe, Alison M

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to survey a nationally representative sample of obstetricians regarding comfort, knowledge, and practice patterns of caring for pregnant women after bariatric surgery. We conducted an online survey of US obstetricians and describe obstetrician's demographics, practice settings, and practice patterns. We assessed respondent's knowledge and recommended practices. We compared provider knowledge by years since completing residency, scope of practice (generalist or specialist), and practice setting (academic setting or other). Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. A total of 106 completed the survey (response rate of 54%). Respondents had a median age of 47 and median 17 years in practice. Sixty-two percent were generalists. Nearly all of the respondents (94%) had some experience with caring for pregnant women after bariatric surgery and 83% reported feeling "very comfortable" (48%) or "somewhat comfortable" (35%) providing care for this population. Most (74%) were aware of increased risk of small for gestational age after surgery. Only 13% were able to correctly identify all recommended nutritional labs and 20% reported that they "did not know" which labs are recommended. There were no differences in comfort, experience, knowledge, and practice patterns by physician characteristics and practice settings. While most obstetricians are aware of perinatal risks after bariatric surgery, a substantial percentage of obstetricians are unaware of recommended practices regarding nutrition and nutritional monitoring. As bariatric surgery becomes increasingly prevalent among reproductive age women, educational interventions to increase obstetricians' knowledge of optimal care of pregnant women after bariatric surgery are urgently needed.

  1. Client Involvement in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone

    2013-01-01

    , political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: ‘Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care’; ‘Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life......’; ‘Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting’; and ‘Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life’. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which...

  2. Collaborative care for depression in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish...... context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an “active ingredient” in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two...... detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression...

  3. Patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe: Updated results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, Ferran; Venselaar, Jack; Hoskin, Peter; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Peiffert, Didier; Londres, Bradley; Ventura, Montse; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Van Limbergen, Erik; Poetter, Richard; Kovacs, Gyorgy

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This descriptive survey evaluated brachytherapy (BT) practices and resources in the European area. This was a follow-up study to the original patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE). Materials and methods: A total of 1121 radiotherapy (RT) centres from 41 countries were asked to complete an online questionnaire on BT practices and resources. Countries with fewer than 50% of centres responding were excluded. Participating countries were divided into three groups based on gross domestic product (GDP); group I contained the countries with the highest GDP. Results: The response rate was 56% (633/1121 centres) with 30/41 countries (73%) meeting the inclusion criteria. Sixty percent of reporting centres provided brachytherapy. Responding centres treated an average of 138 (±10, 1 SD) patients with BT; in group I, the mean was 110/centre, an increase of 18% from 2002. CT-dosimetry increased to 61% of centres vs. 33% in 2002. HDR (high-dose rate) BT was the most commonly reported technique (65% of centres). Most BT interventions were for gynaecological tumors (59% of all cases), followed by prostate (17%), breast (9%), lung/bronchus (3%), and esophagus tumors(2%). Conclusion: Gynaecological BT remains the most common application, although both prostate and breast BT have increased. CT-based dosimetry has become increasingly common since 2002. The use of HDR and PDR (pulsed-dose rate) techniques has increased markedly, while both LDR and MDR (medium-dose rate) have declined.

  4. Hydroxychloroquine screening practice patterns within a large multispecialty ophthalmic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Adrian; Parikh, Vishal; Modi, Yasha S; Ehlers, Justis P; Schachat, Andrew P; Singh, Rishi P

    2015-09-01

    To determine provider compliance with hydroxychloroquine screening following the revised recommendations published in 2011 by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Evaluation of adherence to a screening protocol. Subjects were identified with hydroxychloroquine as a medication by electronic query at a large multispecialty ophthalmic practice. Patients were excluded if patients: (1) were screened by an outside physician; (2) lacked recorded height, weight, start date, or dosing; or (3) took hydroxychloroquine for malaria prophylaxis. Screening tests were stratified by ophthalmic subspecialty. Guidelines define proper screening as 1 subjective test-Humphrey visual field (HVF), and 1 objective test-spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), or multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Adherence to guidelines was determined by categorizing practices as: (1) "appropriate"-consistent with guidelines; (2) "underscreened"-insufficient testing; or (3) "inappropriate"-no testing. The study comprised 756 patients with a mean age of 56 years undergoing 1294 screening visits. Twenty-one patients received initial screenings outside the institution. Most common screening tests employed included SD OCT (56.6%), 10-2 HVF (55.0%), and Amsler grid (40.0%). Of the 735 initial screenings, 341 (46.4%) were appropriately screened, 204 (27.8%) underscreened, and 190 (25.9%) inappropriately screened. Of those who presented solely for screening (560), 307 (54.8%) were appropriately screened, 144 (25.7%) underscreened, and 109 (19.5%) inappropriately screened. Of patients presenting for hydroxychloroquine screening, 54.8% of patients received appropriate evaluation, indicating lack of adherence to guidelines. Overall, SD OCT and 10-2 HVF were the preferred screening modalities, with FAF and mfERG less frequently ordered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Do financial incentives linked to ownership of specialty hospitals affect physicians' practice patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jean M

    2008-07-01

    Although physician-owned specialty hospitals have become increasingly prevalent in recent years, little research has examined whether the financial incentives linked to ownership influence physicians' referral rates for services performed at the specialty hospital. We compared the practice patterns of physician owners of specialty hospitals in Oklahoma, before and after ownership, to the practice patterns of physician nonowners who treated similar cases over the same time period in Oklahoma markets without physician-owned specialty hospitals. We constructed episodes of care for injured workers with a primary diagnosis of back/spine disorders. We used pre-post comparisons and difference-in-differences analysis to evaluate changes in practice patterns for physician owners and nonowners over the time period spanned by the entry of the specialty hospital. Findings suggest the introduction of financial incentives linked to ownership coincided with a significant change in the practice patterns of physician owners, whereas such changes were not evident among physician nonowners. After physicians established ownership interests in a specialty hospital, the frequency of use of surgery, diagnostic, and ancillary services used in the treatment of injured workers with back/spine disorders increased significantly. Physician ownership of specialty hospitals altered the frequency of use for an array of procedures rendered to patients treated at these hospitals. Given the growth in physician-owned specialty hospitals, these findings suggest that health care expenditures will be substantially greater for patients treated at these institutions relative to persons who obtain care from nonself-referral providers.

  6. Cancer patients' use of family practice and secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Kjeldgaard, Anette Hvenegaard; Olesen, Frede

    Aims: We know that in Denmark some 90% of citizens have contact with family practice (FP) during a year and around 40% has contact with secondary care.  This demands efforts to create integrated and shared care. The aim of this study is to document the pattern of contacts with FP among patients...... population b) about 33,000 patients diagnosed with cancer in 2007, and c) about 220,000 patients living with a previous diagnosis of cancer.        Results: Data for the total population is known. The total number of contacts with FP in daytime is about 38.4 million, with out of hours service about 2...

  7. Instruction of pattern recognition by MATLAB practice 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    This book describes the pattern recognition by MATLAB practice. It includes possibility and limit of AI, introduction of pattern recognition a vector and matrix, basic status and a probability theory, a random variable and probability distribution, statistical decision theory, data-mining, gaussian mixture model, a nerve cell modeling such as Hebb's learning rule, LMS learning rule, genetic algorithm, dynamic programming and DTW, HMN on Markov model and HMM's three problems and solution, introduction of SVM with KKT condition and margin optimum, kernel trick and MATLAB practice.

  8. Determinants of cord care practices among mothers in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-04

    Oct 4, 2011 ... Background: Mothers care for their infants' umbilical cord stump in various ways. Different cord care practices have been documented; some are beneficial while others are harmful. Who and what influence the cord care practiced by mothers have, however, not been fully explored particularly in the study ...

  9. Fundamental care guided by the Careful Nursing Philosophy and Professional Practice Model©.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Therese Connell; Timmins, Fiona; Burke, Jacqueline

    2018-02-05

    To propose the Careful Nursing Philosophy and Professional Practice Model © as a conceptual and practice solution to current fundamental nursing care erosion and deficits. There is growing awareness of the crucial importance of fundamental care. Efforts are underway to heighten nurses' awareness of values that motivate fundamental care and thereby increase their attention to effective provision of fundamental care. However, there remains a need for nursing frameworks which motivate nurses to bring fundamental care values to life in their practice and strengthen their commitment to provide fundamental care. This descriptive position paper builds on the Careful Nursing Philosophy and Professional Practice Model © (Careful Nursing). Careful Nursing elaborates explicit nursing values and addresses both relational and pragmatic aspects of nursing practice, offering an ideal guide to provision of fundamental nursing care. A comparative alignment approach is used to review the capacity of Careful Nursing to address fundamentals of nursing care. Careful Nursing provides a value-based comprehensive and practical framework which can strengthen clinical nurses' ability to articulate and control their practice and, thereby, more effectively fulfil their responsibility to provide fundamental care and measure its effectiveness. This explicitly value-based nursing philosophy and professional practice model offers nurses a comprehensive, pragmatic and engaging framework designed to strengthen their control over their practice and ability to provide high-quality fundamental nursing care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Health patterns of cardiac surgery clients using home health care nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, N S; Brassard, A B

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the health patterns of cardiac surgical patients in the home health care population and their relationships to outcomes and duration of home health care using Gordon's Functional Health Pattern framework. Home health care records of 96 cardiac surgical clients were reviewed. Admission health pattern data, reasons for admission, duration and outcomes of home care services, characteristics of hospital experience, and demographic data were analyzed. Dysfunctional health patterns were primarily in the area of activity/exercise. The most common reasons for admission were monitoring of cardiopulmonary status, wound care, and instruction on diet, medications, and cardiac regimen. The mean duration of home care was 28.8 days. Thirty percent of the sample were readmitted to the hospital. Duration of home care was shorter for those who were married and for those who reported weakness, tiredness, or fatigue as a chief complaint. Readmission to the hospital was more likely for those who had complications during their initial hospital stay and those who required at least partial assistance with bathing, dressing, feeding, or toileting. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  11. Implementing practice management strategies to improve patient care: the EPIC project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwell, David; Rogers-Warnock, Leslie; Nemis-White, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare gaps, the difference between usual care and best care, are evident in Canada, particularly with respect to our aging, ailing population. Primary care practitioners are challenged to identify, prevent and close care gaps in their practice environment given the competing demands of informed, litigious patients with complex medical needs, ever-evolving scientific evidence with new treatment recommendations across many disciplines and an enhanced emphasis on quality and accountability in healthcare. Patient-centred health and disease management partnerships using measurement, feedback and communication of practice patterns and outcomes have been shown to narrow care gaps. Practice management strategies such as the use of patient registries and recall systems have also been used to help practitioners better understand, follow and proactively manage populations of patients in their practice. The Enhancing Practice to Improve Care project was initiated to determine the impact of a patient-centred health and disease management partnership using practice management strategies to improve patient care and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Forty-four general practices from four regions of British Columbia participated and, indeed, demonstrated that care and outcomes for patients with CKD could be improved via the implementation of practice management strategies in a patient-centred partnership measurement model of health and disease management.

  12. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  13. Auditing Practice Style Variation in Pediatric Inpatient Asthma Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Jeffrey H; Rosenbaum, Paul R; Wang, Wei; Ludwig, Justin M; Calhoun, Shawna; Guevara, James P; Zorc, Joseph J; Zeigler, Ashley; Even-Shoshan, Orit

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness among children, remaining a leading cause of pediatric hospitalizations and representing a major financial burden to many health care systems. To implement a new auditing process examining whether differences in hospital practice style may be associated with potential resource savings or inefficiencies in treating pediatric asthma admissions. A retrospective matched-cohort design study, matched for asthma severity, compared practice patterns for patients admitted to Children's Hospital Association hospitals contributing data to the Pediatric Hospital Information System (PHIS) database. With 3 years of PHIS data on 48 887 children, an asthma template was constructed consisting of representative children hospitalized for asthma between April 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014. The template was matched with either a 1:1, 2:1, or 3:1 ratio at each of 37 tertiary care children's hospitals, depending on available sample size. Treatment at each PHIS hospital. Cost, length of stay, and intensive care unit (ICU) utilization. After matching patients (n = 9100; mean [SD] age, 7.1 [3.6] years; 3418 [37.6%] females) to the template (n = 100, mean [SD] age, 7.2 [3.7] years; 37 [37.0%] females), there was no significant difference in observable patient characteristics at the 37 hospitals meeting the matching criteria. Despite similar characteristics of the patients, we observed large and significant variation in use of the ICUs as well as in length of stay and cost. For the same template-matched populations, comparing utilization between the 12.5th percentile (lower eighth) and 87.5th percentile (upper eighth) of hospitals, median cost varied by 87% ($3157 vs $5912 per patient; P audit, hospitals and stakeholders can better understand where this excess variation occurs and can help to pinpoint practice styles that should be emulated or avoided.

  14. Culture Care Theory: a proposed practice theory guide for nurse practitioners in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Marilyn M; Eipperle, Marilyn K

    2008-04-01

    Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality is presented as a foundational basis for the educational preparation, primary care contextual practice, and outcomes-focused research endeavours of advanced practice nursing. Discussion emphasises the value of care and caring as the essence of advanced practice nursing through the use of three modes of care, use of the Sunrise and other enablers, and the ethnonursing method. Education, research, practice, and key concepts of the theory are connected as essential components toward the provision of culturally congruent care to meet the healthcare needs of diverse individuals, families, groups, and communities by family nurse practitioners.

  15. Organising nursing practice into care models that catalyse quality: A clinical nurse leader case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam; Spiva, LeeAnna; Su, Wei; Hites, Lisle

    2018-02-09

    To determine the power of a conceptual clinical nurse leader practice model to explain the care model's enactment and trajectory in real world settings. How nursing, organised into specific models of care, functions as an organisational strategy for quality is not well specified. Clinical nurse leader integrated care delivery is one emerging model with growing adoption. A recently validated clinical nurse leader practice model conceptualizes the care model's characteristics and hypothesizes their mechanisms of action. Pattern matching case study design and mixed methods were used to determine how the care model's constructs were operationalized in one regional United States health system that integrated clinical nurse leaders into their care delivery system in 2010. The findings confirmed the empirical presence of all clinical nurse leader practice model constructs and provided a rich description of how the health system operationalized the constructs in practice. The findings support the hypothesized model pathway from Clinical Nurse Leader structuring to Clinical Nurse Leader practice and outcomes. The findings indicate analytic generalizability of the clinical nurse leader practice model. Nursing practice organised to focus on microsystem care processes can catalyse multidisciplinary engagement with, and consistent enactment of, quality practices. The model has great potential for transferability across diverse health systems. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Practice Patterns of School-Based Occupational Therapists Targeting Handwriting: A Knowledge-to-Practice Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Heidi; Egan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Poor handwriting is a common reason for referral to school-based occupational therapy. A survey was used to explore the extent to which current practice patterns in Ontario, Canada, align with evidence on effective intervention for handwriting. Knowledge-to-practice gaps were identified related to focus on performance components versus…

  17. [Practice patterns in Mexican allergologists about specific immunotherapy with allergens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larenas Linnemann, Désirée; Guidos Fogelbach, Guillermo Arturo; Arias Cruz, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been practiced since over a hundred years. Since the first applications up today changes have occurred in the preparation, dose and duration of the treatment, as well as in the extracts used. Guidelines have been published in Mexico and other countries to try to unify these practice patterns of immunotherapy. By means of a questionnaire, sent in various occasions to all members of the Colegio Mexicano de Inmunología Clínica y Alergia (CMICA) and of the Colegio Mexicano de Pediatras, Especialistas en Inmunología y Alergia (CoMPedIA) we tried to get a picture of the daily practice patterns of immunotherapy in the allergist's office. Results will be presented in a descriptive manner. A response rate of 61 (17%) was obtained from the College members. For immunotherapy allergists use locally made and imported extracts, generally mixed in their office (20% over 10 allergens in one bottle). Eighty percent adds bacterial vaccine at some point and 60% uses sublingual immunotherapy. Most use Evans without albumin as diluent, don't routinely premedicate, reach maintenance treatment after more than six months and 46% recommends a maximum duration of immunotherapy of two years or less. We present a diagnosis on the current situation of practice patterns concerning allergen immunotherapy among the members of both Mexican colleges of allergists. The methods used by the allergists for indication, preparation and administration are quite diverse.

  18. Taking Innovation To Scale In Primary Care Practices: The Functions Of Health Care Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Sarah S.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Hemler, Jennifer R.; Balasubramanian, Bijal A.; Edwards, Samuel T.; Green, Larry A.; Kaufman, Arthur; Solberg, Leif I.; Miller, William L.; Woodson, Tanisha Tate; Sweeney, Shannon M.; Cohen, Deborah J.

    2018-01-01

    Health care extension is an approach to providing external support to primary care practices with the aim of diffusing innovation. EvidenceNOW was launched to rapidly disseminate and implement evidence-based guidelines for cardiovascular preventive care in the primary care setting. Seven regional grantee cooperatives provided the foundational elements of health care extension—technological and quality improvement support, practice capacity building, and linking with community resources—to more than two hundred primary care practices in each region. This article describes how the cooperatives varied in their approaches to extension and provides early empirical evidence that health care extension is a feasible and potentially useful approach for providing quality improvement support to primary care practices. With investment, health care extension may be an effective platform for federal and state quality improvement efforts to create economies of scale and provide practices with more robust and coordinated support services. PMID:29401016

  19. Mandatory Nap Times and Group Napping Patterns in Child Care: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Sally L; Smith, Simon S; Hurst, Cameron; Pattinson, Cassandra L; Thorpe, Karen J

    2017-01-01

    Policy provision for naps is typical in child care settings, but there is variability in the practices employed. One practice that might modify children's early sleep patterns is the allocation of a mandatory nap time in which all children are required to lie on their beds without alternate activity permitted. There is currently limited evidence of the effects of such practices on children's napping patterns. This study examined the association between duration of mandatory nap times and group-level napping patterns in child care settings. Observations were undertaken in a community sample of 113 preschool rooms with a scheduled nap time (N = 2,114 children). Results showed that 83.5% of child care settings implemented a mandatory nap time (range = 15-145 min) while 14.2% provided alternate activities for children throughout the nap time period. Overall, 31% of children napped during nap times. Compared to rooms with ≤ 30 min of mandatory nap time, rooms with 31-60 min and > 60 min of mandatory nap time had a two-and-a-half and fourfold increase, respectively, in the proportion of children napping. Nap onset latency did not significantly differ across groups. Among preschool children, exposure to longer mandatory nap times in child care may increase incidence of napping.

  20. Primary care and behavioral health practice size: the challenge for health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Mark S; Leader, Deane; Un, Hyong; Lai, Zongshan; Kilbourne, Amy M

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the size profile of US primary care and behavioral health physician practices since size may impact the ability to institute care management processes (CMPs) that can enhance care quality. We utilized 2009 claims data from a nationwide commercial insurer to estimate practice size by linking providers by tax identification number. We determined the proportion of primary care physicians, psychiatrists, and behavioral health providers practicing in venues of >20 providers per practice (the lower bound for current CMP practice surveys). Among primary care physicians (n=350,350), only 2.1% of practices consisted of >20 providers. Among behavioral health practitioners (n=146,992) and psychiatrists (n=44,449), 1.3% and 1.0% of practices, respectively, had >20 providers. Sensitivity analysis excluding single-physician practices as "secondary" confirmed findings, with primary care and psychiatrist practices of >20 providers comprising, respectively, only 19.4% and 8.8% of practices (difference: Pestimate practice census for a high-complexity, high-cost behavioral health condition; only 1.3-18 patients per practice had claims for this condition. The tax identification number method for estimating practice size has strengths and limitations that complement those of survey methods. The proportion of practices below the lower bound of prior CMP studies is substantial, and care models and policies will need to address the needs of such practices and their patients. Achieving a critical mass of patients for disorder-specific CMPs will require coordination across multiple small practices.

  1. Multivariate analysis of 2-DE protein patterns - Practical approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Jacobsen, Susanne; Grove, H.

    2007-01-01

    Practical approaches to the use of multivariate data analysis of 2-DE protein patterns are demonstrated by three independent strategies for the image analysis and the multivariate analysis on the same set of 2-DE data. Four wheat varieties were selected on the basis of their baking quality. Two...... of the varieties were of strong baking quality and hard wheat kernel and two were of weak baking quality and soft kernel. Gliadins at different stages of grain development were analyzed by the application of multivariate data analysis on images of 2-DEs. Patterns related to the wheat varieties, harvest times...

  2. Sharing best practice in stoma care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willams, Julia

    A problem shared is a problem halved; a very poignant proverb that forms the essence of this year's World Council of Enterostomal Therapists (WCET) UK conference in Coventry. Sharing experiences from practice is invalid if clinical practice is to grow and develop. It raises awareness, offering the opportunity to question and review practice. Sharing practice offers opportunities to enquiring minds.

  3. Pattern of optometry practice and range of services in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thite, Nilesh; Jaggernath, Jyoti; Chinanayi, Farai; Bharadwaj, Shrikant; Kunjeer, Gauri

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the range of services provided by optometrists in various modes of optometric practice in India. An online questionnaire was administered to 1674 optometrists to collect information on the range of optometric services offered. Data were analyzed based on variables including sex, educational qualification, and modes of practice. Two-sample Wilcoxon rank sum tests, χ tests, and Fisher exact text were used to conduct inferential statistics. A total of 563 valid and completed survey questionnaires were received from graduates of 41 optometry institutes working across 23 states of India. Of these, 225 (40.0%) were female, 288 (51.2%) had completed postgraduate education, and 340 (60.5%) were involved in more than one mode of practice. The top three modes of practice were hospital-based practice (44.8%), academia (42.8%), and optical retail (33.0%). Of the 441, out of 563 (78.3%) respondents involved in patient care, the majority (98.4%) performed refraction and routine eye examination, 70.3% dispensed contact lenses, and 66.9% practiced optical dispensing. Lower involvement was seen in providing binocular-vision (45.1%) and low-vision services (30.2%). Higher education was associated with advanced level of practice (p < 0.05) except clinical investigative procedures. There was a significant association between postgraduate studies and involvement in academics and research (p < 0.01). Most optometrists are engaged in multiple modes of practice, with optical practice, hospital-based practice, and academia being the leading modes. Optometrists need to be more involved in providing the core optometric services of binocular vision and low vision. Higher education has an impact on the level of optometric practice.

  4. Initial Experience With Tofacitinib in Clinical Practice: Treatment Patterns and Costs of Tofacitinib Administered as Monotherapy or in Combination With Conventional Synthetic DMARDs in 2 US Health Care Claims Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, James; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Gerber, Robert; Gruben, David; Koenig, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib can be administered as a monotherapy or in combination with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This study describes RA patients' characteristics, treatment patterns, and costs for those initiating tofacitinib treatment as monotherapy or combination therapy, using US claims data from clinical practice. A retrospective cohort analysis of patients aged ≥18 years with RA (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 714.xx) and with ≥1 tofacitinib claim in the Truven Marketscan (TM) or the Optum Clinformatics (OC) database. Index was defined as the first tofacitinib fill date (November 2012-June 2014). Patients were continuously enrolled for ≥12 months before and after index. Adherence was assessed using the proportion of days covered (PDC) and medication possession ratio (MPR). Persistence was evaluated using a 1.5× days' supply gap or switch. All-cause and RA-related costs in the 12-month pre- and post-index periods were evaluated. Unadjusted and adjusted analyses were conducted on data on treatment patterns and costs stratified by monotherapy status. A total of 337 (TM) and 118 (OC) tofacitinib patients met the selection criteria; 52.2% (TM) and 50.8% (OC) received monotherapy and 83.7% (TM) and 76.3% (OC) had pre-index biologic DMARD experience. Twelve-month mean PDC values were 0.56 (TM) and 0.53 (OC), and 12-month mean MPR was 0.84 (TM) and 0.80 (OC), with persistence of 140.0 (TM) and 124.6 (OC) days. Between 12-month pre- and post-index periods, mean (SD) 12-month RA-related medical costs decreased by $5784 ($31,832) in TM and $6103 ($25,897) in OC (both, P tofacitinib knowledge base and will enable informed clinical and policy decision making based on valuable datasets independent of randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alignment of breast cancer screening guidelines, accountability metrics, and practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Haas, Jennifer S; Bitton, Asaf; Brackett, Charles; Weiss, Julie; Goodrich, Martha; Harris, Kimberly; Pyle, Steve; Tosteson, Anna N A

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer screening guidelines and metrics are inconsistent with each other and may differ from breast screening practice patterns in primary care. This study measured breast cancer screening practice patterns in relation to common evidence-based guidelines and accountability metrics. Cohort study using primary data collected from a regional breast cancer screening research network between 2011 and 2014. Using information on women aged 30 to 89 years within 21 primary care practices of 2 large integrated health systems in New England, we measured the proportion of women screened overall and by age using 2 screening definition categories: any mammogram and screening mammogram. Of the 81,352 women in our cohort, 54,903 (67.5%) had at least 1 mammogram during the time period, 48,314 (59.4%) had a screening mammogram. Women aged 50 to 69 years were the highest proportion screened (82.4% any mammogram, 75% screening indication); 72.6% of women at age 40 had a screening mammogram with a median of 70% (range = 54.3%-84.8%) among the practices. Of women aged at least 75 years, 63.3% had a screening mammogram, with the median of 63.9% (range = 37.2%-78.3%) among the practices. Of women who had 2 or more mammograms, 79.5% were screened annually. Primary care practice patterns for breast cancer screening are not well aligned with some evidence-based guidelines and accountability metrics. Metrics and incentives should be designed with more uniformity and should also include shared decision making when the evidence does not clearly support one single conclusion.

  6. Pediatricians’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns regarding special education and Individualized Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Reshma P.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Msall, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The medical community has called upon pediatricians to be knowledgeable about an Individualized Education Program (IEP). We sought to: (1) Evaluate pediatricians’ knowledge and attitudes regarding special education (2) Examine the relationship between perceived responsibilities and practice patterns and (3) Identify barriers that impact pediatricians’ ability to provide comprehensive care to children with educational difficulties. Methods Surveys were mailed to a national sample of 1000 randomly selected general pediatricians and pediatric residents from October 2010 to February 2011. Results The response rate was 47%. Of the knowledge items, respondents answered an average of 59% correctly. The majority of respondents felt pediatricians should be responsible for identifying children who may benefit from special education services and assist families in obtaining services, but less than 50% felt they should assist in the development of an IEP. The majority of pediatricians inquired whether a child is having difficulty at school, but far less conducted screening tests or asked parents if they needed assistance obtaining services. Overall, the prevalence of considering a practice a pediatrician’s responsibility is significantly higher than examples of such a practice pattern being reported. Financial reimbursement and insufficient training were amongst the most significant barriers impacting a pediatrician’s ability to provide care to children with educational difficulties. Conclusion In order to provide a comprehensive medical home, pediatricians must be informed about the special education process. This study demonstrates there are gaps in pediatricians’ knowledge and practice patterns regarding special education that must be addressed. PMID:23707687

  7. Pediatricians' knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns regarding special education and individualized education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Reshma P; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Msall, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    The medical community has called upon pediatricians to be knowledgeable about an individualized education program (IEP). We sought to: 1) evaluate pediatricians' knowledge and attitudes regarding special education; 2) examine the relationship between perceived responsibilities and practice patterns; and 3) identify barriers that impact pediatricians' ability to provide comprehensive care to children with educational difficulties. Surveys were mailed to a national sample of 1000 randomly selected general pediatricians and pediatric residents from October 2010 to February 2011. The response rate was 47%. Of the knowledge items, respondents answered an average of 59% correctly. The majority of respondents thought pediatricians should be responsible for identifying children who may benefit from special education services and assist families in obtaining services, but less than 50% thought they should assist in the development of an IEP. The majority of pediatricians inquired whether a child is having difficulty at school, but far fewer conducted screening tests or asked parents if they needed assistance obtaining services. Overall, the prevalence of considering a practice a pediatrician's responsibility is significantly higher than examples of such a practice pattern being reported. Financial reimbursement and insufficient training were among the most significant barriers affecting a pediatrician's ability to provide care to children with educational difficulties. In order to provide a comprehensive medical home, pediatricians must be informed about the special education process. This study demonstrates that there are gaps in pediatricians' knowledge and practice patterns regarding special education that must be addressed. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Practice of Self-Care among Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Devries, Sabina R.; Wardle, Elizabeth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Self-care behavior is recognized as an important component for the helping professional who practices in the field of counseling or who is training to become a helping professional. Occupational stress and burnout in the field of counseling is of great concern. This study examined the practice of self-care among master level counseling students to…

  9. Attitude and practice of health care providers towards autopsies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Attitude and practice of health care professionals toward autopsy are important as they will give information regarding factors that contribute to the low rate of autopsies in children under five years. Objective: To evaluate the attitude and practice of health care providers towards autopsies in children under five ...

  10. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Eye Health Care amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice of eye health care amongst doctors in Lagos. Methodology: Open and closed-ended questionnaires were given to respondents. The questionnaire contained information about age, sex, general knowledge as well as practice of eye care. Results: A total of 104 ...

  11. Practice Patterns and Job Satisfaction of Mohs Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nita; Golda, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on Mohs surgery workforce patterns. To identify if gender differences exist in practice patterns of Mohs surgeons, factors that influence these differences, and factors influencing job satisfaction among Mohs surgeons. An electronic survey was distributed to dermatology organizations targeting members of the American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS), from October 2015 to April 2016. Two hundred twenty-seven ACMS members responded; 37% were women. Twenty-five percent of women and 19% of men work part time. Thirty-seven percent of women practice in academia versus 22% of men. Forty-three percent of women and 23% of men identified children as a factor affecting their ability to work full time. Gender comparisons for current job satisfaction show 57% of men and 35% of women being very satisfied. Supervision/feedback/recognition adds to satisfaction at a higher rate for women (53%) than for men (29%). For both genders combined, work content, patient base, and autonomy had the highest average job satisfaction ratings. Gender differences exist in practice patterns and job satisfaction of Mohs surgeons. This study demonstrates factors that could influence job satisfaction among female Mohs surgeons-knowledge that is important to individuals who lead, mentor, or supervise female Mohs surgeons.

  12. The family receiving home care: functional health pattern assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, J I

    1996-01-01

    The winds of change in health care make assessment of the family more important than ever as a tool for health care providers seeking to assist the family move themselves toward high-level wellness. Limited medical care and imposed self-responsibility for health promotion and illness prevention, which are natural consequences of these changes, move the locus of control for health management back to the family. The family's teachings, modeling, and interactions are greater influences than ever on the health of the patient. Gordon's functional health patterns provide a holistic model for assessment of the family because assessment data are classified under 11 headings: health perception and health management, nutritional-metabolic, elimination, activity and exercise, sleep and rest, cognition and perception, self-perception and self-concept, roles and relationships, sexuality and reproduction, coping and stress tolerance, and values and beliefs. Questions posed under each of the health patterns can be varied to reflect the uniqueness of the individual family as well as to inquire about family strengths and weaknesses in all patterns. Data using this model provide a comprehensive base for including the family in designing a plan of care.

  13. Practical relevance of pattern uniqueness in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, Paul T

    2013-09-10

    Uniqueness being unprovable, it has recently been argued that individualization in forensic science is irrelevant and, probability, as applied for DNA profiles, should be applied for all identifications. Critiques against uniqueness have omitted physical matching, a realistic and tangible individualization that supports uniqueness. Describing case examples illustrating pattern matches including physical matching, it is indicated that individualizations are practically relevant for forensic science as they establish facts on a definitive basis providing firm leads benefitting criminal investigation. As a tenet of forensic identification, uniqueness forms a fundamental paradigm relevant for individualization. Evidence on the indeterministic and stochastic causal pathways of characteristics in patterns available in the related fields of science sufficiently supports the proposition of uniqueness. Characteristics involved in physical matching and matching achieved in patterned evidence existing in the state of nature are not events amenable for counting; instead these are ensemble of visible units occupying the entire pattern area stretching the probability of re-occurrence of a verisimilitude pattern into infinity offering epistemic support to uniqueness. Observational methods are as respectable as instrumental or statistical methods since they are capable of generating results that are tangible and obviously valid as in physical matching. Applying the probabilistic interpretation used for DNA profiles to the other patterns would be unbefitting since these two are disparate, the causal pathways of the events, the loci, in the manipulated DNA profiles being determinable. While uniqueness enables individualizations, it does not vouch for eliminating errors. Instead of dismissing uniqueness and individualization, accepting errors as human or system failures and seeking remedial measures would benefit forensic science practice and criminal investigation. Copyright © 2013

  14. Bridging generic and professional care practices for Muslim patients through use of Leininger's culture care modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe-Alamah, Hiba

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide knowledge of traditional Muslim generic (folk) care beliefs, expressions and practices derived from research and descriptive sources, in order to assist nurses and other health care professionals to integrate generic (folk) into professional care practices. Muslim generic (folk) care beliefs and practices related to the caregiving process, health, illness, dietary needs, dress, privacy, modesty, touch, gender relations, eye contact, abortion, contraception, birth, death and bereavement were explored. A discussion involving the use of Leininger's culture care preservation and/or maintenance, culture care accommodation and/or negotiation and culture care repatterning and/or restructuring action modes to bridge the gap between generic (folk) and professional (etic) care practices and to consequently promote culturally congruent care is presented.

  15. Health care providers' knowledge and practice of focused antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... observational checklist were the instruments for data collection. Findings revealed poor knowledge of concept, components, timing of visits on focused antenatal care and non compliance with the guidelines for the practice of focused antenatal care, because of health workers lack of knowledge on focused antenatal care.

  16. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  17. Newborn cord care practices amongst mothers in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information obtained included biodata, age and sex of last baby, social class, place of antenatal care and delivery, and cord care practices. Data were analysed using SPSS version 16.0. Results: Two hundred and ten mothers participated in the study. 71.9% were of high social class. Over 80% received antenatal care in ...

  18. Reinventing your primary care practice: becoming an MDCEO™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conard SE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Scott E Conard,1 Maureen Reni Courtney21ACAP Health, Dallas, 2College of Nursing, University of Texas, Arlington, TX, USAAbstract: Primary care medicine in the United States is undergoing a revolutionary shift. Primary care providers and their staff have an extraordinary chance to create and participate in exciting new approaches to care. New strategies will require courage, flexibility, and openness to change by every member of the practice team, especially the lead clinician who is most often the physician, but can also be the nurse practitioner or physician's assistant. Providers must first recognize their need to alter their fundamental identity to incorporate a new kind of leadership role—that of the MDCEO™ (i.e., the individual clinician who leads the practice to ensure that quality, service, and financial systems are developed and effectively managed. This paper provides a practical vision and rationale for the required transition in primary care, pointing the way for how to achieve new practice effectiveness through new leadership roles. It also provides a model to evaluate the status of a primary care practice. The authors have extensive experience in working with primary care providers to radically evolve their clinical practices to become MDCEOs™. The MDCEO™ will articulate the vision and strategy for the practice, define and foster the practice culture, and create and facilitate team development and overall high level functioning. Each member of the team can then begin to lead their part of the practice: a 21st century population-oriented, purpose-based practice resulting in increased quality of care, improved patient outcomes, greater financial success, and enhanced peace of mind.Keywords: primary health care organization and administration, health care reform, leadership, patient-centered care

  19. Psychotropic medication patterns among youth in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Julie M; Safer, Daniel J; Sai, Devadatta; Gardner, James F; Thomas, Diane; Coombes, Phyllis; Dubowski, Melissa; Mendez-Lewis, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Studies have revealed that youth in foster care covered by Medicaid insurance receive psychotropic medication at a rate > 3 times that of Medicaid-insured youth who qualify by low family income. Systematic data on patterns of medication treatment, particularly concomitant drugs, for youth in foster care are limited. The purpose of this work was to describe and quantify patterns of psychotropic monotherapy and concomitant therapy prescribed to a randomly selected, 1-month sample of youth in foster care who had been receiving psychotropic medication. METHODS. Medicaid data were accessed for a July 2004 random sample of 472 medicated youth in foster care aged 0 through 19 years from a southwestern US state. Psychotropic medication treatment data were identified by concomitant pattern, frequency, medication class, subclass, and drug entity and were analyzed in relation to age group; gender; race or ethnicity; International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, psychiatric diagnosis; and physician specialty. Of the foster children who had been dispensed psychotropic medication, 41.3% received > or = 3 different classes of these drugs during July 2004, and 15.9% received > or = 4 different classes. The most frequently used medications were antidepressants (56.8%), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder drugs (55.9%), and antipsychotic agents (53.2%). The use of specific psychotropic medication classes varied little by diagnostic grouping. Psychiatrists prescribed 93% of the psychotropic medication dispensed to youth in foster care. The use of > or = 2 drugs within the same psychotropic medication class was noted in 22.2% of those who were given prescribed drugs concomitantly. Concomitant psychotropic medication treatment is frequent for youth in foster care and lacks substantive evidence as to its effectiveness and safety.

  20. From parallel practice to integrative health care: a conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hara Dennis

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Integrative health care" has become a common term to describe teams of health care providers working together to provide patient care. However this term has not been well-defined and likely means many different things to different people. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for describing, comparing and evaluating different forms of team-oriented health care practices that have evolved in Western health care systems. Discussion Seven different models of team-oriented health care practice are illustrated in this paper: parallel, consultative, collaborative, coordinated, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and integrative. Each of these models occupies a position along the proposed continuum from the non-integrative to fully integrative approach they take to patient care. The framework is developed around four key components of integrative health care practice: philosophy/values; structure, process and outcomes. Summary This framework can be used by patients and health care practitioners to determine what styles of practice meet their needs and by policy makers, healthcare managers and researchers to document the evolution of team practices over time. This framework may also facilitate exploration of the relationship between different practice models and health outcomes.

  1. Technical attainment, practical success and practical knowledge: hermeneutical bases for child nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Débora Falleiros; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2009-01-01

    This reflective study aimed to present some aspects of the concepts technical attainment, practical success and practical knowledge, with a view to a broader understanding of child nursing care. Health care is considered in the perspective of reconstructive practices, characterized as contingencies, highlighting the importance of the connection between technical attainment and practical success and the valuation of practical knowledge, based on philosophical hermeneutics, in the context of practical philosophy. Child health nursing can deal with technical attainment and practical success jointly, and also understand practical knowledge in the longitudinality of care. Health promotion, disease prevention, recovery and rehabilitation of child health should be indissociably associated with contextualized realities, shared between professionals and families, aiming to follow the child's growth and development, produce narratives, identify experiences, choices and decision making to broaden health care.

  2. Heart Failure Care in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasing health care problem worldwide, and a multidisciplinary approach with a general practitioner (GP) in the health care team is considered optimal. HF management has improved substantially over the last two decades, mainly for patients with HF with a reduced ejection

  3. General practice registrars' views on maternity care in general practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Hanna; Jaye, Chrystal; Miller, Dawn L

    2015-12-01

    The number of general practitioners (GPs) providing maternity care in New Zealand has declined dramatically since legislative changes of the 1990s. The Ministry of Health wants GPs to provide maternity care again. To investigate New Zealand general practice registrars' perspectives on GPs' role in maternity care; specifically, whether maternity services should be provided by GPs, registrars' preparedness to provide such services, and training opportunities available or required to achieve this. An anonymous online questionnaire was distributed to all registrars enrolled in The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners' (RNZCGP's) General Practice Education Programme (GPEP) in 2012, via their online learning platform OWL. 165 of the 643 general practice registrars responded (25.7% response rate). Most (95%) believe that GPs interested and trained in maternity care should consider providing antenatal, postnatal or shared care with midwives, and 95% believe women should be able to access maternity care from their general practice. When practising as a GP, 90% would consider providing antenatal and postnatal care, 47.3% shared care, and 4.3% full pregnancy care. Professional factors including training and adequate funding were most important when considering providing maternity care as a GP. Ninety-five percent of general practice registrars who responded to our survey believe that GPs should provide some maternity services, and about 90% would consider providing maternity care in their future practice. Addressing professional issues of training, support and funding are essential if more GPs are to participate in maternity care in New Zealand.

  4. Patterns of clinical care in radiation therapy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the first nationwide evaluation of radiation therapy in the United States with respect to its quality and accessibility are presented. The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) is financially supported by the National Cancer Institute and has served as a model for other oncology-related disciplines. The PCS has determined criteria by which to evaluate radiation therapy care in 10 disease sites in which curative radiation therapy plays a major role. The sampling design identified the institution to be surveyed and included all types of practice in the U.S. This paper examines results related to carcinomas of the cervix, larynx and prostate

  5. Universal Design Patterns for stoma care away-from-home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Meester

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Accommodating the real diversity of user populations,including those with physical and / or mental impairments and functional limitations, requires a large amount of designinformation in connection with human dis-abilities(limitations and possibilities. In order to collect andorganise this information for designers and decision makers, Universal Design Patterns (UD Patterns offer descriptive information about, on the one hand, CONFLICTS between users and built environments, and on the other hand,empirically evident design RESOLUTIONS. Directcollaboration with users / experts was tested in thedevelopment of a specific UD Pattern for a (Semi- ambulant accessible toilet for personal care, with specific emphasis onstoma-care in public facilities. The paper illustrates howpeople with ostomies and care-givers communicate with researchers, and how relevant design information is extracted and structured. On a more general level, results show how environment-related dimensions of human functioning differ from medical aspects, and how direct involvement of end-users enriches the content of design information.

  6. Innovative patient care practices using social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, T Joseph

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the literature on social media applications used to deliver patient care. A search of the literature was conducted on June 11, 2014, using PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Communication Abstracts databases for clinical studies between 2004 and 2014. A combination of the search terms "social media" or "Web 2.0" or "online social networking" or "Facebook" or "Twitter" AND "patient care" or "health care" was used. In addition, 42 additional abstracts were retrieved from www.patientslikeme.com for review. Only published, peer-reviewed journal articles were considered and only publications in English were included. The abstracts from this search were reviewed for relevance to Web-based social media platforms being used in patient care activities. A total of 35 articles were included in the review. A majority of the studies published on social media and patient care used cross-sectional designs and were conducted in the United States. Multiple social media applications were studied, but Facebook was the predominant social media tool found. Patient care opportunities for various diseases with social media have been studied. Recurring themes included overcoming barriers, engaging and empowering patients, enhancing research, providing information for health promotion, scratching the surface, and potential pitfalls. Social media have the potential to help patients and practitioners overcome multiple barriers in the delivery of health care. Maintaining patient privacy, security of information shared in the platform, and integrity of information shared are all concerns when using this type of Web application.

  7. Practical uses of botanicals in skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Alison F; Lupo, Mary P

    2009-01-01

    Cosmeceuticals are the fastest growing sector of the cosmetic industry, and the future of antiaging cosmeceuticals in particular is very promising. Botanical extracts that support the health, texture, and integrity of the skin, hair, and nails are widely used in cosmetic formulations. They form the largest category of cosmeceutical additives found in the marketplace today due to the rising consumer interest and demand for natural products. Various plant extracts that formed the basis of medical treatments in ancient civilizations and many traditional cultures are still used today in cleansers, moisturizers, astringents, and many other skin care products. New botanical skin care treatments are emerging, presenting dermatologists and their patients the challenge of understanding the science behind these cosmeceuticals. Thus, dermatologists must have a working knowledge of these botanicals and keep up with how they evolve to provide optimal medical care and answer patient questions. The most popular botanicals commonly incorporated into skin care protocols are discussed.

  8. Caring presence in practice: facilitating an appreciative discourse in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, E

    2016-09-01

    To report on an appreciation of caring presence practised by nurses in South Africa in order to facilitate an appreciative discourse in nursing and a return to caring values and attitudes. Appreciative reports on caring presence are often overlooked. Media may provide a platform for facilitating appreciation for caring presence practised by nurses. Such an appreciation may foster further practice of caring presence and re-ignite a caring ethos in nursing. This article provides an appreciative discourse on caring presence in nursing in the form of examples of caring presence practised by nurses. An anecdotal approach was followed. Social media, namely narratives on caring presence shared by nurses on a Facebook page, and formal media, namely news reports in which nurses are appreciated for their efforts, were used. Deductive content analysis was applied to analyse the narratives and news reports in relation to a definition of caring presence and types of caring presence. The analysis of the narratives and news reports resulted in an appreciative discourse in which examples of nurses practising caring presence could be provided. Examples of nurses practising caring presence could be found, and an appreciative discourse could be initiated. Appreciation ignites positive action and ownership of high-quality health care. Leadership should thus cultivate a culture of appreciating nurses, through using media, and encourage nurses to share how caring presence impact on quality in health care. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Quality management in home care: models for today's practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhey, M P

    1996-01-01

    In less than a decade, home care providers have been a part of two major transitions in health care delivery. First, because of the advent of managed care and a shift from inpatient to community-based services, home care service delivery systems have experienced tremendous growth. Second, the principles and practices of total quality management and continuous quality improvement have permeated the organization, administration, and practice of home health care. Based on the work of Deming, Juran, and Crosby, the basic tenets of the new quality management philosophy involve a focus on the following five key areas: (1) systems and processes rather than individual performance; (2) involvement, collaboration, and empowerment; (3) internal and external "customers"; (4) data and measurement; and (5) standards, guidelines, and outcomes of care. Home care providers are among those in the forefront who are developing and implementing programs that integrate these foci into the delivery of quality home care services. This article provides a summary of current home care programs that address these five key areas of quality management philosophy and provide models for innovative quality management practice in home care. For further information about each program, readers are referred to the original reports in the home care and quality management journal literature, as cited herein.

  10. Introducing Advanced Practice Nurses / Nurse Practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Moons, Philip; Callens, Betty; Gut, Chris; Lindpaintner, Lyn; Spirig, Rebecca

    2008-11-01

    An increasing number of countries are exploring the option of introducing Advanced Practice Nurses (APN), such as Nurse Practitioners (NP), as part of the health care workforce. This is particular relevant in light of the increase of the elderly and chronically ill. It is crucial that this introduction is preceded by an in depth understanding of the concept of advanced practice nursing as well as an analysis of the context. Firstly, a conceptual clarification of Advanced Practice Nurses and Nurse Practitioners is provided. Secondly, a framework is introduced that assists in the analysis of the introduction and development of Advanced Practice Nurse roles in a particular health care system. Thirdly, outcomes research on Advanced Practice Nursing is presented. Argumentation developed using data based papers and policy reports on Advanced Practice Nursing. The proposed framework consists of five drivers: (1) the health care needs of the population, (2) education, (3) workforce, (4) practice patterns and (5) legal and health policy framework. These drivers act synergistically and are dynamic in time and space. Outcomes research shows that nurse practitioners show clinical outcomes similar to or better than those of physicians. Further examples demonstrate favourable outcomes in view of the six Ds of outcome research; death, disease, disability, discomfort, dissatisfaction and dollars, for models of care in which Advanced Practice Nurses play a prominent role. Advanced Practice Nurses such as Nurse Practitioners show potential to contribute favourably to guaranteeing optimal health care. Advanced Practice Nurses will wield the greatest influence on health care by focusing on the most pressing health problems in society, especially the care of the chronically ill.

  11. Primary care practice organization influences colorectal cancer screening performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Soban, Lynn M; Parkerton, Patricia H; Etzioni, David A

    2007-06-01

    To identify primary care practice characteristics associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening performance, controlling for patient-level factors. Primary care director survey (1999-2000) of 155 VA primary care clinics linked with 38,818 eligible patients' sociodemographics, utilization, and CRC screening experience using centralized administrative and chart-review data (2001). Practices were characterized by degrees of centralization (e.g., authority over operations, staffing, outside-practice influence); resources (e.g., sufficiency of nonphysician staffing, space, clinical support arrangements); and complexity (e.g., facility size, academic status, managed care penetration), adjusting for patient-level covariates and contextual factors. Chart-based evidence of CRC screening through direct colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, or consecutive fecal occult blood tests, eliminating cases with documented histories of CRC, polyps, or inflammatory bowel disease. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health care utilization, patients were significantly more likely to be screened for CRC if their primary care practices had greater autonomy over the internal structure of care delivery (pmanagement and referral procedures are associated with significantly lower CRC screening performance. Competition with hospital resource demands may impinge on the degree of internal organization of their affiliated primary care practices.

  12. Leveraging workflow control patterns in the domain of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Katharina; Marcos, Mar

    2016-02-10

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) include recommendations describing appropriate care for the management of patients with a specific clinical condition. A number of representation languages have been developed to support executable CPGs, with associated authoring/editing tools. Even with tool assistance, authoring of CPG models is a labor-intensive task. We aim at facilitating the early stages of CPG modeling task. In this context, we propose to support the authoring of CPG models based on a set of suitable procedural patterns described in an implementation-independent notation that can be then semi-automatically transformed into one of the alternative executable CPG languages. We have started with the workflow control patterns which have been identified in the fields of workflow systems and business process management. We have analyzed the suitability of these patterns by means of a qualitative analysis of CPG texts. Following our analysis we have implemented a selection of workflow patterns in the Asbru and PROforma CPG languages. As implementation-independent notation for the description of patterns we have chosen BPMN 2.0. Finally, we have developed XSLT transformations to convert the BPMN 2.0 version of the patterns into the Asbru and PROforma languages. We showed that although a significant number of workflow control patterns are suitable to describe CPG procedural knowledge, not all of them are applicable in the context of CPGs due to their focus on single-patient care. Moreover, CPGs may require additional patterns not included in the set of workflow control patterns. We also showed that nearly all the CPG-suitable patterns can be conveniently implemented in the Asbru and PROforma languages. Finally, we demonstrated that individual patterns can be semi-automatically transformed from a process specification in BPMN 2.0 to executable implementations in these languages. We propose a pattern and transformation-based approach for the development of CPG models

  13. Dentists' dietary perception and practice patterns in a dental practice-based research network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Dental caries are largely preventable, and epidemiological evidence for a relationship between diet and oral health is abundant. To date, however, dentists' perceptions about the role of diet and dentists' practice patterns regarding diet counseling have not been clarified.THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO: (1 examine discordance between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual provision of diet counseling to patients, and (2 identify dentists' characteristics associated with their provision of diet counseling.The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey in Japan.The study queried dentists working in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN, which aims to allow dentists to investigate research questions and share experiences and expertise (n = 282.Dentists were asked about their perceptions on the importance of diet and their practice patterns regarding diet counseling, as well as patient, practice, and dentist background data.The majority of participants (n = 116, 63% recognized that diet is "more important" to oral health. However, among participants who think diet is "more important" (n = 116, only 48% (n = 56 provide diet counseling to more than 20% of their patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that several variables were associated with providing diet counseling; dentist gender, practice busyness, percentage of patients interested in caries prevention, caries risk assessment, and percentage of patients who receive blood pressure screening.Some discordance exists between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual practice pattern regarding diet counseling to patients. Reducing this discordance may require additional dentist education, including nutritional and systemic disease concepts; patient

  14. Practice patterns and career satisfaction of Canadian female general surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbard, Pamela C; Wirtzfeld, Debrah A

    2009-06-01

    We wanted to study how female general surgeons in Canada manage lifestyle and career demands. All female Canadian general surgeons registered with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada were asked to complete a survey evaluating their practice patterns, personal lives, and levels of satisfaction related to these factors. Eighty-five surveys (66%) were returned. Most respondents work in full-time clinical practices. While it was rare to find women in part-time or shared practices, 35% of women reported interest in these alternative models. Respondents described the necessary factors for a transition into alternative models. Job satisfaction was high (3.8 out of 5), with personal and parenting satisfaction being less highly rated (3.3 and 3.2, respectively). Canadian female general surgeons have active and satisfying careers, although many would like to work in alternative practice models that better conform to their lifestyle demands. This pressure will have a significant impact on the future surgical workforce.

  15. Future Career Plans and Practice Patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Jason; Coolen, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The practice patterns of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists continue to evolve with each new generation of physicians. Diversifying subspecialties, changes in resident duty hours, job market saturation, and desire for work-life balance are playing stronger roles. Professional practice direction and needs assessment may be aided by awareness of future Obstetrics and Gynaecology physician career plans and expectations. The objective of this study was to determine the expected career plans and practice patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents following residency. The SOGC Junior Member Committee administered its third career planning survey to Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents electronically in December 2011. The data collected was statistically analyzed and compared to previous surveys. There were 183 responses giving a response rate of 43%. More than one half of all residents were considering postgraduate training (58%). Projected practice patterns included: 84% maintaining obstetrical practice, 60% locuming, and 50% job-sharing. The majority of residents expected to work in a 6 to 10 person call group (48%), work 3 to 5 call shifts per month (72%), work 41 to 60 hours weekly (69%), and practise in a city with a population greater than 500 000 (45%). Only 18% of residents surveyed were in favour of streaming residency programs in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Canadian resident career plan and expected practice pattern assessment remains an important tool for aiding in resource allocation and strategic development of care and training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Canada. Copyright © 2016 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sustainability in care through an ethical practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Linda; Salmela, Susanne; Nyström, Lisbet; Koskinen, Camilla

    2018-03-01

    While sustainability is a key concept in many different domains today, it has not yet been sufficiently emphasized in the healthcare sector. Earlier research shows that ethical values and evidence-based care models create sustainability in care practice. The aim of this study was to gain further understanding of the ethical values central to the realization of sustainability in care and to create an ethical practice model whereby these basic values can be made perceptible and active in care practice. Part of the ongoing "Ethical Sustainable Caring Cultures" research project, a hermeneutical application research design was employed in this study. Dialogues were used, where scientific researchers and co-researchers were given the opportunity to reflect on ethical values in relation to sustainability in care. An ethical practice model with ethos as its core was created from the results of the dialogues. In the model, ethos is encircled by the ethical values central to sustainability: dignity, responsibility, respect, invitation, and vows. The model can be used as a starting point for ethical conversations that support carers' reflections on the ethical issues seen in day-to-day care work and the work community, allowing ethical values to become visible throughout the entire care culture. It is intended as a tool whereby carers can more deeply understand an organization's common basic values and what they entail in regard to sustainability in care.

  17. Co- and multimorbidity patterns in primary care based on episodes of care: results from the German CONTENT project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemann Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to technological progress and improvements in medical care and health policy the average age of patients in primary care is continuously growing. In equal measure, an increasing proportion of mostly elderly primary care patients presents with multiple coexisting medical conditions. To properly assess the current situation of co- and multimorbidity, valid scientific data based on an appropriate data structure are indispensable. CONTENT (CONTinuous morbidity registration Epidemiologic NeTwork is an ambitious project in Germany to establish a system for adequate record keeping and analysis in primary care based on episodes of care. An episode is defined as health problem from its first presentation by a patient to a doctor until the completion of the last encounter for it. The study aims to describe co- and multimorbidity as well as health care utilization based on episodes of care for the study population of the first participating general practices. Methods The analyses were based on a total of 39,699 patients in a yearly contact group (YCG out of 17 general practices in Germany for which data entry based on episodes of care using the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC was performed between 1.1.2006 and 31.12.2006. In order to model the relationship between the explanatory variables (age, gender, number of chronic conditions and the response variables of interest (number of different prescriptions, number of referrals, number of encounters that were applied to measure health care utilization, we used multiple linear regression. Results In comparison to gender, patients' age had a manifestly stronger impact on the number of different prescriptions, the number of referrals and number of encounters. In comparison to age (β = 0.043, p Conclusion Documentation in primary care on the basis of episodes of care facilitates an insight to concurrently existing health problems and related medical procedures

  18. Usage Patterns of a Mobile Palliative Care Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haipeng; Liu, David; Marks, Sean; Rickerson, Elizabeth M; Wright, Adam; Gordon, William J; Landman, Adam

    2018-06-01

    Fast Facts Mobile (FFM) was created to be a convenient way for clinicians to access the Fast Facts and Concepts database of palliative care articles on a smartphone or tablet device. We analyzed usage patterns of FFM through an integrated analytics platform on the mobile versions of the FFM application. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the usage data from FFM as a way to better understand user behavior for FFM as a palliative care educational tool. This is an exploratory, retrospective analysis of de-identified analytics data collected through the iOS and Android versions of FFM captured from November 2015 to November 2016. FFM App download statistics from November 1, 2015, to November 1, 2016, were accessed from the Apple and Google development websites. Further FFM session data were obtained from the analytics platform built into FFM. FFM was downloaded 9409 times over the year with 201,383 articles accessed. The most searched-for terms in FFM include the following: nausea, methadone, and delirium. We compared frequent users of FFM to infrequent users of FFM and found that 13% of all users comprise 66% of all activity in the application. Demand for useful and scalable tools for both primary palliative care and specialty palliative care will likely continue to grow. Understanding the usage patterns for FFM has the potential to inform the development of future versions of Fast Facts. Further studies of mobile palliative care educational tools will be needed to further define the impact of these educational tools.

  19. Usage pattern of personal care products in California households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangmei May; Bennett, Deborah H; Ritz, Beate; Cassady, Diana L; Lee, Kiyoung; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2010-11-01

    Given the concern over the potential for health risks associated with certain ingredients (e.g., phthalates) in personal care products, usage patterns of ∼30 types of personal care products (e.g., shampoo, sunscreen, fragrance, etc.) were collected in 604 California households through a telephone interview. Preferences in selecting products, e.g., scented or unscented, aerosol, and brand loyalty, were also investigated. Participants were recruited in three age groups, children (mostly preschoolers), their parents, and adults age 55 or older. Use frequencies of various product types varied by sex, age group, race, education, and climatic region. Product use by parent and child from the same household were correlated. Use frequencies of products in the same class (e.g., skincare) were moderately correlated, which may impact aggregate exposures. Use frequencies observed in this study were generally in the same range as those reported in the EPA Exposure Factor Handbook, but we found differences for some individual products. Our study provides additional data on population-based usage patterns of a large collection of commonly used personal care products pertaining to several age groups and socio-demographic strata. This information will be valuable for exposure and risk assessments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Child Care Practices and Its Effects to School Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Raymund C. Panopio

    2017-01-01

    This scholarly work aimed to determine the child care practices that have the potential in honing a child with good school performance. The result of the study led to the formulation of a model that typifies the good child care practices. Since children are on the accepting side, it is the way parents raise a nd rear them that will influence what they will be in the near future. The participants were selected as they are included in the top p...

  1. Nutritional practices in full-day-care pre-schools.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, A

    2011-06-01

    Full-day-care pre-schools contribute significantly to the nutritional intake and acquisition of dietary habits of the pre-school child. The present study investigated nutritional practices in full-day-care pre-schools in Dublin, Ireland, aiming to determine the nutritional support that pre-school managers deem necessary, thereby facilitating the amelioration of existing pre-school nutritional training and practices.

  2. Lessons learned from testing the quality cost model of Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) transitional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooten, Dorothy; Naylor, Mary D; York, Ruth; Brown, Linda P; Munro, Barbara Hazard; Hollingsworth, Andrea O; Cohen, Susan M; Finkler, Steven; Deatrick, Janet; Youngblut, JoAnne M

    2002-01-01

    To describe the development, testing, modification, and results of the Quality Cost Model of Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) Transitional Care on patient outcomes and health care costs in the United States over 22 years, and to delineate what has been learned for nursing education, practice, and further research. The Quality Cost Model of APN Transitional Care. Review of published results of seven randomized clinical trials with very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants; women with unplanned cesarean births, high risk pregnancies, and hysterectomy surgery; elders with cardiac medical and surgical diagnoses and common diagnostic related groups (DRGs); and women with high risk pregnancies in which half of physician prenatal care was substituted with APN care. Ongoing work with the model is linking the process of APN care with the outcomes and costs of care. APN intervention has consistently resulted in improved patient outcomes and reduced health care costs across groups. Groups with APN providers were rehospitalized for less time at less cost, reflecting early detection and intervention. Optimal number and timing of postdischarge home visits and telephone contacts by the APNs and patterns of rehospitalizations and acute care visits varied by group. To keep people well over time, APNs must have depth of knowledge and excellent clinical and interpersonal skills that are the hallmark of specialist practice, an in-depth understanding of systems and how to work within them, and sufficient patient contact to effect positive outcomes at low cost.

  3. Primary Care Practice Transformation and the Rise of Consumerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrank, William H

    2017-04-01

    Americans are increasingly demanding the same level of service in healthcare that they receive in other services and products that they buy. This rise in consumerism poses challenges for primary care physicians as they attempt to transform their practices to succeed in a value-based reimbursement landscape, where they are rewarded for managing costs and improving the health of populations. In this paper, three examples of consumer-riven trends are described: retail healthcare, direct and concierge care, and home-based diagnostics and care. For each, the intersection of consumer-driven care and the goals of value-based primary care are explored. If the correct payment and connectivity enablers are in place, some examples of consumer-driven care are well-positioned to support primary care physicians in their mission to deliver high-quality, efficient care for the populations they serve. However, concerns about access and equity make other trends less consistent with that mission.

  4. Transforming Practice with Older People through an Ethic of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Lizzie; Barnes, Marian

    2016-06-01

    This article explores the relevance of deliberative practices framed by feminist care ethics to social work practice with older people. It draws on two connected projects which brought together older people: practitioners and academics. The first was a participatory research project in which the significance of care to well-being in old age emerged. The second was a knowledge exchange project which generated learning resources for social care practice based on the research findings of the first project. Here we analyse selected transcripts of recordings from meetings of both projects to consider the ways that discussions about lived experiences and everyday lives demonstrate care through this dialogue. Using this analysis, we propose that care ethics can be useful in transforming relationships between older people and those working with them through the creation of hybrid spaces in which 'care-full deliberation' can happen. We argue that such reflective spaces can enable transformative dialogue about care and its importance to older people and offer a counterbalance to the procedurally driven environments in which much social work practice takes place and can support practice more attuned to the circumstances and concerns of older people.

  5. Developing communities of practice in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Edwards, Kasper

    Purpose Standard operating procedures (SOPs) are a part of healthcare operations but relying on explicit knowledge is not necessarily sufficient to continuously adapt and improve processes. The theory of communities of practice (CoP) proposes an approach to knowledge sharing that could supplement...... the use of SOPs. A CoP is a social community formed around a practice (e.g. ICU nursing) which induce a propensity to share experiences and thereby constitute knowledge sharing (Lave & Wenger 1991; Brown & Duguid 1991). CoP was conceived as a descriptive construct but has gained popularity and is found...

  6. [The elderly care practices of indigenous-performance of health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissardo, Leidyani Karina; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Carreira, Lígia

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to understand the care practices of health professionals who assist the elderly Kaingang. It is a qualitative study, supported in ethnography, conducted by ten professionals working in primary health care in the indigenous land of Faxinal, Paraná, Brazil. The data was collected from November 2010 to February 2012 by participant observation and interviews, and analyzed based on the Transcultural Care Theory. Was identified the preoccupation of the carers practices with the medication and immunization, as well as traditional medical care. To achieve these, care professionals had strategies that implemented maintenance of older people in care. We conclude that cultural values and integrate scientific need assistance to improve the health of elderly indigenous.

  7. A descriptive study of the practice patterns of massage new zealand massage therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna M; Sullivan, S John; Baxter, G David

    2011-03-30

    Massage therapy has grown in popularity, yet little is known globally or in New Zealand about massage therapists and their practices. The aims of this study were to describe the practice patterns of trained Massage New Zealand massage therapists in New Zealand private practice, with regard to therapist characteristics; practice modes and settings, and therapy characteristics; referral patterns; and massage therapy as an occupation. A survey questionnaire was mailed to 66 trained massage therapist members of Massage New Zealand who were recruiting massage clients for a concurrent study of massage therapy culture. Most massage therapists were women (83%), NZ European (76%), and holders of a massage diploma qualification (89%). Massage therapy was both a full- (58%) and part-time (42%) occupation, with the practice of massage therapy being the only source of employment for 70% of therapists. Nearly all therapists (94%) practiced massage for more than 40 weeks in the year, providing a median of 16 - 20 hours of direct client care per week. Most massage therapists worked in a "solo practice" (58%) and used a wide and active referral network. Almost all therapists treated musculoskeletal symptoms: the most common client issues or conditions treated were back pain/problem (99%), neck/shoulder pain/problem (99%), headache or migraine (99%), relaxation and stress reduction (96%), and regular recovery or maintenance massage (89%). The most frequent client fee per treatment was NZ$60 per hour in a clinic and NZ$1 per minute at a sports event or in the workplace. Therapeutic massage, relaxation massage, sports massage, and trigger-point therapy were the most common styles of massage therapy offered. Nearly all massage therapists (99%) undertook client assessment; 95% typically provided self-care recommendations; and 32% combined other complementary and alternative medicine therapies with their massage consultations. This study provides new information about the practice of

  8. Holistic Health Care: A Challenge to Podiatric Medical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Leonard A.; Levine, Peter M.

    1980-01-01

    As the profession of podiatric medicine becomes more closely identified with the delivery of primary care, it is suggested that it is essential for practicing podiatrists and students to have more educational opportunities in the field of holistic health care, psychiatry, and the behavioral sciences. (Author/MLW)

  9. Preparing Students for Practice in a Managed Care Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Nancy; Fortune, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Managed care has profound effects on health and mental health service delivery in the United States. This article describes the knowledge that students need for effective social work practice within a managed care environment and evaluates a course to deliver the content. (Contains 3 tables.)

  10. Behavioral Patterns in Special Education. Good Teaching Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Dorta, Manuela; Borges, África

    2017-01-01

    Providing quality education means to respond to the diversity in the classroom. The teacher is a key figure in responding to the various educational needs presented by students. Specifically, special education professionals are of great importance as they are the ones who lend their support to regular classroom teachers and offer specialized educational assistance to students who require it. Therefore, special education is different from what takes place in the regular classroom, demanding greater commitment by the teacher. There are certain behaviors, considered good teaching practices, which teachers have always been connected with to achieve good teaching and good learning. To ensure that these teachers are carrying out their educational work properly it is necessary to evaluate. This means having appropriate instruments. The Observational Protocol for Teaching Functions in Primary School and Special Education (PROFUNDO-EPE, v.3., in Spanish) allows to capture behaviors from these professionals and behavioral patterns that correspond to good teaching practices. This study evaluates the behavior of two special education teachers who work with students from different educational stages and educational needs. It reveals that the analyzed teachers adapt their behavior according the needs and characteristics of their students to the students responding more adequately to the needs presented by the students and showing good teaching practices. The patterns obtained indicate that they offer support, help and clear guidelines to perform the tasks. They motivate them toward learning by providing positive feedback and they check that students have properly assimilated the contents through questions or non-verbal supervision. Also, they provide a safe and reliable climate for learning.

  11. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance

  12. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults.

  13. Practice Parameter on Child and Adolescent Mental Health Care in Community Systems of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This parameter presents overarching principles and practices for child and adolescent mental health care in community systems of care. Community systems of care are defined broadly as comprising the wide array of child-serving agencies, programs, and practitioners (both public and private), in addition to natural community supports such as…

  14. Relationship-Focused Child Care Practices: Quality of Care and Child Outcomes for Children in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Margaret Tresch; Klausli, Julia F.; Mata-Otero, Ana-Maria; Caughy, Margaret O'Brien

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Child care delivery practices promoting continuous, primary caregiver-child relationships (relationship-focused child care) were evaluated for 223 preschool-age children (45% African American, 55% Latino) attending child care centers serving low-income children. Both relationship-focused and non-relationship-focused centers were…

  15. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  16. Evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice globally. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... best available evidence from research findings, expert ideas from specialists in the various health ... need to be addressed to enhance utilization of the best available evidence in nursing practice.

  17. Health care practices in ancient Greece: The Hippocratic ideal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleisiaris, Christos F.; Sfakianakis, Chrisanthos; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Asclepius and Hippocrates focused medical practice on the natural approach and treatment of diseases, highlighting the importance of understanding the patient’s health, independence of mind, and the need for harmony between the individual, social and natural environment, as reflected in the Hippocratic Oath. The aim of this study was to present the philosophy of care provision in ancient Greece and to highlight the influence of the Hippocratic ideal in modern health care practices. A literature review was carried out using browser methods in international databases. According to the literature, “healthy mind in a healthy body” was the main component of the Hippocratic philosophy. Three main categories were observed in the Hippocratic provision of care: health promotion, interventions on trauma care, and mental care and art therapy interventions. Health promotion included physical activity as an essential part of physical and mental health, and emphasized the importance of nutrition to improve performance in the Olympic Games. Interventions on trauma care included surgical practices developed by Hippocrates, mainly due to the frequent wars in ancient Greece. Mental care and art therapy interventions were in accordance with the first classification of mental disorders, which was proposed by Hippocrates. In this category music and drama were used as management tools in the treatment of illness and in the improvement of human behavior. The role of Asclepieion of Kos was highlighted which clearly indicates a holistic health care model in care provision. Finally, all practices regarded detailed recordings and evaluation of information within the guidelines. The Hippocratic philosophy on health care provision focused on the holistic health care model, applying standards and ethical rules that are still valid today. PMID:25512827

  18. Sexual Harassment of Newcomers in Elder Care. An Institutional Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Krøjer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sexual harassment is illegal and may have very damaging effects on the people exposed to it. One would expect organizations, employers, and institutions to take very good care to prevent employees from exposure to sexual harassment from anyone in their workplace. And yet, many people, mostly women, are exposed to sexual harassment at work. In care work, such behaviour is often directed toward their female caregiver by elderly citizens in need of care. Contemporary Nordic studies of working life and work environment have primarily investigated the interpersonal dimensions of sexual harassment, thus focusing on the relation between elderly citizens in need of care and their professional caregivers. In this article, we argue that sexual harassment from the elderly toward newcomers in elder care should also be seen as an effect of institutional practices. Based upon a Foucauldianinspired notion of practice-making, the article carries out a secondary analysis of three different empirical studies in order to explore how sexual harassment is produced and maintained through institutional practices in elder care. The term institution in this perspective includes three dimensions; a political, an educational (educational institutions in health and elder care, and a work organizational dimension. By examining elder care in these different dimensions, we identify how sexual harassment of professional caregivers is produced and maintained through institutional practice-making in elder care. The article thus contributes to our knowledge on working life by expanding and qualifying the understanding of the problematic working environment in care work, and by offering an alternative theoretical and analytical approach to the study of sexual harassment. Together, these insights suggest how elder care institutions might act to prevent sexual harassment toward caregivers.

  19. A Worldwide Survey on Peyronie's Disease Surgical Practice Patterns Among Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; Wang, Run; Ralph, David; Levine, Laurence; Brock, Gerald

    2018-04-01

    Despite published guidelines on Peyronie's disease (PD), there are limited data on actual surgical practice among surgeons. To evaluate the surgical practice patterns in PD among surgeons from different continents and members of various sexual medicine societies. An anonymous survey on various pre-, intra-, and postoperative aspects of PD surgical care was distributed in printed format during International Society of Sexual Medicine meetings and as an online survey to International Society of Sexual Medicine members. 390 surgeons responded to the survey, with great variations in pre-, intra-, and postoperative strategies in PD surgical care. Most surgeons performed fewer than 10 penile plications and 10 graft surgeries per year. Modified Nesbit plication was the preferred option by most surgeons. Surgeons who received fellowship training were more likely to perform autologous than allograft surgery (odds ratio = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.13-2.82, P = .01). The use of penile color duplex ultrasound was inconsistently performed, with higher-volume surgeons (ie, >20 cases operated a year) more likely to use this diagnostic modality (odds ratio = 70.18, 95% CI = 20.99-234.6, P worldwide survey study has the potential to assist in the formation of a new practice guideline and serve as the basis for future prospective multinational studies. This is one of the largest surveys on PD practice and, to our knowledge, the only survey conducted across various sexual medicine societies, with the inclusion of many high-volume and experienced PD surgeons. This also is the 1st study to comprehensively evaluate many key aspects in surgical practice patterns for PD. However, the categorization on the questionnaire used in this survey was not designed to allow for direct comparison given the possibility of some surgeons with dual society memberships, reporting biases, large CIs in outcomes, different patient demographics, and cultural acceptance. There is great variation in surgical

  20. Patterns for collaborative work in health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, Maria Adela; Peleg, Mor; Cuggia, Marc; Glasspool, David

    2011-11-01

    (exceptional) scenarios. We show that although abstract, the proposed patterns can be instantiated in an executable COGENT prototype, and can be mapped into the Tallis tool that enacts PROforma language specifications of medical guidelines. The proposed patterns are generic and abstract enough to capture the normal and abnormal scenarios of assignment and delegation of tasks in collaborative work in health care teams. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Descriptive Study of the Practice Patterns of Massage New Zealand Massage Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna M.; Sullivan, S. John; Baxter, G. David

    2011-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy has grown in popularity, yet little is known globally or in New Zealand about massage therapists and their practices. Purpose and Setting: The aims of this study were to describe the practice patterns of trained Massage New Zealand massage therapists in New Zealand private practice, with regard to therapist characteristics; practice modes and settings, and therapy characteristics; referral patterns; and massage therapy as an occupation. Research Design and Participants: A survey questionnaire was mailed to 66 trained massage therapist members of Massage New Zealand who were recruiting massage clients for a concurrent study of massage therapy culture. Results: Most massage therapists were women (83%), NZ European (76%), and holders of a massage diploma qualification (89%). Massage therapy was both a full- (58%) and part-time (42%) occupation, with the practice of massage therapy being the only source of employment for 70% of therapists. Nearly all therapists (94%) practiced massage for more than 40 weeks in the year, providing a median of 16 – 20 hours of direct client care per week. Most massage therapists worked in a “solo practice” (58%) and used a wide and active referral network. Almost all therapists treated musculoskeletal symptoms: the most common client issues or conditions treated were back pain/problem (99%), neck/shoulder pain/problem (99%), headache or migraine (99%), relaxation and stress reduction (96%), and regular recovery or maintenance massage (89%). The most frequent client fee per treatment was NZ$60 per hour in a clinic and NZ$1 per minute at a sports event or in the workplace. Therapeutic massage, relaxation massage, sports massage, and trigger-point therapy were the most common styles of massage therapy offered. Nearly all massage therapists (99%) undertook client assessment; 95% typically provided self-care recommendations; and 32% combined other complementary and alternative medicine therapies with their

  2. Narratives and communication in health care practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mariann B.

    2014-01-01

    included in various official visions papers and recommendations. The main question is pedagogical: How do practitioners in the health sector i.e. in nursing deal with these perspectives? The materials are the Danish Health Board´s program of rehabilitation and palliative care, data from a focus group study......, and data from published autobiographies. The analysis shows that challenges are centered on communication about existential and spiritual matters. The relationship between being professional, personal and private is focused on in the light of the concepts of empathy and epoché as well as in a discussion...

  3. Integrating advanced practice providers into medical critical care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Christine; O'Rourke, Nancy C; Madison, J Mark

    2013-03-01

    Because there is increasing demand for critical care providers in the United States, many medical ICUs for adults have begun to integrate nurse practitioners and physician assistants into their medical teams. Studies suggest that such advanced practice providers (APPs), when appropriately trained in acute care, can be highly effective in helping to deliver high-quality medical critical care and can be important elements of teams with multiple providers, including those with medical house staff. One aspect of building an integrated team is a practice model that features appropriate coding and billing of services by all providers. Therefore, it is important to understand an APP's scope of practice, when they are qualified for reimbursement, and how they may appropriately coordinate coding and billing with other team providers. In particular, understanding when and how to appropriately code for critical care services (Current Procedural Terminology [CPT] code 99291, critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient, first 30-74 min; CPT code 99292, critical care, each additional 30 min) and procedures is vital for creating a sustainable program. Because APPs will likely play a growing role in medical critical care units in the future, more studies are needed to compare different practice models and to determine the best way to deploy this talent in specific ICU settings.

  4. Practicing health promotion in primary care -a reflective enquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, S; Chauhan, A S; Mahapatra, S; Sinha, R; Pati, S

    2017-12-01

    Health promotion is an integral part of routine clinical practice. The physicians' role in improving the health status of the general population, through effective understanding and delivery of health promotion practice, is evident throughout the international literature. Data from India suggest that physicians have limited skills in delivering specific health promotion services. However, the data available on this is scarce. This study was planned to document the current health promotion knowledge, perception and practices of local primary care physicians in Odisha. An exploratory study was planned between the months of January - February 2013 in Odisha among primary care physicians working in government set up. This exploratory study was conducted, using a two-step self-administered questionnaire, thirty physicians practicing under government health system were asked to map their ideal and current health promotion practice, and potential health promotion elements to be worked upon to enhance the practice. The study recorded a significant difference between the mean of current and ideal health promotion practices. The study reported that physicians want to increase their practice on health education. We concluded that inclusion of health promotion practices in routine care is imperative for a strong healthcare system. It should be incorporated as a structured health promotion module in medical curriculum as well.

  5. Ten good reasons to practice ultrasound in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; van Hooland, Simon; Elbers, Paul; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, critical care ultrasound has gained its place in the armamentarium of monitoring tools. A greater understanding of lung, abdominal, and vascular ultrasound plus easier access to portable machines have revolutionised the bedside assessment of our ICU patients. Because ultrasound is not only a diagnostic test, but can also be seen as a component of the physical exam, it has the potential to become the stethoscope of the 21st century. Critical care ultrasound is a combination of simple protocols, with lung ultrasound being a basic application, allowing assessment of urgent diagnoses in combination with therapeutic decisions. The LUCI (Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill) consists of the identification of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line); lung sliding (seashore sign); the A-lines (horizontal artefact); the quad sign and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion; the fractal and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation; the B-lines and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndromes; abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax; and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. The BLUE protocol (Bedside Lung Ultrasound in Emergency) is a fast protocol (respiratory failure. With this protocol, it becomes possible to differentiate between pulmonary oedema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax, each showing specific ultrasound patterns and profiles. The FALLS protocol (Fluid Administration Limited by Lung Sonography) adapts the BLUE protocol to be used in patients with acute circulatory failure. It makes a sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography in combination with lung ultrasound, with the appearance of B-lines considered to be the endpoint for fluid therapy

  6. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2......, and monitoring delivered by medical assistants with usual care. Measurements: All-cause hospitalizations at 12 months (primary outcome) and quality of life scores (Short Form 12 Health Questionnaire [SF-12] and the Euroqol instrument [EQ-5D]). Results: Included patients had, on average, four co-occurring chronic...

  7. Communication that heals: mindful communication practices from palliative care leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omilion-Hodges, Leah M; Swords, Nathan M

    2016-01-01

    Though research has begun to highlight the centrality of communication in palliative care, studies have yet to focus on the use of mindful communication. Mindful communication is associated with increases in patient care and decreases in physician burnout. Through in-depth, semi-structured interviews the authors sought mindful communication practices from palliative care leaders in American Hospital Association Circle of Life® award-wining units. Four key mindful communication practices emerged: Know your audience, ask questions, discard scripts, and recognize your role. The discussion articulates how key mindful communication practices may be used as a stage model, where key practices may be used individually or in concert, by sole practitioners or within interdisciplinary teams and by new and seasoned clinicians. Theoretical contributions and areas for future inquiry are also discussed.

  8. Socioeconomic status and patterns of care in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, A.; Vinod, S.K.; Jalaludin, B.; Yuile, P.; Delaney, G.P.; Barton, M.

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study aims to explore any associations between socioeconomic factors and lung cancer management and outcome in the Australian setting. The study population consisted of patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer in 1996 who were living in the Northern Sydney Area Health Service (NSAHS) or South Western Sydney Area Health Service (SWSAHS). These two Area Health Services differ in socioeconomic profiles based on socioeconomic indexes for areas (SEIFA), median income, education level and unemployment rate. Data on patient demographics, tumour characteristics, management details, recurrence and survival were collected, and the patterns of care were analysed. Socioeconomic status indicators of the two Area Health Services were imputed from the Australian Bureau of Statistics data. There were 270 and 256 new cases of lung cancer identified in NSAHS and SWSAHS respectively. Patients in NSAHS were slightly older (median age 73 versus 68 years) and there was less male predominance. The stage distributions and performance status of the two cohorts were similar. There were no significant differences in the utilisation rates of different treatment modalities between the two areas: radiotherapy (54% in NSAHS and 55% in SWSAHS), chemotherapy (34% and 25%), surgery (26% and 21%) and no treatment (22% and 25%). The 5-year overall survival was slightly in favour of NSAHS (10.5% and 7.4%), but did not reach statistical significance. Despite differences in socioeconomic profiles between the two area health services, patients with lung cancer had similar patterns of care and survival

  9. Appreciative Inquiry for quality improvement in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Mary C; Bobiak, Sarah N; Litaker, David; Carter, Caroline A; Wu, Laura; Schroeder, Casey; Zyzanski, Stephen J; Weyer, Sharon M; Werner, James J; Fry, Ronald E; Stange, Kurt C

    2011-01-01

    To test the effect of an Appreciative Inquiry (AI) quality improvement strategy on clinical quality management and practice development outcomes. Appreciative inquiry enables the discovery of shared motivations, envisioning a transformed future, and learning around the implementation of a change process. Thirty diverse primary care practices were randomly assigned to receive an AI-based intervention focused on a practice-chosen topic and on improving preventive service delivery (PSD) rates. Medical-record review assessed change in PSD rates. Ethnographic field notes and observational checklist analysis used editing and immersion/crystallization methods to identify factors affecting intervention implementation and practice development outcomes. The PSD rates did not change. Field note analysis suggested that the intervention elicited core motivations, facilitated development of a shared vision, defined change objectives, and fostered respectful interactions. Practices most likely to implement the intervention or develop new practice capacities exhibited 1 or more of the following: support from key leader(s), a sense of urgency for change, a mission focused on serving patients, health care system and practice flexibility, and a history of constructive practice change. An AI approach and enabling practice conditions can lead to intervention implementation and practice development by connecting individual and practice strengths and motivations to the change objective.

  10. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, D.H.; Cui, D.J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G.L.; Wang, X.Q.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage

  11. Research for superconducting energy storage patterns and its practical countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.H., E-mail: lindehua_cn@yahoo.com.cn [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Cui, D.J.; Li, B.; Teng, Y.; Zheng, G.L. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wang, X.Q. [College of Physics, Chongqing University, JD Duz (USA)-CQU Institute for Superconductivity, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density for SMES system. • Increasing the effective current density in the superconducting coils or optimizing the configuration of the SMES coil could improve the energy storage density. • A new conceive of energy compression is also proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, we attempt to introduce briefly the significance, the present status, as well as the working principle of the primary patterns of the superconducting energy storage system, first of all. According to the defect on the lower energy storage density of existed superconducting energy storage device, we proposed some new ideas and strategies about how to improve the energy storage density, in which, a brand-new but a tentative proposal regarding the concept of energy compression was emphasized. This investigation has a certain reference value towards the practical application of the superconducting energy storage.

  12. How to practice person-centred care: A conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Maria J; Manalili, Kimberly; Jolley, Rachel J; Zelinsky, Sandra; Quan, Hude; Lu, Mingshan

    2018-04-01

    Globally, health-care systems and organizations are looking to improve health system performance through the implementation of a person-centred care (PCC) model. While numerous conceptual frameworks for PCC exist, a gap remains in practical guidance on PCC implementation. Based on a narrative review of the PCC literature, a generic conceptual framework was developed in collaboration with a patient partner, which synthesizes evidence, recommendations and best practice from existing frameworks and implementation case studies. The Donabedian model for health-care improvement was used to classify PCC domains into the categories of "Structure," "Process" and "Outcome" for health-care quality improvement. The framework emphasizes the structural domain, which relates to the health-care system or context in which care is delivered, providing the foundation for PCC, and influencing the processes and outcomes of care. Structural domains identified include: the creation of a PCC culture across the continuum of care; co-designing educational programs, as well as health promotion and prevention programs with patients; providing a supportive and accommodating environment; and developing and integrating structures to support health information technology and to measure and monitor PCC performance. Process domains describe the importance of cultivating communication and respectful and compassionate care; engaging patients in managing their care; and integration of care. Outcome domains identified include: access to care and Patient-Reported Outcomes. This conceptual framework provides a step-wise roadmap to guide health-care systems and organizations in the provision PCC across various health-care sectors. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A preliminary survey of the practice patterns of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan Patricia A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Feldenkrais Method® of somatic education purports to guide people of varying ages and abilities to improve function. Many people choose this method to aid with recovery from injury, manage chronic conditions, or enhance performance even though limited research supporting its safety and effectiveness exists to guide decisions about use and referral. Very little information about practitioner characteristics and practice patterns is publicly available to assist researchers in the design of appropriate safety and effectiveness studies. The purpose of this study was to obtain an initial overview of the characteristics of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais PractitionersCM. Methods Of 1300 certified Feldenkrais® practitioners at the time of the study, there were 1193 practitioners with email accounts who were sent invitations to complete a web-based survey. The survey inquired about practice locations, additional credentials, service patterns and workloads during the previous 3 months. Response rate and descriptive statistics were calculated. Results The survey had a 32.3% (385/1193 response rate. The top states in which responders practiced were California (n = 92 and New York (n = 44. Most responders did not hold other credentials as traditional health care providers or as complementary and alternative medicine providers. Among those who did, the most common credentials were physical therapist (n = 83 and massage therapist (n = 38. Just over a third of traditional health care providers only provided Feldenkrais lessons, compared to 59.3% of complementary and alternative providers. On average, responders saw 7.6 ± 8.1 (median = 5 clients per week for individual lessons, 8.4 ± 11.5 (median = 5 clients per week for group lessons, and 2.9 ± 3.9 (median = 2 new clients per month for individual lessons. Conclusions This preliminary survey of United States Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioners indicated that most

  14. Women's self-perception and self-care practice: implications for health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, E P; Clark, M C; Guevara, E B

    2001-01-01

    Mexican American women experience unique health care needs related to integration of Mexican and American cultures. To learn how to better promote self-care practices and service utilization in women of Mexican origin living in Texas, researchers used a qualitative approach to interview a convenience sample of 11 low-income women attending a health clinic. Researchers collected narrative data about the women's perceptions of health, wellness, and self-care. Using the matrix approach described by Miles and Huberman, we organized findings around women's roles, including participants' descriptions of themselves, their health and wellness awareness, self-care practices for health/illness and wellness/nonwellness, barriers to self-care, origin of self-care practices, and perceptions of life control. Implications for health planning and service delivery are presented.

  15. Postoperative electrolyte management: Current practice patterns of surgeons and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarita, Fernando A; Dueck, Andrew D; Azouz, Solomon M

    2015-07-01

    Managing postoperative electrolyte imbalances often is driven by dogma. To identify areas of improvement, we assessed the practice pattern of postoperative electrolyte management among surgeons and residents. An online survey was distributed among attending surgeons and surgical residents at the University of Toronto. The survey was designed according to a systematic approach for formulating self-administered questionnaires. Questions addressed workload, decision making in hypothetical clinical scenarios, and improvement strategies. Of 232 surveys distributed, 156 were completed (response rate: 67%). The majority stated that junior residents were responsible for managing electrolytes at 13 University of Toronto-affiliated hospitals. Supervision was carried out predominately by senior residents (75%). Thirteen percent reported management went unsupervised. Approximately 59% of residents were unaware how often attending surgeons assessed patients' electrolytes. Despite the majority of residents (53.7%) reporting they were never given tools or trained in electrolyte replacement, they considered themselves moderately or extremely confident. The management of hypothetical clinical scenarios differed between residents and attending surgeons. The majority (50.5%) of respondents considered that an electrolyte replacement protocol is the most appropriate improvement strategy. Electrolyte replacement represents an important component of surgeons' workload. Despite reporting that formal training in electrolyte management is limited, residents consider themselves competent; however, their practice is highly variable and often differs from pharmacologic-directed recommendations. Optimizing how postoperative electrolytes are managed in surgical wards requires building a framework that improves knowledge, training, and limits unnecessary interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Coordinating cancer care: patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T; Morrow, Monica; Griggs, Jennifer J; Jagsi, Reshma; Hamilton, Ann S; Graff, John J; Friese, Christopher R; Hofer, Timothy P

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for more coordinated cancer care models that correspond to initiatives led by cancer providers and professional organizations. These initiatives parallel those underway to integrate the management of patients with chronic conditions. We developed 5 breast cancer patient and practice management process measures based on the Chronic Care Model. We then performed a survey to evaluate patterns and correlates of these measures among attending surgeons of a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer between June 2005 and February 2007 in Los Angeles and Detroit (N = 312; response rate, 75.9%). Surgeon practice specialization varied markedly with about half of the surgeons devoting 15% or less of their total practice to breast cancer, whereas 16.2% of surgeons devoted 50% or more. There was also large variation in the extent of the use of patient and practice management processes with most surgeons reporting low use. Patient and practice management process measures were positively associated with greater levels of surgeon specialization and the presence of a teaching program. Cancer program status was weakly associated with patient and practice management processes. Low uptake of patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer patients may indicate that surgeons are not convinced that these processes matter, or that there are logistical and cost barriers to implementation. More research is needed to understand how large variations in patient and practice management processes might affect the quality of care for patients with breast cancer.

  17. Provider Attitudes and Practices toward Sexual and Reproductive Health Care for Young Women with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, Traci M; Borrero, Sonya; Sawicki, Gregory S; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Jones, Kelley A; Tuchman, Lisa K; Weiner, Daniel J; Pilewski, Joseph M; Orenstein, David M; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the attitudes and practices of cystic fibrosis (CF) providers toward sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care in young women with CF. Adult and pediatric US CF providers were sent an online survey exploring their attitudes toward SRH importance, SRH care practices, and barriers/facilitators to SRH care in adolescent and/or young adult women. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyze results. Attitudes toward the importance of SRH care in patients with CF and self-report of practice patterns of SRH discussion. Respondents (n = 196) were 57% pediatric (111/196) and 24% adult physicians (48/196) and 19% nurse practitioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs) (37/196). Ninety-four percent of respondents believed SRH was important for female patients with CF (184/196). More than 75% believed SRH care should be standardized within the CF care model (147/196) and 41% believed the CF team should have the primary role in SRH discussion and care (80/196). For many CF-specific SRH topics, discrepancies emerged between how important respondents believed these were to address and how often they reported discussing these topics in practice. Significant differences in SRH attitudes and practices were present between adult and pediatric physicians. The most significant barriers to SRH care identified were lack of time (70%, 137/196) and the presence of family in clinic room (54%, 106/196). Potential facilitators included training materials for providers (68%, 133/196) and written (71%, 139/196) or online (76%, 149/196) educational resources for patients. CF providers perceive SRH topics as important to discuss, but identify barriers to routine discussion in current practice. Providers endorsed provider training and patient educational resources as means to improve SRH delivery. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Critical care nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists interface patterns with computer-based decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Scott

    2007-11-01

    The purposes of this review are to examine the types of clinical decision support systems in use and to identify patterns of how critical care advanced practice nurses (APNs) have integrated these systems into their nursing care patient management practices. The decision-making process itself is analyzed with a focus on how automated systems attempt to capture and reflect human decisional processes in critical care nursing, including how systems actually organize and process information to create outcome estimations based on patient clinical indicators and prognosis logarithms. Characteristics of APN clinicians and implications of these characteristics on decision system use, based on the body of decision system user research, are introduced. A review of the Medline, Ovid, CINAHL, and PubMed literature databases was conducted using "clinical decision support systems,"computerized clinical decision making," and "APNs"; an examination of components of several major clinical decision systems was also undertaken. Use patterns among APNs and other clinicians appear to vary; there is a need for original research to examine how APNs actually use these systems in their practices in critical care settings. Because APNs are increasingly responsible for admission to, and transfer from, critical care settings, more understanding is needed on how they interact with this technology and how they see automated decision systems impacting their practices. APNs who practice in critical care settings vary significantly in how they use the clinical decision systems that are in operation in their practice settings. These APNs must have an understanding of their use patterns with these systems and should critically assess whether their patient care decision making is affected by the technology.

  19. Improving the rate and quality of medicaid well child care exams in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katy Duncan; Merchen, Eileen; Turner, Crystal D; Vaught, Cara; Fritz, Terrie; Mold, Jim

    2010-07-01

    Providing recommended well child care to children insured bythe Medicaid Program can be challenging. Members of the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine (DFPM) at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center contracted to help practices improve the rates and quality of well child care visits within the Oklahoma Medicaid Program. Sixteen pediatric and family medicine practices in three Oklahoma counties chose to participate in this quality improvement initiative. The records of Sooner Care-insured children age 0-20 were reviewed for both rate and quality of well child care visits made during the previous twelve months. Performance feedback was provided. Practice guidelines, Sooner Care requirements, and tips from exemplary practices were provided. In two of the counties, a case manager helped practices with challenging patients. Practice Enhancement Assistants (PEAs) then helped practices implement a variety of strategies to increase visit rates and improve the quality of early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment (EPSDT) visits. Information technology (IT) support was provided when needed. The average rates of visits, for all counties combined, increased. Visit rates increased more in the younger age groups (birth to two years). There was significant improvement in quality of visits. Rates and quality improved much more in some practices than in others. A combination of academic detailing, performance feedback, practice facilitation, case management, and IT support produced increases in the quality and rates of EPSDT exams.

  20. Emergency Radiology Practice Patterns: Shifts, Schedules, and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Tarek N; Shekhani, Haris; Lamoureux, Christine; Mar, Hanna; Nicola, Refky; Sliker, Clint; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari

    2017-03-01

    To assess the practice environment of emergency radiologists with a focus on schedule, job satisfaction, and self-perception of health, wellness, and diagnostic accuracy. A survey drawing from prior radiology and health care shift-work literature was distributed via e-mail to national societies, teleradiology groups, and private practices. The survey remained open for 4 weeks in 2016, with one reminder. Data were analyzed using hypothesis testing and logistic regression modeling. Response rate was 29.6% (327/1106); 69.1% of respondents (n = 226) were greater than 40 years old, 73% (n = 240) were male, and 87% (n = 284) practiced full time. With regard to annual overnight shifts (NS): 36% (n = 118) did none, 24.9% (n = 81) did 182 or more, and 15.6% (n = 51) did 119. There was a significant association between average NS worked per year and both perceived negative health effects (P impact on memory (P job enjoyment and number of annual NS (P job" for radiologists who work no NS is 2.21 times greater than for radiologists who work at least 119 NS, when shift length is held constant. Radiologists with 11+ years of experience who work no NS or 1 to 100 NS annually have lower odds of feeling overwhelmed when compared with those working the same number of NS with job satisfaction and negative health self-perception. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

    2010-05-01

    In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care.

  2. Practice versus politics in Danish day-care centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Line; Jensen de López, Kristine M.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential that early educators in day-care services possess adequate pedagogical tools for supporting children’s communicative development. Early literacy programmes (ELPs) are potential tools. However, studies investigating the effects of ELPs seldom address implementation processes......’ (NNS) political statements on early learning. This study presents results from 18 pre-programme interviews with pedagogues and illustrates their daily practices prior to the ELP implementation. Results suggest that: (1) there is a potential gap between practice and politics concerning Danish practices...... for promoting early learning; and (2) certain aspects related to existing pedagogical practices may be foreseen as potential challenges for the implementation of structured ELPs....

  3. Holistic health care: Patients' experiences of health care provided by an Advanced Practice Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Irene; Lindblad, Monica; Möller, Ulrika; Gillsjö, Catharina

    2018-02-01

    Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is a fairly new role in the Swedish health care system. To describe patients' experiences of health care provided by an APN in primary health care. An inductive, descriptive qualitative approach with qualitative open-ended interviews was chosen to obtain descriptions from 10 participants regarding their experiences of health care provided by an APN. The data were collected during the spring 2012, and a qualitative approach was used for analyze. The APNs had knowledge and skills to provide safe and secure individual and holistic health care with high quality, and a respectful and flexible approach. The APNs conveyed trust and safety and provided health care that satisfied the patients' needs of accessibility and appropriateness in level of care. The APNs way of providing health care and promoting health seems beneficial in many ways for the patients. The individual and holistic approach that characterizes the health care provided by the APNs is a key aspect in the prevailing change of health care practice. The transfer of care and the increasing number of older adults, often with a variety of complex health problems, call for development of the new role in this context. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Nursing Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Gatifloxacin phase IV surveillance trial (TeqCES study) utilizing 5000 primary care physician practices: report of pathogens isolated and susceptibility patterns in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Jones, Ronald N

    2002-09-01

    Recently FDA-approved fluoroquinolones like gatifloxacin possess enhanced activity against Gram-positive pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, experience with adverse events among previously used fluoroquinolones has led to expanded post-marketing investigations of clinical efficacy and safety. An open-label gatifloxacin trial was initiated in early 2000, using 2795 (>15000 enrolled cases) primary care providers for treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) such as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB), acute sinusitis. Microbiology specimens and sputum slides were referred to a reference laboratory, pathogens identified and reference antimicrobial susceptibility tests performed. Results were classified by infection site, geographic census region and patient profile/demographics. The most frequent pathogens were: for CAP (n = 384)-S. pneumoniae (37%) > Hemophilus influenzae (31%) > Moraxella catarrhalis (13%); for ABECB (528)-H. influenzae (37%) > M. catarrhalis (26%) > S. pneumoniae (17%); and for sinusitis (2691)-M. catarrhalis (29%) > H. influenzae (24%) > S. pneumoniae (17%). H. parainfluenzae (ABECB) and S. aureus (sinusitis) were also commonly isolated. CAP S. pneumoniae isolates had significantly less high-level resistance (5% at > or =2 micro g/ml) than those isolates from ABECB or sinusitis (13-15%). United States census zone differences in S. pneumoniae resistance were identified (greatest in West or East South Central, South Atlantic). S. pneumoniae macrolide resistance was high (23-33%) and H. influenzae clarithromycin susceptibility was only 56-62%. beta-lactamase rates in H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were 21-29% and 88-92%, respectively. Only one S. pneumoniae was not susceptible to gatifloxacin, and this new fluoroquinolone was fourfold more potent than levofloxacin (MIC(50,) 0.25 vs. 1 micro g/ml). This Phase IV surveillance trial (Teq

  5. Nursing care documentation practice: The unfinished task of nursing care in the University of Gondar Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Mihiretu; Endris, Yesuf; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu

    2017-09-01

    Even though nursing care documentation is an important part of nursing practice, it is commonly left undone. The objective of this study was to assess nursing care documentation practice and the associated factors among nurses who are working at the University of Gondar Hospital. An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 220 nurses working at the University of Gondar Hospital inpatient wards from March 20 to April 30, 2014. Data were collected using a structured and pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered into Epi Info version 7 and analyzed with SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Two hundred and six nurses returned the questionnaire. Good nursing care documentation practice among nurses was 37.4%. A low nurse-to-patient ratio AOR = 2.15 (95%CI [1.155, 4.020]), in-service training on standard nursing process AOR = 2.6 (95%CI[1.326, 5.052]), good knowledge AOR = 2.156(95% CI [1.092, 4.254]), and good attitude toward nursing care documentation AOR = 2.22 (95% CI [1.105, 4.471] were significantly associated with nursing care documentation practice. Most of the nursing care provided remains undocumented. Nurse-to-patient ratio, in-service training, knowledge, and attitude of nurses toward nursing care documentation were factors associated with nursing care documentation practice.

  6. Practices in delivery and birth care from mothers’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Apolinário

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to highlight the practices of delivery and birth care in a maternity ward from mothers’ perspective. Methods: descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach carried out in a maternity hospital of usual risk, with 100 regular postpartum mothers. It was used a semi-structured questionnaire as recommended by the World Health Organization. Results: among the practices that should be encouraged from birth care, stands out: women’s privacy; participation of the companion of their choice; the use of non-pharmacological methods for pain relief. Among the practices that should be eliminated: the transfer to the delivery room at the second stage and the lithotomy position. Conclusion: women are still passive in the birth process despite attempts to change the model of care during labor and birth.

  7. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  8. Primary care clinicians' recognition and management of depression: a model of depression care in real-world primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Seong-Yi; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Gonzales, Junius J

    2013-11-01

    Depression is prevalent in primary care (PC) practices and poses a considerable public health burden in the United States. Despite nearly four decades of efforts to improve depression care quality in PC practices, a gap remains between desired treatment outcomes and the reality of how depression care is delivered. This article presents a real-world PC practice model of depression care, elucidating the processes and their influencing conditions. Grounded theory methodology was used for the data collection and analysis to develop a depression care model. Data were collected from 70 individual interviews (60 to 70 min each), three focus group interviews (n = 24, 2 h each), two surveys per clinician, and investigators' field notes on practice environments. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed for analysis. Surveys and field notes complemented interview data. Seventy primary care clinicians from 52 PC offices in the Midwest: 28 general internists, 28 family physicians, and 14 nurse practitioners. A depression care model was developed that illustrates how real-world conditions infuse complexity into each step of the depression care process. Depression care in PC settings is mediated through clinicians' interactions with patients, practice, and the local community. A clinician's interactional familiarity ("familiarity capital") was a powerful facilitator for depression care. For the recognition of depression, three previously reported processes and three conditions were confirmed. For the management of depression, 13 processes and 11 conditions were identified. Empowering the patient was a parallel process to the management of depression. The clinician's ability to develop and utilize interactional relationships and resources needed to recognize and treat a person with depression is key to depression care in primary care settings. The interactional context of depression care makes empowering the patient central to depression care delivery.

  9. In search of joy in practice: a report of 23 high-functioning primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsky, Christine A; Willard-Grace, Rachel; Schutzbank, Andrew M; Sinsky, Thomas A; Margolius, David; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We highlight primary care innovations gathered from high-functioning primary care practices, innovations we believe can facilitate joy in practice and mitigate physician burnout. To do so, we made site visits to 23 high-performing primary care practices and focused on how these practices distribute functions among the team, use technology to their advantage, improve outcomes with data, and make the job of primary care feasible and enjoyable as a life's vocation. Innovations identified include (1) proactive planned care, with previsit planning and previsit laboratory tests; (2) sharing clinical care among a team, with expanded rooming protocols, standing orders, and panel management; (3) sharing clerical tasks with collaborative documentation (scribing), nonphysician order entry, and streamlined prescription management; (4) improving communication by verbal messaging and in-box management; and (5) improving team functioning through co-location, team meetings, and work flow mapping. Our observations suggest that a shift from a physician-centric model of work distribution and responsibility to a shared-care model, with a higher level of clinical support staff per physician and frequent forums for communication, can result in high-functioning teams, improved professional satisfaction, and greater joy in practice.

  10. Antiemetic therapy in Asia Pacific countries for patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy--a descriptive analysis of practice patterns, antiemetic quality of care, and use of antiemetic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shiying; Burke, Thomas A; Chan, Alexandre; Kim, Hoon-Kyo; Hsieh, Ruey Kuen; Hu, Xichun; Liang, Jin-Tung; Baños, Ana; Spiteri, Carmel; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports prescribing patterns for prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) after highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or MEC) for cancer in six Asia Pacific countries. In a prospective noninterventional study, 31 sites in Australia, China, India, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan recorded details of CINV prophylaxis for the acute phase (first 24 h) and delayed phase (days 2-5) after single-day HEC or MEC for adult patients. Additional information on CINV prophylactic medications was collected from 6-day patient diaries. Primary antiemetic therapies were defined as corticosteroids, the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists (5HT3-RAs), and neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK1-RAs). Evaluable patients in cycle 1 numbered 648 (318 [49%] HEC and 330 [51%] MEC) of mean (SD) age of 56 (12) years, including 58% women. For the acute phase after HEC, overall (and country range), 96% (91-100%) of patients received a 5HT3-RA, 87% (70-100%) a corticosteroid, and 43% (0-91%) an NK1-RA. CINV prophylaxis for the HEC delayed phase was more variable: including 22% (7-65%) 5HT3-RA, 52% (12-93%) corticosteroid, and 46% (0-88%) NK1-RA. For the MEC acute phase, 97% (87-100%) of patients received 5HT3-RA and 86% (73-97%) a corticosteroid. For the MEC delayed phase, 201 patients (61%) received a primary antiemetic, including 5HT3-RA (41%), corticosteroid (37%), and/or NK1-RA (4%). The 5HT3-RAs were prescribed consistently in all countries, while prescribing of other antiemetic therapies was variable, and corticosteroids were under-prescribed for CINV prophylaxis, particularly in the delayed phase.

  11. Orchestrating care: nursing practice with hospitalised older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Sherry Ann; Phinney, Alison; Hall, Wendy Ann; Rodney, Patricia; Baumbusch, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    The increased incidence of health challenges with aging means that nurses are increasingly caring for older adults, often in hospital settings. Research about the complexity of nursing practice with this population remains limited. To seek an explanation of nursing practice with hospitalised older adults. Design. A grounded theory study guided by symbolic interactionism was used to explore nursing practice with hospitalised older adults from a nursing perspective. Glaserian grounded theory methods were used to develop a mid-range theory after analysis of 375 hours of participant observation, 35 interviews with 24 participants and review of selected documents. The theory of orchestrating care was developed to explain how nurses are continuously trying to manage their work environments by understanding the status of the patients, their unit, mobilising the assistance of others and stretching available resources to resolve their problem of providing their older patients with what they perceived as 'good care' while sustaining themselves as 'good' nurses. They described their practice environments as hard and under-resourced. Orchestrating care is comprised of two subprocesses: building synergy and minimising strain. These two processes both facilitated and constrained each other and nurses' abilities to orchestrate care. Although system issues presented serious constraints to nursing practice, the ways in which nurses were making meaning of their work environment both aided them in managing their challenges and constrained their agency. Nurses need to be encouraged to share their important perspective about older adult care. Administrators have a role to play in giving nurses voice in workplace committees and in forums. Further research is needed to better understand how multidisciplinary teams influence care of hospitalized older adults. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Primary care practice and health professional determinants of immunisation coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Cameron C; Petousis-Harris, Helen; Turner, Nikki; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Kerse, Ngaire; Jones, Rhys; York, Deon; Desmond, Natalie; Stewart, Joanna

    2011-08-01

    To identify primary care factors associated with immunisation coverage. A survey during 2005-2006 of a random sample of New Zealand primary care practices, with over-sampling of practices serving indigenous children. An immunisation audit was conducted for children registered at each practice. Practice characteristics and the knowledge and attitudes of doctors, nurses and caregivers were measured. Practice immunisation coverage was defined as the percentage of registered children from 6 weeks to 23 months old at each practice who were fully immunised for age. Associations of practice, doctor, nurse and caregiver factors with practice immunisation coverage were determined using multiple regression analyses. One hundred and twenty-four (61%) of 205 eligible practices were recruited. A median (25th-75th centile) of 71% (57-77%) of registered children at each practice was fully immunised. In multivariate analyses, immunisation coverage was higher at practices with no staff shortages (median practice coverage 76% vs 67%, P = 0.004) and where doctors were confident in their immunisation knowledge (72% vs 67%, P= 0.005). Coverage was lower if the children's parents had received information antenatally, which discouraged immunisation (67% vs 73%, P = 0.008). Coverage decreased as socio-economic deprivation of the registered population increased (P < 0.001) and as the children's age (P = 0.001) and registration age (P = 0.02) increased. CONCLUSIONS Higher immunisation coverage is achieved by practices that establish an early relationship with the family and that are adequately resourced with stable and confident staff. Immunisation promotion should begin antenatally. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. [Supportive care during chemotherapy for lung cancer in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Veronika; Tamási, Lilla; Gálffy, Gabriella; Losonczy, György

    2012-09-01

    Active oncotherapy, combination chemotherapy of lung cancer is accompanied with many side effects which may impair patients' quality of life and compromise the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Most side effects of chemotherapy are preventable or treatable with optimal supportive care which enhances success in patient care and treatment. The aim of this review is to summarize the most important conditions that may be associated with combined chemotherapy of lung cancer from the practical point of view.

  14. Evaluating an holistic assessment tool for palliative care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlfatrick, Sonja; Hasson, Felicity

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate a holistic assessment tool for palliative care practice. This included identifying patients' needs using the holistic tool and exploring the usability, applicability and barriers and facilitators towards implementation in practice. The delivery of effective holistic palliative care requires a careful assessment of the patients' needs and circumstances. Whilst holistic assessment of palliative care needs is advocated, questions exist around the appropriateness of tools to assist this process. Mixed-method research design. Data collection involved an analysis of piloted holistic assessments undertaken using the tool (n = 132) and two focus groups with healthcare professionals (n = 10). The tool enabled health professionals to identify and gain an understanding of the needs of the patients, specifically in relation to the physical healthcare needs. Differences, however, between the analysis of the tool documentation and focus group responses were identified in particular areas. For example, 59 (68·8%) respondents had discussed preferred priorities of care with the patient; however, focus group comments revealed participants had concerns around this. Similarly, whilst over half of responses (n = 50; 57·5%) had considered a prognostic clinical indicator for the patient as an action, focus group results indicated questions around healthcare professionals' knowledge and perceived usefulness of such indicators. Positive aspects of the tool were that it was easy to understand and captured the needs of individuals. Negative aspects of the tool were that it was repetitive and the experience of assessors required consideration. The tool evaluation identified questions regarding holistic assessment in palliative care practice and the importance of communication. A holistic assessment tool can support patient assessment and identification of patients' needs in the 'real world' of palliative care practice, but the 'tool' is merely an aid to assist professionals to

  15. The Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Tazuma, Susumu; Furukawa, Akira; Nishii, Osamu; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Azuhata, Takeo; Itakura, Atsuo; Kamei, Seiji; Kondo, Hiroshi; Maeda, Shigenobu; Mihara, Hiroshi; Mizooka, Masafumi; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Obara, Hideaki; Sato, Norio; Takayama, Yuichi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Miyata, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Izumi; Honda, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Since acute abdomen requires accurate diagnosis and treatment within a particular time limit to prevent mortality, the Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine in collaboration with four other medical societies launched the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen that were the first English guidelines in the world for the management of acute abdomen. Here we provide the highlights of these guidelines [all clinical questions (CQs) and recommendations are shown in supplementary information]. A systematic and comprehensive evaluation of the evidence for epidemiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and primary treatment for acute abdomen was performed to develop the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015. Because many types of pathophysiological events underlie acute abdomen, these guidelines cover the primary care of adult patients with nontraumatic acute abdomen. A total of 108 questions based on 9 subject areas were used to compile 113 recommendations. The subject areas included definition, epidemiology, history taking, physical examination, laboratory test, imaging studies, differential diagnosis, initial treatment, and education. Japanese medical circumstances were considered for grading the recommendations to assure useful information. The two-step methods for the initial management of acute abdomen were proposed. Early use of transfusion and analgesia, particularly intravenous acetaminophen, were recommended. The Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015 have been prepared as the first evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute abdomen. We hope that these guidelines contribute to clinical practice and improve the primary care and prognosis of patients with acute abdomen.

  16. Economies of scope in Danish primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Rose Olsen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    between GP services and overall economies of scope. Data: Cross-section data for a sample of 331 primary care practices with 1-8 GPs from the year 2006. This is a unique combined dataset consisting of survey and register data. Results: We find a trend towards cost complementarities between the production......Aim: We analyze total operating costs and activities in Danish General Practice units to assess whether there are unexploited economies of scope in the production of primary care services. Methods: We apply stochastic frontier analysis to derive cost functions and associated cost complementarities...

  17. The practice brochure: a patient's guide to team care.

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, G N

    1980-01-01

    A practice brochure describing the primary health care team was given to 262 new and established patients in a group practice. Most liked it, and thought it helpful, and improved their knowledge of team care. When asked how they would respond to certain hypothetical health problems and clinical situations, there was a significantly greater use of non-doctor members of the team than by a matched sample who had not read the brochure. Inappropriate use of members of the team was not engendered.

  18. Primary care providers' lived experiences of genetics in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Brittany; Webber, Colleen; Ruhland, Lucia; Dalgarno, Nancy; Armour, Christine M; Birtwhistle, Richard; Brown, Glenn; Carroll, June C; Flavin, Michael; Phillips, Susan; MacKenzie, Jennifer J

    2018-04-26

    To effectively translate genetic advances into practice, engagement of primary care providers (PCPs) is essential. Using a qualitative, phenomenological methodology, we analyzed key informant interviews and focus groups designed to explore perspectives of urban and rural PCPs. PCPs endorsed a responsibility to integrate genetics into their practices and expected advances in genetic medicine to expand. However, PCPs reported limited knowledge and difficulties accessing resources, experts, and continuing education. Rural practitioners' additional concerns included cost, distance, and poor patient engagement. PCPs' perspectives are crucial to develop relevant educational and systems-based interventions to further expand genetic medicine in primary care.

  19. Long-Term Care Workforce Issues: Practice Principles for Quality Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilster, Susan D; Boltz, Marie; Dalessandro, Jennifer L

    2018-01-18

    This article is one in a series of articles in this supplement addressing best practice for quality dementia care. The Alzheimer's Association, in revising their Dementia Care Practice Recommendations for 2017 has identified staff across the long-term care spectrum as a distinct and important determinant of quality dementia care. The purpose of this article is to highlight areas for developing and supporting a dementia-capable workforce. The Alzheimer's Association Principles For Advocacy To Assure Quality Dementia Care Across Settings provide a framework to examine interventions to support the dementia care workforce in long-term care settings. Evidence-based approaches that represent these principles are discussed: (a) staffing, (b) staff training, (c) compensation, (d) supportive work environments, (e) career growth and retention, and (f) engagement with family. Although not all settings currently require attention to the principles described, this article proposes these principles as best practice recommendations. Recommendations and future research considerations to further improve the lives of those who live and work in nursing homes, assisted living, hospice, and home care, are proposed. Additional areas to improve the quality of a dementia care workforce person-centered care information, communication and interdepartmental teamwork, and ongoing evaluation are discussed. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Perspectives from practice: complexities of personal care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyn, Julie-Anne; Zanella, Sally; Wilkinson, Adele

    2017-11-14

    Personal care workers (PCWs) make up the bulk of the workforce in residential and community care services. The knowledge and skill set needed for safe and effective practice in care settings is extensive. A diverse range of registered training organisations (RTOs) offering Certificate III and IV in Individual Support (aging, home and community) are tasked with producing job-ready PCWs. However, the curricula of these programs vary. Additionally, a national code of conduct for healthcare workers became effective in October 2015 as a governance framework for PCWs. The language of the code statements is ambiguous making it unclear how this framework should be translated by RTOs and applied in the preservice practice preparation of PCWs. Employers of PCWs need to feel confident that the content of the preservice education of PCWs satisfactorily prepares them for the diverse contexts of their practice. Likewise, the health professionals who supervise PCWs must be assured about the knowledge and skills of the PCW if they are to safely delegate care activities. The perspectives presented in this discussion make it clear that investigation into the nebulous nature of PCW education, regulation and practice is needed to identify the shortcomings and enable improved practice.

  1. Concussion Management Practice Patterns Among Sports Medicine Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stache, Stephen; Howell, David; Meehan, William P

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine concussion management practice patterns among sports medicine physicians in the United States. Cross-sectional study using a web-based survey. Members of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM). We distributed a questionnaire to physician members of the AMSSM assessing the current practices for evaluating and managing concussions sustained during sports. Specifically, we asked respondents about their use of management guidelines, medications, balance assessments, neuropsychological tests, and return-to-play strategies. Of the 3591 members emailed, 425 (11.8%) respondents responded. Ninety-seven percent of respondents reported basing current management of sport-related concussion on a published set of criteria, with a majority (91.9%) following the guidelines provided by the Fourth International Conference on Concussion in Sport. Seventy-six percent of respondents reported using medication beyond 48 hours postinjury. Acetaminophen was reported as the most commonly administered medication, although tricyclic antidepressants and amantadine were also commonly administered. Vitamins, minerals, and dietary supplements were also reported as commonly administered. Most respondents reported using a form of neuropsychological testing (87.1%). A majority of respondents (88.6%) reported allowing athletes to return to competition after concussion only once the athlete becomes symptom free and completes a return-to-play protocol. Most sports medicine physicians seem to use recently developed guidelines for concussion management, regularly use medications and neuropsychological testing in management strategies, and follow established return-to-play guidelines. Sports medicine physicians seem to have clinical expertise in the management of sport-related concussion.

  2. Pedagogical Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care in Tanzania: Policy and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mligo, Ignasia; Mitchell, Linda; Bell, Beverley

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine current pedagogical practices in early childhood education and care in Tanzania, a reflection from policy and practices to the implementation of Learner-Centred Pedagogy and to put forward possible improvements for the future. In 2005 a new pre-school education curriculum introduced a learner-centred…

  3. Recurrent glioblastoma: Current patterns of care in an Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Sagun; Thursfield, Vicky; Cher, Lawrence; Dally, Michael; Drummond, Katharine; Murphy, Michael; Rosenthal, Mark A; Gan, Hui K

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective population-based survey examined current patterns of care for patients with recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) who had previously undergone surgery and post-operative therapy at original diagnosis. The patients were identified from the Victorian Cancer Registry (VCR) from 2006 to 2008. Patient demographics, tumour characteristics and oncological management were extracted using a standardised survey by the treating clinicians/VCR staff and results analysed by the VCR. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) at diagnosis and progression were calculated. A total of 95 patients (48%) received treatment for first recurrence; craniotomy and post-operative treatment (38), craniotomy only (34) and non-surgical treatment (23). Patients receiving treatment at first progression had a higher median OS than those who did not (7 versus 3 months, ppattern of care survey of treatment for rGBM in an era where post-operative "Stupp" chemo-radiation is standard. First and second line therapy for rGBM is common and associated with significant benefit. Treatment generally includes re-resection and/or systemic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Australian patterns of prostate cancer care: Are they evolving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jonathon; Papa, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M.; Murphy, Declan; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Approaches to prostate cancer (PCa) care have changed in recent years out of concern for overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Despite these changes, many patients continue to undergo some form of curative treatment and with a growing perception among multidisciplinary clinicians that more aggressive treatments are being favored. This study examines patterns of PCa care in Australia, focusing on current rates of screening and aggressive interventions that consist of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND). Methods Health services data were used to assess Australian men undergoing PCa screening and treatment from 2001 to 2014. Age-specific rates of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening were calculated. Ratios of radical prostatectomy (RP) with PLND to RP without PLND, and HDR brachytherapy to low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy were determined by state jurisdictions. Results From 2008, the rate of PSA screening trended downward significantly with year for all age ranges (P use of HDR brachytherapy (ratio of HDR to LDR brachytherapy < 0.5 for all jurisdictions except the Australian Capital Territory). Conclusion Rates of PLND and HDR brachytherapy for PCa have declined in Australia, providing evidence for the effect of stage migration due to widespread PSA screening. Currently, PSA screening rates remain high among older men, which may expose them to unnecessary investigations and treatment-related morbidity. PMID:27014660

  5. Implementation as transfer between policy, research and practice in care.

    OpenAIRE

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Niet, A. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health Services Research is policy related and results have an impact on practices. Implementation of research output into practices is performed with a variety of strategies. Type of policy intentions and research output create a specific context for implementation. The main question here is: what combinations of background factors and implementation strategies lead to successful implementations in health care? Methods: Sources for this study are evaluations of 72 completed imple...

  6. Patterns of care and persistence after incident elevated blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Matthew F; Sinaiko, Alan R; Reifler, Liza M; Tavel, Heather M; Glanz, Jason M; Margolis, Karen L; Parker, Emily; Trower, Nicole K; Chandra, Malini; Sherwood, Nancy E; Adams, Kenneth; Kharbanda, Elyse O; Greenspan, Louise C; Lo, Joan C; O'Connor, Patrick J; Magid, David J

    2013-08-01

    Screening for hypertension in children occurs during routine care. When blood pressure (BP) is elevated in the hypertensive range, a repeat measurement within 1 to 2 weeks is recommended. The objective was to assess patterns of care after an incident elevated BP, including timing of repeat BP measurement and likelihood of persistently elevated BP. This retrospective study was conducted in 3 health care organizations. All children aged 3 through 17 years with an incident elevated BP at an outpatient visit during 2007 through 2010 were identified. Within this group, we assessed the proportion who had a repeat BP measured within 1 month of their incident elevated BP and the proportion who subsequently met the definition of hypertension. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with follow-up BP within 1 month of initial elevated BP. Among 72,625 children and adolescents in the population, 6108 (8.4%) had an incident elevated BP during the study period. Among 6108 with an incident elevated BP, 20.9% had a repeat BP measured within 1 month. In multivariate analyses, having a follow-up BP within 1 month was not significantly more likely among individuals with obesity or stage 2 systolic elevation. Among 6108 individuals with an incident elevated BP, 84 (1.4%) had a second and third consecutive elevated BP within 12 months. Whereas >8% of children and adolescents had an incident elevated BP, the great majority of BPs were not repeated within 1 month. However, relatively few individuals subsequently met the definition of hypertension.

  7. Practices of depression care in home health care: Home health clinician perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A.; Richardson, Joshua E.; Sheeran, Thomas; Bruce, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess any gaps between published best practices and real-world practices of treating depression in home health care (HHC), and barriers to closing any gaps. Methods A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with HHC nurses and administrators from five home health agencies in five states (n=20). Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed by a multi-disciplinary team using grounded theory method to identify themes. Results Routine home health nursing care overlapped with all functional areas of depression care. However, there were reported gaps between best practices and real-world practices. Gaps were associated with perceived scope of practice by HHC nurses, knowledge gaps and low self-efficacy in depression treatment, stigma attached to depression, poor quality of antidepressant management in primary care, and poor communication between HHC and primary care. Conclusions Strategies to close gaps between typical and best practices need to enhance HHC clinician knowledge and self-efficacy with depression treatment and improve the quality of antidepressant management and communication with primary care. PMID:26423098

  8. Physician and staff turnover in community primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Mary; Gotler, Robin S; Goodwin, Meredith A; Stange, Kurt C

    2004-01-01

    The effect of a rapidly changing healthcare system on personnel turnover in community family practices has not been analyzed. We describe physician and staff turnover and examine its association with practice characteristics and patient outcomes. A cross-sectional evaluation of length of employment of 150 physicians and 762 staff in 77 community family practices in northeast Ohio was conducted. Research nurses collected data using practice genograms, key informant interviews, staff lists, practice environment checklists, medical record reviews, and patient questionnaires. The association of physician and staff turnover with practice characteristics, patient satisfaction, and preventive service data was tested. During a 2-year period, practices averaged a 53% turnover rate of staff. The mean length of duration of work at the current practice location was 9.1 years for physicians and 4.1 years for staff. Longevity varied by position, with a mean of 3.4 years for business employees, 4.0 years for clinical employees, and 7.8 years for office managers. Network-affiliated practices experienced higher turnover than did independent practices. Physician longevity was associated with a practice focus on managing chronic illness, keeping on schedule, and responding to insurers' requests. No association was found between turnover and patient satisfaction or preventive service delivery rates. Personnel turnover is pervasive in community primary care practices and is associated with employee role, practice network affiliation, and practice focus. The potentially disruptive effect of personnel turnover on practice functioning, finances, and longitudinal relationships with patients deserves further study despite the reassuring lack of association with patient satisfaction and preventive service delivery rates.

  9. Practice Patterns and Projections for the US Pediatric Otolaryngology Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jason R; Ruch-Ross, Holly; Hotaling, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    This study represents up-to-date information on the current status of and future projections for the pediatric otolaryngology workforce. To provide an update on the practice patterns of and projections for the US pediatric otolaryngology workforce. An online survey was sent to all 172 members of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and fielded from May 29, 2014, to September 17, 2014. Current status of and perceived trends in the pediatric otolaryngology workforce. Eighty-four (48.8%) of the 172 members responded to the survey. Not all respondents answered all questions, and so totals and percentages might not reflect a total of 84 for any given response. The demographics and practice characteristics of the responding pediatric otolaryngologists were similar to those noted in a 1997 workforce survey. Fifty-four percent of respondents (n = 38) planned to continue full-time work over the next 5 years, and 47% (n = 31) believed that the number of patients in their practice was increasing. The proportion of those who believed that the need for pediatric otolaryngologists in their community was increasing (31%; n = 21) or decreasing (13%; n = 9) remained relatively constant from the 1997 survey (34% and 12%, respectively). Forty-nine percent (n = 35) reported believing that the number of pediatric otolaryngologists being trained was appropriate and that the need in their community was stable. Eighty-three percent (n = 55) reported believing that employment opportunities for pediatric otolaryngologists in the United States would be plentiful in the near future. The overall state of the pediatric otolaryngology workforce appears stable. The perceived current and future needs for pediatric otolaryngologists appear to be met by the current number of trainees. Employment opportunities appear promising for future pediatric otolaryngologists based on our respondents' opinions. This represents up

  10. Rethinking the intensive care environment: considering nature in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Claire; Batten, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    With consideration of an environmental concept, this paper explores evidence related to the negative impacts of the intensive care unit environment on patient outcomes and explores the potential counteracting benefits of 'nature-based' nursing interventions as a way to improve care outcomes. The impact of the environment in which a patient is nursed has long been recognised as one determinant in patient outcomes. Whilst the contemporary intensive care unit environment contains many features that support the provision of the intensive therapies the patient requires, it can also be detrimental, especially for long-stay patients. This narrative review considers theoretical and evidence-based literature that supports the adoption of nature-based nursing interventions in intensive care units. Research and theoretical literature from a diverse range of disciplines including nursing, medicine, psychology, architecture and environmental science were considered in relation to patient outcomes and intensive care nursing practice. There are many nature-based interventions that intensive care unit nurses can implement into their nursing practice to counteract environmental stressors. These interventions can also improve the environment for patients' families and nurses. Intensive care unit nurses must actively consider and manage the environment in which nursing occurs to facilitate the best patient outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The German MultiCare-study: Patterns of multimorbidity in primary health care – protocol of a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäfer Ingmar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multimorbidity is a highly frequent condition in older people, but well designed longitudinal studies on the impact of multimorbidity on patients and the health care system have been remarkably scarce in numbers until today. Little is known about the long term impact of multimorbidity on the patients' life expectancy, functional status and quality of life as well as health care utilization over time. As a consequence, there is little help for GPs in adjusting care for these patients, even though studies suggest that adhering to present clinical practice guidelines in the care of patients with multimorbidity may have adverse effects. Methods/Design The study is designed as a multicentre prospective, observational cohort study of 3.050 patients aged 65 to 85 at baseline with at least three different diagnoses out of a list of 29 illnesses and syndromes. The patients will be recruited in approx. 120 to 150 GP surgeries in 8 study centres distributed across Germany. Information about the patients' morbidity will be collected mainly in GP interviews and from chart reviews. Functional status, resources/risk factors, health care utilization and additional morbidity data will be assessed in patient interviews, in which a multitude of well established standardized questionnaires and tests will be performed. Discussion The main aim of the cohort study is to monitor the course of the illness process and to analyse for which reasons medical conditions are stable, deteriorating or only temporarily present. First, clusters of combinations of diseases/disorders (multimorbidity patterns with a comparable impact (e.g. on quality of life and/or functional status will be identified. Then the development of these clusters over time will be analysed, especially with regard to prognostic variables and the somatic, psychological and social consequences as well as the utilization of health care resources. The results will allow the development of an

  12. Patterns of outpatient care utilization by seniors under the National Health Insurance in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chin Hsu

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: This study employed nationally representative data in the detection of patterns in outpatient care utilization by elderly individuals in Taiwan. Medical care providers and policymakers should be fully aware of the complex patterns unique to older patients. The results of this study could be used as a benchmark with which to assess the impact of future medical care policy on elderly people.

  13. Beyond 'doing': Supporting clinical leadership and nursing practice in aged care through innovative models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturato, Lorraine; Drew, Liz

    2010-06-01

    Contemporary health care environments are increasingly challenged by issues associated with the recruitment and retention of qualified nursing staff. This challenge is particularly felt by residential aged care providers, with registered nurse (RN) numbers already limited and resident acuity rapidly rising. As a result, aged care service providers are increasingly exploring creative and alternative models of care. This article details exploratory research into a pre-existing, alternative model of care in a medium sized, regional residential aged care facility. Research findings suggest that the model of care is complex and multi-faceted and is an example of an integrated model of care. As a result of the implementation of this model of care a number of shifts have occurred in the practice experiences and clinical culture within this facility. Results suggest that the main benefits of this model are: (1) increased opportunities for RNs to engage in clinical leadership and proactive care management; (2) improved management and communication in relation to work processes and practices; and (3) enhanced recruitment and retention of both RNs and care workers.

  14. Newborn care practices and home-based postnatal newborn care programme – Mewat, Haryana, India, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latika Nath Sinha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the Home Based Postnatal Newborn Care programme by Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs under the National Rural Health Mission was initiated in 2011 to reduce neonatal mortality rates (NMRs. ASHAs get cash incentives for six postnatal home visits for newborn care. We studied newborn care practices among mothers in Mewat, Haryana, having a high NMR and determined risk factors for unsafe practices and described the knowledge and skills of ASHAs during home visits. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among mothers who had delivered a child during the previous seven months using cluster sampling. We interviewed mothers and ASHAs in the selected subcentres using semi–structured questionnaires on the six safe newborn care practices, namely safe breastfeeding, keeping cord and eyes clean, wrapping baby, kangaroo care, delayed bathing and hand washing. Results: We interviewed 320 mothers, 61 ASHAs and observed 19 home visits. Overall, 60% of mothers adopted less than three safe practices. Wrapping newborns (96% and delayed bathing (64% were better adopted than cord care (49%, safe breastfeeding (48%, hand washing (30%, kangaroo care (20% and eye care (9%. Cultural beliefs and traditional birth attendants influenced the mother’s practices. The lack of supervision by auxiliary nurse midwives (ANM, delayed referral and transportation were the other challenges. Conclusion: Knowledge–practice gaps existed among mothers counselled by ASHAs. Poor utilization of reproductive and child health services decreased opportunities for ASHA–mother dialogue on safe practices. Recommendations included training ANMs, training TBAs as ASHAs, innovative communication strategies for ASHAs and improved referral system.

  15. Health care waste management practice in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, R; Pradhan, B

    2010-10-01

    Health-care waste is a by-product of health care. Its poor management exposes health-care workers, waste handlers and the community to infections, toxic effects and injuries including damage of the environment. It also creates opportunities for the collection of disposable medical equipment, its re-sale and potential re-use without sterilization, which causes an important burden of disease worldwide. The purpose of this study was to find out health care waste management practice in hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Narayani Sub-Regional Hospital, Birgunj from May to October 2006 using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Study population was four different departments of the hospital (Medical/Paediatric, Surgical/Ortho, Gynae/Obstetric and Emergency), Medical Superintendent, In-charges of four different departments and all sweepers. Data was collected using interview, group discussion, observation and measurement by weight and volume. Total health-care waste generated was 128.4 kg per day while 0.8 kg per patient per day. The composition of health care waste was found to be 96.8 kg (75.4%) general waste, 24.1 kg (8.8%) hazardous waste and 7.5 kg (5.8%) sharps per day by weight. Health staffs and sweepers were not practicing the waste segregation. Occupational health and safety was not given due attention. Majority of the sweepers were unaware of waste management and need of safety measures to protect their own health. Health care waste management practice in the hospital was unsatisfactory because of the lack of waste management plan and carelessness of patients, visitors and staffs. Therefore the hospital should develop the waste management plan and strictly follow the National Health Care Waste Management Guideline.

  16. Patient autonomy in home care: Nurses' relational practices of responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gaby

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, new healthcare policies are transforming healthcare practices towards independent living and self-care of older people and people with a chronic disease or disability within the community. For professional caregivers in home care, such as nurses, this requires a shift from a caring attitude towards the promotion of patient autonomy. To explore how nurses in home care deal with the transformation towards fostering patient autonomy and self-care. Research design and context: A case study was conducted in a professional development course ('learning circle') for home care nurses, including participant observations and focus groups. The theoretical notion of 'relational agency' and the moral concept of 'practices of responsibility' were used to conduct a narrative analysis on the nurses' stories about autonomy. Eight nurses, two coaches and two university lecturers who participated in the learning circle. Ethical considerations: Informed consent was sought at the start of the course and again, at specific moments during the course of the learning circle. Three main themes were found that expressed the moral demands experienced and negotiated by the nurses: adapting to the person, activating patients' strengths and collaboration with patients and informal caregivers. On a policy and organisational level, the moral discourse on patient autonomy gets intertwined with the instrumental discourse on healthcare budget savings. This is manifested in the ambiguities the nurses face in fostering patient autonomy in their daily home care practice. To support nurses, critical thinking, moral sensitivity and trans-professional working should be part of their professional development. The turn towards autonomy in healthcare raises moral questions about responsibilities for care. Promoting patient autonomy should be a collaborative endeavour and deliberation of patients, professional and informal caregivers together.

  17. Health information technology workforce needs of rural primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A; Patterson, Davis G; Fenton, Susan H; Ostergard, Stefanie J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed electronic health record (EHR) and health information technology (HIT) workforce resources needed by rural primary care practices, and their workforce-related barriers to implementing and using EHRs and HIT. Rural primary care practices (1,772) in 13 states (34.2% response) were surveyed in 2012 using mailed and Web-based questionnaires. EHRs or HIT were used by 70% of respondents. Among practices using or intending to use the technology, most did not plan to hire new employees to obtain EHR/HIT skills and even fewer planned to hire consultants or vendors to fill gaps. Many practices had staff with some basic/entry, intermediate and/or advanced-level skills, but nearly two-thirds (61.4%) needed more staff training. Affordable access to vendors/consultants who understand their needs and availability of community college and baccalaureate-level training were the workforce-related barriers cited by the highest percentages of respondents. Accessing the Web/Internet challenged nearly a quarter of practices in isolated rural areas, and nearly a fifth in small rural areas. Finding relevant vendors/consultants and qualified staff were greater barriers in small and isolated rural areas than in large rural areas. Rural primary care practices mainly will rely on existing staff for continued implementation and use of EHR/HIT systems. Infrastructure and workforce-related barriers remain and must be overcome before practices can fully manage patient populations and exchange patient information among care system partners. Efforts to monitor adoption of these skills and ongoing support for continuing education will likely benefit rural populations. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  18. Characteristics of primary care practices associated with high quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Haggerty, Jeannie; Tousignant, Pierre; Barnsley, Janet; Hogg, William; Geneau, Robert; Hudon, Éveline; Duplain, Réjean; Denis, Jean-Louis; Bonin, Lucie; Del Grande, Claudio; Dragieva, Natalyia

    2013-09-03

    No primary practice care model has been shown to be superior in achieving high-quality primary care. We aimed to identify the organizational characteristics of primary care practices that provide high-quality primary care. We performed a cross-sectional observational study involving a stratified random sample of 37 primary care practices from 3 regions of Quebec. We recruited 1457 patients who had 1 of 2 chronic care conditions or 1 of 6 episodic care conditions. The main outcome was the overall technical quality score. We measured organizational characteristics by use of a validated questionnaire and the Team Climate Inventory. Statistical analyses were based on multilevel regression modelling. The following characteristics were strongly associated with overall technical quality of care score: physician remuneration method (27.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 19.0-35.0), extent of sharing of administrative resources (7.6; 95% CI 0.8-14.4), presence of allied health professionals (15.3; 95% CI 5.4-25.2) and/or specialist physicians (19.6; 95% CI 8.3-30.9), the presence of mechanisms for maintaining or evaluating competence (7.7; 95% CI 3.0-12.4) and average organizational access to the practice (4.9; 95% CI 2.6-7.2). The number of physicians (1.2; 95% CI 0.6-1.8) and the average Team Climate Inventory score (1.3; 95% CI 0.1-2.5) were modestly associated with high-quality care. We identified a common set of organizational characteristics associated with high-quality primary care. Many of these characteristics are amenable to change through practice-level organizational changes.

  19. Physiotherapy practice in South African intensive care units

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Care focuses largely on mobilisation, exercise therapy and multimodality respiratory therapy. ... use in an SA setting and conducted a pilot survey to determine the scope of practice of ..... be the goal for all survey-based studies.[20] The current ...

  20. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  1. Efficacy beliefs predict collaborative practice among intensive care unit nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Blanc, Pascale M.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Nap, Raoul E.

    P>Aim. This paper is a report of an investigation of whether intensive care nurses' efficacy beliefs predict future collaborative practice, and to test the potential mediating role of team commitment in this relationship. Background. Recent empirical studies in the field of work and organizational

  2. Hand Washing Practices and Compliance among Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hand washing is the simplest, most inexpensive and most effective method of reducing the incidence of hospital-acquired infections in the Intensive Care Unit. Several reports have shown a relationship between improved hand washing practices and reduced infection rates. We conducted a prospective, ...

  3. HIV self-testing practices among Health Care Workers: feasibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV self-testing practices among Health Care Workers: feasibility and options for ... is required to increase the rate of HIV testing and expand treatment services. ... 244(80%) of the HCWs had motivation or interest to be tested by themselves.

  4. Newborn care seeking practices in Central and Southern Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Objective: To investigate local perspectives and practices related to newborn care-seeking and the factors affecting them. .... In Arbe Gonna, they rub the newborn with a herb called hamessa, or take the baby to a health facility like many mothers in the other communities. Sore skin is .... Levels & Trends in Child Mortality.

  5. Practice of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies in Jordan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To describe the current role played by pharmacists in delivering pharmaceutical care (PC) in community pharmacies in Jordan (current activities and practices undertaken in the community and extent of provision of PC standards), pharmacists' perspectives on PC implementation and barriers to implementing PC ...

  6. Under surveillance: using cameras to improve care home practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-05-03

    When the owner of Bramley Court in Birmingham mooted the idea of installing surveillance cameras inside the care home, manager and nurse Ann Willey was unenthusiastic. 'It felt like Big Brother was watching you,' she says. But then she considered how cameras might reduce the risk of poor practice and the potential benefits for vulnerable residents.

  7. Diabetic foot care: Self reported knowledge and practice among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) foot complications are a leading cause of mortality in developing countries and the prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase in the next decades in these countries. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and practice of foot care among diabetes patients attending ...

  8. Knowledge and practice of pharmaceutical care by community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a global strategy to improve health through prompt identification and treatment of diseases. The pharmacy profession has remodelled its roles in an attempt to meet these global expectations through pharmaceutical care. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the knowledge and practice of ...

  9. Intra-Cultural Variation in Child Care Practices in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    This study, comprising three sub-studies, aims to examine how child-rearing practices vary according to different social circumstances in Japan. By comparing teacher-child interaction at mealtimes in day care centres both on an isolated small island located in Okinawa prefecture, Tarama, and in a large industrialised city, Tokyo, the following was…

  10. Involvement of the Client in Home Care Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Kjær, Lone; Præstegaard, Jeanette

    Background: Through the last 35 years, ‘client involvement’ has been a mantra within health policies, education curriculums and health care institutions, yet very little is known about how ‘client involvement’ is practiced in the meetings with clients and health professionals. Aim: To analyse...

  11. Determinants of nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, G.J.

    1996-01-01


    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to analyze nutrition guidance practices of primary-care physicians (PCPs), their nutritional attitudes and knowledge and their interest in the role of nutrition in health and disease. A second objective was to identify the determinants

  12. THE CONTEMPORARY PARENTING PRACTICE AND EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Teixeira Caldas Campana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility for women to engage in professional career and the fact that men are more involved in caring for their children raise awareness to the need for research on contemporary parental practice. The aim of this study was to check for changes in the form parents take care of their children, the key challenges they face and how pediatricians and school workers participate in this process. The methodology used is qualitative and based on semi-structured interviews with five middle-class heterosexual couples who have children up to three years old and their respective pediatricians and school supervisors. Results show that parenthood is transitioning from the traditional model to a more egalitarian practice. Pediatricians act as advisors and parents share with school workers the direct care for children. It is suggested that naturalistic perspectives and time for paternity leave must be questioned in order to promote an egalitarian parenthood.

  13. Tracing detached and attached care practices in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soffer, Ann Katrine B.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of skills labs in Danish nursing education can, in itself, be viewed as a complexity. The students are expected to eventually carry out their work in a situated hospital practice, but they learn their professional skills in a different space altogether, detached and removed from...... of care are not explicated in the curriculum or textbooks; however, they surfaced once this crooked approach to studying care in a simulated practice was applied. The article starts from the assertion that detached engagements are not recognized within the field of nursing education as an equal component...... analytical approach to care work, as involving both attached and detached engagement within Danish nursing education, is advocated....

  14. Enveloped Lives: Practicing Health and Care in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praspaliauskiene, Rima

    2016-12-01

    This article analyzes informal medical payments that the majority of Lithuanians give or feel compelled to give to doctors before or after treatment. It focuses on how patients and their caretakers encounter, practice, and enact informal payments in health care and how these payments create a reality of health care that is not limited to an economic rationality. Within such a frame, rather than being considered a gift or bribe, it conceptualizes these little white envelopes as a practice of health and care. The article shows how an envelope of money given to a doctor transcends the material patient-doctor transaction and emerges as a productive force for coping with illness, medical encounters, and misfortunes. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  15. Intensive care bereavement practices across New Zealand and Australian intensive care units: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Mitchell, Marion; James, Stephen; Wetzig, Krista

    2017-10-01

    End-of-life and bereavement care is an important consideration in intensive care. This study describes the type of bereavement care provided in intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand. Inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted on free-text responses to a web-based survey exploring unit-based bereavement practice distributed to nurse managers in 229 intensive care units in New Zealand and Australia. A total of 153 (67%) surveys were returned with 68 respondents making free-text responses. Respondents were mainly Australian (n = 54, 85·3%), from the public sector (n = 51, 75%) and holding Nurse Unit Managers/Charge Nurse roles (n = 39, 52·9%). From the 124 free-text responses, a total of 187 individual codes were identified focussing on bereavement care practices (n = 145, 77·5%), educational provision to support staff (n = 15, 8%) and organisational challenges (n = 27, 14·4%). Bereavement care practices described use of memory boxes, cultural specificity, annual memorial services and use of community support services. Educational provision identified local in-service programmes, and national bereavement courses for specialist bereavement nurse coordinators. Organisational challenges focussed on lack of funding, especially for provision of bereavement follow-up. This is the first Australasian-wide survey, and one of the few international studies, describing bereavement practices within intensive care, an important aspect of nursing practice. However, with funding for new bereavement services and education for staff lacking, there are continued challenges in developing bereavement care. Given knowledge about the impact of these areas of care on bereaved family members, this requires review. Nurses remain committed to supporting bereaved families during and following death in intensive care. With limited resource to support bereavement care, intensive care nurses undertake a range of bereavement care practices at time of death

  16. Child Care Practices and Its Effects to School Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Raymund C. Panopio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This scholarly work aimed to determine the child care practices that have the potential in honing a child with good school performance. The result of the study led to the formulation of a model that typifies the good child care practices. Since children are on the accepting side, it is the way parents raise a nd rear them that will influence what they will be in the near future. The participants were selected as they are included in the top performing public schools in Batangas City , Philippines . The parents and teachers of the said child were the respondents to assess the ability of the child. A total of 215 students from grades 4 to 6 were selected as the target sample. Descriptive correlational design was utilized to determine the relationship between the child care practices and school performance. A self - made questionnaire was formulated and used face validity and content reliability to come up with the most appropriate instrument. Frequency distribution, weighted mean and chi square were th e statistical tests utilized to aid the analysis of data. Based on the result of the study, breastfeeding, proper hygiene, allowing the child to participate in family conversation and providing monetary allowance were among the practices that lead to child ren’s good school performance. Having knowledge on these practices will guide parents in giving their child a better and assured future, and eventually benefit their children as they become parents themselves.

  17. Practices in Human Dignity in Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Üstün, Çağatay; Uzelli Yilmaz, Derya

    Respecting and valuing an individual's existential dignity forms the basis of nursing and medical practice and of nursing care. The objective of the study was to determine the approach to human dignity that nurses and physicians have while providing palliative care. This qualitative study was performed using a phenomenological research design. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted in 9 nurses and 5 physicians with human dignity approach in palliative care. Following the qualitative Colaizzi method of analyzing the data, the statements made by the nurses and physicians during the interviews were grouped under 8 categories. Consistent with the questionnaire format, 8 themes and 43 subthemes of responses were determined describing the human dignity of the nurse and the physicians. The results of the study showed that in some of the decisions and practices of the nurses giving nursing care and physicians giving medical care to palliative care patients, while they displayed ethically sensitive behavior, on some points, they showed approaches that violated human dignity and showed lack of awareness of ethical, medical, and social responsibilities.

  18. The acute care nurse practitioner in collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, L

    1996-01-01

    Nurse-physician relationships remain, for the most part, hierarchical in nature. A hierarchical structure allows the person at the top, most notably the physician, the highest level of authority and power for decision making. Other health care providers are delegated various tasks related to the medical plan of care. One role of nonmedical health care providers, including nurses, is to support the medical plan of care and increase the productivity of physicians. Medical centers have house staff, usually interns and residents, who work collaboratively with the attending physicians in care delivery. At one medical center, a shortage of medical house staff for internal medicine prompted the development and evaluation of an alternative service. The alternative service utilized master prepared, certified nurse practitioners on a nonteaching service to provide care for selected types of medical patients. Physicians consulted with nurse practitioners, but retained decision-making authority concerning patient admission to the service. This paper describes the development and evaluation of an alternative service based on a collaborative practice model and the role of nurse practitioners working under such a model. Discussion includes suggestions for process guideline development for organizations that want to improve collaborative practice relationships between unit nursing staff, nurse practitioners, and physicians.

  19. Win-win-win: collaboration advances critical care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Deb; Fielding, Sandra

    2002-10-01

    Against a background of increasing interest in education post registration, New Zealand nurses are working to advance their professional practice. Because the acquisition of highly developed clinical capabilities requires a combination of nursing experience and education, collaboration between clinicians and nurse educators is essential. However, the accessibility of relevant educational opportunities has been an ongoing issue for nurses outside the country's main centres. Within the framework of a Master of Health Science, the postgraduate certificate (critical care nursing) developed between Auckland University of Technology and two regional health providers is one such example. Students enrol in science and knowledge papers concurrently then, in the second half of the course, are supported within their practice environment to acquire advanced clinical skills and to analyse, critique and develop practice within their specialty. This paper provides an overview of the structure and pr month, distance education course focused on developing the context of critical care nursing.

  20. DAP in the 'Hood: Perceptions of Child Care Practices by African American Child Care Directors Caring for Children of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kay E.; Deihl, Amy; Kyler, Amy

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative analysis concerning child care practices by six African American directors of subsidized child care centers located in a low-income, racial ethnic minority area of Los Angeles, California. These programs are traditionally African American programs that experienced an influx of Latino immigrant enrollment. Using…

  1. Multimorbidity patterns in a primary care population aged 55 years and over

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinnige, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Westert, G.P.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Braspenning, J.C.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To support the management of multimorbid patients in primary care, evidence is needed on prevalent multimorbidity patterns. OBJECTIVE: To identify the common and distinctive multimorbidity patterns. METHODS: Clinical data of 120480 patients (>/=55 years) were extracted from 158 general

  2. Pattern of Care Study in Metastatic Renal-Cell Carcinoma in the Preimmunotherapy Era in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmeier, Nadja; Rothschild, Sacha I; Rothermundt, Christian; Cathomas, Richard; Schardt, Julian; Berthold, Dominik; von Burg, Philippe; Müller, Beat; Beyer, Jörg; Vogt, Deborah R; Stenner, Frank

    2018-02-02

    In metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC), physicians have a plethora of therapeutic choices, with the latest addition of checkpoint inhibitors. However, many questions regarding the best use of the respective drugs remain unanswered. Therefore, it is important to examine and summarize the outcome of real-world experiences to understand the practical value of the various drugs in daily use and foster optimal treatment algorithms for patients with renal-cell carcinoma. We sought to describe the pattern of care in mRCC under circumstances with access to all therapeutic options for patients. We examined the outcome of patients with mRCC who were treated at 8 major centers in Switzerland, mainly with vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Data from 110 patients with mRCC who had undergone more than one systemic therapy were collected and analyzed. We assessed the pattern of care for patients with mRCC in an unrestricted health care system and outcomes with regard to the respective treatment sequences. We also studied the compliance of individual therapies with published guidelines and correlated the adherence to outcome. Finally, immediate versus deferred treatment and the number of received therapeutic drug lines were analyzed. Median survival of patients treated with targeted agents for mRCC was 2.0 years. Exposure to more than 2 lines of systemic drugs did not improve outcome of patients with mRCC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Maternal Dietary Patterns and Practices and Birth Weight in Northern Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Abubakari

    Full Text Available Adequate maternal nutrition is a key factor for achieving good pregnancy outcomes. Moreover, inadequate dietary intake during pregnancy is considered an important contributor to maternal malnutrition in developing countries. Although some studies have examined the effect of the entire diet on birth outcome, most studies have been very narrow because they considered the effect of single nutrient. The single nutrient approach is a major setback because usually several nutrient deficiencies are more likely to occur than single deficiencies especially in low-income settings.The main aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal dietary patterns, and practices and birth weight in Northern Ghana.A facility-based cross-sectional survey was performed in two districts in the Northern Region of Ghana. The selected districts were the Tamale Metropolis and Savelugu-Nanton District. These districts were purposively sampled to represent a mix of urban, peri-urban and rural populations, therefore ensuring that the distribution in social groups of the study population was similar to the entire population of the region. In all, 578 mothers who were drawing antenatal and postnatal care services were interviewed using a questionnaire, which asked the mothers about their frequency of consumption of individual foods per week since they became pregnant or when they were pregnant.We determined dietary patterns by applying a factor analysis with a varimax rotation using STATA. Multivariate analysis was used to establish association between maternal factors and dietary patterns. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between dietary practices and patterns and birth weight.Women who ate outside the home twice a week (OR = 1.6 & 95% CI; 1.1-2.45, P; 0.017 and those who practiced 'pica' (OR = 1.7 & 95% CI; 1.16-2.75, P; 0.008 had increased odds for low birth. Two dietary patterns were identified-namely 'health conscious' and 'non

  4. Maternal Dietary Patterns and Practices and Birth Weight in Northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakari, Abdulai; Jahn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Adequate maternal nutrition is a key factor for achieving good pregnancy outcomes. Moreover, inadequate dietary intake during pregnancy is considered an important contributor to maternal malnutrition in developing countries. Although some studies have examined the effect of the entire diet on birth outcome, most studies have been very narrow because they considered the effect of single nutrient. The single nutrient approach is a major setback because usually several nutrient deficiencies are more likely to occur than single deficiencies especially in low-income settings. The main aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal dietary patterns, and practices and birth weight in Northern Ghana. A facility-based cross-sectional survey was performed in two districts in the Northern Region of Ghana. The selected districts were the Tamale Metropolis and Savelugu-Nanton District. These districts were purposively sampled to represent a mix of urban, peri-urban and rural populations, therefore ensuring that the distribution in social groups of the study population was similar to the entire population of the region. In all, 578 mothers who were drawing antenatal and postnatal care services were interviewed using a questionnaire, which asked the mothers about their frequency of consumption of individual foods per week since they became pregnant or when they were pregnant. We determined dietary patterns by applying a factor analysis with a varimax rotation using STATA. Multivariate analysis was used to establish association between maternal factors and dietary patterns. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between dietary practices and patterns and birth weight. Women who ate outside the home twice a week (OR = 1.6 & 95% CI; 1.1-2.45, P; 0.017) and those who practiced 'pica' (OR = 1.7 & 95% CI; 1.16-2.75, P; 0.008) had increased odds for low birth. Two dietary patterns were identified-namely 'health conscious' and 'non-health conscious

  5. Physician Practice Patterns Within an Acute Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    2.2 Severe or complete 0 2 Same as 2.1 Uterine Prolapse 2.3 W Ulceration 1 1 Same as 2.1 with Ulceration of Cervix Diagnostic Category - Endometriosis...d) suckling pigs, (e) mermaids, (f) fabulous ones, (g) stray dogs , (h) those that are included in this classification, (i) those that tremble as if...83 84 Evidence 1.1 Ltd Ovary 10 7 Physical Findings Diagnostic Category - Uterine Fibroma Supporting Stg Desc 83 84 Evidence 1.0 W/O Comp 62 58

  6. Everyday practice and unnoticed professional competence in day care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Warring, Niels; Nielsen, Birger Steen

    In Denmark more than 9 out 10 children attend day care centers that are publicly funded and regulated. The main part of employees, the social educators, at day care centers have attended a 3½ years educational programme with both theoretical and practical elements. Nevertheless it has been hard...... for the social educators to get recognition for their professional competencies and the societal importance of their work. Neoliberal governance has imposed a lot of demands for documentation, evaluation etc., and a growing focus on children’s learning in day care centers has resulted in national goals...... hand it can tend to underestimate the value of a large part of their work which is embedded in what in the paper will be explored as unnoticed professional competences. Building on empirical results from research in day care centers based on mixed methods (observations, interviews and action research...

  7. Engaging Primary Care Practices in Studies of Improvement: Did You Budget Enough for Practice Recruitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnan, Lyle J; Walunas, Theresa L; Parchman, Michael L; Dickinson, Caitlin L; Murphy, Katrina M; Howell, Ross; Jackson, Kathryn L; Madden, Margaret B; Ciesla, James R; Mazurek, Kathryn D; Kho, Abel N; Solberg, Leif I

    2018-04-01

    The methods and costs to enroll small primary care practices in large, regional quality improvement initiatives are unknown. We describe the recruitment approach, cost, and resources required to recruit and enroll 500 practices in the Northwest and Midwest regional cooperatives participating in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-funded initiative, EvidenceNOW: Advancing Heart Health in Primary Care. The project management team of each cooperative tracked data on recruitment methods used for identifying and connecting with practices. We developed a cost-of-recruitment template and used it to record personnel time and associated costs of travel and communication materials. A total of 3,669 practices were contacted during the 14- to 18-month recruitment period, resulting in 484 enrolled practices across the 6 states served by the 2 cooperatives. The average number of interactions per enrolled practice was 7, with a total of 29,100 hours and a total cost of $2.675 million, or $5,529 per enrolled practice. Prior partnerships predicted recruiting almost 1 in 3 of these practices as contrasted to 1 in 20 practices without a previous relationship or warm hand-off. Recruitment of practices for large-scale practice quality improvement transformation initiatives is difficult and costly. The cost of recruiting practices without existing partnerships is expensive, costing 7 times more than reaching out to familiar practices. Investigators initiating and studying practice quality improvement initiatives should budget adequate funds to support high-touch recruitment strategies, including building trusted relationships over a long time frame, for a year or more. © 2018 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. Medicare Chronic Care Management Payments and Financial Returns to Primary Care Practices: A Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Phillips, Russell S; Bitton, Asaf; Song, Zirui; Landon, Bruce E

    2015-10-20

    Physicians have traditionally been reimbursed for face-to-face visits. A new non-visit-based payment for chronic care management (CCM) of Medicare patients took effect in January 2015. To estimate financial implications of CCM payment for primary care practices. Microsimulation model incorporating national data on primary care use, staffing, expenditures, and reimbursements. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and other published sources. Medicare patients. 10 years. Practice-level. Comparison of CCM delivery approaches by staff and physicians. Net revenue per full-time equivalent (FTE) physician; time spent delivering CCM services. If nonphysician staff were to deliver CCM services, net revenue to practices would increase despite opportunity and staffing costs. Practices could expect approximately $332 per enrolled patient per year (95% CI, $234 to $429) if CCM services were delivered by registered nurses (RNs), approximately $372 (CI, $276 to $468) if services were delivered by licensed practical nurses, and approximately $385 (CI, $286 to $485) if services were delivered by medical assistants. For a typical practice, this equates to more than $75 ,00 of net annual revenue per FTE physician and 12 hours of nursing service time per week if 50% of eligible patients enroll. At a minimum, 131 Medicare patients (CI, 115 to 140 patients) must enroll for practices to recoup the salary and overhead costs of hiring a full-time RN to provide CCM services. If physicians were to deliver all CCM services, approximately 25% of practices nationwide could expect net revenue losses due to opportunity costs of face-to-face visit time. The CCM program may alter long-term primary care use, which is difficult to predict. Practices that rely on nonphysician team members to deliver CCM services will probably experience substantial net revenue gains but must enroll a sufficient number of eligible patients to recoup costs. None.

  9. Patterns of care in radiation therapy of adenocarcinoma of the endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, K.H.; Fuller, D.E.; Kramer, S.; Davis, L.W.; Herring, D.F.; Delclos, L.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Lustig, R.

    1980-01-01

    In 1974 the Patterns of Care Study began investigating radiation therapy of endometrial cancers in the United States. This endeavor required development of a methodology to survey the care of patients who had similar disease and who were treated at various institutions. Analysis of 919 questionnaires revealed a substantial difference nationwide in treatment approaches to this site. Outcome studies and ongoing research projects, combined with this survey of Patterns of Care, can provide a sound base for educational efforts to improve patient care

  10. Pattern of drug eruptions in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, Z.; Nadeem, N.; Aman, S.; Kazmi, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: An adverse drug reaction is unintentional which occurs at doses used for prophylaxis, diagnosis or treatment. Objectives: To determine the frequency of various cutaneous drug eruptions that occur in patients in a tertiary care hospital setting. Patients and Methods: All patients with cutaneous drug eruptions seen at the Dermatology Department of Mayo Hospital, Lahore, over 6 months were enrolled and the pattern of drug eruptions like urticaria, angioedema, fixed drug eruption, maculopapular rash, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis etc. were recorded, along with drugs that caused it. Results:A total of 160 patients (86 males, 74 females) were included in the study. Mean age of patients was 30.7+-15.4 years. Major eruptions were fixed drug eruption (21.3%) followed by urticaria without angioedema (10%), maculopapular rash (9.3%), lichenoid drug eruption (8.7%), acneiform drug eruption (7.5%), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (6.9%), vesiculobullous eruption (5.6%), erythema multiforme and eczematous eruption (5% each). Common drugs causing eruptions were sulfonamides (16.3%), followed by NSAIDs (14.4%), herbal and homeopathic medications (12.5%), penicillins (9.3%), tetracyclines (8.7%), antituberculous drugs, cephalosporins and antiepileptics (6.3% each). Conclusion: Fixed drug eruption and urticaria without angioedema were commonest eruptions while, sulfonamides and NSAIDs were the major causative drugs. Policy message: Reporting of adverse drug reactions is not done in Pakistan and needs to be done in each hospital. (author)

  11. Core measures for developmentally supportive care in neonatal intensive care units: theory, precedence and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Mary; Gibbins, Sharyn; Hoath, Steven

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a discussion of evidence-based core measures for developmental care in neonatal intensive care units. Inconsistent definition, application and evaluation of developmental care have resulted in criticism of its scientific merit. The key concept guiding data organization in this paper is the United States of America's Joint Commission's concept of 'core measures' for evaluating and accrediting healthcare organizations. This concept is applied to five disease- and procedure-independent measures based on the Universe of Developmental Care model. Electronically accessible, peer reviewed studies on developmental care published in English were culled for data supporting the selected objective core measures between 1978 and 2008. The quality of evidence was based on a structured predetermined format that included three independent reviewers. Systematic reviews and randomized control trials were considered the strongest level of evidence. When unavailable, cohort, case control, consensus statements and qualitative methods were considered the strongest level of evidence for a particular clinical issue. Five core measure sets for evidence-based developmental care were evaluated: (1) protected sleep, (2) pain and stress assessment and management, (3) developmental activities of daily living, (4) family-centred care, and (5) the healing environment. These five categories reflect recurring themes that emerged from the literature review regarding developmentally supportive care and quality caring practices in neonatal populations. This practice model provides clear metrics for nursing actions having an impact on the hospital experience of infant-family dyads. Standardized disease-independent core measures for developmental care establish minimum evidence-based practice expectations and offer an objective basis for cross-institutional comparison of developmental care programmes.

  12. Care ethics and the global practice of commercial surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jennifer A

    2010-09-01

    This essay will focus on the moral issues relating to surrogacy in the global context, and will critique the liberal arguments that have been offered in support of it. Liberal arguments hold sway concerning reproductive arrangements made between commissioning couples from wealthy nations and the surrogates from socioeconomically weak backgrounds that they hire to do their reproductive labor. My argument in this paper is motivated by a concern for controlling harms by putting the practice of globalized commercial surrogacy into the context of care ethics. As I will argue, the unstable situations into which children of global surrogacy arrangements are born is symbolic of the crisis of care that the practice raises. Using the Baby Manji case as my touch point, I will suggest that liberalism cannot address the harms experienced by Manji and children like her who are created through the global practice of assisted reproductive technology. I will argue that, if commissioning couples consider their proposed surrogacy contracts from a care ethics point of view, they will begin to think relationally about their actions, considering the practice from an ethical lens, not just an economic or contractual one.

  13. Redesigning Health Care Practices to Address Childhood Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierman, Arthur H; Beck, Andrew F; Chung, Esther K; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Siegel, Benjamin; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Conroy, Kathleen; Federico, Steven G; Flanagan, Patricia J; Garg, Arvin; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Grace, Aimee M; Gross, Rachel S; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri; Kraft, Colleen; Kuo, Alice; Lewis, Gena; Lobach, Katherine S; Long, Dayna; Ma, Christine T; Messito, Mary; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberley R; Osman, Cynthia; Sadof, Matthew D; Schickedanz, Adam B; Cox, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Child poverty in the United States is widespread and has serious negative effects on the health and well-being of children throughout their life course. Child health providers are considering ways to redesign their practices in order to mitigate the negative effects of poverty on children and support the efforts of families to lift themselves out of poverty. To do so, practices need to adopt effective methods to identify poverty-related social determinants of health and provide effective interventions to address them. Identification of needs can be accomplished with a variety of established screening tools. Interventions may include resource directories, best maintained in collaboration with local/regional public health, community, and/or professional organizations; programs embedded in the practice (eg, Reach Out and Read, Healthy Steps for Young Children, Medical-Legal Partnership, Health Leads); and collaboration with home visiting programs. Changes to health care financing are needed to support the delivery of these enhanced services, and active advocacy by child health providers continues to be important in effecting change. We highlight the ongoing work of the Health Care Delivery Subcommittee of the Academic Pediatric Association Task Force on Child Poverty in defining the ways in which child health care practice can be adapted to improve the approach to addressing child poverty. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  14. Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Tazuma, Susumu; Furukawa, Akira; Nishii, Osamu; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Azuhata, Takeo; Itakura, Atsuo; Kamei, Seiji; Kondo, Hiroshi; Maeda, Shigenobu; Mihara, Hiroshi; Mizooka, Masafumi; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Obara, Hideaki; Sato, Norio; Takayama, Yuichi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Miyata, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Izumi; Honda, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Since acute abdomen requires accurate diagnosis and treatment within a particular time limit to prevent mortality, the Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine, in collaboration with four other medical societies, launched the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen that were the first English guidelines in the world for the management of acute abdomen. Here we provide the highlights of these guidelines (all clinical questions and recommendations were shown in supplementary information). A systematic and comprehensive evaluation of the evidence for epidemiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and primary treatment for acute abdomen was performed to develop the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015. Because many types of pathophysiological events underlie acute abdomen, these guidelines cover the primary care of adult patients with nontraumatic acute abdomen. A total of 108 questions based on nine subject areas were used to compile 113 recommendations. The subject areas included definition, epidemiology, history taking, physical examination, laboratory test, imaging studies, differential diagnosis, initial treatment, and education. Japanese medical circumstances were considered for grading the recommendations to assure useful information. The two-step methods for the initial management of acute abdomen were proposed. Early use of transfusion and analgesia, particularly intravenous acetaminophen, were recommended. The Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015 have been prepared as the first evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute abdomen. We hope that these guidelines contribute to clinical practice and improve the primary care and prognosis of patients with acute abdomen. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  15. The importance of tacit knowledge in practices of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, H

    2010-03-01

    The paper argues that a high quality personal relationship between professionals and clients is a necessary condition of professional knowledge. This epistemological claim is developed against the background of current methods of quality assessment that rely on objectively measurable 'indicators'. A philosophical analysis regarding the nature of professional knowledge in the care sector. The analysis proceeds from Michael Polanyi's concept of tacit knowledge to account for the personal dimension of professional expertise in the care sector. Quantitative methods of quality assessment understand 'quality of care' as being independent from the professional who generates it. Consequently, quality assessment as currently practiced necessarily renders the personal dimension of professional knowledge invisible, thereby excluding it from managerial attention and support. To indicate the relevance of Polanyi's concept of tacit knowledge, the paper offers some observations from the practice of care in a group home for people with intellectual disabilities. The paper concludes that a high quality relationship between professionals and their clients is crucial for quality of care. This relationship generates the positive interaction that enables professionals to gain adequate insight in the needs of their clients.

  16. Current End-of-Life Care Needs and Care Practices in Acute Care Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Thurston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive-comparative study was undertaken to examine current end-of-life care needs and practices in hospital. A chart review for all 1,018 persons who died from August 1, 2008 through July 31, 2009 in two full-service Canadian hospitals was conducted. Most decedents were elderly (73.8% and urbanite (79.5%, and cancer was the most common diagnosis (36.2%. Only 13.8% had CPR performed at some point during this hospitalization and 8.8% had CPR immediately preceding death, with 87.5% having a DNR order and 30.8% providing an advance directive. Most (97.3% had one or more life-sustaining technologies in use at the time of death. These figures indicate, when compared to those in a similar mid-1990s Canadian study, that impending death is more often openly recognized and addressed. Technologies continue to be routinely but controversially used. The increased rate of end-stage CPR from 2.9% to 8.8% could reflect a 1994+ shift of expected deaths out of hospital.

  17. Home Health Chains and Practice Patterns: Evidence of 2008 Medicare Reimbursement Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sean Shenghsiu; Kim, Hyunjee

    2017-10-01

    Home health agencies (HHAs) are known to exploit the Medicare reimbursement schedule by targeting a specific number of therapy visits. These targeting behaviors cause unnecessary medical spending. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services estimates that during fiscal year 2015, Medicare made more than $10 billion in improper payments to HHAs. Better understanding of heterogeneous gaming behaviors among HHAs can inform policy makers to more effectively oversee the home health care industry. This article aims to study how home health chains adjust and adopt new targeting behaviors as compared to independent agencies under the new reimbursement schedule. The analytic data are constructed from: (1) 5% randomly sampled Medicare home health claim data, and (2) HHA chain information extracted from the Medicare Cost Report. The study period spans from 2007 to 2010, and the sample includes 7800 unique HHAs and 380,118 treatment episodes. A multivariate regression model is used to determine whether chain and independent agencies change their practice patterns and adopt different targeting strategies after the revision of the reimbursement schedule in 2008. This study finds that independent agencies are more likely to target 6 and 14 visits, while chain agencies are more likely to target 20 visits. Such a change of practice patterns is more significant among for-profit HHAs. The authors expect these findings to inform policy makers that organizational structures, especially the combination of for-profit status and chain affiliation, should be taken into the consideration when detecting medical fraud and designing the reimbursement schedule.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practices in the provision of nutritional care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fletcher, Antoinette

    2012-02-01

    The nutritional care of patients is one of the primary responsibilities of all registered nurses (Persenius et al, 2008). A poor nutritional status can lead to malnutrition, which can have serious consequences for an individual\\'s quality of life (Field and Smith, 2008). This paper commences with an introduction to the concept of nutrition, provides an overview of nutritional guidelines and nutritional screening tools which identify those at risk of malnutrition. It reviews the literature on nurses\\' knowledge, attitudes and practices in the provision of nutritional care and debates challenges and opportunities encountered to help nurses ensure adequate patient nutrition.

  19. PRACTICE OF PEACE FROM THE ETHICS OF CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Yaravit Bernal-Lujano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is to give an overview priority of teachers versus Group in Elementary Education with regard to the realization of peace practices that begin from the ethics of care for conflict transformation, the school building towards a peaceful coexistence with analysis of nonviolence; it is important that this education is based on the interests of children from the lighter side such as cooperative games that allow integration with others, forming emotional bonds. The promotion of education for peace from the care of themselves, others, including the environment and all living beings as part of that indispensable for the education of children holistic peace.

  20. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Lambert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine general practice (GP care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts. Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for PD with/without agoraphobia. Follow-up measures recorded at 20 weeks/10 months following randomisation. Control arm, unrestricted routine GP care (practice appointments, referrals and prescriptions. Trial arm, occupational therapyled lifestyle treatment comprising lifestyle review of fluid intake, diet pattern, exercise, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Primary outcome measure: beck anxiety inventory. At baseline, participants attended 2-3 times more GP appointments than population average, reducing at 10 months to 1.6 times population average for routine GP care and 0.97 population average for lifestyle arm. At 10 months, 33% fewer referrals (6 referrals; 0 mental health than at baseline (9 referrals; 2 mental health were made for lifestyle arm patients compared with 42% increase (from 12 referrals; 8 mental health at baseline to 17 referrals; 7 mental health in GP care arm. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed most often. Benzodiazepines and beta-blockers were prescribed more often than tricyclic against current clinical guidelines. In conclusion, we found that PD patients at baseline were high healthcare resource users. Treatment in both study arms reduced resource use. Routine GP care requires further review for this patient group.

  1. The quality of COPD care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, F.V.; Borgeskov, H.; Dollerup, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the quality of management of COPD in general practice could be improved by the participation of general practitioners and their staff in a COPD-specific educational programme. One-hundred and fifty-four doctors participated in the study, and 2549 patient record forms were...... included in the first audit and 2394 in the second audit. We observed a significantly increased utilisation of spirometry from the first (52.7%) to the second audit (71.4%) (p quality of management. We conclude that participation in an educational...... programme can improve the quality of COPD care in general practice Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  2. Awareness of holistic care practices by intensive care nurses in north-western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaqawi, Hamdan M; Butcon, Vincent R; Molina, Roger R

    2017-08-01

    To examine awareness of holistic patient care by staff nurses in the intensive care units of hospitals in the city of Hail, Saudi Arabia.  Methods: A quantitative correlational study design was used to investigate relationships between intensive care nurse's awareness of holistic practices and nurses' latest performance review. Intensive care staff nurses (n=99) from 4 public sector hospitals in Hail were surveyed on their awareness of variables across 5 holistic domains: physiological, sociocultural, psychological, developmental, and spiritual. Data were collected between October and December 2015 using written survey, and performance evaluations obtained from the hospital administrations. Results were statistically analyzed and compared (numerical, percentage, Pearson's correlation, Chronbach's alpha). Results: The ICU staff nurses in Hail City were aware of the secular aspects of holistic care, and the majority had very good performance evaluations. There were no demographic trends regarding holistic awareness and nurse performance. Further, awareness of holistic care was not associated with nurse performance.  Conclusion: A caring-enhancement workshop and a mentoring program for non-Saudi nurses may increase holistic care awareness and enhance its practice in the ICUs.

  3. Practical considerations in the calculation of orientation distribution functions from electron back-scattered diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Using model data sets for the Brass orientation, the importance of scatter width, angular accuracy and grain size and volume fraction on the sensitivity of the calculated Orientation Distribution Functions have been determined in order to highlight some of the practical considerations needed in the processing of experimental data from individual grain orientation measurements determined by the Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction technique. It is suggested that the most appropriate scatter width can be calculated from the maximum function height versus scatter width curve in order to accommodate variations in texture sharpness. The sensitivity of the ODF to careful sample preparation, mounting and pattern analysis, in order to keep errors in angular accuracy to 1 or less is demonstrated, as is the imperative need to correct for the size of grains, and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  4. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neck Pain: Clinical Practice Guidelines Help Ensure Quality Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    In 2008, physical therapists published the first neck pain clinical practice guidelines. These guidelines have been updated and are now available in the July 2017 issue of JOSPT. To update these guidelines, physical therapists teamed with the International Collaboration on Neck Pain to identify leading practices. These revised guidelines provide direction to clinicians as they screen, evaluate, diagnose, and make treatment-based classifications of neck pain. They also outline the best nonsurgical treatment options based on the published literature. At the end of the day, the best care is a combination of the leading science, the clinical expertise of your health care provider, and your input as the patient. These guidelines help inform the first step in this process. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(7):513. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0508.

  6. Chiropractic practice in the Danish public health care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie

    2009-01-01

    This commentary offers preliminary considerations around a phenomenological investigation of chiropractic services in a Danish public sector setting. In this narrative description, the main venue for chiropractic public (secondary) sector practice in the Danish context is briefly described...... and defined. Furthermore, a contextually relevant definition of an integral health care service is presented; and the professional importance for chiropractic in providing such services is also discussed. Finally, salient questions requiring empirical investigation in this context are posed; and selected...

  7. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    OpenAIRE

    Viola Timm

    2015-01-01

    At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost...

  8. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  9. Patterns of care for brachytherapy in Europe. Results in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Torrecilla, J; Guedea, F; Heeren, G; Nissin, R; Ellison, T; Cottier, B

    2006-05-01

    In 2003 ESTRO began a project whose primary objective, was to make a map in the European area of infrastructures in technology and personnel for brachytherapy. A survey and a web site were elaborated. The survey was sent to the 76 Spanish Radiation Oncology departments in May 2003. By the end of 2003, 66 (86.8%) services had responded, 40 (71.4%) of which had brachytherapy. The services with brachytherapy treated 73.5% of the total patients, an average of 1,199 patients. The mean number of patients treated with brachytherapy by department was 135.5 and the number of applications was 265 annually. The average number of specialists was 7, 4 of them trained in brachytherapy. The average weekly work load of the radiation oncologists, physicists, and technicians was 22.6 h, 13.8 h and 21.0 h, respectively. The mean time dedicated to each patient by radiation oncologists, physicists and technicians was 9.2 h; 6.19 h; 7.2 h, respectively. The total number of afterloaders was 43 (22 HDR, 18 LDR, 3 PDR). The tumours most frequently treated with brachytherapy were gynaecological (56.24%), breast (14.2%) and prostate (11.7%). High dose rate was used in 47.46% of the patients and low dose rate in 47.24%. Between 1997 and 2002 there was an increase of 50.53% in patients treated with brachytherapy. The survey shows the brachytherapy resources and activity in Spain up to 2003. Increased use of brachytherapy in prostate tumours, prevalence of gynaecology brachytherapy and similar number of treatments with HDR and LDR are demonstrated in the Patterns of Care of Brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE) study in Spain.

  10. Modelling multiple hospital outcomes: the impact of small area and primary care practice variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdon Peter

    2006-11-01

    managerial terms, the analysis points to the utility of formal statistical analysis of hospitalisation rates as a prelude to non-statistical investigation of primary care resourcing and organisation. For example, there may be implications for the location of staff involved in community management of chronic conditions; health managers may also investigate whether some practices have unusual populations (homeless, asylum seekers, students that explain different hospital use patterns.

  11. Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Growth and Morbidity Pattern in Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerti Swarnkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is dened as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn baby derived from practical similarities to marsupial care giving, proximately exclusive breastfeeding and early discharge from hospital. This concept was proposed as an alternative to conventional methods of care for low birth weight (LBW infants, and in replication to quandaries of earnest overcrowding in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. KMC essentially utilizes the mother as a natural incubator Aim and Objectives: The aim was to assess the feasibility, acceptability and the effectiveness of KMC in LBW infants. It avoids agitation routinely experienced in busy ward. Material and Methods: A pilot open-labeled quasi-randomised clinical trial was conducted in Level III NICU of a teaching institution. 60 newborn infants <2500 g, meeting inclusion criteria were alternatively randomised into two groups: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC and Conventional Methods of Care (CMC. Kangaroo mother care was practiced with minimum total period of eight hours a day intermittently for the intervention group while the controls remained in incubators or cots. Weight, head circumference, length, morbidity episodes, hospital stay, feeding patterns were monitored for all infants till postmenstrual age of 42 weeks in preterm babies or till a weight of 2500 g is achieved in term SGA babies. Results: The pilot study conrmed that trial processes were efcient, the intervention was acceptable (to mothers and nurses and that the outcome measures were appropriate; KMC babies achieved signicantly better growth at the end of the study (For preterm babies, weight, length and head circumference gain were signicantly higher in the KMC group (weight 19.28±2.9g/day, length 0.99±0.56cm/week and head circumference 0.72±0.07 cm/week than in the CMC group (P <0.001. A signicantly higher number of babies in the CMC group suffered from hypothermia, hypoglycemia, and

  12. Caring Science: Transforming the Ethic of Caring-Healing Practice, Environment, and Culture within an Integrated Care Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Anne Foss; McDermott, Shawna; Kinney, Gwendolyn; Triner, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    In early 2010, leaders within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Northern California’s Patient Care Services division embarked on a journey to embrace and embed core tenets of Caring Science into the practice, environment, and culture of the organization. Caring Science is based on the philosophy of Human Caring, a theory articulated by Jean Watson, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, as a foundational covenant to guide nursing as a discipline and a profession. Since 2010, Caring Science has enabled KP Northern California to demonstrate its commitment to being an authentic person- and family-centric organization that promotes and advocates for total health. This commitment empowers KP caregivers to balance the art and science of clinical judgment by considering the needs of the whole person, honoring the unique perception of health and healing that each member or patient holds, and engaging with them to make decisions that nurture their well-being. The intent of this article is two-fold: 1) to provide context and background on how a professional practice framework was used to transform the ethic of caring-healing practice, environment, and culture across multiple hospitals within an integrated delivery system; and 2) to provide evidence on how integration of Caring Science across administrative, operational, and clinical areas appears to contribute to meaningful patient quality and health outcomes. PMID:26828076

  13. Caring Science: Transforming the Ethic of Caring-Healing Practice, Environment, and Culture within an Integrated Care Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss Durant, Anne; McDermott, Shawna; Kinney, Gwendolyn; Triner, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    In early 2010, leaders within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Northern California's Patient Care Services division embarked on a journey to embrace and embed core tenets of Caring Science into the practice, environment, and culture of the organization. Caring Science is based on the philosophy of Human Caring, a theory articulated by Jean Watson, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, as a foundational covenant to guide nursing as a discipline and a profession. Since 2010, Caring Science has enabled KP Northern California to demonstrate its commitment to being an authentic person- and family-centric organization that promotes and advocates for total health. This commitment empowers KP caregivers to balance the art and science of clinical judgment by considering the needs of the whole person, honoring the unique perception of health and healing that each member or patient holds, and engaging with them to make decisions that nurture their well-being. The intent of this article is two-fold: 1) to provide context and background on how a professional practice framework was used to transform the ethic of caring-healing practice, environment, and culture across multiple hospitals within an integrated delivery system; and 2) to provide evidence on how integration of Caring Science across administrative, operational, and clinical areas appears to contribute to meaningful patient quality and health outcomes.

  14. Intravenous to oral conversion of fluoroquinolones: knowledge versus clinical practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conort, Ornella; Gabardi, Steven; Didier, Marie-Pauline; Hazebroucq, Georges; Cariou, Alain

    2002-04-01

    To assess the knowledge of prescribers regarding intravenous to oral conversions of fluoroquinolones, the frequency and time until conversion, and to compare prescriber knowledge with the data collected concerning the reasons stated for continuation of intravenous fluoroquinolones. Prospective chart review and questionnaire. Large teaching hospital in Paris, France. Fifty-one males and females. Data were collected on in-patients receiving intravenous fluoroquinolone for at least three days and hospitalized in one of six in-patient units. Patients receiving intravenous fluoroquinolone for less than three days were excluded. A questionnaire to assess the awareness of a potential conversion was distributed to those practitioners who had patients reviewed during the data-collection phase. The questionnaire revealed the ten most common reasons for continuing intravenous administration for more than three days. However, the physicians agreed that most patients should be converted as soon as possible. Practice patterns differed, with only 17 of 51 patients actually converted to oral therapy. In theory, the clinicians were aware of when to perform the conversion. However, in practice, the frequency of conversion was lower than optimum. Changes in clinical practice are needed to decrease the costs of intravenous therapy, without jeopardizing quality of care.

  15. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1984-01-01

    A summary of a study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) is provided. The data covered aspects of recently graduated O.D.s' experience in obtaining a state license, becoming established in practice, and their practice characteristics. (Author/MLW)

  16. Health promotion practice and its implementation in Swedish health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brobeck, E; Odencrants, S; Bergh, H; Hildingh, C

    2013-09-01

    Health promotion practice is an important work assignment within the entire health and medical care sector. Nurses are important for the development and implementation of health promotion in clinical practice. The aim was to describe how district nurses view health promotion practice and how it was implemented in clinical practice following a training initiative. The study has a descriptive design and a qualitative method. The sample consisted of three focus groups with 16 participants. The interviews were conducted as a conversation with focus on the district nurses view of health promotion and its implementation in clinical practice. The data have been processed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Three categories, titled Training as motivation, Lack of grounding and Lack of scope were identified. The result demonstrated that training provides motivation, but also the importance of grounding in the organization and the need for scope in performing health promotion practice. Our results show that the training initiative has contributed positively to the district nurses' view of health promotion practice, but that they also feel that there are obstacles. The district nurses in our study suggest that health promotion practice should be more visible, and not something that is done when time permits. The district nurses feel motivated and have an enthusiasm for health promotion practice but more time and resources are required to design successful health-promoting initiatives. Before implementing a major training initiative for healthcare personnel in health promotion, it is essential to examine whether the conditions for this exist in the organization. © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Safe injection practice among health care workers, Gharbiya, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nanees A; Aboul Ftouh, Aisha M; El Shoubary, Waleed H

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 25 health care facilities in Gharbiya governorate to assess safe injection practices among health care workers (HCWs). Two questionnaires, one to collect information about administrative issues related to safe injection and the other to collect data about giving injections, exposure to needle stick injuries, hepatitis B vaccination status and safe injection training. Practices of injections were observed using a standardized checklist. The study revealed that there was lack of both national and local infection control policies and lack of most of the supplies needed for safe injection practices. Many safe practices were infrequent as proper needle manipulation before disposal (41%), safe needle disposal (47.5%), reuse of used syringe & needle (13.2%) and safe syringe disposal (0%). Exposure to needle stick injuries were common among the interviewed HCWs (66.2%) and hand washing was the common post exposure prophylaxis measure (63.4%). Only 11.3% of HCWs had full course hepatitis B vaccination. Infection control -including safe injections- training programs should be afforded to all HCWs.

  18. Radiotherapy skin care: A survey of practice in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Rachel; Probst, Heidi; Beardmore, Charlotte; James, Sarah; Dumbleton, Claire; Bolderston, Amanda; Faithfull, Sara; Wells, Mary; Southgate, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The primary objective of the survey was to evaluate clinical skin care practice in radiotherapy departments across the United Kingdom. Methods and sample: A questionnaire containing sixty-one questions grouped into eight themed sections was developed and a link to an on-line survey, using the Survey Monkey™ tool, was e-mailed to all radiotherapy department managers in the United Kingdom (N = 67). Each recipient was invited to provide one response per department. Key results: Fifty-four departments responded within the allocated timeframe giving a final response rate of 81%. Products and their use for skin conditions varied and some outdated and unfounded practices were still being used which did not always reflect the current evidence base. The amount of data routinely collected on skin toxicity was limited making it difficult to quantify the extent of skin morbidity following radiotherapy. Conclusion: The survey demonstrated variability in skin care practice in radiotherapy departments across the UK, with limited practice based on evidence or on skin toxicity measurement and monitoring.

  19. Registered Nurses’ Patient Education in Everyday Primary Care Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Nurses’ patient education is important for building patients’ knowledge, understanding, and preparedness for self-management. The aim of this study was to explore the conditions for nurses’ patient education work by focusing on managers’ discourses about patient education provided by nurses. In 2012, data were derived from three focus group interviews with primary care managers. Critical discourse analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews. The discursive practice comprised a discourse order of economic, medical, organizational, and didactic discourses. The economic discourse was the predominant one to which the organization had to adjust. The medical discourse was self-evident and unquestioned. Managers reorganized patient education routines and structures, generally due to economic constraints. Nurses’ pedagogical competence development was unclear, and practice-based experiences of patient education were considered very important, whereas theoretical pedagogical knowledge was considered less important. Managers’ support for nurses’ practical- and theoretical-based pedagogical competence development needs to be strengthened. PMID:28462314

  20. Concepts of person-centred care: a framework analysis of five studies in daily care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margreet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Person-centred care is used as a term to indicate a ‘made to measure’ approach in care. But what does this look like in daily practice? The person-centred nursing framework developed by McCormack and McCance (2010 offers specific concepts but these are still described in rather general terms. Empirical studies, therefore, could help to clarify them and make person-centredness more tangible for nurses. Aims: This paper describes how a framework analysis aimed to clarify the concepts described in the model of McCormack and McCance in order to guide professionals using them in practice. Methods: Five separate empirical studies focusing on older adults in the Netherlands were used in the framework analysis. The research question was: ‘How are concepts of person-centred care made tangible where empirical data are used to describe them?’ Analysis was done in five steps, leading to a comparison between the description of the concepts and the empirical significance found in the studies. Findings: Suitable illustrations were found for the majority of concepts. The results show that an empirically derived specification emerges from the data. In the concept of ‘caring relationship’ for example, it is shown that the personal character of each relationship is expressed by what the nurse and the older person know about each other. Other findings show the importance of values being present in care practices. Conclusions: The framework analysis shows that concepts can be clarified when empirical studies are used to make person-centred care tangible so nurses can understand and apply it in practice. Implications for practice: The concepts of the person-centred nursing framework are recognised when: Nurses know unique characteristics of the person they care for and what is important to them, and act accordingly Nurses use values such as trust, involvement and humour in their care practice Acknowledgement of emotions and compassion create

  1. Discussing Sexual Dysfunction with Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Practice Patterns in the Office of the Nephrologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ek, Gaby F; Krouwel, Esmée M; Nicolai, Melianthe P; Bouwsma, Hanneke; Ringers, Jan; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C M; Elzevier, Henk W

    2015-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common problem in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Sexual health remains a difficult subject to detect and discuss. Although many studies have been performed on the incidence of SD, little is known about practice patterns when it concerns quality of life (QoL)-related questions such as SD in the nephrologists' practice. The aim of this study was to determine to which extent nephrologists, important renal care providers, discuss SD with their patients and their possible barriers toward discussing this subject. A 50-item questionnaire was sent to all Dutch nephrologists (n = 312). The survey results. The response rate of the survey was 34.5%. Almost all responders (96.4%) stated to address SD in less than half of their new patients. The most important barrier not to discuss SD was patients not expressing their concern regarding SD spontaneously (70.8%). Other important barriers were: "the lack of a suitable moment to discuss" (61.9%) and "insufficient time" (46.9%). Eighty-five percent of the nephrologists stated that insufficient attention was paid to SD and treatment options during their training. Sixty-five percent of the respondents stated to be in need of extending their knowledge on the discussing of SD. Dutch nephrologists do not discuss problems with sexual function routinely. The lack of knowledge, suitable education, and insufficient time are factors causing undervaluation of SD in CKD patients. Implementation of competent sexual education and raising awareness among nephrologists on the importance of paying attention to SD could improve care and QoL for patients with CKD. More research should be performed among patients and other renal care providers to develop an adequate method to enhance our current system. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. User embracement in practices care in psychosocial care centers the perspective of local managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Kelly Cardoso da Silva Soares

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychosocial care centres (CAPS, strategic IN articulation of psychosocial care network and health system gateway, propose to the reorganization of health practices, by adopting a new ethic of care, based on respect to the singularity of the subjects and in the reception to the health needs of the users. Reception is a device for transforming practices and humanizing health care.  Objective: To analyse the operation of the host users of CAPS from the perspective of local coordinators in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil.  Method: Qualitative research with case study design, performed with CAPS coordinators of the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observation, being submitted to the analysis of thematic content.  Results: The host constituted innovative device in mental health practices, as triggered the construction of new ways of dealing with the subject in psychological distress, by incorporating technologies such as qualified listening, building autonomy, with attention focused on the user. Provided a reorientation of work and service processes, requesting the articulation for network care. In addition, it was configured as a strategy for humanization in the CAPS. Was presented, however, operational difficulties related to the environment and to the effectiveness of the network of attention.  Final considerations: The host device configured for reorienting health practices, enhancing the consolidation of psychosocial care model, with humanization and increased solvability. However, challenges remain to be overcome, related to the environment and to the effectiveness of the network of care.

  3. Meaning and Practice of Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults with Life Limiting Illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethel Ann Powers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC and end-of-life (EOL services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences and identification of the underlying structure and communication patterns of PC consultation services common to them. Conclusions. Consistent with reports by other researchers, study data support the need to move beyond equating PC with hospice or EOL care and the notion that EOL is a well-demarcated period of time before death. If professional health care providers assume that PC services are limited to assisting with and helping patients and families prepare for dying, they miss opportunities to provide care considered important to older individuals confronting life-limiting illnesses.

  4. Intensive Care Unit Structure Variation and Implications for Early Mobilization Practices. An International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhru, Rita N; McWilliams, David J; Wiebe, Douglas J; Spuhler, Vicki J; Schweickert, William D

    2016-09-01

    Early mobilization (EM) improves outcomes for mechanically ventilated patients. Variation in structure and organizational characteristics may affect implementation of EM practices. We queried intensive care unit (ICU) environment and standardized ICU practices to evaluate organizational characteristics that enable EM practice. We recruited 151 ICUs in France, 150 in Germany, 150 in the United Kingdom, and 500 in the United States by telephone. Survey domains included respondent characteristics, hospital and ICU characteristics, and ICU practices and protocols. We surveyed 1,484 ICU leaders and received a 64% response rate (951 ICUs). Eighty-eight percent of respondents were in nursing leadership roles; the remainder were physiotherapists. Surveyed ICUs were predominantly mixed medical-surgical units (67%), and 27% were medical ICUs. ICU staffing models differed significantly (P equipment were highly variable among respondents. International ICU structure and practice is quite heterogeneous, and several factors (multidisciplinary rounds, setting daily goals for patients, presence of a dedicated physiotherapist, country, and nurse/patient staffing ratio) are significantly associated with the practice of EM. Practice and barriers may be far different based upon staffing structure. To achieve successful implementation, whether through trials or quality improvement, ICU staffing and practice patterns must be taken into account.

  5. Collaboration of midwives in primary care midwifery practices with other maternity care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmelink, J Catja; Wiegers, Therese A; de Cock, T Paul; Klomp, Trudy; Hutton, Eileen K

    2017-12-01

    interactions with physicians (GPs, obstetricians and paediatricians). Midwives with more work experience were more satisfied with their collaboration with GPs. Midwives from the southern region of the Netherlands were more satisfied with collaboration with GPs and obstetricians. Compared to the urban areas, in the rural or mixed areas the midwives were more satisfied regarding their collaboration with MCA(O)s and clinical midwives. Midwives from non-Dutch origin were less satisfied with the collaboration with paediatricians. No relations were found between the overall mean satisfaction of collaboration and work-related and personal characteristics and attitude towards work. Inter-professionals relations in maternity care in the Netherlands can be enhanced, especially the primary care midwives' interactions with physicians and with maternity care providers in the northern and central part of the Netherlands, and in urban areas. Future exploratory or deductive research may provide additional insight in the collaborative practice in everyday work setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Learn new version of Preferred Practice Pattern to further standardize the diagnosis and treatment of amblyopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kanxing; Shi, Xuefeng

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of Preferred Practice Patterns (PPP) into China has given ophthalmologists in China more opportunities to acquaint themselves with international clinical guidelines for eye care, including its developing principles, methods and the application value. It had brought significant effects on the fast improvement of clinical eye care and standardization of diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases in China, and promoted the international academic exchanges. The 2nd Chinese version of PPPs translated by Prof. Jialiang Zhao was officially published in November, 2013. The new version of PPP for amblyopia adopted the newest standard for grading of evidence strength and recommendation assessment, and emphasizes the practicability based on evidence. New explanations of the definition of amblyopia are added according to the recent research progresses in amblyopia. The diagnostic criteria of best visual acuity for bilateral amblyopia at different ages is given with new specifications. Comprehensive and practical suggestions on the examination methods for amblyopia are provided from the qualitative assessment of visual acuity, the choice of eye chart, to the use of cycloplegic agents. In the aspect of the treatment of amblyopia, based on the findings of recent multi-central random controlled clinical trials, not only strong recommendations are provided, but also the insufficiency of evidence supporting for some choices of therapy is pointed out. The necessity of the follow-up evaluation after the cessation of the treatment of amblyopia is emphasized too. In the aspect of the prevention of amblyopia, the new amblyopia PPP points out the importance of the early-period screening of amblyopia, and that the healthcare insurance plans should cover timely screening, treatment, and monitoring for recurrence of amblyopia. This article deciphers the essential contents of the new version of Chinese PPP for amblyopia, and aims to promote the standardization of the diagnosis

  7. Practices for caring in nursing: Brazilian research groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, A L; de Andrade, S R; de Mello, A L Ferreira; Klock, P; do Nascimento, K C; Koerich, M Santos; Backes, D Stein

    2011-09-01

    The present study considers the production of knowledge and the interactions in the environment of research and their relationships in the system of caring in nursing and health. To elaborate a theoretical model of the organization of the practices used for caring, based on the experiences made by the research groups of administration and management in nursing, in Brazil. The study is based on grounded theory. Twelve leaders of research groups, working as professors in public universities in the south and the south-east of Brazil, distributed in sample groups, were interviewed. The core phenomenon 'research groups of administration and management in nursing: arrangements and interactions in the system of caring in nursing' was derived from the categories: conceptual bases and contexts of the research groups; experiencing interactions in the research groups; functionality of the research groups; and outputs of the research groups. The research groups are integrated in the system of caring in nursing. The activities of the Brazilian administration and management in nursing research groups are process oriented and in a process of constant renovation, socially relevant, operate in a complex scenario and contribute to the advancement of the organizations of the system of caring in nursing through strengthening the connection among academia, service and community. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Patterns of Colorectal Cancer Care in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Neetu; Butler, Eboneé N.; Lund, Jennifer; Warren, Joan L.; Harlan, Linda C.; Yabroff, K. Robin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men worldwide. In this study, we used MEDLINE to conduct a systematic review of existing literature published in English between 2000 and 2010 on patterns of colorectal cancer care. Specifically, this review examined 66 studies conducted in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand to assess patterns of initial care, post-diagnostic surveillance, and end-of-life care for colorectal cancer. The majority of studie...

  9. Analysis of international practice patterns regarding postvasectomy fertility options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blach, Ola; Shridharani, Anand N; Sandlow, Jay I

    2014-05-01

    To review the management of postvasectomy fertility options by urologists with vs without andrology fellowship and compare the features of practice in the USA vs UK. We conducted an audit of all American Urological Association-affiliated urologists regarding their practice in managing men requesting vasectomy reversal (VR). Standards of practice were assessed against 10 index parameters deemed, by 1 UK study, to reflect best practice. Fisher exact test was used to test the hypothesis that management of postvasectomy fertility options and practice of VR are no different when undertaken by urologists with vs without andrology training and no different in the USA vs UK. Three hundred twenty-five of 645 US respondents (50.4%) practiced VR vs 178 of 213 (83.6%) in the UK; only 11.9% in the US and 10% in the UK performed >25 and >15 (P <.0001) VR/year, respectively. Compared with the UK urologists the US urologists offered more detailed information on all fertility options and/or outcomes, used microsurgical techniques more often, but less frequently counseled couples together, and referred patients to specialist centers for in vitro fertilization with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (P <.0001-.05). Only 74 of the US and 61 of the UK urologists were fellowship-trained in andrology. Most non-fellowship-trained urologists, in both the countries, performed <5 VR/year and were, statistically, significantly less likely to counsel couples about all fertility options, be conversant in in vitro fertilization with intracytoplasmic sperm injection, provide individualized outcomes data, and use microsurgical techniques (P <.0001-.05). Significant differences exist in the standards of practice between both the US and UK urologists performing VR. Concordance with the indices of "best practice" improves with andrology training and increasing number of procedures performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Managing the primary care practice on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grevenhof P; Rahman; Cabanela; Naessens; Lassig

    2000-01-01

    Physicians and administrators have little hope of responding appropriately to the challenges of the health care market without data to support decision making. Desired Mayo Clinic s Primary Care Practice was to have the ability to access and integrate data from many platforms in many formats from the Enterprise and bring this information to the desktop in a robust interactive display. The solution was delivery of the data to the Web through an interface using Java with access to Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) tools for summarization, graphical display and reporting. Communicating major trends, assisting in planning and management, visually displaying alerts in summary data and individual patients that are all possible through an easy-to-use Web application. To really understand what the summarized data represents, the physicians must be able to drill down, download and explore their own detail data. A pilot project was developed to test the capabilities of the development environment, the acceptance Web tools, the ability to deliver timely information and the methodology of using a multi-dimensional database to define the data. The Family Medicine practice at four separate locations was chosen for the demonstration project. Two practices in Rochester, MN and practices in two smaller towns, totaling 50 physicians and administrative personnel, were the first clients using the system. A cross-functional team examined a variety of development issues such as data sources, data definitions, levels of security, data analysis types, and style of display. Demonstrations of the prototype met with an overwhelming positive response from administrators and department leaders. The Physician Patient Management solution collects, analyzes, and communicates the information needed to meet today s health care challenges.

  11. Perception on Informed Consent Regarding Nursing Care Practices in a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, B; Shrestha, G K

    Background Consent for care procedures is mandatory after receipt of adequate information. It maintains patient's rights and autonomy to make thoughtful decisions. Poor communication often leads to poor health quality. Objective To assess hospitalized patients' perception on informed consent regarding nursing care practices in a tertiary care center. Method This is a descriptive cross-sectional study among 113 admitted patients conducted in February 2012 at Dhulikhel Hospital, Nepal. Patients of various wards were selected using purposive non-probability sampling with at least 3 days of hospitalization. Close ended structured questionnaire was used to assess patients' perception on three different areas of informed consent (information giving, opportunity to make decision and taking prior consent). Result Among the participants 71.6% perceived positively regarding informed consent towards nursing care practices with a mean score of 3.32 ± 1.28. Patients' perception on various areas of informed consent viz. information giving, opportunities to make specific decision and taking prior consent were all positive with mean values of 3.43±1.12, 2.88±1.23, 3.65±1.49 respectively. Comparison of mean perception of informed consent with various variables revealed insignificant correlation (p-value >0.05) for age, educational level and previous hospitalization while it was significant (p-value perception on informed consent towards nursing care practices. Communication skills of nurses affect the perception of patients' regardless of age, education level and past experiences.

  12. Generating Insights from Trends in Newborn Care Practices from Prospective Population-Based Studies: Examples from India, Bangladesh and Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Crowe

    Full Text Available Delivery of essential newborn care is key to reducing neonatal mortality rates, yet coverage of protective birth practices remains incomplete and variable, with or without skilled attendance. Evidence of changes over time in newborn care provision, disaggregated by care practice and delivery type, can be used by policymakers to review efforts to reduce mortality. We examine such trends in four areas using control arm trial data.We analysed data from the control arms of cluster randomised controlled trials in Bangladesh (27 553 births, eastern India (8 939, Dhanusha, Nepal (15 344 and Makwanpur, Nepal (6 765 over the period 2001-2011. For each trial, we calculated the observed proportion of attended births and the coverage of WHO essential newborn care practices by year, adjusted for clustering and stratification. To explore factors contributing to the observed trends, we then analysed expected trends due only to observed shifts in birth attendance, accounted for stratification, delivery type and statistically significant interaction terms, and examined disaggregated trends in care practice coverage by delivery type. Attended births increased over the study periods in all areas from very low rates, reaching a maximum of only 30% of deliveries. Newborn care practice trends showed marked heterogeneity within and between areas. Adjustment for stratification, birth attendance and interaction revealed that care practices could change in opposite directions over time and/or between delivery types - e.g. in Bangladesh hygienic cord-cutting and skin-to-skin contact fell in attended deliveries but not home deliveries, whereas in India birth attendant hand-washing rose for institutional deliveries but fell for home deliveries.Coverage of many essential newborn care practices is improving, albeit slowly and unevenly across sites and delivery type. Time trend analyses of birth patterns and essential newborn care practices can inform policy-makers about

  13. Generating Insights from Trends in Newborn Care Practices from Prospective Population-Based Studies: Examples from India, Bangladesh and Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sonya; Prost, Audrey; Hossen, Munir; Azad, Kishwar; Kuddus, Abdul; Roy, Swati; Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Sikorski, Catherine; Manandhar, Dharma; Costello, Anthony; Pagel, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of essential newborn care is key to reducing neonatal mortality rates, yet coverage of protective birth practices remains incomplete and variable, with or without skilled attendance. Evidence of changes over time in newborn care provision, disaggregated by care practice and delivery type, can be used by policymakers to review efforts to reduce mortality. We examine such trends in four areas using control arm trial data. We analysed data from the control arms of cluster randomised controlled trials in Bangladesh (27 553 births), eastern India (8 939), Dhanusha, Nepal (15 344) and Makwanpur, Nepal (6 765) over the period 2001-2011. For each trial, we calculated the observed proportion of attended births and the coverage of WHO essential newborn care practices by year, adjusted for clustering and stratification. To explore factors contributing to the observed trends, we then analysed expected trends due only to observed shifts in birth attendance, accounted for stratification, delivery type and statistically significant interaction terms, and examined disaggregated trends in care practice coverage by delivery type. Attended births increased over the study periods in all areas from very low rates, reaching a maximum of only 30% of deliveries. Newborn care practice trends showed marked heterogeneity within and between areas. Adjustment for stratification, birth attendance and interaction revealed that care practices could change in opposite directions over time and/or between delivery types - e.g. in Bangladesh hygienic cord-cutting and skin-to-skin contact fell in attended deliveries but not home deliveries, whereas in India birth attendant hand-washing rose for institutional deliveries but fell for home deliveries. Coverage of many essential newborn care practices is improving, albeit slowly and unevenly across sites and delivery type. Time trend analyses of birth patterns and essential newborn care practices can inform policy-makers about effective

  14. Generating Insights from Trends in Newborn Care Practices from Prospective Population-Based Studies: Examples from India, Bangladesh and Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sonya; Prost, Audrey; Hossen, Munir; Azad, Kishwar; Kuddus, Abdul; Roy, Swati; Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Sikorski, Catherine; Manandhar, Dharma; Costello, Anthony; Pagel, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Background Delivery of essential newborn care is key to reducing neonatal mortality rates, yet coverage of protective birth practices remains incomplete and variable, with or without skilled attendance. Evidence of changes over time in newborn care provision, disaggregated by care practice and delivery type, can be used by policymakers to review efforts to reduce mortality. We examine such trends in four areas using control arm trial data. Methods and Findings We analysed data from the control arms of cluster randomised controlled trials in Bangladesh (27 553 births), eastern India (8 939), Dhanusha, Nepal (15 344) and Makwanpur, Nepal (6 765) over the period 2001–2011. For each trial, we calculated the observed proportion of attended births and the coverage of WHO essential newborn care practices by year, adjusted for clustering and stratification. To explore factors contributing to the observed trends, we then analysed expected trends due only to observed shifts in birth attendance, accounted for stratification, delivery type and statistically significant interaction terms, and examined disaggregated trends in care practice coverage by delivery type. Attended births increased over the study periods in all areas from very low rates, reaching a maximum of only 30% of deliveries. Newborn care practice trends showed marked heterogeneity within and between areas. Adjustment for stratification, birth attendance and interaction revealed that care practices could change in opposite directions over time and/or between delivery types – e.g. in Bangladesh hygienic cord-cutting and skin-to-skin contact fell in attended deliveries but not home deliveries, whereas in India birth attendant hand-washing rose for institutional deliveries but fell for home deliveries. Conclusions Coverage of many essential newborn care practices is improving, albeit slowly and unevenly across sites and delivery type. Time trend analyses of birth patterns and essential newborn care practices

  15. Base Station Antenna Pattern Distortion in Practical Urban Deployment Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard

    2014-01-01

    In real urban deployments, base station antennas are typically not placed in free space conditions. Therefore, the radiation pattern can be affected by mounting structures and nearby obstacles located in the proximity of the antenna (near-field), which are often not taken into consideration. Also...... presents a combination of near-field and far-field simulations aimed to provide an overview of the distortion experienced by the base station antenna pattern in two different urban deployment scenarios: rooftop and telecommunications tower. The study illustrates how, in comparison with the near...

  16. Staff immunisation: policy and practice in child care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokes, Paula J; Ferson, Mark J; Ressler, Kelly-Anne

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the level of knowledge among child-care centre directors regarding the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) recommendations for the immunisation of child-care workers, the extent to which this knowledge was translated into practice and any organisational barriers to the development and implementation of staff immunisation policy. A cross-sectional survey, conducted in August 2006, in which a postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 784 NSW child-care centres. Centre directors were asked to complete the questionnaire on immunisation knowledge, policy and practice for the centre. A multivariate logistic-regression model was used to identify factors independently associated with centres with an immunisation policy for staff and centres that offered to pay all or part of the cost of vaccination of staff. Directors from 437 centres participated in the study for a response rate of 56%. Of these, 49% were aware of the NHMRC recommendations, and 57% had a staff immunisation policy in place. In the logistic regression model, centres with a written immunisation policy for staff were more likely to be aware of the NHMRC guidelines and offer long day care services. Centres that offered to pay all or part of the cost of immunisation for staff were more likely to be aware of the NHMRC guidelines, offer other child-care services and not operate for profit. Barriers to staff immunisation were related to the implementation of policy and included cost, time and access to information. The level of awareness of specific staff immunisation recommendations was relatively low. The transition of knowledge to policy was encouraging, although implementation of policies requires further commitment. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. Nurses' care practices at the end of life in intensive care units in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Catherine S; Yaqoob, Maryam; Faraj, Sumaya; O'Neill, Carla L

    2017-12-01

    The process of dying in intensive care units is complex as the technological environment shapes clinical decisions. Decisions at the end of life require the involvement of patient, families and healthcare professionals. The degree of involvement can vary depending on the professional and social culture of the unit. Nurses have an important role to play in caring for dying patients and their families; however, their knowledge is not always sought. This study explored nurses' care practices at the end of life, with the objective of describing and identifying end of life care practices that nurses contribute to, with an emphasis on culture, religious experiences and professional identity. Research Design and context: Grounded theory was used. In all, 10 nurses from intensive care unit in two large hospitals in Bahrain were participated. Ethical Considerations: Approval to carry out the research was given by the Research Ethics Committee of the host institution, and the two hospitals. A core category, Death Avoidance Talk, was emerged. This was supported by two major categories: (1) order-oriented care and (2) signalling death and care shifting. Death talk was avoided by the nurses, doctors and family members. When a decision was made by the medical team that a patient was not to be resuscitated, the nurses took this as a sign that death was imminent. This led to a process of signalling death to family and of shifting care to family members. Despite the avoidance of death talk and nurses' lack of professional autonomy, they created awareness that death was imminent to family members and ensured that end of life care was given in a culturally sensitive manner and aligned to Islamic values.

  18. Regional health care planning: a methodology to cluster facilities using community utilization patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Paul L; Shortridge, Ashton M; Messina, Joseph P

    2013-08-22

    Community-based health care planning and regulation necessitates grouping facilities and areal units into regions of similar health care use. Limited research has explored the methodologies used in creating these regions. We offer a new methodology that clusters facilities based on similarities in patient utilization patterns and geographic location. Our case study focused on Hospital Groups in Michigan, the allocation units used for predicting future inpatient hospital bed demand in the state's Bed Need Methodology. The scientific, practical, and political concerns that were considered throughout the formulation and development of the methodology are detailed. The clustering methodology employs a 2-step K-means + Ward's clustering algorithm to group hospitals. The final number of clusters is selected using a heuristic that integrates both a statistical-based measure of cluster fit and characteristics of the resulting Hospital Groups. Using recent hospital utilization data, the clustering methodology identified 33 Hospital Groups in Michigan. Despite being developed within the politically charged climate of Certificate of Need regulation, we have provided an objective, replicable, and sustainable methodology to create Hospital Groups. Because the methodology is built upon theoretically sound principles of clustering analysis and health care service utilization, it is highly transferable across applications and suitable for grouping facilities or areal units.

  19. Strategic Review Process for an Accountable Care Organization and Emerging Accountable Care Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sarah J; Himmelrich, Sarah; Feeser, Scott A; Flynn, John A; Kravet, Steven J; Bailey, Jennifer; Hebert, Lindsay C; Donovan, Susan H; Kachur, Sarah G; Brown, Patricia M C; Baumgartner, William A; Berkowitz, Scott A

    2018-02-02

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), like other care entities, must be strategic about which initiatives they support in the quest for higher value. This article reviews the current strategic planning process for the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients (JMAP), a Medicare Shared Savings Program Track 1 ACO. It reviews the 3 focus areas for the 2017 strategic review process - (1) optimizing care coordination for complex, at-risk patients, (2) post-acute care, and (3) specialty care integration - reviewing cost savings and quality improvement opportunities, associated best practices from the literature, and opportunities to leverage and advance existing ACO and health system efforts in each area. It then reviews the ultimate selection of priorities for the coming year and early thoughts on implementation. After the robust review process, key stakeholders voted to select interventions targeted at care coordination, post-acute care, and specialty integration including Part B drug and imaging costs. The interventions selected incorporate a mixture of enhancing current ACO initiatives, working collaboratively and synergistically on other health system initiatives, and taking on new projects deemed targeted, cost-effective, and manageable in scope. The annual strategic review has been an essential and iterative process based on performance data and informed by the collective experience of other organizations. The process allows for an evidence-based strategic plan for the ACO in pursuit of the best care for patients.

  20. Dental Care Knowledge and Practice of a Group of Health Workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    importance to oral health cannot be overemphasized. Dental care is the practice of ... Keywords: Dental care, Health workers, Knowledge, Practice. Access this article online ..... The role of diet and nutrition in the etiology and prevention of oral ...

  1. Introduction of pattern recognition by MATLAB practice 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The contents of this book starts introduction and examples of pattern recognition. This book describes a vector and matrix, basic statistics and a probability distribution, statistical decision theory and probability density function, liner shunt, vector quantizing and clustering GMM, PCA and KL conversion, LDA, ID 3, a nerve cell modeling, HMM, SVM and Ada boost. It has direction of MATLAB in the appendix.

  2. New drugs in general practice: prescribing patterns and external influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentinus, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis several studies are presented with the objective to detect and elucidate the patterns by which new drugs are prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, we studied the influences of medical specialists and community pharmacists as important factors on the GP's decision to

  3. Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Michael E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC practices. Methods This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30 were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources. Results Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening. Conclusions Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were

  4. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (Pneonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in Characteristics and Practice Patterns of Ontario Psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyak, Paul; Zaheer, Juveria; Cheng, Joyce; Rudoler, David; Mulsant, Benoit H

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in demographic, geographic, and practice characteristics of all Ontario psychiatrists between 2003 and 2013 and their implication for access to psychiatrists. We included all psychiatrists who were clinically active in Ontario in any year from 2003 to 2013. For each psychiatrist, we reported age, sex, years since medical school graduation, geographic practice region, and practice characteristics such as total number of inpatients, outpatients, and outpatient visit frequencies. In 2013, there were 2070 psychiatrists, with nearly half (47%) more than 30 years since medical school graduation. Female psychiatrists comprised 41% of all psychiatrists in 2013 but 56% of all psychiatrists within 15 years of medical school graduation. Between 2003 and 2013, there was a 17% increase in the total number of psychiatrists, with the largest growth in psychiatrists occurring in the group more than 30 years from medical school graduation. Over these 11 years, the mean (SD) number of unique outpatients seen by a psychiatrist annually increased from 208 (228) to 249 (275) (19.5%; P = 0.001), with male psychiatrists, on average, seeing more outpatients annually than female psychiatrists. The number of outpatients seen by psychiatrists is slowly increasing. However, the large proportion of aging psychiatrists, the high concentration of psychiatrists in urban settings, and the increase in the number of female psychiatrists with smaller practices suggest that without radical changes to the way psychiatrists practice, access to psychiatrists will remain a challenge in Ontario.

  6. Pattern of nosocomial infection in two intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital in karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, M.F.; Hassan, Y.; Abdullah, M.; Shakeel, J.; Memon, A.R.; Razvi, M.F.; Saleem, S.; Shakeel, J.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the pattern of nosocomial infections in two ICUs' of a teaching hospital in terms of frequency, common sites of infection, the pathogens involved and the antibiotic sensitivity patterns. It was conducted in two medical ICUs (Neurology and Nephrology) of a public tertiary care hospital. Data was collected prospectively on patients suspected to have developed nosocomial infection after 48 hours of admission to the ICU according to objective. There were 101 cases of suspected nosocomial infection out of a total of 254 patients. The frequency of nosocomial infection was 39.7%. UTI developed in 44.6%, while 27% had blood stream infection, and 21% had pneumonia. Each of the three major sites of infection was strongly associated with the use of invasive devices. Escherichia (E.) coli was the most common organism isolated followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella. E. coli and Klebsiella showed a maximum sensitivity to Imipenem followed by Tazocin (pipericillin + tazobactam). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to Amikacin and Fosfomycin. The high frequency of nosocomial infection suggests that more strict measures regarding invasive devices should be taken in future to control the infection and limit the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms. (author)

  7. General practice and primary health care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Pedersen, Kjeld; Andersen, John Sahl; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    General practice is the corner stone of Danish primary health care. General practitioners (GPs) are similar to family physicians in the United States. On average, all Danes have 6.9 contacts per year with their GP (in-person, telephone, or E-mail consultation). General practice is characterized...... education. The contract is (re)negotiated every 2 years. General practice is embedded in a universal tax-funded health care system in which GP and hospital services are free at the point of use. The current system has evolved over the past century and has shown an ability to adapt flexibly to new challenges...... by 5 key components: (1) a list system, with an average of close to 1600 persons on the list of a typical GP; (2) the GP as gatekeeper and first-line provider in the sense that a referral from a GP is required for most office-based specialists and always for in- and outpatient hospital treatment; (3...

  8. [Activating therapeutic care in geriatrics : Evaluation of a practice concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acklau, Stefanie; Gödecker, Lisa; Kaden, Andrea; Jahn, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    The special feature of the concept of activating therapeutic care in geriatrics (ATP-G) is based on the focus of nursing and therapeutic elements specifically related to the elderly. Further significance lies in the bottom-up development of this concept, which shows a close proximity to the nursing practice. The research project targeted the characteristics of ATP-G from a nursing point of view. Furthermore, the resulting elements of professional nursing care understanding for inpatient geriatric rehabilitation were used to build a scientific and theoretical foundation of the ATP-G concept. In this study 12 semi-structured interviews with professional caregivers were realized. The data collection was undertaken in three different facilities of inpatient geriatric (early) rehabilitation, chosen by lot. The data analysis was based on the methodology of qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. The research project showed that the basic elements described in the ATP-G concept are consistent with the view of nursing practitioners and therefore reflect the characteristic features of routine daily practice; nonetheless, some new aspects were found, primarily the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork in geriatric settings. There were also difficulties related to the ATP-G concept which were experienced as restraints by the questioned professionals. Further research should therefore investigate the structures for optimal implementation of the ATP-G concept into standard practice.

  9. Formative evaluation of practice changes for managing depression within a Shared Care model in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulac, Julie; Edwards, Jeanette; Steele, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To investigate the implementation and initial impact of the Physician Integrated Network (PIN) mental health indicators, which are specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression, in three primary care practices with Shared Mental Health Care in Manitoba. Manitoba Health undertook a primary care renewal initiative in 2006 called the PIN, which included the development of mental health indicators specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression. These indicators were implemented in three PIN group practice sites in Manitoba, which are also part of Shared Mental Health Care. The design was a non-experimental longitudinal design. A formative evaluation investigated the implementation and initial impact of the mental health indicators using mixed methods (document review, survey, and interview). Quantitative data was explored using descriptive and comparative statistics and a content and theme analysis of the qualitative interviews was conducted. Survey responses were received from 32 out of 36 physicians from the three sites. Interviews were conducted with 15 providers. Findings This evaluation illustrated providers' perceived attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviours related to recognizing and treating depression and expanded our understanding of primary care processes related to managing depression related to the implementation of a new initiative. Depression is viewed as an important problem in primary care practice that is time consuming to diagnose, manage and treat and requires further investigation. Implementation of the PIN mental health indicators was variable across sites and providers. There was an increase in use of the indicators across time and a general sentiment that benefits of screening outweigh the costs; however, the benefit of screening for depression remains unclear. Consistent with current guidelines, a question the findings of this evaluation suggests is whether there are more effective ways of having an impact on

  10. Who Enrolls Onto Clinical Oncology Trials? A Radiation Patterns of Care Study Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Moughan, Jennifer; Owen, Jean; Coia, Lawrence R.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hanks, Gerald; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To identify factors significantly influencing accrual to clinical protocols by analyzing radiation Patterns of Care Study (PCS) surveys of 3,047 randomly selected radiotherapy (RT) patients. Methods and Materials: Patterns of Care Study surveys from disease sites studied for the periods 1992-1994 and 1996-1999 (breast cancer, n = 1,080; prostate cancer, n = 1,149; esophageal cancer, n = 818) were analyzed. The PCS is a National Cancer Institute-funded national survey of randomly selected RT institutions in the United States. Patients with nonmetastatic disease who received RT as definitive or adjuvant therapy were randomly selected from eligible patients at each institution. To determine national estimates, individual patient records were weighted by the relative contribution of each institution and patients within each institution. Data regarding participation in clinical trials were recorded. The factors age, gender, race, type of insurance, and practice type of treating institution (academic or not) were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Overall, only 2.7% of all patients were accrued to clinical protocols. Of these, 57% were enrolled on institutional review board-approved institutional trials, and 43% on National Cancer Institute collaborative group studies. On multivariate analysis, patients treated at academic facilities (p = 0.0001) and white patients (vs. African Americans, p = 0.0002) were significantly more likely to participate in clinical oncology trials. Age, gender, type of cancer, and type of insurance were not predictive. Conclusions: Practice type and race significantly influence enrollment onto clinical oncology trials. This suggests that increased communication and education regarding protocols, particularly focusing on physicians in nonacademic settings and minority patients, will be essential to enhance accrual

  11. Change in ranking order of prescribing patterns by age and sex standardization of the practice population--audit may be misleading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen Nørskov

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate whether standardization of practice populations by age and sex changes the internal prescription ranking order of a group of practices. DESIGN: Data on the prescribing of cardiovascular drugs in a group of practices were obtained from a county-based database. Information...... on the age, sex, and numbers of patients per practice was also obtained. The direct standardization method was used to adjust practice populations for age and sex. SETTING: The town of Randers, Aarhus County, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 35 practices, 41 GPs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ranking of the 35 practices...... of the practices. Only four practices did not change ranking position, while four moved more than ten places. The slope between highest and lowest ranked practice did not diminish after standardization. CONCLUSION: Care should be taken when comparing peer prescribing patterns from crude utilization data, and we...

  12. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conway, R

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant\\'s confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant\\'s self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  13. Mid and later life care work migration: Patterns of re-organising informal care obligations in Central and Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Gudrun; Österle, August

    2016-04-01

    Many women in mid or later life from Central and Eastern Europe commute for live-in 24-hour care work to Austria. In addition to paid care work abroad, the majority of women in this age group is confronted with informal (family) care obligations towards children, towards older relatives or towards grandchildren. This study aims to explore the patterns of re-organising these informal care obligations (childcare, long-term care and domestic work) in the respective home country and to analyse the factors that determine the re-organisation. The study builds on qualitative interviews with 20 migrant care workers aged 40years and over, 9 Romanian and 11 Slovakian women providing 24-hour care work in Austria. All interviewees commute in 2- to 4-weekly shifts between the home country and Austria and report multiple informal care obligations towards family members in the respective home country. In most cases, members of the nuclear and extended family, and in many cases husbands or partners of migrant care workers, act as the main substitute caregivers. Institutional care provision plays a more important role for child care as against for older people in need of care for whom care services are hardly available or accessible in the countries observed. While re-organisation depends much on the specific family constellations, strong assumptions towards family care, the limitations in (monetary) resources and the lack of public welfare provisions strongly co-determine the arrangements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Creating collaborative learning environments for transforming primary care practices now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William L; Cohen-Katz, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The renewal of primary care waits just ahead. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement and a refreshing breeze of collaboration signal its arrival with demonstration projects and pilots appearing across the country. An early message from this work suggests that the development of collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams may be essential for the success of the PCMH. Our focus in this article is on training existing health care professionals toward being thriving members of this transformed clinical care team in a relationship-centered PCMH. Our description of the optimal conditions for collaborative training begins with delineating three types of teams and how they relate to levels of collaboration. We then describe how to create a supportive, safe learning environment for this type of training, using a different model of professional socialization, and tools for building culture. Critical skills related to practice development and the cross-disciplinary collaborative processes are also included. Despite significant obstacles in readying current clinicians to be members of thriving collaborative teams, a few next steps toward implementing collaborative training programs for existing professionals are possible using competency-based and adult learning approaches. Grasping the long awaited arrival of collaborative primary health care will also require delivery system and payment reform. Until that happens, there is an abundance of work to be done envisioning new collaborative training programs and initiating a nation-wide effort to motivate and reeducate our colleagues. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Immediate newborn care practices delay thermoregulation and breastfeeding initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Howard L; Silvestre, Maria Asuncion A; Mantaring, Jacinto Blas V; Oliveros, Yolanda E; Nyunt-U, Soe

    2011-01-01

    Aim A deadly nosocomial outbreak in a Philippine hospital drew nationwide attention to neonatal sepsis. Together with specific infection control measures, interventions that protect newborns against infection-related mortality include drying, skin-to-skin contact, delayed cord clamping, breastfeeding initiation and delayed bathing. This evaluation characterized hospital care in the first hours of life with the intent to drive policy change, strategic planning and hospital reform. Methods Trained physicians observed 481 consecutive deliveries in 51 hospitals using a standardized tool to record practices and timing of immediate newborn care procedures. Results Drying, weighing, eye care and vitamin K injections were performed in more than 90% of newborns. Only 9.6% were allowed skin-to-skin contact. Interventions were inappropriately sequenced, e.g. immediate cord clamping (median 12 sec), delayed drying (96.5%) and early bathing (90.0%). While 68.2% were put to the breast, they were separated two minutes later. Unnecessary suctioning was performed in 94.9%. Doctors trained in neonatal resuscitation were 2.5 (1.1–5.7) times more likely to unnecessarily suction vigorous newborns. Two per cent died and 5.7% developed sepsis/pneumonia. Conclusions This minute-by-minute observational assessment revealed that performance and timing of immediate newborn care interventions are below WHO standards and deprive newborns of basic protections against infection and death. PMID:21375583

  16. Early child health in Lahore, Pakistan: IV. Child care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, S; Jalil, F; Karlberg, J

    1993-08-01

    Child care practices and hygiene measures were studied at 6 months of age in a longitudinally followed cohort of 1476 infants born between September 1984 to March 1987 in four socio-economically different areas in and around Lahore, Pakistan. Although, 76-98% of the mothers looked after their infants during health and 96-98% during a diarrhoeal illness, child care practices and hygiene measures differed significantly between the four areas. During a diarrhoeal episode, the mothers from the upper middle class took timely medical help, fed ample food and Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) to the sick infants and provided uncontaminated food to them in clean surroundings. The mothers from the village and the periurban slum took their sick child, mostly after the second day of illness, to a doctor, but preferred home remedies. Fourteen percent of the mothers in the village and 6% in the periurban slum did not seek any medical help at all. One-third of the families, from these two areas, fed food to children 12 hours after cooking; the surroundings of the child were dirty with large numbers of flies present throughout the year, though the food was commonly kept covered with a lid. We constructed a simple measure of the surroundings of the child, rated as dirty, medium or clean; it was found to be associated to both parental illiteracy and child growth, but not with housing standard. The main conclusion is that any attempt to improve child-care practices and the hygienic environment for the child, should focus on maternal literacy and simple health messages.

  17. Communicating Effectively in Pediatric Cancer Care: Translating Evidence into Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay J. Blazin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective communication is essential to the practice of pediatric oncology. Clear and empathic delivery of diagnostic and prognostic information positively impacts the ways in which patients and families cope. Honest, compassionate discussions regarding goals of care and hopes for patients approaching end of life can provide healing when other therapies have failed. Effective communication and the positive relationships it fosters also can provide comfort to families grieving the loss of a child. A robust body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of optimal communication for patients, families, and healthcare providers. This review aims to identify key communication skills that healthcare providers can employ throughout the illness journey to provide information, encourage shared decision-making, promote therapeutic alliance, and empathically address end-of-life concerns. By reviewing the relevant evidence and providing practical tips for skill development, we strive to help healthcare providers understand the value of effective communication and master these critical skills.

  18. Physiological patterns during practice of the Transcendental Meditation technique compared with patterns while reading Sanskrit and a modern language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, F; Olson, T; Egenes, T; Gupta, H K

    2001-07-01

    This study tested the prediction that reading Vedic Sanskrit texts, without knowledge of their meaning, produces a distinct physiological state. We measured EEG, breath rate, heart rate, and skin conductance during: (1) 15-min Transcendental Meditation (TM) practice; (2) 15-min reading verses of the Bhagavad Gita in Sanskrit; and (3) 15-min reading the same verses translated in German, Spanish, or French. The two reading conditions were randomly counterbalanced, and subjects filled out experience forms between each block to reduce carryover effects. Skin conductance levels significantly decreased during both reading Sanskrit and TM practice, and increased slightly during reading a modern language. Alpha power and coherence were significantly higher when reading Sanskrit and during TM practice, compared to reading modern languages. Similar physiological patterns when reading Sanskrit and during practice of the TM technique suggests that the state gained during TM practice may be integrated with active mental processes by reading Sanskrit.

  19. Patterns of Antenatal Care Seeking Behavior in South East Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on inequities on ANC seeking pattern among the pregnant women in Nigeria. Aim: The study ... behavior of women remains poor and poses one of the greatest ..... data – Or tears: An application to educational enrollments in states of. India.

  20. Ocular injuries and eye care seeking patterns following injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the extent of ocular injuries and health seeking patterns following these injuries are unknown among cocoa farmers in ... policy exists in Ghana for the occupational health and safety of ...... Cambridge,. UK:University Press.1963. 29.

  1. Spirituality and spiritual care: a descriptive survey of nursing practices in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün Şahin, Zümrüt; Kardaş Özdemir, Funda

    2016-08-01

    Nurses' spiritual care practices have been shown to affect patients' well-being, therefore understanding nurses' spiritual care perceptions and their practices. The aim of this paper is to investigate the nurses' views to practising spiritual care. A descriptive survey of 193 nurses was conducted at a general hospital in Turkey. Data was collected using a demographic questionnaire and The Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS). The findings of this study revealed that older nurses (pspiritual care (pspiritual care.

  2. Treatment planning for carcinoma of the cervix: a patterns of care study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C. Clifton; Smith, Alfred R.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Owen, Jean B.; Brickner, Theodore J.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) of patients treated in 1988-89 included 'patterns of treatment planning' for radiotherapy of carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A Consensus Committee of radiation physicists and oncologists established current guidelines and developed questionnaires to assess the treatment planning process (i.e., the general structure, methodology, and tools) of institutions involved in the Patterns of Care Study. This paper reports the findings of the assessment. Methods and Materials: The PCS surveyed 73 radiotherapy facilities, of which 21 are academic institutions (AC), 26 hospital-based facilities (HB), and 26 free-standing centers (FS). In total, 242 cases were assessed with 39% from academic centers, 33% from hospital-based centers, and 28% from free-standing centers. The survey collected treatment planning information such as the use of computed tomography (CT), simulation procedure, contouring of patient outline, tumor or target delineation, identification of critical structures, method of dose prescription (point or isodose), etc. Data was also obtained concerning implant boosts, e.g., radioisotope used, use of midline block for external beam treatment, availability of remote afterloader, practice of interstitial implants, combination with hyperthermia, etc. Results: There is a high degree of compliance relative to the basic treatment planning standards. For example, 171 cases (out of 173) from AC and HB institutions included simulation and 169 used port film; for cases from FS centers, 61 out of 69 involved simulation and 66 out of 69 included port film. Most institutions used linacs (231 out of 242); in five cases, Co-60 units and in six cases betatron was used. In terms of treatment planning, 53% used skin contours, but only 14% had target volume delineation, with AC and HB being slightly more conscientious in these efforts. Critical organs did not appear to be explicitly considered in external beam treatment planning, with only

  3. Mutual powerlessness in client participation practices in mental health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, Tineke; Nieboer, Anna P.; Bal, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Client participation has become a dominant policy goal in many countries including the Netherlands and is a topic much discussed in the literature. The success of client participation is usually measured in terms of the extent to which clients have a say in the participation process. Many articles have concluded that client participation is limited; professionals often still control the participation process and outcomes. Objective  The objective of this study is to gain insight into (i) the practice of client participation within a quality improvement collaborative in mental health care and (ii) the consequences of a Foucauldian conceptualization of power in analysing practices of client participation. Design  We used an ethnographic design consisting of observations of national events and improvement team meetings and interviews with the collaborative’s team members and programme managers. Results  Contrary to many studies on client participation, we found both clients and service providers frequently felt powerless in its practice. Professionals and clients alike struggled with the contributions clients could make to the improvement processes and what functions they should fulfil. Moreover, professionals did not want to exert power upon clients, but ironically just for that reason sometimes struggled with shaping practices of client participation. This mutual powerlessness (partly) disappeared when clients helped to determine and execute specific improvement actions instead of participating in improvement teams. Conclusion  Recognizing that power is inescapable might allow for a more substantive discussion concerning the consequences that power arrangements produce, rather than looking at who is exerting how much power. PMID:22390793

  4. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Klein

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL, fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  5. A retrospective analysis of practice patterns in the management of acute asthma attack across Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türktaş, Haluk; Bavbek, Sevim; Misirligil, Zeynep; Gemicioğlu, Bilun; Mungan, Dilşad

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate patient characteristics and practice patterns in the management of acute asthma attack at tertiary care centers across Turkey. A total of 294 patients (mean age: 50.4 ± 15.1 years; females: 80.3%) diagnosed with persistent asthma were included in this retrospective study upon their admission to the hospital with an acute asthma attack. Patient demographics, asthma control level, asthma attack severity and the management of the attack were evaluated. There was no influence of gender on asthma control and attack severity. In 57.5% of the patients, asthma attack was moderate. Most patients (78.9%) were hospitalized with longer duration evident in the severe attack. Spirometry and chest X-Ray were the most frequent tests (85.4%), while steroids (72.0% parenteral; 29.0% oral) and short-acting beta-agonists (SABA) + anticholinergics (45.5%) were the main drugs of choice in the attack management. Attack severity and pre-attack asthma control level was significantly correlated (p attack asthma was uncontrolled in 42.6% of the patients with severe attack. Most of the patients were on combination of more than one (two in 38.7% and 3-4 in 31.2%) controller drugs before the attack. Providing country specific data on practice patterns in the management of acute asthma attack in a representative cohort in Turkey, prescription of steroids and SABA + anticholinergics as the main drugs of choice was in line with guidelines while the significant relation of pre-attack asthma control to risk/severity of asthma attack and rate/duration of hospitalization seem to be the leading results of the present study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalent practice patterns in glaucoma: Poll of Indian ophthalmologists at a national conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Shreeram Choudhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to explore and compare the prevailing practice patterns in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma among subspecialists and general ophthalmologists in India. Materials and Methods: This is an interactive audience response system (ARS based poll of ophthalmologists attending the annual conference of the Glaucoma Society of India in 2013. Results: The information was obtained from 379 ophthalmologists (146 glaucoma specialists, 54 nonglaucoma subspecialists, and 179 general ophthalmologists. The majority of polled ophthalmologists (236; 62% had 10 or more years of experience in ophthalmology. The glaucoma specialists differed from nonglaucomatologists in their preference for Goldmann applanation tonometer (P < 0.01, four-mirror gonioscope (P < 0.01, Humphrey perimeter (P < 0.01, laser peripheral iridotomy in primary angle closure disease (P = 0.03, postiridotomy gonioscopy (P < 0.01, and usage of antifibrotic agents during filtering surgery (P < 0.01. Optical coherence tomography was the most preferred imaging modality and was utilized more often by the subspecialists than general ophthalmologists. The ophthalmologists also differed in their choice of antiglaucoma medications. More glaucoma specialists were performing surgery on children with congenital glaucoma (P < 0.01, implanting glaucoma drainage devices (P < 0.01, and using scientific journals to upgrade knowledge (P = 0.03 than the other ophthalmologists. Conclusions: This poll is the first of its kind in India, in its usage of the ARS, and in comparing the practice patterns of care for glaucoma among subspecialists and general ophthalmologists. It has revealed substantial diversity in a few areas among those who did and did not receive specialty training in glaucoma.

  7. Gender bias in child care and child health: global patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Rohan; Jain, Snigdha; Lodha, Rakesh; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2014-04-01

    Gender-based discrimination is reported across the spectrum of paediatric healthcare including emergency, inpatient, outpatient and preventive care and is mostly reported from South Asia and China with sporadic reports from Africa and South America. Biases against young girls have been documented even in immunisation percentage, home food allocation, seeking medical care for childhood ailments and percentage of household healthcare expenditures allocated to them. Such gender discrimination in access to medical care is likely to have an influence on the overall health of female children. Over the last five decades, the under-5 sex ratios are worsening in India with declining number of girls. Deliberate parental neglect of girls' essential and life-saving medical care is also an important contributing factor apart from sex-selective abortions to the declining gender ratios. Corrective measures and focused action are needed.

  8. Physician profiling. An analysis of inpatient practice patterns in Florida and Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, H G; Miller, M E; Welch, W P

    1994-03-03

    Physician profiling is a method of cost control that focuses on patterns of care instead of on specific clinical decisions. It is one cost-control method that takes into account physicians' desire to curb the intrusion of administrative mechanisms into the clinical encounter. To provide a concrete example of profiling, we analyzed the inpatient practice patterns of physicians in Florida and Oregon. Data for 1991 from Medicare's National Claims History File were used to profile 12,720 attending physicians in Florida and 2589 in Oregon. For each attending physician, we determined the total relative value of all physicians' services delivered during each patient's hospital stay. Relative value was measured in relative-value units (RVUs), according to the resource-based relative-value scale used by Medicare in determining payments to physicians. The mean number of RVUs per admission was then adjusted for the physician's case mix according to the patients' assigned diagnosis-related groups. The influence of the physician's specialty and of selected types of services (such as imaging and endoscopy) was also examined. Florida physicians used markedly more resources, on average, than their colleagues in Oregon (46 vs. 30 case-mix-adjusted RVUs per admission). The difference was apparent for all specialties and all types of service. To illustrate the profiling data potentially available to the medical staffs of individual hospitals, we examined specific data on individual attending physicians and for various types of service for three hospitals' staffs. Despite similar overall profiles that fell below the national mean, each staff had a different practice pattern and would require different efforts to improve efficiency. In an effort to encourage further debate, we have described one method of physician profiling. Profiling data help identify and characterize differences in practice style to which individual physicians or hospital staffs can respond. Because profiling is

  9. Smart practice: smart card design considerations in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, R A; Pacheco, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent innovations in microelectronics and advances in cryptography are driving the appearance of a new generation of smart cards with wider applications; this has important repercussions for our society in the coming years. Essentially, these breakthroughs include built-in microprocessors capable of generating cryptographic transactions (e.g.,Jelectronic blinded signatures, digital pseudonyms, and digital credentials), developments toward a single electronic card offering multi-access to services such as transport, telecommunications, health, financial, and entertainment (Universal Access Services), and incorporation of personal identification technologies such as voice, eye, or skin pattern recognition. For example, by using electronic representatives or cryptographic blinded signatures, a smart card can be used for multi transactions across different organizations and under different generated pseudonyms. These pseudonyms are capable of recognizing an individual unambiguously, while none of her records can be linked [1]. Moreover, tamper-proof electronic observers would make smart cards a very attractive technology for high-security based applications, such as those in the health care field. New trends in smart card technology offer excellent privacy and confidentiality safeguards. Therefore, smart cards constitute a promising technology for the health sector in Australia and other countries around the world in their pursuit of technology to support the delivery of quality care services. This paper addresses the main issues and the key design criteria which may be of strategic importance to the success of future smart card technology in the health care sector.

  10. Medical tourism in plastic surgery: ethical guidelines and practice standards for perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Verma, Kapil; Ashktorab, Samaneh; Davison, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this review was to identify the safety and medical care issues that surround the management of patients who had previously undergone medical care through tourism medicine. Medical tourism in plastic surgery occurs via three main referral patterns: macrotourism, in which a patient receives treatments abroad; microtourism, in which a patient undergoes a procedure by a distant plastic surgeon but requires postoperative and/or long-term management by a local plastic surgeon; and specialty tourism, in which a patient receives plastic surgery from a non-plastic surgeon. The ethical practice guidelines of the American Medical Association, International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and American Board of Plastic Surgeons were reviewed with respect to patient care and the practice of medical tourism. Safe and responsible care should start prior to surgery, with communication and postoperative planning between the treating physician and the accepting physician. Complications can arise at any time; however, it is the duty and ethical responsibility of plastic surgeons to prevent unnecessary complications following tourism medicine by adequately counseling patients, defining perioperative treatment protocols, and reporting complications to regional and specialty-specific governing bodies. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  11. Patient-centered Fertility Care: From Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Healthcare areas, especially fertility care (commonly accompanied with high emotions, as well as long-term and recurring treatment periods could exclusively benefit from patient-centered care (PCC. Despite evident advantages of PCC, this approach has not been practiced as a routine procedure in current clinical environments yet, even in western developed countries. Therefore, this review aimed to evaluate the significance and different aspects of PCC, while emphasizing on patient-centered fertility care, its challenges, and applicable recommendations in this regard. Methods: This narrative review was conducted on 29 relevant medical and clinical papers (published during 1990-2015 collected using various national and international databases (e.g., SID, Magiran, Medlib, Google scholar, Proquest, Pubmed, Wiley, Science direct, and Scopus. Key words and phrases used in this review were “infertility”, “fertility care”, “childlessness”, “patient-centered care”, “patient-centered fertility care” “shared decision-making”, “infertile patient preferences”, and “patient involvement in fertility care”. Results: According to the literature, implementation challenges of patient-centered fertility care were reported as different individual and organizational factors. These factors include lack of professional motivation to change, underestimating the significance of patient-centeredness by healthcare professionals, difficulty in translation of feedback into concrete measures, lack of time and financial resources, insufficient experience of healthcare professionals with regard to identification of needs and preferences of patients, traditional organizational culture, and common misconceptions. Conclusion: Promotion of patient-centered fertility services requires the identification of infertile needs and priorities of individuals, designation of interventional and supportive programs based on sociocultural

  12. Advanced practice nursing role delineation in acute and critical care: application of the strong model of advanced practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, D J; Ackerman, M H

    2000-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to differentiate between the roles of clinical nurse specialists and acute care nurse practitioners. Hypothesized blending of the clinical nurse specialist and acute care nurse practitioner roles is thought to result in an acute care clinician who integrates the clinical skills of the nurse practitioner with the systems knowledge, educational commitment, and leadership ability of the clinical nurse specialist. Ideally, this role blending would facilitate excellence in both direct and indirect patient care. The Strong Model of Advanced Practice, which incorporates practice domains of direct comprehensive care, support of systems, education, research, and publication and professional leadership, was tested to search for practical evidence of role blending. This descriptive, exploratory, pilot study included subjects (N = 18) solicited from an academic medical center and from an Internet advanced practice listserv. Questionnaires included self-ranking of expertise in practice domains, as well as valuing of role-related tasks. Content validity was judged by an expert panel of advanced practice nurses. Analyses of descriptive statistics revealed that clinical nurse specialists, who had more experience both as registered nurses and in the advanced practice nurse role, self-ranked their expertise higher in all practice domains. Acute care nurse practitioners placed higher importance on tasks related to direct comprehensive care, including conducting histories and physicals, diagnosing, and performing diagnostic procedures, whereas clinical nurse specialists assigned greater importance to tasks related to education, research, and leadership. Levels of self-assessed clinical expertise as well as valuing of role-related tasks differed among this sample of clinical nurse specialists and acute care nurse practitioners. Groundwork has been laid for continuing exploration into differentiation in advanced practice nursing roles. As the clinical

  13. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Timm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At the margins of modern medical practice, pushing the very limits of science, and indefatigably rendering the precincts of public discourse, still functional remnants of Christian civilization continue to provide care for the hopeless, perform healing sacraments for the incurable, and curate objects of votive devotion for the suffering and needy. These public services go largely unaccounted for, though they secure an ordered world, structure perception, and serve as ontological anchors. Lost in the vague, scientifically unrarified notions of spirituality that brace a general, undifferentiated worldwide metaphysical experience and disregard immense cultural, functional, geographic and performative distinctness, Catholic sacramental practices aimed at alleviating suffering and promoting healthy lifestyles are receiving only marginal mention in scientific literature(1, despite the fact that they make up daily reality in large parts of contemporary Europe and Latin America. Writing this editorial from the Northeast of Brazil, where traditional religious practice has sustained generations through the calamities of severe droughts, slavery, extreme poverty, high child mortality, failed political orders, and a harsh global economic reality, it is difficult to underestimate the power of sacramental experience to sustain a cultural identity. It was defined the concept of care of the sick in the context of the religious experience of the Northeast of Brazil which is historically relevant to health promotion. Until the emergence of national health care in the late nineteenth century, it was largely the order of the Franciscan friars that was charged with promoting healthy lives in the region. The Catholic concept of care that guided their efforts structures three procedural reality principles: the psychological reality of the transference to the person in one’s charge (care/caritas, the performative practice of religious sacrament such as the anointment

  14. How does the culture of medical group practices influence the types of programs used to assure quality of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissi, Amer; Kralewski, John; Curoe, Ann; Dowd, Bryan; Silversmith, Janet

    2004-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the culture of medical group practices greatly influences the quality of care, but little is known about how cultures are translated into specific types of programs focused on quality. This study explores this issue by assessing the influence of the organizational culture on these types of programs in medical group practices in the upper Midwest. Data were obtained from two surveys of medical group practices. The first survey was designed to assess the culture of the practice using a nine-dimension instrument developed previously. The second survey was designed to obtain organizational structure data including the programs identified by the literature as important to the quality of care in medical practices. Completed surveys were obtained from eighty-eight medical groups. The relationship of the group practice culture to structural programs focused on quality of care was analyzed using logistic regression equations. Several interesting patterns emerged. As expected, practices with a strong information culture favor electronic data systems and formal programs that provide comparative or evidence-based data to enhance their clinical practices. However, those with a quality-centered culture appear to prefer patient satisfaction surveys to assess the quality of their care, while practices that are more business-oriented rely on bureaucratic strategies such as benchmarking and physician profiling. Cultures that emphasize the autonomy of physician practice were negatively (but not at a statistically significant level) associated with all the programs studied. Practices with a highly collegial culture appear to rely on informal peer review mechanisms to assure quality rather than any of the structural programs included in this analysis. This study suggests that the types of quality programs that group practices develop differ according to their cultures. Consequently, it is important for practice administrators and medical directors to

  15. Associations among personal care product use patterns and exogenous hormone use in the NIEHS Sister Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kyla W; Baird, Donna D; Herring, Amy H; Engel, Lawrence S; Nichols, Hazel B; Sandler, Dale P; Troester, Melissa A

    2017-09-01

    It is hypothesized that certain chemicals in personal care products may alter the risk of adverse health outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to use a data-centered approach to classify complex patterns of exposure to personal care products and to understand how these patterns vary according to use of exogenous hormone exposures, oral contraceptives (OCs) and post-menopausal hormone therapy (HT). The NIEHS Sister Study is a prospective cohort study of 50,884 US women. Limiting the sample to non-Hispanic blacks and whites (N=47,019), latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify groups of individuals with similar patterns of personal care product use based on responses to 48 survey questions. Personal care products were categorized into three product types (beauty, hair, and skincare products) and separate latent classes were constructed for each type. Adjusted prevalence differences (PD) were calculated to estimate the association between exogenous hormone use, as measured by ever/never OC or HT use, and patterns of personal care product use. LCA reduced data dimensionality by grouping of individuals with similar patterns of personal care product use into mutually exclusive latent classes (three latent classes for beauty product use, three for hair, and four for skin care. There were strong differences in personal care usage by race, particularly for haircare products. For both blacks and whites, exogenous hormone exposures were associated with higher levels of product use, especially beauty and skincare products. Relative to individual product use questions, latent class variables capture complex patterns of personal care product usage. These patterns differed by race and were associated with ever OC and HT use. Future studies should consider personal care product exposures with other exogenous exposures when modeling health risks.

  16. Meal patterns and cooking practices in Southern France and Central England

    OpenAIRE

    Pettinger, C.; Holdsworth, Michelle; Gerber, M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether meal patterns and cooking practices in Central England and Mediterranean France conform to popular stereotypes, eating together as a household, preparation of meals, food purchasing patterns, cooking practices and eating out were investigated. Design: Cross-sectional studies conducted simultaneously in April 2001 using self-administered postal questionnaires. Setting: England (Nottingham, East Midlands) and France (Montpellier, Languedoc-Roussillon). Subjects: A...

  17. Audit and feedback by medical students to improve the preventive care practices of general practice supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkes, Lucy A; Liira, Helena; Emery, Jon

    Medical students benefit from their contact with clinicians and patients in the clinical setting. However, little is known about whether patients and clinicians also benefit from medical students. We developed an audit and feedback intervention activity to be delivered by medical students to their general practice supervisors. We tested whether the repeated cycle of audit had an effect on the preventive care practices of general practitioners (GPs). The students performed an audit on topics of preventive medicine and gave feedback to their supervisors. Each supervisor in the study had more than one student performing the audit over the academic year. After repetitive cycles of audit and feedback, the recording of social history items by GPs improved. For example, recording alcohol history increased from 24% to 36%. This study shows that medical students can be effective auditors, and their repeated audits may improve their general practice supervisors' recording of some aspects of social history.

  18. The comprehensive care project: measuring physician performance in ambulatory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Eric S; Weng, Weifeng; Arnold, Gerald K; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Greenfield, Sheldon; Hood, Sarah; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of comprehensively assessing physician-level performance in ambulatory practice. Ambulatory-based general internists in 13 states participated in the assessment. We assessed physician-level performance, adjusted for patient factors, on 46 individual measures, an overall composite measure, and composite measures for chronic, acute, and preventive care. Between- versus within-physician variation was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). External validity was assessed by correlating performance on a certification exam. Medical records for 236 physicians were audited for seven chronic and four acute care conditions, and six age- and gender-appropriate preventive services. Performance on the individual and composite measures varied substantially within (range 5-86 percent compliance on 46 measures) and between physicians (ICC range 0.12-0.88). Reliabilities for the composite measures were robust: 0.88 for chronic care and 0.87 for preventive services. Higher certification exam scores were associated with better performance on the overall (r = 0.19; pmeasures and by sampling feasible numbers of patients for each condition. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  19. Optimal utilization of a breast care advanced practice clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Katie W; Mone, Mary C; Serpico, Victoria J; Ward, Cori; Lynch, Joanna; Neumayer, Leigh A; Nelson, Edward W

    2014-12-01

    Incorporation of "lean" business philosophy within health care has the goal of adding value by reducing cost and improving quality. Applying these principles to the role of Advance Practice Clinicians (APCs) is relevant because they have become essential members of the healthcare team. An independent surgical breast care clinic directed by an APC was created with measurements of success to include the following: time to obtain an appointment, financial viability, and patient/APC/MD satisfaction. During the study period, there was a trend toward a decreased median time to obtain an appointment. Monthly APC charges increased from $388 to $30,800. The mean provider satisfaction score by Press Ganey was 96% for the APC and 95.8% for the surgeon. Both clinicians expressed significant satisfaction with clinic development. Overall, initiation of an APC breast clinic met the proposed goals of success. The use of lean philosophy demonstrates that implementation of change can result in added value in patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  1. Burn patient care lost in good manufacturing practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, G.; Jafari, P.; de Buys Roessingh, A.; Hirt-Burri, N.; Raffoul, W.; Applegate, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Application of cell therapies in burn care started in the early 80s in specialized hospital centers world-wide. Since 2007, cell therapies have been considered as “Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products” (ATMP), so classified by European Directives along with associated Regulations by the European Parliament. Consequently, regulatory changes have transformed the standard linear clinical care pathway into a more complex one. It is important to ensure the safety of cellular therapies used for burn patients and to standardize as much as possible the cell sources and products developed using cell culture procedures. However, we can definitely affirm that concentrating the bulk of energy and resources on the implementation of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) alone will have a major negative impact on the care of severely burned patients world-wide. Developing fully accredited infrastructures and training personnel (required by the new directives), along with obtaining approval for clinical trials to go ahead, can be a lengthy process.We discuss whether or not these patients could benefit from cell therapies provided by standard in-hospital laboratories, thus avoiding having to meet rigid regulations concerning the use of industrial pharmaceutical products. “Hospital Exemption” could be a preferred means to offer burn patients a customized and safe product, as many adaptations may be required throughout their treatment pathway. Patients who are in need of rapid treatment will be the ones to suffer the most from regulations intended to help them. PMID:28149232

  2. A taxonomy of accountable care organizations for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M; Wu, Frances M; Lewis, Valerie A; Colla, Carrie H; Fisher, Elliott S

    2014-12-01

    To develop an exploratory taxonomy of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) to describe and understand early ACO development and to provide a basis for technical assistance and future evaluation of performance. Data from the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, fielded between October 2012 and May 2013, of 173 Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial payer ACOs. Drawing on resource dependence and institutional theory, we develop measures of eight attributes of ACOs such as size, scope of services offered, and the use of performance accountability mechanisms. Data are analyzed using a two-step cluster analysis approach that accounts for both continuous and categorical data. We identified a reliable and internally valid three-cluster solution: larger, integrated systems that offer a broad scope of services and frequently include one or more postacute facilities; smaller, physician-led practices, centered in primary care, and that possess a relatively high degree of physician performance management; and moderately sized, joint hospital-physician and coalition-led groups that offer a moderately broad scope of services with some involvement of postacute facilities. ACOs can be characterized into three distinct clusters. The taxonomy provides a framework for assessing performance, for targeting technical assistance, and for diagnosing potential antitrust violations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Different Patterns in Health Care Use Among Immigrants in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Nazmy; Artazcoz, Lucía

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyze the differences in the use of primary care (PC), hospital, and emergency services between people born in Spain and immigrants. Data were obtained from the 2006 Spanish National Health Survey. The sample was composed of individuals aged 16-64 years from Spain and the seven countries with most immigrants in Spain (n = 22,224). Hierarchical multiple logistic regression models were fitted. Romanian men were less likely to use health care at all levels compared to men from other countries. Women from Argentina, Bolivia and Ecuador reported a lower use of PC. Among women, there were no differences in emergency visits or hospitalizations between countries. Bolivian men reported more hospitalizations than Spanish men, whereas Argentinean men reported more emergency visits than their Spanish counterparts. In Spain, most immigrants made less than, or about the same use of health care services as the native Spanish population.

  4. Improving immediate newborn care practices in Philippine hospitals: impact of a national quality of care initiative 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Maria Asuncion A; Mannava, Priya; Corsino, Marie Ann; Capili, Donna S; Calibo, Anthony P; Tan, Cynthia Fernandez; Murray, John C S; Kitong, Jacqueline; Sobel, Howard L

    2018-03-31

    To determine whether intrapartum and newborn care practices improved in 11 large hospitals between 2008 and 2015. Secondary data analysis of observational assessments conducted in 11 hospitals in 2008 and 2015. Eleven large government hospitals from five regions in the Philippines. One hundred and seven randomly sampled postpartum mother-baby pairs in 2008 and 106 randomly sampled postpartum mothers prior to discharge from hospitals after delivery. A national initiative to improve quality of newborn care starting in 2009 through development of a standard package of intrapartum and newborn care services, practice-based training, formation of multidisciplinary hospital working groups, and regular assessments and meetings in hospitals to identify actions to improve practices, policies and environments. Quality improvement was supported by policy development, health financing packages, health facility standards, capacity building and health communication. Sixteen intrapartum and newborn care practices. Between 2008 and 2015, initiation of drying within 5 s of birth, delayed cord clamping, dry cord care, uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact, timing and duration of the initial breastfeed, and bathing deferred until 6 h after birth all vastly improved (P<0.001). The proportion of newborns receiving hygienic cord handling and the hepatitis B birth dose decreased by 11-12%. Except for reduced induction of labor, inappropriate maternal care practices persisted. Newborn care practices have vastly improved through an approach focused on improving hospital policies, environments and health worker practices. Maternal care practices remain outdated largely due to the ineffective didactic training approaches adopted for maternal care.

  5. Patterns of Illness and Care Before Deployment to the Persian Gulf War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Richard

    2001-01-01

    ...) Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program (CCEP) upon returning from the Persian Gulf War have patterns of illness and medical care seeking during the year prior to deployment to the Persian Gulf that differ from those of comparison groups of Army...

  6. Patterns of Illness and Care Before Deployment to the Persian Gulf War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Richard

    2002-01-01

    ...) Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program (CCEP) upon returning from the Persian Gulf War have patterns of illness and medical care seeking during the year prior to deployment to the Persian Gulf that differ from those of comparison groups of Army...

  7. Variations in Practice Patterns among Neurosurgeons and Orthopaedic Surgeons in the Management of Spinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Manzar; Nasir, Sadaf; Moed, Amber; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2011-12-01

    This is a case series. We wanted to identify variations in the practice patterns among neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons for the management of spinal disorders. Spinal disorders are common in the clinical practice of both neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons. It has been observed that despite the availability of various guidelines, there is lack of consensus among surgeons about the management of various disorders. A questionnaire was distributed, either directly or via e-mail, to the both the neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons who worked at 5 tertiary care centers within a single region of Korea. The surgeons were working either in private practice or in academic institutions. The details of the questionnaire included demographic details and the specialty (orthopedic/neurosurgeon). The surgeons were classified according to the level of experience as up to 5 years, 6-10 years and > 10 years. Questions were asked about the approach to lumbar discectomy (fragmentectomy or aggressive disc removal), using steroids for treating discitis, the fusion preference for spondylolisthesis, the role of an orthosis after fusion, the preferred surgical approach for spinal stenosis, the operative approach for spinal trauma (early within 72 hours or late > 72 hours) and the role of surgery in complete spinal cord injury. The data was analyzed using SPSS ver 16. p-values neurosurgeons and 10 were orthopedic surgeons. Statistically significant differences were observed for the management of spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, using an orthosis after fusion, the type of lumbar discectomy and the value of surgical intervention after complete spinal cord injury. Our results suggest that there continues to exist a statistically significant lack of consensus among neurosurgeons and orthopedic spine surgeons when considering using an orthosis after fusion, the type of discectomy and the value of intervention after complete spinal injury.

  8. Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Lynne

    2014-09-01

    Construction in and around a working perioperative suite is a challenge beyond merely managing traffic patterns and maintaining the sterile field. The AORN "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II" provides guidance on building design; movement of patients, personnel, supplies, and equipment; environmental controls; safety and security; and control of noise and distractions. Whether the OR suite evolves through construction, reconstruction, or remodeling, a multidisciplinary team of construction experts and health care professionals should create a functional plan and communicate at every stage of the project to maintain a safe environment and achieve a well-designed outcome. Emergency preparedness, a facility-wide security plan, and minimization of noise and distractions in the OR also help enhance the safety of the perioperative environment. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aligning for accountable care: Strategic practices for change in accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilligoss, Brian; Song, Paula H; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    Alignment within accountable care organizations (ACOs) is crucial if these new entities are to achieve their lofty goals. However, the concept of alignment remains underexamined, and we know little about the work entailed in creating alignment. The aim of this study was to develop the concept of aligning by identifying and describing the strategic practices administrators use to align the structures, processes, and behaviors of their organizations and individual providers in pursuit of accountable care. We conducted 2-year qualitative case studies of four ACOs that have assumed full risk for the costs and quality of care for defined populations. Five strategic aligning practices were used by all four ACOs. Informing both aligns providers' understandings with the goals and value proposition of the ACO and aligns the providers' attention with the drivers of performance. Involving both aligns ACO leaders' understandings with the realities facing providers and aligns the policies of the ACO with the needs of providers. Enhancing both aligns the operations of individual provider practices with the operations of the ACO and aligns the trust of providers with the ACO. Motivating aligns what providers value with the goals of the ACO. Finally, evolving is a metapractice of learning and adapting that guides the execution of the other four practices. Our findings suggest that there are second-order cognitive (e.g., understandings and attention) and cultural (e.g., trust and values) levels of alignment, as well as a first-order operational level (organizational structures, processes, and incentives). A well-aligned organization may require ongoing repositioning at each of these levels, as well as attention to both cooperative and coordinative dimensions of alignment. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  10. Ocular injuries and eye care seeking patterns following injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The work environment of cocoa farmers exposes them to several ocular hazards that predispose them to eye diseases and injuries. However, the extent of ocular injuries and health seeking patterns following these injuries are unknown among cocoa farmers in Ghana. Objectives: To determine the prevalence ...

  11. Patterns of uveitis in children presenting at a tertiary eye care centre in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Kannan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the patterns of uveitis in the paediatric age group in a referral eye care centre in south India. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients 15 years or younger with uveitis, examined in the year 2000, were included in this study. The uveitis was classified according to the anatomical site of ocular involvement and the most probable aetiological factor. The final diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations and results of specific laboratory investigations. Results: A total 31 (6.29% paediatric uveitis cases were seen among the 493 uveitic cases in the year 2000. The male: female ratio was 17:14. Anterior (9 cases, intermediate (9 cases and posterior uveitis (9 cases were seen in equal number. Four patients had panuveitis. Twenty-seven patients had visual acuity of 6/36 or better at presentation. Approximately 25% (8 of 31 patients had cataract secondary to inflammation. Immunosuppressives were administered in 4 patients and one patient required cataract surgery. Conclusion: Uveitis in children comprises approximately 6% of uveitis cases in a referral practice in south India. Anterior, intermediate and posterior uveitis are seen in equal numbers. We recommend that intermediate uveitis be ruled out in all cases of anterior uveitis by careful clinical evaluation including examination under anesthesia (EUA when required.

  12. Child obesity prevention in primary health care: investigating practice nurse roles, attitudes and current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alison; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Laws, Rachel; Harris, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Overweight and obesity affects approximately 20% of Australian pre-schoolers. The general practice nurse (PN) workforce has increased in recent years; however, little is known of PN capacity and potential to provide routine advice for the prevention of child obesity. This mixed methods pilot study aims to explore the current practices, attitudes, confidence and training needs of Australian PNs surrounding child obesity prevention in the general practice setting. PNs from three Divisions of General Practice in New South Wales were invited to complete a questionnaire investigating PN roles, attitudes and practices in preventive care with a focus on child obesity. A total of 59 questionnaires were returned (response rate 22%). Semi-structured qualitative interviews were also conducted with a subsample of PNs (n = 10). Questionnaire respondent demographics were similar to that of national PN data. PNs described preventive work as enjoyable despite some perceived barriers including lack of confidence. Number of years working in general practice did not appear to strongly influence nurses' perceived barriers. Seventy per cent of PNs were interested in being more involved in conducting child health checks in practice, and 85% expressed an interest in taking part in child obesity prevention training. Findings from this pilot study suggest that PNs are interested in prevention of child obesity despite barriers to practice and low confidence levels. More research is needed to determine the effect of training on PN confidence and behaviours in providing routine healthy life-style messages for the prevention of child obesity. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. 2009 survey results: surgeon practice patterns regarding arthroscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, John; Burks, Robert

    2009-12-01

    A survey was conducted to collect information on the surgical management and practice preferences of the audience members at a recent continuing medical education conference. Participants were polled on a variety of surgical topics, and their responses were recorded using a wireless audience response system. The answers were tabulated and are presented in this report. The majority of respondents preferred an arthroscopic repair for rotator cuff tears (52%) and shoulder instability (71%). Most (50%) perform single-row repair; 33% perform double-row repair. For simple knee arthroscopy, most use preoperative antibiotics (85%), no tourniquet (53%), and no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (69%). For cruciate ligament reconstruction, the majority preferred only a preoperative antibiotic (67%), no chemical anticoagulation or only compression boots (56%), and single-bundle reconstruction (88%) using a transtibial femoral tunnel (78%). Most (47%) prefer an all inside suture-based meniscus repair device.

  14. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Janice

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta. Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education, environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work, and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit

  15. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, Marije; Dijkstra, Rob; Wensing, Michel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of d...

  16. Diabetic foot wound care practices among patients visiting a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic foot syndrome is one of the most common and devastating preventable complications of diabetes resulting in major economic consequences for the patients, their families, and the society. Aims & Objectives: The present study was carried out to assess knowledge, attitude and practices of Diabetic Foot Wound Care among the patients suffering from Diabetic Foot and to correlate them with the socio-demographic parameters. Material & Methods: It was a Hospital based cross-sectional study involving clinically diagnosed adult (>18 years patients of Diabetic Foot visiting the Surgery and Medicine OPDs at Teerthankar Mahaveer Medical College & Research Centre, Moradabad, India. Results: Significant association KAP (Knowledge, Attitude and Practices score was seen with age of the patient, education, addiction, family history of Diabetes Mellitus, prior receipt of information regarding Diabetic foot-care practices, compliance towards the treatment and the type of foot wear used. Conclusions: The results highlight areas especially Health education, use of safe footwear and life style adjustments, where efforts to improve knowledge and practice may contribute to the prevention of development of Foot ulcers and amputation. 

  17. Antenatal care in practice: an exploratory study in antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessy Flora

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. Yet there are worrying gaps in knowledge of the quality of antenatal care provided in Tanzania. In particular, determinants of health workers' performance have not yet been fully understood. This paper uses ethnographic methods to document health workers' antenatal care practices with reference to the national Focused Antenatal Care guidelines and identifies factors influencing health workers' performance. Potential implications for improving antenatal care provision in Tanzania are discussed. Methods Combining different qualitative techniques, we studied health workers' antenatal care practices in four public antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania. A total of 36 antenatal care consultations were observed and compared with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Participant observation, informal discussions and in-depth interviews with the staff helped to identify and explain health workers' practices and contextual factors influencing antenatal care provision. Results The delivery of antenatal care services to pregnant women at the selected antenatal care clinics varied widely. Some services that are recommended by the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines were given to all women while other services were not delivered at all. Factors influencing health workers' practices were poor implementation of the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines, lack of trained staff and absenteeism, supply shortages and use of working tools that are not consistent with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Health workers react to difficult working conditions by developing informal practices as coping strategies or "street-level bureaucracy". Conclusions Efforts to improve antenatal care should address shortages of trained staff through expanding training opportunities, including health worker

  18. Inferring ancient Agave cultivation practices from contemporary genetic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kathleen C; Trapnell, Dorset W; Hamrick, J L; Hodgson, Wendy C; Parker, Albert J

    2010-04-01

    Several Agave species have played an important ethnobotanical role since prehistory in Mesoamerica and semiarid areas to the north, including central Arizona. We examined genetic variation in relict Agave parryi populations northeast of the Mogollon Rim in Arizona, remnants from anthropogenic manipulation over 600 years ago. We used both allozymes and microsatellites to compare genetic variability and structure in anthropogenically manipulated populations with putative wild populations, to assess whether they were actively cultivated or the result of inadvertent manipulation, and to determine probable source locations for anthropogenic populations. Wild populations were more genetically diverse than anthropogenic populations, with greater expected heterozygosity, polymorphic loci, effective number of alleles and allelic richness. Anthropogenic populations exhibited many traits indicative of past active cultivation: fixed heterozygosity for several loci in all populations (nonexistent in wild populations); fewer multilocus genotypes, which differed by fewer alleles; and greater differentiation among populations than was characteristic of wild populations. Furthermore, manipulated populations date from a period when changes in the cultural context may have favoured active cultivation near dwellings. Patterns of genetic similarity among populations suggest a complex anthropogenic history. Anthropogenic populations were not simply derived from the closest wild A. parryi stock; instead they evidently came from more distant, often more diverse, wild populations, perhaps obtained through trade networks in existence at the time of cultivation.

  19. Shared care dyadic intervention: outcome patterns for heart failure care partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebern, Margaret D; Woda, Aimee

    2012-04-01

    Up to half of heart failure (HF) patients are readmitted to hospitals within 6 months of discharge. Many readmissions are linked to inadequate self-care or family support. To improve care, practitioners may need to intervene with both the HF patient and family caregiver. Despite the recognition that family interventions improve patient outcomes, there is a lack of evidence to support dyadic interventions in HF. Thus, the purpose of this study was to test the Shared Care Dyadic Intervention (SCDI) designed to improve self-care in HF. The theoretical base of the SCDI was a construct called Shared Care. Shared Care represents a system of processes used in family care to exchange support. Key findings were as follows: the SCDI was acceptable to both care partners and the data supported improved shared care for both. For the patient, there were improvements in self-care. For the caregivers, there were improvements in relationship quality and health.

  20. Pattern of Ambulatory Care Visits to Obstetrician-Gynecologists in Taiwan: A Nationwide Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Min Lynn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs are the main actors in the provision of health care to women, their practice patterns have rarely been analyzed. The current study investigated the nationwide ambulatory visits to OB-GYNs in Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database. From the 1/500 sampling datasets indicating 619,760 ambulatory visits in 2012, it was found that 5.8% (n = 35,697 of the visits were made to OB-GYNs. Two-fifths of the services provided were performed by male OB-GYNs aged 50–59 years. Women of childbearing age accounted for more than half of the visits to OB-GYNs (57.2%, and elderly patients above 60 years accounted for only 7.7%. The most frequent diagnoses were menstrual disorders and other forms of abnormal bleeding from the female genital tract (13.1%. Anti-infective agents were prescribed in 15.1% of the visits to OB-GYNs. The study revealed the proportion of aging practicing OB-GYNs, and our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on health policymaking.

  1. Implementing Dementia Care Mapping as a practice development tool in dementia care services: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surr CA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Claire A Surr, Alys W Griffiths, Rachael Kelley Centre for Dementia Research, School of Health and Community Studies, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK Abstract: Dementia Care Mapping (DCM is an observational tool set within a practice development process. Following training in the method, DCM is implemented via a cyclic process of briefing staff, conducting mapping observations, data analysis and report preparation, feedback to staff and action planning. Recent controlled studies of DCM’s efficacy have found heterogeneous results, and variability in DCM implementation has been indicated as a potential contributing factor. This review aimed to examine the primary research evidence on the processes and the barriers and facilitators to implementing DCM as a practice development method within formal dementia care settings. PUBMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library-Cochrane reviews, HMIC (Ovid, Web of Science and Social Care Online were searched using the term “Dementia Care Mapping”. Inclusion criterion was primary research studies in any formal dementia care settings where DCM was used as a practice development tool and which included discussion/critique of the implementation processes. Assessment of study quality was conducted using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Twelve papers were included in the review, representing nine research studies. The papers included discussion of various components of the DCM process, including mapper selection and preparation; mapping observations; data analysis, report writing and feedback; and action planning. However, robust evidence on requirements for successful implementation of these components was limited. Barriers and facilitators to mapping were also discussed. The review found some consensus that DCM is more likely to be successfully implemented if the right people are selected to be trained as mappers, with appropriate mapper preparation and ongoing support and with effective leadership for

  2. Contextualizing learning to improve care using collaborative communities of practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; McShane, Julie; Flintoft, Virginia; White, Peggy; Indar, Alyssa; Maione, Maria; Lopez, A J; Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Scavuzzo, Lauren

    2016-09-02

    The use of interorganizational, collaborative approaches to build capacity in quality improvement (QI) in health care is showing promise as a useful model for scaling up and accelerating the implementation of interventions that bridge the "know-do" gap to improve clinical care and provider outcomes. Fundamental to a collaborative approach is interorganizational learning whereby organizations acquire, share, and combine knowledge with other organizations and have the opportunity to learn from their respective successes and challenges in improvement areas. This learning approach aims to create the conditions for collaborative, reflective, and innovative experiential systems that enable collective discussions regarding daily practice issues and finding solutions for improvement. The concepts associated with interorganizational learning and deliberate learning activities within a collaborative 'Communities-of-practice'(CoP) approach formed the foundation of the of an interactive QI knowledge translation initiative entitled PERFORM KT. Nine teams participated including seven teams from two acute care hospitals, one from a long term care center, and one from a mental health sciences center. Six monthly CoP learning sessions were held and teams, with the support of an assigned mentor, implemented a QI project and monitored their results which were presented at an end of project symposium. 47 individuals participated in either a focus group or a personal interview. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using an iterative content analysis. Four key themes emerged from the narrative dataset around experiences and perceptions associated with the PERFORM KT initiative: 1) being successful and taking it to other levels by being systematic, structured, and mentored; 2) taking it outside the comfort zone by being exposed to new concepts and learning together; 3) hearing feedback, exchanging stories, and getting new ideas; and 4) having a pragmatic and accommodating approach to

  3. Multimorbidity patterns in a primary care population aged 55 years and over.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinnige, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Westert, G.P.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Braspenning, J.C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To support the management of multimorbid patients in primary care, evidence is needed on prevalent multimorbidity patterns. Objective. To identify the common and distinctive multimorbidity patterns. Methods. Clinical data of 120480 patients (≥55 years) were extracted from 158 general

  4. Multimorbidity patterns in a primary care population aged 55 years and over

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinnige, J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Westert, G.P.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Braspenning, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To support the management of multimorbid patients in primary care, evidence is needed on prevalent multimorbidity patterns. Objective. To identify the common and distinctive multimorbidity patterns. Methods. Clinical data of 120 480 patients (≥55 years) were extracted from 158 general

  5. Patterns of care in the management of seminoma stage I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vossen, Carla Y; Horwich, Alan; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    Study Type - Therapy (practise pattern survey). Level of Evidence 3b. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The uncertainties about differences in relapse and rates of other late events such as second malignancy and cardiovascular events for the three post-orchidectomy strateg......Study Type - Therapy (practise pattern survey). Level of Evidence 3b. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The uncertainties about differences in relapse and rates of other late events such as second malignancy and cardiovascular events for the three post......-orchidectomy strategies in seminoma stage I patients has led to debates about whether the three strategies are equally effective and safe. The differences in interpretation of the data as well as the debates are likely to result in differences in treatment after orchidectomy in seminoma stage I patient management...

  6. Visual Analytics for Pattern Discovery in Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Karen A.; Bae, Sung-Heui; Zhang, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Visualization can reduce the cognitive load of information, allowing users to easily interpret and assess large amounts of data. The purpose of our study was to examine home health data using visual analysis techniques to discover clinically salient associations between patient characteristics with problem-oriented health outcomes of older adult home health patients during the home health service period. Methods Knowledge, Behavior and Status ratings at discharge as well as change from admission to discharge that was coded using the Omaha System was collected from a dataset on 988 de-identified patient data from 15 home health agencies. SPSS Visualization Designer v1.0 was used to visually analyze patterns between independent and outcome variables using heat maps and histograms. Visualizations suggesting clinical salience were tested for significance using correlation analysis. Results The mean age of the patients was 80 years, with the majority female (66%). Of the 150 visualizations, 69 potentially meaningful patterns were statistically evaluated through bivariate associations, revealing 21 significant associations. Further, 14 associations between episode length and Charlson co-morbidity index mainly with urinary related diagnoses and problems remained significant after adjustment analyses. Through visual analysis, the adverse association of the longer home health episode length and higher Charlson co-morbidity index with behavior or status outcomes for patients with impaired urinary function was revealed. Conclusions We have demonstrated the use of visual analysis to discover novel patterns that described high-needs subgroups among the older home health patient population. The effective presentation of these data patterns can allow clinicians to identify areas of patient improvement, and time periods that are most effective for implementing home health interventions to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27466053

  7. Homesick: residential and care patterns in patients with severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mooij, Liselotte D.; Kikkert, Martijn; Lommerse, Nick M.; Theunissen, Jan; de Koning, Mariken B.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; Duurkoop, Pim W. R. A.; Dekker, Jack J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the residential and care settings of patients with severe mental illness (SMI) are a concern because of the large variety of possible negative consequences. This study describes patterns of changes in the residential and care settings of SMI patients and explores associations between

  8. Review of occupational exposure patterns in Indian Health Care Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, M.; Nehru, R.M.; Sonawane, A.U.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of individual radiation is a prime part of the radiation protection programme. The primary justification for monitoring helps achieve and demonstrate an appropriate level of protection and can demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements, contribute to the control of operations and design of installations. Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules 2004 advocates that radiation surveillance is mandatory for all radiation workers. The largest group of individuals exposed occupationally to artificial radiation sources is that employed in health care facilities such as Diagnostic Radiology, Radiation Therapy and Nuclear Medicine. In this work, a comprehensive analysis was carried out on occupational exposure data for the period 2000 to 2014 to bring a measure of radiation protection infrastructure quality in health care facilities

  9. Nurses' Perspectives on the Geriatric Nursing Practice Environment and the Quality of Older People's Care in Ontario Acute Care Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Mary T; Sidani, Souraya; Butler, Jeffrey I; Tregunno, Deborah

    2017-06-01

    Background Cultivating hospital environments that support older people's care is a national priority. Evidence on geriatric nursing practice environments, obtained from studies of registered nurses (RNs) in American teaching hospitals, may have limited applicability to Canada, where RNs and registered practical nurses (RPNs) care for older people in predominantly nonteaching hospitals. Purpose This study describes nurses' perceptions of the overall quality of care for older people and the geriatric nursing practice environment (geriatric resources, interprofessional collaboration, and organizational value of older people's care) and examines if these perceptions differ by professional designation and hospital teaching status. Methods A cross-sectional survey, using Dillman's tailored design, that included Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile subscales, was completed by 2005 Ontario RNs and registered practical nurses to assess their perceptions of the quality of care and geriatric nursing practice environment. Results Scores on the Geriatric Institutional Assessment Profile subscales averaged slightly above the midpoint except for geriatric resources which was slightly below. Registered practical nurses rated the quality of care and geriatric nursing practice environment higher than RNs; no significant differences were found by hospital teaching status. Conclusions Nurses' perceptions of older people's care and the geriatric nursing practice environment differ by professional designation but not hospital teaching status. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals should both be targeted for geriatric nursing practice environment improvement initiatives.

  10. Northern nursing practice in a primary health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukic, Adele; Keddy, Barbara

    2002-12-01

    This paper explicates the nature of outpost nursing work, and/or the day-to-day realities of northern nursing practice in a primary health care setting in Canada. The study was carried out to systematically explore the work of nurses in an indigenous setting. Institutional ethnography, pioneered by Dorothy Smith was the methodology used to guide this research. The theoretical perspective of this methodology does not seek causes or links but intends to explicate visible practices. It is intended to explicate the social organization of specific discourses that inform work processes of nurses working in remote indigenous communities. The data originated from various sources including spending 2 weeks in a northern remote community shadowing experienced nurses, taking field notes and audio taping interviews with these nurses. One of the two researchers was a northern practice nurse for many years and has had taught in an outpost nursing programme. As part of the process, texts were obtained from the site as data to be incorporated in the analysis. The lived experiences have added to the analytical understanding of the work of nurses in remote areas. Data uncovered documentary practices inherent to the work setting which were then analysed along with the transcribed interviews and field notes derived from the on-site visit. Identifying disjuncture in the discourse of northern nursing and the lived experience of the nurses in this study was central to the research process. The results indicated that the social organization of northern community nursing work required a broad generalist knowledge base for decision making to work effectively within this primary health care setting. The nurse as 'other' and the invisibility of nurses' work of building a trusting relationship with the community is not reflected in the discourse of northern nursing. Trust cannot be quantified or measured yet it is fundamental to working effectively with the community. The nurses in this study

  11. Ambulatory Melanoma Care Patterns in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, A. L.; Davis, S. A.; Feldman, S. R.; Fleischer, A. B.; Baze, M. R.; Feldman, S. R.; Feldman, S. R.; Fleischer, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    To examine trends in melanoma visits in the ambulatory care setting. Methods. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) from 1979 to 2010 were used to analyze melanoma visit characteristics including number of visits, age and gender of patients, and physician specialty. These data were compared to US Census population estimates during the same time period. Results. The overall rate of melanoma visits increased (ρ< 0.0001) at an apparently higher rate than the increase in population over this time. The age of patients with melanoma visits increased at approximately double the rate (0.47 year per interval year, ρ< 0.0001) of the population increase in age (0.23 year per interval year). There was a nonsignificant(ρ=0.19) decline in the proportion of female patients seen over the study interval. Lastly, ambulatory care has shifted towards dermatologists and other specialties managing melanoma patients and away from family/internal medicine physicians and general/plastic surgeons. Conclusions. The number and age of melanoma visits has increased over time with respect to the overall population, mirroring the increase in melanoma incidence over the past three decades. These trends highlight the need for further studies regarding melanoma management efficiency

  12. Ethics support in community care makes a difference for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magelssen, Morten; Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Lillemoen, Lillian; Førde, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar

    2018-03-01

    Through the Norwegian ethics project, ethics activities have been implemented in the health and care sector in more than 200 municipalities. To study outcomes of the ethics activities and examine which factors promote and inhibit significance and sustainability of the activities. Two online questionnaires about the municipal ethics activities. Participants and research context: A total of 137 municipal contact persons for the ethics project answered the first survey (55% response rate), whereas 217 ethics facilitators responded to the second survey (33% response rate). Ethical considerations: Based on informed consent, the study was approved by the Data Protection Official of the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. Around half of the respondents found the ethics project to have been highly significant for daily professional practice. Outcomes include better handling of ethical challenges, better employee cooperation, better service quality, and better relations to patients and next of kin. Factors associated with sustainability and/or significance of the activities were sufficient support from stakeholders, sufficient available time, and ethics facilitators having sufficient knowledge and skills in ethics and access to supervision. This study shows that ethics initiatives can be both sustainable and significant for practice. There is a need to create regional or national structures for follow-up and develop more comprehensive ethics training for ethics facilitators. It is both possible and potentially important to implement clinical ethics support activities in community health and care services systematically on a large scale. Future ethics initiatives in the community sector should be designed in light of documented promoting and inhibiting factors.

  13. Negotiation of pedagogical design patterns as a means to enhance communities of practice in university teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Michael

    and learning, specifically in the context of technology enhanced learning (”e-learning patterns”). In a competence development project for teachers across our university, the negotiation of design patterns sketched by teachers themselves was used as a means to enhance communities of practice around the sharing...... of ideas and experiences with teaching and learning. Rather than a formal pattern language aimed at a database of design patterns, the real potency of the methodology arises from the very process of negotiating suggested patterns and the resulting elaboration of teachers’ conceptions about problems...

  14. Impact of Collaborative Care on Absenteeism for Depressed Employees Seen in Primary Care Practices: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaji, Akuh; Newcomb, Richard D; Wang, Zhen; Williams, Mark

    2018-01-01

    The impact of "real world" collaborative care on depression and absenteeism for depressed employees seen in primary care practices using objective employer absence data. A retrospective cohort study comparing depressed employees seen in primary care practices who enrolled for a "real world" collaborative care program to practice as usual (PAU) on objective absence days and depression response and remission at 6, and 12-month time periods. Absence days were more in the collaborative care group compared with the PAU group at 3 and 6 months but at 12 months the difference was no longer statistically significant. Collaborative care led to better response and remission depression scores compared with PAU at 12 months. Collaborative care led to faster improvement in depression symptoms but did not translate to less time away from work.

  15. Practical challenges related to point of care testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L.V. Shaw

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Point of care testing (POCT refers to laboratory testing that occurs near to the patient, often at the patient bedside. POCT can be advantageous in situations requiring rapid turnaround time of test results for clinical decision making. There are many challenges associated with POCT, mainly related to quality assurance. POCT is performed by clinical staff rather than laboratory trained individuals which can lead to errors resulting from a lack of understanding of the importance of quality control and quality assurance practices. POCT is usually more expensive than testing performed in the central laboratory and requires a significant amount of support from the laboratory to ensure the quality testing and meet accreditation requirements.Here, specific challenges related to POCT compliance with accreditation standards are discussed along with strategies that can be used to overcome these challenges. These areas include: documentation of POCT orders, charting of POCT results as well as training and certification of individuals performing POCT. Factors to consider when implementing connectivity between POCT instruments and the electronic medical record are also discussed in detail and include: uni-directional versus bidirectional communication, linking patient demographic information with POCT software, the importance of positive patient identification and considering where to chart POCT results in the electronic medical record. Keywords: Point of care Testing, Laboratory accreditation, Medical directive, Results documentation, Electronic Medical Record, Transcription error, Connectivity, Positive patient identification

  16. Continuing Professional Development: Pedagogical Practices of Interprofessional Simulation in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Sofia; Dahlberg, Johanna; Edelbring, Samuel; Hult, Håkan; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    The increasing complexity of health care practice makes continuing professional development (CPD) essential for health care professionals. Simulation-based training is a CPD activity that is often applied to improve interprofessional collaboration and the quality of care. The aim of this study is to explore simulation as a pedagogical practice for…

  17. Preoperative preparation. Value, perspective, and practice in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, V J

    2000-09-01

    Preanesthesia preparation will continue to stimulate creativity and debate. Strategies for process improvement will take various shapes and require tools previously unfamiliar to many medical managers. At UNC Health System, anesthesiologists currently are committed to the centralized preanesthesia clinic approach used in PreCare. To date, their strategies have been validated by their institutional measures of success: a 0.7% first-case AM work-up rate, a 5% no PreCare visit rate, a 5% consent problem rate, and a 0% rejected specimen rate, with a 43% blood-draw rate for all patients. As their health system expands, however, other strategies and preparation modalities may become necessary. Telemedicine and Internet-dependent processes are appealing in the highly educated and technologically sophisticated marketplace. As the region becomes increasingly urbanized, local employment patterns prevent easy access to services, and functional compromises, such as bypassing PreCare or reliance on telephone or on-line interviews for preparation, may become necessary. The need to expand PreCare in the near future is already evident. As was found during initial planning, process improvement and space planning are enhanced by computer modeling. UNC Health System employed a proprietary animated simulation modeling (ASM) tool, MedModel, (ProModel, Orem, UT), although other techniques exist for the same purpose. Use of ASM as a strategy management tool allowed generation of ideal space-time-personnel scenarios that could expose potential problems before resources and physical restructuring occurred. ASM also can be used to compare data obtained from real-time observations to any reference scenario, including any that looks at economic measures of process, to help refine strategic visions before instituting tactical solutions. Used in this manner, ASM can reveal physical, temporal, personnel, and policy-related factors not otherwise seen as exerting effects on overall preprocedural

  18. Self-care practice of ostomy patients: contributions of the Orem’s theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Catunda Gomes Menezes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the conditioning factors to self-care practice of ostomy patients, and verify knowledge and practices on stoma care. Descriptive and qualitative study, referencing the Orem’s Self-Care Theory, carried out at the Ostomy Association of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in June and July 2007. We identified as the main conditioning factors for self-care: male, aged over 51 years, low education, from the capital city/metropolitan area, married, and with low family income. From the participants’ statements, emerged three categories: Learning to take care of stoma: education-support system; Stoma Care: knowledge and practices; and Difficulties found in the practice of self-care. It was concluded that ostomy patients require a multidimensional and individualized nursing care, which enables them to perform self-care effectively.

  19. Learning Patterns in Music Practice: Links between Disposition, Practice Strategies and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    StGeorge, Jennifer Mary; Holbrook, Allyson Patricia; Cantwell, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Research into musical practice has over recent decades focused on the technical and organisational strategies employed by novices and experts. What has been less studied are the background factors or influences on the quality of this music practice. Drawing on interview data collected from 66 children and adults from a mixed methods project, we…

  20. Nutritional quality and patterns of lunch menus at child care centers in South Korea and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sooyoun; Yeoh, Yoonjae; Abe, Satoko

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the nutritional quality and patterns of lunch menus provided by child care centers in South Korea and Japan. The weekly lunch menus from Monday to Saturday that child care centers provided in November 2014 in South Korea and Japan were analyzed. For Korea, a total of 72 meals provided by 12 centers in Seoul were analyzed by referring to the homepage of the Center for Children's Foodservice Management, which serviced menus for child care centers. For Japan, a total of 30 meals provided by 5 child care centers in Tokyo were analyzed. Nutrient content and pattern in lunch menus were evaluated. The lunch menus in Korea and Japan provided 359.5 kcal (25.7% of the estimated energy requirement) and 376.3 kcal (29.5% of the estimated energy requirement), respectively. 'Rice + Soup + Main dish + Side dish I + Side dish II' were provided in 66.7% of meals in Korea, while various patterns with rice and soup as their bases were provided in Japan. The lunch menus of child care centers in Korea and Japan provide similar amounts of energy, protein, carbohydrate, vitamin A, calcium, and other nutrients. However, there were significant differences in the lunch menu patterns in Korea and Japan. This study provides information about the nutritional content and pattern of lunch menus at child care centers in Asian countries with rice as a staple food.

  1. Practice patterns and long-term survival for early-stage rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Sanoff, Hanna K; Penn, Dolly C; Meyers, Michael O; Tepper, Joel E

    2013-12-01

    Standard of care treatment for most stage I rectal cancers is total mesorectal excision (TME). Given the morbidity associated with TME, local excision (LE) for early-stage rectal cancer has been explored. This study examines practice patterns and overall survival (OS) for early-stage rectal cancer. All patients in the National Cancer Data Base diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1998 to 2010 were initially included. Use of LE versus proctectomy and use of adjuvant radiation therapy were compared over time. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare OS based on treatment. LE was used to treat 46.5% of patients with T1 and 16.8% with T2 tumors. Use of LE increased steadily over time (P OS than those treated with proctectomy alone or multimodality therapy. Guideline-concordant adoption of LE for treatment of low-risk stage I rectal cancer is increasing. However, use of LE is also increasing for higher-risk rectal cancers that do not meet guideline criteria for LE. Treatment with LE alone is associated with poorer long-term OS. Additional studies are warranted to understand the factors driving increased use of LE.

  2. Patterns of Cost for Patients Dying in the Intensive Care Unit and Implications for Cost Savings of Palliative Care Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Nita; Benkeser, David; Coe, Norma B; Engelberg, Ruth A; Teno, Joan M; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-11-01

    Terminal intensive care unit (ICU) stays represent an important target to increase value of care. To characterize patterns of daily costs of ICU care at the end of life and, based on these patterns, examine the role for palliative care interventions in enhancing value. Secondary analysis of an intervention study to improve quality of care for critically ill patients. 572 patients who died in the ICU between 2003 and 2005 at a Level-1 trauma center. Data were linked with hospital financial records. Costs were categorized into direct fixed, direct variable, and indirect costs. Patterns of daily costs were explored using generalized estimating equations stratified by length of stay, cause of death, ICU type, and insurance status. Estimates from the literature of effects of palliative care interventions on ICU utilization were used to simulate potential cost savings under different time horizons and reimbursement models. Mean cost for a terminal ICU stay was 39.3K ± 45.1K. Direct fixed costs represented 45% of total hospital costs, direct variable costs 20%, and indirect costs 34%. Day of admission was most expensive (mean 9.6K ± 7.6K); average cost for subsequent days was 4.8K ± 3.4K and stable over time and patient characteristics. Terminal ICU stays display consistent cost patterns across patient characteristics. Savings can be realized with interventions that align care with patient preferences, helping to prevent unwanted ICU utilization at end of life. Cost modeling suggests that implications vary depending on time horizon and reimbursement models.

  3. Urban–Rural Differences in Health-Care-Seeking Pattern of Residents of Abia State, Nigeria, and the Implication in the Control of NCDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugochukwu U. Onyeonoro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding the differences in care-seeking pattern is key in designing interventions aimed at improving health-care service delivery, including prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the differences and determinants of care-seeking patterns of urban and rural residents in Abia State in southeast Nigeria. Methods This was a cross-sectional, community-based, study involving 2999 respondents aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using the modified World Health Organization's STEPS questionnaire, including data on care seeking following the onset of illness. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were used to analyze care-seeking behavior and to identify differences among those seeking care in urban and rural areas. Results In both urban and rural areas, patent medicine vendors (73.0% were the most common sources of primary care following the onset of illness, while only 20.0% of the participants used formal care. Significant predictors of difference in care-seeking practices between residents in urban and rural communities were educational status, income, occupation, and body mass index. Conclusions Efforts should be made to reduce barriers to formal health-care service utilization in the state by increasing health insurance coverage, strengthening the health-care system, and increasing the role of patent medicine vendors in the formal health-care delivery system.

  4. Urban–Rural Differences in Health-Care-Seeking Pattern of Residents of Abia State, Nigeria, and the Implication in the Control of NCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu U.; Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Ukegbu, Andrew U.; Chukwuonye, Innocent I.; Madukwe, Okechukwu O.; Moses, Akhimiem O.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the differences in care-seeking pattern is key in designing interventions aimed at improving health-care service delivery, including prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the differences and determinants of care-seeking patterns of urban and rural residents in Abia State in southeast Nigeria. METHODS This was a cross-sectional, community-based, study involving 2999 respondents aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using the modified World Health Organization’s STEPS questionnaire, including data on care seeking following the onset of illness. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were used to analyze care-seeking behavior and to identify differences among those seeking care in urban and rural areas. RESULTS In both urban and rural areas, patent medicine vendors (73.0%) were the most common sources of primary care following the onset of illness, while only 20.0% of the participants used formal care. Significant predictors of difference in care-seeking practices between residents in urban and rural communities were educational status, income, occupation, and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS Efforts should be made to reduce barriers to formal health-care service utilization in the state by increasing health insurance coverage, strengthening the health-care system, and increasing the role of patent medicine vendors in the formal health-care delivery system. PMID:27721654

  5. Urban-Rural Differences in Health-Care-Seeking Pattern of Residents of Abia State, Nigeria, and the Implication in the Control of NCDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu U; Ogah, Okechukwu S; Ukegbu, Andrew U; Chukwuonye, Innocent I; Madukwe, Okechukwu O; Moses, Akhimiem O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the differences in care-seeking pattern is key in designing interventions aimed at improving health-care service delivery, including prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the differences and determinants of care-seeking patterns of urban and rural residents in Abia State in southeast Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional, community-based, study involving 2999 respondents aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using the modified World Health Organization's STEPS questionnaire, including data on care seeking following the onset of illness. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were used to analyze care-seeking behavior and to identify differences among those seeking care in urban and rural areas. In both urban and rural areas, patent medicine vendors (73.0%) were the most common sources of primary care following the onset of illness, while only 20.0% of the participants used formal care. Significant predictors of difference in care-seeking practices between residents in urban and rural communities were educational status, income, occupation, and body mass index. Efforts should be made to reduce barriers to formal health-care service utilization in the state by increasing health insurance coverage, strengthening the health-care system, and increasing the role of patent medicine vendors in the formal health-care delivery system.

  6. Cardiovascular disease in the Amish: an exploratory study of knowledge, beliefs, and health care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, Deborah R; Staffileno, Beth A; Schwartz, Karon S; Coke, Lola; Fogg, Louis; Reiling, Denise

    2011-01-01

    The Old Order Amish population is growing, yet little is known about their cardiovascular health care practices. This ethnographic study explored their cardiovascular knowledge, beliefs, and health care practices. This study showed that the Amish have distinct beliefs and practices which affect their cardiovascular health, and that culturally appropriate education is needed. Copyright © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  7. [Use of ineffective practices in Primary Health Care: professional opinions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Bustillo, L; Barrasa Villar, J I; Castán Ruíz, S; Moliner Lahoz, F J; Aibar Remón, C

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of ineffective practices in Primary Health Care (PHC) based on the opinions of clinical professionals from the sector, and to assess the significance, implications and factors that may be contributing to their continuance. An on line survey of opinion from a convenience sample of 575 professionals who had published articles over the last years in Atención Primaria and Semergen medical journals. A total of 212 professionals replied (37%). For 70.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64.5 to 73.3) the problem of ineffective practices is frequent or very frequent in PHC, and rate their importance with an average score of 7.3 (standard deviation [SD]=1.8) out of 10. The main consequences would be endangering the sustainability of the system (48.1%; 95% CI, 41.2 to 54.9) and harming patients (32.1%; 95% CI, 25.7 to 38.5). These ineffective practices are the result of the behaviour of the patients themselves (28%; 95% CI, 22.6 to 35.0) workload (26.4%; 95% CI, 20.3 to 32.5), and the lack of the continuous education (19.3%; 95% CI, 13.9 to 24.7). Clinical procedures of greatest misuse are the prescribing of antibiotics for certain infections, the frequency of cervical cancer screening, rigorous pharmacological monitoring of type 2 diabetes in patients over 65 years, the use of psychotropic drugs in the elderly, or the use of analgesics in patients with hypertension or renal failure. The use of ineffective procedures in PHC is considered a very important issue that negatively affects many patients and their treatment, and possibly endangering the sustainability of the system and causing harm to patients. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. [Anesthesia practice in Catalan hospitals and other health care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalonga, Antonio; Sabaté, Sergi; Campos, Juan Manuel; Fornaguera, Joan; Hernández, Carmen; Sistac, José María

    2006-05-24

    The aim of this arm of the ANESCAT study was to characterize anesthesia practice in the various types of health care facilities of Catalonia, Spain, in 2003. We analyzed data from the survey according to a) source of a facility's funding: public hospitals financed by the Catalan Public Health Authority (ICS), the network of subsidized hospitals for public use (XHUP), or private hospitals; b) size: facilities without hospital beds, hospitals with fewer than 250 beds, those with 251 to 500, and those with over 500; and c) training accreditation status: whether or not a facility gave medical resident training. A total of 131 facilities participated (11 under the ICS, 47 from the XHUP, and 73 private hospitals). Twenty-six clinics had no hospital beds, 78 facilities had fewer than 250, 21 had 251 to 500, and 6 had more than 500. Seventeen hospitals trained medical residents. XHUP hospitals performed 44.3% of all anesthetic procedures, private hospitals 36.7%, and ICS facilities 18.5%. Five percent of procedures were performed in clinics without beds, 42.9% in facilities with fewer than 250 beds, 35% in hospitals with 251 to 500, and 17.1% in hospitals with over 500. Anesthetists in teaching hospitals performed 35.5% of all procedures. The mean age of patients was lower in private hospitals, facilities with fewer than 250 beds, and hospitals that did not train medical residents. The physical status of patients was worse in ICS hospitals, in facilities with over 500 beds, and in teaching hospitals. It was noteworthy that 25% of anesthetic procedures were performed on an emergency basis in XHUP and ICS hospitals, in facilities with more than 250 beds, and in teaching hospitals. Anesthesia for outpatient procedures accounted for 40% of the total in private hospitals and 31% of the practice in ICS and XHUP hospitals. The duration of anesthesia and postanesthetic recovery was longer in ICS hospitals, in facilities with over 500 beds, and in those with medical resident

  9. Care Coordination for Children with Complex Special Health Care Needs: The Value of the Advanced Practice Nurse’s Enhanced Scope of Knowledge and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looman, Wendy S.; Presler, Elizabeth; Erickson, Mary M.; Garwick, Ann E.; Cady, Rhonda G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    Efficiency and effectiveness of care coordination depends on a match between the needs of the population and the skills, scope of practice, and intensity of services provided by the care coordinator. There is limited existing literature that addresses the relevance of the APN role as a fit for coordination of care for children with SHCN. The objective of this paper is to describe the value of the advanced practice nurse’s (APN’s) enhanced scope of knowledge and practice for relationship-based care coordination in healthcare homes that serve children with complex special health care needs (SHCN). The TeleFamilies project is provided as an example of the integration of an APN care coordinator in a healthcare home for children with SHCN. PMID:22560803

  10. Accounting for health-care outcomes: implications for intensive care unit practice and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Roslyn; Iedema, Rick

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the environment of health care, and how clinicians and managers respond in terms of performance accountability. A qualitative method was used in a tertiary metropolitan teaching intensive care unit (ICU) in Sydney, Australia, including interviews with 15 clinical managers and focus groups with 29 nurses of differing experience. The study found that a managerial focus on abstract goals, such as budgets detracted from managing the core business of clinical work. Fractures were evident within clinical units, between clinical units and between clinical and managerial domains. These fractures reinforced the status quo where seemingly unconnected patient care activities were undertaken by loosely connected individual clinicians with personalized concepts of accountability. Managers must conceptualize health services as an interconnected entity within which self-directed teams negotiate and agree objectives, collect and review performance data and define collective practice. Organically developing regimens of care within and across specialist clinical units, such as in ICUs, directly impact upon health service performance and accountability.

  11. Long term regional migration patterns of physicians over the course of their active practice careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanasse, Alain; Ricketts, Thomas C; Courteau, Josiane; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Randolph, R; Asghari, Shabnam

    2007-01-01

    The geographic distribution of physicians in the United States of America has been often described as unbalanced or maldistributed. There is much in the literature on the regional distribution of physicians but far less is written about their pattern of movement. This study aimed to examine the geographic transition of physicians at two points in time (1981 and 2003), in and out the four US census regions (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West). We identified 83 383 non-federal clinically active primary care physicians (CAPCP) who were clinically active both in 1981 and in 2003 as registered in the American Medical Association Physician Masterfiles. The main variable was the migration status observed between 1981 and 2003, and they were categorized into three groups: (1) non-migrants (same county of practice); (2) internal migrants (different counties of practice, same region); or (3) external migrants (different regions of practice). Covariables were gender and age for the CAPCP, and the percentage of non-whites in the population, the mean per capita income of the population, the ratio of primary care physicians and the ratio of hospital beds per 1000 inhabitants, as well as the rural/urban status for the county of practice in 1981 (large metropolitan area, small metropolitan area, or non-adjacent). Overall, 13.2 % of CAPCP moved from one region to another between 1981 and 2003. Women and young CAPCPs were more prone to migrate during their career. Proportionally, a greater outflow of the 1981 workforce is observed for the Northeast and Midwest regions with 16% and 18%, respectively, compared with 10% for both the West and South regions. When taking into account the total flow (in and out) for each region, the West and the South 'benefited' from CAPCPs' migration, with respectively a 1.10 and 1.07 increase in 2003 when compared with 1981; while the Midwest and the Northeast regions ended with a 0.90 and 0.92 decrease in 2003. Both logistic regression and regression

  12. Lifestyle counseling in primary care: opportunities and challenges for changing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Joan; Valli, Michel; Ferrier, Suzanne; MacLeod, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Many patients today have health concerns related to lifestyle factors. This has created a situation where physicians are regularly confronted with the challenge of how to conduct lifestyle counseling with patients. Specific strategies can enable physicians to more effectively navigate this complex area of communication with patients, improving patient response in adopting healthy behaviours and increasing physician satisfaction with this task. To evaluate the impact of a lifestyle counseling workshop incorporating the motivational enhancement and transtheoretical models upon primary care clinicians' counseling practice patterns, especially communication and counseling skills, and attitudes toward lifestyle counseling. This study used a mixed method research design. Forty-three clinicians completed a post-workshop evaluation and identified intended changes to practice following the workshop. Twelve participated in interviews several months later to explore the kinds of changes made and influences upon them. Forty-one (95.3%) questionnaire respondents reported an intention to change their practice. Main changes reported were: asking more questions, listening more, assessing patients' readiness to change, tailoring counseling to patients' readiness to change. They seemed to have acquired and retained new knowledge and most were able to apply the new skills in their practices. Many reported feeling more comfortable and/or confident when interacting with patients in need of lifestyle change. But, time constraints, comfort with current skills, lack of self-efficacy, and fears of missing opportunities to influence patients, moderated participants' ability to adopt and maintain new approaches. While primary care clinicians can successfully learn specific lifestyle counseling skills and incorporate them into their practice following a two-hour evidence-based workshop, individual, educational and system factors can interfere.

  13. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  14. 'I try to make a net around each patient': home care nursing as relational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2018-03-01

    As a result of restructuring, home care is increasingly defined in a narrow, task-based way, undermining the holistic nature of practice. Recent practice theories can aid us in articulating the nature of this important, yet often invisible practice. My aim in this article was to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the nature of home care nursing practice. The approach was ethnographic, involving extensive fieldwork and formal interviews with members of five home care nursing teams and 15 older persons receiving care at home in a metropolitan area of Iceland. The study was approved by the National Bioethics Committee. As a net of services, home care was enacted through relational, but often invisible care practices, relating different actors - patient, family and health-care and social-care workers - in doing the work needed for the older persons to live comfortably at home. The work was collective in that it was shared by different actors and motivated by a common understanding that had developed and was preserved in conversations in the teams. Although the findings are limited in that they only reflect home care as practiced in one neighbourhood, they can be seen as providing important insights into what is needed for home care services to work. Home care practice can be understood as relational, aimed at creating a net of needed assistance. This work is a collective accomplishment of the teams and shaped by ideals and values shared among team members. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Cross-sectorial cooperation and supportive care in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Louise Hyldborg; Johnsen, Anna Thit; Ross, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cancer care usually involves several health professionals from different parts of the health care system. Often, the GP has an important role. Patients’ experiences of continuity and support may be related to characteristics of health care, disease or patients. Objectives. To investig......Background. Cancer care usually involves several health professionals from different parts of the health care system. Often, the GP has an important role. Patients’ experiences of continuity and support may be related to characteristics of health care, disease or patients. Objectives...... patients experienced suboptimal cross-sectorial cooperation and supportive care. Efforts to improve cancer care cooperation may focus on the possible supportive role of the...

  16. Discovery of the Meanings, Expressions, and Practices Related to Malaria Care Among the Maasai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Cecily W; Mixer, Sandra J

    2016-07-01

    Although malaria is preventable and treatable, morbidity and mortality from this disease continue among the Maasai of Southern Kenya. Prior to this study, the Maasai's generic and professional malaria care/cure practices were largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to discover, describe, and systematically analyze meanings, expressions, and practices that promote culturally congruent malaria care among this population. The qualitative, ethnonursing research method was used to conduct in-depth examination of the Maasai ethnohistory and culture relevant to malaria care and analyze data from 48 interviews conducted in Maasailand. Guided by the "culture care theory," four themes were discovered related to Maasai community, traditional, spiritual, and professional care/cure practices. These significant findings filled a research gap and contribute to nursing knowledge and caring practice. These study findings have implications for culturally congruent malaria care education, practice, research, policy, and partnership with traditional and professional caregivers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Practical strategies for increasing efficiency and effectiveness in critical care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Maurice F; Berg, Sheri; Bittner, Edward A

    2017-02-04

    Technological advances and evolving demands in medical care have led to challenges in ensuring adequate training for providers of critical care. Reliance on the traditional experience-based training model alone is insufficient for ensuring quality and safety in patient care. This article provides a brief overview of the existing educational practice within the critical care environment. Challenges to education within common daily activities of critical care practice are reviewed. Some practical evidence-based educational approaches are then described which can be incorporated into the daily practice of critical care without disrupting workflow or compromising the quality of patient care. It is hoped that such approaches for improving the efficiency and efficacy of critical care education will be integrated into training programs.

  18. Care Management Processes Used Less Often For Depression Than For Other Chronic Conditions In US Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tara F; Ramsay, Patricia P; Casalino, Lawrence P; Bao, Yuhua; Pincus, Harold A; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-03-01

    Primary care physicians play an important role in the diagnosis and management of depression. Yet little is known about their use of care management processes for depression. Using national survey data for the period 2006-13, we assessed the use of five care management processes for depression and other chronic illnesses among primary care practices in the United States. We found significantly less use for depression than for asthma, congestive heart failure, or diabetes in 2012-13. On average, practices used fewer than one care management process for depression, and this level of use has not changed since 2006-07, regardless of practice size. In contrast, use of diabetes care management processes has increased significantly among larger practices. These findings may indicate that US primary care practices are not well equipped to manage depression as a chronic illness, despite the high proportion of depression care they provide. Policies that incentivize depression care management, including additional quality metrics, should be considered. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. Factors predicting team climate, and its relationship with quality of care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Teik T; Eccles, Martin P; Steen, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of care in general practice may be affected by the team climate perceived by its health and non-health professionals. Better team working is thought to lead to higher effectiveness and quality of care. However, there is limited evidence available on what affects team functioning and its relationship with quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to explore individual and practice factors that were associated with team climate, and to explore the relatio...

  20. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Shook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods: STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO® methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results: Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions: STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care.

  1. PRESCRIPTION PATTERN OF ANTICANCER DRUGS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Rohini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma is one of the most common cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world . Chemotherapy is main stay of treatment with other modalities in the management. Present study had been conducted to evaluate prescribing pattern of anticancer drugs. An observational, retrospective study was conducted in the oncology department of ESI hos pital over a period of one year. Data of patients greater than 19 years and diagnosed as carcinoma were included in the study. Out of 197 enrolled patients, majority were female (134, 68% and in the age group of 41 - 60 years (147, 74.61% patients. Carcino ma of breast (58, 29.44% was most commonly reported followed by carcinoma head and neck (46, 23.35%, and carcinoma cervix (34, 17.25%. Chemotherapy was commonly used as combination regimens (160, 81.21%. 5 - Fluoro Uracil (5 - FU and platinum based combin ation were most frequently prescribed (60, 30.45% especially in head and neck carcinoma (46, 23.35%. Platinum based combinations were also used in management of lung carcinoma. Dexamethasone, Ranitidine, Ondansetron, were used as palliative therapy eithe r to prevent or manage adverse reactions of anticancer drugs

  2. Antibiotic resistance pattern of bacterial isolates in neonatal care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shrestha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bacterial infections account for a huge proportion of neonatal deaths worldwide. The problem of antibiotic resistance among common bacterial pathogens mainly the gram negative bacteria is emerging globally which is of more serious concern in developing countries like Nepal. METHODS: A one year retrospective hospital based study was carried out to analyze the results of neonatal blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, stool and surface cultures and to look into the sensitivity pattern of the commonly used antibiotics. RESULTS: The positive yield of blood, urine, eye swab and CSF cultures were 19.56%, 38.5%, 60% and 0.36% respectively. The most common isolates in the blood culture were coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter and non-haemolytic Streptococcus. A significant percent of the isolates were resistant to the first line antibiotics. Among the gram negative isolates more than 30% are resistant to cefotaxime and more than 50% are resistant to gentamicin. During the one year period we had Nursery outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella infections. With the help of environmental cultures we were able to trace the source and intervene appropriately. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous surveillance for antibiotic susceptibility, rational use of antibiotics and the strategy of antibiotic cycling can provide some answers to the emerging problem of antibiotic resistance.

  3. Antibiotic resistance pattern of bacterial isolates in neonatal care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S; Adhikari, N; Rai, B K; Shreepaili, A

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections account for a huge proportion of neonatal deaths worldwide. The problem of antibiotic resistance among common bacterial pathogens mainly the gram negative bacteria is emerging globally which is of more serious concern in developing countries like Nepal. A one year retrospective hospital based study was carried out to analyze the results of neonatal blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, stool and surface cultures and to look into the sensitivity pattern of the commonly used antibiotics. The positive yield of blood, urine, eye swab and CSF cultures were 19.56%, 38.5%, 60% and 0.36% respectively. The most common isolates in the blood culture were coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter and non-haemolytic Streptococcus. A significant percent of the isolates were resistant to the first line antibiotics. Among the gram negative isolates more than 30% are resistant to cefotaxime and more than 50% are resistant to gentamicin. During the one year period we had Nursery outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella infections. With the help of environmental cultures we were able to trace the source and intervene appropriately. Continuous surveillance for antibiotic susceptibility, rational use of antibiotics and the strategy of antibiotic cycling can provide some answers to the emerging problem of antibiotic resistance.

  4. Enteral nutrition practices in the intensive care unit: Understanding of nursing practices and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adequate nutritional support is important for the comprehensive management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs. Aim: The study was aimed to survey prevalent enteral nutrition practices in the trauma intensive care unit, nurses′ perception, and their knowledge of enteral feeding. Study Design: The study was conducted in the ICU of a level 1 trauma center, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India. The study design used an audit. Materials and Methods: Sixty questionnaires were distributed and the results analyzed. A database was prepared and the audit was done. Results: Forty-two (70% questionnaires were filled and returned. A majority (38 of staff nurses expressed awareness of nutrition guidelines. A large number (32 of staff nurses knew about nutrition protocols of the ICU. Almost all (40 opined enteral nutrition to be the preferred route of nutrition unless contraindicated. All staff nurses were of opinion that enteral nutrition is to be started at the earliest (within 24-48 h of the ICU stay. Everyone opined that the absence of bowel sounds is an absolute contraindication to initiate enteral feeding. Passage of flatus was considered mandatory before starting enteral nutrition by 86% of the respondents. Everyone knew that the method of Ryle′s tube feeding in their ICU is intermittent boluses. Only 4 staff nurses were unaware of any method to confirm Ryle′s tube position. The backrest elevation rate was 100%. Gastric residual volumes were always checked, but the amount of the gastric residual volume for the next feed to be withheld varied. The majority said that the unused Ryle′s tube feed is to be discarded after 6 h. The most preferred (48% method to upgrade their knowledge of enteral nutrition was from the ICU protocol manual. Conclusion: Information generated from this study can be helpful in identifying nutrition practices that are lacking and may be used to review and revise enteral feeding

  5. Valuing narrative in the care of older people: a framework of narrative practice for older adult residential care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Catherine; McCormack, Brendan; Ryan, Assumpta

    2014-09-01

    To report on the development of a framework of narrative practice, in residential care settings for older people. Residential care settings for older people provide care for people who are no longer able to live in their own home. To date, the impact and structure of nursing practice on care provision in these settings has proved difficult to conceptualise within a specific nursing theory framework. A hermeneutic approach incorporating narrative methods was used. Forty-six narrative interviews with older people in residential care were secondary-analysed for key themes through a three-stage process: by the first author, four focus groups of 12 clinical nurse managers and two independent experts. Themes were also derived from a focus group of eight residents who explored person-centredness and narrative. Finally, the combined findings were used to derive a single set of themes. The secondary data analysis process led to the development of a framework of narrative practice for the care of older people in residential settings. The framework is influenced by narrative enquiry, person-centred practice and practice development. It has four pillars, prerequisites, care processes, care environment and narrative aspects of care. To operationalise the framework of narrative practice, three narrative elements, narrative knowing, narrative being and narrative doing, need to be considered. Working with the foundational pillars and the narrative elements would enable staff to 'work in a storied way' and provide person-centred outcomes and a narrative informed philosophy of care for older adults in residential care. This framework provides nurses with a template that confirms the identity of the older person taking account of their biography. The framework outlines an approach that provides staff with a template on how to provide person-centred care in a narrative way. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Patterns of Palliative Care Referral in Patients Admitted With Heart Failure Requiring Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskar, Katie J; Celi, Leo Anthony; McDermid, Robert C; Walley, Keith R; Russell, James A; Boyd, John H; Rush, Barret

    2018-04-01

    Palliative care is recommended for advanced heart failure (HF) by several major societies, though prior studies indicate that it is underutilized. To investigate patterns of palliative care referral for patients admitted with HF exacerbations, as well as to examine patient and hospital factors associated with different rates of palliative care referral. Retrospective nationwide cohort analysis utilizing the National Inpatient Sample from 2006 to 2012. Patients referred to palliative care were compared to those who were not. Patients ≥18 years of age with a primary diagnosis of HF requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) were included. A cohort of non-HF patients with metastatic cancer was created for temporal comparison. Between 2006 and 2012, 74 824 patients underwent MV for HF. A referral to palliative care was made in 2903 (3.9%) patients. The rate of referral for palliative care in HF increased from 0.8% in 2006 to 6.4% in 2012 ( P care referral in patients with cancer increased from 2.9% in 2006 to 11.9% in 2012 ( P care ( P care. The use of palliative care for patients with advanced HF increased during the study period; however, palliative care remains underutilized in this setting. Patient factors such as race and SES affect access to palliative care.

  7. Transformational leadership in primary care: Clinicians' patterned approaches to care predict patient satisfaction and health expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho Phi; Sweeny, Kate; Miller, Tricia

    2018-04-01

    Clinicians face the complex challenge of motivating their patients to achieve optimal health while also ensuring their satisfaction. Inspired by transformational leadership theory, we proposed that clinicians' motivational behaviors can be organized into three patient care styles (transformational, transactional, and passive-avoidant) and that these styles differentially predict patient health outcomes. In two studies using patient-reported data and observer ratings, we found that transformational patient care style positively predicted patients' satisfaction and health expectations above and beyond transactional and passive-avoidant patient care style. These findings provide initial support for the patient care style approach and suggest novel directions for the study of clinicians' motivational behaviors.

  8. Chronic Care Team Profile: a brief tool to measure the structure and function of chronic care teams in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Judith G; Bubner, Tanya; Amoroso, Cheryl; Swan, Edward; Holton, Christine; Winstanley, Julie; Beilby, Justin; Harris, Mark F

    2009-08-01

    At a time when workforce shortages in general practices are leading to greater role substitution and skill-mix diversification, and the demand on general practices for chronic disease care is increasing, the structure and function of the general practice team is taking on heightened importance. To assist general practices and the organizations supporting them to assess the effectiveness of their chronic care teamworking, we developed an interview tool, the Chronic Care Team Profile (CCTP), to measure the structure and function of teams in general practice. This paper describes its properties and potential use. An initial pool of items was derived from guidelines of best-practice for chronic disease care and performance standards for general practices. The items covered staffing, skill-mix, job descriptions and roles, training, protocols and procedures within the practice. The 41-item pool was factor analysed, retained items were measured for internal consistency and the reduced instrument's face, content and construct validity were evaluated. A three-factor solution corresponding to non-general practitioner staff roles in chronic care, administrative functions and management structures provided the best fit to the data and explained 45% of the variance in the CCTP. Further analyses suggested that the CCTP is reliable, valid and has some utility. The CCTP measures aspects of the structure and function of general practices which are independent of team processes. It is associated with the job satisfaction of general practice staff and the quality of care provided to patients with chronic illnesses. As such, the CCTP offers a simple and useful tool for general practices to assess their teamworking in chronic disease care.

  9. [Dental care and oral hygiene practices in long-term geriatric care institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Schwambach, Carolina Wolff; de Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the activities of dentists, dental care and oral hygiene practices in the long-term care institutions of Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brazil). A semi-structured questionnaire was handed out to the coordinators of 37 philanthropic and 30 private institutions. The data was compared by the chi-square and Fisher's Exact Tests. 81% of the questionnaires were answered. The majority of the private (74.2%) and philanthropic institutions (87%) do not have a dentist (p=0.21). The location, period of existence, type institution kind and number of residents weren't factors regarding the presence of a dentist (p>0.05). 67% of the philanthropic institutions with equipped consultation rooms had dentists, though there were none when there was no consultation room. Even without consultation rooms, 13% of the private institutions had dentists. When necessary, 69.6% of the philanthropic institutions refer the elderly to public health centers, while 58.1% of the private institutions refer them to their family dentists. A higher percentage of the private institutions adopted systematic oral hygiene procedures (p=0.01), with a considerable divergence of treatment reported. There is a need to include a dentist on the health staff in the institutions and for systematization of oral hygiene practices.

  10. The process of care in integrative health care settings - a qualitative study of US practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan

    2014-10-23

    There is a lack of research on the organisational operations of integrative healthcare (IHC) practices. IHC is a therapeutic strategy integrating conventional and complementary medicine in a shared context to administer individualized treatment. To better understand the process of care in IHC - the way in which patients are triaged and treatment plans are constructed, interviews were conducted with integrative health care leaders and practitioners in the US. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a pragmatic group of fourteen leaders and practitioners from nine different IHC settings. All interviews were conducted face-to-face with the exception of one phone interview. Questions focussed on understanding the "process of care" in an integrative healthcare setting. Deductive categories were formed from the aims of the study, focusing on: organisational structure, processes of care (subcategories: patient intake, treatment and charting, use of guidelines or protocols), prevalent diseases or conditions treated, and the role of research in the organisation. The similarities and differences of the ITH entities emerged from this process. On an organisational level, conventional and CM services and therapies were co-located in all nine settings. For patients, this means there is more opportunity for 'seamless care'. Shared information systems enabled easy communication using internal messaging or email systems, and shared patient intake information. But beyond this infrastructure alignment for integrative health care was less supported. There were no use of protocols or guidelines within any centre, no patient monitoring mechanism beyond that which occurred within one-on-one appointments. Joint planning for a patient treatment was typically ad hoc through informal mechanisms. Additional duties typically come at a direct financial cost to fee-for-service practitioners. In contrast, service delivery and the process of care within hospital inpatient services followed

  11. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  12. Structured pro-active care for chronic depression by practice nurses in primary care: a qualitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Bennett

    Full Text Available This qualitative study explored the impact and appropriateness of structured pro-active care reviews by practice nurses for patients with chronic or recurrent depression and dysthymia within the ProCEED trial. ProCEED (Pro-active Care and its Evaluation for Enduring Depression was a United Kingdom wide randomised controlled trial, comparing usual general practitioner care with structured 'pro-active care' which involved 3 monthly review appointments with practice nurses over 2 years for patients with chronic or recurrent depression.In-depth interviews were completed with 41 participants: 26 patients receiving pro-active care and 15 practice nurses providing this care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using a 'framework' approach.Patients perceived the practice nurses to be appropriate professionals to engage with regarding their depression and most nurses felt confident in a case management role. The development of a therapeutic alliance between the patient and nurse was central to this model and, where it appeared lacking, dissatisfaction was felt by both patients and nurses with a likely negative impact on outcomes. Patient and nurse factors impacting on the therapeutic alliance were identified and nurse typologies explored.Pro-active care reviews utilising practice nurses as case managers were found acceptable by the majority of patients and practice nurses and may be a suitable way to provide care for patients with long-term depression in primary care. Motivated and interested practice nurses could be an appropriate and valuable resource for this patient group. This has implications for resource decisions by clinicians and commissioners within primary care.

  13. Practical challenges related to point of care testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julie L V

    2016-04-01

    Point of care testing (POCT) refers to laboratory testing that occurs near to the patient, often at the patient bedside. POCT can be advantageous in situations requiring rapid turnaround time of test results for clinical decision making. There are many challenges associated with POCT, mainly related to quality assurance. POCT is performed by clinical staff rather than laboratory trained individuals which can lead to errors resulting from a lack of understanding of the importance of quality control and quality assurance practices. POCT is usually more expensive than testing performed in the central laboratory and requires a significant amount of support from the laboratory to ensure the quality testing and meet accreditation requirements. Here, specific challenges related to POCT compliance with accreditation standards are discussed along with strategies that can be used to overcome these challenges. These areas include: documentation of POCT orders, charting of POCT results as well as training and certification of individuals performing POCT. Factors to consider when implementing connectivity between POCT instruments and the electronic medical record are also discussed in detail and include: uni-directional versus bidirectional communication, linking patient demographic information with POCT software, the importance of positive patient identification and considering where to chart POCT results in the electronic medical record.

  14. [Airway humidification practices in Chilean intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Jaime; Castillo, Juan; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2012-11-01

    In patients with an artificial airway, inspired gases can be humidified and heated using a passive (heat and moisture exchange filter - HMEF), or an active system (heated humidifier). To assess how humidification is carried out and what is the usual clinical practice in this field in Chilean intensive care units (ICUs). A specific survey to evaluate humidification system features as well as caregivers' preferences regarding humidification systems, was carried out on the same day in all Chilean ICUs. Fifty-five ICUs were contacted and 44 of them completed the survey. From a total of 367 patients, 254 (69%) required humidification because they were breathing through an artificial airway. A heated humidifier was employed only in 12 patients (5%). Forty-three ICUs (98%) used HMEF as their routine humidification system. In 52% of surveyed ICUs, heated humidifiers were not available. In Chile the main method to humidify and heat inspired gases in patients with an artificial airway is the HMEF. Although there are clear indications for the use of heated humidifiers, they are seldom employed.

  15. Laparoscopy in Urology Practice at a Tertiary Care Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quddus, M. B.; Mahmud, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the results of laparoscopic procedures at a Urology - Nephrology tertiary care centre. Study Design: Case series / observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Kidney Centre Postgraduate Training Institute, Karachi, from August 2007 to March 2012. Methodology: Medical records of all planned laparoscopic surgery conducted during the study period were reviewed. Those cases which to open surgery were excluded. All were performed by a single surgeon, initially as supervised and later independently. Data was maintained for demographic data, procedure details, length of hospital stay, and complications including conversion to open surgeries. Data was analyzed through SPSS 17.0. Results: There were 36 planned laparoscopic surgeries in the specified period. Out of 36 cases, 8 were converted to open surgery. Those who underwent laparoscopic surgery include two diagnostic procedures and renal cyst deroofing each, four ureterolithotomy, nineteen simple nephrectomy and one radical nephrectomy. So in total 28 cases were performed on 15 females and 13 males with mean age of 33.01 A +- 10.9 years. The mean operative time was 216 A +- 100 minutes and mean length of hospital stay was as 2.7 A +- 1.04 days. There were 10 complications in 28 cases, majority being Clavien Grade II including 7% (2/28) blood transfusion. Conclusion: There are technical challenges in learning laparoscopy for practicing urologists. Following some learning model in a systematic manner will help surmounting the technical challenges in learning laparoscopy. (author)

  16. Organizational climate and hospital nurses' caring practices: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Geneviève; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Clarke, Sean P

    2014-06-01

    Organizational climate in healthcare settings influences patient outcomes, but its effect on nursing care delivery remains poorly understood. In this mixed-methods study, nurse surveys (N = 292) were combined with a qualitative case study of 15 direct-care registered nurses (RNs), nursing personnel, and managers. Organizational climate explained 11% of the variation in RNs' reported frequency of caring practices. Qualitative data suggested that caring practices were affected by the interplay of organizational climate dimensions with patients and nurses characteristics. Workload intensity and role ambiguity led RNs to leave many caring practices to practical nurses and assistive personnel. Systemic interventions are needed to improve organizational climate and to support RNs' involvement in a full range of caring practices. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Organ and tissue donation in a regional paediatric intensive care unit: evaluation of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Laura; Alurkar, Shrirang; Kigozi, Phoebe; Vyas, Harish

    2018-05-01

    Approximately 2% of those on the organ transplant list in the UK are children. Early identification of donors and referral to organ donation teams (ODT) has proven to increase both the success rate of gaining consent and the number of organs actually retrieved. To evaluate the practice relating to organ donation for children receiving end-of-life care on a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) measured against the National Guidelines. All children 0-18 who received their end-of-life care and died on the PICU. A retrospective cohort study of organ donation patterns including referral, approach, consent and donation. This involved a review of case notes on PICU between the years 2009 and 2014. One hundred five deaths were identified and 100 notes were examined and data analysed to ascertain if religion, age and length of stay on PICU impacted on practice. Eighty-six children met the early identification criteria for potential donors, 40 (46.5%) children were referred to the ODT and 33 (38.3%) families were approached regarding donation. Twenty-one (24.4%) families consented to donation. Seventeen donations took place with a total of 41 sets of organs/tissues retrieved. Despite the majority of children meeting early identification for potential donors, many were not being referred. All children on end-of-life care should be referred for potential organ donation. Organ donation needs to be seen as a priority for hospitals as a part of routine end-of-life care to help increase referral rates and give families the opportunity to donate. Many paediatric deaths are not referred for consideration of organ donation, despite guidelines stating that this process should be standard of care. Further optimization of referral rates may aid in increasing the number of organs available for donation. What is Known: • Shortage of organs continues to be a national problem. • NICE guidelines state that all patients who are on end-of-life care should have the option of organ donation

  18. Identifying organisational principles and management practices important to the quality of health care services for chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frølich, Anne

    2012-02-01

    effect of financial incentives and public performance reporting on the behaviour of professionals and quality of care. Using secondary data, KP and the Danish health care system were compared in terms of six central dimensions: population, health care professionals, health care organisations, utilization patterns, quality measurements, and costs. Differences existed between the two systems on all dimensions, complicating the interpretation of findings. For instance, observed differences might be due to similar tendencies in the two health care systems that were observed at different times, rather than true structural differences. The expenses in the two health care systems were corrected for differences in the populations served and the purchasing power of currencies. However, no validated methods existed to correct for observed differences in case-mixes of chronic conditions. Data from a population of about half a million patients with diabetes in a large U.S. integrated health care delivery system affiliated with 41 medical centers employing 15 different CCM management practices was the basis for identifying effective management practices. Through the use of statistical modelling, the management practice of provider alerts was identified as most effective for promoting screening for hemoglobin A1c and lipid profile. The CCM was used as a framework for implementing four rehabilitation programs. The model promoted continuity of care and quality of health care services. New management practices were developed in the study, and known practices were further developed. However, the observational nature of the study limited the generalisability of the findings. In a structured literature survey focusing on the effect of financial incentives and public performance reporting on the quality of health care services, few studies documenting an effect were identified. The results varied, and important program aspects or contextual variables were often omitted. A model describing

  19. Patterns of Service Use in Two Types of Managed Behavioral Health Care Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Hodgkin, Dominic; Hiatt, Deirdre; Horgan, Constance M.; Azzone, Vanessa; McCann, Bernard; Ritter, Grant; Zolotusky, Galina; McGuire, Thomas G.; Reif, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe service use patterns by level of care in two managed care products: employee assistance program (EAP) combined with behavioral health benefits, and standard behavioral health benefits. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of administrative data for 2004 from a national managed behavioral health care organization (MBHO). Utilization of 11 specific service categories was compared across products. The weighted sample reflected exact matching on sociodemographics (N= 710,014 unweighted; 286,750 weighted). Results In the EAP/behavioral health product,, the proportion of enrollees with outpatient mental health and substance abuse office visits (including EAP) was higher (pEAP/behavioral health and standard behavioral health care products had distinct utilization patterns in this large MBHO. In particular, greater use of certain outpatient services was observed within the EAP/behavioral health product. PMID:20044425

  20. Advancing Hospice and Palliative Care Social Work Leadership in Interprofessional Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Susan; Head, Barbara A; Jones, Barbara L; Remke, Stacy S; Supiano, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The importance of interprofessional collaboration in achieving high quality outcomes, improving patient quality of life, and decreasing costs has been growing significantly in health care. Palliative care has been viewed as an exemplary model of interprofessional care delivery, yet best practices in both interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) in the field are still developing. So, too, is the leadership of hospice and palliative care social workers within IPE and IPP. Generating evidence regarding best practices that can prepare social work professionals for collaborative practice is essential. Lessons learned from practice experiences of social workers working in hospice and palliative care can inform educational efforts of all professionals. The emergence of interprofessional education and competencies is a development that is relevant to social work practice in this field. Opportunities for hospice and palliative social workers to demonstrate leadership in IPE and IPP are presented in this article.

  1. A survey of Korean medicine doctors' clinical practice patterns for autism spectrum disorder: preliminary research for clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihong; Lee, Sun Haeng; Lee, Boram; Yang, In Jun; Chang, Gyu Tae

    2018-03-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate autism spectrum disorder (ASD) clinical practice patterns of Korean medicine doctors (KMDs) through questionnaire survey. Questionnaires on Korean medicine (KM) treatment for ASD were distributed to 255 KMDs on December 5, 2016. The KMDs were psychiatrists, pediatricians, or general practitioners, who treated patients with ASD. The questionnaire covered items on treatment methods, aims of treatment, KM syndrome differentiation, diagnostic tools, and sociodemographic characteristics. Frequency analysis was conducted to describe the participants and their practices. A total 22.4% KMDs (n = 57/255) completed the questionnaires and 54 KMDs (21.2%) matched the inclusion criteria. The KMDs utilized herbal medicine (27.3%), body acupuncture (17.6%), scalp acupuncture (10.7%), moxibustion (6.4%), and Korean medical psychotherapy (5.9%) to treat ASD. The most commonly prescribed herbal medicine was Yukmijihwang-tang. Forty-eight (88.9%) KMDs responded that they used KM syndrome differentiation. 'Organ system, Qi, Blood, Yin, Yang, Fluid and Humor diagnosis' was most frequently used for syndrome differentiation. ASD was mainly diagnosed based on the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) and DSM-5. The present study demonstrated the current status of KMDs' diagnosis and treatment of ASD. In future clinical trials and clinical practice guidelines, these findings will provide meaningful information on the actual practice patterns of KMDs.

  2. Impact of point-of-care ultrasound on quality of care in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhikari S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Srikar Adhikari,1 Richard Amini,1 Lori A Stolz,1 Michael Blaivas2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: The use of point-of-care (POC ultrasonography has rapidly expanded in recent years, in both academic and community settings. It is one of the few diagnostic modalities that can be performed rapidly at the bedside by a physician and has significant impact on patient outcomes. It is portable, readily accessible, and cost-effective, and has no risk of ionizing radiation. There is an abundance of evidence that supports the use of POC ultrasound by physicians in different subspecialties. Multiple studies have documented the diagnostic accuracy of POC ultrasound and its ability to decrease the time to definitive treatment. As ultrasound technology has advanced, POC ultrasound applications have also evolved from being used solely in patients with blunt abdominal trauma to applications for nearly every clinical scenario imaginable. From performing procedures more safely to diagnosing pathology more quickly, POC ultrasound is radically changing clinical practice, patient outcomes, and the overall quality of patient care a clinician can provide. Recently, there has been a paradigm shift involving a symptom-based approach to POC ultrasound. This unique symptom-based ultrasound approach has led to improved quality of care in a variety of clinical settings. Keywords: point-of-care ultrasound, ultrasonography, bedside ultrasound, emergency physician, emergency department, quality, symptom-based

  3. The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study Brazil (CKDopps-Brazil: Design, data and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bueno de Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic kidney disease outcomes and practice patterns study (CKDopps is an international observational, prospective, cohort study involving patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stages 3-5 [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, with a major focus upon care during the advanced CKD period (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2]. During a 1-year enrollment period, each one of the 22 selected clinics will enroll up to 60 advanced CKD patients (eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 and not dialysis-dependent and 20 earlier stage CKD patients (eGFR between 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m2. Exclusion criteria: age < 18 years old, patients on chronic dialysis or prior kidney transplant. The study timeline include up to one year for enrollment of patients at each clinic starting in the end of 2013, followed by up to 2-3 years of patient follow-up with collection of detailed longitudinal patient-level data, annual clinic practice-level surveys, and patient surveys. Analyses will apply regression models to evaluate the contribution of patient-level and clinic practice-level factors to study outcomes, and utilize instrumental variable-type techniques when appropriate. Conclusion: Launching in 2013, CKDopps Brazil will study advanced CKD care in a random selection of nephrology clinics across Brazil to gain understanding of variation in care across the country, and as part of a multinational study to identify optimal treatment practices to slow kidney disease progression and improve outcomes during the transition period to end-stage kidney disease.

  4. Implementing change in primary care practices using electronic medical records: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Lynne S; Feifer, Chris; Stuart, Gail W; Ornstein, Steven M

    2008-01-16

    Implementing change in primary care is difficult, and little practical guidance is available to assist small primary care practices. Methods to structure care and develop new roles are often needed to implement an evidence-based practice that improves care. This study explored the process of change used to implement clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in primary care practices that used a common electronic medical record (EMR). Multiple conceptual frameworks informed the design of this study designed to explain the complex phenomena of implementing change in primary care practice. Qualitative methods were used to examine the processes of change that practice members used to implement the guidelines. Purposive sampling in eight primary care practices within the Practice Partner Research Network-Translating Researching into Practice (PPRNet-TRIP II) clinical trial yielded 28 staff members and clinicians who were interviewed regarding how change in practice occurred while implementing clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and strokes. A conceptual framework for implementing clinical guidelines into primary care practice was developed through this research. Seven concepts and their relationships were modelled within this framework: leaders setting a vision with clear goals for staff to embrace; involving the team to enable the goals and vision for the practice to be achieved; enhancing communication systems to reinforce goals for patient care; developing the team to enable the staff to contribute toward practice improvement; taking small steps, encouraging practices' tests of small changes in practice; assimilating the electronic medical record to maximize clinical effectiveness, enhancing practices' use of the electronic tool they have invested in for patient care improvement; and providing feedback within a culture of improvement, leading to an iterative cycle of goal setting

  5. Internal Quality Control Practices in Coagulation Laboratories: recommendations based on a patterns-of-practice survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, A; Aslan, B; Raby, A; Moffat, K A; Selby, R; Padmore, R

    2015-12-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) procedures are crucial for ensuring accurate patient test results. The IQMH Centre for Proficiency Testing conducted a web-based survey to gather information on the current IQC practices in coagulation testing. A questionnaire was distributed to 174 Ontario laboratories licensed to perform prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). All laboratories reported using two levels of commercial QC (CQC); 12% incorporate pooled patient plasma into their IQC program; >68% run CQC at the beginning of each shift; 56% following maintenance, with reagent changes, during a shift, or with every repeat sample; 6% only run CQC at the beginning of the day and 25% when the instruments have been idle for a defined period of time. IQC run frequency was determined by manufacturer recommendations (71%) but also influenced by the stability of test (27%), clinical impact of an incorrect test result (25%), and sample's batch number (10%). IQC was monitored using preset limits based on standard deviation (66%), precision goals (46%), or allowable performance limits (36%). 95% use multirules. Failure actions include repeating the IQC (90%) and reporting patient results; if repeat passes, 42% perform repeat analysis of all patient samples from last acceptable IQC. Variability exists in coagulation IQC practices among Ontario clinical laboratories. The recommendations presented here would be useful in encouraging standardized IQC practices. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Radiotherapy in painful gonarthrosis. Results of a national patterns-of-care study; Strahlentherapie bei schmerzhafter Kniegelenkarthrose (Gonarthrose). Ergebnisse einer deutschen Patterns-of-Care-Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muecke, Ralph; Schaefer, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Klinikum Lippe-Lemgo (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin, Alfried Krupp Krankenhaus, Essen (Germany); Heyd, Reinhard [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH (Germany); Prott, Franz-Josef [GMP fuer Radiologie und Strahlentherapie am St. Josefs-Hospital, Wiesbaden (Germany); Glatzel, Michael [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Klinikum Suhl (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Backgroud and Purpose: After a patterns-of-care study (PCS) in 2003/2004 addressing benign disorders in general, the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) conducted several multicenter cohort studies including the use of radiotherapy (RT) in painful gonarthrosis (GNA). Material and Methods: From 2006 to 2008, a PCS for GNA was conducted in all German RT institutions using a standardized structured questionnaire. Patient accrual, patient number, pretreatment, pain record, treatment indications, RT technique, and target volume concepts for painful GNA were assessed. In addition, the long-term functional and subjective outcomes were evaluated. Results: 238/248 institutions (95.9%) returned the questionnaire: 50 (21%) reported no clinical experience with RT in GNA, while 188 (79%) institutions treated 4,544 patients annually (median 15; range one to 846 cases per institution). Indications for treatment were acute pain symptoms in 18.9%, chronic pain in 95.3%, and treatment-refractory pain in 81.1%. The median total dose was 6 Gy (range 3-12 Gy), with a median single dose of 1 Gy (0.25-3 Gy). 40.4% of the institutions applied two fractions and 51.4% three fractions weekly. RT was delivered with orthovoltage units (25%), linear accelerators (79.6%), and cobalt-60 units (8.3%). 42 institutions evaluated the long-term clinical outcome in a total of 5,069 cases. Median pain reduction for at least 3 months was reported in 60% (5-100%), median pain reduction for at least 12 months in 40% (10-100%), and median persistent pain reduction in 27.8% (10-85%) of the treated patients. In 30% of patients (7-100%), a second RT series was applied for inadequate pain response or early pain recurrence. No radiogenic acute or chronic side effects were observed. Conclusion: This PCS comprises the largest number of cases reported for RT in painful and refractory GNA. Despite variations in daily RT practice, high response and low toxicity for this treatment in

  7. Effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dukyoo; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2016-10-01

    A nursing record focused on sexual health care for patients with cancer could encourage oncology nurses to provide sexual health care for oncology patients in a simple and effective manner. However, existing electronic information systems focus on professional use and not sexual health care, which could lead to inefficiencies in clinical practice. To examine the effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses. Twenty-four full-time registered nurses caring for oncology patients were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups in Korea. The researchers developed a sexual health care record and applied it to the intervention group for one month. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test. Content analysis was used to analyze interviews. Oncology nurses using the sexual health care record had significantly higher levels of sexual health care practice at 4 weeks post-intervention as compared to those who provided usual care to patients with cancer. A sexual health care record may have the potential to facilitate oncology nurses' practice of sexual health care. This study highlighted the importance of using SHC records with oncology patients to improve nursing practice related to sexuality issues. A nursing record focused on SHC for patients with cancer could make it easier and more effective for oncology nurses to provide such care to their patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Patterns and correlates of solid waste disposal practices in Dar es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the patterns and correlations of solid waste disposal practices among households in urbanized and populated Dar es Salaam city in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Household Budget Survey (HBS) data covering many households' characteristics was used. Multinomial Logit (MNL) model was applied to ...

  9. The pattern of mental disorders in private general practice: A six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the pattern of mental disorders in a private (general) practice in a selected Nigerian community, a cross- sectional, descriptive study was conducted. Two hundred and nine patients seen by a general practitioner (GP), and 291 patients (total 500) seen by a psychiatrist were retrospectively and prospectively ...

  10. Patterns of Practice: Case Studies of Early Childhood Education & Family Engagement in Community Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Linda; Rollins, S. Kwesi; Brown, Janet; Naviasky, Heather

    2016-01-01

    This "Patterns of Practice: Case Studies of Early Childhood Education & Family Engagement in Community Schools" report updates the community school case studies through a description of ongoing developments in Cincinnati, OH; Evansville, IN; Multnomah County, OR; and Tulsa, OK and adds to that knowledge base of early learning and…

  11. Risk factors for dementia diagnosis in German primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Anke; Jacob, Louis Ec; Rapp, Michael; Bohlken, Jens; Kostev, Karel

    2016-07-01

    Dementia is a psychiatric condition the development of which is associated with numerous aspects of life. Our aim was to estimate dementia risk factors in German primary care patients. The case-control study included primary care patients (70-90 years) with first diagnosis of dementia (all-cause) during the index period (01/2010-12/2014) (Disease Analyzer, Germany), and controls without dementia matched (1:1) to cases on the basis of age, sex, type of health insurance, and physician. Practice visit records were used to verify that there had been 10 years of continuous follow-up prior to the index date. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted with dementia as a dependent variable and the potential predictors. The mean age for the 11,956 cases and the 11,956 controls was 80.4 (SD: 5.3) years. 39.0% of them were male and 1.9% had private health insurance. In the multivariate regression model, the following variables were linked to a significant extent with an increased risk of dementia: diabetes (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.10-1.24), lipid metabolism (1.07; 1.00-1.14), stroke incl. TIA (1.68; 1.57-1.80), Parkinson's disease (PD) (1.89; 1.64-2.19), intracranial injury (1.30; 1.00-1.70), coronary heart disease (1.06; 1.00-1.13), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (2.12; 1.82-2.48), mental and behavioral disorders due to alcohol use (1.96; 1.50-2.57). The use of statins (OR: 0.94; 0.90-0.99), proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) (0.93; 0.90-0.97), and antihypertensive drugs (0.96, 0.94-0.99) were associated with a decreased risk of developing dementia. Risk factors for dementia found in this study are consistent with the literature. Nevertheless, the associations between statin, PPI and antihypertensive drug use, and decreased risk of dementia need further investigations.

  12. Effects of Conflicts of Interest on Practice Patterns and Complication Rates in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ralph W; Weiner, Joseph A; Schallmo, Michael S; Chun, Danielle S; Barth, Kathryn A; Singh, Sameer K; Hsu, Wellington K

    2017-09-01

    Retrospective cohort study. We sought to determine whether financial relationships with industry had any impact on operative and/or complication rates of spine surgeons performing fusion surgeries. Recent actions from Congress and the Institute of Medicine have highlighted the importance of conflicts of interest among physicians. Orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons have been identified as receiving the highest amount of industry payments among all specialties. No study has yet investigated the potential effects of disclosed industry payments with quality and choices of patient care. A comprehensive database of spine surgeons in the United States with compiled data of industry payments, operative fusion rates, and complication rates was created. Practice pattern data were derived from a publicly available Medicare-based database generated from selected CPT codes from 2011 to 2012. Complication rate data from 2009 to 2013 were extracted from the ProPublica-Surgeon-Scorecard database, which utilizes postoperative inhospital mortality and 30-day-readmission for designated conditions as complications of surgery. Data regarding industry payments from 2013 to 2014 were derived from the Open Payments website. Surgeons performing rate, and/or complication rate. A total of 2110 surgeons met the inclusion criteria for our database. The average operative fusion rate was 8.8% (SD 4.8%), whereas the average complication rate for lumbar and cervical fusion was 4.1% and 1.9%, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a statistically significant but negligible relationship between disclosed payments/transactions and both operative fusion and complication rates. Our findings do not support a strong correlation between the payments a surgeon receives from industry and their decisions to perform spine fusion or associated complication rates. Large variability in the rate of fusions performed suggests a poor consensus for indications for spine fusion surgery. 3.

  13. Paediatric day-case neurosurgery in a resource challenged setting: Pattern and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owojuyigbe, Afolabi Muyiwa; Komolafe, Edward O.; Adenekan, Anthony T.; Dada, Muyiwa A.; Onyia, Chiazor U.; Ogunbameru, Ibironke O.; Owagbemi, Oluwafemi F.; Talabi, Ademola O.; Faponle, Fola A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been generally observed that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment especially if discharged same day after surgery. This is probably due to the fact that children generally tend to feel more at ease in the home environment than in the hospital setting. Only few tertiary health institutions provide routine day-case surgery for paediatric neurosurgical patients in our sub-region. Objective: To review the pattern and practice of paediatric neurosurgical day-cases at our hospital. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of all paediatric day-case neurosurgeries carried out between June 2011 and June 2014. Results: A total of 53 patients (34 males and 19 females) with age ranging from 2 days to 14 years were seen. Majority of the patients (77.4%) presented with congenital lesions, and the most common procedure carried out was spina bifida repair (32%) followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion (26.4%) for hydrocephalus. Sixty-eight percentage belonged to the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 2, whereas the rest (32%) belonged to class 1. General anaesthesia was employed in 83% of cases. Parenteral paracetamol was used for intra-operative analgesia for most of the patients. Two patients had post-operative nausea and vomiting and were successfully managed. There was no case of emergency re-operation, unplanned admission, cancellation or mortality. Conclusion: Paediatric day-case neurosurgery is feasible in our environment. With careful patient selection and adequate pre-operative preparation, good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27251657

  14. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Blanchard Valley Health Systems, Findlay, Ohio (United States); Baardwijk, Angela van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Linden, Yvette van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Arnalot, Palmira Foro [Parc de Salut Mar. Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona (Spain); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [AP-HP Hopital Henri-Mondor, Universite Paris Est Creteil, Creteil (France); Maranzano, Ernesto [' S. Maria' Hospital, Terni (Italy); Liu, Rico [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Wong, Kam-Hung [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wong, Lea-Choung [National University Cancer Institute (Singapore); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT){sub 3} receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  15. International Patterns of Practice in the Management of Radiation Therapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, Kristopher; Zhang Liying; Lutz, Stephen; Baardwijk, Angela van; Linden, Yvette van der; Holt, Tanya; Arnalot, Palmira Foro; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Maranzano, Ernesto; Liu, Rico; Wong, Kam-Hung; Wong, Lea-Choung; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Corn, Benjamin W.; De Angelis, Carlo; Holden, Lori; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate international patterns of practice in the management of radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Methods and Materials: Oncologists prescribing radiation therapy in the United States, Canada, The Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Italy, France, Hong Kong, Singapore, Cyprus, and Israel completed a Web-based survey that was based on 6 radiation therapy-only clinical cases modeled after the minimal-, low-, moderate-, and high-emetic risk levels defined in the antiemetic guidelines of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer. For each case, respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting separately and committed to an initial management approach. Results: In total, 1022 responses were received. Risk estimates and management decisions for the minimal- and high-risk cases varied little and were in line with guideline standards, whereas those for the low- and moderate-risk cases varied greatly. The most common initial management strategies were as follows: rescue therapy for a minimal-risk case (63% of respondents), 2 low-risk cases (56% and 80%), and 1 moderate-risk case (66%); and prophylactic therapy for a second moderate-risk case (75%) and a high-risk case (95%). The serotonin (5-HT) 3 receptor antagonists were the most commonly recommended prophylactic agents. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of a decision for prophylactic or rescue therapy were risk estimates of nausea and vomiting, awareness of the American Society of Clinical Oncology antiemetic guideline, and European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology membership. Conclusions: Risk estimates and management strategies for RINV varied, especially for low- and moderate-risk radiation therapy cases. Radiation therapy-induced nausea and vomiting are under-studied treatment sequelae. New observational and translational studies are needed to allow for individual patient risk

  16. Paediatric day-case neurosurgery in a resource challenged setting: Pattern and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolabi Muyiwa Owojuyigbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been generally observed that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment especially if discharged same day after surgery. This is probably due to the fact that children generally tend to feel more at ease in the home environment than in the hospital setting. Only few tertiary health institutions provide routine day-case surgery for paediatric neurosurgical patients in our sub-region. Objective: To review the pattern and practice of paediatric neurosurgical day-cases at our hospital. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of all paediatric day-case neurosurgeries carried out between June 2011 and June 2014. Results: A total of 53 patients (34 males and 19 females with age ranging from 2 days to 14 years were seen. Majority of the patients (77.4% presented with congenital lesions, and the most common procedure carried out was spina bifida repair (32% followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion (26.4% for hydrocephalus. Sixty-eight percentage belonged to the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 2, whereas the rest (32% belonged to class 1. General anaesthesia was employed in 83% of cases. Parenteral paracetamol was used for intra-operative analgesia for most of the patients. Two patients had post-operative nausea and vomiting and were successfully managed. There was no case of emergency re-operation, unplanned admission, cancellation or mortality. Conclusion: Paediatric day-case neurosurgery is feasible in our environment. With careful patient selection and adequate pre-operative preparation, good outcome can be achieved.

  17. Use of Intervention Mapping to Enhance Health Care Professional Practice: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durks, Desire; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Hossain, Lutfun N; Franco-Trigo, Lucia; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Intervention Mapping is a planning protocol for developing behavior change interventions, the first three steps of which are intended to establish the foundations and rationales of such interventions. This systematic review aimed to identify programs that used Intervention Mapping to plan changes in health care professional practice. Specifically, it provides an analysis of the information provided by the programs in the first three steps of the protocol to determine their foundations and rationales of change. A literature search was undertaken in PubMed, Scopus, SciELO, and DOAJ using "Intervention Mapping" as keyword. Key information was gathered, including theories used, determinants of practice, research methodologies, theory-based methods, and practical applications. Seventeen programs aimed at changing a range of health care practices were included. The social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior were the most frequently used frameworks in driving change within health care practices. Programs used a large variety of research methodologies to identify determinants of practice. Specific theory-based methods (e.g., modelling and active learning) and practical applications (e.g., health care professional training and facilitation) were reported to inform the development of practice change interventions and programs. In practice, Intervention Mapping delineates a three-step systematic, theory- and evidence-driven process for establishing the theoretical foundations and rationales underpinning change in health care professional practice. The use of Intervention Mapping can provide health care planners with useful guidelines for the theoretical development of practice change interventions and programs.

  18. HIV/aids related home based care practices among primary health care workers in Ogun state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Amoran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS is fast becoming a chronic disease with the advent of antiretroviral drugs, therefore making home based care key in the management of chronically ill HIV/AIDS patient. The objective of this study was to determine the perception and practice of health care workers on HIV/AIDS related home based care in the health facilities in Ogun state, Nigeria. Methods This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to obtain a representative sample of the primary health care workers in Ogun state. An interviewer administered structured questionnaire was administered by trained health workers to elicit the required information. Result A total of 350 health care workers were interviewed, 70% of the respondents could adequately describe the components of home based care. Only 38.7% were aware of the National guideline on home based care practices and 17.1% believe that home based care will not significantly improve the prognosis of PLWAs. Few 19.1% had ever been trained or ever involved 16.6% in home based care practices. Only 20 [5.7%] are involved on a weekly basis, 16 [4.6%] monthly and 22 [6.3%] quarterly. Reasons given for non implementation of home based care are inadequate number of healthcare workers 45%, lack of political will 24.4%, lack of implementation by facility managers 14% and inadequate funds 16.6%. Factors that were significantly associated with the practice of home based care were perception of its relevance in improving prognosis [OR = 54.21, C.I = 23.22-129.52] and presence of a support group in the facility [OR = 4.80, C.I = 2.40-9.57]. There was however no statistically significant relationship between adequate knowledge of home based care [OR = 0.78, C.I = 0.39-1.54] and previous training on home based care (OR = 1.43, C.I = 0.66-3.06]. Conclusion The practice of home based care for HIV/AIDS among the study population is low

  19. Building managed primary care practice networks to deliver better clinical care: a qualitative semi-structured interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawa, Jasmine; Robson, John; Hull, Sally

    2017-11-01

    Primary care practices are increasingly working in larger groups. In 2009, all 36 primary care practices in the London borough of Tower Hamlets were grouped geographically into eight managed practice networks to improve the quality of care they delivered. Quantitative evaluation has shown improved clinical outcomes. To provide insight into the process of network implementation, including the aims, facilitating factors, and barriers, from both the clinical and managerial perspectives. A qualitative study of network implementation in the London borough of Tower Hamlets, which serves a socially disadvantaged and ethnically diverse population. Nineteen semi-structured interviews were carried out with doctors, nurses, and managers, and were informed by existing literature on integrated care and GP networks. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and thematic analysis used to analyse emerging themes. Interviewees agreed that networks improved clinical care and reduced variation in practice performance. Network implementation was facilitated by the balance struck between 'a given structure' and network autonomy to adopt local solutions. Improved use of data, including patient recall and peer performance indicators, were viewed as critical key factors. Targeted investment provided the necessary resources to achieve this. Barriers to implementing networks included differences in practice culture, a reluctance to share data, and increased workload. Commissioners and providers were positive about the implementation of GP networks as a way to improve the quality of clinical care in Tower Hamlets. The issues that arose may be of relevance to other areas implementing similar quality improvement programmes at scale. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  20. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level.This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care.Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death.This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  1. The relationship between individualized care and the practice environment: an international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Acaroglu, Rengin; Sendir, Merdiye; Berg, Agneta; Efstathiou, Georgios; Idvall, Ewa; Kalafati, Maria; Katajisto, Jouko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Lemonidou, Chryssoula; da Luz, Maria Deolinda Antunes; Suhonen, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Previous research studies have found that the better the quality of practice environments in hospitals, the better the outcomes for nurses and patients. Practice environment may influence nurses' ability to individualize care but the detailed relationship between individualized care and the professional practice environment has not been investigated widely. Some evidence exists about the association of practice environments with the level of individualization of nursing care, but this evidence is based on single national studies. The aim of this study was to determine whether nurses' views of their professional practice environment associate with their views of the level of care individualization in seven countries. This study had an international, multisite, prospective, cross-sectional, exploratory survey design. The study involved acute orthopedic and trauma surgical inpatient wards (n=91) in acute care hospitals (n=34) in seven countries, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, the State of Kansas, USA, Portugal, Sweden, and Turkey. Nurses (n=1163), registered or licensed practical, working in direct patient care, in orthopedic and trauma inpatient units in acute care hospitals in seven countries participated in the study. Self-administered questionnaires, including two instruments, the Revised Professional Practice Environment and the Individualized Care Scale-Nurse (Individualized Care Scale-Nurse A and B) were used for data collection. Data were analyzed statistically using descriptive statistics, simultaneous multiple regression analysis, and generalized linear model. Two regression models were applied to assess the predictive validity of the Revised Professional Practice Environment on the Individualized Care Scale-Nurse-A and B. The results showed that elements of the professional practice environment were associated with care individualization. Internal work motivation, cultural sensitivity, control over practice, teamwork, and staff relationship with physicians were

  2. Primary care in the United States: practice-based innovations and factors that influence adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Debora Goetz

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the use of specific innovations in primary care practices. The research seeks to examine whether a relationship exists between environmental factors and organizational characteristics and the level of innovation in primary care practices in Virginia. The study utilized multiple secondary data sets and an organizational survey of primary care practices to define the external environment and the level of innovation. Institutional theory was used to explain the connection between innovations in primary care practices and institutional forces within the environment. Resource dependency theory was used to explain motivators for change based on a dependence on scarce financial, human, and information resources. Results show a positive association between organizational size, organizational relationships, and stakeholder expectations on the level of innovation. A negative association was found between competition and the level of innovation. No relationship was found between degree of Medicare and managed care penetration and innovation, nor between knowledge of, and difficulty complying with, payer organization requirements and innovation. Primary care physician practices exist in a market-driven environment characterized by high pressure from regulatory sources, decreasing reimbursement levels, increasing rate of change in technologies, and increasing patient and community expectations. This study contributes new information on the relationship between organizational characteristics, the external environment and specific innovations in primary care practices. Information on the contributing factors to innovation in primary care is important for improving delivery of health care services and the ability of these practices to survive.

  3. Children in Greenland: disease patterns and contacts to the health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kløvgaard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies of Greenlandic children’s disease pattern and contacts to the health care system are sparse and have focused on the primary health care sector. Objective: We aimed to identify the disease pattern and use of health care facilities of children aged 0–10 in two Greenlandic cohorts. Methods and design: In a retrospective, descriptive follow-up of the Ivaaq (The Greenland Child Cohort and the CLEAR (climate changes, environmental contaminants and reproductive health birth cohorts (total n=1,000, we reviewed medical records of children aged 6–10 in 2012 with residence in Nuuk or Ilulissat (n=332. Data on diseases and health care system contacts were extracted. Diagnoses were validated retrospectively. Primary health care contacts were reviewed for a random sample of 1:6. Results: In 311 children with valid social security number, the total number of health care system contacts was 12,471 equalling 4.6 contacts per child per year. The annual incidence rate of hospital admissions was 1:10 children (total n=266, 1,220 days, 4.6 days/admission, outpatient contacts 2:10 children and primary care 3.6 per child. Contacts were overall more frequent in boys compared with girls, 39.5 versus 34.6 during the study period, p=0.02. The highest annual contact rates for diseases were: hospitalisations/acute respiratory diseases 13.9:1,000; outpatient contacts/otitis media 5.1:1,000; primary care/conjunctivitis or nasopharyngitis 410:1,000 children. Outpatient screening for respiratory tuberculosis accounted 6.2:1,000, primary care non-disease (Z-diagnosis 2,081:1,000 annually. Complete adherence to the child vaccination programme was seen in 40%, while 5% did not receive any vaccinations. Conclusions: In this first study of its kind, the health care contact pattern in Greenlandic children showed a relatively high hospitalisation rate and duration per admission, and a low primary health care contact rate. The overall contact rate and

  4. Critical care management of major disasters: a practical guide to disaster preparation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Shawn P; Niven, Alexander S; Reese, Jason M

    2012-02-01

    Recent events and regulatory mandates have underlined the importance of medical planning and preparedness for catastrophic events. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief summary of current commonly identified threats, an overview of mass critical care management, and a discussion of resource allocation to provide the intensive care unit (ICU) director with a practical guide to help prepare and coordinate the activities of the multidisciplinary critical care team in the event of a disaster.

  5. Translating Pressure Ulcer Prevention Into Intensive Care Nursing Practice: Overlaying a Care Bundle Approach With a Model for Research Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyib, Nahla; Coyer, Fiona

    This article reports on the development and implementation process used to integrate a care bundle approach (a pressure ulcer [PU] prevention bundle to improve patients' skin integrity in intensive care) and the Ottawa Model of Research Use (OMRU). The PU prevention care bundle demonstrated significant reduction in PU incidence, with the OMRU model providing a consolidated framework for the implementation of bundled evidence in an effective and consistent manner into daily clinical nursing practice.

  6. A framework and a measurement instrument for sustainability of work practices in long-term care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Slaghuis (Sarah); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); R.A. Bal (Roland); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In health care, many organizations are working on quality improvement and/or innovation of their care practices. Although the effectiveness of improvement processes has been studied extensively, little attention has been given to sustainability of the changed work practices

  7. Integrative mental health care: from theory to practice, part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, James

    2007-01-01

    Integrative approaches will lead to more accurate and different understandings of mental illness. Beneficial responses to complementary and alternative therapies provide important clues about the phenomenal nature of the human body in space-time and disparate biological, informational, and energetic factors associated with normal and abnormal psychological functioning. The conceptual framework of contemporary Western psychiatry includes multiple theoretical viewpoints, and there is no single best explanatory model of mental illness. Future theories of mental illness causation will not depend exclusively on empirical verification of strictly biological processes but will take into account both classically described biological processes and non-classical models, including complexity theory, resulting in more complete explanations of the characteristics and causes of symptoms and mechanisms of action that result in beneficial responses to treatments. Part 1 of this article examines the limitations of the theory and contemporary clinical methods employed in Western psychiatry and discusses implications of emerging paradigms in physics and the biological sciences for the future of psychiatry. In part 2, a practical methodology for planning integrative assessment and treatment strategies in mental health care is proposed. Using this methodology the integrative management of moderate and severe psychiatric symptoms is reviewed in detail. As the conceptual framework of Western medicine evolves toward an increasingly integrative perspective, novel understandings of complex relationships between biological, informational, and energetic processes associated with normal psychological functioning and mental illness will lead to more effective integrative assessment and treatment strategies addressing the causes or meanings of symptoms at multiple hierarchic levels of body-brain-mind.

  8. Integrative mental health care: from theory to practice, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, James

    2008-01-01

    Integrative approaches will lead to more accurate and different understandings of mental illness. Beneficial responses to complementary and alternative therapies provide important clues about the phenomenal nature of the human body in space-time and disparate biological, informational, and energetic factors associated with normal and abnormal psychological functioning. The conceptual framework of contemporary Western psychiatry includes multiple theoretical viewpoints, and there is no single best explanatory model of mental illness. Future theories of mental illness causation will not depend exclusively on empirical verification of strictly biological processes but will take into account both classically described biological processes and non-classical models, including complexity theory, resulting in more complete explanations of the characteristics and causes of symptoms and mechanisms of action that result in beneficial responses to treatments. Part 1 of this article examined the limitations of the theory and contemporary clinical methods employed in Western psychiatry and discussed implications of emerging paradigms in physics and the biological sciences for the future of psychiatry. In part 2, a practical methodology, for planning integrative assessment and treatment strategies in mental health care is proposed. Using this methodology the integrative management of moderate and severe psychiatric symptoms is reviewed in detail. As the conceptual framework of Western medicine evolves toward an increasingly integrative perspective, novel understanding of complex relationships between biological, informational, and energetic processes associated with normal psychological functioning and mental illness will lead to more effective integrative assessment and treatment strategies addressing the causes or meanings of symptoms at multiple hierarchic levels of body-brain-mind.

  9. Preventive care in general practice among healthy older New South Wales residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F; Islam, Fakhrul Md; Jalaludin, Bin; Chen, Jack; Bauman, Adrian E; Comino, Elizabeth J

    2013-06-16

    Despite being at high risk, disadvantaged patients may be less likely to receive preventive care in general practice. This study aimed to explore self-reported preventive care received from general practitioners and the factors associated with this by healthy New South Wales (NSW) residents aged 45-74 years. A self-completed questionnaire was sent to 100,000 NSW residents in the 45 and Up cohort study. There was a 60% response rate. After exclusions there were 39,964 participants aged 45-74 years who did not report cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Dichotomised outcome variables were participant report of having had a clinical assessment of their blood pressure (BP), blood cholesterol (BC) or blood glucose (BG), or received advice to eat less high fat food, eat more fruit and vegetables or be more physically active from their GP in the last 12 months. Independent variables included socio-demographic, lifestyle risk factors, health status, access to health care and confidence in self-management. Most respondents reported having had their BP (90.6%), BC (73.9%) or BG (69.4%) assessed. Fewer reported being given health advice to (a)eat less high fat food (26.6%), (b) eat more fruit and vegetables (15.5%) or (c) do more physical activity (19.9%). The patterns of association were consistent with recognised need: participants who were older, less well educated or overweight were more likely to report clinical assessments; participants who were overseas born, of lower educational attainment, less confident in their own self-management, reported insufficient physical activity or were overweight were more likely to report receiving advice. However current smokers were less likely to report clinical assessments; and rural and older participants were less likely to receive diet or physical activity advice. This study demonstrated a gap between reported clinical assessments and preventive advice. There was evidence for inverse care for rural participants and smokers, who

  10. Thinking in clinical nursing practice: a study of critical care nurses' thinking applying the think-aloud, protocol analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung-Ja; Kim, Hesook Suzie; Kim, Mae-Ja; Hong, Kyung-Ja; Park, Sungae; Yun, Soon-Nyoung; Song, Misoon; Jung, Yoenyi; Kim, Haewon; Kim, Dong-Oak Debbie; Choi, Heejung; Kim, Kyungae

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the paper is to discover the patterns and processes of decision-making in clinical nursing practice. A set of think-aloud data from five critical care nurses during 40 to 50 minutes of caregiving in intensive care units were obtained and analyzed by applying the procedures recommended by Ericsson and Simon for protocol analysis. Four thinking processes before acting were identified to constitute various sorts of thoughts in which the nurses were engaged during patient care: reviewing, validation, consideration, rationalization, and action. In addition, three patterns of sequential streaming of thinking (short, intermediate, long) were identified to reveal various ways the nurses dealt with clinical situations involving nursing tasks and responsibilities. This study specifies the initial categories of thoughts for each of the processes and various patterns with which these processes are sequentially combined, providing insights into the ways nurses think about problems and address their concerns. The findings suggest that the thinking in clinical practice involves more than focused decision-making and reasoning, and needs to be examined from a broader perspective.

  11. Care erosion in hospitals: Problems in reflective nursing practice and the role of cognitive dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; Timmins, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Care erosion - gradual decline in care level - is an important problem in health care today. Unfortunately, the mechanism whereby it occurs is complex and poorly understood. This paper seeks to address this by emphasising problems in reflective nursing practice. Critical reflection on quality of care which should drive good care instead spawns justifications, denial, and trivialisation of deficient care. This perpetuates increasingly poor care levels. We argue that cognitive dissonance theory provides a highly effective understanding of this process and suggest for this approach to be incorporated in all efforts to address care erosion. The paper includes a detailed discussion of examples and implications for practice, in particular the need to restore critical reflection in nursing, the importance of embracing strong values and standards, and the need for increased awareness of signs of care erosion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. APIC position paper: Safe injection, infusion, and medication vial practices in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Susan A; Arias, Kathleen Meehan; Felizardo, Gwen; Barnes, Sue; Kraska, Susan; Patrick, Marcia; Bumsted, Amelia

    2016-07-01

    The transmission of bloodborne viruses and other microbial pathogens to patients during routine health care procedures continues to occur because of the use of improper injection, infusion, medication vial, and point-of-care testing practices by health care personnel. These unsafe practices occur in various clinical settings and result in unacceptable and devastating events for patients. This document updates the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology 2010 position paper on safe injection, infusion, and medication vial practices in health care. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The potential of the internet for alternative caring practices for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sarah; Ayers, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    The practices of health care in late modernity are informed by competing visions of the ideal human and the nature of care. Western societies typically characterise the ideal human as independent and self-reliant. The resultant welfare systems provide temporary havens away from the everyday, competitive spaces of capitalist societies, termed here the enclave model. Social scientists problematise this model on several grounds: the construction of pathologised and medicalised body forms; the neglect of caring practices that are gendered, invisible and primarily private; the de-politicisation of caring practices. Policy calls reject reference to care and its associations with dependency, make visible and value informal care work or invoke a caring citizenship as a policy goal not just a means. Into this field of contested notions of care enters a well-documented rise in access to, and consultation through, the internet in everyday lives for a vast range of issues. Health care encountered online reflects a similar range in form as that encountered offline and much that is innovative, whilst clearly of benefit, does nothing to challenge the existing dominance of the enclave model of social care. However, certain groups of sites create spaces through which participants can both express and extract caring relationships that are otherwise unforthcoming. The paper argues that these sites afford the potential to develop an alternative model of caring, to reframe questions of how to care about distant others and to demonstrate the centrality of caring relations to human life.

  14. A creative analysis of the role of practice development facilitators in a critical care environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Heyns

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Practice development focuses on methods to address the quality of care and advance healthcare practices. The role of practice development facilitators to address challenges of delivering evidence-based person-centred care in the critical care environment was determined by using a nominal group technique. Eleven participants from public and private healthcare services reached consensus on seven clusters: theory-practice application, facilitation of learning, increasing collaboration, effective communication, facilitation of change, time management and role modelling. The clusters were visually represented as a hot air balloon. Competence as facilitators is of vital importance to ensure knowledge translation with the aim to improve quality.

  15. Pattern of use of skin care products in children with and without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare the pattern of use of skin care products between children with eczematous skin lesions and those without. Design: Case control study. Setting: Two well baby clinics at the Kenyatta National Hospital and the Mbagathi District Hospital in Nairobi. Subjects: Eighty nine infants with eczematous skin ...

  16. Referral patterns of children with poor growth in primary health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, F.K.; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Dekker, F.W.; Dommelen, P. van; Buuren, S. van; Lodder-van der Kooij, A.M.; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background. To promote early diagnosis and treatment of short stature, consensus meetings were held in the mid nineteen nineties in the Netherlands and the UK. This resulted in guidelines for referral. In this study we evaluate the referral pattern of short stature in primary health care using these

  17. Pattern of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media at the National Ear Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media at the National Ear Care Centre Kaduna, Nigeria. ... Background: Chronic suppurative otitis media constitutes a major cause of otorhinolaryngological clinic visits in Nigeria, therefore it is pertinent to determine the local ... Children under 10 years constituted the majority (n=64).

  18. Usage patterns of personal care products: Important factors for exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesterbos, J.W.H.; Dudzina, T.; Delmaar, C.J.; Bakker, M.I.; Russel, F.G.M.; Goetz, N. von; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Roeleveld, N.

    2013-01-01

    Complete information regarding the use of personal care products (PCPs) by consumers is limited, but such information is crucial for realistic consumer exposure assessment. To fill this gap, a database was created with person-oriented information regarding usage patterns and circumstances of use for

  19. Knowledge and Practice of Standard Precautions by Health-Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... SPs are the minimum infection prevention practices that apply to all patients regardless ... Nonavailability of materials, limited organizational support, and lack of knowledge regarding infection control practices among HCWs ...

  20. Health Care Costs, Utilization and Patterns of Care following Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrion, Emily R.; Aucott, John; Lemke, Klaus W.; Weiner, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lyme disease is the most frequently reported vector borne infection in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control have estimated that approximately 10% to 20% of individuals may experience Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome – a set of symptoms including fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and neurocognitive complaints that persist after initial antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease. Little is known about the impact of Lyme disease or post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms (PTLDS) on health care costs and utilization in the United States. Objectives 1) to examine the impact of Lyme disease on health care costs and utilization, 2) to understand the relationship between Lyme disease and the probability of developing PTLDS, 3) to understand how PTLDS may impact health care costs and utilization. Methods This study utilizes retrospective data on medical claims and member enrollment for persons aged 0-64 years who were enrolled in commercial health insurance plans in the United States between 2006-2010. 52,795 individuals treated for Lyme disease were compared to 263,975 matched controls with no evidence of Lyme disease exposure. Results Lyme disease is associated with $2,968 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 2,807-3,128, pLyme disease, having one or more PTLDS-related diagnosis is associated with $3,798 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 3,542-4,055, pLyme disease is associated with increased costs above what would be expected for an easy to treat infection. The presence of PTLDS-related diagnoses after treatment is associated with significant health care costs and utilization. PMID:25650808

  1. The dialysis outcomes and practice patterns study phase 5 in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries: Design and study methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald L Pisoni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS is an international prospective cohort study of the relationships between hemodialysis (HD care practices and HD patient outcomes. The DOPPS began in 1996, in the United States, and has since expanded to 21 countries, collecting detailed data from >75,000 HD patients, with >200 scientific publications, focused on describing HD practices associated with improved HD patient outcomes. The goal of DOPPS is to help HD patients "live better and live longer." Starting in 2012, the DOPPS was able to expand to all six of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC countries, namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. The DOPPS study design consists of selecting HD facilities for study participation in each country to represent the different types of HD facilities and geographic regions within each GCC country. Within each study site, HD patients were randomly selected for detailed data collection to represent the HD practices within each participating HD facility. Altogether, 41 HD facilities have participated in the GCC-DOPPS Phase 5 study including 20 facilities from Saudi Arabia, nine from the United Arab Emirates, four each from Kuwait and Oman, two from Qatar, and one from Bahrain. Herein, we provide a detailed description of the study design and methods, data collection, study management, scientific investigator oversight and guidance, and study governance and support for the GCCDOPPS Phase 5 study.

  2. Migraine-preventive prescription patterns by physician specialty in ambulatory care settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Hiroko; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-03-01

    Many adults with migraine who require preventive therapy are often not prescribed the proper medications. The most likely reason is that primary care physicians are unacquainted with preventive medications for migraine. The present study assessed the migraine-preventive prescription patterns in office visits using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2009 in the United States. Patients who were 18 years or older and diagnosed with migraine were included in the analysis. In accordance with the recommendations of the headache guidelines, we included beta-blockers, antidepressants, triptans for short-term prevention of menstrual migraine, and other triptans for acute treatment. Weighted visits of adults with migraine prescribed with preventive medication ranged from 32.8% in 2006 to 38.6% in 2009. Visits to primary care physicians accounted for 72.6% of the analyzed adult migraine visits. Anticonvulsants (odds ratio [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.57, p  < 0.001) and triptans for menstrual migraine (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28-0.91, p  = 0.025) were less frequently prescribed by primary care physicians compared with specialty care physicians, such as neurologists and psychiatrists. There were no significant differences in the prescription patterns of antidepressants and beta-blockers between primary and specialty care physicians. Beta-blockers were prescribed to patients with comorbidity of hypertension, and antidepressants were used by patients with comorbidity of depression. There are differences in the prescription patterns of certain type of preventive medications between primary care physicians and specialty care physicians.

  3. Migraine-preventive prescription patterns by physician specialty in ambulatory care settings in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Takaki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many adults with migraine who require preventive therapy are often not prescribed the proper medications. The most likely reason is that primary care physicians are unacquainted with preventive medications for migraine. The present study assessed the migraine-preventive prescription patterns in office visits using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2006 to 2009 in the United States. Patients who were 18 years or older and diagnosed with migraine were included in the analysis. In accordance with the recommendations of the headache guidelines, we included beta-blockers, antidepressants, triptans for short-term prevention of menstrual migraine, and other triptans for acute treatment. Weighted visits of adults with migraine prescribed with preventive medication ranged from 32.8% in 2006 to 38.6% in 2009. Visits to primary care physicians accounted for 72.6% of the analyzed adult migraine visits. Anticonvulsants (odds ratio [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14–0.57, p < 0.001 and triptans for menstrual migraine (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28–0.91, p = 0.025 were less frequently prescribed by primary care physicians compared with specialty care physicians, such as neurologists and psychiatrists. There were no significant differences in the prescription patterns of antidepressants and beta-blockers between primary and specialty care physicians. Beta-blockers were prescribed to patients with comorbidity of hypertension, and antidepressants were used by patients with comorbidity of depression. There are differences in the prescription patterns of certain type of preventive medications between primary care physicians and specialty care physicians.

  4. The Curricular Expectations and Practice of Caring among Girls and Boys in the USA and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna; Dinçer, F. Çaglayan; Sen, Müge

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to compare curricular expectations regarding caring behaviour in the USA and Turkey and to analyse the practical implication by investigating boys' and girls' caring behaviour. Conceptual framework of this research is underpinned in philosophical ideals of ethics of care and is grounded in theories stressing the…

  5. Challenges to Safe Injection Practices in Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura; Weissburg, Benjamin; Rogers, Kelli; Musuuza, Jackson; Safdar, Nasia; Shirley, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Most recent infection outbreaks caused by unsafe injection practices in the United States have occurred in ambulatory settings. We utilized direct observation and a survey to assess injection practices at 31 clinics. Improper vial use was observed at 13 clinics (41.9%). Pharmacy support and healthcare worker education may improve injection practices. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:614-616.

  6. Associations between structural capabilities of primary care practices and performance on selected quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Coltin, Kathryn L; Safran, Dana Gelb; Dresser, Marguerite; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Schneider, Eric C

    2009-10-06

    Recent proposals to reform primary care have encouraged physician practices to adopt such structural capabilities as performance feedback and electronic health records. Whether practices with these capabilities have higher performance on measures of primary care quality is unknown. To measure associations between structural capabilities of primary care practices and performance on commonly used quality measures. Cross-sectional analysis. Massachusetts. 412 primary care practices. During 2007, 1 physician from each participating primary care practice (median size, 4 physicians) was surveyed about structural capabilities of the practice (responses representing 308 practices were obtained). Data on practice structural capabilities were linked to mu