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  1. Exploring self care in Tehran, Iran: A population based study

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    Hassan Eftekhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: self care empowers individuals to self manage their minor ailments, chronic conditions, and to exert more control over their lives. Self care includes activities such as influencing prevention, health maintenance, and treatment of illness by individuals, this study was conducted to assess views about self care among the general population living in south of Tehran. Materials and Methods: This survey was cross-sectional study by using of two-stage random cluster sampling, 1200 individuals aged 17 years and over was surveyed regarding self care. A structured closed validated questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were finally analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, Pearson Chi-square, Fisher exact test and linear by linear association. Questionnaire has totally five parts including knowledge, attitude, performance toward self care, views regarding general health and demographic characteristics as well. Furthermore; project number is 4276-62-02-85. Results: The mean age of subjects was 27.9 years (SD = 5.2; 50.2% ( n = 603 were female; 54% ( n = 643 were married (deleted, (55%, n = 658 reported that they were not knowledgeable about self care and (82%, n = 986 were interested in self care. Only 4% ( n = 53 of subjects indicated they drank ≥ 7 glasses of water daily; fewer reported they consumed at least five portions of fruits/vegetables daily (3%, n = 31; and (4%, n = 51 engaged in physical activity more than 3 h weekly. There were statistically significant relationships between knowledge and interest ( P < 0.01, knowledge and practice ( P < 0.001, and interest and practice regarding self care ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: The vast majority of subjects approximately two third felt satisfied with their health, most of subjects reported "feeling healthy" despite engaging in unhealthy life styles, it is revealed that more educated people, and likely those with more income, were interested in and knowledgeable regarding self care and were actually

  2. Anaesthesia care for emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding. A nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Patricia; Haahr Raunkjær, Camilla; Møller, Morten Hylander;

    2016-01-01

    describe the prevalence and inter-hospital variation of anaesthesia care in Denmark and identify clinical predictors for choosing anaesthesia care. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This population-based cohort study included all emergency EGDs for PUB in adults during 2012-2013. About 90-day all-cause mortality after...... of the endoscopist. Some 16.7% of the patients undergoing EGD with anaesthesia care died within 90 days after the procedure, compared to 9.8% of the patients who had no anaesthesia care, adjusted OR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.25-1.83). Comparing the two hospitals with the most frequent (98.6% of al EGDs) and least frequent...... EGD was estimated by crude and adjusted logistic regression. Clinical predictors of anaesthesia care were identified in another logistic regression model. RESULTS: Some 3.056 EGDs performed at 21 hospitals were included; 2074 (68%) received anaesthesia care and 982 (32%) were managed under supervison...

  3. Antibiotic prescribing patterns in out-of-hours primary care: A population-based descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, L.; Moth, G.; Christensen, M.B.; Vedsted, P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To describe the frequency and characteristics of antibiotic prescribing for different types of contacts with the Danish out-of-hours (OOH) primary care service. Design. Population-based observational registry study using routine registry data from the OOH registration system on p

  4. Intensive care outcomes in bone marrow transplant recipients: a population-based cohort analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Scales, Damon C.; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Kiss, Alexander; Sibbald, William J; Donald A Redelmeier

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Intensive care unit (ICU) admission for bone marrow transplant recipients immediately following transplantation is an ominous event, yet the survival of these patients with subsequent ICU admissions is unknown. Our objective was to determine the long-term outcome of bone marrow transplant recipients admitted to an ICU during subsequent hospitalizations. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort analysis of all adult bone marrow transplant recipients who received subsequent I...

  5. Improving Population Health by Incorporating Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Into Value-Based Care Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ruth; Rushing, Jill; Nelson, Sharon; Rhyne, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Today's health system transformation provides a prime opportunity to leverage the capacity of public health to reduce the burden of chronic disease and injury, improve population health, and contain health care costs. Health care settings and organizations should support public health capacity as a key investment in population health. PMID:27422946

  6. Socioeconomic inequalities in health care utilisation in Norway: the population-based HUNT3 survey

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    Vikum Eirik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we investigated the distribution of self-reported health care utilisation by education and household income in a county population in Norway, in a universal public health care system based on ideals of equal access for all according to need, and not according to wealth. Methods The study included 24,147 women and 20,608 men aged 20 years and above in the third Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT 3 of 2006–2008. Income-related horizontal inequity was estimated through concentration indexes, and inequity by both education and income was estimated as risk ratios through conventional regression. Results We found no overall pro-rich or pro-educated socioeconomic gradient in needs-adjusted utilisation of general practitioner or inpatient care. However, we found overall pro-rich and pro-educated inequity in utilisation of both private medical specialists and hospital outpatient care. For these services there were large differences in levels of inequity between younger and older men and women. Conclusion In contrast with recent studies from Norway, we found pro-rich and pro-educated social inequalities in utilisation of hospital outpatient services and not only private medical specialists. Utilisation of general practitioner and inpatient services, which have low access threshold or are free of charge, we found to be equitable.

  7. Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team (PREDICT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter; Shirtcliff, R. Michael; Bailit, Howard L.; Huebner, Colleen E; Conrad, Douglas; Ludwig, Sharity; Mitchell, Melissa; Dysert, Jeanne; Allen, Gary; Scott, JoAnna; Mancl, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve the oral health of low-income children, innovations in dental delivery systems are needed, including community-based care, the use of expanded duty auxiliary dental personnel, capitation payments, and global budgets. This paper describes the protocol for PREDICT (Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team), an evaluation project to test the effectiveness of new delivery and payment systems for improving dental care and oral health. Me...

  8. Web-based screening for diabetic retinopathy in a primary care population: The EyeCheck Project

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    Abramoff, M.D.; Suttorp-Schulten, M.S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ATA category 2 Web-based screening for diabetic retinopathy in a primary care population in the Netherlands. A total of 1,676 patients in a primary care setting, with diabetes, without known diabetic retinopathy, and without previous scr

  9. Did changing primary care delivery models change performance? A population based study using health administrative data

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    Klein-Geltink Julie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care reform in Ontario, Canada started with the introduction of new enrollment models, the two largest of which are Family Health Networks (FHNs, a capitation-based model, and Family Health Groups (FHGs, a blended fee-for-service model. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in performance between FHNs and FHGs and to compare performance before and after physicians joined these new primary care groups. Methods This study used Ontario administrative claims data to compare performance measures in FHGs and FHNs. The study population included physicians who belonged to a FHN or FHG for at least two years. Patients were included in the analyses if they enrolled with a physician in the two years after the physician joined a FHN or FHG, and also if they saw the physician in a two year period prior to the physician joining a FHN or FHG. Performance was derived from the administrative data, and included measures of preventive screening for cancer (breast, cervical, colorectal and chronic disease management (diabetes, heart failure, asthma. Results Performance measures did not vary consistently between models. In some cases, performance approached current benchmarks (Pap smears, mammograms. In other cases it was improving in relation to previous measures (colorectal cancer screening. There were no changes in screening for cervical cancer or breast cancer after joining either a FHN or FHG. Colorectal cancer screening increased in both FHNs and FHGs. After enrolling in either a FHG or a FHN, prescribing performance measures for diabetes care improved. However, annual eye examinations decreased for younger people with diabetes after joining a FHG or FHN. There were no changes in performance measures for heart failure management or asthma care after enrolling in either a FHG or FHN. Conclusions Some improvements in preventive screening and diabetes management which were seen amongst people after they enrolled may be

  10. Variations of care quality for infectious pulmonary tuberculosis in Taiwan: a population based cohort study

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    Chang Ray-E

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective and efficient care is required to prevent the spread of infectious pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB. We attempted to compare care quality among different healthcare institutions in Southern Taiwan. Methods This study conducted population-based retrospective cohort design. One tuberculosis sanatorium, 2 medical centers, 11 regional hospitals, and 15 district hospitals and primary practitioners in the study area had reported tuberculosis cases, registered from January 1 to June 30 2003. Those cases with sputum positive PTB were followed 15 months after anti-tuberculosis treatment initiation. Meanwhile, Level of conformance with diagnostic guidelines, efficiency of diagnostic and treatment process, and treatment were measured as main outcome. Association was investigated using Chi-square tests, Kruskal Wallis tests, Mann-Whiteney U tests, and multiple logistic regression analysis to evaluate outcome differences among different levels of institutions. Results The analyses included 421 patients. In comparison with patients receiving treatment at medical centers, regional hospitals, and district hospitals/primary practitioners, patients at the Chest Specialty Hospital were more likely to provide at least three sputum specimens (74.1% vs. 48.2%, 36.8%, and 50.0%, shorter workdays examining sputum smears (2.4 ± 2.4 days vs. 2.6 ± 2.1, 4.5 ± 3.1, and 3.5 ± 2.6 days, shorter interval between the first consultation and treatment (10.1 ± 18.3 days vs. 31.0 ± 53.6, 31.2 ± 70.4, and 25.4 ± 37.6 days, and a higher successful treatment rate (92.6% vs. 65.2%, 63.9%, and 68.0%. Furthermore, after adjusting age and gender, the patients treated by the pulmonologists and treated at Chest Specialty Hospital had significantly more successful treatment rate, of which odds ratios were 1.74 and 4.58 respectively. Conclusion Differences in care quality exist among different types of healthcare institutions and among individual physicians

  11. Mental illness related disparities in diabetes prevalence, quality of care and outcomes: a population-based longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Emery Jonathan D; Sanfilippo Frank M; Holman C D'Arcy J; Mai Qun; Preen David B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Health care disparity is a public health challenge. We compared the prevalence of diabetes, quality of care and outcomes between mental health clients (MHCs) and non-MHCs. Methods This was a population-based longitudinal study of 139,208 MHCs and 294,180 matched non-MHCs in Western Australia (WA) from 1990 to 2006, using linked data of mental health registry, electoral roll registrations, hospital admissions, emergency department attendances, deaths, and Medicare and pharm...

  12. Estimating leptospirosis incidence using hospital-based surveillance and a population-based health care utilization survey in Tanzania.

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    Holly M Biggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The incidence of leptospirosis, a neglected zoonotic disease, is uncertain in Tanzania and much of sub-Saharan Africa, resulting in scarce data on which to prioritize resources for public health interventions and disease control. In this study, we estimate the incidence of leptospirosis in two districts in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based household health care utilization survey in two districts in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania and identified leptospirosis cases at two hospital-based fever sentinel surveillance sites in the Kilimanjaro Region. We used multipliers derived from the health care utilization survey and case numbers from hospital-based surveillance to calculate the incidence of leptospirosis. A total of 810 households were enrolled in the health care utilization survey and multipliers were derived based on responses to questions about health care seeking in the event of febrile illness. Of patients enrolled in fever surveillance over a 1 year period and residing in the 2 districts, 42 (7.14% of 588 met the case definition for confirmed or probable leptospirosis. After applying multipliers to account for hospital selection, test sensitivity, and study enrollment, we estimated the overall incidence of leptospirosis ranges from 75-102 cases per 100,000 persons annually. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We calculated a high incidence of leptospirosis in two districts in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania, where leptospirosis incidence was previously unknown. Multiplier methods, such as used in this study, may be a feasible method of improving availability of incidence estimates for neglected diseases, such as leptospirosis, in resource constrained settings.

  13. Population-based analysis of health care contacts among suicide decedents: identifying opportunities for more targeted suicide prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Ayal; Sinyor, Mark; Kurdyak, Paul; Vigod, Simone; Sareen, Jitender; Reis, Catherine; Green, Diane; Bolton, James; Rhodes, Anne; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Cairney, John; Cheung, Amy

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to detail the nature and correlates of mental health and non-mental health care contacts prior to suicide death. We conducted a systematic extraction of data from records at the Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario of each person who died by suicide in the city of Toronto from 1998 to 2011. Data on 2,835 suicide deaths were linked with provincial health administrative data to identify health care contacts during the 12 months prior to suicide. Sub-populations of suicide decedents based on the presence and type of mental health care contact were described and compared across socio-demographic, clinical and suicide-specific variables. Time periods from last mental health contact to date of death were calculated and a Cox proportional hazards model examined covariates. Among suicide decedents, 91.7% had some type of past-year health care contact prior to death, 66.4% had a mental health care contact, and 25.3% had only non-mental health contacts. The most common type of mental health contact was an outpatient primary care visit (54.0%), followed by an outpatient psychiatric visit (39.8%), an emergency department visit (31.1%), and a psychiatric hospitalization (21.0%). The median time from last mental health contact to death was 18 days (interquartile range 5-63). Mental health contact was significantly associated with female gender, age 25-64, absence of a psychosocial stressor, diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, past suicide attempt, self-poisoning method and absence of a suicide note. Significant differences between sub-populations of suicide decedents based on the presence and nature of their health care contacts suggest the need for targeting of community and clinical-based suicide prevention strategies. The predominance of ambulatory mental health care contacts, often close to the time of death, reinforce the importance of concentrating efforts on embedding risk assessment and care pathways into all routine primary

  14. Access to primary care and visits to emergency departments in England: a cross-sectional, population-based study.

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    Thomas E Cowling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs in England has increased by 20% since 2007-08, placing unsustainable pressure on the National Health Service (NHS. Some patients attend EDs because they are unable to access primary care services. This study examined the association between access to primary care and ED visits in England. METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based analysis of patients registered with 7,856 general practices in England was conducted, for the time period April 2010 to March 2011. The outcome measure was the number of self-referred discharged ED visits by the registered population of a general practice. The predictor variables were measures of patient-reported access to general practice services; these were entered into a negative binomial regression model with variables to control for the characteristics of patient populations, supply of general practitioners and travel times to health services. MAIN RESULT AND CONCLUSION: General practices providing more timely access to primary care had fewer self-referred discharged ED visits per registered patient (for the most accessible quintile of practices, RR = 0.898; P<0.001. Policy makers should consider improving timely access to primary care when developing plans to reduce ED utilisation.

  15. Constructing episodes of inpatient care: data infrastructure for population-based research

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    Fransoo Randy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Databases used to study the care of patients in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs typically contain a separate entry for each segment of hospital or ICU care. However, it is not uncommon for patients to be transferred between hospitals and/or ICUs, and when transfers occur it is necessary to combine individual entries to accurately reconstruct the complete episodes of hospital and ICU care. Failure to do so can lead to erroneous lengths-of-stay, and rates of admissions, readmissions, and death. Methods This study used a clinical ICU database and administrative hospital abstracts for the adult population of Manitoba, Canada from 2000–2008. We compared five methods for identifying patient transfers and constructing hospital episodes, and the ICU episodes contained within them. Method 1 ignored transfers. Methods 2–5 considered the time gap between successive entries (≤1 day vs. ≤2 days, with or without use of data fields indicating inter-hospital transfer. For the five methods we compared the resulting number and lengths of hospital and ICU episodes. Results During the study period, 48,551 hospital abstracts contained 53,246 ICU records. For Method 1 these were also the number of hospital and ICU episodes, respectively. Methods 2–5 gave remarkably similar results, with transfers included in approximately 25% of ICU-containing hospital episodes, and 10% of ICU episodes. Comparison with Method 1 showed that failure to account for such transfers resulted in overestimating the number of episodes by 7-10%, and underestimating mean or median lengths-of-stay by 9-30%. Conclusions In Manitoba is it not uncommon for critically ill patients to be transferred between hospitals and between ICUs. Failure to account for transfers resulted in inaccurate assessment of parameters relevant to researchers, clinicians, and policy-makers. The details of the method used to identify transfers, at least among the variations tested

  16. Common Infections in Patients Prescribed Systemic Glucocorticoids in Primary Care: A Population-Based Cohort Study

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    Fardet, Laurence; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the relative risk of common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections in the general population of individuals exposed to systemic glucocorticoids, or about the impact of glucocorticoid exposure duration and predisposing factors on this risk. Methods and Findings The hazard ratios of various common infections were assessed in 275,072 adults prescribed glucocorticoids orally for ≥15 d (women: 57.8%, median age: 63 [interquartile range 48–73] y) in comparison to those not prescribed glucocorticoids. For each infection, incidence rate ratios were calculated for five durations of exposure (ranging from 15–30 d to >12 mo), and risk factors were assessed. Data were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database. When compared to those with the same underlying disease but not exposed to glucocorticoids, the adjusted hazard ratios for infections with significantly higher risk in the glucocorticoid-exposed population ranged from 2.01 (95% CI 1.83–2.19; p < 0.001) for cutaneous cellulitis to 5.84 (95% CI 5.61–6.08; p < 0.001) for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). There was no difference in the risk of scabies, dermatophytosis and varicella. The relative increase in risk was stable over the durations of exposure, except for LRTI and local candidiasis, for which it was much higher during the first weeks of exposure. The risks of infection increased with age and were higher in those with diabetes, in those prescribed higher glucocorticoid doses, and in those with lower plasma albumin level. Most associations were also dependent on the underlying disease. A sensitivity analysis conducted on all individuals except those with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produced similar results. Another sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of potential unmeasured confounders such as disease severity or concomitant prescription of chemotherapy suggested that it was unlikely that

  17. Maternal Pregnancy Intention and Professional Antenatal Care Utilization in Bangladesh: A Nationwide Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mosfequr; Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Tareque, Md. Ismail; Ferdos, Jannatul; Jesmin, Syeda S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between maternal pregnancy intention and professional antenatal and delivery care utilization. Methods Our data were derived from the 2011 nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey. We included antenatal and delivery care utilization data of the most recent live births for women for the previous three years (n = 4672). We used multilevel logistic regression models to assess the relationship between pregnancy intention and use of professional antenatal and delivery care, with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Results Approximately 13% and 16% of children were reported by their mothers as unwanted and mistimed at the time of conception, respectively. Among the women, 55% received at least one professional antenatal care service; 21% received four or more professional antenatal services, while 32% were attended by professionals during deliveries. Mothers of children whose pregnancies had been unwanted had a greater risk for not seeking professional antenatal and professional delivery care than those whose pregnancies had been wanted [1≥ ANC from professionals: AOR: 0.66; 95% CI:0.51–0.93; 4≥ ANC from professionals: AOR:0.56; 95% CI:0.37–0.84; and delivery care from professionals: AOR: 0.70; 95% CI:0.50–0.97]. Women who were married after age 18, had secondary or higher level of education, and were from the wealthiest households were more likely to utilize antenatal and delivery care. Conclusion Unwanted pregnancy is significantly associated with lower utilization of professional antenatal and delivery care services in Bangladesh. Reducing unwanted births and promoting access to professional antenatal and delivery care are crucial for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 3 in Bangladesh. PMID:27309727

  18. Clinical informatics to improve quality of care: a population-based system for patients with diabetes mellitus

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    Rajeev Chaudhry

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions A clinical informatics system, used to deliver proactive, co-ordinated care to a population of patients with diabetes mellitus, can improve process and also quality outcome measures. Larger studies are needed to confirm these early findings.

  19. Association of antenatal care with facility delivery and perinatal survival – a population-based study in Bangladesh

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    Pervin Jesmin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antenatal Care (ANC during pregnancy can play an important role in the uptake of evidence-based services vital to the health of women and their infants. Studies report positive effects of ANC on use of facility-based delivery and perinatal mortality. However, most existing studies are limited to cross-sectional surveys with long recall periods, and generally do not include population-based samples. Methods This study was conducted within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b in Matlab, Bangladesh. The HDSS area is divided into an icddr,b service area (SA where women and children receive care from icddr,b health facilities, and a government SA where people receive care from government facilities. In 2007, a new Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health (MNCH program was initiated in the icddr,b SA that strengthened the ongoing maternal and child health services including ANC. We estimated the association of ANC with facility delivery and perinatal mortality using prospectively collected data from 2005 to 2009. Using a before-after study design, we also determined the role of ANC services on reduction of perinatal mortality between the periods before (2005 – 2006 and after (2008–2009 implementation of the MNCH program. Results Antenatal care visits were associated with increased facility-based delivery in the icddr,b and government SAs. In the icddr,b SA, the adjusted odds of perinatal mortality was about 2-times higher (odds ratio (OR 1.91; 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.50, 2.42 among women who received ≤1 ANC compared to women who received ≥3 ANC visits. No such association was observed in the government SA. Controlling for ANC visits substantially reduced the observed effect of the intervention on perinatal mortality (OR 0.64; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.78 to non-significance (OR 0.81; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.01, when comparing cohorts before

  20. Income level and chronic ambulatory care sensitive conditions in adults: a multicity population-based study in Italy

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    Forastiere Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relationship between quality of primary health care and preventable hospitalizations has been described in the US, especially among the elderly. In Europe, there has been a recent increase in the evaluation of Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC as an indicator of health care quality, but evidence is still limited. The aim of this study was to determine whether income level is associated with higher hospitalization rates for ACSC in adults in a country with universal health care coverage. Methods From the hospital registries in four Italian cities (Turin, Milan, Bologna, Rome, we identified 9384 hospital admissions for six chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma among 20-64 year-olds in 2000. Case definition was based on the ICD-9-CM coding algorithm suggested by the Agency for Health Research and Quality - Prevention Quality Indicators. An area-based (census block income index was used for each individual. All hospitalization rates were directly standardised for gender and age using the Italian population. Poisson regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between income level (quintiles and hospitalization rates (RR, 95% CI separately for the selected conditions controlling for age, gender and city of residence. Results Overall, the ACSC age-standardized rate was 26.1 per 10.000 inhabitants. All conditions showed a statistically significant socioeconomic gradient, with low income people being more likely to be hospitalized than their well off counterparts. The association was particularly strong for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (level V low income vs. level I high income RR = 4.23 95%CI 3.37-5.31 and for congestive heart failure (RR = 3.78, 95% CI = 3.09-4.62. With the exception of asthma, males were more vulnerable to ACSC hospitalizations than females. The risks were higher among 45-64 year

  1. Mental illness related disparities in diabetes prevalence, quality of care and outcomes: a population-based longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emery Jonathan D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care disparity is a public health challenge. We compared the prevalence of diabetes, quality of care and outcomes between mental health clients (MHCs and non-MHCs. Methods This was a population-based longitudinal study of 139,208 MHCs and 294,180 matched non-MHCs in Western Australia (WA from 1990 to 2006, using linked data of mental health registry, electoral roll registrations, hospital admissions, emergency department attendances, deaths, and Medicare and pharmaceutical benefits claims. Diabetes was identified from hospital diagnoses, prescriptions and diabetes-specific primary care claims (17,045 MHCs, 26,626 non-MHCs. Both univariate and multivariate analyses adjusted for socio-demographic factors and case mix were performed to compare the outcome measures among MHCs, category of mental disorders and non-MHCs. Results The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in MHCs than in non-MHCs (crude age-sex-standardised point-prevalence of diabetes on 30 June 2006 in those aged ≥20 years, 9.3% vs 6.1%, respectively, P 1c, microalbuminuria, blood lipids was suboptimal in both groups, but was lower in MHCs (for all tests combined; adjusted OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.85, at one year; and adjusted rate ratio (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.88, during the study period. MHCs also had increased risks of hospitalisation for diabetes complications (adjusted RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.24, diabetes-related mortality (1.43, 1.35 to 1.52 and all-cause mortality (1.47, 1.42 to 1.53. The disparities were most marked for alcohol/drug disorders, schizophrenia, affective disorders, other psychoses and personality disorders. Conclusions MHCs warrant special attention for primary and secondary prevention of diabetes, especially at the primary care level.

  2. Quality of care indicators and their related outcomes: A population-based study in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We describe variations across the regional cancer centres in Ontario, Canada for five prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) quality indicators: incomplete pre-treatment assessment, follow-up care, leg immobilization, bladder filling, and portal film target localization. Along with cancer centre volume, we examined each indicator’s association with relevant outcomes: long-term cause-specific survival, urinary incontinence, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary late morbidities. Materials and methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of 924 prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 1998 who received RT within 9 months of diagnosis. Data sources included treating charts and registry and administrative data. The associations between indicators and outcomes were analysed using regression techniques to control for potential confounders. Results: Practice patterns varied across the regional cancer centres for all indicators (p < 0.0001). Incomplete pre-treatment assessment was associated with worse cause-specific survival although this result was not significant when adjusted for confounding (adjusted RR = 1.78, 95% CI = 0.79–3.98). Treatment without leg immobilization (adjusted RR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.16–2.56) and with an empty bladder (adjusted RR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.08–3.63) was associated with genitourinary late morbidities. Treatment without leg immobilization was also associated with urinary incontinence (adjusted RR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.23–3.87). Conclusions: We documented wide variations in practice patterns. We demonstrated that measures of quality of care can be shown to be associated with clinically relevant outcomes in a population-based sample of prostate cancer patients

  3. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, psychosocial co-morbidity and health care seeking in general practice: population based case control study

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    Schellevis François G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of upper gastrointestinal (GI symptoms is still poorly understood. Psychological symptoms were found to be more common in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, but it is debated whether they are primarily linked to GI symptoms or rather represent motivations for health-care seeking. Purpose of our study was to compare co-morbidity, in particular psychological and social problems, between patients with and without upper GI symptoms. In addition, we investigated whether the prevalence of psychological and social problems is part of a broader pattern of illness related health care use. Methods Population based case control study based on the second Dutch National Survey of general practice (conducted in 2001. Cases (adults visiting their primary care physician (PCP with upper GI symptoms and controls (individuals not having any of these complaints, matched for gender, age, PCP-practice and ethnicity were compared. Main outcome measures were contact frequency, prevalence of somatic as well as psychosocial diagnoses, prescription rate of (psychopharmacological agents, and referral rates. Data were analyzed using odds ratios, the Chi square test as well as multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Data from 13,389 patients with upper GI symptoms and 13,389 control patients were analyzed. Patients with upper GI symptoms visited their PCP twice as frequently as controls (8.6 vs 4.4 times/year. Patients with upper GI symptoms presented not only more psychological and social problems, but also more other health problems to their PCP (odds ratios (ORs ranging from 1.37 to 3.45. Patients with upper GI symptoms more frequently used drugs of any ATC-class (ORs ranging from 1.39 to 2.90, including psychotropic agents. The observed differences were less pronounced when we adjusted for non-attending control patients. In multivariate regression analysis, contact frequency and not psychological or

  4. Hospital care for children and young adults in the last year of life: a population-based study

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    DiGiuseppe David L

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To help design population-based pediatric palliative care services, we sought to describe the hospital care received in the last year of life by children and young adults who died. We also determined the proportion with complex chronic conditions (CCCs and tested whether the use of hospital services increased as the date of death drew nearer. Methods For all deaths occurring under 25 years of age from 1990 to 1996 in Washington State, USA, we linked death certificate information to hospital utilization records and analyzed the timing and duration of hospitalizations and the nature of hospital procedures during the year prior to death. Results Of the 8 893 deaths, 25 % had CCCs. Among infants with CCCs, 84 % were hospitalized at the time of death and 50 % had been mechanically ventilated during their terminal admission. Among the 458 CCC neonates dying under a week of age, 92% of all days of life were spent in the hospital; among the 172 CCC neonates dying during the second to fourth weeks of life, 85 % of all days of life were spent hospitalized; among the 286 CCC infants dying during the second to twelfth month of life, 41 % of all days of life were spent hospitalized. Among children and young adults with CCCs, 55 % were hospitalized at the time of death, and 19 % had been mechanically ventilated during their terminal admission. For these older patients, the median number of days spent in the hospital during the year preceding death was 18, yet less than a third of this group was hospitalized at any point in time until the last week of their lives. The rate of hospital use increased as death drew near. For subjects who had received hospital care, 44 % had governmental insurance as the source of primary payment. Conclusions Infants who died spent a substantial proportion of their lives in hospitals, whereas children and adolescents who died from CCCs predominantly lived outside of the hospital during the last year of life. To

  5. Care practices and traditional beliefs related to neonatal jaundice in northern Vietnam: a population-based, cross-sectional descriptive study

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Loc T; Partridge, John Colin; Tran, Bich H; Le, Vui T; Duong, Tuan K; Nguyen, Ha T.; Newman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Hospital of Pediatrics in Vietnam performed >200 exchange transfusions annually (2006–08), often on infants presenting encephalopathic from lower-level hospitals. As factors delaying care-seeking are not known, we sought to study care practices and traditional beliefs relating to neonatal jaundice in northern Vietnam. Methods We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, population-based, descriptive study from November 2008 through February 2010. We prospectively ident...

  6. Why children with severe bacterial infection die: a population-based study of determinants and consequences of suboptimal care with a special emphasis on methodological issues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Launay

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Suboptimal care is frequent in the management of severe bacterial infection. We aimed to evaluate the consequences of suboptimal care in the early management of severe bacterial infection in children and study the determinants. METHODS: A previously reported population-based confidential enquiry included all children (3 months- 16 years who died of severe bacterial infection in a French area during a 7-year period. Here, we compared the optimality of the management of these cases to that of pediatric patients who survived a severe bacterial infection during the same period for 6 types of care: seeking medical care by parents, evaluation of sepsis signs and detection of severe disease by a physician, timing and dosage of antibiotic therapy, and timing and dosage of saline bolus. Two independent experts blinded to outcome and final diagnosis evaluated the optimality of these care types. The effect of suboptimal care on survival was analyzed by a logistic regression adjusted on confounding factors identified by a causal diagram. Determinants of suboptimal care were analyzed by multivariate multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS: Suboptimal care was significantly more frequent during early management of the 21 children who died as compared with the 93 survivors: 24% vs 13% (p = 0.003. The most frequent suboptimal care types were delay to seek medical care (20%, under-evaluation of severity by the physician (20% and delayed antibiotic therapy (24%. Young age (under 1 year was independently associated with higher risk of suboptimal care, whereas being under the care of a paediatric emergency specialist or a mobile medical unit as compared with a general practitioner was associated with reduced risk. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal care in the early management of severe bacterial infection had a global independent negative effect on survival. Suboptimal care may be avoided by better training of primary care physicians in the specifics of

  7. A Population-Based and Longitudinal Study of Sexual Behavior and Multidrug-Resistant HIV Among Patients in Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozal Michael J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based and longitudinal information regarding sexual risk behavior among patients with multidrug resistant (MDR HIV and their sexual partners is of great public health and clinical importance. Objective To characterize the HIV sexual risk behaviors of patients with and without drug-resistant HIV in the clinical care setting over time. Measurements 393 HIV-positive patients completed questionnaires of self-reported sexual risk behaviors at approximate 6-month intervals extending over 24 months. HIV viral load and genotypic drug resistance obtained during the same time points were matched to the behavioral data. Multidrug resistance was defined as having resistance to 2 or 3 antiretroviral (ARV drug classes. Results In serial cross-sectional analyses, 393 patients (44% female and 79% heterosexual contributed 919 matched behavioral and virologic results over the 24 months of data collection. Of these, 250 patients (64% reported having sex during at least 1 survey period resulting in greater than 10,000 sexual events with more than 1000 partners. Unprotected sexual behavior was reported by 45% of sexually active patients, resulting in 34% of all sex events that exposed 29% of all partners. Of these patients with unprotected sexual events, 31% had HIV drug resistance - 11.6% with resistance to 2 classes of ARVs (2-class, and 1.8% with 3-class ARV resistance at the time of a sexual risk event. Close to 1000 or 28% of all unprotected sexual events involved resistant strains (11% of these with resistance to 2 classes and 0.2% with 3-class resistance, exposing 20% of unprotected sexual partners to resistant HIV (8% to 2-class and 0.6% to 3-class resistance. In longitudinal analysis among the 78 patients who reported a cumulative total of 12 months of sexual history and had resistance testing, 38% reported engaging in unprotected sexual behavior. There was substantial and complex variation in the distribution of unprotected

  8. Population based study of noncardiac chest pain in southern Chinese:Prevalence, psychosocial factors and health care utilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wai Man Wong; Chi Kuen Chan; Annie O.O. Chan; Shiu Kum Lam; Benjamin Chun-Yu Wong; Kwok Fai Lam; Cecilia Cheng; Wai Mo Hui; Harry Hua-Xiang Xia; Kam Chuen Lai; Wayne H.C. Hu; Jia Qing Huang; Cindy L.K. Lam

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Population-based assessment of noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, psychosocial factors and health seeking behaviour of NCCP in southern Chinese.METHODS: A total of 2 209 ethnic Hong Kong Chinese households were recruited to participate in a telephone survey to study the epidemiology of NCCP using the Rose angina questionnaire, a validated gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaire and the hospital anxietydepression scale. NCCP was defined as non-exertional chest pain according to the Rose angina questionnaire and had not been diagnosed as ischaemic heart diseases by a physician.RESULTS: Chest pain over the past year was present in 454 subjects (20.6%, 95% CI 19-22), while NCCP was present in 307 subjects (13.9%, 95% CI 13-15). GERD was present in 51% of subjects with NCCP and 34% had consulted a physician for chest pain. Subjects with NCCP had a significantly higher anxiety (P<0.001) and depression score (P=0.007), and required more days off (P=0.021) than subjects with no chest pain. By multiple logistic regression analysis, female gender (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), presence of GERD (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.6-4.8), and social life being affected by NCCP (OR 6.9, 95% CI 3.3-15.9) were independent factors associated with health seeking behaviour in southern Chinese with NCCP.CONCLUSION: NCCP is a common problem in southern Chinese and associated with anxiety and depression. Female gender, GERD and social life affected by chest pain were associated with health care utilization in subjects with NCCP.

  9. Divorce, divorce rates, and professional care seeking for mental health problems in Europe: a cross-sectional population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symoens Sara AA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about differences in professional care seeking based on marital status. The few existing studies show more professional care seeking among the divorced or separated compared to the married or cohabiting. The aim of this study is to determine whether, in a sample of the European general population, the divorced or separated seek more professional mental health care than the married or cohabiting, regardless of self-reported mental health problems. Furthermore, we examine whether two country-level features--the supply of mental health professionals and the country-level divorce rates--contribute to marital status differences in professional care-seeking behavior. Methods We use data from the Eurobarometer 248 on mental well-being that was collected via telephone interviews. The unweighted sample includes 27,146 respondents (11,728 men and 15,418 women. Poisson hierarchical regression models were estimated to examine whether the divorced or separated have higher professional health care use for emotional or psychological problems, after controlling for mental and somatic health, sociodemographic characteristics, support from family and friends, and degree of urbanization. We also considered country-level divorce rates and indicators of the supply of mental health professionals, and applied design and population weights. Results We find that professional care seeking is strongly need based. Moreover, the divorced or separated consult health professionals for mental health problems more often than people who are married or who cohabit do. In addition, we find that the gap between the divorced or separated and the married or cohabiting is highest in countries with low divorce rates. Conclusions The higher rates of professional care seeking for mental health problems among the divorced or separated only partially correlates with their more severe mental health problems. In countries where marital dissolution is more

  10. Smoking and use of primary care services: findings from a population-based cohort study linked with administrative claims data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Louisa R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available evidence suggests that smokers have a lower propensity than others to use primary care services. But previous studies have incorporated only limited adjustment for confounding and mediating factors such as income, access to services and health status. We used data from a large prospective cohort study (the 45 and Up Study, linked to administrative claims data, to quantify the relationship between smoking status and use of primary care services, including specific preventive services, in a contemporary Australian population. Methods Baseline questionnaire data from the 45 and Up Study were linked to administrative claims (Medicare data for the 12-month period following study entry. The main outcome measures were Medicare benefit claimed for unreferred services, out-of-pocket costs (OOPC paid, and claims for specific preventive services (immunisations, health assessments, chronic disease management services, PSA tests and Pap smears. Rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated using a hierarchical series of models, adjusted for predisposing, access- and health-related factors. Separate hurdle (two part regression models were constructed for Medicare benefit and OOPC. Poisson models with robust error variance were used to model use of each specific preventive service. Results Participants included 254,382 people aged 45 years and over of whom 7.3% were current smokers. After adjustment for predisposing, access- and health-related factors, current smokers were very slightly less likely to have claimed Medicare benefit than never smokers. Among those who claimed benefit, current smokers claimed similar total benefit, but recent quitters claimed significantly greater benefit, compared to never-smokers. Current smokers were around 10% less likely than never smokers to have paid any OOPC. Current smokers were 15-20% less likely than never smokers to use immunisations, Pap smears and prostate specific antigen

  11. Access to Adequate Outpatient Depression Care for Mothers in the US: A Nationally Representative Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Whitney P.; Keller, Abiola; Gottlieb, Carissa; Litzelman, Kristin; Hampton, John; Maguire, Jonathan; Hagen, Erika W.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal depression is often untreated, resulting in serious consequences for mothers and their children. Factors associated with receipt of adequate treatment for depression were examined in a population-based sample of 2,130 mothers in the USA with depression using data from the 1996-2005 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Chi-squared analyses were used to evaluate differences in sociodemographic and health characteristics by maternal depression treatment status (none, some, adequate). Multi...

  12. Stressful life events, social health issues and low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort: challenges and opportunities in antenatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Georgina A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investment in strategies to promote 'a healthy start to life' has been identified as having the greatest potential to reduce health inequalities across the life course. The aim of this study was to examine social determinants of low birthweight in an Australian population-based birth cohort and consider implications for health policy and health care systems. Methods Population-based survey distributed by hospitals and home birth practitioners to >8000 women six months after childbirth in two states of Australia. Participants were women who gave birth to a liveborn infant in Victoria and South Australia in September/October 2007. Main outcome measures included stressful life events and social health issues, perceived discrimination in health care settings, infant birthweight. Results 4,366/8468 (52% of eligible women returned completed surveys. Two-thirds (2912/4352 reported one or more stressful life events or social health issues during pregnancy. Women reporting three or more social health issues (18%, 768/4352 were significantly more likely to have a low birthweight infant ( Conclusions There is a window of opportunity in antenatal care to implement targeted preventive interventions addressing potentially modifiable risk factors for poor maternal and infant outcomes. Developing the evidence base and infrastructure necessary in order for antenatal services to respond effectively to the social circumstances of women's lives is long overdue.

  13. IMPaCT Back study protocol. Implementation of subgrouping for targeted treatment systems for low back pain patients in primary care: a prospective population-based sequential comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Nadine E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic assessment tools to identify subgroups of patients at risk of persistent low back pain who may benefit from targeted treatments have been developed and validated in primary care. The IMPaCT Back study is investigating the effects of introducing and supporting a subgrouping for targeted treatment system in primary care. Methods/Design A prospective, population-based, quality improvement study in one Primary Care Trust in England with a before and after design. Phases 1 and 3 collect data on current practice, attitudes and behaviour of health care practitioners, patients' outcomes and health care costs. Phase 2 introduces and supports the subgrouping for targeted treatment system, via a multi-component, quality improvement intervention that includes educational courses and outreach visits led by opinion leaders, audit/feedback, mentoring and organisational support to embed the subgrouping tools within IT and clinical management systems. We aim to recruit 1000 low back pain patients aged 18 years and over consulting 7 GP practices within one Primary Care Trust in England, UK. The study includes GPs in participating practices and physiotherapists in associated services. The primary objective is to determine the effect of the subgrouping for targeted treatment system on back pain related disability and catastrophising at 2 and 6 months, comparing data from phase 1 with phase 3. Key secondary objectives are to determine the impact on: a GPs' and physiotherapists' attitudes and behaviour regarding low back pain; b The process of care that patients receive; c The cost-effectiveness and sustainability of the new clinical system. Discussion This paper details the rationale, design, methods, planned analysis and operational aspects of the IMPaCT Back study. We aim to determine whether the new subgrouping for targeted treatment system is implemented and sustained in primary care, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision

  14. Measuring frailty in population-based healthcare databases: multi-dimensional prognostic indices for the improvement of geriatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Sultana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The prognostic evaluation of geriatric patients is critical in helping clinicians to weigh the risks versus the benefits of available therapeutic options. Frailty contributes significantly to the risk of mortality in older patients and is already known to have implications on the outcome of treatment in a clinical context. The multi-dimensional prognostic index (MPI is a prognostic tool based on a comprehensive geriatric assessment and includes detailed information on patient cognition, functionality, disease and drug burden. The value of the MPI in predicting mortality has already been shown in hospital and community settings but never in a population- based healthcare database setting. One of the aims of the ongoing EU-funded MPI_Age project is to improve our understanding of how geriatric frailty data can be identified in healthcare databases and whether this can be used to predict serious adverse events associated with pharmacotherapy. Our findings suggest that data on functionality in elderly patients is poorly registered in The Health Improvement Network (THIN, a UK nationwide general practice database, and only few of the functionality domains could be used in a population-based analysis. The most commonly registered functionality information was related to mobility, dressing, accommodation and cognition. Our results suggest that some of these functionality domains are predictive of short- and long-term mortality in community-dwelling patients. This may have implications in observational research where frailty is an unmeasured confounder.

  15. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-01-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative.

  16. The association between continuity of care in the community and health outcomes: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreiher Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study goal was to assess indices of continuity of care in the primary care setting and their association with health outcomes and healthcare services utilization, given the reported importance of continuity regarding quality of care and healthcare utilization. Methods The study included a random sample of enrollees from Clalit Health Services 19 years-of-age or older who visited their primary care clinic at least three times in 2009. Indices of continuity of care were computed, including the Usual Provider Index (UPC, Modified Modified Continuity Index (MMCI, Continuity of Care Index (COC, and Sequential Continuity (SECON. Quality measures of preventive medicine and healthcare services utilization and their costs were assessed as outcomes. Results 1,713 randomly sampled patients were included in the study (mean age: 48.9 ± 19.2, 42% males. Continuity of care indices were: UPC: 0.75; MMCI: 0.81; COC: 0.67; SECON: 0.70. After controlling for patient characteristics in a multivariate analysis, a statistically significant association was found between higher values of UPC, COC, and SECON and a decrease in the number and cost of ED visits. Higher MMCI values were associated with a greater number and higher costs of medical consultation visits. Continuity of care indices were associated with BMI measurements, and inversely associated with blood pressure measurements. No association was found with other quality indicators, e.g., screening tests for cancer. Conclusions Several continuity of care indices were associated with decreased number and costs of ED visits. There were both positive and negative associations of continuity of care indices with different aspects of healthcare utilization. The relatively small effects of continuity might be due to the consistently high levels of continuity in Clalit Health Services.

  17. Big Data, Big Research: Implementing Population Health-Based Research Models and Integrating Care to Reduce Cost and Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Patton, Jason; Sayeed, Zain; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    Recent trends in clinical research have moved attention toward reporting clinical outcomes and resource consumption associated with various care processes. This change is the result of technological advancement and a national effort to critically assess health care delivery. As orthopedic surgeons traverse an unchartered health care environment, a more complete understanding of how clinical research is conducted using large data sets is necessary. The purpose of this article is to review various advantages and disadvantages of large data sets available for orthopaedic use, examine their ideal use, and report how they are being implemented nationwide. PMID:27637658

  18. Big Data, Big Research: Implementing Population Health-Based Research Models and Integrating Care to Reduce Cost and Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Patton, Jason; Sayeed, Zain; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    Recent trends in clinical research have moved attention toward reporting clinical outcomes and resource consumption associated with various care processes. This change is the result of technological advancement and a national effort to critically assess health care delivery. As orthopedic surgeons traverse an unchartered health care environment, a more complete understanding of how clinical research is conducted using large data sets is necessary. The purpose of this article is to review various advantages and disadvantages of large data sets available for orthopaedic use, examine their ideal use, and report how they are being implemented nationwide.

  19. Smoking and use of primary care services: findings from a population-based cohort study linked with administrative claims data

    OpenAIRE

    Jorm Louisa R; Shepherd Leah C; Rogers Kris D; Blyth Fiona M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Available evidence suggests that smokers have a lower propensity than others to use primary care services. But previous studies have incorporated only limited adjustment for confounding and mediating factors such as income, access to services and health status. We used data from a large prospective cohort study (the 45 and Up Study), linked to administrative claims data, to quantify the relationship between smoking status and use of primary care services, including specifi...

  20. [Vulnerable populations and access to care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Christine; Michard-Lenoir, Anne-Pascale; Allemand, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Precariousness is a very complex concept that brings together a diverse and fragmented population. The interest in comparing views and opinions is clear for understanding of this phenomenon. A physician in the paediatric emergency unit of a hospital and the head of a "Medecins du Monde" branch evoke the different faces of precariousness. A difficult and sometimes poignant reality, which health care providers must try to cope with. PMID:23074804

  1. Disability and Hospital Care Expenses among National Health Insurance Beneficiaries: Analyses of Population-Based Data in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lin, Fu-Gong; Lin, Pei-Ying; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    Nationwide data were collected concerning inpatient care use and medical expenditure of people with disabilities (N = 937,944) among national health insurance beneficiaries in Taiwan. Data included gender, age, hospitalization frequency and expenditure, healthcare setting and service department, discharge diagnose disease according to the ICD-9-CM…

  2. Out-of-hours primary care - a population-based study of the diagnostic scope of telephone contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth, Grete; Huibers, Linda; Christensen, Morten Bondo;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GPs answer all patient calls to the out-of-hours primary care (OOH-PC) services in Denmark. Knowledge is scarce on how the triage-GPs act on the specific reasons for encounter (RFE). OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the RFEs, the applied diagnoses and the severity of health prob...

  3. Acculturation and use of health care services by Turkish and Moroccan migrants: a cross-sectional population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesselink Arlette E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is insufficient empirical evidence which shows if and how there is an interrelation between acculturation and health care utilisation. The present study seeks to establish this evidence within first generation Turkish and Moroccan migrants, two of the largest migrant groups in present-day Western Europe. Methods Data were derived from the Amsterdam Health Monitor 2004, and were complete for 358 Turkish and 288 Moroccan foreign-born migrants. Use of health services (general practitioner, outpatient specialist and health care for mental health problems was measured by means of self-report. Acculturation was measured by a structured questionnaire grading (i ethnic self-identification, (ii social interaction with ethnic Dutch, (iii communication in Dutch within one's private social network, (iv emancipation, and (v cultural orientation towards the public domain. Results Acculturation was hardly associated with the use of general practitioner care. However, in case of higher adaptation to the host culture there was less uptake of outpatient specialist care among Turkish respondents (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82-0.99 and Moroccan male respondents (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.71-0.93. Conversely, there was a higher uptake of mental health care among Turkish men (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.71-0.93 and women (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.71-0.93. Uptake of mental health care among Moroccan respondents again appeared lower (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.55-0.99. Language ability appeared to play a central role in the uptake of health care. Conclusion Some results were in accordance with the popular view that an increased participation in the host society is concomitant to an increased use of health services. However, there was heterogeneity across ethnic and gender groups, and across the domains of acculturation. Language ability appeared to play a central role. Further research needs to explore this heterogeneity into more

  4. Quality of Diabetes Care in Germany Improved from 2000 to 2007 to 2014, but Improvements Diminished since 2007. Evidence from the Population-Based KORA Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Gabriella; Schunk, Michaela; Meisinger, Christa; Huth, Cornelia; Holle, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the development of the quality of diabetes care in Germany. The aim of this study is to analyze time trends in patient self-management, physician-delivered care, medication, risk factor control, complications and quality of life from 2000 to 2014. Methods Analyses are based on data from individuals with type 2 diabetes of the population-based KORA S4 (1999–2001, n = 150), F4 (2006–2008, n = 203), FF4 (2013/14, n = 212) cohort study. Information on patient self-management, physician-delivered care, medication, risk factor control and quality of life were assessed in standardized questionnaires and examinations. The 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk was calculated using the UKPDS risk engine. Time trends were analyzed using multivariable linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, education, diabetes duration, and history of cardiovascular disease. Results From 2000 to 2014 the proportion of participants with type 2 diabetes receiving oral antidiabetic/cardio-protective medication and of those reaching treatment goals for glycemic control (HbA1c<7%, 60% to 71%, p = 0.09), blood pressure (<140/80 mmHg, 25% to 69%, p<0.001) and LDL cholesterol (<2.6 mmol/l, 13% to 27%, p<0.001) increased significantly. However, improvements were generally smaller from 2007 to 2014 than from 2000 to 2007. Modeled 10-year CHD risk decreased from 30% in 2000 to 24% in 2007 to 19% in 2014 (p<0.01). From 2007 to 2014, the prevalence of microvascular complications decreased and quality of life increased, but no improvements were observed for the majority of indicators of self-management. Conclusion Despite improvements, medication and risk factor control has remained suboptimal. The flattening of improvements and deteriorations in quality of (self-) care since 2007 indicate that more effort is needed to improve quality of care and patient self-management. Due to selection or lead time bias an overestimation of quality of care

  5. Widespread pain - do pain intensity and care-seeking influence sickness absence? - A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Søren; Christiansen, David Høyrup; Jensen, Jens Christian;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both musculoskeletal pain-intensity in relation to a specific location (e.g. lower back or shoulder) and pain in multiple body regions have been shown to be associated with impaired function and sickness absence, but the impact of pain intensity on the association between widespread...... pain and sickness absence has not been studied. Additionally it is unknown whether care-seeking in general practice due to musculoskeletal disorders has a positive or negative impact on future absenteeism. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of pain intensity on the association...... between number of musculoskeletal pain sites and sickness absence, and to analyze the impact on absenteeism from care-seeking in general practice due to musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: 3745 Danish adults registered with eight General Practitioners (GPs) in one primary medical center reported location...

  6. Systematic age-related differences in chronic disease management in a population-based cohort study: a new paradigm of primary care is required.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Buja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our interest in chronic conditions is due to the fact that, worldwide, chronic diseases have overtaken infectious diseases as the leading cause of death and disability, so their management represents an important challenge for health systems. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of primary health care services in managing diabetes, congestive heart failure (CHF and coronary heart disease (CHD, by age group. METHODS: This population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted in Italy, enrolling 1,948,622 residents ≥ 16 years old. A multilevel regression model was applied to analyze compliance to care processes with explanatory variables at both patient and district level, using age group as an independent variable, and adjusting for sex, citizenship, disease duration, and Charlson index on the first level, and for District Health Unit on the second level. RESULTS: The quality of chronic disease management showed an inverted U-shaped relationship with age. In particular, our findings indicate lower levels for young adults (16-44 year-olds, adults (45-64, and oldest old (+85 than for patients aged 65-74 in almost all quality indicators of CHD, CHF and diabetes management. Young adults (16-44 y, adults (45-64 y, the very old (75-84 y and the oldest old (+85 y patients with CHD, CHF and diabetes are less likely than 65-74 year-old patients to be monitored and treated using evidence-based therapies, with the exceptions of echocardiographic monitoring for CHF in young adult patients, and renal monitoring for CHF and diabetes in the very old. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that more effort is needed to ensure that primary health care systems are sensitive to chronic conditions in the young and in the very elderly.

  7. Using a Web-Based Approach to Assess Test-Retest Reliability of the "Hypertension Self-Care Profile" Tool in an Asian Population: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; Lua, Yi Hui Adela; Hong, Liyue; Bong, Huey Shin Shirley; Yeo, Ling Sui Jocelyn; Tsang, Li Ping Marianne; Ong, Kai Zhi; Wong, Sook Wai Samantha; Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Essential hypertension often requires affected patients to self-manage their condition most of the time. Besides seeking regular medical review of their life-long condition to detect vascular complications, patients have to maintain healthy lifestyles in between physician consultations via diet and physical activity, and to take their medications according to their prescriptions. Their self-management ability is influenced by their self-efficacy capacity, which can be assessed using questionnaire-based tools. The "Hypertension Self-Care Profile" (HTN-SCP) is 1 such questionnaire assessing self-efficacy in the domains of "behavior," "motivation," and "self-efficacy." This study aims to determine the test-retest reliability of HTN-SCP in an English-literate Asian population using a web-based approach. Multiethnic Asian patients, aged 40 years and older, with essential hypertension were recruited from a typical public primary care clinic in Singapore. The investigators guided the patients to fill up the web-based 60-item HTN-SCP in English using a tablet or smartphone on the first visit and refilled the instrument 2 weeks later in the retest. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated using Cronbach's Alpha and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), respectively. The t test was used to determine the relationship between the overall HTN-SCP scores of the patients and their self-reported self-management activities. A total of 160 patients completed the HTN-SCP during the initial test, from which 71 test-retest responses were completed. No floor or ceiling effect was found for the scores for the 3 subscales. Cronbach's Alpha coefficients were 0.857, 0.948, and 0.931 for "behavior," "motivation," and "self-efficacy" domains respectively, indicating high internal consistency. The item-total correlation ranges for the 3 scales were from 0.105 to 0.656 for Behavior, 0.401 to 0.808 for Motivation, 0.349 to 0.789 for Self-efficacy. The corresponding

  8. Can an alert in primary care electronic medical records increase participation in a population-based screening programme for colorectal cancer? COLO-ALERT, a randomised clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem in Spain. Over the last decade, several regions have carried out screening programmes, but population participation rates remain below recommended European goals. Reminders on electronic medical records have been identified as a low-cost and high-reach strategy to increase participation. Further knowledge is needed about their effect in a population-based screening programme. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an electronic reminder to promote the participation in a population-based colorectal cancer screening programme. Secondary aims are to learn population’s reasons for refusing to take part in the screening programme and to find out the health professionals’ opinion about the official programme implementation and on the new computerised tool. This is a parallel randomised trial with a cross-sectional second stage. Participants: all the invited subjects to participate in the public colorectal cancer screening programme that includes men and women aged between 50–69, allocated to the eleven primary care centres of the study and all their health professionals. The randomisation unit will be the primary care physician. The intervention will consist of activating an electronic reminder, in the patient’s electronic medical record, in order to promote colorectal cancer screening, during a synchronous medical appointment, throughout the year that the intervention takes place. A comparison of the screening rates will then take place, using the faecal occult blood test of the patients from the control and the intervention groups. We will also take a questionnaire to know the opinions of the health professionals. The main outcome is the screening status at the end of the study. Data will be analysed with an intention-to-treat approach. We expect that the introduction of specific reminders in electronic medical records, as a tool to facilitate and encourage direct referral by

  9. Etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in a population-based study: Link between etiology and patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capelastegui Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiologic profile of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP for each age group could be similar among inpatients and outpatients. This fact brings up the link between etiology of CAP and its clinical evolution and outcome. Furthermore, the majority of pneumonia etiologic studies are based on hospitalized patients, whereas there have been no recent population-based studies encompassing both inpatients and outpatients. Methods To evaluate the etiology of CAP, and the relationship among the different pathogens of CAP to patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes, a prospective population-based study was conducted in Spain from April 1, 2006, to June 30, 2007. Patients (age >18 with CAP were identified through the family physicians and the hospital area. Results A total of 700 patients with etiologic evaluation were included: 276 hospitalized and 424 ambulatory patients. We were able to define the aetiology of pneumonia in 55.7% (390/700. The most frequently isolated organism was S. pneumoniae (170/390, 43.6%, followed by C. burnetti (72/390, 18.5%, M. pneumoniae (62/390, 15.9%, virus as a group (56/390, 14.4%, Chlamydia species (39/390, 106%, and L. pneumophila (17/390, 4.4%. The atypical pathogens and the S. pneumoniae are present in pneumonias of a wide spectrum of severity and age. Patients infected by conventional bacteria were elderly, had a greater hospitalization rate, and higher mortality within 30 days. Conclusions Our study provides information about the etiology of CAP in the general population. The microbiology of CAP remains stable: infections by conventional bacteria result in higher severity, and the S. pneumoniae remains the most important pathogen. However, atypical pathogens could also infect patients in a wide spectrum of severity and age.

  10. Severity of obesity and management of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and smoking in primary care: population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, H P; Prevost, A T; Gulliford, M C

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-associated cardiovascular risk are increasing worldwide. This study aimed to determine how different levels of obesity are associated with the management of smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia in primary care. We conducted a cohort study of adults aged 30-100 years in England, sampled from the primary care electronic health records in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Prevalence, treatment and control were estimated for each risk factor by body mass index (BMI) category. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were estimated, allowing for age, gender, comorbidity and socioeconomic status, with normal weight as reference category. Data were analysed for 247,653 patients including 153,308 (62%) with BMI recorded, of whom 46,149 (30%) were obese. Participants were classified into simple (29,257), severe (11,059) and morbid obesity (5833) categories. Smoking declined with the increasing BMI category, but smoking cessation treatment increased. Age-standardised hypertension prevalence was twice as high in morbid obesity (men 78.6%; women 66.0%) compared with normal weight (men 37.3%; women 29.4%). Hypertension treatment was more frequent (AOR 1.75, 1.59-1.92) but hypertension control less frequent (AOR 0.63, 0.59-0.69) in morbid obesity, with similar findings for severe obesity. Hypercholesterolaemia was more frequent in morbid obesity (men 48.2%; women 36.3%) than normal weight (men 25.0%; women 20.0%). Lipid lowering therapy was more frequent in morbid obesity (AOR 1.83, 1.61-2.07) as was cholesterol control (AOR 1.19, 1.06-1.34). Increasing obesity category is associated with elevated risks from hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. Inadequate hypertension control in obesity emerges as an important target for future interventions.

  11. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer treatment: a population-based study of quality-of-care indicators in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacerdote Carlotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been documented that variations exist in breast cancer treatment despite wide dissemination of clinical practice guidelines. The aim of this population-based study was to evaluate the impact of regional guidelines (Piedmont guidelines, PGL for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment on quality-of-care indicators in the Northwestern Italian region of Piedmont. Methods We included two samples of women aged 50–69 years with incident breast cancer treated in Piedmont before and after the introduction of PGL: 600 in 2002 (pre-PGL and 621 in 2004 (post-PGL. Patients were randomly selected among all incident breast cancer cases identified through the hospital discharge records database. We extracted clinical data on breast cancer cases from medical charts and ascertained vital status through linkage with town offices. We assessed compliance with 14 quality-of-care indicators from PGL recommendations, before and after their introduction in clinical practice. Results Among patients with invasive lesions, 77.1% (N = 368 and 77.5% (N = 383 in the pre-PGL and post-PGL groups, respectively, received breast conservative surgery (BCS as a first-line treatment. Following BCS, 87.7% received radiotherapy in 2002, compared to 87.9% in 2004. Of all patients at medium-to-high risk of distant metastasis, 65.5% (N = 268 and 63.6% (N = 252 received chemotherapy in 2002 and in 2004, respectively. Among the 117 patients with invasive lesions and negative estrogen receptor status in 2002, hormonal therapy was prescribed in 23 of them (19.6%. The incorrect prescription of hormonal therapy decreased to 10.8% (N = 10 among the 92 estrogen receptor-negative patients in 2004 (p Compliance with PGL recommendations was already high in the pre-PGL group, although some quality-of-care indicators did not reach the standard. In the pre/post analysis, 8 out of 14 quality-of-care indicators showed an improvement from 2002 to 2004, but only 4 out of 14

  12. Care needs and clinical outcomes of older people with dementia: a population-based propensity score-matched cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Yuan Hsiao

    Full Text Available To explore the healthcare resource utilization, psychotropic drug use and mortality of older people with dementia.A nationwide propensity score-matched cohort study.National Health Insurance Research database.A total of 32,649 elderly people with dementia and their propensity-score matched controls (n=32,649.Outpatient visits, inpatient care, psychotropic drug use, in-hospital mortality and all-cause mortality at 90 and 365 days.Compared to the non-dementia group, a higher proportion of patients with dementia used inpatient services (1 year after index date: 20.91% vs. 9.55%, and the dementia group had more outpatient visits (median [standard deviation]: 7.00 [8.87] vs. 3.00 [8.30]. Furthermore, dementia cases with acute admission had the highest psychotropic drug utilization both at baseline and at the post-index dates (difference-in-differences: all <0.001. Dementia was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (90 days, Odds ratio (OR=1.85 [95%CI 1.67-2.05], p<0.001; 365 days, OR=1.59 [1.50-1.69], p<0.001 and in-hospital mortality (90 days, OR=1.97 [1.71-2.27], p<0.001; 365 days, OR=1.82 [1.61-2.05], p<0.001 compared to matched controls.When older people with dementia are admitted for acute illnesses, they may increase their use of psychotropic agents and their risk of death, particularly in-hospital mortality.

  13. Multi-centre evaluation of the Determine HIV Combo assay when used for point of care testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian P Conway

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Determine HIV Combo (DHC is the first point of care assay designed to increase sensitivity in early infection by detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. We conducted a large multi-centre evaluation of DHC performance in Sydney sexual health clinics. METHODS: We compared DHC performance (overall, by test component and in early infection with conventional laboratory HIV serology (fourth generation screening immunoassay, supplementary HIV antibody, p24 antigen and Western blot tests when testing gay and bisexual men attending four clinic sites. Early infection was defined as either acute or recent HIV infection acquired within the last six months. RESULTS: Of 3,190 evaluation specimens, 39 were confirmed as HIV-positive (12 with early infection and 3,133 were HIV-negative by reference testing. DHC sensitivity was 87.2% overall and 94.4% and 0% for the antibody and antigen components, respectively. Sensitivity in early infection was 66.7% (all DHC antibody reactive and the DHC antigen component detected none of nine HIV p24 antigen positive specimens. Median HIV RNA was higher in false negative than true positive cases (238,025 vs. 37,591 copies/ml; p = 0.022. Specificity overall was 99.4% with the antigen component contributing to 33% of false positives. CONCLUSIONS: The DHC antibody component detected two thirds of those with early infection, while the DHC antigen component did not enhance performance during point of care HIV testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

  14. Health-care-seeking patterns in the emerging private sector in Burkina Faso: a population-based study of urban adult residents in Ouagadougou.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrissa Beogo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The private medical care sector is expanding in urban cities in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. However, people's health-care-seeking behaviors in this new landscape remain poorly understood; furthermore, distinguishing between public and private providers and among various types of private providers is critical in this investigation. This study assessed, by type, the healthcare providers urban residents in Burkina Faso visit, and their choice determinants. METHOD: We conducted a population-based survey of a representative sample of 1,600 households in Ouagadougou from July to November 2011, consisting of 5,820 adults. We assessed the types of providers people typically sought for severe and non-severe conditions. We applied generalized estimating equations in this study. RESULTS: Among those surveyed, 97.7% and 53.1% indicated that they seek a formal provider for treating severe and non-severe conditions, respectively. Among the formal provider seekers, 20.5% and 17.0% chose for-profit (FP providers for treating severe and non-severe conditions, respectively. Insurance coverage was held by 2.0% of those surveyed. Possessing insurance was the strongest predictor for seeking FP, for both severe (odds ratio [OR]  = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-1.28, and non-severe conditions (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.07-1.39. Other predictors included being a formal jobholder and holding a higher level education. By contrast, we observed no significant difference in predisposing, enabling, or need characteristics between not-for-profit (NFP provider seekers and public provider seekers. Proximity was the primary reason for choosing a provider. CONCLUSION: The results suggested that FP providers play a crucial role in the urban healthcare market in SSA. Socioeconomic status and insurance status are significant predictors of provider choice. The findings can serve as a crucial reference for policymakers in response to the emergence of FP providers

  15. Defining Prolonged Length of Acute Care Stay for Surgically and Conservatively Treated Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Population-Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Stein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The definition of prolonged length of stay (LOS during acute care remains unclear among surgically and conservatively treated patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Methods. Using a population-based quality assessment registry, we calculated change points in LOS for surgically and conservatively treated patients with ICH. The influence of comorbidities, baseline characteristics at admission, and in-hospital complications on prolonged LOS was evaluated in a multivariate model. Results. Overall, 13272 patients with ICH were included in the analysis. Surgical therapy of the hematoma was documented in 1405 (10.6% patients. Change points for LOS were 22 days (CI: 8, 22; CL 98% for surgically treated patients and 16 days (CI: 16, 16; CL: 99% for conservatively treated patients. Ventilation therapy was related to prolonged LOS in surgically (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.5–3.1; P<0.001 and conservatively treated patients (OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 2.2–2.9; P<0.001. Two or more in-hospital complications in surgical patients (OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 2.1–3.5 and ≥1 in conservative patients (OR: 3.0, 95% CI: 2.7–3.3 were predictors of prolonged LOS. Conclusion. The definition of prolonged LOS after ICH could be useful for several aspects of quality management and research. Preventing in-hospital complications could decrease the number of patients with prolonged LOS.

  16. The additional yield of a periodic screening programme for open-angle glaucoma : a population-based comparison of incident glaucoma cases detected in regular ophthalmic care with cases detected during screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoutenbeek, R.; de Voogd, S.; Wolfs, R. C. W.; Hofman, A.; de Jong, P. T. V. M.; Jansonius, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the additional yield of a periodic screening programme for open-angle glaucoma (OAG) by comparing, in a population-based setting, incident OAG (iOAG) cases detected in regular ophthalmic care with those detected during screening. Methods: Participants aged 55 and over from the populati

  17. Community-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... respite care, transportation, medication coverage, rehabilitation (including maintenance physical and occupational therapy ), hearing aids, eyeglasses, and a variety of other benefits. The program also has the flexibility to pay ...

  18. Incremental health care costs for chronic pain in Ontario, Canada: a population-based matched cohort study of adolescents and adults using administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Taddio, Anna; Katz, Joel; Shah, Vibhuti; Krahn, Murray

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the economic burden of chronic pain and how chronic pain affects health care utilization. We aimed to estimate the annual per-person incremental medical cost and health care utilization for chronic pain in the Ontario population from the perspective of the public payer. We performed a retrospective cohort study using Ontario health care databases and the electronically linked Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) from 2000 to 2011. We identified subjects aged ≥12 years from the CCHS with chronic pain and closely matched them to individuals without pain using propensity score matching methods. We used linked data to determine mean 1-year per-person health care costs and utilization for each group and mean incremental cost for chronic pain. All costs are reported in 2014 Canadian dollars. After matching, we had 19,138 pairs of CCHS respondents with and without chronic pain. The average age was 55 years (SD = 18) and 61% were female. The incremental cost to manage chronic pain was $1742 per person (95% confidence interval [CI], $1488-$2020), 51% more than the control group. The largest contributor to the incremental cost was hospitalization ($514; 95% CI, $364-$683). Incremental costs were the highest in those with severe pain ($3960; 95% CI, $3186-$4680) and in those with most activity limitation ($4365; 95% CI, $3631-$5147). The per-person cost to manage chronic pain is substantial and more than 50% higher than a comparable patient without chronic pain. Costs are higher in people with more severe pain and activity limitations. PMID:26989805

  19. Interpersonal Processes of Care in Diverse Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Anita L.; Nápoles-Springer, Anna; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Posner, Samuel F.; Bindman, Andrew B.; Pinderhughes, Howard L.; Washington, A. Eugene

    1999-01-01

    Persons of lower socioeconomic status and members of racial and ethnic minority groups experience poorer health and increased health risk factors. A framework of interpersonal processes of care specifies distinct components and incorporates the perspective of diverse racial and ethnic or socioeconomic groups. Its dimensions, each with several domains, are communication (general clarity, elicitation of and responsiveness to patient concerns, explanations, empowerment), decision making (respons...

  20. Making Our Health and Care Systems Fit for an Ageing Population: Considerations for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Melissa K.; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    A report from the United Kingdom on making health and care systems fit for an ageing population proposes a range of interventions to make care better for older adults, especially those who are frail. Here, we discuss the proposed shift for the acute care hospital to other models of care. The key for these models of care requires a fundamental shift to care that addresses the full range of an individual’s needs, rather than being based around single diseases. How this might apply in the Canadian context is considered. We emphasize strategies to keep people out of hospital but still receive needed care, make acute hospital care less hazardous, and improve the interface between acute and long-term care. PMID:25452826

  1. Montessori-based dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Janet

    2006-10-01

    Montessori-based Dementia Care is an approach used in Alzheimer's care that does not involve chemical or physical restraints. This program works by giving the elder with Alzheimer/Dementia a purpose by getting them involved. When staff/families care for a confused Alzheimer/Dementia patient, who is having behaviors, the Montessori program teaches them to look at what is causing the behavior. When assessing the elder to determine what is causing the behavior, the goal is to find the answer, but the answer cannot be dementia. The goal of the program is to bring meaning to the life of an Alzheimer/Dementia elder. PMID:17111647

  2. Sociodemographic characteristics and chronic medical conditions as risk factors for herpes zoster: a population-based study from primary care in Madrid (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro; Gil de Miguel, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate incidence density rates (IDR) of herpes zoster (HZ) and to analyze the association with sociodemographic characteristics and selected chronic medical conditions. The study cohort consisted of the adult population included in the Public Health System of the Autonomous Community of Madrid, Spain on 1/10/2009 (5 244 402 persons). Data source were electronic medical records from primary care between 1/10/2009-31/12/2012. Individual socioeconomic status (SES) was inferred by geocoding. Poisson regression analyses were stratified by sex, to identify factors associated with HZ. We identified 81 541 incident cases of HZ (61.7% in women and 46.5% in the group aged 60 and over). IDR was 4.11 per 1000 person-years in men and 5.95 in women. IDR were higher with age, in autochthonous population, those with lower SES and in patients with immunodeficiencies. After adjustment, higher incidence rate ratios were found with age, autochthonous origin, lower SES, and in patients with HIV-infection/AIDS (3.20, CI95% 2.90-3.53 in men and 2.98, CI95% 2.58-3.45 in women), and other immunodeficiencies (1.57, CI95% 1.41-1.75 and 1.65, CI95% 1.50-1.80). COPD, asthma, DM, ischemic heart disease, other cardiovascular diseases, and cancer were also associated with an increased incidence of HZ. We conclude that older, autochthonous patients with lower SES and with certain underlying medical conditions had a higher probability of suffering HZ. Electronic databases are useful for estimating the incidence of HZ, and for finding associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Identifying unrecognized risk factors for HZ, such as asthma or cardiovascular diseases, is crucial to interpret the epidemiology of HZ, to target vaccination programs and to monitor their effect. PMID:24805130

  3. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim P. Valentijn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to understand the complexity of integrated care.Methods:  The search method involved a combination of electronic database searches, hand searches of reference lists (snowball method and contacting researchers in the field. The process of synthesizing the literature was iterative, to relate the concepts of primary care and integrated care. First, we identified the general principles of primary care and integrated care. Second, we connected the dimensions of integrated care and the principles of primary care. Finally, to improve content validity we held several meetings with researchers in the field to develop and refine our conceptual framework.Results: The conceptual framework combines the functions of primary care with the dimensions of integrated care. Person-focused and population-based care serve as guiding principles for achieving integration across the care continuum. Integration plays complementary roles on the micro (clinical integration, meso (professional and organisational integration and macro (system integration level. Functional and normative integration ensure connectivity between the levels.Discussion:  The presented conceptual framework is a first step to achieve a better understanding of the inter-relationships among the dimensions of integrated care from a primary care perspective.

  4. Primary care for urban adolescent girls from ethnically diverse populations: foregone care and access to confidential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Diane; Fletcher, Jason

    2006-11-01

    Adolescent girls face unique challenges in health care utilization, which can result in unmet needs. We sought to describe settings of usual care and primary care use, and to identify predictors of foregone care and experience of confidential care in a primarily racial/ethnic minority low-income sample. We conducted an anonymous computer-assisted self-administered survey of 9th-12th grade girls (n=819) in three Bronx public high schools, the majority of whom were Hispanic (69.8%) and Black (21.4%). Most (80%) reported having a usual source of care. Of these, 77.2% had a regular doctor. Those least likely to have a usual source of care were non-U.S. born girls (73.1% vs. 83.1%) and less acculturated girls. Predictors of foregone care in the last year include being sexually active, poor family social support, and low self esteem. Predictors of access to confidential care at last visit were age, self-efficacy for confidential care, having a regular doctor, setting of care, and having had a recent physical exam. Many urban adolescent girls, especially non-U.S. born girls, lack a usual source of care and regular health care provider. Continued attention to reducing both financial and non-financial barriers to care is required to ensure access to and quality of care for diverse populations. PMID:17242529

  5. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2...... diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action planning...

  6. The interface between primary health care and population health: challenges and opportunities for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Primary health care has the potential to contribute to population health at the individual and population levels. The '5As' (ask, assess, advise/agree, assist and arrange) provide a framework to realise this potential, especially for disadvantaged and vulnerable populations, not only by better organising multidisciplinary preventive interventions within primary health care, but also by linking these interventions with more intensive community and population programs and services, especially for patients with low health literacy. This requires changes to information systems to prompt and record preventive care, work with practices to engage a range of disciplines, including practice nurses, and development of effective linkages with other services in the local community. This has important implications for the newly established Primary Health Networks in supporting improvement within primary care, and creating linkages and partnerships with a range of organisations involved in delivering preventive interventions in the community. However, prevention in primary health care needs to be underpinned by funding systems that support multidisciplinary and preventive care for a population, rather than simply reactive, episode-based care. PMID:26863164

  7. Impact of the pay-for-performance contract and the management of hypertension in Scottish primary care: a 6-year population-based repeated cross-sectional study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Simpson, Colin R

    2011-07-01

    The 2004 introduction of the pay-for-performance contract has increased the proportion of income that GPs are able to earn by targeting quality care to patients with chronic diseases such as hypertension.

  8. Living Will Interest and Preferred End-of-life Care and Death Locations among Japanese Adults 50 and over: A Population-based Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Nishie, Hiroyuki; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Etsuji; Sato, Kenji; TODA, YUICHIRO; Matsuoka, Junji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between Japanese individualsʼ interest in living wills and their preferred end-of-life care and death locations. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,000 individuals aged ァ50 to measure these 2 factors. We examined the associations between the respondentsʼ characteristics and their preferred care and death locations by using multinomial logistic regression models. The response rate was 74%. Home was the most frequently preferred pla...

  9. Do homosexual persons use health care services more frequently than heterosexuals persons: findings from a Dutch population survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F.C.; Sandfort, T.G.M.; Vanwesenbeeck, I.; Lindert, H. van; Westert, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    Use of health care services has been suggested to be lower among homo- or bisexual persons than among heterosexual persons, due to a lack of trust in the health care system. However, population-based studies on differences in health care utilization according to sexual orientation are scarce. The pu

  10. The Impact of Hospice Care on Survival and Healthcare Costs for Patients with Lung Cancer: A National Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Kun Chiang

    Full Text Available The healthcare costs of cancer care are highest in the last month of life. The effect of hospice care on end-of-life (EOL healthcare costs is not clearly understood.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hospice care on survival and healthcare costs for lung cancer patients in their final month of life.We adopted Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Claims Database to analyze data for 3399 adult lung cancer patients who died in 1997-2011. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors of high healthcare cost, defined as costs falling above the 90th percentile. Patients who received hospice cares were assigned to a hospice (H group and those who did not were assigned to a non-hospice (non-H group.The patients in the H group had a longer mean (median survival time than those in the non-H group did (1.40 ± 1.61 y (0.86 vs. 1.10 ± 1.47 (0.61, p<0.001. The non-H group had a lower mean healthcare cost than the H group (US $1,821 ± 2,441 vs. US $1,839 ± 1,638, p<0.001. And, there were a total of 340 patients (10% with the healthcare costs exceeding the 90th percentile (US $4,721 as the cutoff value of high cost. The non-H group had a higher risk of high cost than the H group because many more cases in the non-H group had lower costs. Moreover, the risk of high health care costs were predicted for patients who did not receive hospice care (odds ratio [OR]: 3.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.44-5.79, received chemotherapy (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.18-1.96 and intubation (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.64-4.16, and those who had more emergency department visits (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.24-2.52, longer hospital admission in days (OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.07-1.09, and received radiotherapy (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.00-1.78. Lower risks of high health care costs were observed in patients with low socioeconomic status (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.40-0.83, or previous employment (OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.47-0.92. After propensity-score matching

  11. Oculocutaneous albinism: identifying and overcoming barriers to vision care in a Nigerian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeh, N N; Eze, B I; Onwubiko, S N; Arinze, O C; Onwasigwe, E N; Umeh, R E

    2014-06-01

    To assess eye care service utilization, and identify access barriers in a south-eastern Nigerian albino population. The study was a population-based, cross-sectional survey conducted in Enugu state between August, 2011 and January, 2012. Using the data base of the state's Albino Foundation and tailored awareness creation, persons living with albinism were identified and recruited at two study centres. Data on participants' socio-demographics, perception of vision, visual needs, previous eye examination and or low vision assessment, use of glasses or low vision devices were collected. Reasons for non-utilisation of available vision care services were also obtained. Descriptive and comparative statistics were performed. A p albinism. The identified barriers to vision care access are amenable to awareness creation and logistic change in the provision of appropriate vision care services.

  12. Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management And Quality Oucomes in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sheila A; Vlasses, Frances; Havey, Julia

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple demands and challenges inherent in establishing staffing models in ambulatory heath care settings today. If health care administrators establish a supportive physical and interpersonal health care environment, and develop high-performing interprofessional teams and staffing models and electronic documentation systems that track performance, patients will have more opportunities to receive safe, high-quality evidence-based care that encourages patient participation in decision making, as well as provision of their care. The health care organization must be aligned and responsive to the community within which it resides, fully invested in population health management, and continuously scanning the environment for competitive, regulatory, and external environmental risks. All of these challenges require highly competent providers willing to change attitudes and culture such as movement toward collaborative practice among the interprofessional team including the patient.

  13. Unique health care utilization patterns in a homeless population in Ghent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verlinde Evelyn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing studies concerning the health care use of homeless people describe higher utilisation rates for hospital-based care and emergency care, and lower rates for primary care by homeless people compared to the general population. Homeless people are importantly hindered and/or steered in their health care use by barriers directly related to the organisation of care. Our goal is to describe the accessibility of primary health care services, secondary care and emergency care for homeless people living in an area with a universal primary health care system and active guidance towards this unique system. Methods Observational, cross-sectional study design. Data from the Belgian National health survey were merged with comparable data collected by means of a face-to-face interview from homeless people in Ghent. 122 homeless people who made use of homeless centres and shelters in Ghent were interviewed using a reduced version of the Belgian National Health survey over a period of 5 months. 2-dimensional crosstabs were built in order to study the bivariate relationship between health care use (primary health care, secondary and emergency care and being homeless. To determine the independent association, a logistic model was constructed adjusting for age and sex. Results and Discussion Homeless people have a higher likelihood to consult a GP than the non-homeless people in Ghent, even after adjusting for age and sex. The same trend is demonstrated for secondary and emergency care. Conclusions Homeless people in Ghent do find the way to primary health care and make use of it. It seems that the universal primary health care system in Ghent with an active guidance by social workers contributes to easier GP access.

  14. The impact of nationwide education program on clinical practice in sepsis care and mortality of severe sepsis: a population-based study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We investigated the effect of a nationwide educational program following surviving sepsis campaign (SSC guidelines. Physicians' clinical practice in sepsis care and patient mortality rate for severe sepsis were analyzed using a nationally representative cohort. METHODS: Hospitalizations for severe sepsis with organ failure from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD, and trends in sepsis incidence and mortality rates were analyzed. A before-and-after study design was used to evaluate changes in the utilization rates of SSC items and changes in severe sepsis mortality rates occurred after a national education program conducted by the Joint Taiwan Critical Care Medicine Committee since 2004. A total of 39,706 hospitalizations were analyzed, which consisted of a pre-intervention cohort of 14,848 individuals (2000-2003 and a post-intervention cohort of 24,858 individuals (2005-2008. RESULTS: The incidence rate of severe sepsis increased from 1.88 per 1,000 individuals in 1997 to 5.07 per 1,000 individuals in 2008. The cumulative mortality rate decreased slightly from 48.2% for the pre-intervention cohort to 45.9% for the post-intervention cohort. The utilization rates of almost all SSC items changed significantly between the pre-intervention and post-intervention cohorts. These changes of utilization rates were found to be associated with mild reduction in mortality rate. CONCLUSION: The nationwide education program through a national professional society has a significant impact on physicians' clinical practice and resulted in a slight but significant reduction of severe sepsis mortality rate.

  15. Population-Based Inorganic Mercury Biomonitoring and the Identification of Skin Care Products as a Source of Exposure in New York City

    OpenAIRE

    McKelvey, Wendy; Jeffery, Nancy; Clark, Nancy; Kass, Daniel; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mercury is a toxic metal that has been used for centuries as a constituent of medicines and other items. Objective We assessed exposure to inorganic mercury in the adult population of New York City (NYC). Methods We measured mercury concentrations in spot urine specimens from a representative sample of 1,840 adult New Yorkers in the 2004 NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Cases with urine concentrations ≥ 20 μg/L were followed up with a telephone or in-person interview th...

  16. A collaborative clinical and population-based curriculum for medical students to address primary care needs of the homeless in New York City shelters : Teaching homeless healthcare to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin; Naderi, Ramesh; Gaughran, Margaret; Sckell, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    Background Millions of Americans experience homelessness annually. Medical providers do not receive adequate training in primary care of the homeless.Methods Starting in 2012, a comprehensive curriculum was offered to medical students during their family medicine or ambulatory clerkship, covering clinical, social and advocacy, population-based, and policy aspects. Students were taught to: elicit specific social history, explore health expectations, and assess barriers to healthcare; evaluate clinical conditions specific to the homeless and develop plans for care tailored toward patients' medical and social needs; collaborate with shelter staff and community organizations to improve disease management and engage in advocacy efforts. A mixed methods design was used to evaluate students' knowledge, attitudes, and skills including pre- and post-curriculum surveys, debriefing sessions, and observed clinical skills.Results The mean age of the students (n = 30) was 26.5 years; 55 % were female. The overall scores improved significantly in knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy domains using paired t‑test (p communication skills, the majority were rated as having 'outstanding rapport with patients.'Conclusions Comprehensive and ongoing clinical component in shelter clinics, complementary teaching, experienced faculty, and working relationship and collaboration with community organizations were key elements. PMID:27277430

  17. Underutilization of palliative care services in the liver transplant population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Priya; Smith, Alexander; Lai, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate use of palliative care services in patients with end-stage liver disease who do not have access to liver transplant. METHODS Evaluated were end-stage liver disease patients who were removed from the liver transplant wait-list or died prior to transplant at a single transplant center over a 2-year period. Those who were removed due to noncompliance or ultimately transplanted elsewhere were excluded from this study. Patient characteristics associated with palliative care consultation were assessed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Six hundred and eighty-three patients were listed for liver transplant in 2013-2014 with 107 (16%) dying (n = 62) or removed for clinical decompensation prior to liver transplant (n = 45): Median age was 58 years, and the majority were male (66%), Caucasian (53%), had Child C cirrhosis (61%) or hepatocellular carcinoma (52%). The palliative care team was consulted in only 18 of the 107 patients (17%) who died or were removed, 89% of which occurred as inpatients. Half of these consultations occurred within 72 h of death. In univariable analysis, patients of younger age, white race, and higher end-stage liver disease scores at time of listing and delisting were more likely to receive palliative care services. Only younger age [Odds ratio (OR) = 0.92; P = 0.02] and Caucasian race (OR = 4.90; P = 0.02) were still associated with integration of palliative care services through multivariable analysis. CONCLUSION Palliative care services are grossly underutilized in older, non-white patients with cirrhosis on the liver transplant wait-list. We encourage early integration of these services into clinical decision-making in the transplant population, with further studies aimed at understanding barriers to consultation. PMID:27683638

  18. The Health Care Institution, Population Health and Black Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher J; Redwood, Yanique

    2016-05-01

    The ongoing existence of institutionalized racism and discriminatory practices in various systems (education, criminal justice, housing, employment) serve as root causes of poor health in Blacks Lives. Furthermore, these unjust social structures and their complex interplay result in inefficient utilization of health services and reactive or futile interactions with medical providers. Collectively, these factors contribute to racial disparities in health and treatment represents a significant portion of the nation's health care expenditures. In order for health care systems to optimize population health goals, racism must be recognized as a determinant of health. As anchor institutions in their respective communities, we offer hospitals and health systems a conceptual framework to address the issue within internal and external constructs. PMID:27372475

  19. Managing cancer pain at the end of life with multiple strong opioids: a population-based retrospective cohort study in primary care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: End-of-life cancer patients commonly receive more than one type of strong opioid. The three-step analgesic ladder framework of the World Health Organisation (WHO provides no guidance on multiple opioid prescribing and there is little epidemiological data available to inform practice. This study aims to investigate the time trend of such cases and the associated factors. METHODS: Strong opioid prescribing in the last three months of life of cancer patients were extracted from the General Practice Research Database (GPRD. The outcome variable was the number of different types of prescribed non-rescue doses of opioids (1 vs 2-4, referred to as a complex case. Associated factors were evaluated using prevalence ratios (PR derived from multivariate log-binomial model, adjusting for clustering effects and potential confounding variables. RESULTS: Overall, 26.4% (95% CI: 25.6-27.1% of 13,427 cancer patients (lung 41.7%, colorectal 19.1%, breast 18.6%, prostate 15.5%, head and neck 5.0% were complex cases. Complex cases increased steadily over the study period (1.02% annually, 95%CI: 0.42-1.61%, p = 0.048 but with a small dip (7.5% reduction, 95%CI: -0.03 to 17.8% around the period of the Shipman case, a British primary care doctor who murdered his patients with opioids. The dip significantly affected the correlation of the complex cases with persistent increasing background opioid prescribing (weighted correlation coefficients pre-, post-Shipman periods: 0.98(95%CI: 0.67-1.00, p = 0.011; 0.14 (95%CI: -0.85 to 0.91, p = 0.85. Multivariate adjusted analysis showed that the complex cases were predominantly associated with year of death (PRs vs 2000: 1.05-1.65, not other demographic and clinical factors except colorectal cancer (PR vs lung cancer: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.12-1.37. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that prescribing behaviour, rather than patient factors, plays an important role in multiple opioid prescribing at the end of life

  20. Knowledge on preconceptional folic acid supplementation and intention to seek for preconception care among men and women in an urban city: A population-based cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Temel (Sevilay); Ö. Erdem (Özcan); T. Voorham (Toon); G.J. Bonsel (Gouke); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); S. Denktaş (Semiha)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To study the knowledge of a large city population on preconception folic acid supplementation and intention to seek for preconception care within an urban perinatal health program. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys run in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in 2007 and annually from 2

  1. Urinary Stone Disease: Advancing Knowledge, Patient Care, and Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Charles D; Tasian, Gregory E; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Goldfarb, David S; Star, Robert A; Kirkali, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Expanding epidemiologic and physiologic data suggest that urinary stone disease is best conceptualized as a chronic metabolic condition punctuated by symptomatic, preventable stone events. These acute events herald substantial future chronic morbidity, including decreased bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease, and CKD. Urinary stone disease imposes a large and growing public health burden. In the United States, 1 in 11 individuals will experience a urinary stone in their lifetime. Given this high incidence and prevalence, urinary stone disease is one of the most expensive urologic conditions, with health care charges exceeding $10 billion annually. Patient care focuses on management of symptomatic stones rather than prevention; after three decades of innovation, procedural interventions are almost exclusively minimally invasive or noninvasive, and mortality is rare. Despite these advances, the prevalence of stone disease has nearly doubled over the past 15 years, likely secondary to dietary and health trends. The NIDDK recently convened a symposium to assess knowledge and treatment gaps to inform future urinary stone disease research. Reducing the public health burden of urinary stone disease will require key advances in understanding environmental, genetic, and other individual disease determinants; improving secondary prevention; and optimal population health strategies in an increasingly cost-conscious care environment. PMID:26964844

  2. Ethnic differences in antenatal care use in a large multi-ethnic urban population in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chote, Anushka A.; de Groot, Christianne J. M.; Bruijnzeels, Marc A.; Redekop, Ken; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Foets, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to determine differences in antenatal care use between the native population and different ethnic minority groups in the Netherlands. Design: the Generation R Study is a multi-ethnic population-based prospective cohort study. Setting: seven midwife practices participating in the Generatio

  3. Geriatrics and the triple aim: defining preventable hospitalizations in the long-term care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouslander, Joseph G; Maslow, Katie

    2012-12-01

    Reducing preventable hospitalizations is fundamental to the "triple aim" of improving care, improving health, and reducing costs. New federal government initiatives that create strong pressure to reduce such hospitalizations are being or will soon be implemented. These initiatives use quality measures to define which hospitalizations are preventable. Reducing hospitalizations could greatly benefit frail and chronically ill adults and older people who receive long-term care (LTC) because they often experience negative effects of hospitalization, including hospital-acquired conditions, morbidity, and loss of functional abilities. Conversely, reducing hospitalizations could mean that some people will not receive hospital care they need, especially if the selected measures do not adequately define hospitalizations that can be prevented without jeopardizing the person's health and safety. An extensive literature search identified 250 measures of preventable hospitalizations, but the measures have not been validated in the LTC population and generally do not account for comorbidity or the capacity of various LTC settings to provide the required care without hospitalization. Additional efforts are needed to develop measures that accurately differentiate preventable from necessary hospitalizations for the LTC population, are transparent and fair to providers, and minimize the potential for gaming and unintended consequences. As the new initiatives take effect, it is critical to monitor their effect and to develop and disseminate training and resources to support the many community- and institution-based healthcare professionals and emergency department staff involved in decisions about hospitalization for this population. PMID:23194066

  4. Interpreting the psychometric properties of the components of primary care instrument in an elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl B Aspy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the psychometric properties of the Components of Primary Care Instrument (CPCI in a patient population aged 65 or older. Materials and Methods: 795 participants in the OKLAHOMA Studies, a longitudinal population-based study of predominantly Caucasian, elderly patients, completed the CPCI. Reliability analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were done to provide psychometric properties for this elderly sample. Models were constructed and tested to determine the best fit for the data including the addition of a method factor for negatively worded items. Results: Cronbach′s alphas were comparable to values reported in prior studies. The confirmatory factor analysis with factor inter-correlations and a method factor each improved the fit of the factor model to the data. The combined model′s fit approached the level conventionally recognized as adequate. Conclusion: CPCI appears to be a reliable tool for describing patient perceptions of the quality of primary care for patients over age 65.

  5. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  6. A Web-Based Model for Diabetes Education and Decision Support for the Home Care Nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Michelle; Kirby, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Diabetes education for the home care population requires expert knowledge to be available at the point-of-care, the patient's home. This poster displays a model for Web-based diabetes education and decision support for the home care nurse. The system utilizes the line of reasoning (LOR) model to organize and represent expert decision-making thought processes.

  7. Community Partners in Care: Leveraging Community Diversity to Improve Depression Care for Underserved Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Mendel, Peter; Dixon, Elizabeth; Jones, Andrea; Masongsong, Zoe; Wells, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that the quality and outcomes of depression treatment for adults can be substantially improved through “collaborative care” programs. However, there is a lack of resources required to implement such programs in vulnerable communities. Our paper examines the planning phase of the Community Partners in Care (CPIC) initiative, which addresses this problem through a unique approach in which academic institutions partner directly with a wide range of community-based and service o...

  8. Combining data on health care utilization and socioeconomic status of a defined population: use of a population oriented health information system for regional planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommels, M; Heinonen, M O; Tuomola, S

    1987-01-01

    Health services planning on a regional or national level needs information on health care utilization as well as data on the population to be served. Health or hospital information systems usually cover services provision and utilization, and population data for planning purposes must be obtained from other sources. In the health information system presented, hospital performance data are combined with census and socioeconomic data of the population. That makes cautious analysis of reasons for variation in health care utilization within the planning area possible. The HIS is regional, including 11 health care providers, and population based, linking data to municipality (38 in all). The system is described, including its structure, input registration, file content and output formats. An output example is presented. Necessary conditions for use of the HIS in planning activities are that the corresponding health care delivery system is comprehensive, the population served well defined, and that good control of patient flow and user behaviour is achieved. Use is limited by the character of information stored in the HIS: it is registered retrospectively and by routine. In a system covering various hospitals and municipalities, engaging different types of clerical and health care personnel, data reliability is also a critical issue.

  9. Health Care of the Elderly in Medically Disadvantaged Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Pearl S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study of three disadvantaged urban areas reports on the relationship between available resources and ambulatory health care. Findings indicate a high proportion of elderly receiving care for serious conditions but a sharp drop in care for less serious but potentially disabling conditions. (Author)

  10. Informal and Formal Kinship Care Populations: A Study in Contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Beth; Thomas, Rebecca

    1996-01-01

    Contrasts a group of informal kinship care providers in Philadelphia (KIDS'n'KIN Program) with two "formal" kinship care groups in Baltimore and California, examining similarities and differences in child and caregiver demographies and service needs. Presents the program's response to the needs of informal kinship care providers. (Author/SD)

  11. Disseminating evidence-based care into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Eric A; Rosenbek, Susan A; Roman, Sarah P

    2013-08-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has launched the Partnership for Patients initiative, promising a 20% reduction in readmissions nationally across all payers by December 31, 2013. To address this ambitious goal, CMS has awarded grants to Hospital Engagement Networks, Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations, and the Community-based Care Transitions Program, as well as instituted new penalties for excessive readmission that began in October 2012. National efforts aimed at realizing this goal are predicated, in part, on our effectiveness in disseminating evidence-based care models into practice to improve outcomes and reduce costs. The Care Transitions Intervention (CTI) has been developed, tested, and disseminated to over 750 health care organizations in 40 states nationwide. Four factors promote wide-scale CTI dissemination. The first factor focuses on model fidelity whereby adopters are given insight into which elements of the intervention can be adapted and customized. The second factor concerns the selection of Transitions Coaches and reinforcement of their role through training and participation in a national peer learning network. The third factor relates to model execution with attention to integrating the intervention into existing workflows and fostering relationships with community stakeholders. The fourth factor involves cultivating the support to sustain or expand the intervention through continually making the business case in a changing health care landscape. The lessons learned through the dissemination and implementation of the CTI may be generalizable to the spread of a variety of evidence-based care models.

  12. Gesundes Kinzigtal Integrated Care: improving population health by a shared health gain approach and a shared savings contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hildebrandt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated care solutions need supportive financial incentives. In this paper we describe the financial architecture and operative details of the integrated pilot 'Gesundes Kinzigtal'. Description of integrated care case: Located in Southwest Germany, 'Gesundes Kinzigtal' is one of the few population-based integrated care approaches in Germany, organising care across all health service sectors and indications. The system serving around half of the population of the region is run by a regional health management company (Gesundes Kinzigtal GmbH in coope­ration with the physicians' network in the region (MQNK, a German health care management company with a background in medical sociology and health economics (OptiMedis AG and with two statutory health insurers (among them is the biggest health insurer in Southwest Germany: AOK Baden-Württemberg. Discussion and (preliminary conclusion: The shared savings contract between Gesundes Kinzigtal GmbH and the two health insurers, providing financial incentives for managers and health care providers to realize a sub­stantial efficiency gain, could be an appropriate contractual base of Gesundes Kinzigtal's population health gain approach. This approach is based on the assumption that a more effective trans-sector organisation of Germany's health care system and increased investments in well-designed preventive programmes will lead to a reduction in  morbidity, and in particular to a reduced incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases. This, in turn, is to lead to a comparative reduction in health care cost. Although the comparative cost in the Kinzigtal region has been reduced from the onset of Gesundes Kinzigtal Integrated Care, only future research will have to demonstrate whether - and to what extent - cost reduction may be attributed to a real population health gain.

  13. Gesundes Kinzigtal Integrated Care: improving population health by a shared health gain approach and a shared savings contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hildebrandt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated care solutions need supportive financial incentives. In this paper we describe the financial architecture and operative details of the integrated pilot Gesundes Kinzigtal.Description of integrated care case: Located in Southwest Germany, Gesundes Kinzigtal is one of the few population-based integrated care approaches in Germany, organising care across all health service sectors and indications. The system serving around half of the population of the region is run by a regional health management company (Gesundes Kinzigtal GmbH in coope­ration with the physicians' network in the region (MQNK, a German health care management company with a background in medical sociology and health economics (OptiMedis AG and with two statutory health insurers (among them is the biggest health insurer in Southwest Germany: AOK Baden-Württemberg.Discussion and (preliminary conclusion: The shared savings contract between Gesundes Kinzigtal GmbH and the two health insurers, providing financial incentives for managers and health care providers to realize a sub­stantial efficiency gain, could be an appropriate contractual base of Gesundes Kinzigtal's population health gain approach. This approach is based on the assumption that a more effective trans-sector organisation of Germany's health care system and increased investments in well-designed preventive programmes will lead to a reduction in  morbidity, and in particular to a reduced incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases. This, in turn, is to lead to a comparative reduction in health care cost. Although the comparative cost in the Kinzigtal region has been reduced from the onset of Gesundes Kinzigtal Integrated Care, only future research will have to demonstrate whether - and to what extent - cost reduction may be attributed to a real population health gain.

  14. Representativeness in population-based studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drivsholm, Thomas Bo; Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Davidsen, Michael;

    2006-01-01

    Decreasing rates of participation in population-based studies increasingly challenge the interpretation of study results, in both analytic and descriptive epidemiology. Consequently, estimates of possible differences between participants and non-participants are increasingly important for the...... interpretation of study results and generalization to the background population....

  15. Prevalence of self-reported multimorbidity in the general population and in primary care practices: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Mokraoui, Nadjib-Mohamed; Haggerty, Jeannie; Almirall, José; Fortin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Settings affect estimation of multimorbidity prevalence. Multimorbidity prevalence was reported to be substantially higher among family practice-based patients than in the general population, but prevalence estimates were obtained with different methods and at different time periods. The aim of the present study was to compare estimates of the prevalence of multimorbidity in the general population and in primary care clinical practices, both measured simultaneously and with the sam...

  16. Using health information technology to manage a patient population in accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Frances M; Rundall, Thomas G; Shortell, Stephen M; Bloom, Joan R

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the current landscape of health information technology (HIT) in early accountable care organizations (ACOs), the different strategies ACOs are using to develop HIT-based capabilities, and how ACOs are using these capabilities within their care management processes to advance health outcomes for their patient population. Design/methodology/approach - Mixed methods study pairing data from a cross-sectional National Survey of ACOs with in-depth, semi-structured interviews with leaders from 11 ACOs (both completed in 2013). Findings - Early ACOs vary widely in their electronic health record, data integration, and analytic capabilities. The most common HIT capability was drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction checks, with 53.2 percent of respondents reporting that the ACO possessed the capability to a high degree. Outpatient and inpatient data integration was the least common HIT capability (8.1 percent). In the interviews, ACO leaders commented on different HIT development strategies to gain a more comprehensive picture of patient needs and service utilization. ACOs realize the necessity for robust data analytics, and are exploring a variety of approaches to achieve it. Research limitations/implications - Data are self-reported. The qualitative portion was based on interviews with 11 ACOs, limiting generalizability to the universe of ACOs but allowing for a range of responses. Practical implications - ACOs are challenged with the development of sophisticated HIT infrastructure. They may benefit from targeted assistance and incentives to implement health information exchanges with other providers to promote more coordinated care management for their patient population. Originality/value - Using new empirical data, this study increases understanding of the extent of ACOs' current and developing HIT capabilities to support ongoing care management. PMID:27296880

  17. The HIV Care Continuum among Female Sex Workers: A Key Population in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Elizabeth Lancaster

    Full Text Available The HIV care continuum among female sex workers (FSW, a key population, has not been well characterized, especially within the generalized epidemics of sub-Saharan Africa. This was the first study to characterize the HIV care continuum among FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi.From July through September 2014, we used venue-based sampling to enroll 200 adult FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi into a cross-sectional evaluation assessing HIV care continuum outcomes. Seropositive FSW, identified using HIV rapid testing, received rapid CD4 counts in addition to viral loads using dried blood spots. We calculated proportions of HIV-infected FSW who had history of care, were on ART, and had suppressed viral load and we used Poisson regression to estimate the associations of demographic characteristics and transmission risk behaviors with each outcome.HIV seroprevalence was 69% (n = 138. Among all FSW the median age was 24 years (IQR: 22-28. Among the 20% who were newly diagnosed and reported previously testing negative, the median time since last HIV test was 11 months (interquartile range: 3-17. The majority (69% of HIV-infected FSW had a history of HIV care, 52% reported current ART use, and 45% were virally suppressed. Of the FSW who reported current ART use, 86% were virally suppressed. Transmission risk behaviors were not associated with continuum outcomes.FSW in Lilongwe were predominately young and have a high HIV prevalence. Only half of HIV-infected FSW reported current ART use, but the majority of those on ART were virally suppressed. To reduce ongoing transmission and improve health outcomes, increased HIV testing, care engagement, and ART coverage is urgently needed among FSW. Universal testing and treatment strategies for all FSW in Malawi must be strongly considered.

  18. Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis;

    2010-01-01

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices...... suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies....

  19. Understanding Health Care Costs in a Wisconsin Acute Leukemia Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Steinert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated factors driving health care costs of patients with a diagnosis of acute myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Standard costs identified in insurance claims data obtained from the Wisconsin Health Information Organization were used in a sample of 837 acute leukemia patients from April 2009 to June 2011. The Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization guided selection of patient and community factors expected to influence health care costs. A generalized linear model fitting gamma-distributed data with log-link technique was used to analyze cost. Results: Type of treatment received and disease severity represented significant cost drivers, and patients receiving at least some of their treatment from academic medical centers experienced higher costs. Inpatient care and pharmacy costs of patients who received treatment from providers located in areas of higher poverty experienced lower costs, raising questions of potential treatment and medical practice disparities between provider locations. Directions of study findings were not consistent between different types of services received and underscore the complexity of investigating health care cost. Conclusions: While prevalence of acute leukemia in the United States is low compared to other diseases, its extreme high cost of treatment is not well understood and potentially influences treatment decisions. Acute leukemia health care costs may not follow expected patterns; further exploration of the relationship between cost and the treatment decision, and potential treatment disparities between providers in different socioeconomic locations, is needed.

  20. Time based management in health care system: The chosen aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kobza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-based management (TBM is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms. Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990 and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001–2011 have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary

  1. Estudo da assistência hospitalar pública e privada em bases populacionais, 1986-1996 Study of public and private hospital care on a populational basis, 1986-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Stuardo Yazlle Rocha

    1999-02-01

    financiamento do SUS, reprimindo demanda e desestimulando os prestadores privados a trabalhar com pacientes SUS levou a uma seletividade negativa para o SUS. O resultado foi que aumentou a diferença nos padrões de assistência entre os serviços públicos e privados.INTRODUCTION: The last decade saw the creation and implementation of the Brazilian National Health System (NHS ­ public, universal and equalitarian ­ with the objective of offering wide coverage to meet the population's health needs. The objective of the study was the assessment of the evolution of public and private hospital care on a populational basis during the period of the implementation of the NHS. METHODS: The 984,142 inpatients of the general hospitals of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, during the period 1986 to 1996 were studied and those of them living in their own municipal district were selected. The inpatients are classified according to the financing system as private, pre-payment and NHS; the social situation of the patients and the profile of hospital morbidity are analysed. RESULTS: In the period studied a continuous growth in the number of hospitalizations is observed, both in absolute numbers and in coefficient per thousand inhabitants, increasing from 43,773 to 55,844 inpatients per year. Though when the categories of the hospitalizations are studied, it is seen that private inpatients present a reduction both in absolute numbers and as a coefficient from 3,181 (7.3% to 2,215 (3.9%; the NHS inpatients decrease in absolute numbers and in a percentage by a third at the end of the period - falling from 33,254 (76.0% to 29,373 (51.7%. On the other hand the pre-payment inpatient system triplicates in absolute numbers and duplicates by rate for inhabitant - from 7,338 (16.8% to 25,256 (44.4%. The NHS hospital care attends mainly unskilled and semi-skilled manual workers; the professionals, technicians, non manual and skilled manual workers being assisted by the private services. The hospital morbidity of

  2. A framework to support team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Greenstock, Louise N; Brooks, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Health systems with strong primary care orientations are known to be associated with improved equity, better access for patients to appropriate services at lower costs, and improved population health. Team-based models of primary care have emerged in response to health system challenges due to complex patient profiles, patient expectations and health system demands. Successful team-based models of primary care require a combination of interprofessional education and learning; organisational and management policies and systems; and practice support systems. To ensure evidence is put into practice, we propose a framework comprising five domains (theory, implementation, infrastructure, sustainability and evaluation) to assist policymakers, educators, researchers, managers and health professionals in supporting team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system. PMID:25370088

  3. A framework to support team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Greenstock, Louise N; Brooks, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Health systems with strong primary care orientations are known to be associated with improved equity, better access for patients to appropriate services at lower costs, and improved population health. Team-based models of primary care have emerged in response to health system challenges due to complex patient profiles, patient expectations and health system demands. Successful team-based models of primary care require a combination of interprofessional education and learning; organisational and management policies and systems; and practice support systems. To ensure evidence is put into practice, we propose a framework comprising five domains (theory, implementation, infrastructure, sustainability and evaluation) to assist policymakers, educators, researchers, managers and health professionals in supporting team-based models of primary care within the Australian health care system.

  4. Navigator Approach to Improve Quality of Care for Vulnerable Populations in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rebeca; Ferreira-Pinto, João; Loza, Oralia

    2015-01-01

    For nearly 30 years, Programa Compañeros Inc (Compañeros) has worked in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, to ensure that vulnerable populations can exercise their rights to receive HIV and substance abuse prevention and treatment services. Compañeros staff has worked to ameliorate the negative results that limit access to care to the most vulnerable individuals: those who are poor, homeless, sex workers, addicted, and others whose life context put them at greater risk for being infected with HIV. With support from the MAC AIDS Foundation, Compañeros has expanded its capacity to deliver services to persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and to HIV-vulnerable populations. This short communication describes findings from an internal evaluation conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the MAC AIDS-funded navigator-based program implemented at Compañeros. PMID:26242198

  5. Provision of critical care services for the obstetric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, P; Arulkumaran, N; Rhodes, A

    2013-12-01

    Management of the peripartum patient is a challenging aspect of critical care that requires consideration of both the physiological changes associated with pregnancy as well as the well-being of the foetus. In the UK, for every maternal death, approximately 118 near-miss events or severe acute maternal morbidities (SAMMs) occur. While a dedicated anaesthetic cover is usually provided on larger labour wards in the UK and US, a close communication with intensive care and other medical specialties must still be maintained. Medical outreach teams and early warning scores may help facilitate the early identification of clinical deterioration and prompt treatment. Ultimately level of care is allocated according to the clinical need, not the location, which may be a designated room, a normal labour room or a recovery area. Specialist obstetric units that provide high-dependency care facilities show lower rates of maternal transfer to critical care units and improved continuity of care before and after labour. The benefits of obstetric high-dependency units (HDUs) are likely to be determined by a number of logistic aspects of the hospital organisation, including hospital size and available resources. There remains a striking contrast in the burden of maternal mortality and morbidity and intensive care unit (ICU) resources between high- and low-income countries. The countries with the highest maternal mortality rates have the lowest number of ICU beds per capita. In under-resourced countries, patients admitted to ICUs tend to have higher illness severity scores, suggesting delayed admission to the ICU. The appropriate training of midwives is essential for successful HDUs located within labour wards. PMID:23972289

  6. HIV/aids related home based care practices among primary health care workers in Ogun state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Amoran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS is fast becoming a chronic disease with the advent of antiretroviral drugs, therefore making home based care key in the management of chronically ill HIV/AIDS patient. The objective of this study was to determine the perception and practice of health care workers on HIV/AIDS related home based care in the health facilities in Ogun state, Nigeria. Methods This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to obtain a representative sample of the primary health care workers in Ogun state. An interviewer administered structured questionnaire was administered by trained health workers to elicit the required information. Result A total of 350 health care workers were interviewed, 70% of the respondents could adequately describe the components of home based care. Only 38.7% were aware of the National guideline on home based care practices and 17.1% believe that home based care will not significantly improve the prognosis of PLWAs. Few 19.1% had ever been trained or ever involved 16.6% in home based care practices. Only 20 [5.7%] are involved on a weekly basis, 16 [4.6%] monthly and 22 [6.3%] quarterly. Reasons given for non implementation of home based care are inadequate number of healthcare workers 45%, lack of political will 24.4%, lack of implementation by facility managers 14% and inadequate funds 16.6%. Factors that were significantly associated with the practice of home based care were perception of its relevance in improving prognosis [OR = 54.21, C.I = 23.22-129.52] and presence of a support group in the facility [OR = 4.80, C.I = 2.40-9.57]. There was however no statistically significant relationship between adequate knowledge of home based care [OR = 0.78, C.I = 0.39-1.54] and previous training on home based care (OR = 1.43, C.I = 0.66-3.06]. Conclusion The practice of home based care for HIV/AIDS among the study population is low

  7. Clincal and population-based epidemiology of vertigo, migraine and migrainous vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhauser, Hannelore

    2010-01-01

    This cumulative habilitation thesis is based on studies on various aspects of the clinical and population-based epidemiology of vertigo, migraine and migrainous vertigo. A large study of the general population by validated neurotologic interviews shows that vertigo is a frequent and underdiagnosed symptom in the general population. Vertigo has considerable personal impact and leads to a high health care utilisation. Data on the epidemiology of migraine in Germany are presented based on a...

  8. 老年人口长期护理需求及影响因素分析--基于上海调查数据的实证分析%Analyzing the Long-term Care Needs of the Elderly Population and Its Factors:Based on Shanghai Survey Data Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 高向东

    2016-01-01

    The elderly long-term care has become one of the most important social issues. Basing on the survey data of 28 commu-nities in Shanghai and using relevant quantitative model to analysis the demand and satisfaction degree of the care services of the elderly in Shanghai as well as its influencing factors. The study found:not only the health of the elderly,long-term care costs have a significant influence long-term care needs of the elderly population,more important is the resource supply situation long-term care has become a key factor restricting the development of elderly long-term care. Clear the main responsibility for long-term care of the elderly population,and the establishment of geriatric care demand-oriented evaluation system,building government-led, long-term care service system,multi-subject social participation becomes effective path response to population aging risks.%老年人长期护理问题已经成为当前我国重要的社会问题之一。文章基于上海市28个社区的调查数据,利用相关定量模型,实证分析上海老年人对护理服务的需求、满意情况及其影响因素。研究发现:不仅老年人健康状况、长期护理费用对老年人口长期护理需求有显著影响,更为重要的是长期护理的资源供给情况已经成为制约老年长期护理发展的关键因素。明确老年人口长期护理服务的责任主体,建立以老年护理需求为导向的评估体系,构建政府主导、社会多元主体参与的长期护理服务体系成为应对人口老龄化风险的有效路径。

  9. A future for primary care for the Greek population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Jurgutis, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Greece is hit hard by the state debt crisis. This calls for comprehensive reforms to restore sustainable and balanced growth. Healthcare is one of the public sectors needing reform. The European Union (EU) Task Force for Greece asked the authors to assess the situation of primary care an

  10. Caring for an Ageing Population: Are Physiotherapy Graduates Adequately Prepared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramklass, Serela S.; Butau, Anne; Ntinga, Nomusa; Cele, Nozipho

    2010-01-01

    In view of South African policy developments related to the care of older persons, it was necessary to examine the nature of the geriatrics content within physiotherapy curricula. A survey was conducted amongst final-year student physiotherapists at South African universities, together with content analysis of physiotherapy curricula. Very little…

  11. After the flood. A strategic primary health care plan for homeless and migrant populations during an environmental disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, G T

    1998-01-01

    An environmental crisis, such as a flood, can significantly affect health care delivery and services in a community. Environmental disasters can be particularly devastating to already vulnerable populations such as the homeless and migrants, who, because of social, political, and economic constraints, experience special health care needs. In 1993, after Iowa experienced the worst flood in its history, President Clinton declared the entire state a federal disaster area. Later, the Iowa Department of Public Health received a federal grant to evaluate the health care delivered during the flood and develop a strategic plan to enhance primary health care for the homeless and migrant populations during future environmental disasters. The plan was based on data obtained during and after the flood in three critical areas--communication, health care delivery, and community. These areas were themes that emerged from a series of interviews with representatives from health care agencies and clients themselves. Each theme became the focus of specific, comprehensive recommendations and strategies to meet the daily challenges of the homeless and migrants, as well as to enhance the delivery of primary health care services in the future.

  12. Access to general health care services by a New Zealand population with serious mental illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheeler A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Literature suggests that good quality health care access can have a positive impact on the health of people with serious mental illness (SMI, but literature relating to patterns of access by this group is equivocal. AIM: This study was designed to explore health care access patterns in a group of people with SMI and to compare them with a general New Zealand population group, in order for health providers to understand how they might contribute to positive health outcomes for this group. METHODS: The study surveyed 404 mental health consumers aged 18-65 years receiving care from one district health board in Auckland about their patterns of health care access. Results were compared with those from the New Zealand Health Survey of the general population. RESULTS: Findings suggest that the SMI consumer respondents had poorer physical health than the general population respondents, accessed health care services in more complex ways and were more particular about who they accessed for their care than the general population respondents. There was some concern from SMI consumers around discrimination from health care providers. The study also suggested that some proactive management with SMI consumers for conditions such as metabolic syndrome was occurring within the health care community. DISCUSSION: The first point of access for SMI consumers with general health problems is not always the family general practitioner and so other health professionals may sometimes need to consider the mental and physical health of such consumers in a wider context than their own specialism.

  13. Evaluation of the european heart failure self-care behaviour scale in a united kingdom population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shuldham, Caroline; Theaker, Chris; Jaarsma, Tiny; Cowie, Martin R.

    2007-01-01

    Title. Evaluation of the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale in a United Kingdom population Aim. This paper is a report of a study to test the internal consistency, reliability and validity of the 12-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale in an English-speaking sample in

  14. Vehicle parameter identification using population based algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKDAĞ, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with parameter identification of a vehicle using population based algorithms such as Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), Artificial Bee Colony Optimization (ABC) and Genetic Algorithm (GA). Full vehicle model with seven degree of freedom (DoF) is employed, and two objective functions based on reference and computed responses are proposed. Solving the optimization problem vehicle mass, moments of inertia and vehicle center of gravity parameters, which are necessary for later app...

  15. Pivoting to Value-Based Care in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangvai, Devdutta G

    2016-01-01

    Health care in the United States, and by extension in North Carolina, is in a perpetual state of flux. From the Nixon-era predictions of runaway costs to the insurance-anchored efforts of Hillarycare to wide-sweeping reforms of Obamacare, established providers are regularly counseling the next generation on how different medicine will look when they are in practice. The accuracy of some of these predictions aside, one thing is sure: the pace and magnitude of change is palpably different this time. Pushed by both private and public payers to move from fee-for-service to value-based care while striving to meet the Triple Aim of improving patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs, all arenas of medicine--hospital-based, ambulatory, and public health--are feeling the pressure. At the same time, patients are acting more like consumers, demanding transparency in pricing and increased quality. In this issue of the NCMJ, experts from a broad range of backgrounds and health care organizations discuss the trials and rewards facing providers and health systems as they promise better outcomes and assume greater financial risk in care delivery. The ways that we are striving to meet new payment models--and the successes we are achieving--are as varied as the practices across North Carolina. In the following pages, you will read about the many efforts to implement these new models, both stories of success and a few cautionary tales. PMID:27422945

  16. Guidance for Structuring Team-Based Incentives in Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenthal, Daniel M.; Song, Zirui; Jena, Anupam B.; Ferris, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    New payment methods designed to incentivize more efficient care delivery are accelerating the movement of health care providers into organized provider groups. More efficient health care delivery requires explicit structuring of care delivery processes around teams of clinicians working toward common patient care goals. Provider organizations accepting new payment methods will need to design and implement compensation systems that provide incentives for team-based care. While lessons from stu...

  17. Applying activity-based costing in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodchis, W P

    1998-01-01

    As greater numbers of the elderly use health services, and as health care costs climb, effective financial tracking is essential. Cost management in health care can benefit if costs are linked to the care activities where they are incurred. Activity-based costing (ABC) provides a useful approach. The framework aligns costs (inputs), through activities (process), to outputs and outcomes. It allocates costs based on client care needs rather than management structure. The ABC framework was tested in a residential care facility and in supportive housing apartments. The results demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of ABC for long term care agencies, including community-based care. PMID:10339203

  18. Applying activity-based costing in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodchis, W P

    1998-01-01

    As greater numbers of the elderly use health services, and as health care costs climb, effective financial tracking is essential. Cost management in health care can benefit if costs are linked to the care activities where they are incurred. Activity-based costing (ABC) provides a useful approach. The framework aligns costs (inputs), through activities (process), to outputs and outcomes. It allocates costs based on client care needs rather than management structure. The ABC framework was tested in a residential care facility and in supportive housing apartments. The results demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of ABC for long term care agencies, including community-based care.

  19. Depression Care for Low-Income, Minority, Safety Net Clinic Populations with Comorbid Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Kathleen; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Xie, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Increasingly, mental health care is provided within the general health care sector. Accompanying this significant change is the demand for evidence-based as well as cost-effective or cost-neutral care models. Method: The authors present a pooled analysis of three large randomized clinical trials in which social workers provide…

  20. Chronic care case management for the frail elderly population in the United States: normative, funding and organizational aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giulio de Belvis

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    In the most developed countries, it is necessary to bring about significant changes to health care delivery through the strengthening of prevention, rehabilitation and the integration of the social and healthcare dimensions.

    This means moving the policy focus from “treating” to “taking care” of the sick in a broader and more integrated way, one which is more closely linked to the World Health Organization’s definition of health as physical, psychological and social well-being. This change involves the delivery of care for the elderly. Developed countries are confronting this issue by using different community-based programs to integrate acute and long-term care services for frail elderly individuals with complex health needs.

    The objective of this health policy article is to give an overview of the most recent initiatives on long-term care management for the elderly including normative, funding and organizational issues in the USA, as their public health system largely differs from those of the Western European countries.

    Particular attention is given to the PACE (Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly, which applies a comprehensive approach to managing the care of the frail elderly population and would represent a new framework in geriatric care. By incorporating a central core care team to manage the needs of each elderly individual, this approach recognizes the contributing factors that non-traditional health related functions play in the overall health of the individual.

    Although there is a little knowledge of this program, as it covers a very small percentage of the eligible individuals, and it may be difficult to extrapolate to other sectors of the population, PACE offers many lessons that could be applied to more effective integration of care for individuals and lead to better health outcomes.

  1. Integrated patient unit care in schizophrenia population vs a non-integrated patient unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waago-Hansen C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have described the benefits of integrated care in chronic conditions. Keeping the patients out of hospital is considered to increase value to the patient and is also benefit to the society and the healthcare provider.As we have an increase in the treatment options, costs, age and demand, an optimized treatment model is required if we want to maintain or obtain a sustainable system. The objective of this study was to describe how costs of treatment and value to the patient, to the hospital and the society differs in a non integrated patient unit (IPU vs an IPU system.Methods: Contact data of schizophrenic patients (n=51 from the hospital's electronic medical records (EMRs was accessed (from October 2010 till March 2012 and analyzed. All financial data was obtained from the finance department. Time driven activity based costing (TDABC as used to calculate the costs.Results: The study examined 1,149 out-patient consultations and 4,386 days of occupancy. By adopting an IPU approach, the costs were significantly reduced compared to the non-IPU approach. Increased complexity benefitted significantly from IPU. These patients had a higher frequency of contact but lower degrees of admission, whilst the non-IPU had significantly higher admission rates and duration of stay.Conclusions: This study shows a striking difference in the resources used on patients treated with an IPU vs a non-IPU approach. In almost every aspect, the IPU approach is by far superior to the non-IPU approach.

  2. Individual based population inference using tagging data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Baktoft, Henrik;

    estimate and its uncertainty (Hessian) can be computed. The individual model used in this text is a hidden Markov model. A simulation study concerning a two-dimensional biased random walk is examined to verify the consistency of the hierarchical estimation framework. In addition, a study based on acoustic...... telemetry data from pike illustrates how the framework can identify individuals that deviate from the remaining population....

  3. [A Maternal Health Care System Based on Mobile Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Zeng, Weijie; Li, Chengwei; Xue, Junwei; Wu, Xiuyong; Liu, Yinjia; Wan, Yuxin; Zhang, Yiru; Ji, Yurong; Wu, Lei; Yang, Yongzhe; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yueshan; Wu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Wearable devices are used in the new design of the maternal health care system to detect electrocardiogram and oxygen saturation signal while smart terminals are used to achieve assessments and input maternal clinical information. All the results combined with biochemical analysis from hospital are uploaded to cloud server by mobile Internet. Machine learning algorithms are used for data mining of all information of subjects. This system can achieve the assessment and care of maternal physical health as well as mental health. Moreover, the system can send the results and health guidance to smart terminals. PMID:27382731

  4. Provider-Level and Other Health Systems Factors Influencing Engagement in HIV Care: A Qualitative Study of a Vulnerable Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yukyan; Westergaard, Ryan; Kirk, Gregory; Ahmadi, Azal; Genz, Andrew; Keruly, Jeanne; Hutton, Heidi; Surkan, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the existence of highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV/AIDS morbidity and mortality continue to be public health burdens in the United States due to difficulties in engaging people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in continuous, effective care. In comparison to studies investigating patient-level characteristics associated with starting and remaining in care, there is relatively little research on how structural factors, such as those pertaining to healthcare providers and the infrastructure for delivery of health services, influence patients' engagement in HIV care. Our study, based in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, uses qualitative research methods with a population of predominantly African American PLWHA who have a history of drug abuse, to examine facilitators and barriers regarding adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and HIV care appointment attendance. Data collection involved conducting one-on-one, in-depth interviews with 31 study participants, and data analysis entailed thematic coding of interview transcripts and writing analytic memos to develop ideas and concepts. Among other findings, factors described as influential by our study participants related to appointment reminders and scheduling, the attitudes and communication styles of HIV clinicians, and the disposition and availability of other healthcare workers on the care "team." Thus, improving quality of HIV care and means of delivering it may help mitigate the numerous points in the continuum of HIV care when a patient may disengage. PMID:27428012

  5. Provider-Level and Other Health Systems Factors Influencing Engagement in HIV Care: A Qualitative Study of a Vulnerable Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yukyan; Westergaard, Ryan; Kirk, Gregory; Ahmadi, Azal; Genz, Andrew; Keruly, Jeanne; Hutton, Heidi; Surkan, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the existence of highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV/AIDS morbidity and mortality continue to be public health burdens in the United States due to difficulties in engaging people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in continuous, effective care. In comparison to studies investigating patient-level characteristics associated with starting and remaining in care, there is relatively little research on how structural factors, such as those pertaining to healthcare providers and the infrastructure for delivery of health services, influence patients’ engagement in HIV care. Our study, based in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, uses qualitative research methods with a population of predominantly African American PLWHA who have a history of drug abuse, to examine facilitators and barriers regarding adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and HIV care appointment attendance. Data collection involved conducting one-on-one, in-depth interviews with 31 study participants, and data analysis entailed thematic coding of interview transcripts and writing analytic memos to develop ideas and concepts. Among other findings, factors described as influential by our study participants related to appointment reminders and scheduling, the attitudes and communication styles of HIV clinicians, and the disposition and availability of other healthcare workers on the care “team.” Thus, improving quality of HIV care and means of delivering it may help mitigate the numerous points in the continuum of HIV care when a patient may disengage. PMID:27428012

  6. Integrating care for patients and populations: developing a national strategy for integrated health and social care in England

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This workshop examines the rise of integrated care as a central component of the UK Government’s current reforms to its health and social care system. In particular, the workshop presents the key debates and conclusions from work undertaken by The King’s Fund and the Nuffield Trust [1]—two key health policy ‘think tanks’ in the UK—in direct support of the UK Government’s emerging legislation and strategy. This work included a review of the evidence-base for integrated care; workshops and inte...

  7. Recruitment issues when primary care population clusters are used in randomised controlled clinical trials: climbing mountains or pushing boulders uphill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddinott, Pat; Britten, Jane; Harrild, Kirsten; Godden, David J

    2007-05-01

    Cluster randomised controlled trials for health promotion, education, public health or organisational change interventions are becoming increasingly common to inform evidence-based policy. However, there is little published methodological evidence on recruitment strategies for primary care population clusters. In this paper, we discuss how choosing which population cluster to randomise can impact on the practicalities of recruitment in primary care. We describe strategies developed through our experiences of recruiting primary care organisations to participate in a national randomised controlled trial of a policy to provide community breastfeeding groups for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, the BIG (Breastfeeding in Groups) trial. We propose an iterative qualitative approach to recruitment; collecting data generated through the recruitment process, identifying themes and using the constant comparative method of analysis. This can assist in developing successful recruitment strategies and contrasts with the standardised approach commonly used when recruiting individuals to participate in randomised controlled trials. Recruiting primary care population clusters to participate in trials is currently an uphill battle in Britain. It is a complex process, which can benefit from applying qualitative methods to inform trial design and recruitment strategy. Recruitment could be facilitated if health service managers were committed to supporting peer reviewed, funded and ethics committee approved research at national level. PMID:16996320

  8. An aging population and growing disease burden will require a large and specialized health care workforce by 2025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Timothy M; Gallo, Paul D; Chakrabarti, Ritasree; West, Terry; Semilla, April P; Storm, Michael V

    2013-11-01

    As the US population ages, the increasing prevalence of chronic disease and complex medical conditions will have profound implications for the future health care system. We projected future prevalence of selected diseases and health risk factors to model future demand for health care services for each person in a representative sample of the current and projected future population. Based on changing demographic characteristics and expanded medical coverage under the Affordable Care Act, we project that the demand for adult primary care services will grow by approximately 14 percent between 2013 and 2025. Vascular surgery has the highest projected demand growth (31 percent), followed by cardiology (20 percent) and neurological surgery, radiology, and general surgery (each 18 percent). Market indicators such as long wait times to obtain appointments suggest that the current supply of many specialists throughout the United States is inadequate to meet the current demand. Failure to train sufficient numbers and the correct mix of specialists could exacerbate already long wait times for appointments, reduce access to care for some of the nation's most vulnerable patients, and reduce patients' quality of life. PMID:24191094

  9. Risk adjustment methods for Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs based on the minimum data set for home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirdes John P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increasing interest in enhancing accountability in health care. As such, several methods have been developed to compare the quality of home care services. These comparisons can be problematic if client populations vary across providers and no adjustment is made to account for these differences. The current paper explores the effects of risk adjustment for a set of home care quality indicators (HCQIs based on the Minimum Data Set for Home Care (MDS-HC. Methods A total of 22 home care providers in Ontario and the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA in Manitoba, Canada, gathered data on their clients using the MDS-HC. These assessment data were used to generate HCQIs for each agency and for the two regions. Three types of risk adjustment methods were contrasted: a client covariates only; b client covariates plus an "Agency Intake Profile" (AIP to adjust for ascertainment and selection bias by the agency; and c client covariates plus the intake Case Mix Index (CMI. Results The mean age and gender distribution in the two populations was very similar. Across the 19 risk-adjusted HCQIs, Ontario CCACs had a significantly higher AIP adjustment value for eight HCQIs, indicating a greater propensity to trigger on these quality issues on admission. On average, Ontario had unadjusted rates that were 0.3% higher than the WRHA. Following risk adjustment with the AIP covariate, Ontario rates were, on average, 1.5% lower than the WRHA. In the WRHA, individual agencies were likely to experience a decline in their standing, whereby they were more likely to be ranked among the worst performers following risk adjustment. The opposite was true for sites in Ontario. Conclusions Risk adjustment is essential when comparing quality of care across providers when home care agencies provide services to populations with different characteristics. While such adjustment had a relatively small effect for the two regions, it did

  10. Comparisons of annual health care utilization, drug consumption, and medical expenditure between the elderly and general population in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Hsuan Lu, MS

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Elderly people had higher medical utilization than the general population, which may contribute to a fragmented health care system. Strategies to integrate health care for older people would be considered a first priority task of policymakers and health professionals.

  11. Population ageing and its implications on aggregate health care demand: empirical evidence from 22 OECD countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palangkaraya, Alfons; Yong, Jongsay

    2009-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the relationship between age and health care expenditure is not as straightforward as it appears. In fact, micro-level studies find that time to death, rather than ageing, is possibly the main driver of the escalating health care costs in developed countries. Unfortunately, the evidence at the macro level is less clear and often depends on the specification of the empirical model used. We use an aggregate demand framework to assess whether health expenditure is more likely to be driven by ageing per se or proximity to death. Using panel data from 22 OECD countries from the first half of the 1990s, we find population ageing to be negatively correlated with health expenditure once proximity to death is accounted for. This suggests that the effects of ageing on health expenditure growth might be overstated while the effects of the high costs of medical care at the end of life are potentially underestimated. With respect to the latter, our finding highlights the importance of long-term and hospice care management. An expanded long-term care program may not only improve patient welfare, but also reduce costs of care by reducing the duration of hospital care for terminally ill patients. If expensive medical treatment for patients near the end of life can be controlled for, health expenditure growth resulting from population ageing is unlikely to present a most serious problem.

  12. The utility of a health risk assessment in providing care for a rural free clinic population

    OpenAIRE

    Scariati, Paula D; Williams, Cyndy

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Free clinics are an important part of our country's health safety net, serving a working poor uninsured population. With limited resources and heavily dependent upon volunteer health care providers, these clinics have historically focused on stopgap, band-aid solutions to the population's health problems. Embracing a new paradigm, free clinics are now prioritizing resources for disease prevention and health promotion. Methods We initiated a Healthy Friday Clinic project in...

  13. Population Of US Practicing Psychiatrists Declined, 2003-13, Which May Help Explain Poor Access To Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tara F; Seirup, Joanna K; Pincus, Harold Alan; Ross, Joseph S

    2016-07-01

    A large proportion of the US population suffers from mental illness. Limited access to psychiatrists may be a contributor to the underuse of mental health services. We studied changes in the supply of psychiatrists from 2003 to 2013, compared to changes in the supply of primary care physicians and neurologists. During this period the number of practicing psychiatrists declined from 37,968 to 37,889, which represented a 10.2 percent reduction in the median number of psychiatrists per 100,000 residents in hospital referral regions. In contrast, the numbers of primary care physicians and neurologists grew during the study period. These findings may help explain why patients report poor access to mental health care. Future research should explore the impact of the declining psychiatrist supply on patients and investigate new models of care that seek to integrate mental health and primary care or use team-based care that combines the services of psychiatrists and nonphysician providers for individuals with severe mental illnesses. PMID:27385244

  14. A successful population-based smoking cessation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovan-Somborac Jaroslava

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Our country is in the third place in Europe concerning tobacco smoking. Although strict law regulations regarding indoor smoking have been brought, the law banning all tobacco advertising, and the behaviour of our population are inadequate. Our objective was to persuade smokers for the 'Quit and Win' campaign and to establish the number of smokers in health personnel employed in health facilities. Material and methods This population-based smoking cessation campaign was coordinated by Federal Institute of Public Health, through a network of Public Health Institutes within the country with the support of national and local media. Results and discussion Quit and Win campaign was organized for the third time. The campaign was realized with the financial support and sponsorship at community level throughout the country. The Federal Ministry provided a national health award. The national and local media accompanied the campaign. The campaign included 3.178 smokers and 2.575 supporters, that is 0.1% of the population over 18 years of age. This is in accordance with participants in some other countries, who had a better support. More than 60% of health care facility employees are smokers. Conclusions Our tradition, habits in the society and overall situation encourage smoking habits to spread in general population. Our campaign has proved that people should be motivated to quit smoking, but they need to be informed. Actions taken in general population and based on a positive smoking cessation program in which smokers are willing to stop smoking have given unexpectedly good results.

  15. Outness, Stigma, and Primary Health Care Utilization among Rural LGBT Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Whitehead

    Full Text Available Prior studies have noted significant health disadvantages experienced by LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations in the US. While several studies have identified that fears or experiences of stigma and disclosure of sexual orientation and/or gender identity to health care providers are significant barriers to health care utilization for LGBT people, these studies have concentrated almost exclusively on urban samples. Little is known about the impact of stigma specifically for rural LGBT populations, who may have less access to quality, LGBT-sensitive care than LGBT people in urban centers.LBGT individuals residing in rural areas of the United States were recruited online to participate in a survey examining the relationship between stigma, disclosure and "outness," and utilization of primary care services. Data were collected and analyzed regarding LGBT individuals' demographics, health care access, health risk factors, health status, outness to social contacts and primary care provider, and anticipated, internalized, and enacted stigmas.Higher scores on stigma scales were associated with lower utilization of health services for the transgender & non-binary group, while higher levels of disclosure of sexual orientation were associated with greater utilization of health services for cisgender men.The results demonstrate the role of stigma in shaping access to primary health care among rural LGBT people and point to the need for interventions focused towards decreasing stigma in health care settings or increasing patients' disclosure of orientation or gender identity to providers. Such interventions have the potential to increase utilization of primary and preventive health care services by LGBT people in rural areas.

  16. Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care: reflections on the populations assisted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Leme Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is the result of reflections of a group discussion among professionals, students and teachersheld during the First Symposium on Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care (PHC in 2011, which aimedto reflect on issues related to the populations assisted by the occupational therapist in PHC. The discussionssuggested two areas of consideration: (1 the challenges in the composition of care lines as well as living conditionsof the population assisted by occupational therapy; (2 the general practice of occupational therapists and theirinclusion in interdisciplinary teams. Participants reported that, in PHC, they provide assistance to populationstraditionally accompanied by Occupational Therapy such as people under psychological distress, people with disabilities, children with developmental delay, among others. The discussion pointed out that the difficultyof access to services, the weakness in the constitution of the lines of comprehensive health care and neglectof services to a number of groups that are excluded from care, define the profile of the population monitoredand the potential of assistance. These factors are related to the formation of PHC and “SUS” (Brazilian HealthSystem in the country. On the other hand, the living conditions of the population assisted, marked by povertyand social exclusion, the fragmentation of PHC practices, and the need for the professional to have a generalistprofile, being able to act interdisciplinarily and intersectorally, were considered crucial for the construction ofnew working tolls, theoretical improvement, and greater theoretical basis of professional performance in PHC.

  17. Rapid Point-of-Care Diagnostic Test for Syphilis in High-Risk Populations, Manaus, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Sabidó, Meritxell; Adele S Benzaken; de Andrade Rodrigues, Ệnio José; Mayaud, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the acceptability and operational suitability of a rapid point-of-care syphilis test and identified barriers to testing among high-risk groups and healthcare professionals in a sexually transmitted infections clinic in Manaus, Brazil. Use of this test could considerably alleviate the impact of syphilis in hard-to-reach populations in the Amazon region of Brazil.

  18. The Value of a College Degree for Foster Care Alumni: Comparisons with General Population Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is associated with substantial adult life benefits, including higher income and improved quality of life, among others. The current study compared adult outcomes of 250 foster care alumni college graduates with two samples of general population graduates to explore the role higher education plays in these young adults' lives.…

  19. Problematising Home-based Care for Children with Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, Hannah Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background and Literature Review This study explores issues around home-based care for children with cancer. Current policy tends to promote home-based care for children with cancer; this project seeks to interrogate that approach further and to explore the evidence base for this policy direction. The literature review is structured around key themes and demonstrates the gap in the evidence from health care professionals‘ perspectives and UK based research Methodology I adopt a quali...

  20. Complexity in caring for an ageing heart failure population: concomitant chronic conditions and age related impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Steeman, Els; Leventhal, Marcia E; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Hengartner-Kopp, Beatrice; Conca, Antoinette; Bernasconi, Arlette T; Petry, Heidi; Brunner-La Rocca, Hanspeter

    2004-12-01

    The complexity of caring for the ageing heart failure (HF) population is further complicated by concomitant chronic conditions (i.e., polypharmacy, depression), age related impairments (i.e., hearing, visual and cognitive impairments, impairments in activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), and other issues (e.g., health illiteracy, lack of social support). This paper provides an overview of these risk factors, outlines how they individually and in interplay endanger favourable outcome by putting patients at risk for poor self-management. Moreover, suggestions are made on how these issues could be addressed and integrated in heart failure management by applying gerontological care principles in caring for the ageing heart failure population.

  1. Family reintegration of children and adolescents in foster care in Brazilian municipalities with different population sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Iannelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this article is to present and analyze data from Brazilian foster care services for children / adolescents from the perspective of family reintegration. It also seeks to support the implementation of public policies in order to provide effective reintegration in accordance with the differing local contexts. It uses data from 1,157 municipalities that have foster care services. The methodology takes into account the data collection of 2,624 Brazilian centers and 36,929 children and adolescents in care. The growing number of children/adolescents in care is in line with the increase in population size: 8.4 per small city; 60 per large city and 602.4 per metropolis. With respect to care residence in a different municipality there are varying indices: 12.4% in metropolises and 33.6% in small cities, revealing the absence of centers close to family units in the smaller communities. Regarding the activities promoted together with families, it was seen that there are still units that do not perform any activities, which runs contrary to Brazilian law. It is clear that policies for the child/adolescent in foster care centers need to consider the capacity of the municipality in accordance with population size to implement support actions for families to assist in family reintegration.

  2. Health Care System Delay and Heart Failure in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Treated With Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Follow-up of Population-Based Medical Registry Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Hansen, Hans-Henrik Tilsted;

    2011-01-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), delay between contact with the health care system and initiation of reperfusion therapy (system delay) is associated with mortality, but data on the associated risk for congestive heart failure (CHF) among survivors are limited....

  3. The incidence of first venous thromboembolism in and around pregnancy using linked primary and secondary care data: a population based cohort study from England and comparative meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyshah Abdul Sultan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent linkage between primary and secondary care data has provided valuable information for studying heath outcomes that may initially present in different health care settings. The aim of this study was therefore, twofold: to use linked primary and secondary care data to determine an optimum definition for estimating the incidence of first VTE in and around pregnancy; and secondly to conduct a systematic literature review of studies on perinatal VTE incidence with the purpose of comparing our estimates. METHODS: We used primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD, which incorporates linkages to secondary care contained within Hospital Episode Statistics (HES between 1997 and 2010 to estimate the incidence rate of VTE in the antepartum and postpartum period. We systematically searched the literature on the incidence of VTE during antepartum and postpartum periods and performed a meta-analysis to provide comparison. FINDINGS: Using combined CPRD and HES data and a restrictive VTE definition, the absolute rate during the antepartum period and first six weeks postpartum (early postpartum were 99 (95%CI 85-116 and 468 (95%CI 391-561 per 100,000 person-years respectively. These were comparable to the pooled estimates from our meta-analysis (using studies after 2005 during the antepartum period (118/100,000 person-years and early postpartum (424/100,000 person-years. When we used only secondary care data to identify VTE events, incidence was lower during the early postpartum period (308/100,000 person-years, whereas relying only on primary care data lead to lower incidence during the time around delivery, but higher rates during the postpartum period (558/100,000 person-years. CONCLUSION: Using combined CPRD and HES data gives estimates of the risk of VTE in and around pregnancy that are comparable to the existing literature. It also provides more accurate estimation of the date of VTE diagnosis which will allow

  4. Oral Sex and HPV: Population Based Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anupam; Verma, Veerendra

    2015-03-01

    Human pappilloma virus (HPV) is well established in etiology of uterine cervical cancers, but its role in head and neck cancer is strongly suggested through many epidemiological and laboratory studies. Although HPV-16 induced oropharyngeal cancer is a distinct molecular entity, its role at other sub-sites (oral cavity, larynx, nasopharynx, hypopharynx) is less well established. Oral sex is supposedly the most commonly practiced unnatural sex across the globe and may prove to be a potential transmitting link between cancers of the uterine cervix and the oropharynx in males particularly in those 10-15% non-smokers. In India with the second largest population (higher population density than China) the oral sex is likely to be a common 'recreation-tool' amongst the majority (poor) and with the concurrent highly prevalent bad cervical/oral hygiene the HPV is likely to synergize other carcinogens. Hence in accordance (or coincidently), in India the cervical cancer happens to be the commonest cancer amongst females while oral/oropharyngeal cancer amongst males. Oral sex as a link between these two cancer types, can largely be argued considering a poor level of evidence in the existing literature. The modern world has even commercialized oral sex in the form of flavored condoms. The inadequate world literature currently is of a low level of evidence to conclude such a relationship because no such specific prospective study has been carried out and also due to wide (and unpredictable) variety of sexual practices, such a relationship can only be speculated. This article briefly reviews the existing literature on various modes and population based indications for HPV to be implicated in head and neck cancer with reference to oral sexual practice.

  5. [The present and future of community/home-based palliative care in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueng, Ruey-Shiuan; Hsu, Su-Hsuan; Shih, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2015-04-01

    In Taiwan, the Department of Health (DOH) has implemented regulations and policies related to hospice and palliative care since 1995. Taiwan is the first country in Asia to have a Natural Death Act, promulgated in 2000. Although recognition of the need for palliative care in non-cancer terminally ill patients is increasing, at present, the needs of these patients are often not met. Moreover, while a majority of the population prefers to die at home, the percentage of patients who die in the home setting remains small. The palliative care system should be adjusted to improve the accessibility and continuity of care based on the needs of patients. Therefore, the Jin-Shan Branch of the National Taiwan University Hospital has run a pilot community palliative care service model since 2012. National Health Insurance reimbursement was introduced in 2014 for community-based palliative care services. Establishing a formal system of community-based palliative care should be encouraged in order to improve the quality of care at the end of life and to allow more patients to receive end-of-life care and die in their own communities. This system will require that skilled nurses provide discharge planning, symptoms control, end-of-life communications, social-resources integration, and social-support networks in order to achieve a high quality of end-of-life care. PMID:25854944

  6. Pittsburgh as a High Risk Population: The Potential Savings of a Personalized Dental Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrew J; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Little evidence exists for the current standard of two annual preventative care visits. The purpose of this study was investigate this claim by modeling the potential savings of implementing a personalized care plan for high risk individuals in the Pittsburgh region. Methods. Using radiographs from 39 patients in the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository database, two models were created to analyse the direct savings of implementing a more aggressive preventative treatment plan and to view the longitudinal cost of increased annual yearly visits. Results. There is a significant decrease (p < 0.001) between original and modeled treatment cost when treatment severity is reduced. In addition, there is a significant decrease in adult lifetime treatment cost (p < 0.001) for up to four annual visits. Conclusions. Patients in high risk populations may see significant cost benefits in treatment cost when a personalized care plan, or higher annual preventative care visits, is implemented. PMID:27006657

  7. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie L W Spoorenberg

    Full Text Available Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through "Embrace," an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach.Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1 Experiences with aging, with the themes "Struggling with health," "Increasing dependency," "Decreasing social interaction," "Loss of control," and "Fears;" and 2 Experiences with Embrace, with the themes "Relationship with the case manager," "Interactions," and "Feeling in control, safe, and secure". The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants' ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system.The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging.

  8. Health Care Use by Patients with Somatoform Disorders A Register-Based Follow-Up Study*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nadia Lyhne Trærup; Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Andersen, Jon Trærup;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies have shown a greater use of medical than mental health services in patients with somatoform disorders. However, not many studies are based on structured interviews and include the entire somatoform spectrum of diagnoses. We conducted a register-based case-control study to...... background population. Data from the Danish National Registers were used to assess health care use in both primary and secondary care. RESULTS: Somatoform patients incurred 2.11 (2.09-2.12) times the primary care visits of controls. They had 3.12 (3.08-3.16) times as many somatic bed-days than controls and 3...

  9. Prevalence of nephropathy in the German diabetes population-Is early referral to nephrological care a realistic demand today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, Wolfgang

    2008-10-01

    In Germany, diabetes mellitus in the general population has increased to ∼8 million people. The implication of this trend for future nephrological care is not well known, as data on this issue are rather limited. Results from different population-based studies suggest that microalbuminuria in diabetic patients is present in 20-30% of the cases. Findings from the diabetes disease management programme in the North-Rhine area revealed the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage II in half of the participants (CKD stage III was present in ∼20%). Only a small proportion of this cohort (∼1-2%) will reach end-stage renal failure, probably due to the excess mortality risks attributed to advanced kidney disease. Results from the QUASI-Niere registry, which reports on renal replacement therapy in Germany, indicate almost constant incidence and prevalence rates of diabetes in the last 5 years (30.6-34.2% and 23.6-27.1%, respectively). The high percentages of early stages of CKD in the diabetes population indicate a potentially high burden of future nephrological care, especially if patients are referred to nephrologists at an early stage. In reality, in nephrological care, bearing this burden is impossible without expanding the resources for this patient group.

  10. [Factors affecting access to health care institutions by the internally displaced population in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2008-04-01

    In Colombia, the on-going armed conflict causes displacement of thousands of persons that suffer its economic, social, and health consequences. Despite government regulatory efforts, displaced people still experience serious problems in securing access to health care. In order to analyze the institutional factors that affect access to health care by the internally displaced population, a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was carried out by means of semi-structured individual interviews with a criterion sample of stakeholders (81). A narrative content analysis was performed, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation of data by themes and informants. Inadequate funding, providers' problems with reimbursement by insurers, and lack of clear definition as to coverage under the Social Security System in Health pose barriers to access to health care by the internally displaced population. Bureaucratic procedures, limited inter- and intra-sector coordination, and scarce available resources for public health service providers also affect access. Effective government action is required to ensure the right to health care for this population. PMID:18392351

  11. Local environment but not genetic differentiation influences biparental care in ten plover populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Vincze

    Full Text Available Social behaviours are highly variable between species, populations and individuals. However, it is contentious whether behavioural variations are primarily moulded by the environment, caused by genetic differences, or a combination of both. Here we establish that biparental care, a complex social behaviour that involves rearing of young by both parents, differs between closely related populations, and then test two potential sources of variation in parental behaviour between populations: ambient environment and genetic differentiation. We use 2904 hours behavioural data from 10 geographically distinct Kentish (Charadrius alexandrinus and snowy plover (C. nivosus populations in America, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa to test these two sources of behavioural variation. We show that local ambient temperature has a significant influence on parental care: with extreme heat (above 40 °C total incubation (i.e. % of time the male or female incubated the nest increased, and female share (% female share of incubation decreased. By contrast, neither genetic differences between populations, nor geographic distances predicted total incubation or female's share of incubation. These results suggest that the local environment has a stronger influence on a social behaviour than genetic differentiation, at least between populations of closely related species.

  12. The seduction of general practice and illegitimate birth of an expanded role in population health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetow, Stephen; Docherty, Barbara

    2005-08-01

    To reduce health inequalities and improve quality in health care, health policy initiatives in countries including New Zealand and the United Kingdom are expecting general practice to share responsibilities for a population approach to health care. This is giving increased emphasis to preventative care, including health promotion. Reasoned debate on this policy is overdue, not least in New Zealand, where clinicians within general practice appear to have been seduced by the lack of clarity in health policy into accepting this policy without question. They appear to disregard implications of the policy for redefining the nature and scope of their discipline (and of public health), including their own role as providers of personal care. This paper suggests that a population health approach is inappropriate in general practice when this approach weakens personal care and involves health promotion activity of unknown safety and effectiveness. The example of intentional weight loss to reduce overweight is used to illustrate these issues. We argue for a restricted range of general practice services.

  13. Practice Based Versus Telemedicine Based Collaborative Care for Depression in Rural Federally Qualified Health Centers: A Pragmatic Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, John C.; Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Mouden, Sip B.; Mittal, Dinesh; Hudson, Teresa J.; Schroeder, Gary W.; Williams, David K.; Bynum, Carol A.; Mattox, Rhonda; Rost, Kathryn M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Practice Based Collaborative Care is a complex evidence-based practice that is difficult to implement in smaller primary care practices lacking on-site mental health staff. Telemedicine Based Collaborative Care virtually co-locates and integrates mental health providers into primary care settings. The objective of this multi-site randomized pragmatic comparative effectiveness trial was to compare the outcomes of patients randomized to Practice Based versus Telemedicine Based Collaborative Care. Method From 2007–2009, patients at Federally Qualified Health Centers serving medically underserved populations were screened for depression, and 364 patients screening positive were enrolled and followed for 18 months. Those randomized to Practice Based Collaborative Care received evidence-based care from an on-site primary care provider and nurse care manager. Those randomized to Telemedicine Based Collaborative Care received evidence-based care from an on-site primary care provider and off-site telephone nurse care manager, telephone pharmacist, tele-psychologist and tele-psychiatrist. The primary clinical outcomes were treatment response, remission and changes in depression severity Results There were significant group main effects for both response (OR=7.74, CI95=3.94–15.20, p<0.0001) and remission (OR=12.69, CI95=4.81–33.46, p<0.0001) and a significant overall group by time interaction effect for Hopkins Symptom Checklist depression severity (χ23=40.51, p<0.0001) with greater reductions in depression severity observed over time for those randomized to Telemedicine Based Collaborative Care. Improvements in outcomes appeared to be attributable to higher fidelity to the collaborative care evidence-base in the Telemedicine Based group. Conclusions Contracting with an off-site Telemedicine Based Collaborative Care team yields better outcomes than implementing Practice Based Collaborative Care with locally available staff. PMID:23429924

  14. Availability and structure of primary medical care services and population health and health care indicators in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Geoffrey

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that greater availability of primary medical care practitioners (GPs contributes to better population health. We evaluated whether measures of the supply and structure of primary medical services are associated with health and health care indicators after adjusting for confounding. Methods Data for the supply and structure of primary medical services and the characteristics of registered patients were analysed for 99 health authorities in England in 1999. Health and health care indicators as dependent variables included standardised mortality ratios (SMR, standardised hospital admission rates, and conceptions under the age of 18 years. Linear regression analyses were adjusted for Townsend score, proportion of ethnic minorities and proportion of social class IV/ V. Results Higher proportions of registered rural patients and patients ≥ 75 years were associated with lower Townsend deprivation scores, with larger partnership sizes and with better health outcomes. A unit increase in partnership size was associated with a 4.2 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 6.7 unit decrease in SMR for all-cause mortality at 15–64 years (P = 0.001. A 10% increase in single-handed practices was associated with a 1.5 (0.2 to 2.9 unit increase in SMR (P = 0.027. After additional adjustment for percent of rural and elderly patients, partnership size and proportion of single-handed practices, GP supply was not associated with SMR (-2.8, -6.9 to 1.3, P = 0.183. Conclusions After adjusting for confounding with health needs of populations, mortality is weakly associated with the degree of organisation of practices as represented by the partnership size but not with the supply of GPs.

  15. Impact of Population Stratification on Family-Based Association in an Admixed Population

    OpenAIRE

    Mersha, T. B.; Ding, L; He, H; Alexander, E. S.; Zhang, X.; B. G. Kurowski; Pilipenko, V.; Kottyan, L.; Martin, L. J.; Fardo, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Population substructure is a well-known confounder in population-based case-control genetic studies, but its impact in family-based studies is unclear. We performed population substructure analysis using extended families of admixed population to evaluate power and Type I error in an association study framework. Our analysis shows that power was improved by 1.5% after principal components adjustment. Type I error was also reduced by 2.2% after adjusting for family substratification. The prese...

  16. Do Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems benefit local populations? Maternal care utilisation in Butajira HDSS, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesganaw Fantahun Afework

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The benefits of Health and Demographic Surveillance sites for local populations have been the topic of discussion as countries such as Ethiopia take efforts to achieve their Millennium Development Goal targets, on which they lag behind. Ethiopia's maternal mortality ratio is very high, and in the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey (2011 EDHS it was estimated to be 676/100,000 live births. Recent Global Burden of Disease (GBD and estimates based on the United Nations model reported better, but still unacceptably high, figures of 497/100,000 and 420/100,000 live births for 2013. In the 2011 EDHS, antenatal care (ANC utilization was estimated at 34%, and delivery in health facilities was only 10%. Objectives: To compare maternal health service utilization among populations in a Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS to non-HDSS populations in Butajira district, south central Ethiopia. Design: A community-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in January and February 2012 among women who had delivered in the 2 years before the survey. Results: A total of 2,296 women were included in the study. One thousand eight hundred and sixty two (81.1% had attended ANC at least once, and 37% of the women had attended ANC at least four times. A quarter of the women delivered their last child in a health facility. Of the women living outside the HDSS areas, 715 (75.3% attended ANC at least once compared to 85.1% of women living in the HDSS areas [adjusted odds ratio (AOR 0.59; 95% CI 0.46, 0.74]. Of the women living outside the HDSS areas, only 170 (17.9% delivered in health facilities and were assisted by skilled attendants during delivery, whereas 30.0% of those living in HDSS areas delivered in health facilities (AOR 0.66; 95% CI 0.48, 0.91. Conclusion: This paper provides possible evidence that living in an HDSS site has a positive influence on maternal health. In addition, there may be a positive influence on

  17. [Prevalence of home care and associated factors in the Brazilian elderly population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Louriele Soares; Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Soares, Mariangela Uhlmann; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Thumé, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of home care for the Brazilian elderly population and associated factors, using a cross-sectional design with a sample of individuals 60 years or older living in the urban areas of 100 municipalities located in 23 states. A Poisson regression model was used for crude and adjusted analyses. A total of 6,624 elderly individuals were interviewed, and prevalence of home care was 11.7%. After adjustment, higher home care rates were associated with female gender, older old age, lower schooling and purchasing power, diagnosis of chronic illness, history of falls, previous hospitalization, and medical consultation in the previous three months. The results highlight more extensive use of home care by the most vulnerable elderly. This finding suggests a contribution from home care to the promotion of healthcare equity in Brazil, especially due to the expansion of the Family Health Strategy. The results can support the organization of the work process for primary care professionals and managers. PMID:27027455

  18. Age- and Gender-Based Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Response, and Recovery Health Care and Health Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing Laws, Regulations, and Guidelines Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prescription Drug Misuse and ...

  19. A Patient-Based Analysis of Drug Disorder Diagnoses in the Medicare Population

    OpenAIRE

    Cartwright, William S.; Ingster, Lillian M.

    1993-01-01

    This article utilizes the Part A Medicare provider analysis and review (MEDPAR) file for fiscal year (FY) 1987. The discharge records were organized into a patient-based record that included alcohol, drug, and mental (ADM) disorder diagnoses as well as measures of resource use. The authors find that there are substantially higher costs of health care incurred by the drug disorder diagnosed population. Those of the Medicare population diagnosed with drug disorders had longer lengths of stay (L...

  20. [Problems of accessibility for the population of Georgian modern outpatient and inpatient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkvadze, R A; Gerzmava, O Kh

    2014-12-01

    Which began in 2013, the implementation of the priority national project - Universal health programs for population of Georgia - has important social significance, given the increased accessibility of the population in case of timely and quality medical care. Various forms of public participation in the payment of services received in varying degrees allow us to find a compromise between containment of demand and increase access to treatment. And if the insurance in its various forms, largely solves the last problem, but may create a problem of rising costs, the different types of direct payments more efficient demand, however creates a need to control access to health care for populations with a high demand for medical care. Co-payments under the defined government programs and directly to the patient, on the one hand, imply severally pay for health care and the fear of the occurrence of catastrophic costs of treatment, and on the other hand, allow you to control the rising costs of the health system. The problem of reducing the availability of medical care is overcome by introducing exemptions from co-payments for vulnerable groups, which in turn leads to a substantial increase in government spending. It must be emphasized that the tools developed and the results of the calculations can be used to compare the effects of the introduction of various schemes of co-payments and choose the most suitable scheme, in terms of the extent of the burden of private expenditure on treatment, as well as income and expenses of the health system in general. PMID:25617109

  1. Caring relationships in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

  2. Dental care for aging populations in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, United kingdom, and Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Vigild, Merete; Nitschke, Ina;

    2005-01-01

    to perceived need, a variety of social and behavioral factors as well as general health factors have been identified as determinants of dental service use. Frail and functionally dependent elderly have special difficulties in accessing dental care; private dental practitioners are hesitant to provide dental......This article reviews access to and financing of dental care for aging populations in selected nations in Europe. Old age per se does not seem to be a major factor in determining the use of dental services. Dentition status, on the other hand, is a major determinant of dental attendance. In addition...... care to these patients. One reason may be that the fee for treating these patients is too low, considering high dental office expenses. Another reason may be problems related to management of medically compromised patients. This raises an important question: does inadequate training in geriatric...

  3. Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Skin Carriage among Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Personnel: from Population to Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hira, Vishal; Sluijter, Marcel; Goessens, Wil H.F.; Ott, Alewijn; Groot, Ronald; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Kornelisse, René F.

    2010-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major cause of sepsis in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide. Infecting strains of these commensal bacteria may originate from NICU personnel. Therefore, we studied the characteristics of CoNS isolates from NICU personnel and compared them to those of isolates from the general population and from sepsis patients. Furthermore, we studied the epidemiological effect on CoNS carriage of NICU personnel after a period of absence. In our study...

  4. Population-Based Placental Weight Ratio Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M. Macdonald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The placental weight ratio (PWR is a health indicator that reflects the balance between fetal and placental growth. The PWR is defined as the placental weight divided by the birth weight, and it changes across gestation. Its ranges are not well established. We aimed to establish PWR distributions by gestational age and to investigate whether the PWR distributions vary by fetal growth adequacy, small, average, and large for gestational age (SGA, AGA, and LGA. The data came from a hospital based retrospective cohort, using all births at two London, Ontario hospitals in the past 10 years. All women who delivered a live singleton infant between 22 and 42 weeks of gestation were included (n=41441. Nonparametric quantile regression was used to fit the curves. The results demonstrate decreasing PWR and dispersion, with increasing gestational age. A higher proportion of SGA infants have extreme PWRs than AGA and LGA, especially at lower gestational ages. On average, SGA infants had higher PWRs than AGA and LGA infants. The overall curves offer population standards for use in research studies. The curves stratified by fetal growth adequacy are the first of their kind, and they demonstrate that PWR differs for SGA and LGA infants.

  5. A public-private trauma center network in Florida harnesses data to improve care quality for an aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVernay, Christina

    2013-12-01

    As the US population ages, trauma systems face new challenges in addition to the long-standing problem of access. Patients ages sixty-five and older are more likely than younger patients to fall and suffer serious injury or death as a result. This older patient population, when compared with younger cohorts, suffers higher mortality rates, has more comorbidities-diabetes, cancer, and heart conditions being the more serious among them-and takes more medications, which can complicate treatment. The University of South Florida (USF) Medical School and the HCA hospital system have partnered to create a network of five trauma centers in underserved areas of the state to increase access to trauma care for all Floridians while maintaining a special focus on geriatric trauma care. Collecting and analyzing data for improving care quality and undertaking research is a central aim of the partnership. Based on their research findings, trauma surgeons in the USF/HCA Trauma Network have identified best practices and codified them in standard operating procedures. PMID:24301397

  6. Dental care for aging populations in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, United kingdom, and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Vigild, Merete; Nitschke, Ina; Berkey, Douglas B

    2005-09-01

    This article reviews access to and financing of dental care for aging populations in selected nations in Europe. Old age per se does not seem to be a major factor in determining the use of dental services. Dentition status, on the other hand, is a major determinant of dental attendance. In addition to perceived need, a variety of social and behavioral factors as well as general health factors have been identified as determinants of dental service use. Frail and functionally dependent elderly have special difficulties in accessing dental care; private dental practitioners are hesitant to provide dental care to these patients. One reason may be that the fee for treating these patients is too low, considering high dental office expenses. Another reason may be problems related to management of medically compromised patients. This raises an important question: does inadequate training in geriatric dentistry discourage dentists from seeking opportunities to treat geriatric patients? Overall, the availability of dental services, the organization of the dental health care delivery system, and price subsidy for dental treatment are important factors influencing access to dental care among older people in Europe as well as in the United States. PMID:16141084

  7. Value Based Care and Patient-Centered Care: Divergent or Complementary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Eric K; Hicks, Lisa K

    2016-08-01

    Two distinct but overlapping care philosophies have emerged in cancer care: patient-centered care (PCC) and value-based care (VBC). Value in healthcare has been defined as the quality of care (measured typically by healthcare outcomes) modified by cost. In this conception of value, patient-centeredness is one important but not necessarily dominant quality measure. In contrast, PCC includes multiple domains of patient-centeredness and places the patient and family central to all decisions and evaluations of quality. The alignment of PCC and VBC is complicated by several tensions, including a relative lack of patient experience and preference measures, and conceptions of cost that are payer-focused instead of patient-focused. Several strategies may help to align these two philosophies, including the use of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials and value determinations, and the purposeful integration of patient preference in clinical decisions and guidelines. Innovative models of care, including accountable care organizations and oncology patient-centered medical homes, may also facilitate alignment through improved care coordination and quality-based payment incentives. Ultimately, VBC and PCC will only be aligned if patient-centered outcomes, perspectives, and preferences are explicitly incorporated into the definitions and metrics of quality, cost, and value that will increasingly influence the delivery of cancer care.

  8. Population and antenatal-based HIV prevalence estimates in a high contracepting female population in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnighausen Till

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To present and compare population-based and antenatal-care (ANC sentinel surveillance HIV prevalence estimates among women in a rural South African population where both provision of ANC services and family planning is prevalent and fertility is declining. With a need, in such settings, to understand how to appropriately adjust ANC sentinel surveillance estimates to represent HIV prevalence in general populations, and with evidence of possible biases inherent to both surveillance systems, we explore differences between the two systems. There is particular emphasis on unrepresentative selection of ANC clinics and unrepresentative testing in the population. Methods HIV sero-prevalence amongst blood samples collected from women consenting to test during the 2005 annual longitudinal population-based serological survey was compared to anonymous unlinked HIV sero-prevalence amongst women attending antenatal care (ANC first visits in six clinics (January to May 2005. Both surveillance systems were conducted as part of the Africa Centre Demographic Information System. Results Population-based HIV prevalence estimates for all women (25.2% and pregnant women (23.7% were significantly lower than that for ANC attendees (37.7%. A large proportion of women attending urban or peri-urban clinics would be predicted to be resident within rural areas. Although overall estimates remained significantly different, presenting and standardising estimates by age and location (clinic for ANC-based estimates and individual-residence for population-based estimates made some group-specific estimates from the two surveillance systems more predictive of one another. Conclusion It is likely that where ANC coverage and contraceptive use is widespread and fertility is low, population-based surveillance under-estimates HIV prevalence due to unrepresentative testing by age, residence and also probably by HIV status, and that ANC sentinel surveillance over

  9. Impact of Population Stratification on Family-Based Association in an Admixed Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Mersha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Population substructure is a well-known confounder in population-based case-control genetic studies, but its impact in family-based studies is unclear. We performed population substructure analysis using extended families of admixed population to evaluate power and Type I error in an association study framework. Our analysis shows that power was improved by 1.5% after principal components adjustment. Type I error was also reduced by 2.2% after adjusting for family substratification. The presence of population substructure was underscored by discriminant analysis, in which over 92% of individuals were correctly assigned to their actual family using only 100 principal components. This study demonstrates the importance of adjusting for population substructure in family-based studies of admixed populations.

  10. Impact of Population Stratification on Family-Based Association in an Admixed Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersha, T B; Ding, L; He, H; Alexander, E S; Zhang, X; Kurowski, B G; Pilipenko, V; Kottyan, L; Martin, L J; Fardo, D W

    2015-01-01

    Population substructure is a well-known confounder in population-based case-control genetic studies, but its impact in family-based studies is unclear. We performed population substructure analysis using extended families of admixed population to evaluate power and Type I error in an association study framework. Our analysis shows that power was improved by 1.5% after principal components adjustment. Type I error was also reduced by 2.2% after adjusting for family substratification. The presence of population substructure was underscored by discriminant analysis, in which over 92% of individuals were correctly assigned to their actual family using only 100 principal components. This study demonstrates the importance of adjusting for population substructure in family-based studies of admixed populations. PMID:26064873

  11. Village-based primary health care in the Central Highlands of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, B; Ladinsky, J; Volk, N

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes the first year of an ongoing village health care and economic development project in the Krong Buk district of Dak Lak province in Vietnam's Central Highlands. The project serves 21 villages with a total population of just over 15,000. Most belong to ethnic minority groups. Physicians from the province capital of Boun Me Thuot were trained by a multi-disciplinary team of American health care workers to be trainers and supervisors of 21 village health care workers (VHWs). Two months later, a VHW from each village was trained in primary and preventive health care by the physician-supervisors. Since this initial training, each VHW has been provided with materials, medicines and monthly supervision by the physician-supervisors. The health care component has been complemented by an economic development project based on a system of small loans. Data from the first year of monthly reports and from a baseline survey are presented in this paper.

  12. Patient navigation and financial incentives to promote smoking cessation in an underserved primary care population: A randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, Lisa M; Russinova, Zlatka L; Bloch, Philippe P; Truong, Ve; Xuan, Ziming; Pbert, Lori; Lasser, Karen E

    2015-11-01

    Despite the high risk of tobacco-related morbidity and mortality among low-income persons, few studies have connected low-income smokers to evidence-based treatments. We will examine a smoking cessation intervention integrated into primary care. To begin, we completed qualitative formative research to refine an intervention utilizing the services of a patient navigator trained to promote smoking cessation. Next, we will conduct a randomized controlled trial combining two interventions: patient navigation and financial incentives. The goal of the intervention is to promote smoking cessation among patients who receive primary care in a large urban safety-net hospital. Our intervention will encourage patients to utilize existing smoking cessation resources (e.g., quit lines, smoking cessation groups, discussing smoking cessation with their primary care providers). To test our intervention, we will conduct a randomized controlled trial, randomizing 352 patients to the intervention condition (patient navigation and financial incentives) or an enhanced traditional care control condition. We will perform follow-up at 6, 12, and 18 months following the start of the intervention. Evaluation of the intervention will target several implementation variables: reach (participation rate and representativeness), effectiveness (smoking cessation at 12 months [primary outcome]), unintended consequences (e.g., purchase of illicit substances with incentive money), adoption (use of intervention across primary care suites), implementation (delivery of intervention), and maintenance (smoking cessation after conclusion of intervention). Improving the implementation of smoking cessation interventions in primary care settings serving large underserved populations could have substantial public health impact, reducing cancer-related morbidity/mortality and associated health disparities. PMID:26362691

  13. Violent offenders as a target population for Public Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassaert, T; Segeren, M; Grimbergen, C; Tuinebreijer, W; de Wit, M

    2016-05-01

    The study sought to specify which part of a population of young adult violent offenders in Amsterdam (mean age 24.9 years, sd = 8.2) were eligible for Public Mental Health Care (PMHC). The results of a semi-structured clinical interview were used (N = 454), which included the Self-Sufficiency Matrix (SSM-D). Using the SSM-D and two distinct definitions of what constitutes a need for PMHC, the size of the PMHC target population was determined twice. Depending on which definition was used, 35.9% (mathematical algorithm which put weights to single SSM-D domains) and 34.8% (problematic levels of self-sufficiency on a selection of domains) appeared to be eligible for entering the PMHC system. The study confirms that a substantial proportion of vulnerable people are among the forensic population. PMID:27038096

  14. Severity, not type, is the main predictor of decreased quality of life in elderly women with urinary incontinence: a population-based study as part of a randomized controlled trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barentsen Janka A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary incontinence negatively influences the lives of 25-50% of elderly women, mostly due to feelings of shame and being limited in activities and social interactions. This study explores whether differences exist between types of urinary incontinence (stress, urgency or mixed and severity of the symptoms, with regard to their effects on generic and condition-specific quality of life. Methods This is a cross-sectional study among participants of a randomized controlled trial in primary care. A total of 225 women (aged ≥ 55 years completed a questionnaire (on physical/emotional impact and limitations and were interviewed for demographic characteristics and co-morbidity. Least squares regression analyses were conducted to estimate differences between types and severity of urinary incontinence with regard to their effect on quality of life. Results Most patients reported mixed urinary incontinence (50.7% and a moderate severity of symptoms (48.9%. Stress urinary incontinence had a lower impact on the emotional domain of condition-specific quality of life compared with mixed urinary incontinence (r = −7.81. There were no significant associations between the types of urinary incontinence and generic quality of life. Severe symptoms affected both the generic (r = −0.10 and condition-specific (r = 17.17 quality of life. Conclusions The effects on condition-specific quality of life domains differ slightly between the types of incontinence. The level of severity affects both generic and condition-specific quality of life, indicating that it is not the type but rather the severity of urinary incontinence that is the main predictor of decreased quality of life.

  15. Adjustment factors to per capita health-care indicators in countries with expatriate male-majority populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, A H

    2014-11-01

    From 2000 to 2010, the population in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries underwent an increase of 53%, compared with an average global increase of 13%. The rates varied by country, ranging from 23% in Oman to 198% in Qatar. The main driving force for this sharp increase in population was the high demand for immigrant labour. The aim of this study was to adjust the population in the GCC countries in order to ensure that the comparisons of health-care key performance indicators with other countries account for the composition of the populations. The conclusion of the study was that adjusting the population in the GCC is instrumental for determining health spending and health outcomes, and that inaccurate forecasting would result in serious overestimation of the need for GCC countries to invest in the health-care sector. Policy-makers can utilize the population models in this study to accurately plan for health-care delivery. PMID:25601807

  16. Population Scalability Analysis of Abstract Population-based Random Search: Spectral Radius

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Population-based Random Search (RS) algorithms, such as Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs), Ant Colony Optimization (ACO), Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), have been widely applied to solving discrete optimization problems. A common belief in this area is that the performance of a population-based RS algorithm may improve if increasing its population size. The term of population scalability is used to describe the relationship between the performance of RS algorithms and their population size. Although understanding population scalability is important to design efficient RS algorithms, there exist few theoretical results about population scalability so far. Among those limited results, most of them belong to case studies, e.g. simple RS algorithms for simple problems. Different from them, the paper aims at providing a general study. A large family of RS algorithms, called ARS, has been investigated in the paper. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a novel appro...

  17. 2015 ACC Health Policy Statement on Cardiovascular Team-Based Care and the Role of Advanced Practice Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, John E; Handberg, Eileen M; Biga, Cathleen; Birtcher, Kim K; Bove, Alfred A; Casale, Paul N; Clark, Michael G; Garson, Arthur; Hines, Jerome L; Linderbaum, Jane A; Rodgers, George P; Shor, Robert A; Thourani, Vinod H; Wyman, Janet F

    2015-05-19

    The mission of the American College of Cardiology is "to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health." Cardiovascular team-based care is a paradigm for practice that can transform care, improve heart health, and help meet the demands of the future. One strategic goal of the College is to help members successfully transition their clinical practices to the future, with all its complexity, challenges, and opportunities. The ACC's strategic plan is aligned with the triple aim of improved care, improved population health, and lower costs per capita. The traditional understanding of quality, access, and cost is that you cannot improve one component without diminishing the others. With cardiovascular team-based care, it is possible to achieve the triple aim of improving quality, access, and cost simultaneously to also improve cardiovascular health. Striving to serve the best interests of patients is the true north of our guiding principles. Cardiovascular team-based care is a model that can improve care coordination and communication and allow each team member to focus more on the quality of care. In addition, the cardiovascular team-based care model increases access to cardiovascular care and allows expansion of services to populations and geographic areas that are currently underserved. This document will increase awareness of the important components of cardiovascular team-based care and create an opportunity for more discussion about the most creative and effective means of implementing it. We hope that this document will stimulate further discussions and activities within the ACC and beyond about team-based care. We have identified areas that need improvement, specifically in APP education and state regulation. The document encourages the exploration of collaborative care models that should enable team members to optimize their education, training, experience, and talent. Improved team leadership, coordination, collaboration, engagement, and efficiency

  18. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K;

    2012-01-01

    . Our study highlights the importance of providing hospital-based home care with consideration for the family members' need for the sense of security achieved by home care by experienced paediatric oncology nurses and regular contact with the doctor. In future studies, interviews with children...

  19. Hypertension Screening and Follow-up Management by Primary Health Care System among Chinese Population Aged 35 Years and Above

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Ya Jing; WANG Hui Cheng; LI Yi Chong; ZHAO Wen Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe hypertension screening and follow-up management among Chinese population aged 35 years and above within the primary health care system. Methods Data from 2010 China Chronic Disease and Risk Factor Surveillance System were used. We investigated previous hypertension diagnosis, screening, and follow-up assessments within the primary health care system. The prevalence of self-reported and criterion-based hypertension, screening rates, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics associated with screening, and patterns of follow-up assessments were recorded. The SAS software system was used for statistical analyses. Results About 17.1% reported a previous hypertension diagnosis. The rate difference between the two measures of prevalence was 27.2%. Among those without self-reported hypertension, 27.7%reported never visiting a clinic during the past 1 year and 60.4%of those attending a clinic reported ever being screened. Younger age group was associated with lower screening proportion;odds ratios of 35-, 45-, 55-, and≥65 years were 1.7 (95%CI:1.5-1.9), 1.5 (95%CI:1.3-1.7), 1.3 (95%CI:1.2-1.4), and 1.0, respectively. About 35.1% of the patients had undergone follow-up assessments four or more times during the past 1 year. Conclusion Majority of the Chinese population aged 35 years and above, particularly the less educated, elderly population, and rural residents were unaware of that they were suffering from hypertension. Most patients did not receive enough management services by the primary health care system. Thus, strengthening both the screening and follow-up management is needed.

  20. Nanotechnology-Based Cosmetics for Hair Care

    OpenAIRE

    Jamie Rosen; Angelo Landriscina; Friedman, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Hair is a significant indicator of health and can have a major impact on an individual’s cosmetic appearance. Research within the cosmetics industry has revealed that when nanomaterials are engineered into hair care, they can enhance the benefits of active ingredients in order to improve hair cosmesis. Within the cosmetics arena, the unique size and intrinsic properties of nanoparticles can be tailored to target the hair follicle and shaft. This review aims to provide an overview of cosmetic ...

  1. Adaptation of the Critical Care Family Need Inventory to the Turkish population and its psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükçoban, Sibel; Çiçeklioğlu, Meltem; Demiral Yılmaz, Nilüfer; Civaner, M Murat

    2015-01-01

    In the complex environment of intensive care units, needs of patients' relatives might be seen as the lowest priority. On the other hand, because of their patients' critical and often uncertain conditions, stress levels of relatives are quite high. This study aims to adapt the Critical Care Family Need Inventory, which assesses the needs of patients' relatives, for use with the Turkish-speaking population and to assess psychometric properties of the resulting inventory. The study was conducted in a state hospital with the participation of 191 critical care patient relatives. Content validity was assessed by expert opinions, and construct validity was examined by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to determine internal consistency. The translated inventory has a content validity ratio higher than the minimum acceptable level. Its construct validity was established by the EFA. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the entire scale was 0.93 and higher than 0.80 for subscales, thus demonstrating the translated version's reliability. The Turkish adaptation appropriately reflects all dimensions of needs in the original CCFNI, and its psychometric properties were acceptable. The revised tool could be useful for helping critical care healthcare workers provide services in a holistic approach and for policymakers to improve quality of service. PMID:26357593

  2. Population-based tobacco treatment: study design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Steven S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most smokers do not receive comprehensive, evidence-based treatment for tobacco use that includes intensive behavioral counseling along with pharmacotherapy. Further, the use of proven, tobacco treatments is lower among minorities than among Whites. The primary objectives of this study are to: (1 Assess the effect of a proactive care intervention (PRO on population-level smoking abstinence rates (i.e., abstinence among all smokers including those who use and do not utilize treatment and on utilization of tobacco treatment compared to reactive/usual care (UC among a diverse population of smokers, (2 Compare the effect of PRO on population-level smoking abstinence rates and utilization of tobacco treatments between African American and White smokers, and (3 Determine the cost-effectiveness of the proactive care intervention. Methods/Design This prospective randomized controlled trial identifies a population-based sample of current smokers from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA electronic medical record health factor dataset. The proactive care intervention combines: (1 proactive outreach and (2 offer of choice of smoking cessation services (telephone or face-to-face. Proactive outreach includes mailed invitation materials followed by an outreach call that encourages smokers to seek treatment with choice of services. Proactive care participants who choose telephone care receive VA telephone counseling and access to pharmacotherapy. Proactive care participants who choose face-to-face care are referred to their VA facility's smoking cessation clinic. Usual care participants have access to standard smoking cessation services from their VA facility (e.g., pharmacotherapy, smoking cessation clinic and from their state telephone quitline. Baseline data is collected from VA administrative databases and participant surveys. Outcomes from both groups are collected 12 months post-randomization from participant surveys and from VA

  3. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer;

    2013-01-01

    children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  4. Decision support for health care: the PROforma evidence base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fox

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer Research UK has developed PROforma, a formal language for modelling clinical processes, along with associated tools for creating decision support, care planning, clinical workflow management and other applications. The PROforma method has been evaluated in a variety of settings: in primary health care (prescribing, referral of suspected cancer patients, genetic risk assessment and in specialist care of patients with breast cancer, leukaemia, HIV infection and other conditions. About nine years of experience have been gained with PROforma technologies. Seven trials of decision support applications have been published or are in preparation. Each of these has shown significant positive effects on a variety of measures of quality and/or outcomes of care. This paper reviews the evidence base for the clinical effectiveness of these PROforma applications, and previews the CREDO project _a multi-centre trial of a complex PROforma application for supporting integrated breast cancer care across primary and secondary care settings.

  5. Regression Discontinuity Designs Based on Population Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggers, Andrew C.; Freier, Ronny; Grembi, Veronica;

    In many countries, important features of municipal government (such as the electoral system, mayors' salaries, and the number of councillors) depend on whether the municipality is above or below arbitrary population thresholds. Several papers have used a regression discontinuity design (RDD) to...

  6. Indicadores de atenção básica em quatro municípios do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 2005: resultados de inquérito domiciliar de base populacional Primary health care indicators in four municipalities of the Sate of Rio de Janeiro, 2005: results of a domestic survey in the population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Landmann Szwarcwald

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O inquérito domiciliar de base populacional, realizado em quatro dos 22 municípios com mais de cem mil habitantes do Estado do Rio de Janeiro que implementaram o Projeto de Expansão e Consolidação do Saúde da Família (Proesf, visa à institucionalização da avaliação e monitoramento da atenção básica. Este estudo desenvolveu-se no contexto dos Estudos de Linha de Base (ELB do Proesf. O instrumento utilizado é uma adaptação do questionário aplicado anteriormente em âmbito nacional para avaliação de desempenho de saúde, sob a ótica dos usuários. As alterações voltaram-se para a avaliação da atenção básica, com foco no Programa de Saúde da Família (PSF. Construíram-se indicadores de cobertura, qualidade de atendimento pré-natal, assistência ao parto, saúde infantil, prevenção de câncer de colo uterino e mama, assistência a idosos e saúde bucal. Destacaram-se os resultados observados na prevenção de câncer de colo de útero, pelas elevadas coberturas de exame ginecológico no período de três anos, ficando evidente a fragilidade do sistema de saúde em relação ao tempo de entrega do resultado do exame. Reforça-se a importância de avaliar a qualidade da atenção básica recebida sob a ótica do usuário, para o estabelecimento de metas e definição de prioridades.The domestic survey carried out in the population of four of the 22 municipalities with more than 100 thousand inhabitants of the State of Rio de Janeiro that implemented the PROESF aims at institutionalizing assessment and monitoring of primary health care. This study was developed in the context of the baseline studies of the PROESF. The tool used in this study is an adaptation of the questionnaire used before on national level for assessing the performance of the health care system from the viewpoint of the user. The adaptations made refer to assessment of basic care focusing the PSF. Indicators were constructed for covering the areas

  7. Effect of interventions to improve health care services for ethnic minority populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Forsetlund

    2011-03-01

    available evidence for the other interventions was too low to draw reliable conclusions. We found no studies that only included young patients, but we suggest that interventions targeted at health personnel or health organisations may be applicable regardless of the age of the patient population. This review reveals that the evidence for interventions to improve health care for minorities is sparse and generally of low quality.

  8. Evidence-based medicine in health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gordon B

    2011-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 mandates a national comparative outcomes research project agenda. Comparative effectiveness research includes both clinical trials and observational studies and is facilitated by electronic health records. A national network of electronic health records will create a vast electronic data "warehouse" with exponential growth of observational data. High-quality associations will identify research topics for pragmatic clinical trials, and systematic reviews of clinical trials will provide optimal evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Thus, health care reform will provide a robust environment for comparative effectiveness research, systematic reviews, and evidence-based medicine, and implementation of evidence-based medicine should lead to improved quality of care.

  9. Group-based care: does it change problem behaviour?

    OpenAIRE

    van Weel, Chris

    1980-01-01

    As a result of disappointing experiences in managing problem behaviour presented by patients in general practice, a system of team or group-based care was developed at the Ommoord Health Centre in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  10. Evidence-based care in Iran: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Weak knowledge, weak attitude, and time shortage .are among the most significant barriers of evidence-based care in Iran. These problems require more accurate planning and more favorable policies on the part of medical science authorities.

  11. Analysis and strategies of pre-hospital emergency care for a community-based population in urban areas of Fuzhou city in 2010%福州市2010年中心城区社区人群的院前急救分析及策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈锋; 柯俊; 钱欣; 王晓萍; 陈敏; 陈兵; 何武兵; 林才经

    2013-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively analyze the epidemiological characteristics of pre-hospital emergency care for a community-based population in the urban areas of Fuzhou city and to propose strategies for improving pre-hospital emergency care and the prevention and treatment of common emergency conditions.Methods Data of different sorts of diseases,age,gender,monthly variation in number of cases,time required to response the emergency call and outcome of care were retrospectively analyzed in patients who received pre-hospital emergency care in the urban areas of Fuzhou city in 2010.Results A total of 2130 subjects had pre-hospital emergency care in the urban areas of Fuzhou city.Among them,trauma was the major cause,and was found mainly in youths and adults aged 31-40 years.Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were the second most common causes and were found mainly in patients aged >50 years (especially in those > 70) accounting for 50.57% in patients of that age cohort.More males than females received pre-hospital emergency care (1.57∶1).A total of 190 patients died during pre-hospital emergency care with trauma (n =69,36.32%),the leading cause of death.Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were the second leading cause of death and found mainly in patients aged > 50 (n =53) accounting for 81.54% of deaths in patients of this age cohort.Among patients with sudden death before admission,there was no one had cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed by witness before the emergency care given.Pre-hospital emergency care and pre-hospital deaths were more often occurred in the winter and spring seasons.The time required to response emergency call and the time elapsed to on-site emergency care were (10.0 ± 6.1) min and (11.8 ± 5.9) min,respectively,for patients receiving prehospital emergency care; and the time required to response the emergency call and the time elapsed to onsite emergency care were (11.2 ± 6.2) min and (29.0 ± 21.1) min

  12. Awareness and action for eliminating health care disparities in pain care: Web-based resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ling; Thomas, Melissa; Deitrick, Ginna E; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2008-01-01

    Evidence shows that disparities in pain care exist, and this problem spans across all health care settings. Health care disparities are complex, and stem from the health system climate, limitations imposed by laws and regulations, and discriminatory practices that are deep seated in biases, stereotypes, and uncertainties surrounding communication and decision-making processes. A search of the Internet identified thousands of Web sites, documents, reports, and educational materials pertaining to health and pain disparities. Web sites for federal agencies, private foundations, and professional and consumer-oriented organizations provide useful information on disparities related to age, race, ethnicity, geography, socioeconomic status, and specific populations. The contents of 10 Web sites are examined for resources to assist health professionals and consumers in better understanding health and pain disparities and ways to overcome them in practice. PMID:19042858

  13. The population value of quality indicator reporting: a framework for prioritizing health care performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David O; Chung, Jeanette W

    2014-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports contain more than 250 quality indicators, such as whether a patient with a suspected heart attack received an aspirin. The Department of Health and Human Services National Quality Measures Clearinghouse identifies more than 2,100 such indicators. Because resources for making quality improvements are limited, there is a need to prioritize among these indicators. We propose an approach to assess how reporting specific quality indicators would change care to improve the length and quality of life of the US population. Using thirteen AHRQ quality indicators with readily available data on the benefits of indicator reporting, we found that seven of them account for 93 percent of total benefits, while the remaining six account for only 7 percent of total benefits. Use of a framework such as this could focus resources on indicators having the greatest expected impact on population health.

  14. Principle-based concept analysis: Caring in nursing education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehian, Maryam; Heydari, Abbas; Aghebati, Nahid; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Mazloom, Seyed Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this principle-based concept analysis was to analyze caring in nursing education and to explain the current state of the science based on epistemologic, pragmatic, linguistic, and logical philosophical principles. Methods A principle-based concept analysis method was used to analyze the nursing literature. The dataset included 46 English language studies, published from 2005 to 2014, and they were retrieved through PROQUEST, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID scientific databases. The key dimensions of the data were collected using a validated data-extraction sheet. The four principles of assessing pragmatic utility were used to analyze the data. The data were managed by using MAXQDA 10 software. Results The scientific literature that deals with caring in nursing education relies on implied meaning. Caring in nursing education refers to student-teacher interactions that are formed on the basis of human values and focused on the unique needs of the students (epistemological principle). The result of student-teacher interactions is the development of both the students and the teachers. Numerous applications of the concept of caring in nursing education are available in the literature (pragmatic principle). There is consistency in the meaning of the concept, as a central value of the faculty-student interaction (linguistic principle). Compared with other related concepts, such as “caring pedagogy,” “value-based education,” and “teaching excellence,” caring in nursing education does not have exact and clear conceptual boundaries (logic principle). Conclusion Caring in nursing education was identified as an approach to teaching and learning, and it is formed based on teacher-student interactions and sustainable human values. A greater understanding of the conceptual basis of caring in nursing education will improve the caring behaviors of teachers, create teaching-learning environments, and help experts in curriculum development

  15. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Population-Wide Wait Times for Patients Seeking Medical vs. Cosmetic Dermatologic Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Geeta; Goldberg, Hanna R.; Barense, Morgan D.; Bell, Chaim M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Though previous work has examined some aspects of the dermatology workforce shortage and access to dermatologic care, little research has addressed the effect of rising interest in cosmetic procedures on access to medical dermatologic care. Our objective was to determine the wait times for Urgent and Non-Urgent medical dermatologic care and Cosmetic dermatology services at a population level and to examine whether wait times for medical care are affected by offering cosmetic services. Methods A population-wide survey of dermatology practices using simulated calls asking for the earliest appointment for a Non-Urgent, Urgent and Cosmetic service. Results Response rates were greater than 89% for all types of care. Wait times across all types of care were significantly different from each other (all P < 0.05). Cosmetic care was associated with the shortest wait times (3.0 weeks; Interquartile Range (IQR) = 0.4–3.4), followed by Urgent care (9.0 weeks; IQR = 2.1–12.9), then Non-Urgent Care (12.7 weeks; IQR = 4.4–16.4). Wait times for practices offering only Urgent care were not different from practices offering both Urgent and Cosmetic care (10.3 vs. 7.0 weeks). Interpretation Longer wait times and greater variation for Urgent and Non-Urgent dermatologic care and shorter wait times and less variation for Cosmetic care. Wait times were significantly longer in regions with lower dermatologist density. Provision of Cosmetic services did not increase wait times for Urgent care. These findings suggest an overall dermatology workforce shortage and a need for a more streamlined referral system for dermatologic care. PMID:27632206

  16. Population Distribution and Influencing Factors Based on ESDA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lv Chen; Fan Jie; Sun Wei

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) technique and geographic information system (GIS) platform, with statistic data of counties in 2005, this paper confirms that there is a large population density gap between counties in 2005 because the Gini coefficient is 0.55. Population distribution does not change a lot during the past decades, and the southeast China is still much more densely populated than the northwest China. The global spa- tial autoeorrelation of population distribution is obvious because Moran's I scores 0.42 and local spatial autocorrelation is partly significant. Climate and elevation are still the main natural influ- encing factors. Meanwhile industrial structure and transportation significantly influence population distribution. Different combinations of natural factors have different effects on population distribution. For a long term, climate and terrain factor stability affect population distribution. But its influence will be weakened by progress of technology. Economic development is the main factor that changes population distribution for a short term.

  17. Epidemiology and resistance patterns in urinary pathogens from long-term care facilities and GP populations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brabazon, E D

    2012-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a major source of antimicrobial prescribing in the clinical setting and a potential reservoir for the emergence of resistant organisms. Although studies have been published on resistance rates for urinary pathogens from both hospital and general practitioner (GP) settings, there is little information from Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCFs) in Ireland. This study aimed to document the epidemiology and resistance rates in urinary isolates, in the LTCF and GP setting, from samples submitted to a typical microbiology laboratory. In 2010, there were 963 urinary isolates from LTCFs and 1,169 urinary isolates from GPs, identified from patients 65 years and over, with cytology suggestive of infection. E. coil was the most common causative organism identified. There were significantly higher levels of resistance to ampicillin, co-amoxiclav, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim, and piperacillin\\/tazobactam in the LTCF population compared to the GP population (e.g. for E. coli, 86%-v-69%; 30%-v- 21%; 58%-v-26%, 10%-v-3%, 68%-v-48%, 10%-v- 4% respectively). Isolates with resistance mechanisms to beta-lactams, were identified in both populations. Results presented in this paper demonstrate significant differences between resistance rates in LTCF and GP populations which suggest that there are implications for empiric antimicrobial prescribing for UTIs in the LTCF setting.

  18. Neonatal outcomes in obese mothers: a population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsart Anne-Frederique

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If it is well known that obesity increases morbidity for both mother and fetus and is associated with a variety of adverse reproductive outcomes, then few studies have assessed the relation between obesity and neonatal outcomes. This is the aim of the present study after taking into account type of labor and delivery, as well as social, medical and hospital characteristics in a population-based analysis. Methods This study used 2009 data from the Belgian birth register data pertaining to the regions of Brussels and Wallonia and included 38,675 consecutive births. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals for admission to neonatal intensive care unit, Apgar score, and perinatal mortality were calculated by logistic regression analyses adjusting for medical, social and hospital characteristics using obesity as the primary independent variable. The impact of analyzing all delivery sites together was tested using mixed-effect analyses. Results The adjusted odds ratio for neonatal intensive care unit admission was higher for obese mothers by 38% compared to non-obese mothers (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.22-1.56, and by 45% (CI: 1.21-1.73 and 34% (CI: 1.10-1.63 after spontaneous and induced labour respectively. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.18 (CI: 0.86-1.63 after caesarean section. The adjusted odds ratio for 1 minute Apgar score inferior to 7 was higher for obese mothers by 31% compared to non-obese mothers (CI: 1.15-1.49 and by 26% (CI: 1.04-1.52 and 38% (CI: 1.12-1.69 after spontaneous and induced labour respectively. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.50 (CI: 0.96-2.36 after caesarean section. The adjusted odds ratio for perinatal mortality was 1.36 (CI: 0.75-2.45 for obese mothers compared to non-obese mothers. Conclusions Neonatal admission to intensive care and low Apgar scores were more likely to occur in infants from obese mothers, both after spontaneous and induced labor.

  19. Technology-based interventions in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, J M

    2014-12-01

    There are several converging forces that create a particularly opportune time for technological solutions to enhance cost efficiency in healthcare. Health care costs are unsustainable, yet many patients do not have adequate access to state-of-the-art treatments or to ongoing disease management. Consumerism is an increasingly powerful force in healthcare and the emphasis on personalised medicine will help to define future research and clinical treatment strategies. At the same time, the phenomenal advances in internet utilisation and mobile device applications provide possibilities that have never before existed. We have reason to be very optimistic about these opportunities, but appropriate research will be required to develop scalable and sustainable methods as well as determine expected outcomes. PMID:25154596

  20. The importance of job characteristics in determining medical care-seeking in the Dutch working population, a longitudinal survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steenbeek Romy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The working population is ageing, which will increase the number of workers with chronic health complaints, and, as a consequence, the number of workers seeking health care. It is very important to understand factors that influence medical care-seeking in order to control the costs. I will investigate which work characteristics independently attribute to later care-seeking in order to find possibilities to prevent unnecessary or inefficient care-seeking. Methods Data were collected in a longitudinal two-wave study (n = 2305 workers. The outcome measures were visits (yes/no and frequency to a general practitioner (GP, a physical therapist, a medical specialist and/or a mental health professional. Multivariate regression analyses were carried out separately for men and women for workers with health complaints. Results In the Dutch working population, personal, health, and work characteristics, but not sickness absence, were associated with later care-seeking. Work characteristics independently attributed to medical care-seeking but only for men and only for the frequency of visits to the GP. Women experience more health complaints and seek health care more often than men. For women, experiencing a work handicap (health complaints that impede work performance was the only work characteristic associated with more care-seeking (GP. For men, work characteristics that led to less care-seeking were social support by colleagues (GP frequency, high levels of decision latitude (GP frequency and high levels of social support by the supervisor (medical specialist. Other work characteristics led to more care-seeking: high levels of engagement (GP, full time work (GP frequency and experiencing a work handicap (physical therapist. Conclusions We can conclude that personal and health characteristics are most important when explaining medical care-seeking in the Dutch working population. Work characteristics independently attributed to

  1. An audit of intensive care unit admission in a pediatric cardio-thoracic population in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azike Jerome

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study aimed to perform an audit of intensive care unit admissions in the paediatric cardio-thoracic population in Enugu, Nigeria and examine the challenges and outcome in this high risk group. Ways of improvement based on this study are suggested. METHODS: The hospital records of consecutive postoperative pediatric cardiothoracic admissions to the multidisciplinary and cardiothoracic intensive care units of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH Enugu, Nigeria to determine their Intensive Care Unit management and outcome over a 2 year span - June 2002 to June 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included patient demographics, diagnosis, duration of stay in the intensive care unit, therapeutic interventions and outcome. RESULTS: There were a total of thirty consecutive postoperative paediatric admissions to the intensive care unit over the 2 year study period. The average age of the patients was 5.1 years with a range of 2 weeks to 13 years. Twelve patients had cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, three patients had colon transplant, four patients had pericardiotomy/pericardicectomy, and five patients had diagnostic/therapeutic bronchoscopy. The remaining patients had the following surgeries, thoracotomy for repair of diaphragmatic hernia/decortications, delayed primary repair of esophageal atresia and gastrostomy. Two patients had excision of a cervical teratoma and cystic hygroma. The average duration of stay in the intensive care unit was 6.2 days. Ten patients (33% received pressor agents for organ support. Five patients (17% had mechanical ventilation, while twenty-five patients (83% received oxygen therapy via intranasal cannula or endotracheal tube. Seven patients (23% received blood transfusion in the ICU. There was a 66% survival rate with ten deaths. CONCLUSION: Paediatric cardio-thoracic services in Nigeria suffer from the problems of inadequate funding and manpower flight to better

  2. [Health care based on cooperation between professionals and affected people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel-Fernández, Rafael; García-Domínguez, José-Miguel; Rodríguez-Gómez, Susana; Sagués-Amadó, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to support the need for a change of care, based on cooperation between those who provide care and those who receive it. This article develops the decisive factors for change: the investee cooperation, the reference in case management, the concept of recovery and terminal care, the reduction of suffering and the value of change reflected in the 'win-win'. In each of them a questioning of the current situation, a methodological analysis and an input of tools and consequences of the change is made. To conclude, the article incorporates the 'itinerary of shared care' as a resource and one of the ways to bring these changes to the reality of day-to-day care. PMID:26553866

  3. The health care needs of the physically disabled patient in a home-based care environment: Implications for the training of ancillary health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Springe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available According to existing literature, ancillary health care workers (AHCWs often do not meet the health care needs of patients with physical disabilities (physically disabled patients in a homebased environment, because of inadequate training programmes. The purpose of this research study was to explore the health care needs of physically disabled patients in long-term, home-based care in the northern suburbs of Johannesburg and, based on results, to offer recommendations for the training of AHCWs. Qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual means were employed in data collection and analysis. The population consisted of eight physically disabled participants who employed an AHCW to assist them with their long-term home care. Purposive sampling was used with subsequent snowballing to identify further participants for the study. Individual interviews were conducted, where participants had to answer the questions (1‘What are your health care needs?’ and(2 ‘How should these be met?’ Data saturation was ensured, after which Tesch’s method of data analysis was followed. Three categories of health care needs were identified (1 physical health care needs, (2 interpersonal relationship needs and (3 social needs, and 12 themes were derived from these categories. These categories of health care needs should be addressed in the training of AHCWs.From the themes, recommendations were described for the training of AHCWs on the health care needs of the home-based physically disabled patients. The AHCW should assist in the adaptation of the environment to the patient’s individual needs, and should use knowledge and critical thinking skills to ensure a patient-centred care setting.

    Opsomming

    Volgens die literatuur kan assistentgesondheidsorgwerkers (AGWs, as gevolg van ontoereikende opleiding, nie altyd aan die behoeftes van fisies gestremde pasiënte in 'n tuisopset voldoen nie.Die doel van hierdie navorsingstudie was

  4. A survey-based study of knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease among health care staff

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth Wendy; Fielding Elaine; Beattie Elizabeth; Gardner Anne; Moyle Wendy; Franklin Sara; Hines Sonia; MacAndrew Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Continued aging of the population is expected to be accompanied by substantial increases in the number of people with dementia and in the number of health care staff required to care for them. Adequate knowledge about dementia among health care staff is important to the quality of care delivered to this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge about dementia across a range of health care staff in a regional health service district. Methods K...

  5. Primary care practice-based care management for chronically ill patients (PraCMan: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN56104508

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldauf Annika

    2011-06-01

    status and severity (PHQ-9, self-management capabilities and clinical parameters. Data collection will be performed at baseline, 12 and 24 months (12 months post-intervention. Discussion Practice-based care management for high risk individuals involving trained HCAs appears to be a promising approach to face the needs of an aging population with increasing care demands. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN56104508

  6. A population-based Habitable Zone perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Zsom, Andras

    2015-01-01

    What can we tell about exoplanet habitability if currently only the stellar properties, planet radius, and the incoming stellar flux are known? A planet is in the Habitable Zone (HZ) if it harbors liquid water on its surface. The HZ is traditionally conceived as a sharp region around stars because it is calculated for one planet with specific properties. Such an approach is limiting because the planets' atmospheric and geophysical properties, which influence the presence of liquid water on the surface, are currently unknown but expected to be diverse. A statistical HZ description is outlined which does not favor one planet type. Instead the stellar and planet properties are treated as random variables and a continuous range of planet scenarios are considered. Various probability density functions are assigned to each random variable, and a combination of Monte Carlo sampling and climate modeling is used to generate synthetic exoplanet populations with known surface climates. Then, the properties of the liquid...

  7. Perceived quality of healthcare in a multicenter, community-based population of polypathological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Gómez, Manuel; Bernabeu-Wittel, Máximo; Bohórquez-Colombo, Pilar; Moreno-Gaviño, Lourdes; Cassani-Garza, Manuel; Ortiz-Camúñez, María-Ángeles; Ollero-Baturone, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to determine perceived quality of care (PQC) in patients with multiple chronic conditions, whose care is structured in Andalusia (Spain) under polypathological patients (PP) care process, and identifying aspects for its improvement. The study was a community-based cross-sectional survey carried out in 4 primary care centers (which attended a total of 62,702 adults, of them, 662 were actively identified as PP). Finally, 461 PP and their caregivers were interviewed (69% of eligible population) including assessment of PQC following SERVQUAL model, clinical and demographical data. On a five-point Likert scale (from 1, 'much worse than expected'; to 5, 'much better'), PQC rated 3.68±0.59 (±S.D.). Independent PQC predictors were: empathy for family physician, identifying nurses, presence of peripheral artery disease or diabetes mellitus with vascular complications, and not having functional limitations. In this population-based survey, PP attended at primary care have an acceptable PQC. Measures aimed to lessening functional deterioration, supporting dependent patients, and improving relationship between PP and their healthcare professionals could increase PQC. PMID:20346523

  8. Perceived quality of healthcare in a multicenter, community-based population of polypathological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Gómez, Manuel; Bernabeu-Wittel, Máximo; Bohórquez-Colombo, Pilar; Moreno-Gaviño, Lourdes; Cassani-Garza, Manuel; Ortiz-Camúñez, María-Ángeles; Ollero-Baturone, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to determine perceived quality of care (PQC) in patients with multiple chronic conditions, whose care is structured in Andalusia (Spain) under polypathological patients (PP) care process, and identifying aspects for its improvement. The study was a community-based cross-sectional survey carried out in 4 primary care centers (which attended a total of 62,702 adults, of them, 662 were actively identified as PP). Finally, 461 PP and their caregivers were interviewed (69% of eligible population) including assessment of PQC following SERVQUAL model, clinical and demographical data. On a five-point Likert scale (from 1, 'much worse than expected'; to 5, 'much better'), PQC rated 3.68±0.59 (±S.D.). Independent PQC predictors were: empathy for family physician, identifying nurses, presence of peripheral artery disease or diabetes mellitus with vascular complications, and not having functional limitations. In this population-based survey, PP attended at primary care have an acceptable PQC. Measures aimed to lessening functional deterioration, supporting dependent patients, and improving relationship between PP and their healthcare professionals could increase PQC.

  9. Renal disease disparities in Asian and Pacific-based populations in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Marjorie K; West, Margaret; Sugihara, Jared; Kamaka, Martina; Mikami, Judy; Cheng, Shiuh-Feng

    2003-10-01

    The prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States is expected to double over the next 10 years. The identification of ethnic differences in the prevalence, treatment, morbidity, and mortality related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) is of great concern. Asian Americans comprise a rapidly expanding sector of the U.S. population and are reported to have ESRD growth rates that are approximately 50% higher than caucasians. Hawai'i has a large, well-established Asian and Pacific-based population that facilitates the examination of disparities in renal disease among the state's diverse ethnic groups. The prevalence of ESRD in Hawai'i has continued to rise due, in part, to high rates of diabetes, glomerulonephritis, and hypertension reported in Asian Americans and Pacific-based populations. ESRD patients in Hawai'i have a two-fold higher prevalence of glomerulonephritis, compared with the general ESRD population in the United States. Other potential sources of renal disparities-such as cultural factors, language barriers, and health access factors-among Hawaii's major ethnic groups are assessed. However, few studies have examined the relative contribution of these potential factors. Consequently, efforts to reduce and eventually eliminate renal disease disparities will require a better understanding of the major sources of health disparities, such as timely medical care, a diverse health workforce, and cultural/social barriers, that affect optimal health care practices in Asian and Pacific-based populations. PMID:14620708

  10. Terminal Versus Advanced Cancer: Do the General Population and Health Care Professionals Share a Common Language?

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Shin, Dong Wook; Kim, So Young; Yang, Hyung Kook; Nam, Eunjoo; Jho, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Eunmi; Cho, Be Long; Park, Keeho; Park, Jong-Hyock

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Many end-of-life care studies are based on the assumption that there is a shared definition of language concerning the stage of cancer. However, studies suggest that patients and their families often misperceive patients’ cancer stages and prognoses. Discrimination between advanced cancer and terminal cancer is important because the treatment goals are different. In this study, we evaluated the understanding of the definition of advanced versus terminal cancer of the general populatio...

  11. Identifying elements of patient-centered care in underserved populations: a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela Raja

    Full Text Available Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes.

  12. Identifying elements of patient-centered care in underserved populations: a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sheela; Hasnain, Memoona; Vadakumchery, Tracy; Hamad, Judy; Shah, Raveena; Hoersch, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:25993110

  13. Nationwide and population-based prescription patterns in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to describe prescription patterns and changes in these patterns over the last decade for patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder in mental healthcare, using population-based and nationwide data, and to relate the findings to recommendations from...... international guidelines. METHODS: A population-based, nationwide study was carried out. It included register-based longitudinal data on all patients with a first-ever contact with mental healthcare with a diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder from the entire Danish population, and all prescription data...

  14. Population-based tobacco treatment: study design of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Steven S; van Ryn Michelle; Sherman Scott E; Burgess Diana J; Noorbaloochi Siamak; Clothier Barbara; Joseph Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Most smokers do not receive comprehensive, evidence-based treatment for tobacco use that includes intensive behavioral counseling along with pharmacotherapy. Further, the use of proven, tobacco treatments is lower among minorities than among Whites. The primary objectives of this study are to: (1) Assess the effect of a proactive care intervention (PRO) on population-level smoking abstinence rates (i.e., abstinence among all smokers including those who use and do not utili...

  15. Adolescent school absenteeism and service use in a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Askeland, Kristin Gärtner; Haugland, Siren; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Bøe, Tormod; Hysing, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Background School absenteeism is linked to a range of health concerns, health risk behaviors and school dropout. It is therefore important to evaluate the extent to which adolescents with absenteeism are in contact with health care and other services. The aim of the current study was to investigate service use of Norwegian adolescents with moderate and high absenteeism in comparison to students with lower rates of absence. Methods The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012...

  16. Benzodiazepine discontinuation among community-dwelling older people: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, J Simon; Lavikainen, Piia; Korhonen, Mikko; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2010-01-01

    Benzodiazepine discontinuation among community-dwelling older people: a population-based cohort study fax: +358-171-62424 (Bell, J. Simon) (Bell, J. Simon) Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland - P.O. Box 1627 - 70211 - Kuopio - FINLAND (Bell, J. Simon) Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Unit, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland - Kuopio - FINLAND (Bell, J. Simon) ...

  17. Economic evaluation in primary health care: the case of Western Kenya community based health care project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang'ombe, J K

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology and presents preliminary results of an economic appraisal of a community based health care project in Kenya. Community health workers, trained for 12 weeks and deployed in two locations in Kenya's Western Province, act as first contact providers of basic health care and promoters of selected health, sanitation and nutrition practices. A Cost Benefit Analysis has been undertaken using the Willingness to Pay approach to compare the costs of the project and its benefits. The benefits are in the form of more easily accessible basic health care and are measured as consumer surplus accruing to the community. Gain in consumer surplus is consequent on the fall of average user costs and rise in utilisation of the project established points of first contact with primary health care. The argument for the economic viability of the project is validated by the large Net Present Value and Benefit Cost Ratio obtained for the whole of the project area and for the two locations separately. Although the evaluation technique used faces the problem of valuation of community time, aggregation of health care services at all points of first contact and the partial nature of cost benefit analysis evaluations, the results are strongly in favour of decentralisation of primary health care on similar lines in the rest of the country. PMID:6427933

  18. Spironolactone use and renal toxicity: population based longitudinal analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, L; Struthers, A D; Fahey, T; Watson, A D; MacDonald, T. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety of spironolactone prescribing in the setting of the UK National Health Service. Design Population based longitudinal analysis using a record linkage database. Setting Tayside, Scotland. Population All patients who received one or more dispensed prescriptions for spironolactone between 1994 and 2007. Main outcome measures Rates of prescribing for spironolactone, hospital admissions for hyperkalaemia, and hyperkalaemia and renal function without...

  19. Newborn care practices and home-based postnatal newborn care programme – Mewat, Haryana, India, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latika Nath Sinha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the Home Based Postnatal Newborn Care programme by Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs under the National Rural Health Mission was initiated in 2011 to reduce neonatal mortality rates (NMRs. ASHAs get cash incentives for six postnatal home visits for newborn care. We studied newborn care practices among mothers in Mewat, Haryana, having a high NMR and determined risk factors for unsafe practices and described the knowledge and skills of ASHAs during home visits. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among mothers who had delivered a child during the previous seven months using cluster sampling. We interviewed mothers and ASHAs in the selected subcentres using semi–structured questionnaires on the six safe newborn care practices, namely safe breastfeeding, keeping cord and eyes clean, wrapping baby, kangaroo care, delayed bathing and hand washing. Results: We interviewed 320 mothers, 61 ASHAs and observed 19 home visits. Overall, 60% of mothers adopted less than three safe practices. Wrapping newborns (96% and delayed bathing (64% were better adopted than cord care (49%, safe breastfeeding (48%, hand washing (30%, kangaroo care (20% and eye care (9%. Cultural beliefs and traditional birth attendants influenced the mother’s practices. The lack of supervision by auxiliary nurse midwives (ANM, delayed referral and transportation were the other challenges. Conclusion: Knowledge–practice gaps existed among mothers counselled by ASHAs. Poor utilization of reproductive and child health services decreased opportunities for ASHA–mother dialogue on safe practices. Recommendations included training ANMs, training TBAs as ASHAs, innovative communication strategies for ASHAs and improved referral system.

  20. Use of Drop-In Clinic Versus Appointment-Based Care for LGBT Youth: Influences on the Likelihood to Access Different Health-Care Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bernie S; Passidomo, Kim; Gormley, Kate; Manley, Alecia

    2014-06-01

    The structure of health-care service delivery can address barriers that make it difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents to use health services. This study explores the differences among youth who access care in one of two service delivery structures in an LGBT health-care center: the drop-in clinic or the traditional appointment-based model. Analysis of 578 records of LGBT and straight youth (aged 14-24) who accessed health care either through a drop-in clinic or appointment-based care within the first year of offering the drop-in clinic reveals patterns of use when both models are available. We studied demographic variables previously shown to be associated with general health-care access to determine how each correlated with a tendency to use the drop-in structure versus routine appointments. Once the covariates were identified, we conducted a logistic regression analysis to identify its association with likelihood of using the drop-in clinic. Insurance status, housing stability, education, race, and gender identity were most strongly associated with the type of clinic used. Youth who relied on Medicaid, those in unstable housing, and African Americans were most likely to use the drop-in clinic. Transgender youth and those with higher education were more likely to use the appointment-based clinic. Although sexual orientation and HIV status were not related to type of clinic used, youth who were HIV positive used the appointment-based clinic more frequently. Both routes to health care served distinct populations who often experience barriers to accessible, affordable, and knowledgeable care. Further study of the factors related to accessing health care may clarify the extent to which drop-in hours in a youth-friendly context may increase the use of health care by the most socially marginalized youth.

  1. Use of Drop-In Clinic Versus Appointment-Based Care for LGBT Youth: Influences on the Likelihood to Access Different Health-Care Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bernie S; Passidomo, Kim; Gormley, Kate; Manley, Alecia

    2014-06-01

    The structure of health-care service delivery can address barriers that make it difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents to use health services. This study explores the differences among youth who access care in one of two service delivery structures in an LGBT health-care center: the drop-in clinic or the traditional appointment-based model. Analysis of 578 records of LGBT and straight youth (aged 14-24) who accessed health care either through a drop-in clinic or appointment-based care within the first year of offering the drop-in clinic reveals patterns of use when both models are available. We studied demographic variables previously shown to be associated with general health-care access to determine how each correlated with a tendency to use the drop-in structure versus routine appointments. Once the covariates were identified, we conducted a logistic regression analysis to identify its association with likelihood of using the drop-in clinic. Insurance status, housing stability, education, race, and gender identity were most strongly associated with the type of clinic used. Youth who relied on Medicaid, those in unstable housing, and African Americans were most likely to use the drop-in clinic. Transgender youth and those with higher education were more likely to use the appointment-based clinic. Although sexual orientation and HIV status were not related to type of clinic used, youth who were HIV positive used the appointment-based clinic more frequently. Both routes to health care served distinct populations who often experience barriers to accessible, affordable, and knowledgeable care. Further study of the factors related to accessing health care may clarify the extent to which drop-in hours in a youth-friendly context may increase the use of health care by the most socially marginalized youth. PMID:26789623

  2. Biosignal-based relaxation evaluation of head-care robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takeshi; Takeda, Maki; Maruyama, Tomomi; Susuki, Yuto; Hirose, Toshinori; Fujioka, Soichiro; Mizuno, Osamu; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Yukio, Honda

    2013-01-01

    Such popular head care procedures as shampooing and scalp massages provide physical and mental relaxation. However, they place a big burden such as chapped hands on beauticians and other practitioners. Based on our robot hand technology, we have been developing a head care robot. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluated its relaxation effect using the following biosignals: accelerated plethymography (SDNN, HF/TP, LF/HF), heart rate (HR), blood pressure, salivary amylase (sAA) and peripheral skin temperature (PST). We compared the relaxation of our developed head care robot with the head care provided by nurses. In our experimental result with 54 subjects, the activity of the autonomic nerve system changed before and after head care procedures performed by both a human nurse and our proposed robot. Especially, in the proposed robot, we confirmed significant differences with the procedure performed by our proposed head care robot in five indexes: HF/TP, LF/HF, HR, sAA, and PST. The activity of the sympathetic nerve system decreased, because the values of its indexes significantly decreased: LF/HF, HR, and sAA. On the other hand, the activity of the parasympathetic nerve system increased, because of the increase of its indexes value: HF/TP and PST. Our developed head care robot provided satisfactory relaxation in just five minutes of use. PMID:24111288

  3. CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF CONJUNCTIVAL TUMOURS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The broad spectrum of conjunctival tumors ranges from non-neoplastic benign tumors to very aggressive malignancies, such as melanoma or Kaposi’s sarcoma which threat visual function and life of the patient. There is a relative paucity of large published studies documenting conjunctival lesions. In the Indian population, reported 46% of epithelial origin (benign, premalignant, and malignant neoplasm, degenerative lesions (14%, chronic non-specific inflammation (12%, melanocytic tumors (12%, lymphoid tumors (6%. Squamous cell carcinoma (20%, miscellaneous (22%, pterygium (10%, squamous papilloma (8%, and OSSN (8%. A review of a large series of conjunctival biopsy specimens from an adult US population documented the following distribution: inflammatory/degenerative lesions (12%, benign epithelial (2%, pigmented (53%, premalignant and malignant epithelial (11%, lymphoid (8%, miscellaneous (12% and congenital lesions (2%. AIM: To study the clinical and histopathological features of conjunctival tumors at a tertiary care hospital in south Indian population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In our study, 134 patients with conjunctival tumors followed between January 2009 and September 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data were collected from medical records and analyzed. Of the 134 patients with conjunctival tumor, 80 were male (59.70% and 54 were female (40.29%. The mean age of the134 patients was 35 years (range1to 95 years. In our series, the most common diagnosis of 134 lesions were, nevus 18.66% (n=25, carcinoma in situ 10.44% (n=14, dysplasia 5.97%(n=8, squamous cell carcinoma(SCC 5.22% (n=7, haemangioma 3.73% (n=5, squamous papilloma 3.73%(n=5, limbal dermoid 2.98%(n=4, malignant melanoma 1.49% (n=2 and lymphoma 0.74 %(n=1. CONCLUSION: Nevus was found to be the most common conjunctival benign tumor. Even though squamous cell carcinoma is a rare conjunctival malignant tumor, it may be encountered in younger male population.

  4. Oncology Nursing Is Evidence-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy Sheldon, Lisa; Brown, Carlton G

    2016-06-01

    This issue of the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing (CJON) will be the final time that you will see the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) feature column. Why? Because we have seen oncology nursing evolve in the past 20 years and EBP is everywhere! We use it in our clinics and hospital units, incorporate it into decisions about symptom management, and use evidence to develop survivorship guidelines. We discuss EBP in journal clubs and use applications on mobile devices to find the best interventions for our patients. We have oncology nurses sitting on committees to develop guidelines based on the best evidence and expert opinion. We have come a long way and it is our belief that EBP is included in almost every article in CJON and, therefore, a need no longer exists for an individual column about EBP. 
. PMID:27206287

  5. Demand and Supply–Based Operating Modes—A Framework for Analyzing Health Care Service Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillrank, Paul; Groop, P Johan; Malmström, Tomi J

    2010-01-01

    Context: The structure of organizations that provide services should reflect the possibilities of and constraints on production that arise from the market segments they serve. Organizational segmentation in health care is based on urgency and severity as well as disease type, bodily function, principal method, or population subgroup. The result is conflicting priorities, goals, and performance metrics. A managerial perspective is needed to identify activities with similar requirements for integration, coordination, and control. Methods: The arguments in this article apply new reasoning to the previous literature. Findings: The method used in this article to classify health care provision distinguishes different types of health problems that share generic constraints of production. Conclusions: The analysis leads to seven different demand-supply combinations, each with its own operational logic. These are labeled demand and supply–based operating modes (DSO modes), and constitute the managerial building blocks of health care organizations. The modes are Prevention, Emergency, One visit, Project, Elective, Cure, and Care. As analytical categories the DSO modes can be used to understand current problems. Several operating modes in one unit create managerial problems of conflicting priorities, goals, and performance metrics. The DSO modes are constructed as managerially homogeneous categories or care platforms responding to general types of demand, and supply constraints. The DSO modes bring methods of industrial management to bear on efforts to improve health care. PMID:21166870

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Community-Based Dementia Care Networks: The Dementia Care Networks' Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux-Charles, Louis; Chambers, Larry W.; Cockerill, Rhonda; Jaglal, Susan; Brazil, Kevin; Cohen, Carole; LeClair, Ken; Dalziel, Bill; Schulman, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The Dementia Care Networks' Study examined the effectiveness of four community-based, not-for-profit dementia networks. The study involved assessing the relationship between the types of administrative and service-delivery exchanges that occurred among the networked agencies and the network members' perception of the effectiveness of…

  7. [The provision of population of the Russian Federation with basic personnel resource of public health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepin, V O

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of complex scientific analysis of number and structure of physicians and paramedical personnel of public and municipal health care system of the Russian Federation. The provision of country population, its federal okrugs and federation subjects with physicians and paramedical personnel of various specialties are analyzed too, including ratio of physicians and paramedical personnel and territorial differentiation of provision of population with basic medical personnel. The study results demonstrate that in 2012 provision of population (per 10 000 of population) with physicians increased from 43.9 to 44.7. At the same time provision with paramedical personnel decreased from 92.3 to 90.8. in the Russian Federation are preserved significant territorial disproportions of provision of population with medical personnel resource. The provision of population with physicians and paramedical personnel is 4.3 times and 1.9 times higher in cities than in rural area. The differences between extreme indicators of provision of population of the Russian Federation with physicians and paramedical personnel are 2.9 and 2.4 times correspondingly. The differences between indicators of provision with physicians of clinical specialties are 2.6 times. The average ratio between physician and paramedical personnel is 1:2.03. The structure of medical manpower corresponds to the need of population in medical care in incomplete measure. The materials substantiate necessity to continue modernization, optimization and development of manpower support of public health care system in the Russian Federation.

  8. Home-based care, technology, and the maintenance of selves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, I will argue that there is a deep connection between home-based care, technology, and the self. Providing the means for persons (especially older persons) to receive care at home is not merely a kindness that respects their preference to be at home: it is an important means of extending their selfhood and respecting the unique selves that they are. Home-based technologies like telemedicine and robotic care may certainly be useful tools in providing care for persons at home, but they also have important implications for sustaining selfhood in ways that are of value to individuals and those who care for them. I will argue, by appealing to Hilde Lindemann's notion of "holding" persons' identities in place, that technological interventions are not only useful tools for improving and sustaining health and good care at home, but that they may also help to extend our personal identities and relational capacities in ways that are practically and ethically good. Because of these important goods, I will claim that there is a prima facie moral duty to do this "holding" work and that it is best done by family members and loved ones who are well suited to the job because of their history and relationship with the individual that needs to be "held" in place.

  9. Model-based decision support in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzsieder, E; Vogt, L; Kohnert, K-D; Heinke, P; Augstein, P

    2011-05-01

    The model-based Karlsburg Diabetes Management System (KADIS®) has been developed as a patient-focused decision-support tool to provide evidence-based advice for physicians in their daily efforts to optimize metabolic control in diabetes care of their patients on an individualized basis. For this purpose, KADIS® was established in terms of a personalized, interactive in silico simulation procedure, implemented into a problem-related diabetes health care network and evaluated under different conditions by conducting open-label mono- and polycentric trials, and a case-control study, and last but not least, by application in routine diabetes outpatient care. The trial outcomes clearly show that the recommendations provided to the physicians by KADIS® lead to significant improvement of metabolic control. This model-based decision-support system provides an excellent tool to effectively guide physicians in personalized decision-making to achieve optimal metabolic control for their patients. PMID:20621384

  10. The logic of tax-based financing for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenheimer, T; Sullivan, K

    1997-01-01

    Employment-based health insurance faces serious problems. For the first time, the number of Americans covered by such health insurance is falling. Employers strongly oppose the employer mandate approach to extending health insurance. Employment-based financing is regressive and complex. Serious debate is needed on an alternative solution to financing health care for all Americans. Taxation represents a clear alternative to employment-based health care financing. The major criterion for choosing a tax is equity, with simplicity a second criterion. An earmarked, progressive individual income tax is a fair and potentially simple tax with which to finance health care. The political feasibility of such a tax is greater than that of employer mandate legislation.

  11. Vitamin status and cognitive function in a long-term care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meckling Kelly A

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ageing can be associated with poor dietary intake, reduced nutrient absorption, and less efficient utilization of nutrients. Loss of memory and related cognitive function are also common among older persons. This study aimed to measure the prevalence of inadequate vitamin status among long-term care patients and determine if an association exists between vitamin status and each of three variables; cognitive function, vitamin supplementation, and medications which alter gastric acid levels. Methods Seventy-five patients in a long-term care hospital in Guelph, Ontario were recruited to a cross-sectional study. 47 were female and the mean age was 80.7 (+/-11.5 years, ranging from 48 to 100 years. Blood was used to measure levels of vitamins B12 (cobalamin, B6 (pyridoxal-5'-phosphate/PLP, erythrocyte folate, vitamin B3 (niacin and homocysteine (Hcy. The Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE was administered to measure cognitive function. A list of medications and vitamin supplementation for each patient was provided by the pharmacy. Results The prevalence of low vitamin (B12, B6, erythrocyte folate, niacin or high metabolite (homocysteine levels among 75 patients were as follows: B12 13.3 μmol/L in 31/75 (41.3%. There was no significant difference among residents grouped into marked (n = 44, mild (n = 14, or normal (n = 9 cognitive function when evaluating the effect of vitamin status. There were no significant differences in mean B12 and homocysteine levels between users and non-users of drug therapy (Losec, Zantac, or Axid. Compared to vitamin supplement non-users, supplemented residents had significantly higher mean B12 (p Conclusion Given the prevalence data on vitamin status in this sample population, the possible benefits of vitamin supplementation should be considered in clinical intervention studies using these populations of elderly.

  12. Teaching Chinese health care professionals about community-based long-term care (CBLTC) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bei

    2005-01-01

    Academic exchanges between the U.S. and other countries around the world are increasing and teaching students abroad is part of this trend. China is in its initial stage of developing gerontology education and is in great need of new concepts and ideas for dealing with its rapidly aging population. This paper discusses the challenges and rewards of teaching gerontology to health care professionals in China. To achieve the desired learning outcomes in another country requires culturally appropriate course materials and teaching methods; drawing on students' knowledge and expertise by using an interactive format and gaining students' respect.

  13. MEDICO-SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF POPULATION GROUPS SEEKING FOR DENTAL CARE IN POLYCLINICS SMOLENSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Николаевна Дехнич

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research’s aim is to give health-social characteristic of contingents of the urban population, seeking for outpatient dental care, including a comparative estimation of stomatological index of life quality (SILQ by doctors and patients.Novelty: Was installed the difference in the estimation of work sets SILQ by doctors and patients.Methodology of the research work. It was used an advantage «Card of studying the dental health» for holding the research, including the objective and subjective expert estimations of the dental patient’s status by doctors. This information was comparing with the subjective estimation of SILQ by patients. The sample volume was about 400 people out of number of people, seeking for outpatient dental care in state budget dental clinics during 2011-2012 years.Results. Was installed mostly very high level of prevalence of caries, the destruction of fabrics of parodont reaches 100 % with the age. The stomatological index of life quality among the patients, seeking for outpatient care is low. One of the reasons- a low population’s sanitary culture. A big part of patients seek in case of acute pain(40%. Out of three components of SILQ the criteria of social welfare got rather high estimation. The lowest estimation was given to moral psychological well-being criteria. In this case the moral psychological well-being criteria was given a higher estimation by doctors then by patients (in 1,8. The criteria of the physical and social well-being is lower compared with the patient’s (in 1,8 and 1,2 times respectively.Practical implication: Indicators SILQ may be the basis for planning activities of stomatological polyclinics, including the preventive dentists’ work.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-46

  14. Affordability of population towards dental care in Mathura City—A household survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Kundan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the factors of affordability towards dental care in Mathura city. Material and Methods The present study included 100 households from which 100 persons were interviewed above the age group of 25 years. Data was collected with the help of structured Questionnaires & Face interviews. Information was collected regarding Socio-demographic variables & attitudes of the subjects towards the utilization of dental service and the affordability of the dental services. The data was then statistically analyzed using chi square test. Results In the present study it was found that the income and education were significantly associated with the affordability of the dental services. Individuals having an income of above Rs 20, 000/ were found to afford the available dental care. Individuals having educational qualification of graduate and above were utilizing the dental services better than others. Conclusion Within the limitation of this study, we can conclude that the utilization of dental services is not very high among Mathura city population. The affordability factor such as income, education and occupation were identified as the major factor towards utilization of dental services. However place of visit differs according to income, education and occupation.

  15. [THE ORGANIZATION OF REHABILITATION CARE OF POPULATION USING INNOVATIVE MEDICAL ORGANIZATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES AND PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totskaia, E G; Sheliakina, O W; Sadovoii, M A; Netchaev, V S

    2015-01-01

    The article considers actual problems of actual stage of development of health care related to using innovative approaches to organization and management of rehabilitation care ofpopulation. The rehabilitation is most important direction of medical sector supporting complex of services in closed cycle of rendering medical care to population and significant social economic effects. The capacity and extreme unprofitability of rehabilitation services determine necessity of searching alternative forms of organization of this type of care and financing including mechanisms of public-private partnership. The experience is presented related to involvement of resources of non-public medical organizations for implementing public commitments on rendering qualitative rehabilitation services to population using innovative medical organizational technologies. PMID:26987174

  16. Recurrent Wheezing in Infants: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen, Manon; De Blic, Jacques; Laforest, Laurent; Laigle, Valérie; Chanut-Vogel, Céline; Lamezec, Liliane; Brouard, Jacques; Fauroux, Brigitte; de Pouvourville, Gérard; Ginoux, Marine; Van Ganse, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent wheezing (RW) has a significant impact on infants, caregivers, and society, but morbidity and related medical resource utilization (MRU) have not been thoroughly explored. The burden of RW needs to be documented with population-based data. The objective was to assess the characteristics, medical management, and MRU of RW infants identified from national claims data. Infants aged from 6 to 24 months, receiving ≥2 dispensations of respiratory drugs within 3 months, and presenting a marker of poor control (index date), were selected. During the 6 months after index date, MRU was described in the cohort and among 3 subgroups with more severe RW, defined as ≥4 dispensations of respiratory drugs, ≥3 dispensations of oral corticosteroids (OCS), or ≥1 hospitalization for respiratory symptoms. A total of 115,489 infants had RW, corresponding to 8.2% of subjects in this age group. During follow-up, 68.7% of infants received inhaled corticosteroids, but only 1.8 U (unit) were dispensed over 6 months, suggesting discontinuous use. Control was mostly inadequate: 61.7% of subjects received OCS, 80.2% antibiotics, and 71.2% short-acting beta-agonists, and medical/paramedical visits were numerous, particularly for physiotherapy. Severe RW concerned 39.0% of the cohort; 32.8% and 11.7% of infants had repeated use of respiratory drugs and OCS, respectively, and 5.5% were hospitalized for respiratory symptoms. In this real-life nation-wide study, RW was common and infants had poor control and high MRU. Interventions are needed to support adequate use of controller therapy, and to improve medical care. PMID:27082618

  17. Managing incidental findings in population based biobank research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Solberg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of whole genome sequencing in medical research, the debate on how to handle incidental findings is becoming omnipresent. Much of the literature on the topic so far, seems to defend the researcher’s duty to inform, the participant’s right to know combined with a thorough informed consent in order to protect and secure high ethical standards in research. In this paper, we argue that this ethical response to incidental findings and whole genome sequencing is appropriate in a clinical context, in what we call therapeutic research. However, we further argue, that it is rather inappropriate in basic research, like the research going on in public health oriented population based biobanks. Our argument is based on two premises: First, in population based biobank research the duties and rights involved are radically different from a clinical based setting. Second, to introduce the ethical framework from the clinical setting into population based basic research, is not only wrong, but it may lead to unethical consequences. A Norwegian population based biobank and the research-ethical debate in Norway on the regulation of whole genome sequencing is used as an illustrative case to demonstrate the pitfalls when approaching the debate on incidental findings in population based biobank research.

  18. Adapting evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral interventions for anxiety for use with adults in integrated primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepardson, Robyn L; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Weisberg, Risa B

    2016-06-01

    Evidence-based treatments for adult patients with anxiety are greatly needed within primary care settings. Psychotherapy protocols, including those for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), are often disorder-specific and were developed for specialty mental health settings, rendering them infeasible in primary care. Behavioral health consultants (BHCs) integrated into primary care settings are uniquely positioned to provide anxiety treatment. However, due to the dearth of empirically supported brief treatments for anxiety, BHCs are tasked with adapting existing treatments for use in primary care, which is quite challenging due to the abbreviated format and population-based approach to care. CBT protocols are highly effective in the treatment of anxiety and fit well with the self-management emphasis of integrated primary care. We review the rationale and procedure for 6 evidence-based CBT intervention techniques (psycho-education, mindfulness and acceptance-based behavioral techniques, relaxation training, exposure, cognitive restructuring, and behavioral activation) that can be adapted for use in the brief format typical of integrated primary care. We offer tips based on our clinical experience, highlight resources (e.g., handouts, websites, apps), and discuss 2 case examples to aid BHCs in their everyday practice. Our goal is to provide BHCs with practical knowledge that will facilitate the use of evidence-based interventions to improve the treatment of anxiety in primary care settings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27064434

  19. An evidence-based health workforce model for primary and community care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Matthew J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The delivery of best practice care can markedly improve clinical outcomes in patients with chronic disease. While the provision of a skilled, multidisciplinary team is pivotal to the delivery of best practice care, the occupational or skill mix required to deliver this care is unclear; it is also uncertain whether such a team would have the capacity to adequately address the complex needs of the clinic population. This is the role of needs-based health workforce planning. The objective of this article is to describe the development of an evidence-informed, needs-based health workforce model to support the delivery of best-practice interdisciplinary chronic disease management in the primary and community care setting using diabetes as a case exemplar. Discussion Development of the workforce model was informed by a strategic review of the literature, critical appraisal of clinical practice guidelines, and a consensus elicitation technique using expert multidisciplinary clinical panels. Twenty-four distinct patient attributes that require unique clinical competencies for the management of diabetes in the primary care setting were identified. Patient attributes were grouped into four major themes and developed into a conceptual model: the Workforce Evidence-Based (WEB planning model. The four levels of the WEB model are (1 promotion, prevention, and screening of the general or high-risk population; (2 type or stage of disease; (3 complications; and (4 threats to self-care capacity. Given the number of potential combinations of attributes, the model can account for literally millions of individual patient types, each with a distinct clinical team need, which can be used to estimate the total health workforce requirement. Summary The WEB model was developed in a way that is not only reflective of the diversity in the community and clinic populations but also parsimonious and clear to present and operationalize. A key feature of the

  20. Child Disaster Mental Health Services: a Review of the System of Care, Assessment Approaches, and Evidence Base for Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Several decades of research have informed our knowledge of children's reactions to disasters and the factors that influence their reactions. This article describes the system of care for child disaster mental health services using population risk to determine needed services and a stepped care approach built on assessment and monitoring to advance children to appropriate services. To assess the evidence base for disaster interventions, recent reviews of numerous child disaster mental health interventions are summarized.

  1. Difficulties in accessing and availing of public health care systems among rural population in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Lakshmi Sreerama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite policies to make health care accessible to all, it is not universally accessible. Frequent evaluation of barriers to accessibility of health care services paves path for improvement. Hence, present study is undertaken to evaluate the factors and public health policies influencing health care access to rural people in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, which can be interpolated for other regions. Aims: To assess knowledge, perceptions, availing of public health care services, barriers to health care access in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, hospital-based survey in the Government Maternity Hospital (GMH, Tirupati, a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Fifty women delivered normally in GMH through convenient sampling technique. Data collected on standardized pro forma as per IMS Institute of Healthcare Informatics. Statistical Analysis Used: Is done through MS Excel 2007, Epi Info 7 (of Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA and frequencies were described. Results: Distance, waiting hours, societal responsibility, nature of the illness, presumed commercialization of Medicare system, attitudes of health care providers, and loss of wages were not barriers for accessing health care. Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and availability of ambulance services made great improvements in health care accessibility. Absenteeism of health care providers is a problem. Conclusions: Expanding the ambulance services and ASHA network will be an effective measure for further accessibility to health care. Absenteeism of health care providers needs correction.

  2. Financial access to health care in Karuzi, Burundi: a household-survey based performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Herp Michel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, Médecins Sans Frontières, the provincial government, and the provincial health authority began a community project to guarantee financial access to primary health care in Karuzi province, Burundi. The project used a community-based assessment to provide exemption cards for indigent households and a reduced flat fee for consultations for all other households. Methods An evaluation was carried out in 2005 to assess the impact of this project. Primary data collection was through a cross-sectional household survey of the catchment areas of 10 public health centres. A questionnaire was used to determine the accuracy of the community-identification method, households' access to health care, and costs of care. Household socioeconomic status was determined by reported expenditures and access to land. Results Financial access to care at the nearest health centre was ensured for 70% of the population. Of the remaining 30%, half experienced financial barriers to access and the other half chose alternative sites of care. The community-based assessment increased the number of people of the population who qualified for fee exemptions to 8.6% but many people who met the indigent criteria did not receive a card. Eighty-eight percent of the population lived under the poverty threshold. Referring to the last sickness episode, 87% of households reported having no money available and 25% risked further impoverishment because of healthcare costs even with the financial support system in place. Conclusion The flat fee policy was found to reduce cost barriers for some households but, given the generalized poverty in the area, the fee still posed a significant financial burden. This report showed the limits of a programme of fee exemption for indigent households and a flat fee for others in a context of widespread poverty.

  3. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claire Visser; Gina Hadley; Bee Wee

    2015-01-01

    hTere has been a paradigm shitf in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically signiifcant beneifts may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. hTe typical treatmentvs. placebo comparison necessitated by ‘gold standard’ randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. hTe complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be diffcult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. hTis review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. hTe future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a ‘mixed methods approach’ are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes.

  4. ATTEND: Toward a Mindfulness-Based Bereavement Care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Joanne; Flint, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Few, if any, mindfulness-based bereavement care models exist. The ATTEND (attunement, trust, touch, egalitarianism, nuance, and death education) model is an interdisciplinary paradigm for providers, including physicians, social workers, therapists, nursing staff, and others. Using a case example to enhance the breadth and depth of understanding,…

  5. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne;

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...... for children with cancer....

  6. Evidence Based Order Sets as a Nursing Care Planning System

    OpenAIRE

    LaCrosse, Lisa M.; Heermann, Judith; Azevedo, Karen; Sorrentino, Catherine; Straub, Dawn; O'Dowd, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    The process for developing the nursing care planning (NCP) function for integration into a clinical information system (CIS) will be described. This NCP system uses evidence based order sets or interventions that are specific to a problem with associated patient focused goals or outcomes. The problem, order set, goal framework will eventually be used by all disciplines in the patient focused record.

  7. The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population radiation dose in a 'health-care level I' representative region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo Cornetto, Andrea; Aimonetto, Stefania; Pisano, Francesco; Giudice, Marcello; Sicuro, Marco; Meloni, Teodoro; Tofani, Santi

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates per-procedure, collective and per capita effective dose to the population by interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed during 2002-11 at the main hospital of Aosta Valley Region that can be considered as representative of the health-care level I countries, as defined by the UNSCEAR, based on its socio-demographic characteristics. IC procedures investigated were often multiple procedures in patients older than 60 y. The median extreme dose-area product values of 300 and 22 908 cGycm(2) were found for standard pacemaker implantation and coronary angioplasty, respectively, while the relative mean per-procedure effective dose ranged from 0.7 to 47 mSv. A 3-fold increase in frequency has been observed together with a correlated increase in the delivered per capita dose (0.05-0.27 mSv y(-1)) and the collective dose (5.8-35 man Sv y(-1)). Doses increased particularly from 2008 onwards mainly because of the introduction of coronary angioplasty procedures in the authors' institution. IC practice contributed remarkably in terms of effective dose to the population, delivering ∼10% of the total dose by medical ionising radiation examination categories.

  8. Community health workers in primary care practice: redesigning health care delivery systems to extend and improve diabetes care in underserved populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinsworth, Ashley; Vulimiri, Madhulika; Snead, Christine; Walton, James

    2014-11-01

    New, comprehensive, approaches for chronic disease management are needed to ensure that patients, particularly those more likely to experience health disparities, have access to the clinical care, self-management resources, and support necessary for the prevention and control of diabetes. Community health workers (CHWs) have worked in community settings to reduce health care disparities and are currently being deployed in some clinical settings as a means of improving access to and quality of care. Guided by the chronic care model, Baylor Health Care System embedded CHWs within clinical teams in community clinics with the goal of reducing observed disparities in diabetes care and outcomes. This study examines findings from interviews with patients, CHWs, and primary care providers (PCPs) to understand how health care delivery systems can be redesigned to effectively incorporate CHWs and how embedding CHWs in primary care teams can produce informed, activated patients and prepared, proactive practice teams who can work together to achieve improved patient outcomes. Respondents indicated that the PCPs continued to provide clinical exams and manage patient care, but the roles of diabetes education, nutritional counseling, and patient activation were shifted to the CHWs. CHWs also provided patients with social support and connection to community resources. Integration of CHWs into clinical care teams improved patient knowledge and activation levels, the ability of PCPs to identify and proactively address specific patient needs, and patient outcomes.

  9. Leveraging The Affordable Care Act To Enroll Justice-Involved Populations In Medicaid: State And Local Efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Bandara, Sachini N.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Riedel, Lauren E.; McGinty, Emma E.; Webster, Daniel; Toone, Robert E.; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to enroll criminal justice–involved populations in health insurance, particularly Medicaid. As a result, many state and county corrections departments have launched programs that incorporate Medicaid enrollment in discharge planning. Our study characterizes the national landscape of programs enrolling criminal justice–involved populations in Medicaid as of January 2015. We provide an overview of sixty-four programs operating in jai...

  10. Evaluating Comparative Effectiveness Research Priorities for Care Coordination in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Community-Based eDelphi Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stellefson, Michael; Alber, Julia; Paige, Samantha; Castro, Daniela; Singh, Briana

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite research supporting the use of care coordination in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there is relatively little known about the comparative effectiveness of different strategies used to organize care for patients. To investigate the most important COPD care coordination strategies, community-based stakeholder input is needed, especially from medically underserved populations. Web-based platforms are electronic tools now being used to bring together individuals ...

  11. The evidence base for professional and self-care prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this conference paper was to examine the evidence base for primary and secondary prevention of dental caries, erosions and dentin hypersensitivity through professional and self-care measures. METHODS: A mapping of systematic reviews (SR) of literature was carried out in Pub....... Likewise, the GRADE score for preventing erosions located in the enamel with fluoride supplements was low. The quality of evidence for various professional and self-care methods to prevent and manage dentine hypersensitivity was very low. CONCLUSIONS: There are knowledge gaps in many domains of cariology...

  12. LGBT Demographics: Comparisons among population-based surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    This report uses four large, national, population-based surveys to consider the ways in which LGBT populations are demographically similar to or distinct from their non-LGBT counterparts in the United States. Comparisons of demographic characteristics are made among the surveys and, when possible, among sexual orientation identities to consider differences between those who identify as lesbian or gay and those who identify as bisexual (none of the surveys allow for separate identification of ...

  13. Choosing quality of care measures based on the expected impact of improved care on health.

    OpenAIRE

    Siu, A L; McGlynn, E A; Morgenstern, H; Beers, M H; Carlisle, D M; Keeler, E B; Beloff, J.; Curtin, K; Leaning, J; Perry, B C

    1992-01-01

    Consumers, payers, and policymakers are demanding to know more about the quality of the services they are purchasing or might purchase. The information provided, however, is often driven by data availability rather than by epidemiologic and clinical considerations. In this article, we present an approach for selecting topics for measuring technical quality of care, based on the expected impact on health of improved quality. This approach employs data or estimates on disease burden, efficacy o...

  14. Evidence-based medicine and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Donna; Vineis, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we set out to examine the arguments for and against the claim that Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) will improve the quality of care. In particular, we examine the following issues: 1. Are there hidden ethical assumptions in the methodology of EBM? 2. Is there a tension between the duty of care and EBM? 3. How can patient preferences be incorporated into quality guidelines and effectiveness studies? 4. Is there a tension between the quality of a particular intervention and overall quality of care? 5. Are certain branches of medicine and patient groups innately or prima facie disadvantaged by a shift to EBM? In addition we consider a case study in the ethics of EBM, on a clinical trial concerning the collection of umbilical cord blood in utero and ex utero, during or after labour in childbirth.

  15. Home-based Self-care: Understanding and Designing Pervasive Technology to Support Care Management Work at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    -clinical settings. As such, sustaining daily care activities in the home (or other non-clinical settings) is challenging as they are becoming more and more intertwined into people’s everyday life. Thus, this dissertation is concerned about one major challenge in Pervasive Healthcare: the design of technology......Demographic changes are challenging healthcare systems as well as societies around the world due to an increasing aging population and rapid propagation of chronic diseases. To deal with the consequences of these changes, more and more long-term care services are being implemented including home...... the self-care management work at home. People need to know which care activities to perform, when to perform them, how to proceed and why these are important. While at home, an active lifestyle and comorbidity not only challenge self-care activities but also the use of self-care technologies in non...

  16. Integrating care coordination home telehealth and home based primary care in rural Oklahoma: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorocco, Kristen H; Bratkovich, Kristi L; Wingo, Rita; Qureshi, Saleem M; Mason, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to evaluate the benefits of integrating VA Care Coordination Home Telehealth and Telemental health within HBPC. A case study design was used to determine quality assurance and quality improvement of incorporating additional home telehealth equipment within Home Based Primary Care (HBPC). Veterans with complex medical conditions and their caregivers living in rural Oklahoma were enrolled. Veterans received the same care other HBPC patients received with the addition of home telehealth equipment. Members from the interdisciplinary treatment team were certified to use the telehealth equipment. Veterans and their caregivers were trained on use of the equipment in their homes. Standard HBPC program measures were used to assess the program success. Assessments from all disciplines on the HBPC team were at baseline, 3, and 6 months, and participants provided satisfaction and interview data to assess the benefits of integrating technology into standard care delivery within an HBPC program. Six veterans were enrolled (mean age = 72 yrs) with a range of physical health conditions including: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident, spinal cord injury, diabetes, hypertension, and syncope. Primary mental health conditions included depression, dementia, anxiety, and PTSD. Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination ranged from 18 to 30. Over a 6-month period, case studies indicated improvements in strength, social functioning, decreased caregiver burden, and compliance with treatment plan. This integration of CCHT and HBPC served previously underserved rural veterans having complex medical conditions and appears both feasible and clinically beneficial to veterans and their caregivers.

  17. Gout treatment and comorbidities: a retrospective cohort study in a large US managed care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plana Estel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gout prevalence increased in recent years to become one of the most common causes of inflammatory arthritis in most industrialised countries. Comorbidities may affect the disease severity and treatment patterns. We describe the main characteristics of gout patients, gout-related treatment patterns and prevalent comorbidities in a managed care population. Methods From the large US PharMetrics Patient-Centric Database, patients aged 20-89 with at least 2 claims for a diagnosis of gout (ICD9 274.xx and related prescriptions between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2008 were included. Gout flares were ascertained during follow-up. Sex-specific multivariable Poisson regression models were used to assess factors associated with number of flares. Results 177,637 gout patients were included (mean age 55.2 years; men 75.6%. Overall, more than half (58.1% had any of the considered comorbidities; hypertension (36.1%, dyslipidemia (27.0% and diabetes (15.1% being the most common. Nonselective NSAIDs were the most commonly dispensed (in 38.7% of patients. Notably, 39% of patients did not receive any prescription medication for gout. Patients with comorbidities were significantly more likely to receive anti-gout prescriptions. During an acute episode the prescription of NSAIDs and colchicine increased; and 29.9% of patients received allopurinol. The risk of flares was associated with cardiometabolic comorbidities and older age in women (highest at age 60-69, while in men it decreased by age. Women with these conditions were 60% more likely to have flares (incidence rate ratio, IRR 1.60;1.48-1.74, while men were 10% (IRR 1.10; 1.06-1.13 more likely. Conclusions Comorbidities affected gout treatment patterns and the occurrence and frequency of acute attacks. Cardiometabolic comorbidities, common in this patients' population, were associated with an increased risk of flares.

  18. Improving Access to Primary Care for a Growing Latino Population: The Role of Safety Net Providers in the Rural Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Lynn A.; Casey, Michelle; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2004-01-01

    Many rural Midwestern communities are experiencing rapid growth in Latino populations with low rates of health insurance coverage, limited financial resources, language and cultural differences, and special health care needs. We report on 2-day site visits conducted in 2001 and 2002 in 3 communities (Marshalltown, Iowa; Great Bend, Kansas; and…

  19. How and by whom care is delivered influences anti-inflammatory use in asthma : Results of a national population survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, RJ; Weiss, ST; Fuhlbrigge, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Studies examining the influence of provider behavior and patterns of care delivery on the use of antiinflammatory asthma therapy have been limited to selected populations or have been unable to assess the appropriateness of therapy for individuals. We have previously reported the influen

  20. Elder abuse and neglect in a population offering care by a primary health care center in Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissal, Aygul; Beşer, Ayşe

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of abuse and neglect of the elderly aged 65 years and older, living with their relative in a primary health care center area and affecting factors. A descriptive study included 331 people aged 65 years. The most frequent type of abuse was psychological abuse and the least frequent was sexual abuse. Female gender, low education levels, living with spouses and children, and perception of familial relationships as average or below average significantly increased abuse. The nurses providing primary health care should be able to identify and observe the elderly at risk of abuse and conduct programs preventing abuse. PMID:21347984

  1. Population Control for Multi-agent Based Topical Crawlers

    OpenAIRE

    Mouton, Alban; Marteau, Pierre-François

    2008-01-01

    International audience The use of multi-agent topical Web crawlers based on the endogenous fitness model raises the problem of controling the population of agents. We tackle this question through an energy based model to balance the reproduction/life expectency of agents. Our goal is to simplify the tuning of parameters and to optimize the use of ressources available for the crawling. We introduce an energy based model designed to control the number of agents according to the precision of ...

  2. Geospatial Technology in Disease Mapping, E- Surveillance and Health Care for Rural Population in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveenkumar, B. A.; Suresh, K.; Nikhil, A.; Rohan, M.; Nikhila, B. S.; Rohit, C. K.; Srinivas, A.

    2014-11-01

    Providing Healthcare to rural population has been a challenge to the medical service providers especially in developing countries. For this to be effective, scalable and sustainable, certain strategic decisions have to be taken during the planning phase. Also, there is a big gap between the services available and the availability of doctors and medical resources in rural areas. Use of Information Technology can aid this deficiency to a good extent. In this paper, a mobile application has been developed to gather data from the field. A cloud based interface has been developed to store the data in the cloud for effective usage and management of the data. A decision tree based solution developed in this paper helps in diagnosing a patient based on his health parameters. Interactive geospatial maps have been developed to provide effective data visualization facility. This will help both the user community as well as decision makers to carry out long term strategy planning.

  3. [THE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL CARE OF POPULATION IN CONDITIONS OF SPECIALIZED DAY-TIME HOSPITALS OF NEUROLOGICAL PROFILE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, N K; Solovieva, N B; Abdulsalamova, Z A

    2015-01-01

    The article considers issues concerning increasing of quality and accessibility of medical care in Moscow neurological profile included at the expense of wide-spread implementation of specialized day-time hospitals in health care practice. The analysis applied was based on average Moscow indicators of functioning of public health institutions and characteristics of clinical course of diseases of the mentioned profile.

  4. Accidental intoxication of the infant-juvenile population in households: profiles of emergency care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackeline Gonçalves Brito

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Analyzing profiles of intoxication and accidental poisoning of infant-juvenile population (0-24 years in the household, treated at a reference facility for Emergency and Primary Care, during the year 2013. METHOD A descriptive, cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using Epi-Info, by way of simple and bivariate analyzes. The project was approved by the Research Ethics Committee (protocol 405.578. RESULTS There were 45 intoxications, with a prevalence of males (60.0%, aged 1-4 years (71.1%. Among children under one, there was a higher frequency of pesticide poisoning (66.6%, between the ages of 1-4 by cleaning products (34.4%, and between 5-9 years of age by pharmacological substances (66.6%. The primary assistance was provided only at health institutions, with hospital admissions in 24.4% of the cases. CONCLUSION The importance of prevention through legislation is evident, in order to ensure greater safety in packaging of various products, and community awareness to eliminate risks in the household environment.

  5. Population aging and its impacts: strategies of the health-care system in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Peng, Li-Ning; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2010-11-01

    Taiwan is one of the fastest aging countries in the world. As such, the government has developed various strategies to promote an age-friendly health-care system. Health services are supported by National Health Insurance (NHI), which insures over 97% of citizens and over 99% of health-care institutes. The current health-care system has difficulties in caring for older patients with multiple comorbidities, complex care needs, functional impairments, and post-acute care needs. Taipei, an international metropolis with a well-preserved tradition of filial piety in Chinese societies, has developed various strategies to overcome the aforementioned barriers to an age-friendly health-care system. These include an emphasis on general medical care and a holistic approach in all specialties, development of a geriatrics specialty training program, development of post-acute services, and strengthening of linkages between health and social care services. Despite achievements thus far, challenges still include creating a more extensive integration between medical specialties, promotion of an interdisciplinary care model across specialties and health-care settings, and integration of health and social care services. The experiences of Taipei in developing an age-friendly health-care service system may be a culturally appropriate model for other Chinese and Asian communities.

  6. Why isn't evidence based practice improving health care for minorities in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeok; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Baik, Sung-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Achieving health equity by improving the health care of all racial/ethnic groups is one of the key goals of Healthy People 2020. The implementation of evidence based practice (EBP) has been a major recommendation to achieve health equity in hopes of eliminating the subjectivity of clinical decision making. However, health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities are persistent in spite of the adoption of standardized care based on evidence. The EBP with racial and ethnic minorities is often seen as a possible cause of health and health care disparities. Three potential issues of using EBP to reduce health disparities have been identified: (1) a lack of data for EBP with ethnic/racial minority populations; (2) limited research on the generalizability of the evidence based on a European-American middle-class; and (3) sociocultural considerations in the context of EBP. Using EBP to reduce disparities in health care and health outcomes requires that nurse professionals should know how to use relevant evidence in a particular situation as well as to generate knowledge and theory which is relevant to racial/ethnic minorities. In addition, EBP implementation should be contextualized within the sociocultural environments in which patients are treated rather than solely focusing on the health problems. PMID:23928122

  7. A mobile phone-based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: the care assessment platform (CAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer effective means to prevent recurrence of a cardiac event, but poor uptake of current programs have been reported globally. Home based models are considered as a feasible alternative to avoid various barriers related to care centre based programs. This paper sets out the study design for a clinical trial seeking to test the hypothesis that these programs can be better and more efficiently supported with novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Methods/Design We have integrated mobile phones and web services into a comprehensive home- based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Mobile phones with a built-in accelerometer sensor are used to measure physical exercise and WellnessDiary software is used to collect information on patients' physiological risk factors and other health information. Video and teleconferencing are used for mentoring sessions aiming at behavioural modifications through goal setting. The mentors use web-portal to facilitate personal goal setting and to assess the progress of each patient in the program. Educational multimedia content are stored or transferred via messaging systems to the patients phone to be viewed on demand. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to compare the health outcomes and cost efficiency of the proposed model with a traditional community based rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure is adherence to physical exercise guidelines. Discussion The study will provide evidence on using mobile phones and web services for mentoring and self management in a home-based care model targeting sustainable behavioural modifications in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR with number ACTRN12609000251224.

  8. Understanding integrated care: a comprehensive conceptual framework based on the integrative functions of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, P.P.; Schepman, S.M.; Opheij, W.; Bruijnzeels, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care has a central role in integrating care within a health system. However, conceptual ambiguity regarding integrated care hampers a systematic understanding. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that combines the concepts of primary care and integrated care, in order to

  9. The benefits of measurement-based care for primary care patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W Clay

    2016-03-01

    Follow the case of Mrs C, a primary care patient with depression who fails to respond to initial antidepressant treatment, and see how measurement-based care helps her clinician confirm her diagnosis, track symptom response, and assess her sense of well-being. Using rating scales such as the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale (GAD-7), and Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) can help clinicians recognize suboptimal response and make treatment adjustments such as optimizing the medication dose, switching to another medication, or augmenting with medications, psychotherapy, or exercise. For Mrs C and other patients with depression, the goal of treatment must go beyond symptom remission to improve quality of life. PMID:27046318

  10. Protocol for a population-based Ankylosing Spondylitis (PAS cohort in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop a population-based cohort of people with ankylosing spondylitis (AS in Wales using (1 secondary care clinical datasets, (2 patient-derived questionnaire data and (3 routinely-collected information in order to examine disease history and the health economic cost of AS. Methods This data model will include and link (1 secondary care clinician datasets (i.e. electronic patient notes from the rheumatologist (2 patient completed questionnaires (giving information on disease activity, medication, function, quality of life, work limitations and health service utilisation and (3 a broad range of routinely collected data (including; GP records, in-patient hospital admission data, emergency department data, laboratory/pathology data and social services databases. The protocol involves the use of a unique and powerful data linkage system which allows datasets to be interlinked and to complement each other. Discussion This cohort can integrate patient supplied, primary and secondary care data into a unified data model. This can be used to study a range of issues such as; the true economic costs to the health care system and the patient, factors associated with the development of severe disease, long term adverse events of new and existing medication and to understand the disease history of this condition. It will benefit patients, clinicians and health care managers. This study forms a pilot project for the use of routine data/patient data linked cohorts for other chronic conditions.

  11. Organizing palliative care for rural populations: a systematic review of the evidence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, R.W.; Stone, D.; Elwyn, G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative care services have developed mostly in urban areas. Rural areas typically are characterized by the lack of well-organized services, with primary care professionals, specifically GPs and community nurses, having to undertake most of the palliative care. Little is known, however

  12. Teacher's Understanding, Perceptions, and Experiences of Students in Foster Care: A Forgotten Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Davis, Darneika

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine elementary teacher's understanding, perceptions, and experiences of working with students in foster care. The researcher examined whether teachers are informed about students in foster care, determined teacher's understanding of the foster care system, and how their students are affected. The results…

  13. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newman Mark J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at http://epitope.liai.org:8080/tools/population. Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine, and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups.

  14. Female genital cutting: an evidence-based approach to clinical management for the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearst, Adelaide A; Molnar, Alexandra M

    2013-06-01

    The United States has more than 1.5 million immigrants from countries in Africa and the Middle East where female genital cutting (FGC) is known to occur. Often, FGC occurs in infancy and childhood in the countries where it is practiced, but patients of any age can present with complications. Lack of understanding of this common problem can potentially alienate and lower quality of care for this patient population. We provide an introduction to the practice of FGC and practice guidelines for the primary care physician. We reviewed original research, population-based studies, and legal research from PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL plus, PsycINFO, and Legal Trac. The terms searched included female genital cutting, female genital circumcision, and female genital mutilation alone and with the term complications or health consequences; no limit on date published. Legal databases were searched using the above terms, as well as international law and immigration law. Editorials and review articles were excluded. This review discusses the different types of FGC, important cultural considerations for physicians caring for patients with FGC, the common early and late medical complications and their management, and psychosocial issues associated with FGC. Current laws pertaining to FGC are briefly reviewed, as well as implications for patients seeking asylum status in the United States because of FGC. Finally, the article presents evidence-based, culturally sensitive approaches to discussions of FGC with girls and women for whom this is an issue. PMID:23726401

  15. Health Literacy in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Van Tuyen; Lin, I-Feng; Sorensen, Kristine; Pelikan, Jürgen M; Van Den Broucke, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Chin; Chang, Peter Wushou

    2015-11-01

    Data on health literacy (HL) in the population is limited for Asian countries. This study aimed to test the validity of the Mandarin version of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q) for use in the general public in Taiwan. Multistage stratification random sampling resulted in a sample of 2989 people aged 15 years and above. The HLS-EU-Q was validated by confirmatory factor analysis with excellent model data fit indices. The general HL of the Taiwanese population was 34.4 ± 6.6 on a scale of 50. Multivariate regression analysis showed that higher general HL is significantly associated with the higher ability to pay for medication, higher self-perceived social status, higher frequency of watching health-related TV, and community involvement but associated with younger age. HL is also associated with health status, health behaviors, and health care accessibility and use. The HLS-EU-Q was found to be a useful tool to assess HL and its associated factors in the general population. PMID:26419635

  16. Evaluation of the integrated community based home care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Uys

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1999-2000 the Integrated Community-Based Home Care model for the care of people with AIDS in communities were implemented in seven sites across the country. The post-implementation evaluation showed that most respondents felt that the model could be replicated if a functioning and informed network including all partners, and a strong management team were in place. The effects of the project were mainly positive for all stakeholders (hospice, clinic, hospital, PWA and their carers, professionals and other community members. Hospitals and community- based services became more aware of and involved in the needs of PWA and felt that the model enabled them to address these needs. PWA and their carers felt supported and respected.

  17. Primary health care utilization by the mexican indigenous population: the role of the Seguro popular in socially inequitable contexts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Leyva-Flores

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between primary health care utilization and extended health insurance coverage under the Seguro Popular (SP among Mexican indigenous people. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 2012 (n = 194,758. Quasi-experimental matching methods and nonlinear regression probit models were used to estimate the influence of SP on primary health care utilization. RESULTS: 25% of the Mexican population reported having no health insurance coverage, while 59% of indigenous versus 35% of non-indigenous reported having SP coverage. Health problems were reported by 13.9% of indigenous vs. 10.5% of non-indigenous; of these, 52.8% and 57.7% respectively, received primary health care (p<0.05. Economic barriers were the most frequent reasons for not using primary health care services. The probability of utilizing primary health care services was 11.5 percentage points higher (p<0.01 for indigenous SP affiliates in comparison with non-indigenous, in similar socioeconomic conditions. CONCLUSION: Socioeconomic conditions, not ethnicity per-se, determine whether people utilize primary health care services. Therefore, SP can be conceived as a public policy strategy which acts as a social buffer by enhancing health care utilization regardless of ethnicity. Further analysis is required to explore the potential gaps as a result of SP coverage among socially vulnerable groups.

  18. Population-based preconception carrier screening: how potential users from the general population view a test for 50 serious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Mirjam; Birnie, Erwin; Abbott, Kristin M; Sinke, Richard J; Lucassen, Anneke M; Schuurmans, Juliette; Kaplan, Seyma; Verkerk, Marian A; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    With the increased international focus on personalized health care and preventive medicine, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has substantially expanded the options for carrier screening of serious, recessively inherited diseases. NGS screening tests not only offer reproductive options not previously available to couples, but they may also ultimately reduce the number of children born with devastating disorders. To date, preconception carrier screening (PCS) has largely targeted single diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but NGS allows the testing of many genes or diseases simultaneously. We have developed an expanded NGS PCS test for couples; simultaneously it covers 50 very serious, early-onset, autosomal recessive diseases that are untreatable. This is the first, noncommercial, population-based, expanded PCS test to be offered prospectively to couples in a health-care setting in Europe. So far, little is known about how potential users view such a PCS test. We therefore performed an online survey in 2014 among 500 people from the target population in the Netherlands. We enquired about their intention to take an expanded PCS test if one was offered, and through which provider they would like to see it offered. One-third of the respondents said they would take such a test were it to be offered. The majority (44%) preferred the test to be offered via their general practitioner (GP) and 58% would be willing to pay for the test, with a median cost of €75. Our next step is to perform an implementation study in which this PCS test will be provided via selected GPs in the Northern Netherlands. PMID:27165008

  19. A region-based palliative care intervention trial using the mixed-method approach: Japan OPTIM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morita Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    populations are a nearly representative sample of advanced cancer patients, bereaved family members, physicians, and nurses in the region. Qualitative process studies consist of 3 studies with each aim: 1 to describe the process in developing regional palliative care in each local context, 2 to understand how and why the regional palliative care program led to changes in the region and to propose a model for shaping regional palliative care, and 3 to systemically collect the barriers of palliative care at a regional level and potential resolutions. The study methodology is a case descriptive study, a grounded theory approach based on interviews, and a content analysis based on systemically collected data, respectively. Discussion This study is, to our knowledge, one of the most comprehensive evaluations of a region-based palliative care intervention program. This study has 3 unique aspects: 1 it measures a wide range of outcomes, including quality of care and quality of life measures specifically designed for palliative care populations, whether patients died where they actually preferred, the changes in physicians and nurses at a regional level; 2 adopts qualitative studies along with quantitative evaluations; and 3 the intervention is without a fundamental change in health care systems. A comprehensive understanding of the findings in this study will contribute to a deeper insight into how to develop community palliative care. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR, Japan, UMIN000001274.

  20. Cost Effectiveness of Facility-Based Care, Home-Based Care and Mobile Clinics for Provision of Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Babigumira, Joseph B; Sethi, Ajay K.; Smyth, Kathleen A.; Singer, Mendel E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders in HIV/AIDS care currently use different programmes for provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. It is not known which of these represents the best value for money. Objective: To compare the cost effectiveness of home-based care (HBC), facility-based care (FBC) and mobile clinic care (MCC) for provision of ART in Uganda. Methods: Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using decision and Markov modeling of adult AIDS patients in WHO Clinical ...

  1. PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF POPULATION BASED ANT COLONY OPTIMIZATION ALGORITHM

    OpenAIRE

    Valeeva, A.; Goncharova, Yu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we consider the Split Delivery Vehicle Routing Problem, which has a wide practical application. The SDVRP is NP-hard problem. We propose a population based ant colony optimization algorithm for solving the SDVRP. Computational experiments for developed algorithm are reported.

  2. Individual based model of slug population and spatial dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Y.H.; Bohan, D.A.; Potting, R.P.J.; Semenov, M.A.; Glen, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The slug, Deroceras reticulatum, is one of the most important pests of agricultural and horticultural crops in UK and Europe. In this paper, a spatially explicit individual based model (IbM) is developed to study the dynamics of a population of D. reticulatum. The IbM establishes a virtual field wit

  3. Arteriovenous fistula: An evidence based practice in nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Prevyzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The arteriovenous fistula (AVF is the most frequent form of vascular access for patients undergoing haemodialysis because it ensures good quality of dialysis and reduce haemodialysis mortality. For this reason, the nephrology nurse plays an important role in the appropriate care of fistula with a view to promoting the longevity and prevention of complications. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to investigate the role of Nephrology nurse in the appropriate care of fistula, promoting longevity and reducing complications, based on scientific data and international guidelines. Material-Method: The methodology followed in this review relied on literatures reviews and investigative studies, which were carried out during the period 2000-2012 and international (Medline, PubMed, Cinahl and Greek databases (Iatrotek on the care and management of fistula in people undergoing chronic haemodialysis. Key-words were used: Arteriovenous fistula, cannulation techniques fistula, guidelines, vascular access, role of nurse. Results: The arteriovenous fistula (AVF is the life line for patients undergoing haemodialysis. For this reason, the appropriate care of fistula and its maintenance in a good condition plays an important role for patient΄s life. Conclusions: Nephrology nurse has a major role in the proper management of the fistula and the education of the patient. Additionally, there is a need for cooperation between all the members of the multidisciplinary team, which includes dialysis nurse, nefrologist, access surgeon, and radiologist, for the broader assessment of fistula and the prevention and timely treatment of any complications.

  4. IMPLEMENTING AN ISO 10001-BASED PROMISE IN INPATIENTS CARE

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    Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman Khan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of a Customer Satisfaction Promise (CSP that requires nurses to introduce themselves and explain the care plan to the patients of a hospital unit in Canada. The CSP implementation, maintenance and improvement activities were based on ISO 10001:2007. Qualitative and quantitative performance data were collected from nurses, the unit manager and patients, and improvement suggestions were made. During the implementation, nurses introduced themselves 95% of the time and explained the care plan 86% of the time. When interviewed, some nurses stated that the CSP was a good reinforcement of a practice already expected of them, which made patients happy, satisfied and more comfortable. Data from a small sample of patients was not adequate in clearly indicating the CSP's performance or improvement, but was useful in validating the survey and the feedback form. To our knowledge, applications of ISO 10001:2007 in health care have not been studied. Furthermore, this paper may be the first example of the integrated use of ISO 10001 and ISO 10002 in health care.

  5. The Team Approach to Home-Based Primary Care: Restructuring Care to Meet Patient, Program, and System Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckrey, Jennifer M.; Soriano, Theresa A.; Hernandez, Cameron R.; DeCherrie, Linda V.; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address patient, program, and system needs, we restructured a portion of our large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. Our Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care though practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound. PMID:25645568

  6. Anxiety disorders in young people: a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Thaíse Campos Mondin; Caroline Elizabeth Konradt; Taiane de Azevedo Cardoso; Luciana de Avila Quevedo; Karen Jansen; Luciano Dias de Mattos; Ricardo Tavares Pinheiro; Ricardo Azevedo da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of anxiety disorders and associated factors in young adults. Methods: Cross-sectional population-based study of individuals between the ages of 18 and 24 years randomly selected from 89 census-based sectors to ensure an adequate sample size. Household selection within the sectors was performed according to a systematic sampling process. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The final sample compris...

  7. Prevalence and factors associated with the presence of non alcoholic fatty liver disease in an apparently healthy adult population in primary care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizarro Gregorio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty liver disease is characterized by the accumulation of fat vacuoles inside of the hepatocytes. Non alcoholic fatty liver is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipemia, the intake of certain drugs and with the so-called metabolic syndrome. However, there is little information on the clinical relevance of this disorder as a healthcare problem in the general population, since the studies published generally include a limited number of patients and the diagnosis is established on the basis of clear biochemical alterations and liver biopsy. Methods/Design The aim of the study is the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in a general adult population by hepatic ultrasonography. A population-based, descriptive, transversal, multicentre study. Eighteen primary care centres of the north of Barcelona and the Maresme Areas of Healthcare Management attending an urban and semi-urban population of 360.000 inhabitants. A randomized sample of 786 subjects of 15 years or older were selected from the population and assigned to the participating centres according to the Primary Care Information System (SIAP: This population is practically the same as the general population of the area. The following determinations will be carried out in all the participants: hepatic ultrasonography to detect fatty liver, a questionnaire concerning liver diseases, alcohol intake, smoking and drug use, physical examination including abdominal perimeter and body mass index and biochemical analysis including liver function tests and parameters related to the metabolic syndrome and the HAIR score. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of fatty liver will be made according to established criteria (American Gastroenterology Association and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance. Discussion This study will attempt to determine the prevalence of non alcoholic fatty liver disease

  8. Population uptake of antiretroviral treatment through primary care in rural South Africa

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    Bärnighausen Till W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KwaZulu-Natal is the South African province worst affected by HIV and the focus of early modeling studies investigating strategies of antiretroviral treatment (ART delivery. The reality of antiretroviral roll-out through primary care has differed from that anticipated and real world data are needed to inform the planning of further scaling up of services. We investigated the factors associated with uptake of antiretroviral treatment through a primary healthcare system in rural South Africa. Methods Detailed demographic, HIV surveillance and geographic information system (GIS data were used to estimate the proportion of HIV positive adults accessing antiretroviral treatment within northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in the period from initiation of antiretroviral roll-out until the end of 2008. Demographic, spatial and socioeconomic factors influencing the likelihood of individuals accessing antiretroviral treatment were explored using multivariable analysis. Results Mean uptake of ART among HIV positive resident adults was 21.0% (95%CI 20.1-21.9. Uptake among HIV positive men (19.2% was slightly lower than women (21.8%, P = 0.011. An individual's likelihood of accessing ART was not associated with level of education, household assets or urban/rural locale. ART uptake was strongly negatively associated with distance from the nearest primary healthcare facility (aOR = 0.728 per square-root transformed km, 95%CI 0.658-0.963, P = 0.002. Conclusions Despite concerns about the equitable nature of antiretroviral treatment rollout, we find very few differences in ART uptake across a range of socio-demographic variables in a rural South African population. However, even when socio-demographic factors were taken into account, individuals living further away from primary healthcare clinics were still significantly less likely to be accessing ART

  9. Prediction of critical illness in elderly outpatients using elder risk assessment: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, Michelle; Takahashi, Paul Y; Cha, Stephen S; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Gajic, Ognjen; Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Identifying patients at high risk of critical illness is necessary for the development and testing of strategies to prevent critical illness. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between high elder risk assessment (ERA) score and critical illness requiring intensive care and to see if the ERA can be used as a prediction tool to identify elderly patients at the primary care visit who are at high risk of critical illness. Methods A population-based historical cohort study was conducted in elderly patients (age >65 years) identified at the time of primary care visit in Rochester, MN, USA. Predictors including age, previous hospital days, and comorbid health conditions were identified from routine administrative data available in the electronic medical record. The main outcome was critical illness, defined as sepsis, need for mechanical ventilation, or death within 2 years of initial visit. Patients with an ERA score of 16 were considered to be at high risk. The discrimination of the ERA score was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Of the 13,457 eligible patients, 9,872 gave consent for medical record review and had full information on intensive care unit utilization. The mean age was 75.8 years (standard deviation ±7.6 years), and 58% were female, 94% were Caucasian, 62% were married, and 13% were living in nursing homes. In the overall group, 417 patients (4.2%) suffered from critical illness. In the 1,134 patients with ERA >16, 154 (14%) suffered from critical illness. An ERA score ≥16 predicted critical illness (odds ratio 6.35; 95% confidence interval 3.51–11.48). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.75, which indicated good discrimination. Conclusion A simple model based on easily obtainable administrative data predicted critical illness in the next 2 years in elderly outpatients with up to 14% of the highest risk population suffering from critical illness

  10. Managing evidence-based health care: a diagnostic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, K; Pyne, T; Cowling, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a diagnostic framework useful to Trust managers who are faced with the task of devising and implementing strategies for improvements in clinical effectiveness, and is based on a recent study incorporating clinicians, managers, and professional staff in four NHS Trusts in the North Thames Region. The gap framework is inspired by the gap model developed by Zeithaml, Parasuraman and Berry from their research into service quality and incorporates Dave Sackett's schema as well as a personal competency profile needed for the practice of evidence based health-care (EBHC). The paper highlights the four organisational and personal failures (gaps) which contribute to the fifth gap, namely the discrepancy between clinically relevant research evidence and its implementation in health care. To close the gaps, Trusts need to set the goal and tackle the cultural, organisational, attitudinal and more material aspects such as investment in the information infrastructure, education and training of doctors. Doctors need to go through a process from awareness to action facilitated through a combination of personal and organisational incentives and rewards as well as training in the requisite skills. Researchers should take steps to improve the quality of the evidence and its accessibility and purchasers should reinforce the use of EBHC by withdrawing funding for care which has proved to be ineffective, inappropriate or inferior.

  11. Quality care for community-based FP / MCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Regional Workshop on Quality Care for Community-based FP/MCH in Asia was organized by the Family Planning Association of Nepal (FPAN) in cooperation with JOICFP and held in Kathmandu, Nepal, December 4-9. Representatives of counterpart organizations in Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal, and the Philippines implementing the UNFPA-supported Sustainable Community-based FP/MCH Project with Special Focus on Women were included among the forty participants. Representatives of China and Vietnam as well as resource persons from Mexico and Japan also attended the event. The workshop was held with the goal of providing participants with effective strategies for promoting quality care for community-based FP/MCH activities based upon the Nepalese experience. The event also provided the opportunity for participants to share experiences, develop strategies for project sustainability, and identify strategies and action plans suitable for their particular country situations. In field trips to Panchkhal, Sunsari, and Morang where the project is being implemented in 26 villages, participants noted the strong community involvement and village leader support. They were also impressed by the communities' awareness of services provided under the project. FPAN has succeeded despite geographical and cultural difficulties in promoting fee-based services toward project sustainability. By paying nominal fees, villagers also enjoy access to drugs and services which may not have been available through the government free of charge. Participants at the end of the workshop recommended the identification of specific indicators and systems for monitoring services and activities, training and orientation at all levels to improve the skills and attitudes of health care workers, the development of potential income-generating activities, the provision of essential FP/MCH equipment, and the equal involvement of men and women at the policy and implementation levels. PMID:12288392

  12. Health IT-enabled Care for Underserved Rural Populations: The Role of Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Effken, Judith A.; Abbott, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This white paper explains the strong roles that nursing can play in using information technology (IT) to improve healthcare delivery in rural areas. The authors describe current challenges to providing care in rural areas, and how technology innovations can help rural communities to improve their health and health care. To maximize benefits, rural stakeholders (as individuals and groups) must collaborate to effect change. Because nonphysician providers deliver much of the health care in rural...

  13. Primary Health Care Software-A Computer Based Data Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuli K

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Realising the duplication and time consumption in the usual manual system of data collection necessitated experimentation with computer based management system for primary health care in the primary health centers. The details of the population as available in the existing manual system were used for computerizing the data. Software was designed for data entry and analysis. It was written in Dbase III plus language. It was so designed that a person with no knowledge about computer could use it, A cost analysis was done and the computer system was found more cost effective than the usual manual system.

  14. Integrating Literacy, Culture, and Language to Improve Health Care Quality for Diverse Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulis, Dennis P.; Brach, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand the interrelationship of literacy, culture, and language and the importance of addressing their intersection. Methods Health literacy, cultural competence, and linguistic competence strategies to quality improvement were analyzed. Results Strategies to improve health literacy for low-literate individuals are distinct from strategies for culturally diverse and individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP). The lack of integration results in health care that is unresponsive to some vulnerable groups’ needs. A vision for integrated care is presented. Conclusion Clinicians, the health care team, and health care organizations have important roles to play in addressing challenges related to literacy, culture, and language. PMID:17931131

  15. Recommendations for improving the end-of-life care system for homeless populations: A qualitative study of the views of Canadian health and social services professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil Ryan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeless populations have complex and diverse end-of-life care needs. However, they typically die outside of the end-of-life care system. To date, few studies have explored barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations. This qualitative study involving health and social services professionals from across Canada sought to identify barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations and generate recommendations to improve their access to end-of-life care. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 54 health and social services professionals involved in end-of-life care services delivery to homeless persons in six Canadian cities (Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, Thunder Bay, Toronto and Winnipeg. Participants included health administrators, physicians, nurses, social workers, harm reduction specialists, and outreach workers. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Results Participants identified key barriers to end-of-life care services for homeless persons, including: (1 insufficient availability of end-of-life care services; (2 exclusionary operating procedures; and, (3 poor continuity of care. Participants identified recommendations that they felt had the potential to minimize these barriers, including: (1 adopting low-threshold strategies (e.g. flexible behavioural policies and harm reduction strategies; (2 linking with population-specific health and social care providers (e.g. emergency shelters; and, (3 strengthening population-specific training. Conclusions Homeless persons may be underserved by the end-of-life care system as a result of barriers that they face to accessing end-of-life care services. Changes in the rules and regulations that reflect the health needs and circumstances of homeless persons and measures to improve continuity of care have the potential to increase equity in the end-of-life care system for this

  16. [De-institutionalization of mental health and care practices in the context of home-based care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Ana Karenina de Melo Arraes; Dimenstein, Magda

    2009-01-01

    In Brazil, the home-based care services (HCS) are considered strategic and essential in the de-institutionalization process of patients who passed years in psychiatric hospitals and lost their family and social links. However, this service faces a series of problems and challenges in the wider context of health care. This article seeks to analyze some of these problems and challenges based on the experience of the home-based care service in Natal RN and on the literature in this field. Proposed on the basis of the idea that the encounters between insanity and city are potent destructors of the ' asylum logic' , these home-based care services put in question the current healthcare model, claiming to destruct the rigid and hegemonic forms of residence and care. The aim of this article is to discuss this ' asylum logic' that surpasses the limits of the concrete insane asylum penetrating some daily practices of the substitute services, taking advantage of the weak articulation between the mental health services. The lack of a strong connection between the home-based care service and the psychosocial care center allows this logic to operate through day-by-day bio-political devices. Thus, we discuss the risks of this logic taking over and indicate some possibilities of avoiding this, defending a care model allowing for potent meetings with the city and for the construction of ' affectionate networks' producing life and liberty.

  17. Ontology Based Tele-Health Smart Home Care System : Ontosmart to Monitor Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachabe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The population ageing is a demographical phenomenon that will intensify in the upcoming decades, leading to an increased number of older pe rsons that live independently. These elderly prefer to stay at home rather than going to special health care association. Thus, new tele- health smart home care systems (TSHCS are needed i n order to provide health services for older persons and to remotely monitor them. These s ystems help to keep patients safe and to inform their relatives and the medical staff about their status. Although various types of TSHCS already exist, they are environment dependent and s cenario specific. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to propose sensors and scenarios independe nt flexible context aware and distributed TSHCS based on standardized e-Health ontologies and multi-agent architecture.

  18. A randomized study of telephonic care support in populations at risk for musculoskeletal preference-sensitive surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veroff David R

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of elective surgeries varies dramatically by geography in the United States. For many of these surgeries, there is not clear evidence of their relative merits over alternate treatment choices and there are significant tradeoffs in short- and long-term risks and benefits of selecting one treatment option over another. Conditions and symptoms for which there is this lack of a single clear evidence-based treatment choice present great opportunities for patient and provider collaboration on decision making; back pain and joint osteoarthritis are two such ailments. A number of decision aids are in active use to encourage this shared decision-making process. Decision aids have been assessed in formal studies that demonstrate increases in patient knowledge, increases in patient-provider engagement, and reduction in surgery rates. These studies have not widely demonstrated the added benefit of health coaching in support of shared decision making nor have they commonly provided strong evidence of cost reductions. In order to add to this evidence base, we undertook a comparative study testing the relative impact on health utilization and costs of active outreach through interactive voice response technology to encourage health coaching in support of shared decision making in comparison to mailed outreach or no outreach. This study focused on individuals with back pain or joint pain. Methods We conducted four waves of stratified randomized comparisons for individuals with risk for back, hip, or knee surgery who did not have claims-based evidence of one or more of five chronic conditions and were eligible for population care management services within three large regional health plans in the United States. An interactive voice response (IVR form of outreach that included the capability for individuals to directly connect with health coaches telephonically, known as AutoDialog®, was compared to a control (mailed outreach or

  19. Integration of Medical Care and Endowment: A New Exploration of Endowment Mode in the Context of Population Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinpeng; XU; Xiaopeng; FU

    2015-01-01

    China’s aging pressure is increasingly serious. The elderly people are difficult to seek medical advice,the elderly dependency ratio is soaring,finance fails to bear such heavy load,and social endowment service pressure is also constantly increasing. Traditional endowment mode is already incapable of satisfying current endowment demands. On the basis of the population aging,this paper came up with the new endowment mode " hospital + nursing home" and analyzed its feasibility. Finally,it reached the conclusion that this endowment mode is helpful for solving problems of endowment and medical care,and alleviating the problem of population aging.

  20. Evidence-based Health Care via Multi-Criteria Decision Analytic decision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer Kaltoft, Mette; Dowie, Jack

    ’Evidence-based Health Care via Multi-Criteria Decision Analytic decision support: a Danish case study......’Evidence-based Health Care via Multi-Criteria Decision Analytic decision support: a Danish case study...

  1. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B.; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism’s entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained. PMID:27093056

  2. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  3. A Model for Community-Based Pediatric Oral Heath: Implementation of an Infant Oral Care Program

    OpenAIRE

    RAMOS-GOMEZ, FRANCISCO J.

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates risk assessments, preventive care, and evaluations based on outcomes. ACA compliance will require easily accessible, cost-effective care models that are flexible and simple to establish. UCLA has developed an Infant Oral Care Program (IOCP) in partnership with community-based organizations that is an intervention model providing culturally competent perinatal and infant oral care for underserved, low-income, and/or minority children aged 0–5 and their ca...

  4. The Southern European migrant-based care model: long-term care and employment trajectories in Italy and Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Da Roit; A. González Ferrer; F.J. Moreno-Fuentes

    2013-01-01

    The development of personal social services and female employment is intertwined, not only in the domain of childcare. With the ageing of the population, the changing forms of care and the developments in the eldercare labour market become crucial issues. The new risk of dependency represents a chal

  5. Populism

    OpenAIRE

    Abts, Koenraad; van Kessel, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Populism is a concept applied to a wide range of political movements and actors across the globe. There is, at the same time, considerable confusion about the attributes and manifestation of populism, as well as its impact on democracy. This contribution identifies the defining elements of the populist ideology and discusses the varieties in which populism manifests itself, for instance as a component of certain party families. We finally discuss various normative interpretations of populism,...

  6. Importance of Health and Social Care Research into Gender and Sexual Minority Populations in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Pramod R; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2015-11-01

    Despite progressive legislative developments and increased visibility of sexual and gender minority populations in the general population, mass media often report that this population face a wide range of discrimination and inequalities. LGBT (lesbian, gay, and bisexual, and transgender) populations have not been considered as priority research populations in Nepal. Research in other geographical settings has shown an increased risk of poor mental health, violence, and suicide and higher rates of smoking, as well as alcohol and drugs use among LGBT populations. They are also risk for lifestyle-related illness such as cancer, diabetes, and heart diseases. Currently, in Nepal, there is a lack of understanding of health and well-being, social exclusion, stigma, and discrimination as experienced by these populations. Good-quality public health research can help design and implement targeted interventions to the sexual and gender minority populations of Nepal. PMID:26543163

  7. Importance of Health and Social Care Research into Gender and Sexual Minority Populations in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Pramod R; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2015-11-01

    Despite progressive legislative developments and increased visibility of sexual and gender minority populations in the general population, mass media often report that this population face a wide range of discrimination and inequalities. LGBT (lesbian, gay, and bisexual, and transgender) populations have not been considered as priority research populations in Nepal. Research in other geographical settings has shown an increased risk of poor mental health, violence, and suicide and higher rates of smoking, as well as alcohol and drugs use among LGBT populations. They are also risk for lifestyle-related illness such as cancer, diabetes, and heart diseases. Currently, in Nepal, there is a lack of understanding of health and well-being, social exclusion, stigma, and discrimination as experienced by these populations. Good-quality public health research can help design and implement targeted interventions to the sexual and gender minority populations of Nepal.

  8. Feminist Interruptions: Creating Care-ful and Collaborative Community-Based Research with Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Concannon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a feminist community-based research project involving faculty and student collaboration to evaluate a dating and domestic violence awareness initiative. Using a critical ethics of care that emphasizes relationships and allows for constant reflection about power dynamics, role, positionality, and emotions, the authors reflect on what was learned during the research process. Faculty and student researchers share their perspectives and offer suggestions for future feminist collaborative research projects. Significant lessons learned include ensuring that all are invested from the outset of the project, guaranteeing that student researchers understand why their role is so critical in community-based research, and acknowledging not just faculty power over students but student privilege as well.

  9. Within-population variation in mating system and parental care patterns in the Sander ling (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reneerkens, J.; van Veelen, P.; van der Velde, M.; Luttikhuizen, P.; Piersma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Sandpipers and allies (Scolopacidae) show an astounding diversity in mating and parental care strategies. Comparative studies have tried to interpret this variation in terms of phylogenetic constraints and ecological shaping factors. In such analyses, mating and parental care systems are necessarily

  10. Integrating Compliance, Communication, and Culture: Delivering Health Care to an Aging Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Nieli

    2008-01-01

    Older adults often get lost in the process of assessment, diagnosis and service brokering. If our concern as care providers is to enable older persons to remain independent or in the community for as long as possible, we must tap into their personal values, cultural identity and health beliefs in order to foster enhanced health care communication.…

  11. [THE STATE AND PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF TRAUMATOLOGICAL ORTHOPEDIC OUT-PATIENT CARE TO POPULATION OF THE PRIVOLJSKII FEDERAL OKRUG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, I A; Baratov, A W; Andreeva, T M; Yushina, B S; Fedonnikov, A S

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of analysis ofmanpower support of specialized out-patient traumatological orthopedic care in the Privoljskii federal okrug. The manpower deficiency of traumatologist-orthopedist at the out-patient stage was established especially especially in rural area. This is cause of low indicators ofdispensary monitoring of patients with consequences of traumas and diseases of musculo-skeletal system and factual unavailability of rehabilitation care to patients of given profile. The experience oftraining and re-training of traumatologist-orthopedist is presented. The organization of hospital-substituting forms of medical service of profile patients in the Saratovskaia oblast. The directions of development of organization of specialized out-patient care to population of the region.

  12. Out of care and into care again: A Danish register‐based study of children placed in out-of‐home care before their third birthday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ubbesen, Mads Bonde; Petersen, Liselotte; Mortensen, Preben Bo;

    2012-01-01

    personal identification numbers to link several registration systems. The study population was defined as all children from entry cohorts in 1991–2001 who entered the Danish out-of-home care systembefore their third birthday (n=3928). Graphs of cumulative incidences are used to de- scribe the processes...

  13. Antibody screening & identification in the general patient population at a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India

    OpenAIRE

    Raj Nath Makroo; Aakanksha Bhatia; Vikas Hegde; Mohit Chowdhry; Uday Kumar Thakur; N L Rosamma

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: The development of alloantibodies can significantly complicate transfusion therapy and results in difficulties in cross-matching of blood. Most literature on alloimmunization is limited to multitransfused individuals, with very few studies on the general hospital patients. This study was aimed at assessing the frequency and type of unexpected red cell antibodies in the general patient population at a multispecialty tertiary care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods...

  14. Comparisons of annual health care utilization, drug consumption, and medical expenditure between the elderly and general population in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Wan-Hsuan Lu, MS; Wei-Ju Lee, MD, MS; Liang-Kung Chen, MD, PhD; Fei-Yuan Hsiao, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose: The aim of this study was to present an overview of health care utilization (outpatient, inpatient, and emergency visits), total medical expenditure, and drug consumption between the elderly and general population under Taiwan's National Health Insurance program. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using the 2010 Taiwan's Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. Our analysis included 999,418 beneficiaries with eligible records under the National Health Insur...

  15. Eclampsia: maternal and perinatal outcome among tribal population of Bastar, Chhattisgarh, India in a tertiary care centre

    OpenAIRE

    Indu Sharma; Alpana Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eclampsia is one of the major causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in India and other developing countries. This problem is continued in spite of challenging efforts to reviev each and every pregnant woman with eclampsia and to analyse the factors affecting the outcome. The aim of the research is to study the demographic profile, maternal as well as perinatal outcome of patients with eclampsia and factor affecting it in tertiary care centre of tribal population...

  16. Combined horizontal and vertical integration of care: a goal of practice-based commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul; Meads, Geoffrey; Moustafa, Ahmet; Nazareth, Irwin; Stange, Kurt C; Donnelly Hess, Gertrude

    2008-01-01

    Practice-based commissioning (PBC) in the UK is intended to improve both the vertical and horizontal integration of health care, in order to avoid escalating costs and enhance population health. Vertical integration involves patient pathways to treat named medical conditions that transcend organisational boundaries and connect community-based generalists with largely hospital-sited specialists, whereas horizontal integration involves peer-based and cross-sectoral collaboration to improve overall health. Effective mechanisms are now needed to permit ongoing dialogue between the vertical and horizontal dimensions to ensure that medical and nonmedical care are both used to their best advantage. This paper proposes three different models for combining vertical and horizontal integration - each is a hybrid of internationally recognised ideal types of primary care organisation. Leaders of PBC should consider a range of models and apply them in ways that are relevant to the local context. General practitioners, policy makers and others whose job it is to facilitate horizontal and vertical integration must learn to lead such combined approaches to integration if the UK is to avoid the mistakes of the USA in over-medicalising health issues.

  17. Implementing evidence-based interventions in health care: application of the replicating effective programs framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pincus Harold A

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the use of a conceptual framework and implementation protocol to prepare effective health services interventions for implementation in community-based (i.e., non-academic-affiliated settings. Methods The framework is based on the experiences of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC Replicating Effective Programs (REP project, which has been at the forefront of developing systematic and effective strategies to prepare HIV interventions for dissemination. This article describes the REP framework, and how it can be applied to implement clinical and health services interventions in community-based organizations. Results REP consists of four phases: pre-conditions (e.g., identifying need, target population, and suitable intervention, pre-implementation (e.g., intervention packaging and community input, implementation (e.g., package dissemination, training, technical assistance, and evaluation, and maintenance and evolution (e.g., preparing the intervention for sustainability. Key components of REP, including intervention packaging, training, technical assistance, and fidelity assessment are crucial to the implementation of effective interventions in health care. Conclusion REP is a well-suited framework for implementing health care interventions, as it specifies steps needed to maximize fidelity while allowing opportunities for flexibility (i.e., local customizing to maximize transferability. Strategies that foster the sustainability of REP as a tool to implement effective health care interventions need to be developed and tested.

  18. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research.

  19. Perspectives on Health, Health Needs and Health Care Services among Select Nomad Tribal Populations of Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandana Sachdev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the opinion of select nomad tribal communities of Rajasthan State in India on health, health needs, and health care services. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 1113 nomadic populations in select districts of Jhunjhunu, Sikar and Churu were undertaken. A perception on regarding various health issues among the study populations were obtained through semi-structured questionnaires. Results: The major insight of nomad tribal populations on health, health need and health care services are lack of infrastructures, inaccessibility to health institutions, ill-treated by government hospitals staff, acceptability and affordability are some of the main problems contributing to their poor health status. Conclusion: The Nomad tribal environment and sense of community with its associated strong social networks are identified as key determinants for common perception in all communities. However, the inaccessibility to health care and reluctance to seek help for health issues remain a significant problem in nomad tribal areas. In considering priorities for health, greater effort and resources are required to increase their awareness and change attitudes towards health issues

  20. Screening and cervical cancer cure: population based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Andrae, B.; Andersson, T. M.-L.; Lambert, P C; Kemetli, L.; Silfverdal, L.; Strander, B.; Ryd, W.; Dillner, J.; Tornberg, S.; Sparen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether detection of invasive cervical cancer by screening results in better prognosis or merely increases the lead time until death. Design Nationwide population based cohort study. Setting Sweden. Participants All 1230 women with cervical cancer diagnosed during 1999-2001 in Sweden prospectively followed up for an average of 8.5 years. Main outcome measures Cure proportions and five year relative survival ratios, stratified by screening history, mode of detection, age...

  1. Cyberbullying among Finnish adolescents – a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Lindfors Pirjo L; Kaltiala-Heino Riittakerttu; Rimpelä Arja H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyberbullying, threatening or harassing another via the internet or mobile phones, does not cause physically harm and thus the consequences are less visible. Little research has been performed on the occurrence of cyberbullying among adolescents or the perception of its seriousness. Only a few population-based studies have been published, none of which included research on the witnessing of cyberbullying. Here, we examined exposure to cyberbullying during the last year, an...

  2. Genetic diversity of Sardinian goat population based on microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last century, the selection for production traits of the main livestock species has led to a reduction in number of local populations with consequent loss of genetic variability. In Sardinia, the genetic improvement strategy has been based on selection for the local pure breed in sheep, whereas in the other species (cattle, swine and goat, an often unplanned crossbreeding with improved breeds has been applied.

  3. Work-based learning in health care environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spouse, J

    2001-03-01

    In reviewing contemporary literature and theories about work-based learning, this paper explores recent trends promoting life-long learning. In the process the paper reviews and discusses some implications of implementing recent policies and fostering le arning in health care practice settings. Recent Government policies designed to provide quality health care services and to improve staffing levels in the nursing workforce, have emphasized the importance of life-long learning whilst learning-on-the-job and the need to recognize and credit experiential learning. Such calls include negotiation of personal development plans tailored to individual educational need and context-sensitive learning activities. To be implemented effectively, this policy cann ot be seen as a cheap option but requires considerable financial resourcing for preparation of staff and the conduct of such activities. Successful work-based learning requires investment in staff at all levels as well as changes to staffing structures in organizations and trusts; changes designed to free people up to work and learn collaboratively. Creating an organizational environment where learning is prized depends upon a climate of trust; a climate where investigation and speculation are fostered and where time is protected for engaging in discussions about practice. Such a change may be radical for many health care organizations and may require a review of current policies and practices ensuring that they include education at all levels. The nature of such education also requires reconceptualizing. In the past, learning in practice settings was seen as formal lecturing or demonstration, and relied upon behaviourist principles of learning. Contemporary thinking suggests effective learning in work-settings is multi-faceted and draws on previously acquired formal knowledge, contextualizes it and moulds it according to situations at hand. Thinking about work-based learning in this way raises questions about how such

  4. Differences in primary health care delivery to Australia’s Indigenous population: a template for use in economic evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Katherine S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health economics is increasingly used to inform resource allocation decision-making, however, there is comparatively little evidence relevant to minority groups. In part, this is due to lack of cost and effectiveness data specific to these groups upon which economic evaluations can be based. Consequently, resource allocation decisions often rely on mainstream evidence which may not be representative, resulting in inequitable funding decisions. This paper describes a method to overcome this deficiency for Australia’s Indigenous population. A template has been developed which can adapt mainstream health intervention data to the Indigenous setting. Methods The ‘Indigenous Health Service Delivery Template’ has been constructed using mixed methods, which include literature review, stakeholder discussions and key informant interviews. The template quantifies the differences in intervention delivery between best practice primary health care for the Indigenous population via Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs, and mainstream general practitioner (GP practices. Differences in costs and outcomes have been identified, measured and valued. This template can then be used to adapt mainstream health intervention data to allow its economic evaluation as if delivered from an ACCHS. Results The template indicates that more resources are required in the delivery of health interventions via ACCHSs, due to their comprehensive nature. As a result, the costs of such interventions are greater, however this is accompanied by greater benefits due to improved health service access. In the example case of the polypill intervention, 58% more costs were involved in delivery via ACCHSs, with 50% more benefits. Cost-effectiveness ratios were also altered accordingly. Conclusions The Indigenous Health Service Delivery Template reveals significant differences in the way health interventions are delivered from ACCHSs compared to

  5. Implementation of an Interdisciplinary, Team-Based Complex Care Support Health Care Model at an Academic Medical Center: Impact on Health Care Utilization and Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Ritchie; Robin Andersen; Jessica Eng; Garrigues, Sarah K.; Gina Intinarelli; Helen Kao; Suzanne Kawahara; Kanan Patel; Lisa Sapiro; Anne Thibault; Erika Tunick; Barnes, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Geriatric Resources for the Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE) program has been shown to decrease acute care utilization and increase patient self-rated health in low-income seniors at community-based health centers. Aims To describe adaptation of the GRACE model to include adults of all ages (named Care Support) and to evaluate the process and impact of Care Support implementation at an urban academic medical center. Setting 152 high-risk patients (≥5 ED visits or ≥2 hosp...

  6. The incidence of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in Quebec: a population data-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houde Michelle

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the population incidence of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA in Quebec. Methods We obtained data from Quebec's physician claims database. Incident cases were defined as having a visit for JRA in 2000, no visit in the previous 3 years, a confirmed diagnosis by an arthritis specialist, or having ≥ 2 visits to any physician for JRA, ≥ 2 months apart but within 2 years. Results Cumulative incidence of JRA was 17.8/100,000. Mean age at diagnosis was 9.8 ± 4.6 years, 68% were female and more persons were diagnosed in winter. Subjects had a median of 10 medical visits over the first year. Conclusion Our population based incidence estimate was similar to others. Children and adolescents with JRA are heavy users of medical care. Additional study of environmental or climate- related triggers may be warranted.

  7. Arts-based and creative approaches to dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a review of arts-based and creative approaches to dementia care as an alternative to antipsychotic medications. While use of antipsychotics may be appropriate for some people, the literature highlights the success of creative approaches and the benefits of their lack of negative side effects associated with antipsychotics. The focus is the use of biographical approaches, music, dance and movement to improve wellbeing, enhance social networks, support inclusive practice and enable participation. Staff must be trained to use these approaches. A case study is presented to demonstrate how creative approaches can be implemented in practice and the outcomes that can be expected when used appropriately. PMID:26938607

  8. Comparison of diabetes management in five countries for general and indigenous populations: an internet-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhiqiang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diabetes epidemic is associated with huge human and economic costs, with some groups, such as indigenous populations in industrialised countries, being at especially high risk. Monitoring and improving diabetes care at a population level are important to reduce diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. A set of diabetes indicators has been developed collaboratively among the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD countries to monitor performance of diabetes care. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of diabetes management in five selected OECD countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the US and the UK, based on data available for general and indigenous populations where appropriate. Methods We searched websites of health departments and leading national organisations related to diabetes care in each of the five countries to identify publicly released reports relevant to diabetes care. We collected data relevant to 6 OECD diabetes indicators on processes of diabetes care (annual HbA1c testing, lipid testing, renal function screening and eye examination and proximal outcomes (HbA1c and lipid control. Results Data were drawn from 29 websites, with 14 reports and 13 associated data sources included in this review. Australia, New Zealand, the US and the UK had national data available to construct most of the 6 OECD diabetes indicators, but Canadian data were limited to two indicators. New Zealand and the US had national level diabetes care data for indigenous populations, showing relatively poorer care among these groups when compared with general populations. The US and UK performed well across the four process indicators when compared with Australia and New Zealand. For example, annual HbA1c testing and lipid testing were delivered to 70-80% of patients in the US and UK; the corresponding figures for Australia and New Zealand were 50-60%. Regarding proximal outcomes, HbA1c control for

  9. Primary Care Providers’ experiences with Pharmaceutical Care-based Medication Therapy Management Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Maracle, Pharm.D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored primary care providers’ (PCPs experiences with the practice of pharmaceutical care-based medication therapy management (MTM. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six PCPs who have experiences working with MTM pharmacists for at least three years. The first author conducted the interviews that were audio-taped, transcribed, and coded independently. The codes were then harmonized via discussion and consensus with the other authors. Data were analyzed for themes using the hermeneutic-phenomenological method as proposed by Max van Manen. Three men and three women were interviewed. On average, the interviewees have worked with MTM pharmacists for seven years. The six (6 themes uncovered from the interviews included: (1 “MTM is just part of our team approach to the practice of medicine”: MTM as an integral part of PCPs’ practices; (2 “Frankly it’s education for the patient but it’s also education for me”: MTM services as a source of education; (3 “It’s not exactly just the pharmacist that passes out the medicines at the pharmacy”: The MTM practitioner is different from the dispensing pharmacist; (4 “So, less reactive, cleaning up the mess, and more proactive and catching things before they become so involved”: MTM services as preventative health care efforts; (5“I think that time is the big thing”: MTM pharmacists spend more time with patients; (6 “There’s an access piece, there’s an availability piece, there’s a finance piece”: MTM services are underutilized at the clinics. In conclusion, PCPs value having MTM pharmacists as part of their team in ambulatory clinics. MTM pharmacists are considered an important source of education to patients as well as to providers as they are seen as having a unique body of knowledge –medication expertise. All PCPs highly treasure the time and education provided by the MTM pharmacists, their ability to manage and adjust patients

  10. Health and Health Care Disparities: The Effect of Social and Environmental Factors on Individual and Population Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently the existence and prevalence of health and health care disparities has increased with accompanying research showing that minorities (African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders are disproportionately affected resulting in poorer health outcomes compared to non-minority populations (whites. This is due to multiple factors including and most importantly the social determinants of health which includes lower levels of education, overall lower socioeconomic status, inadequate and unsafe housing, and living in close proximity to environmental hazards; all contributing to poor health. Given the ever widening gap in health and health care disparities, the growing number of individuals living at or below the poverty level, the low number of college graduates and the growing shortage of health care professionals (especially minority the goals of this paper are to: (1 Define diversity and inclusion as interdependent entities. (2 Review the health care system as it relates to barriers/problems within the system resulting in the unequal distribution of quality health care. (3 Examine institutional and global benefits of increasing diversity in research. (4 Provide recommendations on institutional culture change and developing a diverse culturally competent healthcare workforce.

  11. Research on the cultivation path of smart home-based care service mode in Internet+ vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qingchao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Home-based care for the aged is an effective method to solve the problem of caring the aged in China. This thesis analyzes some problems existing in the development of current home-based care service for the aged in our country and the positive effects brought by Internet+ in home-based care service. It proposes a new service mode of care for the aged--Internet+ home-based care service, and explains the establishment of this system and the responsibilities of the participants. Also, it explores the path to realize the establishment of Internet+ home-based care service mode so as to promote the healthy development of home-based care service in China.

  12. Full-cost determination of different levels of care in the intensive care unit. An activity-based costing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J J; Casciano, J P; Arikian, S R; Mauskopf, J; Paul, J E

    1996-10-01

    We applied an activity-based costing methodology to determine the full cost of intensive care service at a community hospital, a university hospital and a health maintenance organisation (HMO)-affiliated hospital. A total of 5 patient care units were analysed: the intensive care unit (ICU) and surgical ICU (SICU) at the university setting, the ICU at the community setting, and the SICU and cardiac care unit at the HMO setting. The selection of the different ICU types was based on the types of critical care units that were found in each setting (e.g. the HMO did not have an ICU). Institution-specific cost data and clinical management parameters were collected through surveys and site visits from the 3 respective organisation types. The analysis revealed a marked increase in patient-minute cost associated with mechanical ventilation. Higher costs associated with prolonged neuromuscular blockade have important economic implications with respect to selection of an appropriate neuromuscular blocking agent.

  13. Evidence-based models of care for people with epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzsimons, Mary

    2012-02-01

    Advances in medical science and technology, together with improved medical and nursing care, are continuously improving health outcomes in chronic illness, including epilepsy. The consequent increasing diagnostic and therapeutic complexity is placing a burgeoning strain on health care systems. In response, an international move to transform chronic disease management (CDM) aims to optimize the quality and safety of care while containing health care costs. CDM models recommend: integration of care across organizational boundaries that is supported with information and communication technology; patient self-management; and guideline implementation to promote standardized care. Evidence of the effectiveness of CDM models in epilepsy care is presented in this review article.

  14. Improving long-term care provision: towards demand-based care by means of modularity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Blok; K. Luijkx; B. Meijboom; J. Schols

    2010-01-01

    Background: As in most fields of health care, societal and political changes encourage suppliers of long-term care to put their clients at the center of care and service provision and become more responsive towards client needs and requirements. However, the diverse, multiple and dynamic nature of d

  15. Revisiting the symptom iceberg in today's primary care: results from a UK population survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannaford Philip C

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent changes in UK primary care have increased the range of services and healthcare professionals available for advice. Furthermore, the UK government has promoted greater use of both self-care and the wider primary care team for managing symptoms indicative of self-limiting illness. We do not know how the public has been responding to these strategies. The aim of this study was to describe the current use of different management strategies in the UK for a range of symptoms and identify the demographic, socio-economic and symptom characteristics associated with these different approaches. Methods An age and sex stratified random sample of 8,000 adults (aged 18-60, drawn from twenty general practices across the UK, were sent a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire collected detailed information on 25 physical and psychological symptoms ranging from those usually indicative of minor illness to those which could be indicative of serious conditions. Information on symptom characteristics, actions taken to manage the symptoms and demographic/socio-economic details were also collected. Results Just under half of all symptoms reported resulted in respondents doing nothing at all. Lay-care was used for 35% of symptoms and primary care health professionals were consulted for 12% of symptoms. OTC medicine use was the most common lay-care strategy (used for 25% of all symptom episodes. The GP was the most common health professional consulted (consulted for 8% of all symptom episodes while use of other primary care health professionals was very small (each consulted for less than 2% of symptom episodes. The actions taken for individual symptoms varied substantially although some broad patterns emerged. Symptom characteristics (in particular severity, duration and interference with daily life were more commonly associated with actions taken than demographic or socio-economic characteristics. Conclusion While the use of lay-care was

  16. The impact of market-based 'reform' on cultural values in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, L L

    1999-12-01

    The many issues managed care poses for providers and health networks are crystallized in the moral problems occasioned by its shifting of the financial risks of care from insurer to provider. The issues occasioned by market-based reform include: the problems presented by clashes between public expectations and payer restrictions; the corporatization of health service delivery and the cultural shift from humanitarian endeavor to business enterprise the depersonalization of treatment as time and money constraints stretch resources, and the culture rewards efficient "business-like" behavior the underfunding of care for the poor and uninsured, even as these populations grow the restructuring of care and reengineering of healthcare roles as the emphasis shifts from quality of care to conservation of resources rapid mergers of both health plans and institutional providers with all the inherent turmoil as rules change, services are eliminated, and support services are minimized to save money the unhealthy competition inherent in market-based reform that posits profit taking and market share as the measures of successful performance the undermining of the professional ethic of advocacy the use of incentives that pander to greed and self-interest. The costs of sophisticated technologies and the ongoing care of increasingly fragile patients have pulled many other elements into what previously were considered "privileged" professional interactions. The fact that very few citizens indeed could pay out-of-pocket for the treatment and ongoing care they might need led to social involvement (few people remember that both widespread health insurance and public programs are relatively recent phenomena--only about 30 years old). However, whether in tax dollars or insurance premiums, other people's money is being spent on the patient's care. Clearly, those "other people" never intended to give either the patient or the professional open-ended access to their collective pocketbooks

  17. The impact of market-based 'reform' on cultural values in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, L L

    1999-12-01

    The many issues managed care poses for providers and health networks are crystallized in the moral problems occasioned by its shifting of the financial risks of care from insurer to provider. The issues occasioned by market-based reform include: the problems presented by clashes between public expectations and payer restrictions; the corporatization of health service delivery and the cultural shift from humanitarian endeavor to business enterprise the depersonalization of treatment as time and money constraints stretch resources, and the culture rewards efficient "business-like" behavior the underfunding of care for the poor and uninsured, even as these populations grow the restructuring of care and reengineering of healthcare roles as the emphasis shifts from quality of care to conservation of resources rapid mergers of both health plans and institutional providers with all the inherent turmoil as rules change, services are eliminated, and support services are minimized to save money the unhealthy competition inherent in market-based reform that posits profit taking and market share as the measures of successful performance the undermining of the professional ethic of advocacy the use of incentives that pander to greed and self-interest. The costs of sophisticated technologies and the ongoing care of increasingly fragile patients have pulled many other elements into what previously were considered "privileged" professional interactions. The fact that very few citizens indeed could pay out-of-pocket for the treatment and ongoing care they might need led to social involvement (few people remember that both widespread health insurance and public programs are relatively recent phenomena--only about 30 years old). However, whether in tax dollars or insurance premiums, other people's money is being spent on the patient's care. Clearly, those "other people" never intended to give either the patient or the professional open-ended access to their collective pocketbooks

  18. Prediction of critical illness in elderly outpatients using elder risk assessment: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biehl M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Biehl,1 Paul Y Takahashi,2 Stephen S Cha,3 Rajeev Chaudhry,2 Ognjen Gajic,1 Bjorg Thorsteinsdottir2 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, 2Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 3Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Rationale: Identifying patients at high risk of critical illness is necessary for the development and testing of strategies to prevent critical illness. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between high elder risk assessment (ERA score and critical illness requiring intensive care and to see if the ERA can be used as a prediction tool to identify elderly patients at the primary care visit who are at high risk of critical illness. Methods: A population-based historical cohort study was conducted in elderly patients (age >65 years identified at the time of primary care visit in Rochester, MN, USA. Predictors including age, previous hospital days, and comorbid health conditions were identified from routine administrative data available in the electronic medical record. The main outcome was critical illness, defined as sepsis, need for mechanical ventilation, or death within 2 years of initial visit. Patients with an ERA score of 16 were considered to be at high risk. The discrimination of the ERA score was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: Of the 13,457 eligible patients, 9,872 gave consent for medical record review and had full information on intensive care unit utilization. The mean age was 75.8 years (standard deviation ±7.6 years, and 58% were female, 94% were Caucasian, 62% were married, and 13% were living in nursing homes. In the overall group, 417 patients (4.2% suffered from critical illness. In the 1,134 patients with ERA >16, 154 (14% suffered from critical illness. An ERA score ≥16 predicted critical illness (odds ratio 6.35; 95% confidence interval 3.51–11.48. The area under the

  19. Immigrant mothers and access to prenatal care: evidence from a regional population study in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Chiavarini, Manuela; Lanari, Donatella; Minelli, Liliana; Pieroni, Luca; Salmasi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We addressed the question of whether use of adequate prenatal care differs between foreign-born and Italian mothers and estimated the extent to which unobservable characteristics bias results. Setting This study is on primary care and especially on adequate access to prenatal healthcare services by immigrant mothers. Participants Approximately 37 000 mothers of both Italian and foreign nationality were studied. Data were obtained from the Standard Certificate of Live Birth between ...

  20. Virtual Environment: assistance in nursing care for the deaf based on the protocol of Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Martini Rodrigues

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Presenting a Virtual Environment (VE based on the Protocol of Treatment of Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus type 2, used in Primary Care for evaluation of dietary habits in nursing consultations. Method: An experimental study applied by two nurses and a nurse manager, in a sample of 30 deaf patients aged between 30 and 60 years. The environment was built in Visual Basic NET and offered eight screens about feeding containing food pictures, videos in Libras (Brazilian sign language and audio. The analysis of the VE was done through questionnaires applied to patients and professionals by the Poisson statistical test. Results: The VE shows the possible diagnostics in red, yellow, green and blue colors, depending on the degree of patients’ need. Conclusion: The environment obtained excellent acceptance by patients and nurses, allowing great interaction between them, even without an interpreter. The time in consultation was reduced to 15 minutes, with the preservation of patient privacy.

  1. Population-based incidence and prevalence of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnts, Hisse; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Padberg, George W.; Verschuuren, Jan J.G.M.; Bakker, Egbert; Weinreich, Stephanie S.; Verbeek, André L.M.; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence and prevalence of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) in the Netherlands. Methods: Using 3-source capture-recapture methodology, we estimated the total yearly number of newly found symptomatic individuals with FSHD, including those not registered in any of the 3 sources. To this end, symptomatic individuals with FSHD were available from 3 large population-based registries in the Netherlands if diagnosed within a 10-year period (January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2010). Multiplication of the incidence and disease duration delivered the prevalence estimate. Results: On average, 52 people are newly diagnosed with FSHD every year. This results in an incidence rate of 0.3/100,000 person-years in the Netherlands. The prevalence rate was 12/100,000, equivalent to 2,000 affected individuals. Conclusions: We present population-based incidence and prevalence estimates regarding symptomatic individuals with FSHD, including an estimation of the number of symptomatic individuals not present in any of the 3 used registries. This study shows that the total number of symptomatic persons with FSHD in the population may well be underestimated and a considerable number of affected individuals remain undiagnosed. This suggests that FSHD is one of the most prevalent neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25122204

  2. Self-reported health and health care use in an ageing population in the Agincourt sub-district of rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa is experiencing a demographic and epidemiological transition with an increase in population aged 50 years and older and rising prevalence of non-communicable diseases. This, coupled with high HIV and tuberculosis prevalence, puts an already weak health service under greater strain. Objective: To measure self-reported chronic health conditions and chronic disease risk factors, including smoking and alcohol use, and to establish their association with health care use in a rural South African population aged 50 years or older. Methods: The Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE, in collaboration with the INDEPTH Network and the World Health Organization, was implemented in the Agincourt sub-district in rural northeast South Africa where there is a long-standing health and socio-demographic surveillance system. Household-based interviews were conducted in a random sample of people aged 50 years and older. The interview included questions on self-reported health and health care use, and some physical measurements, including blood pressure and anthropometry. Results: Four hundred and twenty-five individuals aged 50 years or older participated in the study. Musculoskeletal pain was the most prevalent self-reported condition (41.7%; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 37.0–46.6 followed by hypertension (31.2%; 95% CI 26.8–35.9 and diabetes (6.1%; 95% CI 4.1–8.9. All self-reported conditions were significantly associated with low self-reported functionality and quality of life, 57% of participants had hypertension, including 44% of those who reported normal blood pressure. A large waist circumference and current alcohol consumption were associated with high risk of hypertension in men, whereas in women, old age, high waist–hip ratio, and less than 6 years of formal education were associated with high risk of hypertension. Only 45% of all participants reported accessing health care in the last 12 months. Those who reported

  3. Is accessing dental care becoming more difficult? Evidence from Canada's middle-income population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantel Ramraj

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore trends in access to dental care among middle-income Canadians. METHODS: A secondary data analysis of six Canadian surveys that collected information on dental insurance coverage, cost-barriers to dental care, and out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care was conducted for select years from 1978 to 2009. Descriptive analyses were used to outline and compare trends among middle-income Canadians with other levels of income as well as national averages. RESULTS: By 2009, middle-income Canadians had the lowest levels of dental insurance coverage (48.7% compared to all other income groups. They reported the greatest increase in cost-barriers to dental care, from 12.6% in 1996 to 34.1% by 2009. Middle-income Canadians had the largest rise in out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care since 1978. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that affordability issues in accessing dental care are no longer just a problem for the lowest income groups in Canada, but are now impacting middle-income earners as a consequence of their lack of, or decreased access to, comprehensive dental insurance.

  4. Studies of Health and Long-Term Care Expenditure Growth in Aging Populations

    OpenAIRE

    de Meijer, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn recent decades, elderly populations in most developed countries have increased considerably, both in absolute and relative terms. This growth of the elderly share of the population is mainly attributable to two demographic transitions: the (simultaneous) increase in longevity and decrease in fertility. Additionally, for some European countries a third cause of population aging can be distinguished: the aging of the baby boom generation. The extent to which this third demographi...

  5. Value-based health care for inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deen, Welmoed K; Esrailian, Eric; Hommes, Daniel W

    2015-05-01

    Increasing healthcare costs worldwide put the current healthcare systems under pressure. Although many efforts have aimed to contain costs in medicine, only a few have achieved substantial changes. Inflammatory bowel diseases rank among the most costly of chronic diseases, and physicians nowadays are increasingly engaged in health economics discussions. Value-based health care [VBHC] has gained a lot of attention recently, and is thought to be the way forward to contain costs while maintaining quality. The key concept behind VBHC is to improve achieved outcomes per encountered costs, and evaluate performance accordingly. Four main components need to be in place for the system to be effective: [1] accurate measurement of health outcomes and costs; [2] reporting of these outcomes and benchmarking against other providers; [3] identification of areas in need of improvement based on these data and adjusting the care delivery processes accordingly; and [4] rewarding high-performing participants. In this article we will explore the key components of VBHC, we will review available evidence focussing on inflammatory bowel diseases, and we will present our own experience as a guide for other providers.

  6. Health Care Professionals’ Beliefs About Using Wiki-Based Reminders to Promote Best Practices in Trauma Care

    OpenAIRE

    Archambault, Patrick Michel; Bilodeau, Andrea; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Aubin, Karine; Lavoie, André; Lapointe, Jean; Poitras, Julien; Croteau, Sylvain; Pham-Dinh, Martin; Légaré, France

    2012-01-01

    Background Wikis are knowledge translation tools that could help health professionals implement best practices in acute care. Little is known about the factors influencing professionals’ use of wikis. Objectives To identify and compare the beliefs of emergency physicians (EPs) and allied health professionals (AHPs) about using a wiki-based reminder that promotes evidence-based care for traumatic brain injuries. Methods Drawing on the theory of planned behavior, we conducted semistructured int...

  7. Do symptom-based questions help screen COPD among Chinese populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Wang, Min; Li, Xiaona; Wang, Hong; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry is required to confirm a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) diagnosis, but it is difficult to perform in resource-limited settings. This study aimed to evaluate symptom-based questions for screening of individuals with COPD among Chinese populations. We recruited 3969 adult subjects from the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University. Spirometric measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were collected to confirm the COPD diagnosis. A symptom-based questionnaire was administered to collect data related to COPD. The sensitivity and specificity together with the area under the curve (AUC) were calculated. The traditional IPAG eight-item questionnaire yielded an AUC of 0.80(95% CI: 0.78-0.82), with a sensitivity of 67.8% and specificity of 76.8%. After removing and adding questions, a revised eleven-item questionnaire exhibited a significantly increased diagnostic accuracy, with an AUC of 0.85(95% CI: 0.84-0.87). At the inflection point of the curve, it demonstrated a sensitivity of 82.5% and specificity of 72.9%. We showed that the revised symptom-based questionnaire could be used to screen individuals with a high likelihood of COPD among Chinese populations. Further validation is required before we claim it is a useful diagnostic for primary care populations. PMID:27456860

  8. Workplace-based assessment in a primary-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Kent G; Norris, Jill; Coe, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Workplace-based assessment (WBA) is the process of directly observing students' work within a clinical setting, assessing their performance, and providing specific, goal oriented feedback. Assessment methods used for workplace-based assessment include tools developed for clinical interaction (e.g., the mini clinical evaluation exercise [mini-CEX]), for procedural or technical skills (e.g., the direct observation of procedural skills [DOPS]), and multi-source feedback tools to assess interpersonal and technical skills. While several of these assessment methods are being adopted by veterinary schools to evaluate students' progress through their clinical rotations, there is little reported at this time about their utility and effectiveness within the veterinary context. This article provides an introduction to the use of these tools and offers guidance in selecting appropriate methods for assessment in the primary health care setting. PMID:22951458

  9. Confidentiality or continuity? Family caregivers' experiences with care for HIV/AIDS patients in home-based care in Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoae, Mokhantso G; Jubber, Ken

    2008-04-01

    In the context of poor access to antiretroviral therapies in sub-Saharan Africa, the minimum treatment package intended to treat opportunistic infections common with HIV infection is inadequate but appealing, since it presumes universal coverage of medical care for patients living with HIV and AIDS. The overall objective of this study was to analyse the challenges which family caregivers encountered in home-based care when they tried to access medical treatment for home-based AIDS patients in the context of confidentiality and limited medical care. A qualitative study using in-depth interviews with a sample of 21 family caregivers -16 females and 5 males aged between 23 and 85 years was conducted with the assistance of health personnel in two hospitals in Lesotho. Using the concept of continuity of care, this article discusses the experiences of family caregivers about home care, including their experiences of adherence to confidentiality by health care professionals and non-disclosure of AIDS as the context of illness, the circumstances under which the caregivers initiated caregiving and sought medical care, and how these factors could be stressors in caregiving. There was continuity of care where the caregivers obtained hospital support. However, when confidentiality was adhered to the caregivers were frustrated by lack of information, disrupted treatment, exclusion of their perspectives in medical care, failure to secure hospitalisation, ambiguous goals and non-responsiveness, so that continuity of care was jeopardised. Thus it can be concluded that professional-assisted disclosure benefited the patients because it facilitated continuity of care through the caregivers. PMID:18496618

  10. Preventive Care Use among the Belgian Elderly Population: Does Socio-Economic Status Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Hoeck

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the association between influenza and pneumococcus vaccination and blood cholesterol and blood sugar measurement by Belgian elderly respondents (≥65 years and socio-demographic characteristics, risk factors, health status and socio-economic status (SES. Methods: A cross-sectional study based on 4,544 non-institutionalized elderly participants of the Belgian Health Interview Surveys 2004 and 2008. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to examine the independent effect of socio-demographic characteristics, risk factors, health status and SES on the four preventive services. Results: After adjustment for age, sex, region, survey year, living situation, risk factors (body mass index, smoking status, physical activity and health status (self-assessed health and longstanding illness lower educated elderly were significantly less likely to report a blood cholesterol and blood sugar measurement. For instance, elderly participants with no degree or only primary education were less likely to have had a cholesterol and blood sugar measurement compared with those with higher education. Pneumococcus vaccination was not related to educational level, but lower income groups were more likely to have had a pneumococcus immunization. Influenza vaccination was not significantly related to SES. Conclusion: The results highlight the need to promote cholesterol and blood sugar measurement for lower SE groups, and pneumococcus immunization for the entire elderly population. Influenza immunization seems to be equally spread among different SE groups.

  11. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  12. Chinese Health Care Products Industry's Future Strategic Positioning: Elderly Biotechnological Health Care Products Based on TCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study future strategic positioning of elderly biotechnological health care products from biological extraction technology in Chinese health care products industries, we analyze that the development of high-quality elderly health care products is needed and still remains a challenge due to the rapid growth in biological extraction technology. In this study, with the improvement of people's living standards, health care products has become a major consumer products for elderly, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM as a traditional medicine health and health culture, is health care products developed an important theoretical basis and effective material source, development with biological extraction technology can promote future strategic positioning of elderly biotechnological health care products in Chinese health care products industry.

  13. Costs and prospects for home based Long Term Care in Northern Italy: the Galca survey

    OpenAIRE

    Bettio, Francesca; Mazzotta, Fernanda; Solinas, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    An important issue in the design of sustainable Long Term Care policies is the relative social cost of community or home based care versus institutional care. Here we undertake this cost comparison making use of the findings from the GALCA surveys on Long Term Care in Denmark, Ireland and Italy but confining attention to Italy. The survey for Italy was conducted in the municipality of Modena that may be considered broadly representative of Long Term Care conditions in the North of the country...

  14. Cost analysis of prenatal care using the activity-based costing model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesse, T; Golembeski, S; Potter, J

    1999-01-01

    The cost of prenatal care in a private nurse-midwifery practice was examined using the activity-based costing system. Findings suggest that the activities of the nurse-midwife (the health care provider) constitute the major cost driver of this practice and that the model of care and associated, time-related activities influence the cost. This pilot study information will be used in the development of a comparative study of prenatal care, client education, and self care.

  15. Cost Analysis of Prenatal Care Using the Activity-Based Costing Model: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gesse, Theresa; Golembeski, Susan; Potter, Jonell

    1999-01-01

    The cost of prenatal care in a private nurse-midwifery practice was examined using the activity-based costing system. Findings suggest that the activities of the nurse-midwife (the health care provider) constitute the major cost driver of this practice and that the model of care and associated, time-related activities influence the cost. This pilot study information will be used in the development of a comparative study of prenatal care, client education, and self care.

  16. Utility of routine data sources for feedback on the quality of cancer care: an assessment based on clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baade Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Not all cancer patients receive state-of-the-art care and providing regular feedback to clinicians might reduce this problem. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of various data sources in providing feedback on the quality of cancer care. Methods Published clinical practice guidelines were used to obtain a list of processes-of-care of interest to clinicians. These were assigned to one of four data categories according to their availability and the marginal cost of using them for feedback. Results Only 8 (3% of 243 processes-of-care could be measured using population-based registry or administrative inpatient data (lowest cost. A further 119 (49% could be measured using a core clinical registry, which contains information on important prognostic factors (e.g., clinical stage, physiological reserve, hormone-receptor status. Another 88 (36% required an expanded clinical registry or medical record review; mainly because they concerned long-term management of disease progression (recurrences and metastases and 28 (11.5% required patient interview or audio-taping of consultations because they involved information sharing between clinician and patient. Conclusion The advantages of population-based cancer registries and administrative inpatient data are wide coverage and low cost. The disadvantage is that they currently contain information on only a few processes-of-care. In most jurisdictions, clinical cancer registries, which can be used to report on many more processes-of-care, do not cover smaller hospitals. If we are to provide feedback about all patients, not just those in larger academic hospitals with the most developed data systems, then we need to develop sustainable population-based data systems that capture information on prognostic factors at the time of initial diagnosis and information on management of disease progression.

  17. Studies of Health and Long-Term Care Expenditure Growth in Aging Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A.M. de Meijer (Claudine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn recent decades, elderly populations in most developed countries have increased considerably, both in absolute and relative terms. This growth of the elderly share of the population is mainly attributable to two demographic transitions: the (simultaneous) increase in longevity and decr

  18. Medicine and health care along the Silk Road. China's population control program among the national minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T O

    1985-01-01

    Travel along the Silk Road where many of China's national minorities live gives a new insight into the population growth problem. As a whole China's "one-child-for-one-family" campaign seems to have succeeded in controlling its national population, although the government takes a more liberal attitude toward the national minorities.

  19. Is there a demand for physical activity interventions provided by the health care sector? Findings from a population survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lars

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care providers in many countries have delivered interventions to improve physical activity levels among their patients. Thus far, less is known about the population's interest to increase their physical activity levels and their opinion about the health care provider's role in physical activity promotion. The aims of this paper were to investigate the self-reported physical activity levels of the population and intention to increase physical activity levels, self-perceived need for support, and opinions about the responsibilities of both individuals and health care providers to promote physical activity. Methods A regional public health survey was mailed to 13 440 adults (aged 18-84 years living in Östergötland County (Sweden in 2006. The survey was part of the regular effort by the regional Health Authorities. Results About 25% of the population was categorised as physically active, 38% as moderately active, 27% as somewhat active, and 11% as low active. More than one-third (37% had no intentions to increase their physical activity levels, 36% had thought about change, while 27% were determined to change. Lower intention to change was mainly associated with increased age and lower education levels. 28% answered that physical activity was the most important health-related behaviour to change "right now" and 15% of those answered that they wanted or needed support to make this change. Of respondents who might be assumed to be in greatest need of increased activity (i.e. respondents reporting poor general health, BMI>30, and inactivity more than one-quarter wanted support to make improvements to their health. About half of the respondents who wanted support to increase their physical activity levels listed health care providers as a primary source for support. Conclusions These findings suggest that there is considerable need for physical activity interventions in this population. Adults feel great responsibility for

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hospital-based Case Management in Cancer Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Christian N; Vedsted, Peter; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case management (CM) models based on experienced nurses are increasingly used to improve coordination and continuity of care for patients with complex health care needs. Anyway, little is known about the effects of hospital-based CM in cancer care.Aim.To analyse the effects of hospital...

  1. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  2. Genomic-based nursing care for women with Turner Syndrome: genomic-based nursing care Atención de enfermería basada en genómica para las mujeres con Síndrome de Turner Cuidado de enfermagem baseado em genômica para mulheres com Síndrome de Turner

    OpenAIRE

    Milena Flória-Santos; Ester Silveira Ramos

    2006-01-01

    Biologic and technologic advances generated from The Human Genome Project are having a dramatic impact on the expanding role of nurses in current health care practice. New genetic research needs to be transformed rapidly into clinical protocols with recommendations for delivering care to targeted populations. Nurses can contribute significantly, as part of an interdisciplinary approach, to translate genome-based knowledge into benefits for health care and society. In this context, we describe...

  3. Wealth Inequality and Mental Disability Among the Chinese Population: A Population Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjie Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the study described herein, we investigated and explored the association between wealth inequality and the risk of mental disability in the Chinese population. We used nationally represented, population-based data from the second China National Sample Survey on Disability, conducted in 2006. A total of 1,724,398 study subjects between the ages of 15 and 64, including 10,095 subjects with mental disability only, were used for the analysis. Wealth status was estimated by a wealth index that was derived from a principal component analysis of 10 household assets and four other variables related to wealth. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI for mental disability for each category, with the lowest quintile category as the referent. Confounding variables under consideration were age, gender, residence area, marital status, ethnicity, education, current employment status, household size, house type, homeownership and living arrangement. The distribution of various types and severities of mental disability differed significantly by wealth index category in the present population. Wealth index category had a positive association with mild mental disability (p for trend <0.01, but had a negative association with extremely severe mental disability (p for trend <0.01. Moreover, wealth index category had a significant, inverse association with mental disability when all severities of mental disability were taken into consideration. This study’s results suggest that wealth is a significant factor in the distribution of mental disability and it might have different influences on various types and severities of mental disability.

  4. A Population-Based Clinical Trial of Irinotecan and Carboplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derick Lau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Phase I trials of anticancer drugs are commonly conducted using the method of modified Fibonacci. We have developed a population-based design for phase I trials of combining anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and carboplatin. Patients and Methods. Intrapatient dose escalation of irinotecan and carboplatin was performed according to a predetermined schema to reach individual dose-limiting toxicity (DLT in 50 patients with solid tumors refractory to previous chemotherapy. The individual toxicity-limiting dose levels were analyzed for normal distribution using the method of Ryan-Joiner and subsequently used to determine a population-based maximum tolerated dose (pMTD. For comparison, a simulation study was performed using the method of modified Fibonacci. Results. The most common dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs included neutropenia (58%, thrombocytopenia (16%, and diarrhea (8%. The frequency of individual toxicity-limiting dose levels of 50 patients approximated a normal distribution. The dose levels associated with individual limiting toxicities ranged from level 1 (irinotecan 100 mg/m2 and carboplatin AUC = 4 mg/mL x min to level 8 (irinotecan 350 mg/m2 and carboplatin AUC = 6. The pMTD was determined to be dose level 3 (150 mg/m2 for irinotecan and AUC = 5 for carboplatin. In contrast, the MTD was determined to be dose level 4 (200 mg/m2 for irinotecan and AUC 5 for carboplatin by modified-Fibonacci simulation. Conclusions. The population-based design of phase I trial allows optimization of dose intensity and derivation of a pMTD. The pMTD has been applied in phase II trial of irinotecan and carboplatin in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

  5. A Population Health Approach to Clinical Social Work with Complex Patients in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stephen M; Hatzenbuehler, Stephanie; Gilbert, Erika; Bouchard, Mark P; McGill, Debra

    2016-05-01

    Chronic diseases disproportionately occur among people from disadvantaged backgrounds. These backgrounds correlate with poor health in adulthood. Capacity for patients' to collaborate in their care tends to be lower than among other patients, leading to inefficient uses in medical services and higher risk of adverse events. In the course of this study, social workers engaged patients with increased inpatient and emergency department (ED) use and barriers to self-management, and evaluated them for lifetime exposure to material disadvantage and violence. Intervention focused on creating a primary care team that improved patients' self-efficacy, increased locus of control, and improved capacity for engagement. Results include a 49 percent decrease in admissions and a 5 percent decrease in ED utilization with significant cost savings. Authors recommend further study to analyze social, clinical, and financial risk in a larger sample, which may yield information about a health care provider's most at-risk patients for early targeted intervention. PMID:27263199

  6. Atrial fibrillation in a primary care population: how close to NICE guidelines are we?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Loo, Bryan

    2009-06-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation were published in June 2006. It was anticipated that they would potentially lead to increased demand for echocardiography (ECHO), increased access to secondary care services (for example for cardioversion), and require additional resources for monitoring anticoagulation. A primary care survey was therefore initiated in South Devon, in advance of publication of the guidelines as a snapshot of existing practice, to determine any additional resources and education required to meet the new standards. The main aim was to determine what proportion of patients were managed exclusively in primary care, how frequently patients were investigated by ECHO and whether anticoagulation was being appropriately targeted at patients at high risk of thromboembolic events.

  7. Potential Medicaid Cost Savings from Maternity Care Based..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Medicaid pays for about half the births in the United States, at very high cost. Compared to usual obstetrical care, care by midwives at a birth center could reduce...

  8. Condition based payment: improving care of chronic illness

    OpenAIRE

    DiPiero, Albert; Sanders, David G

    2005-01-01

    Fee-for-service is more than a payment method; it defines the method of care. Fee-for-condition—a payment method that rewards superior results and encourages innovation—could greatly improve care for chronic conditions

  9. Monitoring of osteoporosis among geriatric population in the primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šipovac Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Osteoporosis is a chronic, progressive bone disease which leads to a reduction in bone mineral density and disruption of bone micro-architecture. Patients with osteoporosis have an increased risk of fractures caused by “small trauma” - stresses which would not normally cause fracture in a non-osteoporotic individual. This study was aimed at determining the incidence of osteoporosis in geriatric population, crucial demographic parameters (gender and age structure in patients, presence of comorbidities, and the most common drug choice in treatment of osteoporosis. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in the period from August 1st, 2012 to May 12th, 2014 and it included 526 patients over 65 years of age who were diagnosed to have osteoporosis based on clinical findings (presence/absence of pathological fractures, laboratory tests and osteodensitometry. Data were analyzed by using standard statistical methods and statistical significance was assessed by x2 and t - test. Results. The most affected patients were women (91%. The incidence of pathological fractures was 31.80%. The presence of two or more fractures caused by a “small trauma” was determined in 13.6%. Cardiovascular comorbidities dominated in 72.70% of cases. The most common therapeutic choice was the bisphosphonates, being administered in 77% along with the simultaneous use of vitamin D analogs - alfacalciferol (13.6%, cholecalciferol (40.9%, calcium carbonate + cholecalciferol (22.7%. Conclusion. Osteoporosis shows predominance in females aged 65-70 years. Comorbidities do not increase the risk of disease but significantly reduce the quality of life in patients. Bisphosphonates are the most common drug choice with the simultaneous use of calcium and vitamin D analogs.

  10. A Concept Analysis of Spiritual Care Based on Islamic Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmatollah Marzband; Seyed Hamzeh Hosseini; Zeinab Hamzehgardeshi

    2016-01-01

    The cultural and religious resources of every community influence the definition of spiritual care. This paper discusses a concept analysis of spiritual care in an Islamic context. The Quran, narrations (Shie’h) and commentarial books were searched, for information data. The data was used to provide a comprehensive definition of the concept of spiritual care from Islamic literature. We identified the attributes, antecedents and consequences of spiritual care according to Roger’s concept analy...

  11. The HackensackUMC Value-Based Care Model: Building Essentials for Value-Based Purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Claudia; Aroh, Dianne; Colella, Joan; Quadri, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act, 2010, and the subsequent shift from a quantity-focus to a value-centric reimbursement model led our organization to create the HackensackUMC Value-Based Care Model to improve our process capability and performance to meet and sustain the triple aims of value-based purchasing: higher quality, lower cost, and consumer perception. This article describes the basics of our model and illustrates how we used it to reduce the costs of our patient sitter program.

  12. Preventable trauma deaths: from panel review to population based-studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesconi Sergio

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Preventable trauma deaths are defined as deaths which could be avoided if optimal care has been delivered. Studies on preventable trauma deaths have been accomplished initially with panel reviews of pre-hospital and hospital charts. However, several investigators questioned the reliability and validity of this method because of low reproducibility of implicit judgments when they are made by different experts. Nevertheless, number of studies were published all around the world and ultimately gained some credibility, particularly in regions where comparisons were made before and after trauma system implementation with a resultant fall in mortality. During the last decade of century the method of comparing observed survival with probability of survival calculated from large trauma registries has obtained popularity. Preventable trauma deaths were identified as deaths occurred notwithstanding a high calculated probability of survival. In recent years, preventable trauma deaths studies have been replaced by population-based studies, which use databases representative of overall population, therefore with high epidemiologic value. These databases contain readily available information which carry out the advantage of objectivity and large numbers. Nowadays, population-based researches provide the strongest evidence regarding the effectiveness of trauma systems and trauma centers on patient outcomes.

  13. Evaluation of a cyanoacrylate protectant to manage skin tears in the acute care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamrosh, Martha A; Valk, Debbie L; Milne, Catherine T

    2013-01-01

    Skin tears are a common problem that can impact the quality of life due to pain and the potential of becoming complicated wounds if not treated properly. The use of a cyanoacrylate skin protectant to manage skin tears was evaluated in 30 patients in an acute care setting.

  14. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal skin carriage among neonatal intensive care unit personnel: From population to infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Hira (Vishal); M. Sluijter (Marcel); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); A. Ott (Alewijn); R. de Groot (Ronald); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); R.F. Kornelisse (René)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCoagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major cause of sepsis in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide. Infecting strains of these commensal bacteria may originate from NICU personnel. Therefore, we studied the characteristics of CoNS isolates from NICU personnel and compa

  15. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal skin carriage among neonatal intensive care unit personnel: from population to infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, V.; Sluijter, M.; Goessens, W.H.F.; Ott, A.; Groot, R. de; Hermans, P.W.M.; Kornelisse, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major cause of sepsis in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide. Infecting strains of these commensal bacteria may originate from NICU personnel. Therefore, we studied the characteristics of CoNS isolates from NICU personnel and compared them to

  16. Efficacy of a Morinda citrifolia Based Skin Care Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J. West

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A six week clinical trial of a Morinda citrifolia (noni based skin care regimen was conducted with 49 women, ages 38 to 55 years. Daily application of three product formulations to the face and neck resulted in significant reductions in lateral canthal fine lines and wrinkles (crow’s feet, as measured by technician scoring and digital image analysis. Use of the regimen also improved skin elasticity and firmness Cutometer® measurements. No evidence of skin irritation was present in any participant at any time during the trial. A study questionnaire revealed that the measured improvements were visibly perceptible to more than 90% of the participants. The trial results substantiate traditional uses of the noni plant to improve skin health.

  17. Reducing Barriers to Care in the Office-Based Health Care Setting for Children With Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultas, Margaret W; McMillin, Stephen Edward; Zand, Debra H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this survey-design research study was to evaluate the usefulness of a researcher-developed tool designed to improve office-based health care services and to assess the barriers and resources affecting office-based health care services for children with autism spectrum disorder. Fifty-four health care providers (HCPs) and 59 parents participated in the study. HCPs reported child behaviors, communication, and fears as barriers to providing care, whereas parents reported child behavior, sensory issues, and feelings of a disconnect with the HCP as barriers. HCPs identified the parent as a key resource. Parent-identified resources included provider adaptations to the patient, including slowing down the delivery of care and environmental adaptations to the office. In addition, both HCPs and parents indicated that the researcher-developed tool would be useful in reducing barriers during the HCE. Reducing barriers and improving health care interactions during delivery of care for children with autism spectrum disorder has the potential to improve health outcomes.

  18. Young adults' trajectories of Ecstasy use: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Andrew; Najman, Jake M; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Plotnikova, Maria; Wells, Helene; Legosz, Margot; Kemp, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Young adults' Ecstasy use trajectories have important implications for individual and population-level consequences of Ecstasy use, but little relevant research has been conducted. This study prospectively examines Ecstasy trajectories in a population-based sample. Data are from the Natural History Study of Drug Use, a retrospective/prospective cohort study conducted in Australia. Population screening identified a probability sample of Ecstasy users aged 19-23 years. Complete data for 30 months of follow-up, comprising 4 time intervals, were available for 297 participants (88.4% of sample). Trajectories were derived using cluster analysis based on recent Ecstasy use at each interval. Trajectory predictors were examined using a generalized ordered logit model and included Ecstasy dependence (World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Instrument), psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale), aggression (Young Adult Self Report) and contextual factors (e.g. attendance at electronic/dance music events). Three Ecstasy trajectories were identified (low, intermediate and high use). At its peak, the high-use trajectory involved 1-2 days Ecstasy use per week. Decreasing frequency of use was observed for intermediate and high-use trajectories from 12 months, independently of market factors. Intermediate and high-use trajectory membership was predicted by past Ecstasy consumption (>70 pills) and attendance at electronic/dance music events. High-use trajectory members were unlikely to have used Ecstasy for more than 3 years and tended to report consistently positive subjective effects at baseline. Given the social context and temporal course of Ecstasy use, Ecstasy trajectories might be better understood in terms of instrumental rather than addictive drug use patterns.

  19. Young adults' trajectories of Ecstasy use: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Andrew; Najman, Jake M; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Plotnikova, Maria; Wells, Helene; Legosz, Margot; Kemp, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Young adults' Ecstasy use trajectories have important implications for individual and population-level consequences of Ecstasy use, but little relevant research has been conducted. This study prospectively examines Ecstasy trajectories in a population-based sample. Data are from the Natural History Study of Drug Use, a retrospective/prospective cohort study conducted in Australia. Population screening identified a probability sample of Ecstasy users aged 19-23 years. Complete data for 30 months of follow-up, comprising 4 time intervals, were available for 297 participants (88.4% of sample). Trajectories were derived using cluster analysis based on recent Ecstasy use at each interval. Trajectory predictors were examined using a generalized ordered logit model and included Ecstasy dependence (World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Instrument), psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale), aggression (Young Adult Self Report) and contextual factors (e.g. attendance at electronic/dance music events). Three Ecstasy trajectories were identified (low, intermediate and high use). At its peak, the high-use trajectory involved 1-2 days Ecstasy use per week. Decreasing frequency of use was observed for intermediate and high-use trajectories from 12 months, independently of market factors. Intermediate and high-use trajectory membership was predicted by past Ecstasy consumption (>70 pills) and attendance at electronic/dance music events. High-use trajectory members were unlikely to have used Ecstasy for more than 3 years and tended to report consistently positive subjective effects at baseline. Given the social context and temporal course of Ecstasy use, Ecstasy trajectories might be better understood in terms of instrumental rather than addictive drug use patterns. PMID:23899430

  20. Risk of ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction in a Spanish population: observational prospective study in a primary-care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cucalón José M

    2006-02-01

    analyses. After multivariate adjustments, age, male gender, smoking, high total cholesterol, high HDL/LDL ratio, diabetes and overweight remained strongly associated with risk. Relative risks for hypertension in women and for diabetes in men did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion Despite high prevalence of vascular risk factors, incidence rates were lower than those reported for other countries and other periods, but similar to those reported in the few population-based studies in Spain. Effect measures of vascular risk factors were mainly as reported worldwide and support the hypothesis that protective factors not considered in this study must exist as to explain low rates. This study shows the feasibility of conducting epidemiological cohort studies in primary-care settings.

  1. Enhanced statistical tests for GWAS in admixed populations: assessment using African Americans from CARe and a Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Pasaniuc

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available While genome-wide association studies (GWAS have primarily examined populations of European ancestry, more recent studies often involve additional populations, including admixed populations such as African Americans and Latinos. In admixed populations, linkage disequilibrium (LD exists both at a fine scale in ancestral populations and at a coarse scale (admixture-LD due to chromosomal segments of distinct ancestry. Disease association statistics in admixed populations have previously considered SNP association (LD mapping or admixture association (mapping by admixture-LD, but not both. Here, we introduce a new statistical framework for combining SNP and admixture association in case-control studies, as well as methods for local ancestry-aware imputation. We illustrate the gain in statistical power achieved by these methods by analyzing data of 6,209 unrelated African Americans from the CARe project genotyped on the Affymetrix 6.0 chip, in conjunction with both simulated and real phenotypes, as well as by analyzing the FGFR2 locus using breast cancer GWAS data from 5,761 African-American women. We show that, at typed SNPs, our method yields an 8% increase in statistical power for finding disease risk loci compared to the power achieved by standard methods in case-control studies. At imputed SNPs, we observe an 11% increase in statistical power for mapping disease loci when our local ancestry-aware imputation framework and the new scoring statistic are jointly employed. Finally, we show that our method increases statistical power in regions harboring the causal SNP in the case when the causal SNP is untyped and cannot be imputed. Our methods and our publicly available software are broadly applicable to GWAS in admixed populations.

  2. Psychiatric symptomatology and personality in a population of primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Biała

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction and objective. Psychiatric disorders (and their high rates of prevalence in primary care have been widely analyzed, but the problem of underdiagnosis remains unresolved. This becomes increasingly more important in rural health centres in the face of lack of epidemiological data from these centres. The aim of this study is focused on the relationship between general health, psychiatric symptomatology and personality characteristics in the context of an adequate diagnosis. materials and methods. 518 primary care patients in 6 Polish urban clinical centres were studied using (in order of administration: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R. results. The investigated sample was representative for urban primary care patients. The findings confirmed a significant association between neuroticism and general health. The strongest relation with current functioning and mental distress of the patients (GHQ general score was observed in case of symptoms of anxiety and insomnia. The symptoms of depression may be the most difficult to identify (psychiatric symptoms assessed using GHQ sub-scales. conclusions. According to the GHQ assumptions and confirmed by the presented study, sub-threshold psychiatric symptomatology affects the functioning of primary care patients and their general health. This correlates with personality factors. Improving adequacy of diagnosis becomes extremely important, as it may often be the only chance for appropriate therapy of mental problems for people living in rural areas due to lower availability of specialistic mental services. Further epidemiological studies concerning rural primary care and prevalence of the spectrum of mental disorders need to be conducted.

  3. A population-based study of large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M V; Hook, C C; Call, T G; Go, R S

    2016-01-01

    Large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disorder of cytotoxic cells. T-cell LGL (T-LGL) leukemia is characterized by accumulation of cytotoxic T cells in blood and infiltration of the bone marrow, liver or spleen. Population-based studies have not been reported in LGL leukemia. We present clinical characteristics, natural history and risk factors for poor survival in patients with LGL leukemia using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) and the United States National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). LGL leukemia is an extremely rare disease with the incidence of 0.2 cases per 1 000 000 individuals. The median age at diagnosis was 66.5 years with females likely to be diagnosed at 3 years earlier compared with males. Analysis of patient-level data using NCDB (n=978) showed that 45% patients with T-LGL leukemia required some form of systemic treatment at the time of diagnosis. T-LGL leukemia patients have reduced survival compared with general population, with a median overall survival of 9 years. Multivariate analysis showed that age >60 years at the time of diagnosis and the presence of significant comorbidities were independent predictors of poor survival. PMID:27494824

  4. Optimal inverse functions created via population-based optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Alan L; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2014-06-01

    Finding optimal inputs for a multiple-input, single-output system is taxing for a system operator. Population-based optimization is used to create sets of functions that produce a locally optimal input based on a desired output. An operator or higher level planner could use one of the functions in real time. For the optimization, each agent in the population uses the cost and output gradients to take steps lowering the cost while maintaining their current output. When an agent reaches an optimal input for its current output, additional agents are generated in the output gradient directions. The new agents then settle to the local optima for the new output values. The set of associated optimal points forms an inverse function, via spline interpolation, from a desired output to an optimal input. In this manner, multiple locally optimal functions can be created. These functions are naturally clustered in input and output spaces allowing for a continuous inverse function. The operator selects the best cluster over the anticipated range of desired outputs and adjusts the set point (desired output) while maintaining optimality. This reduces the demand from controlling multiple inputs, to controlling a single set point with no loss in performance. Results are demonstrated on a sample set of functions and on a robot control problem. PMID:24235281

  5. Copula-Based Approach to Synthetic Population Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byungduk; Lee, Wonjoon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Shin, Hayong

    2016-01-01

    Generating synthetic baseline populations is a fundamental step of agent-based modeling and simulation, which is growing fast in a wide range of socio-economic areas including transportation planning research. Traditionally, in many commercial and non-commercial microsimulation systems, the iterative proportional fitting (IPF) procedure has been used for creating the joint distribution of individuals when combining a reference joint distribution with target marginal distributions. Although IPF is simple, computationally efficient, and rigorously founded, it is unclear whether IPF well preserves the dependence structure of the reference joint table sufficiently when fitting it to target margins. In this paper, a novel method is proposed based on the copula concept in order to provide an alternative approach to the problem that IPF resolves. The dependency characteristic measures were computed and the results from the proposed method and IPF were compared. In most test cases, the proposed method outperformed IPF in preserving the dependence structure of the reference joint distribution. PMID:27490692

  6. Copula-Based Approach to Synthetic Population Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Generating synthetic baseline populations is a fundamental step of agent-based modeling and simulation, which is growing fast in a wide range of socio-economic areas including transportation planning research. Traditionally, in many commercial and non-commercial microsimulation systems, the iterative proportional fitting (IPF) procedure has been used for creating the joint distribution of individuals when combining a reference joint distribution with target marginal distributions. Although IPF is simple, computationally efficient, and rigorously founded, it is unclear whether IPF well preserves the dependence structure of the reference joint table sufficiently when fitting it to target margins. In this paper, a novel method is proposed based on the copula concept in order to provide an alternative approach to the problem that IPF resolves. The dependency characteristic measures were computed and the results from the proposed method and IPF were compared. In most test cases, the proposed method outperformed IPF in preserving the dependence structure of the reference joint distribution. PMID:27490692

  7. The protocols for the 10/66 dementia research group population-based research programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Aquiles

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Latin America, China and India are experiencing unprecedentedly rapid demographic ageing with an increasing number of people with dementia. The 10/66 Dementia Research Group's title refers to the 66% of people with dementia that live in developing countries and the less than one tenth of population-based research carried out in those settings. This paper describes the protocols for the 10/66 population-based and intervention studies that aim to redress this imbalance. Methods/design Cross-sectional comprehensive one phase surveys have been conducted of all residents aged 65 and over of geographically defined catchment areas in ten low and middle income countries (India, China, Nigeria, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Brazil, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru and Argentina, with a sample size of between 1000 and 3000 (generally 2000. Each of the studies uses the same core minimum data set with cross-culturally validated assessments (dementia diagnosis and subtypes, mental disorders, physical health, anthropometry, demographics, extensive non communicable disease risk factor questionnaires, disability/functioning, health service utilisation, care arrangements and caregiver strain. Nested within the population based studies is a randomised controlled trial of a caregiver intervention for people with dementia and their families (ISRCTN41039907; ISRCTN41062011; ISRCTN95135433; ISRCTN66355402; ISRCTN93378627; ISRCTN94921815. A follow up of 2.5 to 3.5 years will be conducted in 7 countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru and Argentina to assess risk factors for incident dementia, stroke and all cause and cause-specific mortality; verbal autopsy will be used to identify causes of death. Discussion The 10/66 DRG baseline population-based studies are nearly complete. The incidence phase will be completed in 2009. All investigators are committed to establish an anonymised file sharing archive with monitored public access. Our

  8. Mental health care use in medically unexplained and explained physical symptoms: findings from a general population study

    OpenAIRE

    van Eck van der Sluijs, J; ten Have, Margreet; Rijnders, Cees; van Marwijk, Harm; de Graaf, Ron; Feltz-Cornelis, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Jonna F van Eck van der Sluijs,1,2 Margreet ten Have,3 Cees A Rijnders,4 Harm WJ van Marwijk,5,6 Ron de Graaf,3 Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis1,2 1Clinical Centre of Excellence for Body, Mind and Health, GGz Breburg, 2Tranzo Department, Tilburg University, Tilburg, 3Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, Utrecht, 4Department of Residency training, GGz Breburg, Tilburg, the Netherlands; 5Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manc...

  9. Mental health policy in Kenya -an integrated approach to scaling up equitable care for poor populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Rachel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most donor and development agency attention is focussed on communicable diseases in Kenya, the importance of non-communicable diseases including mental health and mental illness is increasingly apparent, both in their own right and because of their influence on health, education and social goals. Mental illness is common but the specialist service is extremely sparse and primary care is struggling to cope with major health demands. Non health sectors e.g. education, prisons, police, community development, gender and children, regional administration and local government have significant concerns about mental health, but general health programmes have been surprisingly slow to appreciate the significance of mental health for physical health targets. Despite a people centred post colonial health delivery system, poverty and global social changes have seriously undermined equity. This project sought to meet these challenges, aiming to introduce sustainable mental health policy and implementation across the country, within the context of extremely scarce resources. Methods A multi-faceted and comprehensive programme which combined situation appraisal to inform planning, sustained intersectoral policy dialogue at national and regional level; establishment of a health sector system for coordination, supervision and training of at each level (national, regional, district and primary care; development workshops; production of toolkits, development of guidelines and standards; encouragement of intersectoral liaison at national, regional, district and local levels; public education; and integration of mental health into health management systems. Results The programme has achieved detailed situation appraisal, epidemiological needs assessment, inclusion of mental health into the health sector reform plans, and into the National Package of Essential Health Interventions, annual operational plans, mental health policy guidelines

  10. Fitting Community Based Newborn Care Package into the health systems of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Y V; Upreti, S R; Kc, N P; Thapa, K; Shrestha, P R; Shedain, P R; Dhakwa, J R; Aryal, D R; Aryal, S; Paudel, D C; Paudel, D; Khanal, S; Bhandari, A; Kc, A

    2011-10-01

    Community-based strategies for delivering effective newborn interventions are an essential step to avert newborn death, in settings where the health facilities are unable to effectively deliver the interventions and reach their population. Effective implementation of community-based interventions as a large scale program and within the existing health system depends on the appropriate design and planning, monitoring and support systems. This article provides an overview of implementation design of Community-Based Newborn Care Package (CB-NCP) program, its setup within the health system, and early results of the implementation from one of the pilot districts. The evaluation of CB-NCP in one of the pilot districts shows significant improvement in antenatal, intrapartum and post natal care. The implementation design of the CB-NCP has six different health system management functions: i) district planning and orientation, ii) training/human resource development, iii) monitoring and evaluation, iv) logistics and supply chain management, v) communication strategy, and vi) pay for performance. The CB-NCP program embraced the existing system of monitoring with some additional components for the pilot phase to test implementation feasibility, and aligns with existing safe motherhood and child health programs. Though CB-NCP interventions are proven independently in different local and global contexts, they are piloted in 10 districts as a "package" within the national health system settings of Nepal. PMID:22929840

  11. Integrating mental health into primary care for displaced populations: the experience of Mindanao, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Tatiana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For more than forty years, episodes of violence in the Mindanao conflict have recurrently led to civilian displacement. In 2008, Medecins Sans Frontieres set up a mental health program integrated into primary health care in Mindanao Region. In this article, we describe a model of mental health care and the characteristics and outcomes of patients attending mental health services. Methods Psychologists working in mobile clinics assessed patients referred by trained clinicians located at primary level. They provided psychological first aid, brief psychotherapy and referral for severe patients. Patient characteristics and outcomes in terms of Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ20 and Global Assessment of Functioning score (GAF are described. Results Among the 463 adult patients diagnosed with a common mental disorder with at least two visits, median SRQ20 score diminished from 7 to 3 (p Conclusions Brief psychotherapy sessions provided at primary level during emergencies can potentially improve patients' symptoms of distress.

  12. Optimizing Drug Prescribing in Managed Care Populations: Improving Clinical and Economic Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Czubak; Jasmine Tucker; Zarowitz, Barbara J.

    2004-01-01

    Managed care presents interesting opportunities to optimize clinical and economic outcomes related to drug prescribing. There are very few randomized controlled trials that have evaluated methods to educate or incentivize physicians, implement formulary management or guideline tools, profile physicians, and implement pharmacist interventions to ensure optimal drug prescribing. Single methods of optimizing medication outcomes have not been shown to be as effective as multifaceted approaches. S...

  13. Nurses in emotional competence: exploratory study on population of continued care national network

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Tânia; Veiga-Branco, Augusta; Baptista, Gorete

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of this study - the first empirical research (to our knowledge) in Continued Care National Network (RCNN) context - emerge to understand the role of emotions in workplace behaviour (Côté, 2005; Austin, Dore & Donovan, 2008; Liu et al. 2008; Barsade, Ramarajan, Burack, 2008), but here, with terminally ill people and great physical and psychological weakness. Recent scientific literature is exposing a significatly negative correlations between Emotional Intelligence...

  14. Barriers to accessing eye care services among visually impaired populations in rural Andhra Pradesh, South India

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    Kovai Vilas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To understand the reasons why people in rural south India with visual impairment arising from various ocular diseases do not seek eye care. Materials and Methods: A total of 5,573 persons above the age of 15 were interviewed and examined in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh covering the districts of Adilabad, West Godavari and Mahaboobnagar. A pre-tested structured questionnaire on barriers to eye care was administered by trained field investigators. Results: Of the eligible subjects, 1234 (22.1%, N=5573 presented with distant visual acuity < 20/60 or equivalent visual field loss in the better eye. Of these, 898 (72.7%, N=1234 subjects had not sought treatment despite noticing a decrease in vision citing personal, economic and social reasons. The analysis also showed that the odds of seeking treatment was significantly higher for literates [odds ratio (OR 1.91, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.38 to 2.65], for those who would be defined as blind by visual acuity category (OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.90 and for those with cataract and other causes of visual impairment (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.03. Barriers to seeking treatment among those who had not sought treatment despite noticing a decrease in vision over the past five years were personal in 52% of the respondents, economic in 37% and social in 21%. Conclusion: Routine planning for eye care services in rural areas of India must address the barriers to eye care perceived by communities to increase the utilization of services.

  15. Implementation of an Interdisciplinary, Team-Based Complex Care Support Health Care Model at an Academic Medical Center: Impact on Health Care Utilization and Quality of Life.

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    Christine Ritchie

    Full Text Available The Geriatric Resources for the Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE program has been shown to decrease acute care utilization and increase patient self-rated health in low-income seniors at community-based health centers.To describe adaptation of the GRACE model to include adults of all ages (named Care Support and to evaluate the process and impact of Care Support implementation at an urban academic medical center.152 high-risk patients (≥5 ED visits or ≥2 hospitalizations in the past 12 months enrolled from four medical clinics from 4/29/2013 to 5/31/2014.Patients received a comprehensive in-home assessment by a nurse practitioner/social worker (NP/SW team, who then met with a larger interdisciplinary team to develop an individualized care plan. In consultation with the primary care team, standardized care protocols were activated to address relevant key issues as needed.A process evaluation based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research identified key adaptations of the original model, which included streamlining of standardized protocols, augmenting mental health interventions and performing some assessments in the clinic. A summative evaluation found a significant decline in the median number of ED visits (5.5 to 0, p = 0.015 and hospitalizations (5.5 to 0, p<0.001 6 months before enrollment in Care Support compared to 6 months after enrollment. In addition, the percent of patients reporting better self-rated health increased from 31% at enrollment to 64% at 9 months (p = 0.002. Semi-structured interviews with Care Support team members identified patients with multiple, complex conditions; little community support; and mild anxiety as those who appeared to benefit the most from the program.It was feasible to implement GRACE/Care Support at an academic medical center by making adaptations based on local needs. Care Support patients experienced significant reductions in acute care utilization and significant improvements

  16. Comorbidity profile of poliomyelitis survivors in a Chinese population: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2011-06-01

    Previous reports of comorbid conditions in poliomyelitis survivors mainly focused on some disease categories, such as respiratory diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, psychiatric diseases, neurological diseases and cancer. Data regarding a wide spectrum of medical comorbidities in patients with poliomyelitis is still sparse. This study aimed to investigate and profile the wide range of comorbidities among the survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis in a Chinese population. In total, 2,032 paralytic poliomyelitis patients were selected as the study group and the comparison group consisted of 10,160 randomly selected enrollees. The comorbidities for analysis were based on a modified version of the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index. Conditional logistic regression analyses were computed to investigate the risk of comorbidities for these two groups. As compared to controls, patients with paralytic poliomyelitis had significantly higher prevalence of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, peripheral vascular disorder, stroke, paralysis, migraines, Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, pulmonary circulation disorders, chronic pulmonary disease, liver disease, peptic ulcers, hepatitis B or C, deficiency anemias, depression, and lymphoma. Most of the differences are of clinical interest, ORs often being between 2 and 3. No significant difference between poliomyelitis patients and controls was observed in the prevalence of SLE, tuberculosis, alcohol abuse and drug abuse. Our findings demonstrate that survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis in Taiwan are at higher risk of having multiple medical comorbidities although some potential confounding factors including educational level, marital status, obesity and physical activity are not available in our database. The pattern is generally consistent with previous observations from Western populations. Nevertheless, we found several novel associations

  17. Spike-based population coding and working memory.

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    Martin Boerlin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Compelling behavioral evidence suggests that humans can make optimal decisions despite the uncertainty inherent in perceptual or motor tasks. A key question in neuroscience is how populations of spiking neurons can implement such probabilistic computations. In this article, we develop a comprehensive framework for optimal, spike-based sensory integration and working memory in a dynamic environment. We propose that probability distributions are inferred spike-per-spike in recurrently connected networks of integrate-and-fire neurons. As a result, these networks can combine sensory cues optimally, track the state of a time-varying stimulus and memorize accumulated evidence over periods much longer than the time constant of single neurons. Importantly, we propose that population responses and persistent working memory states represent entire probability distributions and not only single stimulus values. These memories are reflected by sustained, asynchronous patterns of activity which make relevant information available to downstream neurons within their short time window of integration. Model neurons act as predictive encoders, only firing spikes which account for new information that has not yet been signaled. Thus, spike times signal deterministically a prediction error, contrary to rate codes in which spike times are considered to be random samples of an underlying firing rate. As a consequence of this coding scheme, a multitude of spike patterns can reliably encode the same information. This results in weakly correlated, Poisson-like spike trains that are sensitive to initial conditions but robust to even high levels of external neural noise. This spike train variability reproduces the one observed in cortical sensory spike trains, but cannot be equated to noise. On the contrary, it is a consequence of optimal spike-based inference. In contrast, we show that rate-based models perform poorly when implemented with stochastically spiking neurons.

  18. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

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    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  19. Hypervolemia for Hypertension Pathophysiology: A Population-Based Study

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    Ender Hür

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Hypertension and hypervolemia relationship was proven among renal disease, although it is not known in normal population. Present study determines the fluid distribution defects in relation to blood pressure. Material and Methods. In a population-based survey in Turkey demographics, height, weight, blood pressure, urine analysis, and serum creatinine measurements were recorded. Bioimpedance measured with the Body Composition Monitor. Results. Total 2034 population of 71.6% male, mean age 47 ± 12.6 (18–89 years, systolic blood pressure (SBP 134.7 ± 20, diastolic blood pressure 77.9 ± 11.6 mmHg. Body mass index (BMI was 28.5 ± 4.5 (15.8–50.6 kg/m2; overhydration was 0.05 ± 1.05 L. There was a correlation between extracellular water (ECW/height and SBP (r = 0.21, P < 0.001. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve with the performance of 0.60 (P < 0.001 that showed cut-off value of ECW/height was 10.06 L/m, with the 69% sensitivity and 45% specificity for SBP: 140 mmHg values. Risk factors for high SBP were increase of ECW/Height, age, BMI and presence of diabetes. ECW/height, SBP, and fat tissue index (FTI increased in BMI categories (low, normal, and obese and in diabetics. SBP and FTI were lower in smokers. Conclusions. High blood pressure may be accompanied by increased extracellular volume indices. In the future volume status assessment could be of use in evaluating the effectiveness of pharmacological intervention in the treatment of hypertension.

  20. Measuring coverage in MNCH: a validation study linking population survey derived coverage to maternal, newborn, and child health care records in rural China.

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    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate data on coverage of key maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH interventions are crucial for monitoring progress toward the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Coverage estimates are primarily obtained from routine population surveys through self-reporting, the validity of which is not well understood. We aimed to examine the validity of the coverage of selected MNCH interventions in Gongcheng County, China. METHOD AND FINDINGS: We conducted a validation study by comparing women's self-reported coverage of MNCH interventions relating to antenatal and postnatal care, mode of delivery, and child vaccinations in a community survey with their paper- and electronic-based health care records, treating the health care records as the reference standard. Of 936 women recruited, 914 (97.6% completed the survey. Results show that self-reported coverage of these interventions had moderate to high sensitivity (0.57 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.50-0.63] to 0.99 [95% CI: 0.98-1.00] and low to high specificity (0 to 0.83 [95% CI: 0.80-0.86]. Despite varying overall validity, with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC ranging between 0.49 [95% CI: 0.39-0.57] and 0.90 [95% CI: 0.88-0.92], bias in the coverage estimates at the population level was small to moderate, with the test to actual positive (TAP ratio ranging between 0.8 and 1.5 for 24 of the 28 indicators examined. Our ability to accurately estimate validity was affected by several caveats associated with the reference standard. Caution should be exercised when generalizing the results to other settings. CONCLUSIONS: The overall validity of self-reported coverage was moderate across selected MNCH indicators. However, at the population level, self-reported coverage appears to have small to moderate degree of bias. Accuracy of the coverage was particularly high for indicators with high recorded coverage or low recorded coverage but high specificity. The

  1. Population-Based Disease Management in the German Statutory Health Insurance: Implementation and Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie A.K. Stock; Marcus Redaelli; Karl W. Lauterbach

    2006-01-01

    Social healthcare systems in Europe must cope with aging populations and rising costs. For the German social healthcare system, which dates back to the 19th century, this problem is especially apparent, as soaring structural unemployment and the demographic transition of the population threaten the financial basis of the Statutory Health Insurance (SHI) [Gesetzliche Krankenversicherung]. In order to preserve free access to high-quality care and mandatory insurance for most of the population w...

  2. Knowledge of and attitude to foot care amongst Type 2 diabetes patients attending a university-based primary care clinic in Nigeria

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    Rabi I. Ekore

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals living with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of developing foot ulcers and cardiovascular complications or a neuropathy that may result in amputations. These complications have been shown to be already present in about 10% of diabetic patients at the time of diagnosis.Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the level of awareness and attitude to foot care among adult diabetic patients attending a university health centre (i.e. a primary care centre and to emphasise the ever-present need for health education and promotion and early complication detection (especially of foot problems among diabetic patients.Method: A descriptive cross-sectional, clinic-based study was carried out at the University of Ibadan Health Centre (Jaja Clinic. The study population consisted of consenting adult diabetic patients. Data were collected by the self-administration of structured questionnaires to eligible subjects and were analysed using the SPSS v.15software. Appropriate statistics were employed to analyse the collected data.Results: A total of 137 patients participated in the study and ranged in age from 37 to 75 years, with the mean ± SD age being 58.2 ± 9.2 years. Of the participants, 98 (71.5% were men and 39 (28.5%were women; all of the participants were married. The duration of illness ranged from 1 year to 20 years, with the median duration of illness being 3 ± 1.7 years. One hundred and twenty-six (92%patients had never received any education on foot care from their healthcare providers, while 11(8% had received some form of foot care education. Among those who had never received any foot care education, 92 (73% had been diabetic for 1–5 years, while the remaining 34 (27% had been diabetic for 6 – 20 years. Of the foot care measures that were known, 35 (25.5% patients knew to wash their feet daily and dry in between the toes thoroughly, 31 (22.6% knew not to go outdoors barefooted, 27 (19.7% checked

  3. Health care expenditure for hospital-based delivery care in Lao PDR

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    Douangvichit Daovieng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery by a skilled birth attendant (SBA in a hospital is advocated to improve maternal health; however, hospital expenses for delivery care services are a concern for women and their families, particularly for women who pay out-of-pocket. Although health insurance is now implemented in Lao PDR, it is not universal throughout the country. The objectives of this study are to estimate the total health care expenses for vaginal delivery and caesarean section, to determine the association between health insurance and family income with health care expenditure and assess the effect of health insurance from the perspectives of the women and the skilled birth attendants (SBAs in Lao PDR. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two provincial hospitals in Lao PDR, from June to October 2010. Face to face interviews of 581 women who gave birth in hospital and 27 SBAs was carried out. Both medical and non-medical expenses were considered. A linear regression model was used to assess influencing factors on health care expenditure and trends of medical and non-medical expenditure by monthly family income stratified by mode of delivery were assessed. Results Of 581 women, 25% had health care insurance. Health care expenses for delivery care services were significantly higher for caesarean section (270 USD than for vaginal delivery (59 USD. After adjusting for the effect of hospital, family income was significantly associated with all types of expenditure in caesarean section, while it was associated with non-medical and total expenditures in vaginal delivery. Both delivering women and health providers thought that health insurance increased the utilisation of delivery care. Conclusions Substantially higher delivery care expenses were incurred for caesarean section compared to vaginal delivery. Three-fourths of the women who were not insured needed to be responsible for their own health care payment. Women who had higher family

  4. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  5. Collaborating while competing? The sustainability of community-based integrated care initiatives through a health partnership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Plochg; D.M.J. Delnoij; N.P.C. Hoogedoorn; N.S. Klazinga

    2006-01-01

    Background: To improve health-care delivery, care providers must base their services on community health needs and create a seamless continuum of care in which these needs can be met. Though, it is not obvious that providers apply this vision. Experiments with regulated competition in the health sys

  6. Collaborating while competing? The substainability of community-based integrated care initiatives through a health partnership.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plochg, T.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Hoogedoorn, N.P.C.; Klazinga, N.S.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve health-care delivery, care providers must base their services on community health needs and create a seamless continuum of care in which these needs can be met. Though, it is not obvious that providers apply this vision. Experiments with regulated competition in the health sys

  7. A Concept Analysis of Spiritual Care Based on Islamic Sources

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    Rahmatollah Marzband

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The cultural and religious resources of every community influence the definition of spiritual care. This paper discusses a concept analysis of spiritual care in an Islamic context. The Quran, narrations (Shie’h and commentarial books were searched, for information data. The data was used to provide a comprehensive definition of the concept of spiritual care from Islamic literature. We identified the attributes, antecedents and consequences of spiritual care according to Roger’s concept analysis approach. The review of the Islamic text showed that spiritual care is a series of spiritual skills or competencies that help patients to achieve excellent life. It is grouped into categories and has numerous positive effects on patients and caregivers. This study will be useful to Muslim clinicians and nurse educators as they strive to understand and incorporate spiritual care within their practice for Muslim patients.

  8. Improving Diabetes Care in the Latino Population: The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Greene, Rachel; Ferez-Pinzon, Anyul M.; Mejia, Robert; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of diabetes in Latinos is 12.8% compared to 9.3% of the general population. Latinos suffer from a higher prevalence of diabetic complications and mortality than whites yet receive less monitoring tests and education. Purpose: (1) Identify changes in clinical indicators among subjects with type 2 diabetes participating in…

  9. Health characteristics and nursing diagnosis in the home care population of the Community Health Care Center of Castellar del Vallès

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    Montserrat Ballester Rubio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing growth of life expectancy in western societies brings along higher rates of chronic, limiting and invalidating diseases. Amongst these services being offered to the dependent elder, the ATDOM program is intended to provide health support for elders at home.The project was first developed to assess the health characteristics for patients included in ATDOM program.To reach that objective a Descriptive study was developed. The study population were the 87 patients included in the ATDOM program at the Community Health Care Center of Castellar del Vallès. Measurement instruments used for assessing some of the main variables were Barthel scale, Braden scale and Zarit test. NANDA classification was used to identify Nursing diagnoses.Average age of our population was 82’90 years, 35’6% of them being male and 64’4% female. 98’9% of these patients reported having an identified caregiver. Average age of caregivers was 62’94, 82’6% being women. 21’8% of patients presented with severe or total dependence levels. 26’1% of caregivers reported being overloaded by caregiving burden. Only 1’4% had high risk of having bedsore.Most prevailing nursing diagnoses were related to skin injury and difficulties with physical mobility as well as to lack of autonomy on daily living activities.

  10. Evidence-based surgical wound care on surgical wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jaqueline

    2002-09-01

    Surgical wound infection is an important outcome indicator in the postoperative period. A 3-year prospective cohort epidemiological study of 2202 surgical patients from seven surgical wards across two hospitals was carried out using gold standard surveillance methodology. This involved following patients up as inpatients and postdischarge surveillance to 30 days by an independent observer. The results led to the development of a mathematical model for risk of clean, elective surgical wound infection. Risk of surgical wound infection was increased by smoking, higher body mass index, presence of malignancy, haematoma formation, increasing numbers of people in theatre, adherent dressing usage, and higher times to suture removal (P<0.05). The results show that this type of surveillance is an effective way of collecting accurate data on wound infection rates. It was noted that patient care practices affected the surgical wound infection rate and the surveillance was used to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based practice, through recommendations for clean surgery, to reduce the risk from extrinsic risk factors for wound infection. As a result of the implementation of this evidence-based practice there was a significant reduction (P<0.05) in the clean wound infection rate.

  11. Screening for thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies in a tertiary care hospital of West Bengal: Implications for population screening

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    Bhawna Bhutoria Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are common genetic disorders of hemoglobin, which can be prevented by population screening and offering genetic counseling. In absence of population-based screening for hemoglobinopathies, the hospital-based diagnosis register provide idea about the extent of problem in the community. The present study was undertaken to find out the burden of hemoglobinopathies and spectrum of this disorders among the population who were screened in the hospital-based screening program. A record-basedanalysis of subjects who underwent screening for hemoglobinopathies in Burdwan Medical College and Hospital over a period of 3 years and 4 months revealed that overall 29.3% of subjects were positive for hemoglobinopathies. Beta thalassemia heterozygous was the most commonhemoglobinopathy in this region closely followed by hemoglobin E heterozygous. In view of high prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in this region, a routine premarital screening program is needed for identification and prevention of high-risk marriages.

  12. Recurrent pain is associated with decreased selective attention in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsen, C P; Dijkstra, J B; van Boxtel, M P J

    2011-01-01

    Studies which have examined the impact of pain on cognitive functioning in the general population are scarce. In the present study we assessed the predictive value of recurrent pain on cognitive functioning in a population-based study (N=1400). Furthermore, we investigated the effect of pain on cognitive functioning in individuals with specific pain complaints (i.e. back pain, gastric pain, muscle pain and headache). Cognitive functioning was assessed using the Stroop Color-Word Interference test (Stroop interference), the Letter-Digit-Substitution test (LDST) and the Visual Verbal learning Task (VVLT). Pain was measured with the COOP/WONCA pain scale (Dartmouth Primary Care Cooperative Information Project/World Organization of National Colleges, Academies, and Academic Associations of General Practice /Family Physicians). We controlled for the effects of age, sex, level of education and depressive symptoms. It was demonstrated that pain had a negative impact on the performance on the Stroop interference but not on the VVLT and the LDST. This indicates that subjects who reported extreme pain had more problems with selective attention and were more easily distracted. Effects were in general larger in the specific pain groups when compared to the associations found in the total group. Implications of these findings are discussed. The experience of recurrent pain has a negative influence on selective attention in a healthy population.

  13. Predictors of Childhood Anxiety: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

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    Dawn Kingston

    Full Text Available Few studies have explored predictors of early childhood anxiety.To determine the prenatal, postnatal, and early life predictors of childhood anxiety by age 5.Population-based, provincial administrative data (N = 19,316 from Manitoba, Canada were used to determine the association between demographic, obstetrical, psychosocial, medical, behavioral, and infant factors on childhood anxiety.Risk factors for childhood anxiety by age 5 included maternal psychological distress from birth to 12 months and 13 months to 5 years post-delivery and an infant 5-minute Apgar score of ≤7. Factors associated with decreased risk included maternal age < 20 years, multiparity, and preterm birth.Identifying predictors of childhood anxiety is a key step to early detection and prevention. Maternal psychological distress is an early, modifiable risk factor. Future research should aim to disentangle early life influences on childhood anxiety occurring in the prenatal, postnatal, and early childhood periods.

  14. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes. PMID:25499658

  15. Task-role-based Access Control Model in Smart Health-care System

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Peng; Jiang Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    As the development of computer science and smart health-care technology, there is a trend for patients to enjoy medical care at home. Taking enormous users in the Smart Health-care System into consideration, access control is an important issue. Traditional access control models, discretionary access control, mandatory access control, and role-based access control, do not properly reflect the characteristics of Smart Health-care System. This paper proposes an advanced access control model for...

  16. Evolving effective behaviours to interact with tag-based populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Osman; Crawford, Chad; Sen, Sandip

    2015-07-01

    Tags and other characteristics, externally perceptible features that are consistent among groups of animals or humans, can be used by others to determine appropriate response strategies in societies. This usage of tags can be extended to artificial environments, where agents can significantly reduce cognitive effort spent on appropriate strategy choice and behaviour selection by reusing strategies for interacting with new partners based on their tags. Strategy selection mechanisms developed based on this idea have successfully evolved stable cooperation in games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game but relies upon payoff sharing and matching methods that limit the applicability of the tag framework. Our goal is to develop a general classification and behaviour selection approach based on the tag framework. We propose and evaluate alternative tag matching and adaptation schemes for a new, incoming individual to select appropriate behaviour against any population member of an existing, stable society. Our proposed approach allows agents to evolve both the optimal tag for the environment as well as appropriate strategies for existing agent groups. We show that these mechanisms will allow for robust selection of optimal strategies by agents entering a stable society and analyse the various environments where this approach is effective.

  17. A home-based comprehensive care model in patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A study pre-protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lufei; Healey, Kathleen; Charlton, Mary; Schmid, Kendra; Zabad, Rana; Wester, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability is prevalent in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), leading to difficulty in care access, significant caregiver burden, immense challenges in self-care and great societal burden.  Without highly coordinated, competent and accessible care, individuals living with progressive MS experience psychological distress, poor quality of life, suffer from life-threatening complications, and have frequent but avoidable healthcare utilizations. Unfortunately, current healthcare delivery models present severe limitations in providing easily accessible, patient-centered, coordinated comprehensive care to those with progressive MS. We propose a home-based comprehensive care model (MAHA) to address the unmet needs, challenges, and avoidable complications in individuals with progressive MS with disabling disease. Objective The article aims to describe the study design and methods used to implement and evaluate the proposed intervention.   Method The study will use a randomized controlled design to evaluate the feasibility of providing a 24-month, home-based, patient-centered comprehensive care program to improve quality of life, reduce complications and healthcare utilizations overtime (quarterly) for 24 months. A transdisciplinary team led by a MS-Comprehensivist will carry out this project. Fifty MS patients will be randomly assigned to the intervention and usual care program using block randomization procedures. We hypothesize that patients in the intervention group will have fewer complications, higher quality of life, greater satisfaction with care, and reduced healthcare utilization. The proposed project is also expected to be financially sustainable in fee-for-service models but best suited for and gain financial success in valued-based care systems.   Discussion This is the first study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based comprehensive care management program in MS patients living with progressive disability. If

  18. Why Children with Severe Bacterial Infection Die: A Population–Based Study of Determinants and Consequences of Suboptimal Care with a Special Emphasis on Methodological Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Elise Launay; Christèle Gras-Le Guen; Alain Martinot; Rémy Assathiany; Elise Martin; Thomas Blanchais; Catherine Deneux-Tharaux; Jean-Christophe Rozé; Martin Chalumeau

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Suboptimal care is frequent in the management of severe bacterial infection. We aimed to evaluate the consequences of suboptimal care in the early management of severe bacterial infection in children and study the determinants. METHODS: A previously reported population-based confidential enquiry included all children (3 months- 16 years) who died of severe bacterial infection in a French area during a 7-year period. Here, we compared the optimality of the management of these cas...

  19. Towards Evidence-based Precision Medicine: Extracting Population Information from Biomedical Text using Binary Classifiers and Syntactic Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Kalpana; Dasot, Naman; Goyal, Pawan; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2016-01-01

    Precision Medicine is an emerging approach for prevention and treatment of disease that considers individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. The dissemination of individualized evidence by automatically identifying population information in literature is a key for evidence-based precision medicine at the point-of-care. We propose a hybrid approach using natural language processing techniques to automatically extract the population information from biomedical literature. Our approach first implements a binary classifier to classify sentences with or without population information. A rule-based system based on syntactic-tree regular expressions is then applied to sentences containing population information to extract the population named entities. The proposed two-stage approach achieved an F-score of 0.81 using a MaxEnt classifier and the rule- based system, and an F-score of 0.87 using a Nai've-Bayes classifier and the rule-based system, and performed relatively well compared to many existing systems. The system and evaluation dataset is being released as open source. PMID:27570671

  20. Concept of Care, Caring Expectations, and Caring Frustrations of the Elderly Suffering from Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Santos, Charisse Izobelle Q.; Santos, Ivan Benedict A.; Santos, Jedda A.; Santos, Justin E.; Santos, Justo Martin S.; Santos, Vincent Emmanuelle E.

    2012-01-01

    While it is true that elderly concepts of care and caring expectations have been ascertained in previous literatures, little is known about how the elderly population views caring frustrations--particularly that of the Filipino elderly. This study purports to surface the lebenswelt of healthcare expectations and frustrations based on the…

  1. Estrogen and Alzheimer′s disease in Aging Population: Population based case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Hong; Zhen-xin Zhang; Hui Li; Jie hao Zhao; Jue-bin Huang; ling Wei

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Wc conducted a population based case-control study to evaluate the effect of estrogen associated variables in Alzhcimer′s disease. Methods: A total of 2995 female residents aged 55 years or older was drawn-by means of stratified multistage cluster sampling in urban and rural areas of Beijing. Wc collected gynecological data of 2995 females. Cases were females Alzheimer′s disease ascertained by DSM-Ⅳ criteria and NINCDS-ADRDA critcria. Controls were female residents whose MMSE scores upper than 50 percentage. Odds Ratio were calculated from Logistic models. Results: By a Logistic stepwise multiple regression model, we found that the risk of dementia in women increased with increasing age (OR per year, 1.21, 95%CI, 1.16 -1.27). The risk decreased with increased duration with menstrual cycles (OR per year, 0.8L, 95%CI, 0.68 to 0.97). The risk decreased with increased age of menopause (OR per year, 0.97, 95%CI, 0.91 to 1.04). The risk decreased in women ever suffered from uterine, ovary, or breast tumor (OR, 0.30, 95%C1:0.04- 2.28). Conclusion: The risk of AD decreased with increased duration of menstrual cycles and increased age of menopause and in wome ever suffered fiom uterine. ovary or breast tumor. These findings offers additional support for a protective influence of estrogen i AD.

  2. Evangelical Protestants and the ACA: An Opening for Community-Based Primary Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Berkeley; Skinner, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Evangelical Protestants make up the largest religious subgroup in the United States, and previous research has shown that Evangelical churches are disproportionately active in community engagement and efforts toward social change. Although Evangelical Protestant perspectives have been considered with regard to persistent socioeconomic stratification and racial discrimination, less focus has been given to how churches interpret poor health outcomes within the United States. In particular, this research addresses how enduring health disparities are understood within the larger discussion of healthcare reform. Due to the similarity of approaches favored by participants in this study and community-based philosophy, a suggestion is made for future health policy dialogue. Although Evangelical Protestants have been most likely to reject all aspects of the Affordable Care Act, in many ways the findings of this study suggest the potential for successful future health policy collaboration. In particular, community-based primary care might appeal to Evangelicals and health professionals in the ongoing effort to improve population health and the quality of healthcare in the United States. PMID:27050877

  3. Population aging in Albanian post-socialist society: Implications for care and family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meçe Merita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Population aging is becoming an inevitable phenomenon in Albanian post-socialist society, posing multi-faceted challenges to its individuals, families and society as a whole. Since 1991, the Albanian population has been exposed to intensive demographic changes caused by unintended aspects of socio-economic transition from a planned socialist economy to a market-oriented capitalist one (Hoff, 2008. Ongoing processes of re-organization of social institutions increased its socio-economic insecurity leading to the application of various coping mechanisms. While adjusting themselves to other aspects of life, people changed their decisions of having children and leaving the country (Hoff, 2008. On the other hand, replacement of former traditional extended family forms with diverse living arrangements and family structures has been the outcome of the combination of three factors: falling fertility, increasing life expectancy and increasing migration (INSTAT, 2014.

  4. Children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease can be identified through population-based registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Gunnar; Hærskjold, Ann; Stensballe, Lone Graff;

    2015-01-01

    as having hemodynamically significant CHD according to the recommendations for treatment with palivizumab. CONCLUSION: It was possible to identify a subgroup of children with hemodynamically significant CHD using an epidemiological approach and an algorithm with high validity. Our results will enable well-powered......BACKGROUND: Epidemiological research is facilitated in Sweden by a history of national health care registers, making large unselected national cohort studies possible. However, for complex clinical populations, such as children with congenital heart disease (CHD), register-based studies...... is indicated as a prophylactic treatment against respiratory syncytial virus infections in children with hemodynamically significant CHD. AIM: The aim of the study reported here was to develop and validate an algorithm to identify children with hemodynamically significant CHD according to recommendations...

  5. Adopting Ambulatory Breast Cancer Surgery as the Standard of Care in an Asian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Ying Ru Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in Asia. A 23-hour ambulatory (AS23 service was implemented at our institute in March 2004 to allow more surgeries to be performed as ambulatory procedures. In this study, we reviewed the impact of the AS23 service on breast cancer surgeries and reviewed surgical outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 1742 patients who underwent definitive breast cancer surgery from 1 March 2004 to 31 December 2010. Results. By 2010, more than 70% of surgeries were being performed as ambulatory procedures. Younger women (P<0.01, those undergoing wide local excision (P<0.01 and those with ductal carcinoma-in situ or early stage breast cancer (P<0.01, were more likely to undergo ambulatory surgery. Six percent of patients initially scheduled for ambulatory surgery were eventually managed as inpatients; a third of these were because of perioperative complications. Wound complications, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates were not more frequent with ambulatory surgery. Conclusion. Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is now the standard of care at our institute. An integrated workflow facilitating proper patient selection and structured postoperativee outpatient care have ensured minimal complications and high patient acceptance.

  6. Geospatial Technology in Disease Mapping, E- Surveillance and Health Care for Rural Population in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Praveenkumar, B. A.; Suresh, K.; Nikhil, A.; M Rohan; Nikhila, B. S.; Rohit, C. K.; Srinivas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Providing Healthcare to rural population has been a challenge to the medical service providers especially in developing countries. For this to be effective, scalable and sustainable, certain strategic decisions have to be taken during the planning phase. Also, there is a big gap between the services available and the availability of doctors and medical resources in rural areas. Use of Information Technology can aid this deficiency to a good extent. In this paper, a mobile application...

  7. PATTERN OF OVARIAN NEOPLASM IN RURAL POPULATION: A FIVE YEAR STUDY FROM TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Umesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : The aim of the study was to know the morphological pattern of benign and malignant ovarian neoplasms and their distribution in different age groups in rural population of India. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A retrospective study of all cases of ovarian neoplasms diagnosed at department of pathology, Maharaja Medical College, Agroha during period of five year (Aug, 07 — Oct.12) was done. The tumors were classified according to WHO classification after thorou...

  8. Monitoring of osteoporosis among geriatric population in the primary care service

    OpenAIRE

    Šipovac Dragana; Sević Siniša; Mikić Sandra Stefan; Kovačević Nadica; Ivanov Igor; Eić Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Osteoporosis is a chronic, progressive bone disease which leads to a reduction in bone mineral density and disruption of bone micro-architecture. Patients with osteoporosis have an increased risk of fractures caused by “small trauma” - stresses which would not normally cause fracture in a non-osteoporotic individual. This study was aimed at determining the incidence of osteoporosis in geriatric population, crucial demographic parameters (gende...

  9. Android-based access to holistic emergency care record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system which interfaces with a Holistic Emergency Care Record (HECR) that aims at managing emergency care holistically by supporting EMS processes and is accessible by Android-enabled mobile devices. PMID:23823406

  10. Integrating Medical Services, Rehabilitation and Nursing Care to Figure Out Practical ;Solutions for the Challenge of Population Aging in Hangzhou%杭州市医养护一体化服务破解老龄化难题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢道溥; 费敏浩; 徐林山; 洪晓静

    2015-01-01

    杭州市以医疗康复护理进家庭为基础,拓展日托养老与机构养老健康服务内涵。本文通过介绍杭州市医养护一体化签约服务模式的设计架构、主要做法和医保配套措施,探索破解全国老龄化社会难题。%By home-based medical treatment, rehabilitation, and nursing care, the services contents of day-care and the institutional care for the older people have be expanded in Hangzhou. In this paper, we introduce the frame structure of the signed service model of integrated medical service, rehabilitation and nursing care, the main practices, and the health insurance policy, to explore practical solutions for the social problems of population aging.

  11. Ocular biometry in the adult population in rural central China: a population-based, cross-sectional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting; Fu; Yin-Wei; Song; Zhi-Qi; Chen; Jun-Wen; He; Kun; Qiao; Xu-Fang; Sun; Hong; Zhang; Jun-Ming; Wang

    2015-01-01

    ·AIM: To describe the distribution and determinants of ocular biometric parameters and to ascertain the relative importance of these determinants in a large population of adults in rural central China.·METHODS: A population-based, cross-sectional study performed in rural central China included 1721 participants aged 40 or more years. Ocular biometrical parameters including axial length(AL), anterior chamber depth(ACD), radius of corneal curvature(K) and horizontal corneal diameter [white-to-white(WTW)distance] were measured using non-contact partial coherence interferometry [intraocular lens(IOL)-Master].·RESULTS: Ocular biometric data on 1721 participants with a average age of 57.0 ±8.7y were analyzed at last.The general mean AL, ACD, mean corneal curvature radius(MCR), WTW were 22.80±1.12, 2.96±0.36, 7.56±0.26 and 11.75 ±0.40 mm, respectively. The mean values of each parameter in 40 to 49, 50 to 59, 60 to 69, and 70 to91 years age groups were as follows: AL, 22.77 ±0.87,22.76 ±1.06, 22.89 ±1.41, 22.92 ±0.80 mm; ACD, 3.10 ±0.32,2.98 ±0.34, 2.86 ±0.36, 2.77 ±0.35 mm; MCR, 7.58 ±0.25,7.54 ±0.26, 7.55 ±0.26, 7.49 ±0.28 mm; WTW, 11.79 ±0.38,11.75 ±0.40, 11.72 ±0.41, 11.67 ±0.41 mm. The AL, ACD,MCR and WTW were correlated with age and the AL was correlated with height and weight.·CONCLUSION: Our findings can serve as an important normative reference for multiple purposes and may help to improve the quality of rural eye care.

  12. Patterns and expenditures of multi-morbidity in an insured working population in the United States: insights for a sustainable health care system and building healthier lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Robert; Dasso, Edwin; Ho, Sam; Frank, Jerry; Scandrett, Graeme; Genaidy, Ash

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. health care system is currently heading toward unsustainable health care expenditures and increased dissatisfaction with health outcomes. The objective of this population-based study is to uncover practical insights regarding patients with 1 or more chronic illnesses. A cross-sectional investigation was designed to gather data from health records drawn from diverse US geographic markets. A database of 9.74 million fully-insured, working individuals was used, together with members in the same households. Among nearly 3.43 million patients with claims, 2.22 million had chronic conditions. About 24.3% had 1 chronic condition and 40.4% had multi-morbidity. Health care expenditures for chronic conditions accounted for 92% of all costs (52% for chronic costs and 40% for nonchronic costs). Psychiatry, orthopedics-rheumatology, endocrinology, and cardiology areas accounted for two thirds of these chronic condition costs; nonchronic condition costs were dominated by otolaryngology, gastroenterology, dermatology, orthopedics-rheumatology conditions, and preventive services. About 50.1% of all households had 2 or more members with chronic conditions. In summary, multi-morbidity is prevalent not only among those older than age 65 years but also in younger and working individuals, and commonly occurs among several members of a household. The authors suggest that the disease-focused model of medicine should change to a more holistic illness-wellness model, emphasizing not only the physical but also the mental and social elements that can influence individual health. In that way the chronic care model could be broadened in context and content to improve the health of patients and households.

  13. Leveraging The Affordable Care Act To Enroll Justice-Involved Populations In Medicaid: State And Local Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Sachini N; Huskamp, Haiden A; Riedel, Lauren E; McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel; Toone, Robert E; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to enroll criminal justice-involved populations in health insurance, particularly Medicaid. As a result, many state and county corrections departments have launched programs that incorporate Medicaid enrollment in discharge planning. Our study characterizes the national landscape of programs enrolling criminal justice-involved populations in Medicaid as of January 2015. We provide an overview of sixty-four programs operating in jails, prisons, or community probation and parole systems that enroll individuals during detention, incarceration, and the release process. We describe the variation among the programs in terms of settings, personnel, timing of eligibility screening, and target populations. Seventy-seven percent of the programs are located in jails, and 56 percent use personnel from public health or social service agencies. We describe four practices that have facilitated the Medicaid enrollment process: suspending instead of terminating Medicaid benefits upon incarceration, presuming that an individual is eligible for Medicaid before the process is completed, allowing enrollment during incarceration, and accepting alternative forms of identification for enrollment. The criminal justice system is a complex one that requires a variety of approaches to enroll individuals in Medicaid. Future research should examine how these approaches influence health and criminal justice outcomes. PMID:26643624

  14. Exploring the Utility of Ultra-Brief Delirium Assessments in a Nonintensive Care Geriatric Population: The GEM Study

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, James S.; Doering, Tracey; Gordon, Sharon; Svetlana K Eden; Shintani, Ayumi; Schnelle, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine how an ultra-brief structured tool that would require usually less than a minute for delirium assessment compares with a clinical assessment based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) in a geriatric postacute care (PAC) rehabilitation unit. Design: Prospective observational cohort study. Setting: Postacute geriatric hospital ward of a Veteran’s Affairs hospital. Participants: Consecutively admitted patients between 50 and 100 years old for inpatient postacu...

  15. Compact atomic clock prototype based on coherent population trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danet Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toward the next generations of compact atomic clocks, clocks based on coherent population trapping (CPT offer a very interesting alternative. Thanks to CPT, a quantum interfering process, this technology has made a decisive step in the miniaturization direction. Fractional frequency stability of 1.5x10-10 at 1 s has been demonstrated in commercial devices of a few cm3. The laboratory prototype presented here intends to explore what could be the ultimate stability of a CPT based device. To do so, an original double-Λ optical scheme and a pulsed interrogation have been implemented in order to get a good compromise between contrast and linewidth. A study of two main sources of noise, the relative intensity and the local oscillator (LO noise, has been performed. By designing simple solutions, it led to a new fractional frequency limitation lower than 4x10-13 at 1 s integration. Such a performance proves that such a technology could rival with classical ones as double resonance clocks.

  16. Population-based initiatives in college mental health: students helping students to overcome obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel J; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie L; Morse, Charles; Ellison, Marsha L; Doerfler, Leonard A; Riba, Michelle B

    2014-12-01

    College students' need for mental health care has increased dramatically, leaving campus counseling and mental health centers struggling to meet the demand. This has led to the investigation and development of extra-center, population-based interventions. Student-to-student support programs are but one example. Students themselves are a plentiful, often-untapped resource that extends the reach of mental health services on campus. Student-to-student programs capitalize on students' natural inclination to assist their peers. A brief review of the prevalence and effects of mental disorders in the college population is provided, followed by a broad overview of the range of peer-to-peer programs that can be available on college campuses. Two innovative programs are highlighted: (1) a hospital- and community-based program, the College Mental Health Program (CMHP) at McLean Hospital, and 2) the Student Support Network (SSN) at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The subsequent section reviews the literature on peer-to-peer programs for students with serious and persistent mental illness for which there is a small but generally positive body of research. This lack of an empirical basis in college mental health leads the authors to argue for development of broad practice-research networks.

  17. Patient Preferences of a Low-Income Hispanic Population for Mental Health Services in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Patricia M; Ingram, Maia; Rimas, Heather; Carvajal, Scott; Cunningham, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    We used a discrete-choice conjoint experiment to model the mental health services preferences of patients of a federally-qualified health center serving a primarily low-income, Hispanic farmworker population in southwestern Arizona. The two attributes that had the largest influence on patient choices (i.e., received the highest importance scores) were where patients receive these services and the language and cultural awareness of the provider who prescribed their treatment. Simulations indicated that the clinic could substantially improve its patients' welfare with even a single change. The single most effective change in terms of patient preferences would be to offer behavioral health services onsite. PMID:26410547

  18. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in an Irish elderly population in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Cristín

    2009-12-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: * Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people is a well-documented problem and has been associated with adverse drug reactions and hospitalization. * Beers\\' criteria, Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) are screening tools that have been formulated to help physicians and pharmacists identify potentially inappropriate prescribing and potential prescribing omissions. * The prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing and prescribing omissions in the elderly population presenting to hospital with acute illness is high according to STOPP and START criteria.

  19. Penn State Worry Questionnaire - 10: A new tool for measurement-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Beier; Sripada, Rebecca K; Klumpp, Heide; Abelson, James L; Muzik, Maria; Zhao, Zhuo; Rosenblum, Katherine; Briggs, Hedieh; Kaston, Michelle; Warren, Ricks

    2016-05-30

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire - Past Week (PSWQ-PW) is an adaptation of the widely used Penn State Worry Questionnaire, measuring pathological worry weekly. However, it contains problematic negatively worded items and has not been validated in a large sample yet. To meet the needs of measurement-based care (MBC), we developed a shortened version (PSWQ-10) based on the PSWQ-PW, retaining only positively worded items, and examined its psychometric properties and clinical utility. Patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and other anxiety disorders completed the PSWQ-10 and other instruments during routine evaluation in an academic anxiety clinic. A second cohort from a perinatal clinic was evaluated similarly. The PSWQ-10 displayed excellent internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, and criterion group validity. Patients with GAD scored significantly higher than those with other anxiety disorders but did not differ from those with MDD. The PSWQ-10 showed sensitivity to change over time and demonstrated excellent psychometric properties in the perinatal population. The PSWQ-10 is a reliable, valid, efficient, and straightforward worry-focused instrument that can be readily used in MBC and help clinicians objectively measure worry as a treatment outcome in broad clinical populations. PMID:27137962

  20. [Nursing care systematization at the intensive care unit (ICU) based on Wanda Horta's theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amante, Lúcia Nazareth; Rossetto, Annelise Paula; Schneider, Dulcinéia Ghizoni

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement the Nursing Care Systematization--Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE)--with Wanda Aguiar Horta's Theory of Basic Human Necessities and the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's (NANDA) Nursing Diagnosis as its references. The starting point was the evaluation of the knowledge of the nursing team about the SAE, including their participation in this process. This is a qualitative study, performed in the Intensive Care Unit in a hospital in the city of Brusque, Santa Catarina, from October, 2006 to March, 2007. It was observed that the nursing professionals know little about SAE, but they are greatly interested in learning and developing it in their daily practice. In conclusion, it was possible to execute the healthcare systematization in an easy way, with the use of simple brochures that provided all the necessary information for the qualified development of nursing care.

  1. On the Estimation of Heritability with Family-Based and Population-Based Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdoe Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For a family-based sample, the phenotypic variance-covariance matrix can be parameterized to include the variance of a polygenic effect that has then been estimated using a variance component analysis. However, with the advent of large-scale genomic data, the genetic relationship matrix (GRM can be estimated and can be utilized to parameterize the variance of a polygenic effect for population-based samples. Therefore narrow sense heritability, which is both population and trait specific, can be estimated with both population- and family-based samples. In this study we estimate heritability from both family-based and population-based samples, collected in Korea, and the heritability estimates from the pooled samples were, for height, 0.60; body mass index (BMI, 0.32; log-transformed triglycerides (log TG, 0.24; total cholesterol (TCHL, 0.30; high-density lipoprotein (HDL, 0.38; low-density lipoprotein (LDL, 0.29; systolic blood pressure (SBP, 0.23; and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, 0.24. Furthermore, we found differences in how heritability is estimated—in particular the amount of variance attributable to common environment in twins can be substantial—which indicates heritability estimates should be interpreted with caution.

  2. A Novel Quantum Dots-Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-05-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  3. A Novel Quantum Dots–Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ding

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots–based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91–100%, while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68–91% and 100% (95% CI, 91–100%, respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot–based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold–based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  4. A comparison of effectiveness of hepatitis B screening and linkage to care among foreign-born populations in clinical and nonclinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekar E

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Edwin Chandrasekar,1 Ravneet Kaur,1 Sharon Song,1 Karen E Kim2 1Asian Health Coalition, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Division of the Biological Sciences and Office of Community Engagement and Cancer Disparities, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Hepatitis B (HBV is an urgent, unmet public health issue that affects Asian Americans disproportionately. Of the estimated 1.2 million living with chronic hepatitis B in USA, more than 50% are of Asian ethnicity, despite the fact that Asian Americans constitute less than 6% of the total US population. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends HBV screening of persons who are at high risk for the disease. Yet, large numbers of Asian Americans have not been diagnosed or tested, in large part because of perceived cultural and linguistic barriers. Primary care physicians are at the front line of the US health care system, and are in a position to identify individuals and families at risk. Clinical settings integrated into Asian American communities, where physicians are on staff and wellness care is emphasized, can provide testing for HBV. In this study, the Asian Health Coalition and its community partners conducted HBV screenings and follow-up linkage to care in both clinical and nonclinical settings. The nonclinic settings included health fair events organized by churches and social services agencies, and were able to reach large numbers of individuals. Twice as many Asian Americans were screened in nonclinical settings than in health clinics. Chi-square and independent samples t-test showed that participants from the two settings did not differ in test positivity, sex, insurance status, years of residence in USA, or education. Additionally, the same proportion of individuals found to be infected in the two groups underwent successful linkage to care. Nonclinical settings were as effective as clinical settings in screening for HBV, as well as in making treatment options available to

  5. Mandatory bundled payment getting into formation for value-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, John

    2015-10-01

    Succeeding under Medicare's enterprise Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model will require collaboration among caregivers and financial arrangements to align incentives Priorities for most organization's transition to becoming a value-based hospitals will be care redesign, supply-purchasing strategy, and post-acute care provider partnering. Pursuing value for your joint replacement program will chart a path for other service lines and lead your organization's transition to becoming a value-based enterprise. PMID:26595977

  6. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E; Go, Peter M N Y H; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects.

  7. Community-based rehabilitation: working in partnership with eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Weber

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Any response to the needs of people with visual impairment and their families will be more effective if eye care workers and CBR programme staff can work together at the community level.

  8. Development and Implementation of Team-Based Panel Management Tools: Filling the Gap between Patient and Population Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Drawz, Paul; Carter, Cameron; Shumaker, Amy Hirsch; Kern, Elizabeth F

    2016-08-01

    Effective team-based models of care, such as the Patient-Centered Medical Home, require electronic tools to support proactive population management strategies that emphasize care coordination and quality improvement. Despite the spread of electronic health records (EHRs) and vendors marketing population health tools, clinical practices still may lack the ability to have: (1) local control over types of data collected/reports generated, (2) timely data (eg, up-to-date data, not several months old), and accordingly (3) the ability to efficiently monitor and improve patient outcomes. This article describes a quality improvement project at the hospital system level to develop and implement a flexible panel management (PM) tool to improve care of subpopulations of patients (eg, panels of patients with diabetes) by clinical teams. An in-depth case analysis approach is used to explore barriers and facilitators in building a PM registry tool for team-based management needs using standard data elements (eg, laboratory values, pharmacy records) found in EHRs. Also described are factors that may contribute to sustainability; to date the tool has been adapted to 6 disease-focused subpopulations encompassing more than 200,000 patients. Two key lessons emerged from this initiative: (1) though challenging, team-based clinical end users and information technology needed to work together consistently to refine the product, and (2) locally developed population management tools can provide efficient data tracking for frontline clinical teams and leadership. The preliminary work identified critical gaps that were successfully addressed by building local PM registry tools from EHR-derived data and offers lessons learned for others engaged in similar work. (Population Health Management 2016;19:232-239).

  9. Development and Implementation of Team-Based Panel Management Tools: Filling the Gap between Patient and Population Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Drawz, Paul; Carter, Cameron; Shumaker, Amy Hirsch; Kern, Elizabeth F

    2016-08-01

    Effective team-based models of care, such as the Patient-Centered Medical Home, require electronic tools to support proactive population management strategies that emphasize care coordination and quality improvement. Despite the spread of electronic health records (EHRs) and vendors marketing population health tools, clinical practices still may lack the ability to have: (1) local control over types of data collected/reports generated, (2) timely data (eg, up-to-date data, not several months old), and accordingly (3) the ability to efficiently monitor and improve patient outcomes. This article describes a quality improvement project at the hospital system level to develop and implement a flexible panel management (PM) tool to improve care of subpopulations of patients (eg, panels of patients with diabetes) by clinical teams. An in-depth case analysis approach is used to explore barriers and facilitators in building a PM registry tool for team-based management needs using standard data elements (eg, laboratory values, pharmacy records) found in EHRs. Also described are factors that may contribute to sustainability; to date the tool has been adapted to 6 disease-focused subpopulations encompassing more than 200,000 patients. Two key lessons emerged from this initiative: (1) though challenging, team-based clinical end users and information technology needed to work together consistently to refine the product, and (2) locally developed population management tools can provide efficient data tracking for frontline clinical teams and leadership. The preliminary work identified critical gaps that were successfully addressed by building local PM registry tools from EHR-derived data and offers lessons learned for others engaged in similar work. (Population Health Management 2016;19:232-239). PMID:26440062

  10. Incentive-Based Primary Care: Cost and Utilization Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hollander, Marcus J.; Kadlec, Helena

    2015-01-01

    This study used Canadian Ministry of Health administrative data for Fiscal Year 2010–2011. After controlling for patients’ age, sex, service-needs level, and continuity of care (ie, attachment to a general practice), the incentives reduced the net annual health care costs for patients with hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and congestive heart failure, but not for diabetes. The incentives were also associated with fewer hospital days, fewer admissions and readmissions, and ...

  11. Arteriovenous fistula: An evidence based practice in nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelia Prevyzi

    2013-01-01

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the most frequent form of vascular access for patients undergoing haemodialysis because it ensures good quality of dialysis and reduce haemodialysis mortality. For this reason, the nephrology nurse plays an important role in the appropriate care of fistula with a view to promoting the longevity and prevention of complications. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to investigate the role of Nephrology nurse in the appropriate care of fistula, promoting lon...

  12. VAMP - a vision based sensor network for health care hygiene

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Padraig; Buckley, John; O'Flynn, Brendan; Li, Xuchun; Zhou, Jiang; Lacey, Gerard; Ó Mathúna, S. Cian

    2008-01-01

    Adequate hand-washing has been shown to be a critical activity in preventing the transmission of infections such as MRSA in health-care environments. Hand-washing guidelines published by various health-care related institutions recommend a technique incorporating six hand-washing poses that ensure all areas of the hands are thoroughly cleaned. In this paper, an embedded wireless vision system (VAMP) capable of accurately monitoring hand-washing quality is presented. The VAMP system hardware c...

  13. A spatial analysis of patterns of growth and concentration of population based on homogeneous population censuses: Spain (1877-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Franch Auladell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work constitutes a contribution to the analysis of long term patterns of population concentration applied to the case of Spain. The proposed methodology is based on the homogenisation of both data and administrative units which takes the municipal structure of the 2001 census as its base reference. This work seeks to show how applying spatial analysis techniques to this type of homogeneous data series allows us to make more detailed studies of population patterns within a given territory. The most important conclusions that we reached was that, in Spain, sustained population growth has followed a spatial pattern that has become increasingly consolidated over time. The tendencies observed have produced an uneven distribution of population within the national territory marked by the existence of a series of well-defined, and often very localised, areas that spread beyond the limits of the official administrative boundaries.

  14. Developing evidence-based maternity care in Iran: a quality improvement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current Iranian perinatal statistics indicate that maternity care continues to need improvement. In response, we implemented a multi-faceted intervention to improve the quality of maternity care at an Iranian Social Security Hospital. Using a before-and-after design our aim was to improve the uptake of selected evidence based practices and more closely attend to identified women's needs and preferences. Methods The major steps of the study were to (1 identify women's needs, values and preferences via interviews, (2 select through a process of professional consensus the top evidence-based clinical recommendations requiring local implementation (3 redesign care based on the selected evidence-based recommendations and women's views, and (4 implement the new care model. We measured the impact of the new care model on maternal satisfaction and caesarean birth rates utilising maternal surveys and medical record audit before and after implementation of the new care model. Results Twenty women's needs and requirements as well as ten evidence-based clinical recommendations were selected as a basis for improving care. Following the introduction of the new model of care, women's satisfaction levels improved significantly on 16 of 20 items (p Conclusion The introduction of a quality improvement care model improved compliance with evidence-based guidelines and was associated with an improvement in women's satisfaction levels and a reduction in rates of caesarean birth.

  15. Four proposals for market-based health care system reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, W

    1994-08-01

    A perfectly free, competitive medical market would not meet many social goals, such as universal access to health care. Micromanagement of interactions between patients and providers does not guarantee quality care and frequently undermines that relationship, to the frustration of all involved. Furthermore, while some North American health care plans are less expensive than others, none have reduced the medical inflation rate to equal the general inflation rate. Markets have always fixed uneven inflation rates in other domains. The suggested reforms could make elective interactions between patients and providers work more like a free market than did any preceding system. The health and life insurance plan creates cost-sensitive consumers, informed by a corporation with significant research incentives and abilities. The FFEB proposal encourages context-sensitive pricing, established by negotiation processes that weigh labor and benefit. Publication of providers' expected outcomes further enriches the information available to consumers and may reduce defensive medicine incentives. A medical career ladder would ease entry and exit from medical professions. These and complementary reforms do not specifically cap spending yet could have a deflationary impact on elective health care prices, while providing incentives to maintain quality. They accomplish these ends by giving more responsibility, information, incentives, and choice to citizens. We could provide most health care in a marketlike environment. We can incorporate these reforms in any convenient order and allow them to compete with alternative schemes. Our next challenge is to design, implement, and evaluate marketlike health care systems.

  16. SCREENING FOR GLAUCOMA IN RURAL POPULATION: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhutuja A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM To estimate the prevalence of blindness due to glaucoma in patients aged 40 years and above attending Tertiary Care Hospital. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study was conducted in the Department of Ophthalmology, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram. Visual acuity, anterior segment examination and anterior chamber depth assessment by slit lamp, digital tension, non-contact tonometry, confrontation field test, fundus examination, direct ophthalmoscopy and fundus imaging was done. Gonioscopy and automated perimetry was done in glaucoma suspects. RESULTS 7600 eyes of 3800 patients were examined, 108 eyes were diagnosed to have glaucoma. Based on the best corrected visual acuity, 15(13.8% eyes and 8(0.22% persons had visual impairment and 33(30.5% eyes and 20(31.7% persons were blind. The prevalence of glaucoma in eyes was 1.42%. The prevalence of blindness due to glaucoma in eyes was 0.43% and person was 0.52%. The prevalence of Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in eyes was 1%, Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma in eyes was 0.15%, Neovascular glaucoma in eyes was 0.07%, Lens Induced Glaucoma in eyes was 0.17% and Pseudoexfoliative Glaucoma in eyes was 0.03%. IOP>20mmHg was present in 50(36.1% glaucomatous eyes, majority of the eyes being in Open Angle Glaucoma 24(31.5% eyes; 58(53.7% glaucomatous eyes had IOP in the range 11-20mmHg, among them 38 eyes were on treatment and 20 eyes were operated. CONCLUSION Being an irreversible disease if diagnosed early, blindness can be avoided. So screening is very important for early diagnosis and their proper management thereon.

  17. Higher migraine risk in healthcare professionals than in general population: a nationwide population-based cohort study in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Wan-Yin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Su, Shih-Bin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Guo, How-Ran; Hsu, Chien-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Background High stress levels and shift work probably trigger migraine in healthcare professionals (HCPs). However, the migraine risk differences between HCPs and the general population is unknown. Methods This nationwide population-based cohort study used Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Physicians (50,226), nurses (122,357), and other HCPs (pharmacists, technicians, dietitians, rehabilitation therapists, social workers, etc.) (45,736) were enrolled for the study cohort,...

  18. 76 FR 21372 - Medicare Program; Solicitation for Proposals for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Solicitation for Proposals for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services... to participate in the Medicare Community-based Care Transitions Program, which was authorized...

  19. Pancreatic cancer: Wait times from presentation to treatment and survival in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Valérie; Dejardin, Olivier; Bouvier, Véronique; Arveux, Patrick; Maynadie, Marc; Launoy, Guy; Bouvier, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic survival is one of the worst in oncology. To what extent wait times affect outcomes in unknown No population-based study has previously explored patient and treatment delays among individuals with pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to estimate patient and treatment delays in patients with pancreatic cancer and to measure their association with survival in a nonselected population. All patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer for the first time between 2009 and 2011 and registered in two French digestive cancer registries were included. Patient delay (time from onset of symptoms until the first consultation categorized into <1 or ≥1 month), and treatment delay (time between the first consultation and treatment categorized into less or more than 29 days, the median time) were collected. Overall delay was used to test associations between survival and the timeliness of care by combining patient delay and treatment delay. Patient delay was longer than 1 month in 46% of patients. A patient delay longer than one month was associated with the absence of jaundice (p < 0.001) and the presence of metastasis (p = 0.003). After adjusting for other covariates, such as symptoms and treatment, the presence of metastasis was negatively associated with treatment delay longer than 29 days (p = 0.025). After adjustment for other covariates, especially metastatic dissemination and the result of the resection, overall delay was not significantly associated with prognosis. We found little evidence to suggest that timely care was associated with the survival of patients. PMID:27130333

  20. Area-level poverty and preterm birth risk: A population-based multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muglia Louis A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is a complex disease with etiologic influences from a variety of social, environmental, hormonal, genetic, and other factors. The purpose of this study was to utilize a large population-based birth registry to estimate the independent effect of county-level poverty on preterm birth risk. To accomplish this, we used a multilevel logistic regression approach to account for multiple co-existent individual-level variables and county-level poverty rate. Methods Population-based study utilizing Missouri's birth certificate database (1989–1997. We conducted a multilevel logistic regression analysis to estimate the effect of county-level poverty on PTB risk. Of 634,994 births nested within 115 counties in Missouri, two levels were considered. Individual-level variables included demographics factors, prenatal care, health-related behavioral risk factors, and medical risk factors. The area-level variable included the percentage of the population within each county living below the poverty line (US census data, 1990. Counties were divided into quartiles of poverty; the first quartile (lowest rate of poverty was the reference group. Results PTB th quartile (4.9%, p adjOR 1.18 (95% CI 1.03, 1.35, with a similar effect at earlier gestational ages (adjOR 1.27 (95% CI 1.06, 1.52. Conclusion Women residing in socioeconomically deprived areas are at increased risk of preterm birth, above other underlying risk factors. Although the risk increase is modest, it affects a large number of pregnancies.

  1. THE STUDY OF BACTERIAL POPULATION IN AIR SAMPLES OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Sarathi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The bacterial load in different air samples from environment of most hospitals remained undetermined. Any direct correlation between such bacterial load and the nosocomial infection are also lacking. Only higher bacterial load in air of a particular hospital environment may indicate higher risk of airborne cross infections. AIMS: The study is to determine the bacterial presence per unit volume of air, and the factors influencing the bioload. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The air samples were collected from different locations of our tertiary care hospital, during Jul 2011 to June 2012 with information like room space per patient, number of daily average visitors, system of air circulation and house-keeping quality. METHODS: A specific volume of air was impacted on a plastic strips containing nutrient agar by air sampler La200, Hi-Media. Following incubation for 24 hour bacterial colonies were counted and organisms were identified up to genus level. RESULTS: Mostly Gram positive cocci followed by Gram positive and a few Gram negative bacilli were detected. The highest bacterial load was found in general outdoor premises (2456 CFU/cm, followed by some extremely crowded general wards (573 CFU/cm. The lowest count of such was found in nursery area (94 CFU/cm, where special emphasis was given on cleanliness, room ventilation and visitor’s restriction. Similarly variations in bacterial loads were also noted in different times in a day and in different seasons in a year. The bioload in all tested samples were within permissible limits. CONCLUSIONS: By appropriate measures the aerobic bacterial load in hospital environment can be restricted within optimal level

  2. Prescribing patterns of antihypertensive drugs in geriatric population in tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renoy Philip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the major chronic diseases with high mortality and morbidity in the today’s world. Present study was to assess the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive medications in geriatric population suffering mainly from hypertension with or without co morbidities like Diabetes Mellitus (DM. A prospective observational study was carried out for a period of six months in an in-patient general medicine department. Elderly patients who have been diagnosed with pure hypertension as per JNC 7 guidelines and hypertension with co- morbid condition like diabetes mellitus and patients receiving or prescribed with antihypertensive drugs were included. A total of 150 prescriptions were analyzed. The present study revealed that there were 93 patients with pure Hypertension and 57 patients with co morbid conditions like Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Among antihypertensive drugs in pure hypertensive cases, 53.76% of cases were prescribed with monotherapy, followed by 46.23% by combination therapy. The commonly prescribed antihypertensive monotherapy is calcium channel blockers. The most commonly prescribed combination therapy in severe cases was angiotensin receptor blockers with diuretics. This prescribing pattern of antihypertensives was as per Joint National Committee-7report on hypertension. In case of geriatric patients suffering from hypertension with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, most commonly prescribed antihypertensive as monotherapy was found to be amlodipine and combination therapy was telmisartan + hydrochlorothiazide.

  3. PATTERN OF OVARIAN NEOPLASM IN RURAL POPULATION: A FIVE YEAR STUDY FROM TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : The aim of the study was to know the morphological pattern of benign and malignant ovarian neoplasms and their distribution in different age groups in rural population of India. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A retrospective study of all cases of ovarian neoplasms diagnosed at department of pathology, Maharaja Medical College, Agroha during period of five year (Aug, 07 — Oct.12 was done. The tumors were classified according to WHO classification after thorough examination of slides and their distribution in different age groups was also noted. RESULTS : There were total fifty three cases of ovarian tumors noted during this period. Benign tumors comprised 81.13% and malignant tumors were 18.86%. Surface epithelial tumor emerged as the commonest variety accounting for 60.37%, followed by germ cell tumor (32.07% and sex cord stromal tumors were least common comprising 7.54 % of all ovarian neoplasm. No metastatic tumor or tumors with borderline malignancy were seen. Serous cystadenoma was the commonest tumor (43.39% followed by mature cystic teratoma (30.23%.Among the malignant tumor, malignant germ cell tumor were the commonest type (40%, followed by 30 %of each surface epithelial tumor and sex cord stromal tumor. CONCLUSION : Benign ovarian tumors are seen more common than malignant tumor. Malignant epithelial tumors are seen after the age of 30 years and malignant germ cell tumor are seen below the age of 30 years. Bilaterality is more commonly seen in malignant o varian neoplasm

  4. A Comparison of Internet-Based Participant Recruitment Methods: Engaging the Hidden Population of Cannabis Users in Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Clare Temple

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a growing number of researchers are embracing Internet-based data collection methods, the adoption of Internet-based recruitment methods has been relatively slow. This may be because little is known regarding the relative strengths and weaknesses of different methods of Internet-based participant recruitment, nor how these different recruitment strategies impact on the data collected. These issues are addressed in this article with reference to a study comparing the effectiveness of three Internet-based strategies in recruiting cannabis users for an online study. Consideration of the recruitment data leads us to recommend that researchers use multipronged Internet-based recruitment campaigns with appropriately detailed recruitment messages tailored to the population of interest and located carefully to ensure they reach the intended audience. Further, we suggest that building rapport directly with potential participants, or utilising derived rapport and implicit endorsements, is an important aspect of successful Internet-based participant recruitment strategies.

  5. Scalable Entity-Based Modeling of Population-Based Systems, Final LDRD Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleary, A J; Smith, S G; Vassilevska, T K; Jefferson, D R

    2005-01-27

    The goal of this project has been to develop tools, capabilities and expertise in the modeling of complex population-based systems via scalable entity-based modeling (EBM). Our initial focal application domain has been the dynamics of large populations exposed to disease-causing agents, a topic of interest to the Department of Homeland Security in the context of bioterrorism. In the academic community, discrete simulation technology based on individual entities has shown initial success, but the technology has not been scaled to the problem sizes or computational resources of LLNL. Our developmental emphasis has been on the extension of this technology to parallel computers and maturation of the technology from an academic to a lab setting.

  6. Socio-demographic caracteristics and prevalence of risk factors in a hypertensive and diabetics population: a cross-sectional study in primary health care in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Baldisserotto, Julio; Luciane KOPITTKE; Nedel, Fulvio Borges; Takeda, Silvia Pasa; Mendonça, Claunara Schilling; Sirena, Sérgio Antonio; Diercks, Margarita Silva; de Lima, Lena Azeredo; Nicolau, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and their related morbidity and mortality, are currently the most common public health problems and also a higher burden of disease in Brazil. They represent a real challenge for primary health care. This study describes the methodology and baseline data of an adult population with hypertension and diabetes attending in primary health care. Methods It is a cross sectional study which presents data from a longitudinal research. 3...

  7. Estimation of statistical binding properties of ligand population during in vitro selection based on population dynamics theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Takuyo; Nishigaki, Koichi; Husimi, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    During in vitro selection process, it is very valuable to monitor the binding properties of the ligand population in real time, particularly the population average of the association constant in the population. If this monitoring can be realized, the selection process can be controlled in a rational way. In this paper, we present a simple method to estimate the binding properties of the ligand population during in vitro selection. The framework of the method is as follows. First, the number of all the collected ligand molecules, which are eluted after incubation and washing, is measured. Ideally, this number corresponds to the number of all the ligand molecules bound with the target-receptor or other materials in a test tube. This measurement is performed through several successive rounds of selection. Second, the measured numbers of molecules are subjected to a theoretical analysis, based on the mathematical theory of population dynamics in the selection process. Then, we can estimate the probability density of the binding free energy in the ligand population. The validity of our method was confirmed by several computer simulations based on a physicochemical model. PMID:24239675

  8. Searching for evidence-based information in eye care

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Blackhall

    2005-01-01

    A growth in health awareness has led to an increase in the volume and availability of health information. Health care professionals may feel under pressure to read this increasing volume of material. A search on the internet is often a quick and efficient way to find information and this can be done by using one of the many search engines such as Google or Google Scholar2 or one of the health care information portals such as Omni. A previous article by Sally Parsley in the Community Eye Healt...

  9. Sleep and multisystem biological risk: a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith E Carroll

    Full Text Available Short sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and mortality. This study examines the contribution of sleep duration and sleep quality on a multisystem biological risk index that is known to be associated with morbidity and mortality.Analyses include a population-based sample from the Midlife Development in the United States survey recruited to the Biomarker substudy. A total of 1,023 participants aged 54.5 years (SD = 11.8, 56% female and 77.6% white, were included in the analyses. A multisystem biological risk index was derived from 22 biomarkers capturing cardiovascular, immune, lipid-metabolic, glucose-metabolic, sympathetic, parasympathetic, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal systems. Self-reported average sleep duration was categorized as short (5 sleep.Linear mixed effect models adjusting for age, gender, race, education, income, BMI, and health status were performed. As compared to normal sleepers, multisystem biological risk in both short (B(SE = .38(.15, p<.01 and long sleepers (B(SE = .28(.11, p<.01 were elevated. Poor quality sleep alone was associated with elevated multisystem biological risk (B(SE = .15(.06, p = .01, but was not significant after adjustment for health status. All short sleepers reported poor sleep quality. However in the long sleepers, only those who reported poor sleep quality exhibited elevated multisystem biological risk (B(SE = .93(.3, p = .002.Self-reported poor sleep quality with either short or long sleep duration is associated with dysregulation in physiological set points across regulatory systems, leading to elevated multisystem biological risk. Physicians should inquire about sleep health in the assessment of lifestyle factors related to disease risk, with evidence that healthy sleep is associated with lower multisystem biological risk.

  10. Closing the health equity gap: evidence-based strategies for primary health care organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Browne Annette J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction International evidence shows that enhancement of primary health care (PHC services for disadvantaged populations is essential to reducing health and health care inequities. However, little is known about how to enhance equity at the organizational level within the PHC sector. Drawing on research conducted at two PHC Centres in Canada whose explicit mandates are to provide services to marginalized populations, the purpose of this paper is to discuss (a the key dimensions of equity-oriented services to guide PHC organizations, and (b strategies for operationalizing equity-oriented PHC services, particularly for marginalized populations. Methods The PHC Centres are located in two cities within urban neighborhoods recognized as among the poorest in Canada. Using a mixed methods ethnographic design, data were collected through intensive immersion in the Centres, and included: (a in-depth interviews with a total of 114 participants (73 patients; 41 staff, (b over 900 hours of participant observation, and (c an analysis of key organizational documents, which shed light on the policy and funding environments. Results Through our analysis, we identified four key dimensions of equity-oriented PHC services: inequity-responsive care; trauma- and violence-informed care; contextually-tailored care; and culturally-competent care. The operationalization of these key dimensions are identified as 10 strategies that intersect to optimize the effectiveness of PHC services, particularly through improvements in the quality of care, an improved 'fit' between people's needs and services, enhanced trust and engagement by patients, and a shift from crisis-oriented care to continuity of care. Using illustrative examples from the data, these strategies are discussed to illuminate their relevance at three inter-related levels: organizational, clinical programming, and patient-provider interactions. Conclusions These evidence- and theoretically

  11. Use of nursing homes by a high-risk long-term care population.

    OpenAIRE

    Manheim, L M; Hughes, S L

    1986-01-01

    Limited information exists concerning lifetime use of nursing home services by the aged. This article examines the longitudinal experience, over four years, of elderly individuals at high risk of institutionalization, and develops a simple model of nursing home use based on these observations. This model allows us to predict future lifetime use under alternative assumptions. The main observations drawn from this sample are that high-risk elderly tend to move from the community to nursing home...

  12. PCA-based population structure inference with generic clustering algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Chun-Hsi; Abdool Ali; Lee Chih

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Handling genotype data typed at hundreds of thousands of loci is very time-consuming and it is no exception for population structure inference. Therefore, we propose to apply PCA to the genotype data of a population, select the significant principal components using the Tracy-Widom distribution, and assign the individuals to one or more subpopulations using generic clustering algorithms. Results We investigated K-means, soft K-means and spectral clustering and made compari...

  13. Share your story, shape your care: engaging the diverse and disperse population of Northwestern Ontario in healthcare priority setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Kristin; DuBois-Wing, Gwen; Westwood, Ellis

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the North West Local Health Integration Network hosted Share Your Story, Shape Your Care, an innovative community engagement initiative. Over 800 residents and health service providers in Northwestern Ontario participated and identified healthcare priorities, reacted to proposed strategies and shared ideas and stories. Primarily web-based (with a Choicebook, message board, blog and YouTube video), paper copies and conversation guides supported informed and reflective participation. This project enabled community-level participation in healthcare, supporting local planning and decision-making, and was awarded the inaugural Innovation Using Technology Award by the International Association for Public Participation. PMID:20523159

  14. Using a self-service kiosk to identify behavioural health needs in a primary care clinic serving an urban, underserved population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Wrenn

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Integration of behavioural health into primary care clinics is an established model of care and important approach to eliminating mental health disparities, but demands on provider time is a barrier to mental health screening. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a kiosk placed in a primary care clinic to screen for multiple mental health disorders.Methods Quality improvement initiative with Plan-Do-Study-Act implementation and time series monitoring of utilisation outcomes.Results A total of 281 screens were completed identifying positive screens for depression (30% and bipolar disorder (17%. Post-traumatic stress disorder and concerning substance use were less common.Conclusions Development of health information technology to facilitate behavioural health assessment in primary care is a promising approach to integrated care and provides additional benefits of population health monitoring. 

  15. Abortion services in a high-needs district: a community-based model of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snook S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In 2009, a high-deprivation district health board in New Zealand set up a community-based abortion clinic in order to provide a local service and to avoid out-of-region referrals. The service offers medical abortions for women with pregnancies of up to 63 days' gestation, and surgical abortion with local anaesthetic for women with pregnancies of up to 14 weeks' gestation. AIM: To describe the services developed and assess safety and timeliness for the first year of community-based services. METHODS: An audit of clinical records for patients seen in 2010 was performed in order to obtain data on location of services, timeliness, safety and complications. RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of locally provided abortions in 2010 were medical abortions, completed on average less than two days after referral to the service. One percent of patients experienced haemorrhaging post abortion, and 4% had retained products. These rates are within accepted standards for an abortion service. DISCUSSION: This report illustrates that a community-based model of care can be both clinically and culturally safe, while providing a much-needed service to a high-needs population.

  16. Nanotechnology Based Materials and Devices for Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepaka; Cho, K.; Brenner, Don; Menon, Madhu; Andriotis, Antonis; Sagman, Uri; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on trends in NASA nanotechnology research and development, and future biotechnological applications for that nanotechnology. The presentation covers nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanomaterials, biomimetics, devices and materials for health care, carbon nanotubes, biosensors for astrobiology, solid-state nanopores for DNA sequencing, and protein nanotubes.

  17. Does childhood cancer affect parental divorce rates? A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syse, Astri; Loge, Jon H; Lyngstad, Torkild H

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE Cancer in children may profoundly affect parents' personal relationships in terms of psychological stress and an increased care burden. This could hypothetically elevate divorce rates. Few studies on divorce occurrence exist, so the effect of childhood cancers on parental divorce rates was explored. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data on the entire Norwegian married population, age 17 to 69 years, with children age 0 to 20 years in 1974 to 2001 (N = 977,928 couples) were retrieved from the Cancer Registry, the Central Population Register, the Directorate of Taxes, and population censuses. Divorce rates for 4,590 couples who were parenting a child with cancer were compared with those of otherwise similar couples by discrete-time hazard regression models. Results Cancer in a child was not associated with an increased risk of parental divorce overall. An increased divorce rate was observed with Wilms tumor (odds ratio [OR], 1.52) but not with any of the other common childhood cancers. The child's age at diagnosis, time elapsed from diagnosis, and death from cancer did not influence divorce rates significantly. Increased divorce rates were observed for couples in whom the mothers had an education greater than high school level (OR, 1.16); the risk was particularly high shortly after diagnosis, for CNS cancers and Wilms tumors, for couples with children 0 to 9 years of age at diagnosis, and after a child's death. CONCLUSION This large, registry-based study shows that cancer in children is not associated with an increased parental divorce rate, except with Wilms tumors. Couples in whom the wife is highly educated appear to face increased divorce rates after a child's cancer, and this may warrant additional study.

  18. Severity of malocclusion in adolescents: populational-based study in the north of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marise Fagundes Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion in a population of adolescents. METHODS In this cross-sectional population-based study, the sample size (n = 761 was calculated considering a prevalence of malocclusion of 50.0%, with a 95% confidence level and a 5.0% precision level. The study adopted correction for the effect of delineation (deff = 2, and a 20.0% increase to offset losses and refusals. Multistage probability cluster sampling was adopted. Trained and calibrated professionals performed the intraoral examinations and interviews in households. The dependent variable (severity of malocclusion was assessed using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI. The independent variables were grouped into five blocks: demographic characteristics, socioeconomic condition, use of dental services, health-related behavior and oral health subjective conditions. The ordinal logistic regression model was used to identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion. RESULTS We interviewed and examined 736 adolescents (91.5% response rate, 69.9% of whom showed no abnormalities or slight malocclusion. Defined malocclusion was observed in 17.8% of the adolescents, being severe or very severe in 12.6%, with pressing or essential need of orthodontic treatment. The probabilities of greater severity of malocclusion were higher among adolescents who self-reported as black, indigenous, pardo or yellow, with lower per capita income, having harmful oral habits, negative perception of their appearance and perception of social relationship affected by oral health. CONCLUSIONS Severe or very severe malocclusion was more prevalent among socially disadvantaged adolescents, with reported harmful habits and perception of compromised esthetics and social relationships. Given that malocclusion can interfere with the self-esteem of adolescents, it is essential to improve public policy for the inclusion of orthodontic treatment among

  19. Severity of malocclusion in adolescents: populational-based study in the north of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Freire, Rafael Silveira; Nepomuceno, Marcela Oliveira; Martins, Andrea Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Marcopito, Luiz Francisco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion in a population of adolescents. METHODS In this cross-sectional population-based study, the sample size (n = 761) was calculated considering a prevalence of malocclusion of 50.0%, with a 95% confidence level and a 5.0% precision level. The study adopted correction for the effect of delineation (deff = 2), and a 20.0% increase to offset losses and refusals. Multistage probability cluster sampling was adopted. Trained and calibrated professionals performed the intraoral examinations and interviews in households. The dependent variable (severity of malocclusion) was assessed using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). The independent variables were grouped into five blocks: demographic characteristics, socioeconomic condition, use of dental services, health-related behavior and oral health subjective conditions. The ordinal logistic regression model was used to identify the factors associated with severity of malocclusion. RESULTS We interviewed and examined 736 adolescents (91.5% response rate), 69.9% of whom showed no abnormalities or slight malocclusion. Defined malocclusion was observed in 17.8% of the adolescents, being severe or very severe in 12.6%, with pressing or essential need of orthodontic treatment. The probabilities of greater severity of malocclusion were higher among adolescents who self-reported as black, indigenous, pardo or yellow, with lower per capita income, having harmful oral habits, negative perception of their appearance and perception of social relationship affected by oral health. CONCLUSIONS Severe or very severe malocclusion was more prevalent among socially disadvantaged adolescents, with reported harmful habits and perception of compromised esthetics and social relationships. Given that malocclusion can interfere with the self-esteem of adolescents, it is essential to improve public policy for the inclusion of orthodontic treatment among health care

  20. Population-based study of central post-stroke pain in Rimini district, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaeli W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Raffaeli,1 Cristina E Minella,2 Francesco Magnani,3 Donatella Sarti3 1ISAL Foundation, Institute for Research on Pain, Torre Pedrera, Rimini, Italy 2Pain Therapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy 3Department of Pain Therapy and Palliative Care, Infermi Hospital, Rimini, Italy Abstract: Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is still an underestimated complication of stroke, resulting in impaired quality of life and, in addition to the functional and cognitive consequences of stroke, the presence of CPSP may be associated with mood disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. This type of pain may also impair activities of daily living and further worsen quality of life, negatively influencing the rehabilitation process. The prevalence of CSPS in the literature is highly variable (1%–12% according to different studies, and this variability could be influenced by selection criteria and the different ethnic populations being investigated. With this scenario in mind, we performed a population-based study to assess the prevalence of CPSP and its main features in a homogeneous health district (Rimini, Italy, including five hospitals for a total population of 329,970 inhabitants. From 2008 to 2010, we selected 1,494 post-stroke patients and were able to interview 660 patients, 66 (11% of whom reported pain with related tactile and thermal hyperesthesia, accompanied by needle puncture, tingling, swelling, and pressure sensations. Patients reported motor impairment and disability, which influenced their working ability, rehabilitation, and social life. Despite this severe pain state, there was a high percentage of patients who did not receive adequate treatment for pain. Keywords: stroke, central post-stroke pain, disability

  1. Population-Based Prevention of Child Maltreatment: The U.S. Triple P System Population Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Prinz, Ronald J.; Sanders, Matthew R; Shapiro, Cheri J.; Whitaker, Daniel J.; Lutzker, John R

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of child maltreatment necessitates a public health approach. In the U.S. Triple P System Population Trial, 18 counties were randomly assigned to either dissemination of the Triple P—Positive Parenting Program system or to the services-as-usual control condition. Dissemination involved Triple P professional training for the existing workforce (over 600 service providers), as well as universal media and communication strategies. Large effect sizes were found for three independent...

  2. A Model for Community-Based Pediatric Oral Heath: Implementation of an Infant Oral Care Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Ramos-Gomez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act (ACA mandates risk assessments, preventive care, and evaluations based on outcomes. ACA compliance will require easily accessible, cost-effective care models that are flexible and simple to establish. UCLA has developed an Infant Oral Care Program (IOCP in partnership with community-based organizations that is an intervention model providing culturally competent perinatal and infant oral care for underserved, low-income, and/or minority children aged 0–5 and their caregivers. In collaboration with the Venice Family Clinic's Simms/Mann Health and Wellness Center, UCLA Pediatrics, Women, Infants, and Children (WIC, and Early Head Start and Head Start programs, the IOCP increases family-centered care access and promotes early utilization of dental services in nontraditional, primary care settings. Emphasizing disease prevention, management, and care that is sensitive to cultural, language, and oral health literacy challenges, IOCP patients achieve better oral health maintenance “in health” not in “disease modality”. IOCP uses interprofessional education to promote pediatric oral health across multiple disciplines and highlights the necessity for the “age-one visit”. This innovative clinical model facilitates early intervention and disease management. It sets a new standard of minimally invasive dental care that is widely available and prevention focused, with high retention rates due to strong collaborations with the community-based organizations serving these vulnerable, high-risk children.

  3. The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population radiation dose in a 'health-care level I' representative region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates per-procedure, collective and per capita effective dose to the population by interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed during 2002-11 at the main hospital of Aosta Valley Region that can be considered as representative of the health-care level I countries, as defined by the UNSCEAR, based on its socio-demographic characteristics. IC procedures investigated were often multiple procedures in patients older than 60 y. The median extreme dose-area product values of 300 and 22 908 cGy cm2 were found for standard pacemaker implantation and coronary angioplasty, respectively, while the relative mean per-procedure effective dose ranged from 0.7 to 47 mSv. A 3-fold increase in frequency has been observed together with a correlated increase in the delivered per capita dose (0.05-0.27 mSv y-1) and the collective dose (5.8-35 man Sv y-1). Doses increased particularly from 2008 onwards mainly because of the introduction of coronary angioplasty procedures in the authors' institution. IC practice contributed remarkably in terms of effective dose to the population, delivering ∼10 % of the total dose by medical ionising radiation examination categories. (authors)

  4. Europe's strong primary care systems are linked to better population health but also to higher health spending.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, D.S.; Boerma, W.; Zee, J. van der; Groenewegen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Strong primary care systems are often viewed as the bedrock of health care systems that provide high-quality care, but the evidence supporting this view is somewhat limited. We analyzed comparative primary care data collected in 2009-10 as part of a European Union-funded project, the Primary Health

  5. Are marginalized women being left behind? A population-based study of institutional deliveries in Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamson Paul C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While India has made significant progress in reducing maternal mortality, attaining further declines will require increased skilled birth attendance and institutional delivery among marginalized and difficult to reach populations. Methods A population-based survey was carried out among 16 randomly selected rural villages in rural Mysore District in Karnataka, India between August and September 2008. All households in selected villages were enumerated and women with children 6 years of age or younger underwent an interviewer-administered questionnaire on antenatal care and institutional delivery. Results Institutional deliveries in rural areas of Mysore District increased from 51% to 70% between 2002 and 2008. While increasing numbers of women were accessing antenatal care and delivering in hospitals, large disparities were found in uptake of these services among different castes. Mothers belonging to general castes were almost twice as likely to have an institutional birth as compared to scheduled castes and tribes. Mothers belonging to other backward caste or general castes had 1.8 times higher odds (95% CI: 1.21, 2.89 of having an institutional delivery as compared to scheduled castes and tribes. In multivariable analysis, which adjusted for inter- and intra-village variance, Below Poverty Line status, caste, and receiving antenatal care were all associated with institutional delivery. Conclusion The results of the study suggest that while the Indian Government has made significant progress in increasing antenatal care and institutional deliveries among rural populations, further success in lowering maternal mortality will likely hinge on the success of NRHM programs focused on serving marginalized groups. Health interventions which target SC/ST may also have to address both perceived and actual stigma and discrimination, in addition to providing needed services. Strategies for overcoming these barriers may include

  6. Using data from patient interactions in primary care for population level chronic disease surveillance: The Sentinel Practices Data Sourcing (SPDS) project

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Abhijeet; Charlton, Karen E.; Girdo, Lisa; Batterham, Marijka

    2014-01-01

    Background Population health planning within a health district requires current information on health profiles of the target population. Information obtained during primary care interactions may provide a valuable surveillance system for chronic disease burden. The Sentinel Practices Data Sourcing project aimed to establish a sentinel site surveillance system to obtain a region-specific estimate of the prevalence of chronic diseases and mental health disorders within the Illawarra-Shoalhaven ...

  7. Evidence based nursing practice : one exploratory study between different care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Rui Pedro Gomes; Martins, Alice; Peixoto, Maria José; Martins, Teresa; Barbieri, Maria do Céu; Carneiro, António Vaz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, the importance of a clinical practice based on the best available evidence justifies the development of investigation to construct a situational diagnosis that allows to identify in different contexts of care, barriers, attitudes and practices towards an evidence-based nursing. Objective: In this investigation we aim to identify barriers regarding the adoption of an Evidence Based Practice (EBP) in different care settings and describe the main nurse’s attitudes and pr...

  8. Development and validation of an individual based Daphnia magna population model: The influence of crowding on population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preuss, T.G.; Hammers-Wirtz, M.; Hommen, U.; Rubach, M.N.; Ratte, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    An individual-based model was developed to predict the population dynamics of Daphnia magna at laboratory conditions from individual life-history traits observed in experiments with different feeding conditions. Within the model, each daphnid passes its individual life cycle including feeding on alg

  9. Epidemiology of fatty liver in an islander population of China:a population-based case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Fen Dai; Zhe Shen; Chao-Hui Yu; Xi-Cheng Zhang; You-Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because of dififculty in evaluating fatty liver disease in islander populations, we conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the prevalence of fatty liver and its risk factors in an islander population of East China. METHODS: Randomized multistage stratiifed cluster sampling from the islander population was used in a population-based case-control study. Then interview, physical examination, and ultrasonography were done. RESULTS: Univariate logistic-regression analysis showed that male gender, smoking, daily alcohol intake ≥20 g, duration of drinking≥5 years, total alcohol intake≥36.5 kg, hypertension and obesity were closely related to fatty liver (all P CONCLUSIONS: The duration of drinking≥5 years and obesity were two important risk factors for fatty liver in the islander population of East China. The prevalence of fatty liver in this population was high. An alcoholic threshold effect may be more important than a dose-response effect on the morbidity of fatty liver.

  10. Cyberbullying among Finnish adolescents – a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindfors Pirjo L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyberbullying, threatening or harassing another via the internet or mobile phones, does not cause physically harm and thus the consequences are less visible. Little research has been performed on the occurrence of cyberbullying among adolescents or the perception of its seriousness. Only a few population-based studies have been published, none of which included research on the witnessing of cyberbullying. Here, we examined exposure to cyberbullying during the last year, and its frequency and perceived seriousness among 12 to 18-year-old adolescents in Finland. We studied four dimensions of cyberbullying: being a victim, bully, or both victim and bully of cyberbullying, and witnessing the cyberbullying of friends. Methods Self-administered questionnaires, including four questions on cyberbullying, were mailed to a representative sample of 12-, 14-, 16-, and 18-year-old Finns in 2009 (the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Survey. The respondents could answer via the internet or paper questionnaire. Results The number of respondents was 5516 and the response rate was 56%. Girls more often than boys reported experiencing at least one dimension of cyberbullying during the last year. The proportion was highest among 14-year-olds and lowest among 18-year-olds of both sexes. Among girls, the most commonly encountered dimension was witnessing the cyberbullying of friends (16%; and being a victim was slightly more common than being a bully (11% vs. 9%. Among boys, an equal proportion, approximately 10%, had been a victim, a bully, or had witnessed cyberbullying. The proportion of bully-victims was 4%. Serious and disruptive cyberbullying was experienced by 2% of respondents and weekly cyberbullying by 1%; only 0.5% of respondents had been bullied weekly and considered bullying serious and disruptive. Conclusions Adolescents are commonly exposed to cyberbullying, but it is rarely frequent or considered serious or disruptive. Cyberbullying

  11. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe: population based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Judith; Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Greenlees, Ruth; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Dias, Carlos; Draper, Elizabeth S; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Lynch, Catherine; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O’Mahony, Mary T; Pierini, Anna; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; de Walle, Hermien E K; Wellesley, Diana; Wiesel, Awi; Dolk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of microcephaly in Europe, determine if the diagnosis of microcephaly is consistent across Europe, and evaluate whether changes in prevalence would be detected using the current European surveillance performed by EUROCAT (the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies). Design Questionnaire and population based observational study. Setting 24 EUROCAT registries covering 570 000 births annually in 15 countries. Participants Cases of microcephaly not associated with a genetic condition among live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks’ gestation, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly at any gestation. Main outcome measures Prevalence of microcephaly (1 Jan 2003-31 Dec 2012) analysed with random effects Poisson regression models to account for heterogeneity across registries. Results 16 registries responded to the questionnaire, of which 44% (7/16) used the EUROCAT definition of microcephaly (a reduction in the size of the brain with a skull circumference more than 3 SD below the mean for sex, age, and ethnic origin), 19% (3/16) used a 2 SD cut off, 31% (5/16) were reliant on the criteria used by individual clinicians, and one changed criteria between 2003 and 2012. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe was 1.53 (95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.96) per 10 000 births, with registries varying from 0.4 (0.2 to 0.7) to 4.3 (3.6 to 5.0) per 10 000 (χ2=338, df=23, I2=93%). Registries with a 3 SD cut off reported a prevalence of 1.74 per 10 000 (0.86 to 2.93) compared with those with the less stringent 2 SD cut off of 1.21 per 10 000 (0.21 to 2.93). The prevalence of microcephaly would need to increase in one year by over 35% in Europe or by over 300% in a single registry to reach statistical significance (PZika virus of a similar magnitude to those observed in Brazil. Because of the rarity of microcephaly and discrepant diagnostic criteria, however, the smaller increases expected in

  12. Predictors of quality of life of people receiving intensive community-based care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerink, P.M.J.; Roeg, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intensive community-based care (ICBC) is a home-treatment approach aiming to support people ‘living in the community’ with severe psychiatric and addiction problems. Although subjective quality of life (SQOL) is an increasingly important outcome measure in health care, little is known on ICB

  13. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Poortaghi; Salsali; Ebadi; Rahnavard; Maleki

    2015-01-01

    Background Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. Objectives This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checkl...

  14. Mediators of Telephone-Based Continuing Care for Alcohol and Cocaine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensinger, Janell Lynn; Lynch, Kevin G.; Tenhave, Thomas R.; McKay, James R.

    2007-01-01

    A previous randomized trial with 224 alcohol and/or cocaine addicts who had completed an initial phase of treatment indicated that 12 weeks of telephone-based continuing care yielded higher abstinence rates over 24 months than did group counseling continuing care. The current study examined mediators of this treatment effect. Results suggested…

  15. Developing Memory Clinics in Primary Care: An Evidence-Based Interprofessional Program of Continuing Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Weston, W. Wayne; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care is challenged to meet the needs of patients with dementia. A training program was developed to increase capacity for dementia care through the development of Family Health Team (FHT)-based interprofessional memory clinics. The interprofessional training program consisted of a 2-day workshop, 1-day observership, and 2-day…

  16. Iterations of the SafeCare Model: An Evidence-Based Child Maltreatment Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Anna; Lutzker, John R.

    2008-01-01

    SafeCare is an evidenced-based parenting program for at-risk and maltreating parents that addresses the social and family ecology in which child maltreatment occurs. SafeCare home visitors focus on behavioral skills that are trained to predetermined performance criteria. Recent research has stressed the importance of successful dissemination and…

  17. An Empirical Typology of Residential Care/Assisted Living Based on a Four-State Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nan Sook; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Eckert, J. Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Residential care/assisted living describes diverse facilities providing non-nursing home care to a heterogeneous group of primarily elderly residents. This article derives typologies of assisted living based on theoretically and practically grounded evidence. Design and Methods: We obtained data from the Collaborative Studies of Long-Term…

  18. Spontaneous preterm delivery among primiparous women at low risk in Denmark: a population based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Kesmodel, Ulrik; Jacobsson, Bo;

    2006-01-01

    can be compared internationally. DESIGN: Population based study. PARTICIPANTS: 99.8% of all deliveries in Denmark, 1995-2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of babies born at less than 37 weeks' completed gestation for each year in the overall population and in a standard population at low risk...

  19. FEAMAC/CARES Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel; Bednarcyk, Brett; Pineda, Evan; Arnold, Steven; Mital, Subodh; Murthy, Pappu; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Reported here is a coupling of two NASA developed codes: CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) with the MAC/GMC (Micromechanics Analysis Code/ Generalized Method of Cells) composite material analysis code. The resulting code is called FEAMAC/CARES and is constructed as an Abaqus finite element analysis UMAT (user defined material). Here we describe the FEAMAC/CARES code and an example problem (taken from the open literature) of a laminated CMC in off-axis loading is shown. FEAMAC/CARES performs stochastic-strength-based damage simulation response of a CMC under multiaxial loading using elastic stiffness reduction of the failed elements.

  20. Geriatric periodontology: how the need to care for the aging population can influence the future of the dental profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamster, Ira B

    2016-10-01

    The world's population is aging, and it has been estimated that by 2050, the number of people 65 years of age and older will reach 1.5 billion. The aging population will be affected by noncommunicable chronic diseases, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment. This important demographic shift includes a reduction in tooth loss/edentulism, particularly in older adults of the developed countries in North America, western Europe and north-east Asia. Therefore, in the future, dental providers will be required to care for an expanded number of older adults who have retained teeth and are medically complex. As the linkage of oral disease and systemic disease has focused on the relationship of periodontitis and noncommunicable chronic diseases, a broad review of 'geriatric periodontology' is both timely and important. This volume of Periodontology 2000 covers a range of subjects under this heading. Included are the demographics of an aging world; the effect of aging on stem cell function in the periodontium; the periodontal microbiota associated with aging; the host response in the periodontium of aging individuals; an analysis of the prevalence of periodontitis in the USA on a national, state-wide and community basis; differentiation of physiologic oral aging from disease; treatment of periodontal disease in older adults; implant therapy for older patients; oral disease and the frailty syndrome; the relationship of tooth loss to longevity and life expectancy; and the relationship of periodontal disease to noncommunicable chronic diseases. Although 'geriatric dentistry' is not a recognized specialty in dentistry, and 'geriatric periodontology' is a descriptive title, the subject of this volume of Periodontology 2000 is critical to the future of clinical dentistry, dental public health and dental research. Any comprehensive focus on older patients can only be accomplished with an emphasis on interprofessional education and practice. If