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Sample records for care observational study

  1. Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis;

    2010-01-01

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices...... suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies....

  2. Handover patterns: an observational study of critical care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Handover (or 'handoff' is the exchange of information between health professionals that accompanies the transfer of patient care. This process can result in adverse events. Handover 'best practices', with emphasis on standardization, have been widely promoted. However, these recommendations are based mostly on expert opinion and research on medical trainees. By examining handover communication of experienced physicians, we aim to inform future research, education and quality improvement. Thus, our objective is to describe handover communication patterns used by attending critical care physicians in an academic centre and to compare them with currently popular, standardized schemes for handover communication. Methods Prospective, observational study using video recording in an academic intensive care unit in Ontario, Canada. Forty individual patient handovers were randomly selected out of 10 end-of-week handover sessions of attending physicians. Two coders independently reviewed handover transcripts documenting elements of three communication schemes: SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendations; SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan; and a standard medical admission note. Frequency and extent of questions asked by incoming physicians were measured as well. Analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results Mean (± standard deviation duration of patient-specific handovers was 2 min 58 sec (± 57 sec. The majority of handovers' content consisted of recent and current patient status. The remainder included physicians' interpretations and advice. Questions posed by the incoming physicians accounted for 5.8% (± 3.9% of the handovers' content. Elements of all three standardized communication schemes appeared repeatedly throughout the handover dialogs with no consistent pattern. For example, blocks of SOAP's Assessment appeared 5.2 (± 3.0 times in patient handovers; they followed Objective blocks in only 45

  3. Ventilation strategies in burn intensive care: A retrospective observational study

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    Stefano Palazzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consensus regarding optimal burns intensive care (BICU patient management is lacking. This study aimed to assess whether ventilation strategies, cardiovascular support and sedation in BICU patients have changed over time, and whether this affects outcome. A retrospective observational study comparing two 12-patient BICU cohorts (2005/06 and 2010/11 was undertaken. Demographic and admission characteristics, ventilation parameters, sedation, fluid resuscitation, cardiovascular support and outcome (length of stay, mortality data were collected from patient notes. Data was analysed using T-tests, Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U tests. In our study cohort groups were equivalent in demographic and admission parameters. There were equal ventilator-free days in the two cohorts 10 ± 12.7 vs. 13.3 ± 12.2 ventilator free days; P = 0.447. The 2005/06 cohort were mechanically ventilated more often than in 2010/11 cohort (568 ventilator days/1000 patient BICU days vs. 206 ventilator days/1000 patient BICU days; P = 0.001. The 2005/06 cohort were ventilated less commonly in tracheostomy group/endotracheal tube spontaneous (17.8% vs. 26%; P = 0.001 and volume-controlled modes (34.4% vs. 40.8%; P = 0.001. Patients in 2010/11 cohort were more heavily sedated (P = 0.001 with more long-acting sedative drug use (P = 0.001 than the 2005/06 cohort, fluid administration was equivalent. Patient outcome did not vary. Inhalational injury patients were ventilated in volume-controlled (44.5% vs. 28.1%; P = 0.001 and pressure-controlled modes (18.2% vs. 9.5%; P = 0.001 more frequently than those without. Outcome did not vary. This study showed there has been shift away from mechanical ventilation, with increased use of tracheostomy/tracheal tube airway spontaneous ventilation. Inhalation injury patients require more ventilatory support though patient outcomes do not differ. Prospective trials are required to establish which strategies confer benefit.

  4. Primary care nursing role and care coordination: an observational study of nursing work in a community health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren R; St Hilaire, Daniel; Flinter, Margaret

    2012-05-01

    Care coordination is a core element of the Patient-Centered Medical Home and requires an effective, well educated nursing staff. A greater understanding of roles and tasks currently being carried out by nurses in primary care is needed to help practices determine how best to implement care coordination and transform into PCMHs. We conducted an observational study of primary care nursing in a Community Health Center by creating a classification schema for nursing responsibilities, directly observing and tracking nurses' work, and categorizing their activities. Ten nurses in eight different practice sites were observed for a total of 61 hours. The vast majority of nursing time was spent in vaccine and medication administration; telephone work; and charting and paper work, while only 15% of their time was spent in activity that was classified broadly as care coordination. Care coordination work appeared to be subsumed by other daily tasks, many of which could have been accomplished by other, lesser trained members of the health care team. Practices looking to implement care coordination need a detailed look at work flow, task assignments, and a critical assessment of staffing, adhering to the principal of each team member working to the highest level of his or her education and license. Care coordination represents a distinct responsibility that requires dedicated nursing time, separate from the day to day tasks in a busy practice. To fully support these new functions, reimbursement models are needed that support such non visit-based work and provide incentives to coordinate and manage complex cases, achieve improved clinical outcomes and enhance efficiency of the health system. This article describes our study methods, data collection, and analysis, results, and discussion about reorganizing nursing roles to promote care coordination. PMID:22686111

  5. How do patients with a Turkish background evaluate their medical care in Germany? An observational study in primary care

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    Goetz K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Katja Goetz,1 Jessica Bungartz,2 Joachim Szecsenyi,1 Jost Steinhaeuser3 1Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2Praxis Medizin im Zentrum, München, Germany; 3Institute of Family Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Germany Background: Patients’ evaluation of medical care is an essential dimension of quality of care and an important aspect of the feedback cycle for health care providers. The aim of this study was to document how patients with a Turkish background evaluate primary care in Germany and determine which aspects of care are associated with language abilities.Methods: The study was based on an observational design. Patients with a Turkish background from German primary care practices completed the EUROPEP (European Project on Patient Evaluation of General Practice Care questionnaire consisting of 23 items. Seventeen primary care practices were involved with either German (n=8 or Turkish (n=9 general practitioners (GPs.Results: A convenience sample of 472 patients with a Turkish background from 17 practices participated in the study (response rate 39.9%. Practices with a German GP had a lower response rate (19.6% than those with a Turkish GP (57.5%. Items evaluated the highest were “keeping data confidential” (73.4% and “quick services for urgent health problems” (69.9%. Subgroup analysis showed lower evaluation scores from patients with good or excellent German language abilities. Patients who consulted a Turkish GP had higher evaluation scores.Conclusion: The evaluation from patients with a Turkish background living in Germany with either Turkish or German GPs showed lower scores than patients in other studies in Europe using EUROPEP. However, our results had higher evaluation scores than those of Turkish patients evaluating GPs in Turkey. Therefore, different explanation models for these findings should be explored in future studies

  6. Observational studies of depression in primary care: what do we know?

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn Jane; Gilchrist Gail

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background We undertook a systematic review of observational studies of depression in primary care to determine 1) the nature and scope of the published studies 2) the methodological quality of the studies; 3) the identified recovery and risk factors for persistent depression and 3) the treatment and health service use patterns among patients. Methods Searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO using combinations of topic and keywords, and Medical Subject Headings in MEDL...

  7. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  8. Observational studies of depression in primary care: what do we know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunn Jane

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We undertook a systematic review of observational studies of depression in primary care to determine 1 the nature and scope of the published studies 2 the methodological quality of the studies; 3 the identified recovery and risk factors for persistent depression and 3 the treatment and health service use patterns among patients. Methods Searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO using combinations of topic and keywords, and Medical Subject Headings in MEDLINE, Headings in CINAHL and descriptors in PsycINFO. Searches were limited to adult populations and articles published in English during 1985–2006. Results 40 articles from 17 observational cohort studies were identified, most were undertaken in the US or Europe. Studies varied widely in aims and methods making it difficult to meaningfully compare the results. Methodological limitations were common including: selection bias of patients and physicians; small sample sizes (range 35–108 patients at baseline and 20–59 patients at follow-up; and short follow-up times limiting the extent to which these studies can be used to inform our understanding of recovery and relapse among primary care patients with depression. Risk factors for the persistence of depression identified in this review were: severity and chronicity of the depressive episode, the presence of suicidal thoughts, antidepressant use, poorer self-reported quality of life, lower self-reported social support, experiencing key life events, lower education level and unemployment. Conclusion Despite the growing interest in depression being managed as a chronic illness, this review identified only 17 observational studies of depression in primary care, most of which have included small sample sizes and been relatively short-term. Future research should be large enough to investigate risk factors for chronicity and relapse, and should be conducted over a longer time frame.

  9. Prevalence, determinants and patterns of multimorbidity in primary care: a systematic review of observational studies.

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    Concepció Violan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Multimorbidity is a major concern in primary care. Nevertheless, evidence of prevalence and patterns of multimorbidity, and their determinants, are scarce. The aim of this study is to systematically review studies of the prevalence, patterns and determinants of multimorbidity in primary care. METHODS: Systematic review of literature published between 1961 and 2013 and indexed in Ovid (CINAHL, PsychINFO, Medline and Embase and Web of Knowledge. Studies were selected according to eligibility criteria of addressing prevalence, determinants, and patterns of multimorbidity and using a pretested proforma in primary care. The quality and risk of bias were assessed using STROBE criteria. Two researchers assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion (Kappa= 0.86. RESULTS: We identified 39 eligible publications describing studies that included a total of 70,057,611 patients in 12 countries. The number of health conditions analysed per study ranged from 5 to 335, with multimorbidity prevalence ranging from 12.9% to 95.1%. All studies observed a significant positive association between multimorbidity and age (odds ratio [OR], 1.26 to 227.46, and lower socioeconomic status (OR, 1.20 to 1.91. Positive associations with female gender and mental disorders were also observed. The most frequent patterns of multimorbidity included osteoarthritis together with cardiovascular and/or metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Well-established determinants of multimorbidity include age, lower socioeconomic status and gender. The most prevalent conditions shape the patterns of multimorbidity. However, the limitations of the current evidence base means that further and better designed studies are needed to inform policy, research and clinical practice, with the goal of improving health-related quality of life for patients with multimorbidity. Standardization of the definition and assessment of multimorbidity is essential in order to better understand this

  10. Podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Dekker, E.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe podiatric care for diabetic patients with foot problems and to explore the changes in knowledge, self-care behaviour and physical functioning after podiatric care. the treatment characteristics of 26 diabetic patients referred to podiatry were assessed. Prior

  11. Association of primary care characteristics with variations in mortality rates in England: an observational study.

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    Louis S Levene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wide variations in mortality rates persist between different areas in England, despite an overall steady decline. To evaluate a conceptual model that might explain how population and service characteristics influence population mortality variations, an overall null hypothesis was tested: variations in primary healthcare service do not predict variations in mortality at population level, after adjusting for population characteristics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an observational study of all 152 English primary care trusts (geographical groupings of population and primary care services, total population 52 million, routinely available published data from 2008 and 2009 were modelled using negative binomial regression. Counts for all-cause, coronary heart disease, all cancers, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality were analyzed using explanatory variables of relevant population and service-related characteristics, including an age-correction factor. The main predictors of mortality variations were population characteristics, especially age and socio-economic deprivation. For the service characteristics, a 1% increase in the percentage of patients on a primary care hypertension register was associated with decreases in coronary heart disease mortality of 3% (95% CI 1-4%, p = 0.006 and in stroke mortality of 6% (CI 3-9%, p<0.0001; a 1% increase in the percentage of patients recalling being better able to see their preferred doctor was associated with decreases in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality of 0.7% (CI 0.2-2.0%, p = 0.02 and in all cancer mortality of 0.3% (CI 0.1-0.5%, p = 0.009 (continuity of care. The study found no evidence of an association at primary care trust population level between variations in achievement of pay for performance and mortality. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Some primary healthcare service characteristics were also associated with variations in mortality at population

  12. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units. Part II: Intensive care benefit for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Artigas, Antonio; Kesecioglu, Jozef;

    2012-01-01

    for intensive care unit admission. INTERVENTIONS:: Admission or rejection to intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Demographic, clinical, hospital, physiologic variables, and 28-day mortality were obtained on consecutive patients. There were 8,472 triages in 6,796 patients, 5,602 (82%) were......RATIONALE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Admission to an intensive care unit is denied when intensive care unit resources are constrained, especially for the elderly. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the effect of intensive care unit triage decisions...... on mortality and intensive care unit benefit, specifically for elderly patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with an explicit request...

  13. Translation of clinical prediction rules for febrile children to primary care practice: an observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ierland, Yvette; Elshout, Gijs; Berger, Marjolein Y; Vergouwe, Yvonne; de Wilde, Marcel; van der Lei, Johan; Mol, Henriëtte A; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) to identify children with serious infections lack validation in low-prevalence populations, which hampers their implementation in primary care practice. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic value of published CPRs for febrile children in primary care. Design and setting Observational cohort study among febrile children (<16 years) who consulted five GP cooperatives (GPCs) in the Netherlands. Method Alarm signs of serious infection and clinical management were extracted from routine clinical practice data and manually recoded with a structured electronic data-entry program. Eight CPRs were selected from literature. CPR-variables were matched with alarm signs and CPRs were applied to the GPC-population. ‘Referral to emergency department (ED)’ was used as a proxy outcome measure for ‘serious infection’. CPR performance was assessed by calibration analyses, sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC-curve (ROC-area). Results A total of 9794 GPC-contacts were eligible, 54% male, median age 2.3 years (interquartile range 1.0–4.6 years) and 8.1% referred to ED. Frequencies of CPR-variables varied from 0.5% (cyanosis, drowsy) to 25% (temperature ≥40°C). Alarm signs frequently included in CPRs were ‘ill appearance’, ‘inconsolable’, and ‘abnormal circulatory or respiratory signs’. The height of the CPR’s predicted risks generally corresponded with being (or not being) referred to the ED in practice. However, calibration-slopes indicated that three CPRs underestimated the risk of serious infection in the GPC-population. Sensitivities ranged from 42% to 54%, specificities from 68% to 89%. ROC-areas ranged from 0.52 to 0.81, with best performance of CPRs for children aged <3 months. Conclusion Published CPRs performed moderately well in the primary out-of-hours care population. Advice is given on how to improve translation of CPRs to primary care practice. PMID:25824182

  14. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units: Part I-European Intensive Care Admission Triage Scores (EICATS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Baras, Mario; Iapichino, Gaetano;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Scoring systems have been developed for prognosticating intensive care unit mortality but none for intensive care unit triage. The objective of this study was to develop an intensive care unit triage...... decision rule based on 28-day mortality rates of admitted and refused patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with a request for intensive...... care unit admission. INTERVENTIONS:: Admission or rejection to an intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Clinical, laboratory, and physiological variables and data from severity scores were collected. Separate scores for accepted and rejected patients with 28-day mortality end point were...

  15. Evaluation of hospital-wide computerised decision support in an intensive care unit: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, W; Day, R O; Baysari, M T

    2016-07-01

    We conducted an observational study with interviews in a 12-bed general/neurological intensive care unit (ICU) at a teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, to determine whether hospital-wide computerised decision support (CDS) embedded in an electronic prescribing system is used and perceived as useful by doctors in an ICU setting. Twenty doctors were shadowed by the observer while on ward rounds (33.6 hours) and non-ward rounds (28 hours) in the ICU. These doctors were also interviewed to explore views of CDS. We found that computerised alerts were triggered frequently in the ICU (n=166, in 59% of orders), less than half of the alerts were read by doctors and only four alerts resulted in a medication order being changed. Pre-written orders were utilised frequently, however reference material was rarely accessed. Interviews with doctors revealed a willingness to use CDS features; however the primary barrier to use was lack of customisation for the ICU setting. Doctors working in the ICU triggered a high number of alerts when prescribing, 40% more alerts than doctors working on general wards of the same hospital. Certain procedures in place in the ICU (e.g. daily microbiology ward rounds) made many alerts redundant in this setting. Lack of customisation for the ICU led to dissatisfaction with CDS and infrequent use of some CDS features. PMID:27456183

  16. Accumulation of advanced glycation end (AGEs products in intensive care patients: an observational, prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommes Johannes H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in the course and eventual outcome in a majority of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. Markers to estimate oxidative stress are not readily available in a clinical setting. AGEs accumulation has been merely described in chronic conditions, but can also occur acutely due to oxidative stress. Since AGEs have emerged to be stable end products, these can be a marker of oxidative stress. Skin autofluorescence (AF is a validated marker of tissue content of AGEs. We hypothesized that AGEs accumulate acutely in ICU patients. Methods We performed an observational prospective study in a medical surgical ICU in a university affiliated teaching hospital. All consecutively admitted ICU patients in a 2 month period were included. Skin AF was measured using an AGE reader in 35 consecutive ICU patients > 18 yrs. As a comparison, historical data of a control group (n = 231 were used. These were also used to calculate age-adjusted AF-levels (AFadj. Values are expressed as median and interquartile range [P25-P75]. Differences between groups were tested by non parametric tests. P Results AFadj values were higher in ICU patients (0.33 [0.00 - 0.68] than in controls (-0.07 [-0.29 - 0.24]; P adj were observed between acute or planned admissions, or presence of sepsis, nor was skin AFadj related to severity of disease as estimated by APACHE-II score, length of ICU, hospital stay or mortality. Conclusion Acute AGE accumulation in ICU patients was shown in this study, although group size was small. This can possibly reflect oxidative stress in ICU patients. Further studies should reveal whether AGE-accumulation will be a useful parameter in ICU patients and whether skin AF has a predictive value for outcome, which was not shown in this small study.

  17. Nursing Team Leader handover in the intensive care unit contains diverse information and lacks structure: An observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Spooner, A. J.; Aitken, L. M.; Corley, A.; Fraser, J. F.; Chaboyer, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite a proliferation of evidence and the development of standardised tools to improve communication at handover, evidence to guide the handover of critical patient information between nursing team leaders in the intensive care unit is limited. Objective: The study aim was to determine the content of information handed over during intensive care nursing team leader shift-to-shift handover. Design: A prospective observational study. Setting: A 21-bed medical/s...

  18. Adverse effects of antiretroviral treatment at a tertiary care hospital in India: a prospective observational study

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    Sweta V. Vaghani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to antiretroviral (ARV use in public health practice are few indicating the need for antiretroviral therapy (ART safety surveillance in clinical care. Methods: 143 patients on ART were studied prospectively over a period of two years. All patients were asked to visit the clinic if they developed any symptoms or on a monthly basis. They were screened clinically and investigated suitably for any ADRs. Results: 143 HIV positive patients were analyzed. At least one ADR was seen in 87 (60.83% subjects. The most common ADR observed was peripheral neuropathy in 54 (37.76% patients, followed by lipodystrophy (13.98%, anemia (10.48% and hyperlipidemia (6.29%. Patients with peripheral neuropathy and lipodystrophy were mainly on stavudine based regimes, while patient with anemia and hyperlipidemia were on zidovudine based regimes. Conclusions: In spite of high ADRs, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is the only answer to HIV/AIDS. To optimize adherence and thus, efficacy of ART, clinicians must focus on preventing adverse effects whenever possible, and distinguish those that are self-limited from those that are potentially serious. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 230-232

  19. Patient satisfaction and side effects in primary care: An observational study comparing homeopathy and conventional medicine

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    Thurneysen André

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is part of a nationwide evaluation of complementary medicine in Switzerland (Programme Evaluation of Complementary Medicine PEK and was funded by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. The main objective of this study is to investigate patient satisfaction and perception of side effects in homeopathy compared with conventional care in a primary care setting. Methods We examined data from two cross-sectional studies conducted in 2002–2003. The first study was a physician questionnaire assessing structural characteristics of practices. The second study was conducted on four given days during a 12-month period in 2002/2003 using a physician and patient questionnaire at consultation and a patient questionnaire mailed to the patient one month later (including Europep questionnaire. The participating physicians were all trained and licensed in conventional medicine. An additional qualification was required for medical doctors providing homeopathy (membership in the Swiss association of homeopathic physicians SVHA. Results A total of 6778 adult patients received the questionnaire and 3126 responded (46.1%. Statistically significant differences were found with respect to health status (higher percentage of chronic and severe conditions in the homeopathic group, perception of side effects (higher percentage of reported side effects in the conventional group and patient satisfaction (higher percentage of satisfied patients in the homeopathic group. Conclusion Overall patient satisfaction was significantly higher in homeopathic than in conventional care. Homeopathic treatments were perceived as a low-risk therapy with two to three times fewer side effects than conventional care

  20. Ischemic heart disease and primary care: identifying gender-related differences. An observational study

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    Real Jordi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender-related differences are seen in multiple aspects of both health and illness. Ischemic heart disease (IHD is a pathology in which diagnostic, treatment and prognostic differences are seen between sexes, especially in the acute phase and in the hospital setting. The objective of the present study is to analyze whether there are differences between men and women when examining associated cardiovascular risk factors and secondary pharmacological prevention in the primary care setting. Methods Retrospective descriptive observational study from January to December of 2006, including 1907 patients diagnosed with ischemic heart disease in the city of Lleida, Spain. The clinical data were obtained from computerized medical records and pharmaceutical records of medications dispensed in pharmacies with official prescriptions. Data was analyzed using bivariate descriptive statistical analysis as well as logistic regression. Results There were no gender-related differences in screening percentages for arterial hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipemia, and smoking. A greater percentage of women were hypertensive, obese and diabetic compared to men. However, men showed a tendency to achieve control targets more easily than women, with no statistically significant differences. In both sexes cardiovascular risk factors control was inadequate, between 10 and 50%. For secondary pharmaceutical prevention, the percentages of prescriptions were greater in men for anticoagulants, beta-blockers, lipid-lowering agents and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers, with age group variations up to 10%. When adjusting by age and specific diagnoses, differences were maintained for anticoagulants and lipid-lowering agents. Conclusion Screening of cardiovascular risk factors was similar in men and women with IHD. Although a greater percentage of women were hypertensive, diabetic or obese, their management of risk

  1. Continuing professional development for volunteers working in palliative care in a tertiary care cancer institute in India: A cross-sectional observational study of educational needs

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    Jayita Kedar Deodhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Training programs for volunteers prior to their working in palliative care are well-established in India. However, few studies report on continuing professional development programs for this group. Aims: To conduct a preliminary assessment of educational needs of volunteers working in palliative care for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program for this group. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study conducted in the Department of Palliative Medicine of a tertiary care cancer institute in India. Materials and Methods: Participant volunteers completed a questionnaire, noting previous training, years of experience, and a comprehensive list of topics for inclusion in this program, rated in order of importance according to them. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics for overall data and Chi-square tests for categorical variables for group comparisons were applied using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 18. Results: Fourteen out of 17 volunteers completed the questionnaire, seven having 5-10-years experience in working in palliative care. A need for continuing professional development program was felt by all participants. Communication skills, more for children and elderly specific issues were given highest priority. Spiritual-existential aspects and self-care were rated lower in importance than psychological, physical, and social aspects in palliative care. More experienced volunteers (>5 years of experience felt the need for self-care as a topic in the program than those with less (<5-years experience ( P < 0.05. Conclusions: Understanding palliative care volunteers′ educational needs is essential for developing a structured formal continuing professional development program and should include self-care as a significant component.

  2. Breast cancer care compared with clinical Guidelines: an observational study in France

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    Daban Alain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great variability in breast cancer (BC treatment practices according to patient, tumour or organisation of care characteristics has been reported but the relation between these factors is not well known. In two French regions, we measured compliance with Clinical Practice Guidelines for non-metastatic BC care management and identified factors associated with non-compliance at clinical and organisational levels. Methods Eligible patients had invasive unilateral BC without distant metastases and at least two contacts with one of the two regional healthcare systems (2003-2004 in the first year after diagnosis. Medical data were collected from patient medical records in all public and private hospitals (99 hospitals. The care process was defined by 20 criteria: clinical decisions for treatment and therapeutic procedures. Each criterion was classified according to level of compliance ("Compliant", "Justifiable" and "Not Compliant" and factors of non-compliance were identified (mixed effect logistic regression. Results 926 women were included. Non-compliance with clinical decisions for treatment was associated with older patient age (OR 2.1; 95%CI: 1.3-3.6 and region (OR 3.0; 95%CI: 1.2-7.4. Non-compliance with clinical decisions for radiotherapy was associated with lymph node involvement or the presence of peritumoural vascular invasion (OR 1.5; 95%CI: 1.01-2.3 and non-compliance with overall treatment (clinical decisions for treatment + therapeutic procedures was associated with the presence of positive lymph nodes (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.2-3.3, grade III versus grade I (OR 2.9; 95%CI: 1.4-6.2, and one region of care versus another (OR 3.5; 95%CI: 1.7-7.1. Finally, heterogeneity of compliance in overall treatment sequence was identified between local cancer units (p Conclusion This study provides interesting insights into factors of non-compliance in non-metastatic BC management and could lead to quality care improvements.

  3. Functional status decline as a measure of adverse events in home health care: an observational study

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    Feldman Penny H

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research that examines the quality of home health care is complex because no gold standard exists for measuring adverse outcomes, and because the patient and clinician populations are highly heterogeneous. The objectives in this study are to develop models to predict functional decline for three indices of functional status as measures of adverse events in home health care and determine which index is most appropriate for risk-adjusting for future quality research. Methods Data come from the Outcomes and Assessment Information Set (OASIS from a large urban home health care agency and other agency data. Prognostic data yields 49,437 episodes, while follow-up data yields 47,684 episodes. We tested three indices defined as substantial decline in three or more (gt3_ADLs, two or more (gt2_ADLs, and one or more (gt1_ADLs ADLs. Multivariate logistic regression determines the performance of the models for each index as measured by the c-statistic and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi square (χ2. Results Frequencies for gt3_ADLs, gt2_ADLs, and gt1_ADLs are 212 (0.43%, 783 (1.58%, and 4,271 (8.64% respectively. Follow-up results are comparable with frequencies of 218 (0.46%, 763 (1.60%, and 3,949 (8.28% for each index. Gt3_ADLs does not produce valid models. The model for gt2_ADLs consistently yields a higher c-statistic compared to gt1_ADLs (0.754 vs. 0.679, respectively. Both indices' models yield non-significant Hosmer-Lemeshow chi square indicating reasonable model fit. Findings for gt2_ADLs and gt1_ADLs are consistent over time as indicated by follow-up data results. Conclusion Gt2_ADLs yields the best models as indicated by a high c-statistic and a non-significant Hosmer-Lemeshow χ2, both of which exhibit exceptional consistency. We conclude that gt2_ADLs may be preferable in defining ADL adverse events in the context of home health care.

  4. Alarming signs and symptoms in febrile children in primary care: an observational cohort study in The Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijs Elshout

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Febrile children in primary care have a low risk for serious infection. Although several alarming signs and symptoms are proposed to have predictive value for serious infections, most are based on research in secondary care. The frequency of alarming signs/symptoms has not been established in primary care; however, in this setting differences in occurrence may influence their predictive value for serious infections. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of alarming signs/symptoms in febrile children in primary care. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. Clinical information was registered in a semi-structured way and manually recoded. SETTING: General practitioners' out-of-hours service. SUBJECTS: Face-to-face patient contacts concerning children (aged ≤16 years with fever were eligible for inclusion. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of 18 alarming signs and symptoms as reported in the literature. RESULTS: A total of 10,476 patient contacts were included. The frequency of alarming signs/symptoms ranged from n = 1 (ABC instability; 40°C as reported by the parents; 12.9% to 8,647 contacts (parental concern; 82.5%. CONCLUSION: Although the prevalence of specific alarming signs/symptoms is low in primary care, ≥50% of children have one or more alarming signs/symptoms. There is a need to determine the predictive value of alarming signs/symptoms not only for serious infections in primary care, but as well for increased risk of a complicated course of the illness.

  5. Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in Hungarian intensive care units: a multicenter, prospective, observational study

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    Bencsik Gabor

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the substantial progress in the quality of critical care, the incidence and mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI continues to rise during hospital admissions. We conducted a national, multicenter, prospective, epidemiological survey to evaluate the importance of AKI in intensive care units (ICUs in Hungary. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of AKI in ICU patients; to characterize the differences in aetiology, illness severity and clinical practice; and to determine the influencing factors of the development of AKI and the patients' outcomes. Methods We analysed the demographic, morbidity, treatment modality and outcome data of patients (n = 459 admitted to ICUs between October 1st, 2009 and November 30th, 2009 using a prospectively filled in electronic survey form in 7 representative ICUs. Results The major reason for ICU admission was surgical in 64.3% of patients and medical in the remaining 35.7%. One-hundred-twelve patients (24.4% had AKI. By AKIN criteria 11.5% had Stage 1, 5.4% had Stage 2 and 7.4% had Stage 3. In 44.0% of patients, AKI was associated with septic shock. Vasopressor treatment, SAPS II score, serum creatinine on ICU admission and sepsis were the independent risk factors for development of any stage of AKI. Among the Stage 3 patients (34 50% received renal replacement therapy. The overall utilization of intermittent renal replacement therapy was high (64.8%. The overall in-hospital mortality rate of AKI was 49% (55/112. The ICU mortality rate was 39.3% (44/112. The independent risk factors for ICU mortality were age, mechanical ventilation, SOFA score and AKI Stage 3. Conclusions For the first time we have established the incidence of AKI using the AKIN criteria in Hungarian ICUs. Results of the present study confirm that AKI has a high incidence and is associated with high ICU and in-hospital mortality.

  6. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/objective: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs’ compliance with the Five A’s Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  7. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs' compliance with the Five A's Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  8. FALCIPARUM MALARIA – IT’S VARIED PRESENTATION : AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Prabhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we are witnessing a change in the scenario of Malaria in India with respect to increase in the incidence of falciparum malaria, drug resistant strains and some vivax presentations changing from benign to malignant type. With varied mani festations falciparum malaria forms a DD to all acute febrile illness especially in endemic areas. With 70 - 100 million cases annually, India is becoming the capital for all malarial problems of the world. AIM OF THE STUDY: To study the varied presentation of confirmed falciparum malaria patients and their treatment out come at a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a hospital based cross sectional study for three years – from 01 Jan . 2011 to 31 Dec . 2013 based on the hospital records (C ase sheets with demographic profile, C linical features, I nvestigations & treatment outcomes . RESULTS: 72 patients confirmed by blood smear examination were included in the study. Majority were males (66.66% and belonged to the age group of 21 - 50 years (72.22% and majority were admitted in post - monsoon months (66.66%. 77.77% of patients were referred from various centers and 27.77% with complications. Only 55.55% had classical fever and chills and 35.7% had host of atypical manifestations with 19.64% of patients presented to various departments. All the patients were treated mainly with Artemisinin group (ACT and 89.28% patients recovered in 7 - 21 days. The mortality was 12.5%. CONCLUSION: The present study explains the importance of knowing the diverse mode of presentation of falciparum malaria. Early diagnosis, early referral and early initiation of ACT will decrease the mortality and morbidity.

  9. Time standards of nursing in Primary Health Care: an observational study

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    Daiana Bonfim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To determine time standards for interventions and activities conducted by nursing professionals in Family Health Units (FHU in Brazil to substantiate the calculation of work force. METHOD This was an observational study carried out in 27 FHU, in 12 municipalities in 10 states, in 2013. In each unit, nursing professionals were observed every 10 minutes, for eight work hours, on five consecutive days via the work sampling technique. RESULTS A total of 32,613 observations were made, involving 47 nurses and 93 nursing technicians/assistants. Appointments were the main intervention carried out by nurses, with a mean time of 25.3 minutes, followed by record-keeping, which corresponded to 9.7%. On average, nursing technicians/assistants spent 6.3% of their time keeping records and 30.6 intervention minutes on immunization/vaccination control. CONCLUSION The study resulted in standard times of interventions carried out by the FHU nursing team, which can underpin the determination of nursing staff size and human resource policies. Furthermore, the study showed the panorama of interventions currently employed, allowing for the work process to be reviewed and optimized.

  10. Etiological spectrum of recurrent jaundice in adults: A retrospective observational study from a tertiary care center

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    Gouranga Santra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies regarding etiological spectrum of recurrent jaundice are rare. We conducted this study to identify the causes of recurrent jaundice in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Frequency of different causes of recurrent jaundice was assessed from 130 patients attended General Medicine Department over a period of 3 years. Recurrent jaundice was considered when patients had more than one episodes of jaundice with serum bilirubin ≥3 mg/dl since childhood. Recurrent jaundice was diagnosed from past medical records, records of follow-up visits, and current clinical presentation. Causes were identified from past and present medical records of history, clinical and laboratory examinations. Results: Causes of recurrent jaundice included prehepatic (30%, hepatic (59.23%, and posthepatic (10.77 % disorders. Prehepatic disorders were Gilbert′s syndrome (GS, megaloblastic anemia, autoimmune haemolytic anemia, Wilson′s disease, G6PD deficiency, etc. Hepatic disorders were exacerbations of alcoholic hepatitis, hepatitis B and C, autoimmune hepatitis, congestive cardiac failure, sarcoidosis, benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis, eclampsia, pregnancy induced cholestasis, falciparum malaria, drug induced liver injury (DILI, etc. Posthepatic causes were choledocholithiasis, recurrent pancreatitis, periampullary carcinoma, choledochal cyst, ascariasis, hemobilia, HIV cholangiopathy, autoimmune pancreatitis, etc. Prehepatic jaundice cases were younger. The highest level of total bilirubin was seen in alcoholic hepatitis, DILI, and hepatitis B. Alcoholic hepatitis was the most common cause of recurrent jaundice (19.23%. GS was the most common prehepatic cause. Mean age was lowest in GS and highest in DILI. Conclusion: Etiological spectrum of recurrent jaundice includes many prehepatic, hepatic or posthepatic disorders. A larger study may enlarge the spectrum.

  11. Nurses' sleep quality, work environment and quality of care in the Spanish National Health System: observational study among different shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, Teresa; Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Fuentelsaz-Gallego, Carmen; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Rol, Maria Angeles; Martínez-Madrid, María José; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the characteristics of nurses' work environments in hospitals in the Spanish National Health System (SNHS) with nurse reported quality of care, and how care was provided by using different shifts schemes. The study also examined the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, sleep quality and daytime drowsiness of nurses and shift work. Methods This was a multicentre, observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study, centred on a self-administered questionnaire. The study was conducted in seven SNHS hospitals of different sizes. We recruited 635 registered nurses who worked on day, night and rotational shifts on surgical, medical and critical care units. Their average age was 41.1 years, their average work experience was 16.4 years and 90% worked full time. A descriptive and bivariate analysis was carried out to study the relationship between work environment, quality and safety care, and sleep quality of nurses working different shift patterns. Results 65.4% (410) of nurses worked on a rotating shift. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index classification ranked 20% (95) as favourable, showing differences in nurse manager ability, leadership and support between shifts (p=0.003). 46.6% (286) were sure that patients could manage their self-care after discharge, but there were differences between shifts (p=0.035). 33.1% (201) agreed with information being lost in the shift change, showing differences between shifts (p=0.002). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index reflected an average of 6.8 (SD 3.39), with differences between shifts (p=0.017). Conclusions Nursing requires shift work, and the results showed that the rotating shift was the most common. Rotating shift nurses reported worse perception in organisational and work environmental factors. Rotating and night shift nurses were less confident about patients' competence of self-care after discharge. The

  12. Immigrants’ use of emergency primary health care in Norway: a registry-based observational study

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    Sandvik Hogne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emigrants are often a selected sample and in good health, but migration can have deleterious effects on health. Many immigrant groups report poor health and increased use of health services, and it is often claimed that they tend to use emergency primary health care (EPHC services for non-urgent purposes. The aim of the present study was to analyse immigrants’ use of EPHC, and to analyse variations according to country of origin, reason for immigration, and length of stay in Norway. Methods We conducted a registry based study of all immigrants to Norway, and a subsample of immigrants from Poland, Germany, Iraq and Somalia, and compared them with native Norwegians. The material comprised all electronic compensation claims for EPHC in Norway during 2008. We calculated total contact rates, contact rates for selected diagnostic groups and for services given during consultations. Adjustments for a series of socio-demographic and socio-economic variables were done by multiple logistic regression analyses. Results Immigrants as a whole had a lower contact rate than native Norwegians (23.7% versus 27.4%. Total contact rates for Polish and German immigrants (mostly work immigrants were 11.9% and 7.0%, but for Somalis and Iraqis (mostly asylum seekers 31.8% and 33.6%. Half of all contacts for Somalis and Iraqis were for non-specific pain, and they had relatively more of their contacts during night than other groups. Immigrants’ rates of psychiatric diagnoses were low, but increased with length of stay in Norway. Work immigrants suffered less from respiratory and gastrointestinal infections, but had more injuries and higher need for sickness certification. All immigrant groups, except Germans, were more often given a sickness certificate than native Norwegians. Use of interpreter was reduced with increasing length of stay. All immigrant groups had an increased need for long consultations, while laboratory tests were most often used

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF AUTOLOGOUS SERUM THERAPY IN CHRONIC URTICARIA: A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY IN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Rakesh Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic urticaria is a challenging condition, both for patient and physician in a day-to-day practice. There is constant search for newer modality of treatment, which can provide prolong remission with less side effect. Autologous serum therapy have shown promising result in initial studies. AIM To evaluate effectiveness of Autologous Serum Therapy in chronic urticaria patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective observational study. Total 220 patients enrolled for study. Autologous serum skin test performed in all patients; 113 patients were given Autologous Serum Therapy along with oral levocetirizine on SOS basis weekly and 107 patients were given only oral levocetirizine on demand basis. Response to treatment assessed by urticaria activity score, urticaria total severity score, antihistamine score, dermatological quality of life index and Likert scale on 2 weekly interval for 10 weeks. RESULTS Autologous Serum Therapy shown significant improvement in both Autologous Serum Skin Test positive and Autologous Serum Skin Test negative patients as compared to non-Autologous Serum Therapy groups. Autologous Serum Therapy is more effective in Autologous Serum Skin Test positive patients. CONCLUSION Autologous Serum Therapy is effective in chronic urticaria patients.

  14. Accumulation of advanced glycation end (AGEs) products in intensive care patients: an observational, prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Rommes Johannes H; Smit Jitty M; Greven Wendela L; Spronk Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in the course and eventual outcome in a majority of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Markers to estimate oxidative stress are not readily available in a clinical setting. AGEs accumulation has been merely described in chronic conditions, but can also occur acutely due to oxidative stress. Since AGEs have emerged to be stable end products, these can be a marker of oxidative stress. Skin autofluorescence (AF) is a v...

  15. Rapidly increasing use of proton pump inhibitors prescribed in primary care: a nationwide observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Peter; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Hansen, Jane Møller

    Background: Antisecretory drugs (ADs) are often prescribed in primary care for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Reimbursement modifications have been made in Denmark to minimize costs related to use of ADs. However knowledge about development in use of ADs over the past decade and the impacts...... of the reimbursement modifications is sparse. Research questions: How has use of ADs developed in Denmark 2001-2011? Which impacts have the reimbursement modifications had on the use of ADs? Methods: The Register of Medicinal Product Statistics includes all sales and redeemed prescriptions nationwide covering...... through the years 2001-2011 were used. Data from prescriptions redeemed by persons younger than 20 years were excluded. Prescriptions for ulcerogenic drugs (acetylsalicylic acid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) redeemed by persons aged 65 years and older were included since ulcer prophylaxis...

  16. A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF SHORT TERM MORBIDITY PATTERN IN PRETERM NEWBORNS DELIVERED IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Harsha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the short term morbidity pattern in preterm new born babies delivered in a tertiary care hospital with level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective observational study was conducted in a level III NICU betwee n November 2009 to July 2010 at Grant medical college and JJ Group of hospitals, Mumbai. All the in born preterm babies were assessed for morbidity pattern from the time of admission till discharge or death. RESULT: 156 preterm babies were included in the study. 83(54.21% were male and 73(46.79% were female. The major morbidities observed in the preterm neonates were hyperbilirubinemia in 50.54%, Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS in25.64% and severe birth asphyxia in13.46%. Other common morbidities seen were retinopathy of prematurity in 12.17%, apnoea in 11.54% and anaemia in 10.9%. Preterm neonates also had in 9.62% culture proven sepsis, in 8.33% hypoglycaemia, in 7.05% Intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH and in 6.41% various congenital anomalies. CONCL USION: Hyperbilirubinemia, respiratory distress syndrome and severe birth asphyxia are major preterm morbidity

  17. Professional quality of life and organizational changes: a five-year observational study in Primary Care

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    Cortes-Rubio Jose

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The satisfaction and the quality of life perceived by professionals have implications for the performance of health organizations. We have assessed the variations in professional quality of life (PQL and their explanatory factors during a services management decentralization process. Methods It was designed as a longitudinal analytical observational study in a Health Area in Madrid, Spain. Three surveys were sent out during an ongoing management decentralization process between 2001 and 2005. The professionals surveyed were divided into three groups: Group I (97.3% physicians, group II (92.5% nurses and group III (auxiliary personnel. Analysis of the tendency and elaboration of an explanatory multivariate model was made. The PQL -35 questionnaire, based on Karasek's demand-control theory, was used to measure PQL. This questionnaire recognizes three PQL dimensions: management support (MS, workload (WL and intrinsic motivation (IM. Results 1444 responses were analyzed. PQL increased 0.16 (CI 95% 0.04 – 0.28 points in each survey. Group II presents over time a higher PQL score than group I of 0.38 (IC 95% 0.18 – 0.59 points. There is no difference between groups I and III. For each point that MS increases, PQL increases between 0.44 and 0.59 points. PQL decreases an average of between 0.35 and 0.49 point, for each point that WL increases. Age appears to have a marginal association with PQL (CI 95% 0.00 – 0.02, as it occurs with being single or not having a stable relationship (CI 95% 0.01 – 0.41. Performing management tasks currently or in the past is related to poorer PQL perception (CI 95% -0.45 – -0.06, and the same occurs with working other than morning shifts (CI 95% -0.03 – -0.40 points. PQL is not related to sex, location of the centre (rural/urban, time spent working in the organization or contractual situation. Conclusion With the improvement in work control and avoiding increases in workloads, PQL

  18. An open model cross sectional observational study of hyponatremic patients in a tertiary care hospital

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    Harsha Gopinath

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: In the present study, hypertension was found a major risk factor for hyponatremia. Common causes of hyponatremia found are intake of diuretics and excessive renal loss. Most of the hypertensive patients in the present study group were on thiazide or potassium sparing diuretics. Diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia were important co-morbidities of hyponatremia. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 713-717

  19. European Practice Assessment of Cardiovascular risk management (EPA Cardio: protocol of an international observational study in primary care

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    van Lieshout Jan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite important improvements in available prevention and treatment, cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Not all high-risk patients and patients with CVD have healthy lifestyles and receive the best possible healthcare. Internationally comparative data are needed to compare cardiovascular risk management in different countries, and to examine the impact of improvement programs and others factors. Objectives This study aims to provide internationally comparative data on cardiovascular risk management provided in primary care and on health-related lifestyles of patients in Europe. The study will also explore the views of doctors and patients on innovative preventive services for CVDs. Design and methods An observational cross-sectional study is planned. In 10 European countries, stratified samples of 36 practices per country will be recruited. In each practice, three samples of 15 patients each will be sampled: patients with coronary heart disease, patients at high risk for CVD, and healthy adult patients. The quality of cardiovascular risk management has been specified in terms of 44 performance indicators that resulted from an international Delphi-procedure with general practitioners. Most indicators are based on medical records, and some on a structured interview with a contact person of the practice. Lifestyle (smoking, physical exercise, diet will be measured with previously validated questionnaires that are completed by patients. Additional measures include practice characteristics and exposure to programs to improve cardiovascular care.

  20. Maternal near miss events: a prospective observational study in a tertiary care centre

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    Gazala Yasmin

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This study concludes hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders to be the leading causes for maternal near miss. Hence evaluation of the circumstances surrounding near-miss can give us an idea to know the exact etiology, treat it in its early stage and prevent death. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(9.000: 3088-3093

  1. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manag...

  2. Testing initiatives increase rates of HIV diagnosis in primary care and community settings: an observational single-centre cohort study.

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    Prini Mahendran

    Full Text Available The primary objective was to examine trends in new HIV diagnoses in a UK area of high HIV prevalence between 2000 and 2012 with respect to site of diagnosis and stage of HIV infection.Single-centre observational cohort study.An outpatient HIV department in a secondary care UK hospital.1359 HIV-infected adults.Demographic information (age, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, site of initial HIV diagnosis (Routine settings such as HIV/GUM clinics versus Non-Routine settings such as primary care and community venues, stage of HIV infection, CD4 count and seroconversion symptoms were collated for each participant.There was a significant increase in the proportion of new HIV diagnoses made in Non-Routine settings (from 27.0% in 2000 to 58.8% in 2012; p<0.001. Overall there was a decrease in the rate of late diagnosis from 50.7% to 32.9% (p=0.001. Diagnosis of recent infection increased from 23.0% to 47.1% (p=0.001. Of those with recent infection, significantly more patients were likely to report symptoms consistent with a seroconversion illness over the 13 years (17.6% to 65.0%; p<0.001.This is the first study, we believe, to demonstrate significant improvements in HIV diagnosis and a shift in diagnosis of HIV from HIV/GUM settings to primary practice and community settings due to multiple initiatives.

  3. Impact of Palliative Care Consultation Service on Terminally Ill Cancer Patients: A 9-Year Observational Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ching-Yi; Shen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chen-Yi; Wang, Hung-Ming; Tang, Shu-Chuan; Chin, Tsu-Ling; Chi, Chuan-Chuan; Yang, Jin-Mei; Chang, Chih-Wen; Lai, Ying-Fen; Yeh, Ya-Chi; Hung, Yu-Shin; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2016-03-01

    The palliative care consultation service (PCCS) that has been enthusiastically promoted in Taiwan since 2005 was designed to provide comprehensive end-of-life care for terminally ill patients with qualified interdisciplinary specialists in acute care ward setting. This study aims to evaluate the impact of PCCS on terminally ill cancer patients.A total of 10,594 terminal cancer patients who were referred to PCCS from a single medical center in Taiwan between 2006 and 2014 were enrolled. The percentages of patients' and their families' disease awareness, do-not-resuscitate (DNR) designation, refusal and acceptance of palliative care among terminally ill cancer patients were analyzed retrospectively.At the beginning of PCCS, the percentages of disease awareness among patients and their family were increased from 25.4% to 37.9% (P = 0.007) and from 61.2% to 84.7% between 2006 and 2014 (P = 0.001), respectively. Patients' disease awareness after PCCS referral between 2006 and 2014 was increased from 47.1% to 64.5% (P = 0.016). Family's awareness of diagnosis and prognosis after PCCS referral researched to a steady plateau, 94.1% to 97.8% in different year cohort (P = 0.34). The percentage of DNR designation rate at the beginning of PCCS (in 2006) was 15.5%, and the designation rate was increased annually and finally reached to 42.0% in 2014 (P = 0.004). The percentage of DNR consents after PCCS was also improved from 44.0% in 2006 up to 80.0% in 2014 (P = 0.005). PCCS refusal rate decreased gradually and dropped to 1.6% in 2014 (P = 0.005). The percentage of PCCS utilization was increased 5-fold during the 9-year period after the promotion of PCCSIn the program of PCCS promotion, an increasing trend of PCCS utilization, better patients' and their families' awareness of diagnosis and prognosis, more consent to DNR, more patients were discharged with stable condition at the end of PCCS and a decrease refusal rate of end-of-life palliative care

  4. The Staffordshire Arthritis, Musculoskeletal, and Back Assessment (SAMBA Study: a prospective observational study of patient outcome following referral to a primary-secondary care musculoskeletal interface service

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    Jordan Kelvin P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent healthcare policy has shifted the management of musculoskeletal conditions in the UK away from secondary care towards Clinical Assessment and Treatment Services at the primary-secondary care interface. However, little is known about the outcome of patients with musculoskeletal conditions referred from primary care to Clinical Assessment and Treatment Services or how best to identify those patients at high risk of poor outcome in this setting. We describe the protocol for a twelve-month prospective observational study which aims to describe the outcome of patients referred to musculoskeletal and back pain services at the primary-secondary care interface and to develop simple prognostic measures to guide clinical prioritisation and triage. Methods/Design All patients referred over a twelve-month period from primary care to musculoskeletal and back pain clinics in the primary-secondary care interface Clinical Assessment and Treatment Service in North Staffordshire will be mailed a postal questionnaire prior to their consultation. This will collect information on quality of life, general health, anxiety and depression, pain, healthcare utilisation including medication use, occupational characteristics, and socio-demographics. At the consultation in the interface clinic, the clinical diagnosis, investigations requested, and clinical interventions will be recorded. Follow-up data for the twelve-month period subsequent to recruitment will be collected via mailed follow-up questionnaires at 6 and 12 months, and review of medical records. Discussion This twelve-month prospective observational study of patients referred to a musculoskeletal Clinical Assessment and Treatment Service will assess the management and outcome of musculoskeletal care at the primary-secondary care interface as proposed in the Musculoskeletal Services Framework.

  5. Study protocol—investigation of the Delirium Observation Screening Scale (DOSS) for the routine detection of delirium in the care home setting: a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teale, Elizabeth; Young, John; Siddiqi, Najma; Munyombwe, Theresa; Harrison, Jennifer; Schuurmanns, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delirium is a common and distressing condition associated with frailty, dementia and comorbidity. These are common in long-term care settings. Residents in care homes are therefore at particular risk of delirium. Despite this, methods to detect delirium in care homes are lacking, with existing diagnostic tools taking too long, or requiring specific training to deliver. This limits their feasibility for use for the routine detection of delirium by care home staff. Routine screening for delirium in care homes would allow timely attention to exacerbating factors to attenuate the episode, and facilitate future research into delirium in the care home environment. Methods Residents from 4 large care homes will be asked to consent (or their consultees asked to provide a declaration of agreement) to participate in the study. Care home staff will administer the 25-item Delirium Observation Screening Scale (DOSS)—a delirium screening tool based on observed behaviours—and this will be tested against the research standard Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) administered by trained research assistants performed two times per week for all participating residents. Analysis Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios and a diagnostic OR will be calculated for the detection of delirium with the 25-item DOSS. The feasibility of routine delirium screening and the scaling properties of the 25-item DOSS will also be explored. Ethics and Dissemination For residents lacking capacity to participate, a consultee will be approached for a declaration of agreement for inclusion in the study. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and disseminated in written format to clinical commissioning groups, general practitioners and relevant third parties. Trial registration number ISRCTN14608554. PMID:27324706

  6. Medication Errors in an Internal Intensive Care Unit of a Large Teaching Hospital: A Direct Observation Study

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    Saadat Delfani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors account for about 78% of serious medical errors in intensive care unit (ICU. So far no study has been performed in Iran to evaluate all type of possible medication errors in ICU. Therefore the objective of this study was to reveal the frequency, type and consequences of all type of errors in an ICU of a large teaching hospital. The prospective observational study was conducted in an 11 bed internal ICU of a university hospital in Shiraz. In each shift all processes that were performed on one selected patient was observed and recorded by a trained pharmacist. Observer would intervene only if medication error would cause substantial harm. The data was evaluated and then were entered in a form that was designed for this purpose. The study continued for 38 shifts. During this period, a total of 442 errors per 5785 opportunities for errors (7.6% occurred. Of those, there were 9.8% administration errors, 6.8% prescribing errors, 3.3% transcription errors and, 2.3% dispensing errors. Totally 45 interventions were made, 40% of interventions result in the correction of errors. The most common causes of errors were observed to be: rule violations, slip and memory lapses and lack of drug knowledge. According to our results, the rate of errors is alarming and requires implementation of a serious solution. Since our system lacks a well-organize detection and reporting mechanism, there is no means for preventing errors in the first place. Hence, as the first step we must implement a system where errors are routinely detected and reported.

  7. Utilization and expenditures of veterans obtaining primary care in community clinics and VA medical centers: an observational cohort study

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    Chapko Michael

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare VA inpatient and outpatient utilization and expenditures of veterans seeking primary care in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs and VA medical centers (VAMCs in fiscal years 2000 (FY00 and 2001. Methods The sample included 25,092 patients who obtained primary care exclusively from 108 CBOCs in FY00, 26,936 patients who obtained primary care exclusively from 72 affiliated VAMCs in FY00, and 11,450 "crossover" patients who obtained primary care in CBOCs and VAMCs in FY00. VA utilization and expenditure data were drawn from the VA's system-wide cost accounting system. Veteran demographic characteristics and a 1999 Diagnostic Cost Group risk score were obtained from VA administrative files. Outpatient utilization (primary care, specialty care, mental health, pharmacy, radiology and laboratory and inpatient utilization were estimated using count data models and expenditures were estimated using one-part or two-part models. The second part of two-part models was estimated using generalized linear regressions. Results CBOC patients had a slightly more primary care visits per year than VAMC patients (p Conclusion CBOCs provided veterans improved access to primary care and other services, but expenditures were contained because CBOC patients who sought health care had fewer visits and hospital stays than comparable VAMC patients. These results suggest a more complex pattern of health care utilization and expenditures by CBOC patients than has been found in prior studies. This study also illustrates that CBOCs continue to be a critical primary care and mental health access point for veterans.

  8. Intravenous Mistletoe Treatment in Integrative Cancer Care: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Procedures, Concepts, and Observations of Expert Doctors

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    Gunver S. Kienle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mistletoe therapy (MT is widely used in patient-centered integrative cancer care. The objective of this study was to explore the concepts, procedures, and observations of expert doctors, with a focus on intravenous MT. Method. A qualitative interview study was conducted with 35 highly experienced doctors specialized in integrative and anthroposophic medicine. Structured qualitative content analysis was applied. For triangulation, the results were compared with external evidence that was systematically collected, reviewed, and presented. Results. Doctors perform individualized patient assessments that lead to multimodal treatment approaches. The underlying goal is to help patients to live with and overcome disease. Mistletoe infusions are a means of accomplishing this goal. They are applied to stabilize disease, achieve responsiveness, induce fever, improve quality of life, and improve the tolerability of conventional cancer treatments. The doctors reported long-term disease stability and improvements in patients’ general condition, vitality, strength, thermal comfort, appetite, sleep, pain from bone metastases, dyspnea in pulmonary lymphangitis carcinomatosa, fatigue, and cachexia; chemotherapy was better tolerated. Also patients’ emotional and mental condition was reported to have improved. Conclusion. Individualized integrative cancer treatment including MT aims to help cancer patients to live well with their disease. Further research should investigate the reported observations.

  9. Assessment and Availability of Trauma Care Services in a District Hospital of South India; A Field Observational Study

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    Pallavi Sarji Uthkarsh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the availability of trauma care services in a district referral hospital of Southern India. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study being performed during 2013 in a tertiary healthcare centre in Southern Indian. A detailed assessment of trauma care services was done in a 400 bed speciality hospital which is an apex referral hospital in the public health system using a check list based on WHO guidelines for evaluation of essential trauma care services, along with in-depth interviews of hospital stake holders and key informants. Results: The hospital had physical infrastructure in terms of emergency room, inpatient wards, operation theatres, intensive care unit and blood bank facilities. The recently constructed designated building for trauma care services was not operational and existing facilities were used beyond capacity. A designated trauma team was lacking and speciality services for managing polytrauma were deficient and thus, existing personnel were performing multiple tasks. Neurosurgeons and rehabilitative nursing staff were unavailable, and a radiographer was not available on a 24/7 basis. Existing nursing personnel had not received any formal training in trauma care and standard operating protocols were not available for trauma care. Resources for acute resuscitation were partially adequate. The hospital lacked adequate resources to manage head, abdomen, chest and spine injuries, and most of the polytrauma cases were referred to nearby city hospitals. Conclusion: District hospital, the only referral hospital in public health system for trauma victims of that region, had inadequate resources to manage trauma victims, which was probably responsible for delay in trauma care, improper referrals, high cost of care and poor outcomes.

  10. The etiological diagnosis and outcome in patients of acute febrile encephalopathy: A prospective observational study at tertiary care center

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    Aniyang Modi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute febrile encephalopathy (AFE is a clinical term used to an altered mental state that either accompanies or follows a short febrile illness and is characterized by a diffuse and nonspecific brain insult manifested by a combination of coma, seizures, and decerebration. Objective: To identify the etiological diagnosis and outcome in adult patients with AFE. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study was done in patients aged 14 years or above who were admitted with AFE at a tertiary care center in northwest India. Materials and Methods: The non-infectious causes of unconsciousness were excluded and then only a diagnosis of AFE was considered. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis and imaging of brain was done to determine the possible etiology. Outcome was assessed at 1 month of follow-up after discharge by using modified Rankin Scale (mRS. Data were analyzed and presented as mean, median, and percentages. A P value of 3 in 14 patients with AVE (P 3 in six patients with AVE and in the rest it was ≤1 (P < 0.001. Conclusions: In this study, pyogenic meningitis was the leading cause of AFE, followed by AVE and cerebral malaria. The outcome in cases with AVE can be fatal or more disabling than other etiologies.

  11. Assessing the accuracy of a computerized decision support system for digoxin dosing in primary care: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, W.L.; Avery, A.J.; Savelyich, B.S.; Brown, N.S.; Schers, H.J.; Howard, R.; Hippisley-Cox, J.; Horsfield, P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out as part of a European Union funded project (PharmDIS-e+), to develop and evaluate software aimed at assisting physicians with drug dosing. A drug that causes particular problems with drug dosing in primary care is digoxin because of its narrow therapeutic range

  12. Childhood urinary tract infection in primary care: a prospective observational study of prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Christopher C; O’Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Hood, Kerenza; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Hollingworth, William; Little, Paul; Van Der Voort, Judith; Dudley, Jan; Rumsby, Kate; Downing, Harriet; Harman, Kim; Hay, Alastair D

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of targeted and serendipitous treatment for, and associated recovery from, urinary tract infection (UTI) in pre-school children is unknown. Aim To determine the frequency and suspicion of UTI in children who are acutely ill, along with details of antibiotic prescribing, its appropriateness, and whether that appropriateness impacted on symptom improvement and recovery. Design and setting Prospective observational cohort study in primary care sites in urban and rural areas in England and Wales. Method Systematic urine sampling from children aged <5years presenting in primary care with acute illness with culture in NHS laboratories. Results Of 6079 children’s urine samples, 339 (5.6%) met laboratory criteria for UTI and 162 (47.9%) were prescribed antibiotics at the initial consultation. In total, 576/7101 (8.1%) children were suspected of having a UTI prior to urine sampling, including 107 of the 338 with a UTI (clinician sensitivity 31.7%). Children with a laboratory-diagnosed UTI were more likely to be prescribed antibiotics when UTI was clinically suspected than when it was not (86.0% versus 30.3%, P<0.001). Of 231 children with unsuspected UTI, 70 (30.3%) received serendipitous antibiotics (that is, antibiotics prescribed for a different reason). Overall, 176 (52.1%) children with confirmed UTI did not receive any initial antibiotic. Organism sensitivity to the prescribed antibiotic was higher when UTI was suspected than when treated serendipitously (77.1% versus 26.0%; P<0.001). Children with UTI prescribed appropriate antibiotics at the initial consultation improved a little sooner than those with a UTI who were not prescribed appropriate antibiotics initially (3.5 days versus 4.0 days; P = 0.005). Conclusion Over half of children with UTI on culture were not prescribed antibiotics at first presentation. Serendipitous UTI treatment was relatively common, but often inappropriate to the organism’s sensitivity. Methods for improved

  13. Clinical profile of acute kidney injury in a pediatric intensive care unit from Southern India: A prospective observational study

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    Sriram Krishnamurthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the term acute renal failure was replaced by acute kidney injury (AKI recently, there is a paucity of data on the incidence and profile of AKI in critically ill children from the developing world. Objectives: The objective of this study is to determine the incidence, etiology, short term outcome and predictors of fatality in critically ill children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU with AKI, aged 1 month to 13 years. Materials and Methods: In this prospective observational study, from June 2010 to March 2011, 215 children admitted to the PICU were screened for AKI, defined according to the AKI Network criteria. The patients with AKI were followed-up until discharge/death. Their clinical and biochemical data were recorded. Results: The incidence of AKI among 215 patients screened was 54 (25.1%. The common etiologies were infections, [34 (62.9%], acute glomerulonephritis (7.6%, snake envenomation (5.7%, hemolytic uremic syndrome (3.8% and congestive cardiac failures (3.8%. Among infections, pneumonia and septicemia constituted 26.5% each, meningoencephalitis accounted for 23.5%, and dengue, scrub typhus, tuberculosis and malaria constituted 9.3% of children with AKI. 27.8% of patients required dialysis. Overall mortality was 46.3%. On logistic regression analysis, requirement of mechanical ventilation was an independent predictor of fatality in AKI. Conclusions: Besides the high incidence of AKI in critically ill-children admitted to the PICU (25.1%, the condition was associated with adverse outcomes, including high mortality (46.3% and need for dialysis (27.8%. Infections dominated the etiological profile. Requirement of mechanical ventilation predicted an adverse outcome in our patient population.

  14. Study on workloads of human care worker with the introduction of IT system - the characteristics of work loads by observational research and the suggestions for KAIZEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Toru; Matsuda, Fumiko; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Motegi, Nobuyuki; Ikegami, Thor; Sakai, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristic of workloads on human care worker with the introduction of IT system, and suggested the support measures for KAIZEN in Japan. The investigation method is workflow line and hearing with a focus on work observation. The objects were 8 human care workers of the acute hospital that introduced an electronic system. By the introduction of the electronic chart, the nurse station sojourn time decreased, sickroom sojourn time increased, and time about direct nursing care to a patient increased. In addition, access to patient information became easy, and the offer of the health care service based on correct information came to be possible in real time. By The point of workflow line, it was effect that moving lengths decreased in order to install the electronic chart in patients' rooms. Though, it was a problem that it hasn't formed where to place the instruments such as sphygmomanometer, clinical thermometer and others. PMID:22317644

  15. Study on workloads of human care worker with the introduction of IT system - the characteristics of work loads by observational research and the suggestions for KAIZEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Toru; Matsuda, Fumiko; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Motegi, Nobuyuki; Ikegami, Thor; Sakai, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristic of workloads on human care worker with the introduction of IT system, and suggested the support measures for KAIZEN in Japan. The investigation method is workflow line and hearing with a focus on work observation. The objects were 8 human care workers of the acute hospital that introduced an electronic system. By the introduction of the electronic chart, the nurse station sojourn time decreased, sickroom sojourn time increased, and time about direct nursing care to a patient increased. In addition, access to patient information became easy, and the offer of the health care service based on correct information came to be possible in real time. By The point of workflow line, it was effect that moving lengths decreased in order to install the electronic chart in patients' rooms. Though, it was a problem that it hasn't formed where to place the instruments such as sphygmomanometer, clinical thermometer and others.

  16. Insomnia among patients with advanced disease during admission in a Palliative Care Unit: a prospective observational study on its frequency and association with psychological, physical and environmental factors

    OpenAIRE

    Renom-Guiteras, Anna; Planas, José; Farriols, Cristina; Mojal, Sergi; Miralles, Ramón; Silvent, Maria A; Ruiz-Ripoll, Ada I

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were: 1) to assess the frequency of insomnia among patients during admission in a Palliative Care Unit (PCU); 2) to study the association between emotional distress and insomnia, taking physical, environmental and other psychological factors into account. Methods Prospective observational study including patients consecutively admitted to a PCU during eight months, excluding those with severe cognitive problems or too low performance status. Insomnia was asse...

  17. Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit: two long-term multiclone outbreaks in a 10-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolari, Chiara; Pecorari, Monica; Della Casa, Elisa; Cattani, Silvia; Venturelli, Claudia; Fabio, Giuliana; Tagliazucchi, Sara; Serpini, Giulia Fregni; Migaldi, Mario; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2013-10-01

    We investigated two consecutive Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) outbreaks which occurred in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a tertiary level hospital in North Italy in a period of 10 years (January 2003-December 2012). Risk factors associated with S. marcescens acquisition were evaluated by a retrospective case-control study. A total of 21,011 clinical samples was examined: S. marcescens occurred in 127 neonates: 43 developed infection and 3 died. Seven clusters were recorded due to 12 unrelated clones which persisted for years in the ward, although no environmental source was found. The main epidemic clone A sustaining the first cluster in 2003 reappeared in 2010 as an extended spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strain and supporting the second epidemic. Birth weight, gestational age, use of invasive devices and length of stay in the ward were significantly related to S. marcescens acquisition. The opening of a new ward for non-intensive care-requiring neonates, strict adherence to alcoholic hand disinfection, the timely identification and isolation of infected and colonized neonates assisted in containing the epidemics. Genotyping was effective in tracing the evolution and dynamics of the clones demonstrating their long-term persistence in the ward.

  18. Burden and outcomes of pressure ulcers in cancer patients receiving the Kerala model of home based palliative care in India: Results from a prospective observational study

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    Biji M Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the prevalence and outcomes of pressure ulcers (PU seen in a cohort of cancer patients requiring home-based palliative care. Materials and Methods: All patients referred for home care were eligible for this prospective observational study, provided they were living within a distance of 35 km from the institute and gave informed consent. During each visit, caregivers were trained and educated for providing nursing care for the patient. Dressing material for PU care was provided to all patients free of cost and care methods were demonstrated. Factors influencing the occurrence and healing of PUs were analyzed using logistic regression. Duration for healing of PU was calculated using the Kaplan Meier method. P < 0.05 are taken as significant. Results: Twenty-one of 108 (19.4% enrolled patients had PU at the start of homecare services. None of the patients developed new PU during the course of home care. Complete healing of PU was seen in 9 (42.9% patients. The median duration for healing of PU was found to be 56 days. Median expenditure incurred in patients with PU was Rs. 2323.40 with a median daily expenditure of Rs. 77.56. Conclusions: The present model of homecare service delivery was found to be effective in the prevention and management of PUs. The high prevalence of PU in this cohort indicates a need for greater awareness for this complication. Clinical Trial Registry Number: CTRI/2014/03/004477

  19. Prospective observational study of emergency airway management in the critical care environment of a tertiary hospital in Melbourne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyett, J F; Moser, M S; Tobin, A E

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the population of patients receiving emergency airway management outside operating theatres at our institution, a tertiary referral centre in Melbourne. A registry of all patients receiving emergency airway management in the emergency department, ICU and on the wards as part of Medical Emergency Response teams' care, was prospectively collected. There were 128 adults and one paediatric patient requiring emergency airway management recruited to the study. Data for analysis included patient demographics, pre-oxygenation and apnoeic oxygenation, staff, drugs, details of laryngoscopic attempts, adjuncts, airway manoeuvres, complications sustained and method of confirmation of endotracheal tube placement. Over a 12-month period, there were 139 intubations of 129 patients, requiring a total of 169 attempts. Respiratory failure was the most common indication for intubation. Intubation was successful on the first episode of laryngoscopy in 116 (83.5%) patients. Complications occurred in 48 patients. In the cohort of patients without respiratory failure, nasal cannulae apnoeic oxygenation significantly reduced the incidence of hypoxaemia (0 out of 31 [0.0%] versus 10 out of 60 [16.7%], P=0.016; absolute risk reduction 16.7%; number needed to treat: 6). Waveform capnography was used to confirm endotracheal tube placement in 133 patients and there were four episodes of oesophageal intubation, all of which were recognised immediately. In the critical care environment of our institution, emergency airway management is achieved with a first-attempt success rate that is comparable to overseas data. Nasal cannulae apnoeic oxygenation appears to significantly reduce the risk of hypoxaemia in patients without respiratory failure and the use of waveform capnography eliminates episodes of unrecognised oesophageal intubation. PMID:26310407

  20. [Methodology for determining the index of caring complexity (ICC):prospective observational study in a stroke unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Bruno; Piu, Franco; Di Matteo, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    The method for determining the value of the index of caring complexity (ICC) is a multi-dimensional capable of resolving the problem of assessing the complexity of care. The fields of application of ICC methodology are multidisciplinary. The ICC method was applied in hospitals and territorial services and could also be useful for free professionals. Methodology is part and parcel of the caring process and does not therefore require specific data collection for classifying patients but the "scores " derive directly from the data flow obtained during the caring process.

  1. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

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    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model.Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation.Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes.Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  2. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model. Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation. Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes. Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  3. Indications and Types of Antibiotic Agents Used in 6 Acute Care Hospitals, 2009-2010: A Pragmatic Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Braykov, Nikolay; Uslan, Daniel Z; Morgan, Daniel J; Gandra, Sumanth; Johannsson, Birgir; Schweizer, Marin L; Weisenberg, Scott A; Young, Heather; Cantey, Joseph; Perencevich, Eli; Septimus, Edward; Srinivasan, Arjun; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To design better antimicrobial stewardship programs, detailed data on the primary drivers and patterns of antibiotic use are needed. OBJECTIVE To characterize the indications for antibiotic therapy, agents used, duration, combinations, and microbiological justification in 6 acute-care US facilities with varied location, size, and type of antimicrobial stewardship programs. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Retrospective medical chart review was performed on a random cross-sectional sample of 1,200 adult inpatients, hospitalized (>24 hrs) in 6 hospitals, and receiving at least 1 antibiotic dose on 4 index dates chosen at equal intervals through a 1-year study period (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010). METHODS Infectious disease specialists recorded patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, microbiological and radiological testing, and agents used, dose, duration, and indication for antibiotic prescriptions. RESULTS On the index dates 4,119 (60.5%) of 6,812 inpatients were receiving antibiotics. The random sample of 1,200 case patients was receiving 2,527 antibiotics (average: 2.1 per patient); 540 (21.4%) were prophylactic and 1,987 (78.6%) were therapeutic, of which 372 (18.7%) were pathogen-directed at start. Of the 1,615 empirical starts, 382 (23.7%) were subsequently pathogen-directed and 1,231 (76.2%) remained empirical. Use was primarily for respiratory (27.6% of prescriptions) followed by gastrointestinal (13.1%) infections. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins together accounted for 47.1% of therapy-days. CONCLUSIONS Use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy was prevalent in 6 US acute care facilities and in most instances was not subsequently pathogen directed. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins were the most frequently used antibiotics, particularly for respiratory indications. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):70-79.

  4. Structural abnormalities and persistent complaints after an ankle sprain are not associated: An observational case control study in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Ochten (John); M.C.E. Mos (Marinka C E); N. Van Putte-Katier (Nienke); E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Persistent complaints are very common after a lateral ankle sprain. Aim To investigate possible associations between structural abnormalities on radiography and MRI, and persistent complaints after a lateral ankle sprain. Design and setting Observational case control study on

  5. "Needs Expressed" and "Offers of Care": An Observational Study of Mothers with Somatisation Disorder and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, Ivona; Craig, Tom K. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The abnormal illness behaviours characterising somatisation disorder may be learnt responses acquired through exposure to parental illness and health anxiety in childhood. In this observational study we explore this hypothesis by examining patterns of interaction in mothers and their school age children. Method: A sample of 136 mother…

  6. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    V. K. Saini; Sewal, R. K.; Ahmad, Yusra; B Medhi

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and ...

  7. Observations of group care worker-child interaction in residential youth care: Pedagogical interventions and child behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaanssen, I.L.W.; Delsing, M.J.M.H.; Geijsen, L.; Kroes, G.; Veerman, J.W.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The work of group care workers in residential youth care is often described as professional parenting. Pedagogical interventions of group care workers influence the quality of care for looked-after children. The aim of the current study was to observe the pedagogical interventions of group care work

  8. Adherence to process of care quality indicators after percutaneous coronary intervention in Ontario, Canada: a retrospective observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnecki, Andrew; Prasad, Treesa J; Wang, Julie; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Cheema, Asim N.; Dz̆avík, Vladimír; Natarajan, Madhu K.; Simpson, Chris S.; So, Derek Y.; Syed, Jaffer; Tu, Jack V.; Ko, Dennis T

    2015-01-01

    Background Public reporting of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) outcomes has been established in many jurisdictions to ensure optimal delivery of care. The majority of PCI report cards examine in-hospital mortality, but relatively little is known regarding the adherence to processes of care. Methods A modified Delphi panel comprising cardiovascular experts was assembled to develop a set of PCI quality indicators. Indicators such as prescription of aspirin, dual antiplatelet therapy, s...

  9. Construct validity of the Chelsea critical care physical assessment tool: an observational study of recovery from critical illness

    OpenAIRE

    Corner, Evelyn J; Soni, Neil; Handy, Jonathan M.; Stephen J Brett

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW) is common in survivors of critical illness, resulting in global weakness and functional deficit. Although ICU-AW is well described subjectively in the literature, the value of objective measures has yet to be established. This project aimed to evaluate the construct validity of the Chelsea Critical Care Physical Assessment tool (CPAx) by analyzing the association between CPAx scores and hospital-discharge location, as a measure of fu...

  10. Incidence and Risk Factors for Delirium among Mechanically Ventilated Patients in an African Intensive Care Setting: An Observational Multicenter Study

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    Arthur Kwizera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Delirium is common among mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. There are little data regarding delirium among mechanically ventilated patients in Africa. We sought to determine the burden of delirium and associated factors in Uganda. Methods. We conducted a multicenter prospective study among mechanically ventilated patients in Uganda. Eligible patients were screened daily for delirium using the confusional assessment method (CAM-ICU. Comparisons were made using t-test, chi-squares, and Fisher’s exact test. Predictors were assessed using logistic regression. The level of statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results. Of 160 patients, 81 (51% had delirium. Median time to onset of delirium was 3.7 days. At bivariate analysis, history of mental illness, sedation, multiorgan dysfunction, neurosurgery, tachypnea, low mean arterial pressure, oliguria, fevers, metabolic acidosis, respiratory acidosis, anaemia, physical restraints, marital status, and endotracheal tube use were significant predictors. At multivariable analysis, having a history of mental illness, sedation, respiratory acidosis, higher PEEP, endotracheal tubes, and anaemia predicted delirium. Conclusion. The prevalence of delirium in a young African population is lower than expected considering the high mortality. A history of mental illness, anaemia, sedation, endotracheal tube use, and respiratory acidosis were factors associated with delirium.

  11. Guided online treatment in routine mental health care: an observational study on uptake, drop-out and effects

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    Kenter Robin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to limited resources patients in the Netherlands often have to wait for a minimum of six weeks after registration for mental health care to receive their first treatment session. Offering guided online treatment might be an effective solution to reduce waiting time and to increase patient outcomes at relatively low cost. In this study we report on uptake, drop-out and effects of online problem solving treatment that was implemented in a mental health center. Methods We studied all 104 consecutive patients aged 18–65 years with elevated symptoms of depression, anxiety and/or burnout who registered at the center during the first six months after implementation. They were offered a five week guided online treatment. At baseline, five weeks and twelve weeks we measured depressive (BDI-II, anxiety (HADS-A and burnout symptoms (MBI. Results A total of 55 patients (53% agreed to start with the online treatment. Patients who accepted the online treatment were more often female, younger and lower educated than those who refused. There were no baseline differences in clinical symptoms between the groups. There were large between group effect sizes after five weeks for online treatment for depression (d = 0.94 and anxiety (d = 1.07, but not for burnout (d = −.07. At twelve weeks, when both groups had started regular face-to-face treatments, we no longer found significant differences between the groups, except for anxiety (d = 0.69. Conclusion The results of this study show that the majority of patients prefer online guided online treatment instead of waiting for face-to-face treatment. Furthermore, online PST increases speed of recovery and can therefore be offered as a first step of treatment in mental healthcare.

  12. Implementation of 'matrix support' (collaborative care) to reduce asthma and COPD referrals and improve primary care management in Brazil: a pilot observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Sonia Maria; Salibe-Filho, William; Tonioli, Luís Paulo; Pfingesten, Luís Eduardo; Braz, Patrícia Dias; McDonnell, Juliet; Williams, Siân; do Carmo, Débora; de Sousa, Jaime Correia; Pinnock, Hilary; Stelmach, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are leading causes of hospitalisation and death in the city of Sao Bernardo do Campo. The municipality had difficulties in sustaining a pulmonology specialist team. Local policy has strengthened the knowledge of the primary care teams to improve the management of these diseases. Our aim is to pilot the implementation of an educational intervention based on collaborative care focused on reducing respiratory-related referrals. We implemented 'matrix support': a Brazilian collaborative educational intervention promoting specialist training and support for primary care physicians in three health territories with the highest number of referrals. Clinicians and nurses from primary care attended an 8-h workshop. The backlog of respiratory referrals was prioritised, where Asthma and COPD represented 70% of referral reasons. Initially, pulmonologists held joint consultations with physicians and nurses; as confidence grew, these were replaced by round-table note-based case discussions. The primary outcome was the number of asthma and COPD referrals. Almost all primary healthcare professionals in the three areas (132 of 157-87%) were trained; 360 patients were discussed, including 220 joint consultations. The number of respiratory referrals dropped from 290 (the year before matrix support) to 134 (the year after) (P<0.05). Referrals for asthma/COPD decreased from 13.4 to 5.4 cases per month (P=0.09) and for other lung diseases from 10.8 to 5.3 cases per month (P<0.05). Knowledge scores showed a significant improvement (P<0.001). Matrix-support collaborative care was well-accepted by primary care professionals associated with improved knowledge and reduced respiratory referrals. The initiative attracted specialists to the region overcoming historical recruitment problems. PMID:27536853

  13. A STUDY OF SEASONAL VARIATION OBSERVED IN OCCURRENCE OF IMMINENT ECLAMPSIA AND ECLAMPSIA AT TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Ashutosh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Eclampsia is an occurrence of seizures in women with pre-eclampsia. It is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity in India. Their etiology is poorly understood even today. Seasonal variation is considered as one of the cause. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To see the frequency of occurrence of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia during rainy (June to August and winter (October to December season. MATERIALS AND METHOD This is a descriptive, retrospective, observational and analytical study on seasonal variations in admission of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia patients in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in KIMS, Karad, from 2012 to 2014. RESULT Among 9122 total number of admissions in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 7678 got delivered in our institute. In which 4150 deliveries occurred in rainy season in which imminent eclampsia were 55 (1.3%, eclampsia cases were 42 (1.01%. While 3528 cases delivered in winter in which imminent eclampsia were 28 (0.7% and eclampsia were 24 (0.68%. The study showed frequency of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia being more common in rainy season than that of winter season. CONCLUSION In our study, we observed the seasonal variation in occurrence of imminent eclampsia and eclampsia. Number of cases of both imminent eclampsia and eclampsia was more common in rainy season. Regular health checkup, availability of health facilities and prompt referral to tertiary hospital can decrease mortality and morbidity of patient.

  14. Quality of interaction between primary health-care providers and patients with type 2 diabetes in Muscat, Oman: an observational study

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    Vernby Åsa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A good patient-physician interaction is particularly important in chronic diseases like diabetes. There are so far no published data regarding the interaction between the primary health-care providers and patients with type 2 diabetes in Oman, where diabetes is a major and growing health problem. This study aimed at exploring how health-care providers interact with patients with type 2 diabetes at primary health-care level in Muscat, Oman, focusing on the consultation environment, and some aspects of care and information. Methods Direct observations of 90 consultations between 23 doctors and 13 diabetes nurses concerned with diabetes management during their consultations with type 2 diabetes patients in six primary health-care centres in the Muscat region, using checklists developed from the National Diabetes Guidelines. Consultations were assessed as optimal if more than 75% of observed aspects were fulfilled and sub-optimal if less than 50% were fulfilled. Results Overall 52% of the doctors' consultations were not optimal. Some important aspects for a positive consultation environment were fulfilled in only about half of the doctors' consultations: ensuring privacy of consultation (49%, eye contact (49%, good attention (52%, encouraging asking questions (47%, and emphasizing on the patients' understanding of the provided information (52%. The doctors enquired about adverse effects of anti-diabetes drugs in less than 10% of consultations. The quality of the nurses' consultations was sub-optimal in about 75% of 85 consultations regarding aspects of consultation environment, care and information. Conclusion The performance of the primary health-care doctors and diabetes nurses needs to be improved. The role of the diabetes nurses and the teamwork should be enhanced. We suggest a multidisciplinary team approach, training and education to the providers to upgrade their skills regarding communication and care. Barriers to

  15. TREATMENT OUTCOME PROFILE OF NON RESOLVING PNEUMONIA AMONG HOSPITALIZED COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA PATIENTS IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

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    Raveendra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Most of the times, a Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP patient is being treated with empirical antibiotics by best guess method by the clinician. Patient who did not show expected clinical improvement or resolution on chest x- ray after 2 weeks of antibiotics is considered as unresolved or non-resolving pneumonia and is a major problem, contributing to increased mortality and morbidity in the medical wards. AIM OF STUDY: 1.Tostudy the clinical profile of unresolved pneumonia among CAP. 2. To know the treatment outcome in these cases. MATERIALS & METHODS: 80 hospitalized CAP patients who did not improve either clinically or radiologically after 2 weeks of broad spectrum antibiotics were included in the study. Details of these patients including investigations done at other higher centers were recorded and patients were followed up for 6 months or till death. RESULTS: Unresolved pneumonia was commonly observed in patients more than 50 years. Pulmonary tuberculosis was the commonest cause, followed by MDR varieties of CAP, Bronchogenic carcinoma. Multiple risk factors were noted, which includes cigarette smoking, alcohol, COPD, Diabetes, HIV positive status. Elderly age, multiple risk factors, antibiotic abuse and resistance resulted in majority of the cases. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of early recognition and appropriate treatment of CAP to prevent unresolved pneumonia and use of invasive and latest investigations to recognize unresolved pneumonia, to decrease mortality and morbidity.

  16. Hovering between Heaven and Hell: An Observational Study Focusing on the Interactions between One Woman with Schizophrenia, Dementia, and Challenging Behaviour and her Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Jansson, Lilian; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2015-07-01

    This case study aims to illuminate the interactions between one woman (Alice) with schizophrenia, dementia, and challenging behaviour and her professional caregivers. We performed participant observations of these interactions and conducted informal interviews at the residential home where the woman lived. The transcripts were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the interactions between Alice and her caregivers were experienced as hovering between heaven and hell. Alice struggled to bring order into her chaotic life world by splitting herself and others, and her caregivers struggled to protect Alice's and their own dignity by limiting her challenging behaviours. They also strived to understand their own and Alice's behaviour. Current practice in caring for people with challenging behaviour usually focuses on symptom reduction through medication and behavioural modification. Instead, we suggest moving toward an understanding of the experiences behind the challenging behaviours and designing person-centred care based on each patients' reality.

  17. An observational study of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus in a tertiary care Hospital of Eastern India

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    Nandini Chatterjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus and its impact on the human body have been extensively dissected over the years. However, skin which is the largest organ in the body, has received minimum attention. Therefore, this study was designed to analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from Eastern region of India. Materials and Methods: This is an observational study, conducted in the General Medicine and Endocrinology departments of a Medical College and Hospital in Eastern India. The data were collected prospectively and systematically in a pre-established proforma designed by us, where clinical findings along with investigations were recorded. Results: Six hundred and eighty (680 diabetic patients were examined, there were (64.8% male and (35.1% were female, of them 95.3% were Type 2 diabetics while 4.7% were Type 1. Five hundred and three patients (503 out of six hundred and eighty. i.e. 73.9% were found to have skin lesions. Thirteen (13 (41% Type1 diabetics demonstrated skin lesions commonest being diabetic xerosis, infections and diabetic hand. Among Type2 diabetics 490(75.61% showed skin lesions. Here infections, xerosis, hair loss beneath the knees, diabetic dermopathy were the most frequent. Majority of patients (67% had combination of more than one type of skin lesion. There was statistically significant correlation of skin lesions with duration of diabetes, however similar correlation could not be demonstrated regarding metabolic control. Conclusion: Involvement of skin is inevitable and multifarious in diabetes mellitus. Higher prevalence is seen in Type 2 diabetic population. The duration of diabetes is positively correlated with lesions and infective dermatologic manifestations were associated with higher HbA1C values.

  18. Bidirectional Assessment of Stress, job satisfaction and work ability of Educators in day care centres: a real-time observation study - the study protocol (BASE

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    Kusma Bianca

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational demands of educators are not very well researched. Nevertheless their work is subject to several requirements. Whether these demands have an effect on the work ability and the health status of employees has also not been examined. Furthermore it is unclear if the ownership type of day care centres have an influence on job satisfaction and work ability of the pedagogical staff and what kind of resources do exist. Previous studies were mainly based on questionnaire data. Objective data does not exist. Therefore the aim of this investigation is to collect precise data relating to work of educators. Methods Effects of different types of ownership of day care centres on job satisfaction and work ability of educators will be assessed with the help of objective real time studies in combination with multi-level psycho diagnostic measurements. Discussion The present study is the first of its kind. Up to now there are no computer-based real time studies on workflow of pedagogical staff with regard to assess their work-related stress. Following an exhaustive documentation of educators work processes the day-to-day task can be estimated and approaches for prevention can be developed. This can substantially contribute to an overall improvement of child care in Germany.

  19. Bidirectional Assessment of Stress, job satisfaction and work ability of Educators in day care centres: a real-time observation study - the study protocol (BASE)

    OpenAIRE

    Kusma Bianca; Nienhaus Albert; Spallek Michael; Quarcoo David; Groneberg David A; Mache Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Occupational demands of educators are not very well researched. Nevertheless their work is subject to several requirements. Whether these demands have an effect on the work ability and the health status of employees has also not been examined. Furthermore it is unclear if the ownership type of day care centres have an influence on job satisfaction and work ability of the pedagogical staff and what kind of resources do exist. Previous studies were mainly based on questionna...

  20. Cardiovascular risk management in patients with coronary heart disease in primary care: variation across countries and practices. An observational study based on quality indicators

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    van Lieshout Jan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care has an important role in cardiovascular risk management (CVRM and a minimum size of scale of primary care practices may be needed for efficient delivery of CVRM . We examined CVRM in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD in primary care and explored the impact of practice size. Methods In an observational study in 8 countries we sampled CHD patients in primary care practices and collected data from electronic patient records. Practice samples were stratified according to practice size and urbanisation; patients were selected using coded diagnoses when available. CVRM was measured on the basis of internationally validated quality indicators. In the analyses practice size was defined in terms of number of patients registered of visiting the practice. We performed multilevel regression analyses controlling for patient age and sex. Results We included 181 practices (63% of the number targeted. Two countries included a convenience sample of practices. Data from 2960 CHD patients were available. Some countries used methods supplemental to coded diagnoses or other inclusion methods introducing potential inclusion bias. We found substantial variation on all CVRM indicators across practices and countries. We computed aggregated practice scores as percentage of patients with a positive outcome. Rates of risk factor recording varied from 55% for physical activity as the mean practice score across all practices (sd 32% to 94% (sd 10% for blood pressure. Rates for reaching treatment targets for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and LDL cholesterol were 46% (sd 21%, 86% (sd 12% and 48% (sd 22% respectively. Rates for providing recommended cholesterol lowering and antiplatelet drugs were around 80%, and 70% received influenza vaccination. Practice size was not associated to indicator scores with one exception: in Slovenia larger practices performed better. Variation was more related to differences between

  1. The impact of childhood acute rotavirus gastroenteritis on the parents’ quality of life: prospective observational study in European primary care medical practices

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    Domingo Javier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus (RV is the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. A Quality of Life study was conducted in primary care in three European countries as part of a larger epidemiological study (SPRIK to investigate the impact of paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE on affected children and their parents. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was linguistically validated in Spanish, Italian and Polish. The questionnaire was included in an observational multicentre prospective study of 302 children aged Results Questionnaire responses showed that acute RVGE in a child adversely affects the parents’ daily life as well as the child. Parents of children with RVGE experience worry, distress and impact on their daily activities. RVGE of greater clinical severity (assessed by the Vesikari scale was associated with higher parental worries due to symptoms and greater changes in the child’s behaviour, and a trend to higher impact on parents’ daily activities and higher parental distress, together with a higher score on the symptom severity scale of the questionnaire. Conclusions Parents of a child with acute RVGE presenting to primary care experience worry, distress and disruptions to daily life as a result of the child’s illness. Prevention of this disease through prophylactic vaccination will improve the daily lives of parents and children.

  2. An observational study to assess an electronic point-of-care wound documentation and reporting system regarding user satisfaction and potential for improved care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florczak, Beth; Scheurich, Anne; Croghan, John; Sheridan, Philip; Kurtz, Debra; McGill, William; McClain, Bonny

    2012-03-01

    The integration of information technology into daily patient care potentially provides a means to standardize care and enable continuous quality improvement through improved communication among care teams. A 2-month observational study was conducted on 38 residents with pressure ulcers at a 51-bed skilled nursing facility to rate the Ease of Use and Wound Management Effectiveness of a point-of-care electronic wound documentation system. Nine nurses evaluated the use of handheld "smart phone" devices equipped with a digital camera to document pressure ulcer assessment and treatment at point of care. Ease of Use (five items) was scored on a 5-point Likert scale (5 = very easy); Wound Management Effectiveness (eight items) was scored on a 5-point Likert scale (5 = very effective). Statistically significant mean changes in nurses' ratings were found for baseline compared to 2-month follow-up by paired t-test. Ease of Use ratings across the five criteria increased from an overall mean of 3.3 at baseline to 4.7 at follow-up (P = 0.5), while Wound Management Effectiveness increased from an overall mean of 3.3 at baseline to 4.4 at follow-up (P = 0.5) . The greatest gains for single items were reviewing wound progress (mean difference = 2.35; P = 0.000) and recognizing changes in wound status (mean difference = 1.78; P = 0.001) within the Ease of Use and Wound Management Effectiveness scales, respectively. The smallest change occurred in reading charts and notes (mean difference = 0.89) and ability to determine resident's risk level (mean difference = 0.39). Further research is needed to assess use of a wound documentation system in this and other settings, as well as to ascertain validity and reliability. PMID:22391956

  3. Drug utilization pattern in acute coronary syndrome at tertiary care hospital: a prospective cross-sectional observational study

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    Praveen Choudhary

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: The present study provides valuable insight about the overall pattern of drug used in Acute Coronary syndrome. Physician should be encouraged to prescribe drugs with generic name. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(2.000: 513-516

  4. European Practice Assessment of Cardiovascular risk management (EPA Cardio): protocol of an international observational study in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    van Lieshout Jan; Campbell Stephen; Ludt Sabine; Wensing Michel; Volbracht Eckhard; Grol Richard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite important improvements in available prevention and treatment, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Not all high-risk patients and patients with CVD have healthy lifestyles and receive the best possible healthcare. Internationally comparative data are needed to compare cardiovascular risk management in different countries, and to examine the impact of improvement programs and others factors. Objectives This study aims t...

  5. Information structure and organisation in change of shift reports: An observational study of nursing hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Hunt, Tara; Parush, Avi; Ellis, Jacqueline; Thomas, Margot; Rashotte, Judy

    2015-06-01

    Patient hand-offs involve the exchange of critical information. Ineffective hand-offs can result in reduced patient safety by leading to wrong treatment, delayed diagnoses or other outcomes that can negatively affect the healthcare system. The objectives of this study were to uncover the structure of the information conveyed during patient hand-offs and look for principles characterising the organisation of the information. With an observational study approach, data was gathered during the morning and evening nursing change of shift hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Content analysis identified a common meta-structure used for information transfer that contained categories with varying degrees of information integration and the repetition of high consequence information. Differences were found in the organisation of the hand-off structures, and these varied as a function of nursing experience. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential benefits of computerised tools which utilise standardised structure for information transfer and the implications for future education and critical care skill acquisition.

  6. Concordance between nurses' perception of their ability to provide spiritual care and the identified spiritual needs of hospitalized patients: A cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Fen; Koo, Malcolm; Tseng, Hui-Chen; Liao, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yuh-Min

    2015-12-01

    Spiritual care is essential to the well-being of patients, and nurses provide spiritual care as a fundamental part of nursing practice. In this study, we investigated the spiritual care needs of hospitalized patients to determine whether the perceived knowledge of nurses corresponded with these spiritual care needs. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1351 hospitalized patients and 200 registered nurses recruited from a medical center in central Taiwan. A questionnaire, including the 21-item Spiritual Care Needs Inventory (patient and nurse version) and basic demographic information, was distributed to eligible participants. The top three items of the spiritual care needs expressed by the hospitalized patients were respect for privacy and dignity, showing concern, and guidance in gaining a sense of hope in life; the percentages of nurses not knowing how to provide these spiritual care needs were 0%, 1%, and 15%, respectively. The spiritual care needs of patients showed a significant relationship with the knowledge of nurses, suggesting that the perceived knowledge of the nurses generally corresponded with the spiritual care items that the patients required most.

  7. Cohort Records Study of 19,655 Women Who Received Postabortion Care in a Tertiary Hospital 2010-2013 in China: What Trends Can Be Observed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen-Yu; Quan, Song; Chai, Dong-Ning; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The retrospective cohort epidemiological study was to investigate the characteristics of women who underwent induced abortion. Data were retrospectively collected from women who underwent induced abortions (n = 19,655) at the Xiamen Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital (2010-2013). The characteristics of women who underwent induced abortions included mean age, unmarried status, no previous deliveries, first pregnancy, ≥2 abortions including the current one, and a history of caesarian section. From 2010 to 2013, mean age increased and declines were observed in the ratio of induced abortions to live births, the proportion of induced abortions among women of 15-24 years, those who were unmarried, had their first pregnancy, or had no history of delivery. However, the rates of induced abortions increased among women who were lactating, had a history of caesarian section, or had an interpregnancy interval of mentality and culture between countries might limit the representativeness of these results. PMID:26989681

  8. A prolonged observational study of tracheal tube displacements: Benchmarking an incidence <0.5-1% in a medical-surgical adult intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Kapadia, Farhad N.; Pandurang C. Tekawade; Nath, Shruti S.; Pachpute, Sharad S.; Saverkar, Sanjay S.; Bhise, Rupali A.; Chavan, Aarti C.; Varghese, Sholly J.; Vidya U. Kantak; Kshirsagar, Rohini V.; Vaishali A. Neve; Samona O. D′souza

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Tracheal tubes are commonly used in intensive care unit (ICU) and lead to complications like displacements. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate if the rate of tracheal tube displacement benchmarked at

  9. Study Design of the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely Ill Patients (microSOAP: an International Multicenter Observational Study of Sublingual Microcirculatory Alterations in Intensive Care Patients

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    Namkje A. R. Vellinga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sublingual microcirculatory alterations are associated with an adverse prognosis in several critical illness subgroups. Up to now, single-center studies have reported on sublingual microcirculatory alterations in ICU patient subgroups, but an extensive evaluation of the prevalence of these alterations is lacking. We present the study design of an international multicenter observational study to investigate the prevalence of microcirculatory alterations in critically ill: the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely ill Patients (microSOAP. Methods. 36 ICU’s worldwide have participated in this study aiming for inclusion of over 500 evaluable patients. To enable communication and data collection, a website, an Open Clinica 3.0 database, and image uploading software have been designed. A one-session assessment of the sublingual microcirculation using Sidestream Dark Field imaging and data collection on patient characteristics has been performed in every ICU patient >18 years, regardless of underlying disease. Statistical analysis will provide insight in the prevalence and severity of sublingual alterations, its relation to systemic hemodynamic variables, disease, therapy, and outcome. Conclusion. This study will be the largest microcirculation study ever performed. It is expected that this study will also establish a basis for future studies related to the microcirculation in critically ill.

  10. A prolonged observational study of tracheal tube displacements: Benchmarking an incidence <0.5-1% in a medical-surgical adult intensive care unit

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    Farhad N. Kapadia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Tracheal tubes are commonly used in intensive care unit (ICU and lead to complications like displacements. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate if the rate of tracheal tube displacement benchmarked at <1% per patient and <0.5% per tracheal tube day, could be sustained over a prolonged period. The secondary aim was to document the patterns of all forms airway accident and to evaluate their consequences. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective observational study of Intubated and ventilated patients in a General Medical-Surgical Adult ICU. The incidence of accidental extubation, self extubation, partial displacement and blockages of tracheal tubes were recorded. Results: The overall tracheal tube displacement rate was 61/10,112 (0.6% per patient and 61/28,464 (0.22% per tracheal tube day. There were 30 additional incidents of blockage, kinking or biting of the tracheal tube. Physiological consequences-69 were mild, 10 moderate, 12 major and one death. Of the 91 accidents, 30 were partly and 30 were completely preventable. 76 incidents involved an endotracheal tube (54 displaced, 12 blocked and 10 bitten-kinked and 15 a tracheostomy tube (seven displaced and eight blocked. Accidents were more common in medical than surgical patients (medical = 48, cardiac surgical = 17 and other surgical/trauma = 26. Conclusion: Tracheal tube displacement rate in a mixed medical-surgical adult ICU was maintained below the pre-set benchmark of <1% per patient and <0.5% per intubated day over nearly a decade.

  11. An observational study to evaluate the maternal and neonatal outcome of forceps delivery in a tertiary care government hospital of a cosmopolitan city of India

    OpenAIRE

    Akanksha Lamba; Ramanjeet Kaur; Zulaihuma Muzafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Operative vaginal delivery using obstetric forceps is a practice that dates back several centuries. Modern obstetrics practice has witnessed an increase in the caesarean section rates. The goal of forceps delivery is to mimic spontaneous vaginal birth, thereby expediting delivery with a minimum of maternal or neonatal morbidity. The main objective of study was to evaluate the maternal and neonatal outcome of forceps assisted deliveries in a tertiary care hospital over a period of ...

  12. Risk of ischaemic heart disease and acute myocardial infarction in a Spanish population: observational prospective study in a primary-care setting

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    Cucalón José M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischaemic heart disease is a global priority of health-care policy, because of its social repercussions and its impact on the health-care system. Yet there is little information on coronary morbidity in Spain and on the effect of the principal risk factors on risk of coronary heart disease. The objective of this study is to describe the epidemiology of coronary disease (incidence, mortality and its association with cardiovascular risk factors using the information gathered by primary care practitioners on cardiovascular health of their population. Methods A prospective study was designed. Eight primary-care centres participated, each contributing to the constitution of the cohort with the entire population covered by the centre. A total of 6124 men and women aged over 25 years and free of cardiovascular disease agreed to participate and were thus enrolled and followed-up, with all fatal and non-fatal coronary disease episodes being registered during a 5-year period. Repeated measurements were collected on smoking, blood pressure, weight and height, serum total cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoproteins and fasting glucose. Rates were calculated for acute myocardial infarction and ischaemic heart disease. Associations between cardiovascular risk factors and coronary disease-free survival were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. Results Mean age at recruitment was 51.6 ± 15, with 24% of patients being over 65. At baseline, 74% of patients were overweight, serum cholesterol over 240 was present in 35% of patients, arterial hypertension in 37%, and basal glucose over 126 in 11%. Thirty-four percent of men and 13% of women were current smokers. During follow-up, 155 first episodes of coronary disease were detected, which yielded age-adjusted rates of 362 and 191 per 100,000 person-years in men and women respectively. Disease-free survival was associated with all risk factors in univariate

  13. A Study of Understandings in Care Work with Elderly People: Experiences using the Sophos Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Helle Krogh

    2004-01-01

    At study about understandings in Care Work. Using Second Order Phenomenological Observation Scheme......At study about understandings in Care Work. Using Second Order Phenomenological Observation Scheme...

  14. Study design of the microcirculatory shock occurrence in acutely Ill patients (microSOAP): An international multicenter observational study of sublingual microcirculatory alterations in intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.R. Vellinga (Namkje ); E.C. Boerma (Christiaan); M. Koopmans (Matty); A. Donati (Abele); A. Dubin (Arnaldo); N.I. Shapiro (Nathan ); R.M. Pearse (Rupert ); J. Bakker (Jan); C. Ince (Can)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective. Sublingual microcirculatory alterations are associated with an adverse prognosis in several critical illness subgroups. Up to now, single-center studies have reported on sublingual microcirculatory alterations in ICU patient subgroups, but an extensive evaluation of the preval

  15. Hospitalization and ambulatory care in imported-malaria: evaluation of trends and impact on mortality. A prospective multicentric 14-year observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Casalino, Enrique; Etienne, Aurélie; Mentré, France; Houzé, Sandrine; ,

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization is usually recommended for imported malaria. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the evolution in clinical pathways while measuring their impact on mortality. Methods This is a 14-year prospective observational study divided into three periods. We evaluated for adult (≥15 years) and paediatric (

  16. Evaluating integrated headache care: a one-year follow-up observational study in patients treated at the Essen headache centre

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    Diener Hans C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outpatient integrated headache care was established in 2005 at the Essen Headache Centre in Germany. This paper reports outcome data for this approach. Methods Patients were seen by a neurologist for headache diagnosis and recommendation for drug treatment. Depending on clinical needs, patients were seen by a psychologist and/or physical therapist. A 5-day headache-specific multidisciplinary treatment programme (MTP was provided for patients with frequent or chronic migraine, tension type headache (TTH and medication overuse headache (MOH. Subsequent outpatient treatment was provided by neurologists in private practice. Results Follow-up data on headache frequency and burden of disease were prospectively obtained in 841 patients (mean age 41.5 years after 3, 6 and 12 months. At baseline mean headache frequency was 18.1 (SD = 1.6 days per month, compared to measurement at 1 year follow-up a mean reduction of 5.8 (SD = 11.9 headache days per month was observed in 486 patients (57.8% after one year (TTH patients mean: -8.5 days per month; migraine mean: -3.2 days per month, patients with migraine and TTH mean: -5.9 days per month. A reduction in headache days ≥ 50% was observed in 306 patients (36.4% independent of diagnosis, while headache frequency remains unchanged in 20.9% and increase in 21.3% of the patient. Conclusion Multidisciplinary outpatient headache centres offer an effective way to establish a three-tier treatment offer for difficult headache patients depending on clinical needs.

  17. Using video-based observation research methods in primary care health encounters to evaluate complex interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Asan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of video-based observation research methods in primary care environment and highlight important methodological considerations and provide practical guidance for primary care and human factors researchers conducting video studies to understand patient–clinician interaction in primary care settings.Methods We reviewed studies in the literature which used video methods in health care research, and we also used our own experience based on the video studies we conducted in primary care settings.Results This paper highlighted the benefits of using video techniques, such as multi-channel recording and video coding, and compared “unmanned” video recording with the traditional observation method in primary care research. We proposed a list that can be followed step by step to conduct an effective video study in a primary care setting for a given problem. This paper also described obstacles, researchers should anticipate when using video recording methods in future studies.Conclusion With the new technological improvements, video-based observation research is becoming a promising method in primary care and HFE research. Video recording has been under-utilised as a data collection tool because of confidentiality and privacy issues. However, it has many benefits as opposed to traditional observations, and recent studies using video recording methods have introduced new research areas and approaches.

  18. Building an international network for a primary care research program: reflections on challenges and solutions in the set-up and delivery of a prospective observational study of acute cough in 13 European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veen Robert ER

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementing a primary care clinical research study in several countries can make it possible to recruit sufficient patients in a short period of time that allows important clinical questions to be answered. Large multi-country studies in primary care are unusual and are typically associated with challenges requiring innovative solutions. We conducted a multi-country study and through this paper, we share reflections on the challenges we faced and some of the solutions we developed with a special focus on the study set up, structure and development of Primary Care Networks (PCNs. Method GRACE-01 was a multi-European country, investigator-driven prospective observational study implemented by 14 Primary Care Networks (PCNs within 13 European Countries. General Practitioners (GPs recruited consecutive patients with an acute cough. GPs completed a case report form (CRF and the patient completed a daily symptom diary. After study completion, the coordinating team discussed the phases of the study and identified challenges and solutions that they considered might be interesting and helpful to researchers setting up a comparable study. Results The main challenges fell within three domains as follows: i selecting, setting up and maintaining PCNs; ii designing local context-appropriate data collection tools and efficient data management systems; and iii gaining commitment and trust from all involved and maintaining enthusiasm. The main solutions for each domain were: i appointing key individuals (National Network Facilitator and Coordinator with clearly defined tasks, involving PCNs early in the development of study materials and procedures. ii rigorous back translations of all study materials and the use of information systems to closely monitor each PCNs progress; iii providing strong central leadership with high level commitment to the value of the study, frequent multi-method communication, establishing a coherent ethos

  19. [Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Dulce Maria; Portella, Jean Cristtus; Bianchi e Silva, Laura

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this experience report is to present the Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions (Laboratório de Estudos Semióticos nas Interações de Cuidado - LESIC). The lab was set up at the Nursing School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil in 2010. It has the purpose of providing didactic and pedagogical updates, based on the Theory developed by the Paris School of Semiotics, that enable the increase of knowledge and interactive/observational skills regarding the nature and mastery of human care.

  20. Transfusão de sangue em terapia intensiva: um estudo epidemiológico observacional Blood transfusion in intensive care: an epidemiological observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodolfo Rocco

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A transfusão de concentrado de hemácias (CHA é muito freqüente no centro de tratamento intensivo (CTI, mas as conseqüências da anemia nos pacientes gravemente enfermos ainda são obscuras. Os objetivos desse estudo foram avaliar a freqüência, as indicações, os limiares transfusionais e o prognóstico dos pacientes criticamente enfermos que receberam CHA. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo de coorte realizado no CTI médico-cirúrgico de um Hospital Universitário durante 16 meses. Foram coletados dados demográficos, clínicos e os relacionados a transfusão de CHA. Regressão logística binária foi utilizada após as análises univariadas. RESULTADOS: Dos 698 pacientes internados, 244 (35% foram transfundidos com CHA. Os pacientes clínicos e em pós-operatório de urgência foram mais transfundidos. Os limiares transfusionais foram: hematócrito = 22,8% ± 4,5% e hemoglobina = 7,9 ± 1,4 g/dL. Os pacientes transfundidos receberam em média 4,4 ± 3,7 CHA e apresentaram maior letalidade no CTI (39,8% versus 13,2%; p 5 unidades e escore SAPS II. CONCLUSÕES: A transfusão de CHA é freqüente no CTI, particularmente nos pacientes internados por problemas clínicos e após cirurgias de emergência, com internação prolongada, em VM e com cirrose hepática. O limiar transfusional observado foi mais baixo que aquele assinalado pela literatura. A transfusão de CHA foi associada com maior letalidade.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Packed red blood cell (PRBC transfusion is frequent in intensive care unit (ICU. However, the consequences of anemia in ICU patients are poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence, indications, pre-transfusion hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, and outcomes of ICU patients transfused with PRBC. METHODS: Prospective cohort study conducted at a medical-surgical ICU of a teaching hospital during a 16-month period. Patients' demographic, clinical, laboratory and transfusion-related data

  1. Evaluation of rationality in prescribing, adherence to treatment guidelines, and direct cost of treatment in intensive cardiac care unit: A prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan P. Christian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs remain the most common cause of sudden death. Hence, appropriate drug therapy in intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU is crucial in managing cardiovascular emergencies and to decrease morbidity and mortality. Objective: To evaluate prescribing pattern of drugs and direct cost of therapy in patients admitted in ICCU. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted in ICCU of a tertiary care teaching hospital were enrolled. Demographic data, clinical history, and complete drug therapy received during their stay in ICCU were noted. Data were analyzed for drug utilization pattern and direct cost of treatment calculated using patient′s hospital and pharmacy bills. Rationality of therapy was evaluated based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA guidelines. Result: Data of 170 patients were collected over 2 months. Mean age of patients was 54.67 ± 13.42 years. Male to female ratio was 2.33:1. Most common comorbid condition was hypertension 76 (44.7%. Most common diagnosis was acute coronary syndrome (ACS 49.4%. Mean stay in ICCU was 4.42 ± 1.9 days. Mean number of drugs prescribed per patient was 11.43 ± 2.85. Antiplatelet drugs were the most frequently prescribed drug group (86.5%. Mean cost of pharmacotherapy per patient was `2701.24 ± 3111.94. Mean direct cost of treatment per patient was `10564.74 ± 14968.70. Parenteral drugs constituted 42% of total drugs and 90% of total cost of pharmacotherapy. Cost of pharmacotherapy was positively correlated with number of drugs (P = 0.000 and duration of stay (P = 0.027. Conclusion: Antiplatelet drugs were the most frequently prescribed drug group. Mean number of drugs per encounter were high, which contributed to the higher cost of pharmacotherapy. ACC/AHA guidelines were followed in majority of the cases.

  2. Caring school leadership: a South African study

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Vyver, C.P.; Van der Westhuizen, P C; Meyer, L.W.

    2014-01-01

    The research pivoted on the question whether South African school principals fulfilled their caring role towards teachers. The aims of the study were threefold. First, to determine how principals rated their care-giving, secondly to determine whether significant discrepancies existed between principals’ rating of their care-giving and teachers’ experiences thereof and thirdly to identify the determinants of care that contributed the most and the least towards principals’ care-givi...

  3. Direct observation of the nutrition care practices of Australian general practitioners

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    Ball LE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nutrition care refers to nutrition-related advice or counselling provided by health professionals in an attempt to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the practices of a sample of Australian general practitioners (GPs when providing nutrition care to adult patients. METHODS: Eighteen GPs (13 male, 5 female were observed by fourth-year medical students during their general practice rotation. Each GP was observed for five consultations that included nutrition care, totalling 90 observed consultations. In each consultation, students completed a 31-item nutrition care checklist of nutrition care practices that could feasibly occur in a standard consultation. Each practice was marked with either a ‘yes’ (completed, ‘no’ (did not complete or ‘completed by practice nurse prior to or after the consultation’. RESULTS: Twenty-eight nutrition care practices were observed at least once. The most frequently observed practices were measuring and discussing blood pressure (76.7%; n=69, followed by general questions about current diet (74.4%; n=67. Approximately half of the consultations included a statement of a nutrition-related problem (52.2%; n=47, and the provision of nutrition advice that focused on a nutrient (45.6%; n=41 or food group (52.2%; n=47. Consultations with male GPs, as well as GPs with more than 25 years of experience, were associated with an increased number of nutrition care practices per consultation. DISCUSSION: The GPs performed nutrition care practices in varying frequencies. Further research is required to identify the most effective GP nutrition care practices to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients.

  4. The diagnosis of urinary tract infections in young children (DUTY: protocol for a diagnostic and prospective observational study to derive and validate a clinical algorithm for the diagnosis of UTI in children presenting to primary care with an acute illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downing Harriet

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is common in children, and may cause serious illness and recurrent symptoms. However, obtaining a urine sample from young children in primary care is challenging and not feasible for large numbers. Evidence regarding the predictive value of symptoms, signs and urinalysis for UTI in young children is urgently needed to help primary care clinicians better identify children who should be investigated for UTI. This paper describes the protocol for the Diagnosis of Urinary Tract infection in Young children (DUTY study. The overall study aim is to derive and validate a cost-effective clinical algorithm for the diagnosis of UTI in children presenting to primary care acutely unwell. Methods/design DUTY is a multicentre, diagnostic and prospective observational study aiming to recruit at least 7,000 children aged before their fifth birthday, being assessed in primary care for any acute, non-traumatic, illness of ≤ 28 days duration. Urine samples will be obtained from eligible consented children, and data collected on medical history and presenting symptoms and signs. Urine samples will be dipstick tested in general practice and sent for microbiological analysis. All children with culture positive urines and a random sample of children with urine culture results in other, non-positive categories will be followed up to record symptom duration and healthcare resource use. A diagnostic algorithm will be constructed and validated and an economic evaluation conducted. The primary outcome will be a validated diagnostic algorithm using a reference standard of a pure/predominant growth of at least >103, but usually >105 CFU/mL of one, but no more than two uropathogens. We will use logistic regression to identify the clinical predictors (i.e. demographic, medical history, presenting signs and symptoms and urine dipstick analysis results most strongly associated with a positive urine culture result. We will

  5. Do the methods used to analyse missing data really matter? An examination of data from an observational study of Intermediate Care patients

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    Kaambwa Billingsley

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Missing data is a common statistical problem in healthcare datasets from populations of older people. Some argue that arbitrarily assuming the mechanism responsible for the missingness and therefore the method for dealing with this missingness is not the best option—but is this always true? This paper explores what happens when extra information that suggests that a particular mechanism is responsible for missing data is disregarded and methods for dealing with the missing data are chosen arbitrarily. Regression models based on 2,533 intermediate care (IC patients from the largest evaluation of IC done and published in the UK to date were used to explain variation in costs, EQ-5D and Barthel index. Three methods for dealing with missingness were utilised, each assuming a different mechanism as being responsible for the missing data: complete case analysis (assuming missing completely at random—MCAR, multiple imputation (assuming missing at random—MAR and Heckman selection model (assuming missing not at random—MNAR. Differences in results were gauged by examining the signs of coefficients as well as the sizes of both coefficients and associated standard errors. Results Extra information strongly suggested that missing cost data were MCAR. The results show that MCAR and MAR-based methods yielded similar results with sizes of most coefficients and standard errors differing by less than 3.4% while those based on MNAR-methods were statistically different (up to 730% bigger. Significant variables in all regression models also had the same direction of influence on costs. All three mechanisms of missingness were shown to be potential causes of the missing EQ-5D and Barthel data. The method chosen to deal with missing data did not seem to have any significant effect on the results for these data as they led to broadly similar conclusions with sizes of coefficients and standard errors differing by less than 54% and 322

  6. Electronic health record-based assessment of oral corticosteroid use in a population of primary care patients with asthma: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Allen-Ramey, Felicia C; Nelsen, Linda M; Leader, Joseph B; Mercer, Dione; Kirchner, Henry Lester; Jones, James B

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral corticosteroid prescriptions are often used in clinical studies as an indicator of asthma exacerbations. However, there is rarely the ability to link a prescription to its associated diagnosis. The objective of this study was to characterize patterns of oral corticosteroid prescription orders for asthma patients using an electronic health record database, which links each prescription order to the diagnosis assigned at the time the order was placed. Methods This was a retrospe...

  7. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions in Children Attending the Department of Pediatrics in a Tertiary Care Center: A Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digra, Kishour Kumar; Pandita, Aakash; Saini, GS; Bharti, Rajni

    2015-01-01

    AIM To study the pattern of various adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurring in children attending the Department of Pediatrics, SMGS Hospital, Jammu over 1 year. SUBJECTS AND METHODS This was a prospective study, with study population of patients attending Department of Pediatrics over a period of 1 year. A structured format was used to enroll the participants. A pilot study was conducted to test the suitability of the format and feasibility of the study. The study was carried out to review various pattern of ADRs by using the Naranjo probability scale, and severity was assessed by using the Hartwig severity scale. ADRs were classified according to the classification used by the Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring Center, Central Drugs Standard Control Organization, New Delhi, India. RESULTS In the present study, 104 patients were found to have developed acute drug reactions. Among these, 83.6% were type B, 14.42% type A, and 1.92% were type U. Furthermore, 25.96% ADRs were due to anticonvulsants, followed by antibiotics (22.11%), antipyretics (11.53%), vaccination (8.65%), steroids (6.73%), decongestants (5.67%), snake antivenom and antiemetics (3.84%), and fluids, insulin, and antacids (1.92%). The patients’ dermatological system was involved in 67.30%, followed by the central nervous system (CNS) in 11.53% patients. Renal system was involved in 6.73% patients. Cardiac, musculoskeletal, metabolic, and other systems were involved in 4.80%, 3.84%, 2.88%, and 0.96%, respectively. According to the Hartwig severity scale of ADRs, 64.4% patients had moderate ADRs, 29.8% patients had severe ADRs, and 5.76% had mild ADRs. In the present study, 64.4% patients expressed moderate severity, whereas 29.8% expressed high severity and 5.76% expressed mild ADRs. CONCLUSION ADRs were seen in 71% of the patients between 1 and 5 years of age, 26% in the age group of 5–10 years, and 3% were more than 10 years old. Anticonvulsants (25.96%) and antibiotics (22.11%) were responsible

  8. Expanding a Care Network for People with Dementia and their Carers Through Musicking: Participant Observation with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Hara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 0 2 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Music use in dementia care often takes place within a music therapy context, where music therapy sessions aim to reduce agitated behaviour, access emotions or enhance inter-personal communication. Such sessions usually take place within care homes and their effect has been evaluated by a number of studies. However, there is little research on music use that takes place outside of care homes (e.g. in community centres for people with dementia who are cared for at home by their family. This paper discusses this type of music use, focusing on the meaning of weekly local music making activities in relation to every day dementia care. I use empirical data from a study of a community based music activity called "Singing for the Brain" (SFTB run by the Alzheimer's Society in the UK. The data was collected through extensive participant observation research and interviews with organisers, carers and care receivers. The preliminary findings from the data analysis are discussed: how SFTB can be seen as a ecological practice; its various “spin-off’ effects in the everyday care of the members with dementia; how SFTB, together with other local music groups, constitute the music and care world in the town; and how this develops into fluid support networks to support local people with dementia and their carers.

  9. Symptoms in patients with skin changes due to chronic venous insufficiency often lead to emergency care service: an Italian observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Michele; Grande, Raffaele; Naso, Agostino; Butrico, Lucia; Rubino, Paolo; Placida, Girolamo Domenico; Cannistrà, Marco; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is the most advanced form of chronic venous disease (CVD), and is often associated with skin changes such as hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis and venous skin ulceration that cause discomfort, pain, sleep disturbances, absenteeism in the workplace, disability and deteriorated quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of CVI and skin changes in patients who turn to Continuous Assistance Services due to the presence of disturbing symptoms of their condition. Data were evaluated by consulting the medical records, during a 16-month period, available with three Continuous Assistance Services of the Italian territory. The overall population of the referring centres consisted of 1186 patients [739 females (62·31%) and 447 males (37·69%)]. Seventy-nine patients (6·66%) consulted the emergency unit for venous symptoms related to CVD. Patients with more severe disease (CVI, categories C4-C6) represented the majority accounting for 60·75%, while patients with moderate disease (C3) accounted for 35·44% and patients with mild disease (C1-C2 stages) accounted for 3·79%. The main finding of this study is that despite CVI not being a disease that commonly requires medical emergency/urgency intervention, patients with CVI, especially in advanced stage with skin changes, may turn to Continuous Assistance Service for treating bothersome symptoms related to their condition.

  10. Use of a hand-held computer observational tool to improve communication for care planning and psychosocial well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Corazzini, Kirsten; Rapp, Carla Gene; McConnell, Eleanor S.; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2009-01-01

    Staff development nurses in long-term care are challenged to implement training programs that foster quality unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) care and improve the transfer of their observations to licensed nursing staff for care planning. This study describes the outcomes of a program where UAP recorded behavioral problems of residents to inform care. Findings suggest staff development nurses who aim to improve UAP reporting without simultaneously targeting licensed nursing staff behavior...

  11. B-type natriuretic peptide measurement in primary care; magnitude of associations with cardiovascular risk factors and their therapies. Observations from the STOP-HF (St. Vincent's Screening TO Prevent Heart Failure) study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conlon, Carmel M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: An effective prevention strategy for heart failure in primary care requires a reliable screening tool for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction. Preliminary data indicate that B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) may be suitable for this task. However, for the most effective use of this peptide, the interrelationships between associated risk factors and their therapies on BNP, and in particular their magnitude of effect, needs to be established in a large primary care population. Therefore, the objective of the study was to establish the extent of the association between BNP, cardiovascular risk factors and their therapies. METHODS: BNP measurement and clinical review was preformed on 1122 primary care patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Multivariate analyses identified significant associates of BNP concentrations which were further explored to establish the magnitude of their association. RESULTS: Associates of BNP were age (1.36-fold increase in BNP\\/decade), female (1.28), beta-blockers (1.90), myocardial infarction (1.36), arrhythmia (1.98), diastolic blood pressure; all p<0.01. A novel method was devised that plotted median BNP per sliding decade of age for the various combinations of these principal associates. CONCLUSIONS: The data presented underline the importance of considering several clinical and therapeutic factors when interpreting BNP concentrations. Most of these variables were associated with increased concentrations, which may in part explain the observed false-positive rates for detecting ventricular dysfunction using this peptide. Furthermore, the design of studies or protocols using BNP as an endpoint or a clinical tool should take particular account of these associations. This analysis provides the foundation for age, risk factor and therapy adjusted reference ranges for BNP in this setting.

  12. Caring School Leadership: A South African Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vyver, Cornelius P.; van der Westhuizen, Philip C.; Meyer, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    The research pivoted on the question whether South African school principals fulfilled their caring role towards teachers. The aims of the study were threefold. First, to determine how principals rated their care-giving, secondly to determine whether significant discrepancies existed between principals' rating of their care-giving and…

  13. Explaining the effects of a multifaceted intervention to improve inpatient care in rural Kenyan hospitals -- interpretation based on retrospective examination of data from participant observation, quantitative and qualitative studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    English Mike

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have reported the results of a cluster randomized trial of rural Kenyan hospitals evaluating the effects of an intervention to introduce care based on best-practice guidelines. In parallel work we described the context of the study, explored the process and perceptions of the intervention, and undertook a discrete study on health worker motivation because this was felt likely to be an important contributor to poor performance in Kenyan public sector hospitals. Here, we use data from these multiple studies and insights gained from being participants in and observers of the intervention process to provide our explanation of how intervention effects were achieved as part of an effort to better understand implementation in low-income hospital settings. Methods Initial hypotheses were generated to explain the variation in intervention effects across place, time, and effect measure (indicator based on our understanding of theory and informed by our implementation experience and participant observations. All data sources available for hospitals considered as cases for study were then examined to determine if hypotheses were supported, rejected, or required modification. Data included transcriptions of interviews and group discussions, field notes and that from the detailed longitudinal quantitative investigation. Potentially useful explanatory themes were identified, discussed by the implementing and research team, revised, and merged as part of an iterative process aimed at building more generic explanatory theory. At the end of this process, findings were mapped against a recently reported comprehensive framework for implementation research. Results A normative re-educative intervention approach evolved that sought to reset norms and values concerning good practice and promote 'grass-roots' participation to improve delivery of correct care. Maximal effects were achieved when this strategy and external support supervision helped

  14. Countesthorpe College: an observant study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Ann; Stamatabis, Kathy

    1974-01-01

    Discussed the objectives and the conditions which made possible a new school embodying radical innovations. The results of a observational study at an early stage of the school's development, undertaken by a group of students, are summarised here by two of them, both now teaching in Leicestershire Upper Schools. (Editor/RK)

  15. Observing nurses has improved my alcohol dependency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Ellise

    2016-09-21

    My first placement in my first year of nursing training was on a gastrointestinal/hepatology ward. Alongside my mentor, I was caring for a patient who had been withdrawing from alcohol since admission to hospital the previous evening.

  16. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  17. Transition from specialist to primary diabetes care: A qualitative study of perspectives of primary care physicians

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    Liddy Clare

    2009-06-01

    , insufficient patient confidence or trust in PCP's ability to manage diabetes, poor motivation and "non-compliance" emerged as potential patient barriers to transition. Incongruence between PCP attitudes and expectations related to diabetes self-management and those of patients who had attended a multidisciplinary specialist center was also observed. Conclusion This study underlines the breadth of PCP concerns related to transition of diabetes care and the importance of this topic to them. While tools that promote timely information flow and care planning are cornerstones to successful transition, and may be sufficient for some practitioners, appropriately resourced decision support and education strategies should also be available to enhance PCP capacity and readiness to resume diabetes care after referral to a specialist center. Characteristics of the patient-care provider relationship that impact discharge were identified and are worthy of further research.

  18. Explaining the effects of a multifaceted intervention to improve inpatient care in rural Kenyan hospitals -- interpretation based on retrospective examination of data from participant observation, quantitative and qualitative studies

    OpenAIRE

    English Mike; Nzinga Jacinta; Mbindyo Patrick; Ayieko Philip; Irimu Grace; Mbaabu Lairumbi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We have reported the results of a cluster randomized trial of rural Kenyan hospitals evaluating the effects of an intervention to introduce care based on best-practice guidelines. In parallel work we described the context of the study, explored the process and perceptions of the intervention, and undertook a discrete study on health worker motivation because this was felt likely to be an important contributor to poor performance in Kenyan public sector hospitals. Here, we ...

  19. Observational study assessing demographic, economic and clinical factors associated with access and utilization of health care services of patients with multiple sclerosis under treatment with interferon beta-1b (EXTAVIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Hadjigeorgiou

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS results in an extensive use of the health care system, even within the first years of diagnosis. The effectiveness and accessibility of the health care system may affect patients' quality of life. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the health care resource use of MS patients under interferon beta-1b (EXTAVIA treatment in Greece, the demographic or clinical factors that may affect this use and also patient satisfaction with the health care system. Structured interviews were conducted for data collection. In total, 204 patients (74.02% females, mean age (SD 43.58 (11.42 years were enrolled in the study. Analysis of the reported data revealed that during the previous year patients made extensive use of health services in particular neurologists (71.08% visited neurologists in public hospitals, 66.67% in private offices and 48.53% in insurance institutes and physiotherapists. However, the majority of the patients (52.45% chose as their treating doctor private practice neurologists, which may reflect accessibility barriers or low quality health services in the public health system. Patients seemed to be generally satisfied with the received health care, support and information on MS (84.81% were satisfied from the information provided to them. Patients' health status (as denoted by disease duration, disability status and hospitalization needs and insurance institute were found to influence their visits to neurologists. Good adherence (up to 70.1% to the study medication was reported. Patients' feedback on currently provided health services could direct these services towards the patients' expectations.

  20. The emerging primary care workforce: preliminary observations from the primary care team: learning from effective ambulatory practices project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladden, Maryjoan D; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Fishman, Nancy W; Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Parchman, Michael; Wagner, Edward H

    2013-12-01

    Many primary care practices are changing the roles played by the members of their health care teams. The purpose of this article is to describe some of these new roles, using the authors' preliminary observations from 25 site visits to high-performing primary care practices across the United States in 2012-2013. These sites visits, to practices using their workforce creatively, were part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded initiative, The Primary Care Team: Learning From Effective Ambulatory Practices.Examples of these new roles that the authors observed on their site visits include medical assistants reviewing patient records before visits to identify care gaps, ordering and administering immunizations using protocols, making outreach calls to patients, leading team huddles, and coaching patients to set self-management goals. The registered nurse role has evolved from an emphasis on triage to a focus on uncomplicated acute care, chronic care management, and hospital-to-home transitions. Behavioral health providers (licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, or licensed counselors) were colocated and integrated within practices and were readily available for immediate consults and brief interventions. Physicians have shifted from lone to shared responsibility for patient panels, with other team members empowered to provide significant portions of chronic and preventive care.An innovative team-based primary care workforce is emerging. Spreading and sustaining these changes will require training both health professionals and nonprofessionals in new ways. Without clinical experiences that model this new team-based care and role models who practice it, trainees will not be prepared to practice as a team. PMID:24128622

  1. [Semantic and conceptual equivalence of the observable indicatorsof Nursing Home Care Quality Instrument].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Wagner Ivan Fonseca de; Hernández, Pedro Jesus Saturno; Sousa, Kelienny de Meneses; Piuvezam, Grasiela; Gama, Zenewton André da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Long-term care facilities (LTCFs) for the elderly are an important health care alternative in the world, though Brazil does not yet have a valid instrument to monitor the quality of these institutions. This study sought to describe the initial stages of the cross-cultural adaptation of the Observable Indicators of Nursing Home Care Quality (OIQ) instrument used to assess the quality of care in LTCFs. Conceptual equivalence was conducted to assess the relevance and feasibility of the OIQ within the Brazilian context, using the Content Validity Index (CVI). The operational, idiomatic and semantic equivalence was then performed. This item consisted of 5 phases: (1) two translations; (2) the respective back translations; (3) formal appraisal; (4) review; and (5) application of the pre-test in three LTCFs. Significant changes were made to ensure the validity of the OIQ. The CVI instrument for the Brazilian contextwas 94.3% (viability) and 95.3% (relevance). The OIQ proved to be easy to understand and apply in the pre-test. Cross-cultural adaptation of the OIQ contributes to assessing and improving quality in Brazilian LTCFs, though the findings should be complemented by a psychometric evaluation of the instrument. PMID:27383357

  2. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  3. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  4. Antenatal care in practice: an exploratory study in antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessy Flora

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. Yet there are worrying gaps in knowledge of the quality of antenatal care provided in Tanzania. In particular, determinants of health workers' performance have not yet been fully understood. This paper uses ethnographic methods to document health workers' antenatal care practices with reference to the national Focused Antenatal Care guidelines and identifies factors influencing health workers' performance. Potential implications for improving antenatal care provision in Tanzania are discussed. Methods Combining different qualitative techniques, we studied health workers' antenatal care practices in four public antenatal care clinics in the Kilombero Valley, south-eastern Tanzania. A total of 36 antenatal care consultations were observed and compared with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Participant observation, informal discussions and in-depth interviews with the staff helped to identify and explain health workers' practices and contextual factors influencing antenatal care provision. Results The delivery of antenatal care services to pregnant women at the selected antenatal care clinics varied widely. Some services that are recommended by the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines were given to all women while other services were not delivered at all. Factors influencing health workers' practices were poor implementation of the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines, lack of trained staff and absenteeism, supply shortages and use of working tools that are not consistent with the Focused Antenatal Care guidelines. Health workers react to difficult working conditions by developing informal practices as coping strategies or "street-level bureaucracy". Conclusions Efforts to improve antenatal care should address shortages of trained staff through expanding training opportunities, including health worker

  5. Validation of the Danish version of the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, J B; Poulsen, Kristian S.O.; Laerkner, E;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing pain in critically ill patients is a challenge even in an intensive care unit (ICU) with a no sedation protocol. The aim of this study was to validate the Danish version of the pain assessment method; Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in an ICU with a no sedation...... in the data collection and CPOT scores were blinded to each other. Calculations of interrater reliability, criterion validity and discriminant validity were performed to validate the Danish version of CPOT. RESULTS: The results indicated a good correlation between the two raters (all scores > 0.9 and P ....05). About 48 (68.6%) of the included patients were able to self-report pain. We found a significantly higher mean CPOT score at the nociceptive procedure than at rest or the non-nociceptive procedure (P

  6. Nurses Use of Critical Care Pain Observational Tool in Patients with Low Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad-Ali Asadi-Noghabi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The diagnosis of pain in patients with low consciousness is a major challenge in the intensive care unit (ICU. Therefore, the use of behavioral tools for pain assessment could be an effective tool to manage pain in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects on pain management by nurses using a critical care pain observational tool in patients with a decreased level of consciousness. Methods: Our research used a before and after design to evaluate the ability of nurses to manage pain in patients with low consciousness. A total of 106 ICU nurses were included in the study. The study was divided into three phases: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. The researchers first observed the nurses management of pain in their patients; this was done three times using a checklist following tracheal suctioning and position change procedures. The nurses were then taught how to apply the critical-care pain observational tool (CPOT. Post-implementation of the tool, the researchers re-evaluated trained the nurses’ pain management. Results: Performance scores after training improved with relation to the nurses diagnosis of pain, pharmacological and nonpharmacological actions, reassessment of pain, and re-relieving of any pain. However, use of the tool did not improve the recording of the patient’s pain and the relief measures used. Conclusion: Use of the CPOT can increase nurse’s sensitivity to pain in non-conscious patients and drive them to track and perform pain management.

  7. Inter-Observer Agreement Among Medical Professionals in Critical Care of Neonates and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osnat Tourgeman-Bashkin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inter-observer agreement is essential to medical staff members and has a major effect on communication. The goal of the study was to examine the way medical professionals evaluate the potential severity of Almost Adverse Events (AAEs that were observed in two intensive care units (ICUs. One hundred and fourteen AAEs were observed and recorded in both units by engineering students. Each AAE was rated independently by five senior medical staff members from each ICU, chosen by the unit manager, on a three- point severity level scale. Statistical analysis (K statistic and Cohen's Kappa yielded relatively low levels of agreement among raters in both ICUs (< 0.3, but significantly greater agreement was found among nurses than among physicians in both ICUs. Low levels of agreement are attributed to the nature of work and characteristics of each ICU. Recommendations for improving agreements including forming shared mental models are specified.

  8. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  9. UFOs: Observations, Studies and Extrapolations

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, T; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Carlier, E; Cerutti, F; Dehning, B; Ducimetière, L; Ferrari, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Garrel, N; Gerardin, A; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Zimmermann, F; Lechner, A; Mertens, V; Misiowiec, M; Nebot Del Busto, E; Morón Ballester, R; Norderhaug Drosdal, L; Nordt, A; Papotti, G; Redaelli, S; Uythoven, J; Velghe, B; Vlachoudis, V; Wenninger, J; Zamantzas, C; Zerlauth, M; Fuster Martinez, N

    2012-01-01

    UFOs (“ Unidentified Falling Objects”) could be one of the major performance limitations for nominal LHC operation. Therefore, in 2011, the diagnostics for UFO events were significantly improved, dedicated experiments and measurements in the LHC and in the laboratory were made and complemented by FLUKA simulations and theoretical studies. The state of knowledge is summarized and extrapolations for LHC operation in 2012 and beyond are presented. Mitigation strategies are proposed and related tests and measures for 2012 are specified.

  10. Caring Teaching as a Moral Practice: An Exploratory Study on Perceived Dimensions of Caring Teaching

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    Khalil Gholami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caring teaching is a conceptual framework used to gain an insight into the moral aspect of teaching. Using a quantitative research approach, we studied 556 teachers in order to explore their perceived dimensions of caring teaching. Drawing on existing literature, we found that caring teaching has been elaborated in line with two broad concepts: personal care and academic care. Considering these concepts, we developed the Caring Teaching Scale with which we identified four dimensions of caring teaching: the nurturing of a student's character, didactical bias, awareness, and respectful didactics. A meta-analysis reflection suggests that the nurturing of students' characters and awareness represent personal care while didactical bias and respectful didactics call for academic care. Further analysis showed that these teachers attached more pedagogical value to personal care. Controlling for two demographic variables, we found statistically significant differences with regard to gender and caring teaching.

  11. Assessing observational studies of medical treatments

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    Butani Yogita

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have assessed the validity of the observational study design by comparing results of studies using this design to results from randomized controlled trials. The present study examined design features of observational studies that could have influenced these comparisons. Methods To find at least 4 observational studies that evaluated the same treatment, we reviewed meta-analyses comparing observational studies and randomized controlled trials for the assessment of medical treatments. Details critical for interpretation of these studies were abstracted and analyzed qualitatively. Results Individual articles reviewed included 61 observational studies that assessed 10 treatment comparisons evaluated in two studies comparing randomized controlled trials and observational studies. The majority of studies did not report the following information: details of primary and ancillary treatments, outcome definitions, length of follow-up, inclusion/exclusion criteria, patient characteristics relevant to prognosis or treatment response, or assessment of possible confounding. When information was reported, variations in treatment specifics, outcome definition or confounding were identified as possible causes of differences between observational studies and randomized controlled trials, and of heterogeneity in observational studies. Conclusion Reporting of observational studies of medical treatments was often inadequate to compare study designs or allow other meaningful interpretation of results. All observational studies should report details of treatment, outcome assessment, patient characteristics, and confounding assessment.

  12. A multilevel study on the association of observer-assessed working conditions with depressive symptoms among female eldercare workers from 56 work units in 10 care homes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Louise M.; Jorgensen, Anette F. B.; Thomsen, Birthe L.;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Eldercare workers in Denmark have a higher prevalence of poor psychological health than other occupational groups. We examined the association between working conditions assessed by trained observers and depressive symptoms assessed by self-report in a study of female Danish eldercare...

  13. Expanding a Care Network for People with Dementia and their Carers Through Musicking: Participant Observation with

    OpenAIRE

    Mariko Hara

    2011-01-01

    Music use in dementia care often takes place within a music therapy context, where music therapy sessions aim to reduce agitated behaviour, access emotions or enhance inter-personal communication. Such sessions usually take place within care homes and their effect has been evaluated by a number of studies. However, there is little research on music use that takes place outside of care homes (e.g. in community centres) for people with dementia who are cared for at home by their family. This...

  14. Syllabus Outline on Child Care for Day Care Teachers at Family Life Teacher Training Centre in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation No. 103.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumina M.

    Five day care centers in Mogadiscio, the capital city of Somalia, were studied to (1) identify problems encountered in teaching a course in child care; (2) observe teaching methods and assess their effectiveness; (3) ascertain reasons for the lack of preservice training for day care teachers; and (4) develop a new syllabus for a course in child…

  15. Women's and care providers' perspectives of quality prenatal care: a qualitative descriptive study

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    Sword Wendy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much attention has been given to the adequacy of prenatal care use in promoting healthy outcomes for women and their infants. Adequacy of use takes into account the timing of initiation of prenatal care and the number of visits. However, there is emerging evidence that the quality of prenatal care may be more important than adequacy of use. The purpose of our study was to explore women's and care providers' perspectives of quality prenatal care to inform the development of items for a new instrument, the Quality of Prenatal Care Questionnaire. We report on the derivation of themes resulting from this first step of questionnaire development. Methods A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 pregnant women and 40 prenatal care providers recruited from five urban centres across Canada. Data were analyzed using inductive open and then pattern coding. The final step of analysis used a deductive approach to assign the emergent themes to broader categories reflective of the study's conceptual framework. Results The three main categories informed by Donabedian's model of quality health care were structure of care, clinical care processes, and interpersonal care processes. Structure of care themes included access, physical setting, and staff and care provider characteristics. Themes under clinical care processes were health promotion and illness prevention, screening and assessment, information sharing, continuity of care, non-medicalization of pregnancy, and women-centredness. Interpersonal care processes themes were respectful attitude, emotional support, approachable interaction style, and taking time. A recurrent theme woven throughout the data reflected the importance of a meaningful relationship between a woman and her prenatal care provider that was characterized by trust. Conclusions While certain aspects of structure of care were identified as being key dimensions of

  16. Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Science Advances Supported Networks, Programs & Initiatives NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) ... Sunsetted/For Reference Only The NICHD started the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD), ...

  17. Maternal health care in India: some observations from RSOC, NFHS-3 and DLHS-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiya Muzaffar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal health is a key indicator of women's health and status. Strengthening of maternal health care services is very important to ensure safe motherhood. The maternal health care services include antenatal care, natal care and postnatal care. Absence of proper maternal health care leads to various complications and eventually maternal death. World Health Organization, in its World Health Report 2005, suggests that poor maternal conditions account for the fourth leading cause of death for women worldwide, after HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Situated within this background, this paper locates the status of maternal health care in India and identifies the changes that have occurred within the maternal health care services since last one decade. This paper is based on the secondary sources in general and the data provided by Rapid Survey on Children (RSOC 2013-14, District Level Household and Facility Survey (DLHS-3, 2007-08 and National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005-06 in particular. The data shows that maternal health care differs with the socio-cultural background like income, age, caste and place of residence. After having a comparison of the data provided by the three different surveys, it was observed that since the last decade the percentage of institutional deliveries has increased for both rural and urban areas. There has been an increase in the proportion of postnatal care received by women within 48 hours of discharge/ delivery. The Iron and Folic Acid (IFA intake for 90 days or more has not improved by more than 0.5 percent. In India still about 30 percent women aged (20-24 married before the legal minimum marriage age of 18. Percentage of women receiving ANC from government health facility has decreased and for private facility it has increased when we compare the data from all the three surveys. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(1.000: 6-12

  18. Transforming youth care through online simulation gaming. Aligning the positions of practitioners and observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees JM van Haaster

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transforming youth care through online simulation gaming. Aligning the positions of practitioners and observersThe youth care service in the Netherlands is currently undergoing a major transition from national and regional finance and control to localized regulation and responsibility. The aim is to initiate a transformation towards greater intervention value and to support greater self-reliance in social networks. Effective youth care depends largely on the quality of the network exchange. If efficiency is our concern, we should look into the methods and techniques of network exchange. When it comes to solving hard problems, the significance of situational knowledge construction and network coordination must not be underrated. Professional deliberation is directed toward understanding, acting and analysis. We need smart and flexible ways to direct systems information from practice to network reflection, and to guide results from network consultation to practice.This article presents a proposal for a case study, as a follow-up to a recent dissertation about online simulation gaming for youth care network exchange (Van Haaster, 2014. The results of that research show that it is a valuable exercise to model intricate issues from practice using simulation game design and that youth care professionals appreciate the relevance, usability and usefulness of this new tool. The question in this paper is how to develop a practicable approach using online simulation gaming to improve patterns of action and reflection on dilemmas and hard-to-solve problems in youth care practice. Child-rearing conditions and family behaviour are usually enhanced through sequences of exploration, experimentation and evaluation. Step-by-step progressions are characterized by balancing acting and thinking. The author elaborates this observation through a model that alternates acting in practice with retrospect and prospect reflection in online game sessions

  19. The German MultiCare-study: Patterns of multimorbidity in primary health care – protocol of a prospective cohort study

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    Schäfer Ingmar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multimorbidity is a highly frequent condition in older people, but well designed longitudinal studies on the impact of multimorbidity on patients and the health care system have been remarkably scarce in numbers until today. Little is known about the long term impact of multimorbidity on the patients' life expectancy, functional status and quality of life as well as health care utilization over time. As a consequence, there is little help for GPs in adjusting care for these patients, even though studies suggest that adhering to present clinical practice guidelines in the care of patients with multimorbidity may have adverse effects. Methods/Design The study is designed as a multicentre prospective, observational cohort study of 3.050 patients aged 65 to 85 at baseline with at least three different diagnoses out of a list of 29 illnesses and syndromes. The patients will be recruited in approx. 120 to 150 GP surgeries in 8 study centres distributed across Germany. Information about the patients' morbidity will be collected mainly in GP interviews and from chart reviews. Functional status, resources/risk factors, health care utilization and additional morbidity data will be assessed in patient interviews, in which a multitude of well established standardized questionnaires and tests will be performed. Discussion The main aim of the cohort study is to monitor the course of the illness process and to analyse for which reasons medical conditions are stable, deteriorating or only temporarily present. First, clusters of combinations of diseases/disorders (multimorbidity patterns with a comparable impact (e.g. on quality of life and/or functional status will be identified. Then the development of these clusters over time will be analysed, especially with regard to prognostic variables and the somatic, psychological and social consequences as well as the utilization of health care resources. The results will allow the development of an

  20. Evidence for the high importance of co-morbid factors in HFE C282Y/H63D patients cared by phlebotomies: results from an observational prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Saliou

    Full Text Available Despite type I haemochromatosis (HC is mainly associated with the HFE C282Y/C282Y genotype, a second genotype -C282Y/H63D- has mostly been described in other patients. Its association with HC, apart from any associated co-morbid factors, remains unclear and complex to interpret for physicians. This study assesses the weight of this genotype and the role of co-morbid factors in the occurrence of iron overload. This prospective study included the C282Y/C282Y (n = 172 and C282Y/H63D (n = 58 patients enrolled in a phlebotomy program between 2004 and 2007 in a blood centre of western Brittany (Brest, France, where HC is frequent. We compared prevalence of these two genotypes, as well as patients' profile regarding degree of iron overload and prevalence of co-morbid factors. First, we confirmed the obvious deficit of C282Y/H63D compound heterozygotes among patients cared by phlebotomies. This genotype was 3.0 times less frequent than the C282Y/C282Y genotype among those patients (18.9% vs. 56.0% whereas it was 4.9 times more frequent in the general population (4.3% vs. 0.9%; p<0.0001. Despite a similar level of hyperferritinaemia, the C282Y/H63D patients who came to medical attention had a milder plasma iron overload, reflected by a lower transferrin saturation median (52.0% vs. 84.0%; p<0.0001. They also exhibited more frequently co-morbid factors, as heavy drinking (26.0% vs. 13.9%; p = 0.0454, overweight (66.7% vs. 39.4%; p = 0.0005 or both (21.3% vs. 2.6%; p<0.0001. Ultimately, they required a lower amount of iron removed to reach depletion (2.1 vs. 3.4 g; p<0.0001, clearly reflecting their lower tissue iron. This study confirms that H63D is a discrete genetic susceptibility factor whose expression is most visible in association with other co-factors. It highlights the importance of searching for co-morbidities in these diagnostic situations and of providing lifestyle and dietary advice.

  1. Ways of learning: Observational studies versus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, T.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Manipulative experimentation that features random assignment of treatments, replication, and controls is an effective way to determine causal relationships. Wildlife ecologists, however, often must take a more passive approach to investigating causality. Their observational studies lack one or more of the 3 cornerstones of experimentation: controls, randomization, and replication. Although an observational study can be analyzed similarly to an experiment, one is less certain that the presumed treatment actually caused the observed response. Because the investigator does not actively manipulate the system, the chance that something other than the treatment caused the observed results is increased. We reviewed observational studies and contrasted them with experiments and, to a lesser extent, sample surveys. We identified features that distinguish each method of learning and illustrate or discuss some complications that may arise when analyzing results of observational studies. Findings from observational studies are prone to bias. Investigators can reduce the chance of reaching erroneous conclusions by formulating a priori hypotheses that can be pursued multiple ways and by evaluating the sensitivity of study conclusions to biases of various magnitudes. In the end, however, professional judgment that considers all available evidence is necessary to render a decision regarding causality based on observational studies.

  2. The Diagnosis of Urinary Tract infection in Young children (DUTY): a diagnostic prospective observational study to derive and validate a clinical algorithm for the diagnosis of urinary tract infection in children presenting to primary care with an acute illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alastair D; Birnie, Kate; Busby, John; Delaney, Brendan; Downing, Harriet; Dudley, Jan; Durbaba, Stevo; Fletcher, Margaret; Harman, Kim; Hollingworth, William; Hood, Kerenza; Howe, Robin; Lawton, Michael; Lisles, Catherine; Little, Paul; MacGowan, Alasdair; O'Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Rumsby, Kate; Sterne, Jonathan Ac; Thomas-Jones, Emma; van der Voort, Judith; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Whiting, Penny; Wootton, Mandy; Butler, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is not clear which young children presenting acutely unwell to primary care should be investigated for urinary tract infection (UTI) and whether or not dipstick testing should be used to inform antibiotic treatment. OBJECTIVES To develop algorithms to accurately identify pre-school children in whom urine should be obtained; assess whether or not dipstick urinalysis provides additional diagnostic information; and model algorithm cost-effectiveness. DESIGN Multicentre, prospective diagnostic cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Children < 5 years old presenting to primary care with an acute illness and/or new urinary symptoms. METHODS One hundred and seven clinical characteristics (index tests) were recorded from the child's past medical history, symptoms, physical examination signs and urine dipstick test. Prior to dipstick results clinician opinion of UTI likelihood ('clinical diagnosis') and urine sampling and treatment intentions ('clinical judgement') were recorded. All index tests were measured blind to the reference standard, defined as a pure or predominant uropathogen cultured at ≥ 10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml in a single research laboratory. Urine was collected by clean catch (preferred) or nappy pad. Index tests were sequentially evaluated in two groups, stratified by urine collection method: parent-reported symptoms with clinician-reported signs, and urine dipstick results. Diagnostic accuracy was quantified using area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and bootstrap-validated AUROC, and compared with the 'clinician diagnosis' AUROC. Decision-analytic models were used to identify optimal urine sampling strategy compared with 'clinical judgement'. RESULTS A total of 7163 children were recruited, of whom 50% were female and 49% were < 2 years old. Culture results were available for 5017 (70%); 2740 children provided clean-catch samples, 94% of whom were ≥ 2 years old

  3. STRengthening analytical thinking for observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altman, Douglas G.; le Cessie, Saskia; Abrahamowicz, Michal;

    2014-01-01

    on their results and conclusions. An efficient way to help researchers to keep up with recent methodological developments is to develop guidance documents that are spread to the research community at large. These observations led to the initiation of the strengthening analytical thinking for observational studies...

  4. IMPACT ON HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEM DUE TO THE WORST FLOOD OF THE CENTURY IN KASHMIR, INDIA: AN OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Flood is the most common natural disaster in the world both in the developed and developing nations. This year one of the greatest floods, worst in over a decade hit the nation in Jammu and Kashmir on 7th September 2014, due to continuous downpour for about 4 days. Study design: Observational. RESULTS: SKIMS Medical College and Hospital, Bemina was inundated first followed by the oldest tertiary care SMHS hospital. Health care was affected at all the three levels viz. primary, secondary and tertiary the total losses to the health care was estimated to be 200 million. CONCLUSION: More than 1.5 million of the population was affected. People were rendered homeless. Unlike flash flood the present flood in Kashmir was a plain flood which occurs due to extensive rainfall lasting several days.

  5. Observing Protein & Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study was designed to assess dietary measurement error by comparing results from self-reported dietary intake data with four dietary biomarkers: doubly labeled water and urinary nitrogen, sodium, and potassium.

  6. A qualitative study on hypertensive care behavior in primary health care settings in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima R

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Razatul Shima,1,3 Mohd Hairi Farizah,1,2 Hazreen Abdul Majid1,2 1Department of Social and Preventive Medicine; 2Centre for Population Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Ministry of Health Malaysia, Putrajaya, Malaysia Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore patients’ experiences with their illnesses and the reasons which influenced them in not following hypertensive care recommendations (antihypertensive medication intake, physical activity, and diet changes in primary health clinic settings. Patients and methods: A qualitative methodology was applied. The data were gathered from in-depth interviews with 25 hypertensive patients attending follow-up in nine government primary health clinics in two districts (Hulu Langat and Klang in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis.Results: There was evidence of lack of patient self-empowerment and community support in Malaysian society. Most of the participants did not take their antihypertensive medication or change their physical activity and diet after diagnosis. There was an agreement between the patients and the health care professionals before starting the treatment recommendation, but there lacked further counseling and monitoring. Most of the reasons given for not taking antihypertensive medication, not doing physical activity and not following diet recommendations were due to side effects or fear of the side effects of antihypertensive medication, patients’ attitudes, lack of information from health care professionals and insufficient social support from their surrounding environment. We also observed the differences on these reasons for nonadherence among the three ethnic groups.Conclusion: Health care professionals should move toward supporting adherence in the management of hypertensive patients by maintaining a dialogue. Patients need to be given time to enable them to overcome their

  7. Does prenatal care benefit maternal health? A study of post-partum maternal care use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsai-Ching; Chen, Bradley; Chan, Yun-Shan; Chen, Chin-Shyan

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on prenatal care focus on its effects on infant health, while studying less about the effects on maternal health. Using the Longitudinal Health Insurance claims data in Taiwan in a recursive bivariate probit model, this study examines the impact of adequate prenatal care on the probability of post-partum maternal hospitalization during the first 6 months after birth. The results show that adequate prenatal care significantly reduces the probability of post-partum maternal hospitalization among women who have had vaginal delivery by 43.8%. This finding suggests that the benefits of prenatal care may have been underestimated among women with vaginal delivery. Timely and adequate prenatal care not only creates a positive impact on infant health, but also yields significant benefits for post-partum maternal health. However, we do not find similar benefits of prenatal care for women undergoing a cesarean section. PMID:26189913

  8. Observation on dengue cases from a virus diagnostic laboratory of a tertiary care hospital in north India

    OpenAIRE

    Om Prakash; Desh Deepak Singh; Geetika Mishra; Shantanu Prakash; Arvind Singh; Shikha Gupta; Jasmeet Singh; Danish Nasar Khan; Parul Jain; Anamika Vishal; Manoj Kumar Pandey; Amita Jain

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: The epidemiology of dengue fever (DF) is complex in the Indian subcontinent as all the four serotypes are circulating. This study reports observations on dengue cases from a virus diagnostic laboratory of a north Indian tertiary care hospital catering to areas in and around Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh. Methods: Serum samples were obtained from suspected cases of dengue referred to the virus diagnostic laboratory during 2011 to 2013, and detailed history was taken on a ...

  9. Older Persons’ Transitions in Care (OPTIC: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Greta G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in health status, triggered by events such as infections, falls, and geriatric syndromes, are common among nursing home (NH residents and necessitate transitions between NHs and Emergency Departments (EDs. During transitions, residents frequently experience care that is delayed, unnecessary, not evidence-based, potentially unsafe, and fragmented. Furthermore, a high proportion of residents and their family caregivers report substantial unmet needs during transitions. This study is part of a program of research whose overall aim is to improve quality of care for frail older adults who reside in NHs. The purpose of this study is to identify successful transitions from multiple perspectives and to identify organizational and individual factors related to transition success, in order to inform improvements in care for frail elderly NH residents during transitions to and from acute care. Specific objectives are to: 1. define successful and unsuccessful elements of transitions from multiple perspectives; 2. develop and test a practical tool to assess transition success; 3. assess transition processes in a discrete set of transfers in two study sites over a one year period; 4. assess the influence of organizational factors in key practice locations, e.g., NHs, emergency medical services (EMS, and EDs, on transition success; and 5. identify opportunities for evidence-informed management and quality improvement decisions related to the management of NH – ED transitions. Methods/Design This is a mixed-methods observational study incorporating an integrated knowledge translation (IKT approach. It uses data from multiple levels (facility, care unit, individual and sources (healthcare providers, residents, health records, and administrative databases. Discussion Key to study success is operationalizing the IKT approach by using a partnership model in which the OPTIC governance structure provides for team decision-makers and

  10. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care – a feasibility study with caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Hermenau, Katharin; Kaltenbach, Elisa; Mkinga, Getrude; Hecker, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy...

  11. Mental disorders in cancer patients: observations at a tertiary care centre in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the frequencies of metal disorders among adult cancer patients in relation to their age, gender, marital status and type of malignancy. Socio-demographic characteristics and cancer diagnoses were recorded on a data capture form. diagnoses of metal disorders were made on the basis of diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM-IV) fourth edition. Shuakat Khanum Memorial Hospital and Research Centre. Two hundred and twenty newly diagnosed cancer patients were interviewed by a clinical psychologist before commencing any cancer treatment. Diagnosis of any metal disorder was transcribed using DSM-IV criteria and data thus collected were analyzed using SPSS for Windows. Observed frequencies of various metal disorders were compared with respect to patient's age, gender, martial status and type of cancer. Sixty five percent patients presented with various mental disorder. Adjusting disorders and mood disorders accounted for 34% each, while anxiety disorder was seen in 30% and remaining had delirium and somatoform disorders. Mental disorders were more common in males, and in younger age group. The oncologist and physicians treating cancer patients should carefully evaluate their patients for symptom of associated mental disorder and provide the required clinical support. (author)

  12. Variability in the Initial Costs of Care and One-Year Outcomes of Observation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbass, Ibrahim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of observation units (OUs following emergency departments (ED visits as a model of care has increased exponentially in the last decade. About one-third of U.S. hospitals now have OUs within their facilities. While their use is associated with lower costs and comparable level of care compared to inpatient units, there is a wide variation in OUs characteristics and operational procedures. The objective of this research was to explore the variability in the initial costs of care of placing patients with non-specific chest pain in observation units (OUs and the one-year outcomes. Methods: The author retrospectively investigated medical insurance claims of 22,962 privately insured patients (2009-2011 admitted to 41 OUs. Outcomes included the one-year chest pain/cardiovascular related costs and primary and secondary outcomes. Primary outcomes included myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke or cardiac arrest, while secondary outcomes included revascularization procedures, ED revisits for angina pectoris or chest pain and hospitalization due to cardiovascular diseases. The author aggregated the adjusted costs and prevalence rates of outcomes for patients over OUs, and computed the weighted coefficients of variation (WCV to compare variations across OUs. Results: There was minimal variability in the initial costs of care (WCV=2.2%, while the author noticed greater variability in the outcomes. Greater variability were associated with the adjusted cardiovascular-related costs of medical services (WCV=17.6% followed by the adjusted prevalence odds ratio of patients experiencing primary outcomes (WCV=16.3% and secondary outcomes (WCV=10%. Conclusion: Higher variability in the outcomes suggests the need for more standardization of the observation services for chest pain patients. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:395–400.

  13. Intensive Care in India: The Indian Intensive Care Case Mix and Practice Patterns Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigeeshu V Divatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To obtain information on organizational aspects, case mix and practices in Indian Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Patients and Methods: An observational, 4-day point prevalence study was performed between 2010 and 2011 in 4209 patients from 124 ICUs. ICU and patient characteristics, and interventions were recorded for 24 h of the study day, and outcomes till 30 days after the study day. Data were analyzed for 4038 adult patients from 120 ICUs. Results: On the study day, mean age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were 54.1 ± 17.1 years, 17.4 ± 9.2 and 3.8 ± 3.6, respectively. About 46.4% patients had ≥1 organ failure. Nearly, 37% and 22.2% patients received mechanical ventilation (MV and vasopressors or inotropes, respectively. Nearly, 12.2% patients developed an infection in the ICU. About 28.3% patients had severe sepsis or septic shock (SvSpSS during their ICU stay. About 60.7% patients without infection received antibiotics. There were 546 deaths and 183 terminal discharges (TDs from ICU (including left against medical advice or discharged on request, with ICU mortality 729/4038 (18.1%. In 1627 patients admitted within 24 h of the study day, the standardized mortality ratio was 0.67. The APACHE II and SOFA scores, public hospital ICUs, medical ICUs, inadequately equipped ICUs, medical admission, self-paying patient, presence of SvSpSS, acute respiratory failure or cancer, need for a fluid bolus, and MV were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: The high proportion of TDs and the association of public hospitals, self-paying patients, and inadequately equipped hospitals with mortality has important implications for critical care in India.

  14. Ozone Lidar Observations for Air Quality Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Huang, Guanyu; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Koshak, William; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John T.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvarez, Raul; Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone lidars are well suited to measuring the high spatio-temporal variability of this important trace gas. Furthermore, lidar measurements in conjunction with balloon soundings, aircraft, and satellite observations provide substantial information about a variety of atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Examples of processes elucidated by ozone-lidar measurements are presented, and modeling studies using WRF-Chem, RAQMS, and DALES/LES models illustrate our current understanding and shortcomings of these processes.

  15. The concept of care complexity: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Guarinoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital organisations based on the level of care intensity have clearly revealed a concept, that of care complexity, which has been widely used for decades in the healthcare field. Despite its wide use, this concept is still poorly defined and it is often confused with and replaced by similar concepts such as care intensity or workload. This study aims to describe the meaning of care complexity as perceived by nurses in their day-to-day experience of hospital clinical care, rehabilitation, home care, and organisation. Design and methods: Fifteen interviews were conducted with nurses belonging to clinical-care areas and to heterogeneous organisational areas. The interview was of an unstructured type. The participants were selected using a propositional methodology. Colaizzi’s descriptive phenomenological method was chosen for the analysis of the interviews. Results: The nurses who were interviewed predominantly perceive the definition of care complexity as coinciding with that of workload. Nevertheless, the managerial perspective does not appear to be exclusive, as from the in-depth interviews three fundamental themes emerge that are associated with the concept of care complexity: the patient, the nurse and the organisation. Conclusions: The study highlights that care complexity consists of both quantitative and qualitative aspects that do not refer only to the organisational dimension. The use of the terminology employed today should be reconsidered: it appears to be inappropriate to talk of measurement of care complexity, as this concept also consists of qualitative – thus not entirely quantifiable – aspects referring to the person being cared for. In this sense, reference should instead be made to the evaluation of care complexity, which would also constitute a better and more complete basis for defining the nursing skills required in professional nursing practice.

  16. Assessing Risk in Patients with Stable Coronary Disease: When Should We Intensify Care and Follow-Up? Results from a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies of the COURAGE and FAME Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, Umberto; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Nijhoff, Freek; Moretti, Claudio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Mennuni, Marco; Capodanno, Davide; Lococo, Marco; Lipinski, Michael J; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background. A large number of clinical and laboratory markers have been appraised to predict prognosis in patients with stable angina, but uncertainty remains regarding which variables are the best predictors of prognosis. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of studies in patients with stable angina to assess which variables predict prognosis. Methods. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for eligible studies published up to 2015, reporting multivariate predictors of major adverse cardiac events (MACE, a composite endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, and revascularization) in patients with stable angina. Study features, patient characteristics, and prevalence and predictors of such events were abstracted and pooled with random-effect methods (95% CIs). Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was the primary endpoint. Results. 42 studies (104,559 patients) were included. After a median follow-up of 57 months, cardiovascular events occurred in 7.8% of patients with MI in 6.2% of patients and need for repeat revascularization (both surgical and percutaneous) in 19.5% of patients. Male sex, reduced EF, diabetes, prior MI, and high C-reactive protein were the most powerful predictors of cardiovascular events. Conclusions. We show that simple and low-cost clinical features may help clinicians in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches within the broad range of outpatients presenting with stable coronary artery disease. PMID:27239372

  17. Assessing Risk in Patients with Stable Coronary Disease: When Should We Intensify Care and Follow-Up? Results from a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies of the COURAGE and FAME Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Barbero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A large number of clinical and laboratory markers have been appraised to predict prognosis in patients with stable angina, but uncertainty remains regarding which variables are the best predictors of prognosis. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of studies in patients with stable angina to assess which variables predict prognosis. Methods. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for eligible studies published up to 2015, reporting multivariate predictors of major adverse cardiac events (MACE, a composite endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, and revascularization in patients with stable angina. Study features, patient characteristics, and prevalence and predictors of such events were abstracted and pooled with random-effect methods (95% CIs. Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE was the primary endpoint. Results. 42 studies (104,559 patients were included. After a median follow-up of 57 months, cardiovascular events occurred in 7.8% of patients with MI in 6.2% of patients and need for repeat revascularization (both surgical and percutaneous in 19.5% of patients. Male sex, reduced EF, diabetes, prior MI, and high C-reactive protein were the most powerful predictors of cardiovascular events. Conclusions. We show that simple and low-cost clinical features may help clinicians in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches within the broad range of outpatients presenting with stable coronary artery disease.

  18. Assessing Risk in Patients with Stable Coronary Disease: When Should We Intensify Care and Follow-Up? Results from a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies of the COURAGE and FAME Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, Umberto; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Nijhoff, Freek; Moretti, Claudio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Mennuni, Marco; Capodanno, Davide; Lococo, Marco; Lipinski, Michael J.; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background. A large number of clinical and laboratory markers have been appraised to predict prognosis in patients with stable angina, but uncertainty remains regarding which variables are the best predictors of prognosis. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of studies in patients with stable angina to assess which variables predict prognosis. Methods. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for eligible studies published up to 2015, reporting multivariate predictors of major adverse cardiac events (MACE, a composite endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, and revascularization) in patients with stable angina. Study features, patient characteristics, and prevalence and predictors of such events were abstracted and pooled with random-effect methods (95% CIs). Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was the primary endpoint. Results. 42 studies (104,559 patients) were included. After a median follow-up of 57 months, cardiovascular events occurred in 7.8% of patients with MI in 6.2% of patients and need for repeat revascularization (both surgical and percutaneous) in 19.5% of patients. Male sex, reduced EF, diabetes, prior MI, and high C-reactive protein were the most powerful predictors of cardiovascular events. Conclusions. We show that simple and low-cost clinical features may help clinicians in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches within the broad range of outpatients presenting with stable coronary artery disease. PMID:27239372

  19. Challenges for Infants’ Home Care: a Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zeinab Hemati; Mahboobeh Namnabati; Friba Taleghani

    2016-01-01

    Background Home care is an acceptable strategy for the relationship between family and healthcare team and implementation of healthcare interventions, and infants’ nurses could play an important role in enhancing the capability of families and promoting child health in this area. This study examined challenges facing infants’ home care from nurses’ viewpoints in Iranian culture.Materials and MethodsA qualitative design was used to explain challenges facing infants’ home care from nurses’ view...

  20. Impact of advance care planning on the care of patients with heart failure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Chetna; Sim, David Kheng Leng; Jaufeerally, Fazlur; Vikas, Nivedita Nadkarni; Sim, Genevieve Wong Cheng; Tan, Boon Cheng; Ng, Clarice Shu Hwa; Tho, Pei Leng; Lim, Jingfen; Chuang, Claire Ya-Ting; Fong, Florence Hui Mei; Liu, Joy; Finkelstein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the promise and popularity of advance care planning, there is insufficient evidence that advance care planning helps patients to meet their end-of-life care preferences, especially in Asian settings. Thus, the proposed study aims to assess whether patients with advanced heart failure who are receiving advance care planning have a greater likelihood of receiving end-of-life care consistent with their preferences compared to patients receiving usual care. Secondary objectives...

  1. Natural course of care dependency in residents of long-term care facilities: prospective follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Caljouw, Monique AA; Cools, Herman JM; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2014-01-01

    Background Insight in the natural course of care dependency of vulnerable older persons in long-term care facilities (LTCF) is essential to organize and optimize individual tailored care. We examined changes in care dependency in LTCF residents over two 6-month periods, explored the possible predictive factors of change and the effect of care dependency on mortality. Methods A prospective follow-up study in 21 Dutch long-term care facilities. 890 LTCF residents, median age 84 (Interquartile r...

  2. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan – a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled “the worst country in which to be a mom” in Save the Children’s World’s Mothers’ Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Methods Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi’s phenomenological analysis. Results Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. Conclusion This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and

  3. Implementing a stepped-care approach in primary care: results of a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Franx Gerdien; Oud Matthijs; de Lange Jacomine; Wensing Michel; Grol Richard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Since 2004, 'stepped-care models' have been adopted in several international evidence-based clinical guidelines to guide clinicians in the organisation of depression care. To enhance the adoption of this new treatment approach, a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) was initiated in the Netherlands. Methods Alongside the QIC, an intervention study using a controlled before-and-after design was performed. Part of the study was a process evaluation, utilizing semi-structu...

  4. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Vedel Isabelle; Ghadi Veronique; De Stampa Matthieu; Routelous Christelle; Bergman Howard; Ankri Joel; Lapointe Liette

    2013-01-01

    Background Although collaborative team models (CTM) improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs). The objectives of this study are to understand: (1) how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2) the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Th...

  5. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Nai-Huan; Yang, Yen; Lee, Ming Shinn; Dalal, Koustuv; Smith, Graeme D

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS) and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT) for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments.

  6. Opinions of maternity care professionals and other stakeholders about integration of maternity care: a qualitative study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, H.; Jans, S.; Verhoeven, C.; Henneman, L.; Wiegers, T.; Mol, B.W.; Schellevis, F.; Jonge, A. de

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to give insight into the opinions of maternity care professionals and other stakeholders on the integration of midwife-led care and obstetrician-led care and on the facilitating and inhibiting factors for integrating maternity care. Methods Qualitative study using intervie

  7. Opinions of maternity care professionals and other stakeholders about integration of maternity care: a qualitative study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, H.; Jans, S.; Verhoeven, C.; Henneman, L.; Wiegers, T.; Mol, B.W.; Schellevis, F.; Jonge, A. de

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to give insight into the opinions of maternity care professionals and other stakeholders on the integration of midwife-led care and obstetrician-led care and on the facilitating and inhibiting factors for integrating maternity care. Methods: Qualitative study using interv

  8. The uses and gratifications of online care pages: a study of CaringBridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Isolde K

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated how online care pages help people connect with others and gain social support during a health care event. It reports the results of a survey of 1035 CaringBridge authors who set up personalized web pages because of hospitalization, serious illness, or other reasons, regarding the uses and gratifications obtained from their sites. Four primary benefits were found to be important to all authors of CaringBridge sites: providing information, receiving encouragement from messages, convenience, and psychological support. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed significant effects for six demographic and health-related variables: gender, age, religiosity, Internet usage, the purpose for which the site was set up, and sufficiency of information received from health care providers. Support was obtained for the perspective that online care pages provide new media gratifications for authors, and that health-related antecedents of media use may affect media selection and gratifications. The implications of this study for communication researchers and support services like CaringBridge are also discussed. PMID:21469004

  9. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  10. Quality of life related to oral mucositis of patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and receiving specialised oral care with low-level laser therapy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezinelli, L M; Eduardo, F P; Neves, V D; Correa, L; Lopes, R M G; Michel-Crosato, E; Hamerschlak, N; Biazevic, M G H

    2016-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a painful condition that occurs in 80% of patients who undergo haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our objective was to determine the impact of mucositis on quality of life (QoL) of patients subjected to HSCT treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Patients were evaluated: (1) on the first day of treatment; (2) 5 days after autologous or 8 days after allogeneic transplantation; (3) once bone marrow had integrated; and (4) 30 days after discharge. Clinical evaluation was performed using the World Health Organization criteria; oral health QoL was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14); and mucositis symptoms with the Patient-Reported Oral Mucositis Symptom (PROMS) scale. The higher the score, the lower the patient's QoL. The OHIP-14 responses showed that at D + 5/D + 8, all domains had the highest scores, while at times 1 and 4, the scores were lower. In the PROMS scale, all domains scored worst at time 2, and the differences between the scores at the four times were statistically significant. The study has shown that QoL improves over time in patients undergoing LLLT therapy for mucositis prevention. PMID:26087364

  11. Demand of elderly people for residential care: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van Bilsen; J. Hamers; W. Groot; C. Spreeuwenberg

    2006-01-01

    Background: Because of the rapid aging population, the demand for residential care exceeds availability. This paper presents the results of a study that focuses on the demand of elderly people for residential care and determinants (elderly people's personal characteristics, needs and resources) that

  12. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to interview 4…

  13. Compliance of Healthcare Workers with Hand Hygiene Practices in Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Units: Overt Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Karaaslan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to assess the compliance of hand hygiene (HH of healthcare workers (HCWs in the neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit in a tertiary university hospital in Istanbul. Methods. An observational study was conducted on the compliance of HH for the five World Health Organization (WHO indications. HCWs were observed during routine patient care in day shift. The authors also measured the technique of HH through hand washing or hand hygiene with alcohol-based disinfectant. Results. A total of 704 HH opportunities were identified during the observation period. Overall compliance was 37.0% (261/704. Compliance differed by role: nurses (41.4% and doctors (31.9% [P=0.02, OR: 1.504, CI 95%: 1.058–2.137]. HCWs were more likely to use soap and water (63.6% compared to waterless-alcohol-based hand hygiene (36.3% [P<0.05]. Conclusion. Adherence to hand hygiene practice and use of alcohol-based disinfectant was found to be very low. Effective education programs that improve adherence to hand hygiene and use of disinfectants may be helpful to increase compliance.

  14. Effective factors in providing holistic care: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Holistic care is a comprehensive model of caring. Previous studies have shown that most nurses do not apply this method. Examining the effective factors in nurses′ provision of holistic care can help with enhancing it. Studying these factors from the point of view of nurses will generate real and meaningful concepts and can help to extend this method of caring. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study was used to identify effective factors in holistic care provision. Data gathered by interviewing 14 nurses from university hospitals in Iran were analyzed with a conventional qualitative content analysis method and by using MAXQDA (professional software for qualitative and mixed methods data analysis software. Results: Analysis of data revealed three main themes as effective factors in providing holistic care: The structure of educational system, professional environment, and personality traits. Conclusion: Establishing appropriate educational, management systems, and promoting religiousness and encouragement will induce nurses to provide holistic care and ultimately improve the quality of their caring.

  15. Implementation of integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 by two Dutch care groups: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien; Huizing, Anna; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Even though previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes of integrated care initiatives, it is not clear why and when integrated care works. This study aims to contribute to filling this knowledge gap by examining the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes by two Dutch care groups. Methods An embedded single case study was conducted including 26 interviews with management staff, care purchasers and health professionals. The Context + Mechanism = Outcome Model...

  16. Implementation of integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 by two Dutch care groups: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien; Huizing, Anna; Vrijhoef, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Background Even though previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes of integrated care initiatives, it is not clear why and when integrated care works. This study aims to contribute to filling this knowledge gap by examining the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes by two Dutch care groups. Methods An embedded single case study was conducted including 26 interviews with management staff, care purchasers and health professionals. The Context + Mechanism = Outcome Model...

  17. Providers' response to child eating behaviors: A direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Alison; Vaughn, Amber E; Fallon, Megan; Hennessy, Erin; Burney, Regan; Østbye, Truls; Ward, Dianne S

    2016-10-01

    Child care providers play an important role in feeding young children, yet little is known about children's influence on providers' feeding practices. This qualitative study examines provider and child (18 months -4 years) feeding interactions. Trained data collectors observed 200 eating occasions in 48 family child care homes and recorded providers' responses to children's meal and snack time behaviors. Child behaviors initiating provider feeding practices were identified and practices were coded according to higher order constructs identified in a recent feeding practices content map. Analysis examined the most common feeding practices providers used to respond to each child behavior. Providers were predominately female (100%), African-American (75%), and obese (77%) and a third of children were overweight/obese (33%). Commonly observed child behaviors were: verbal and non-verbal refusals, verbal and non-verbal acceptance, being "all done", attempts for praise/attention, and asking for seconds. Children's acceptance of food elicited more autonomy supportive practices vs. coercive controlling. Requests for seconds was the most common behavior, resulting in coercive controlling practices (e.g., insisting child eat certain food or clean plate). Future interventions should train providers on responding to children's behaviors and helping children become more aware of internal satiety and hunger cues. PMID:27328098

  18. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-07-12

    The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

  19. Experiences of person-centred care - patients’ perceptions: qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, Tariq Saleem J; Carlström, Eric; Ekman, Inger; Jarneborn, Anders; Olsson, Lars-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient care models have been implemented and documented worldwide. Many studies have focused on features that hinder and facilitate the shift to such models, including the implementation process, staff involvement, resistance to new models and cultural dimensions. However, few studies have identified the potential effects of such new care models from a patient perspective. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether patients did in fact perceive the intentions of partn...

  20. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiung NH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nai-Huan Hsiung,1 Yen Yang,1 Ming Shinn Lee,2 Koustuv Dalal,3 Graeme D Smith4 1Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Curriculum Design and Human Potentials Development, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Department of Public Health Science, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 4School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. Keywords: pain, scales, BPS, CPOT, Taiwan

  1. Study protocol: The Intensive Care Outcome Network ('ICON' study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barber Vicki S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extended follow-up of survivors of ICU treatment has shown many patients suffer long-term physical and psychological consequences that affect their health-related quality of life. The current lack of rigorous longitudinal studies means that the true prevalence of these physical and psychological problems remains undetermined. Methods/Design The ICON (Intensive Care Outcome Network study is a multi-centre, longitudinal study of survivors of critical illness. Patients will be recruited prior to hospital discharge from 20–30 ICUs in the UK and will be assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months following ICU discharge for health-related quality of life as measured by the Short Form-36 (SF-36 and the EuroQoL (EQ-5D; anxiety and depression as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS; and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms as measured by the PTSD Civilian Checklist (PCL-C. Postal questionnaires will be used. Discussion The ICON study will create a valuable UK database detailing the prevalence of physical and psychological morbidity experienced by patients as they recover from critical illness. Knowledge of the prevalence of physical and psychological morbidity in ICU survivors is important because research to generate models of causality, prognosis and treatment effects is dependent on accurate determination of prevalence. The results will also inform economic modelling of the long-term burden of critical illness. Trial Registration ISRCTN69112866

  2. Doctors’ and nurses’ views on patient care for type 2 diabetes: an interview study in primary health care in Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Abdulhadi, Nadia M.; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed Ali; Wahlström, Rolf; Hjelm, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study aimed at exploring the experiences of primary health-care providers of their encounters with patients with type 2 diabetes, and their preferences and suggestions for future improvement of diabetes care. Background Barriers to good diabetes care could be related to problems from health-care providers’ side, patients’ side or the health-care system of the country. Treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes has become a huge challenge in Oman, where the prevalence has increased to...

  3. Competencies of specialised wound care nurses: a European Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Anne M; Maaskant, Jolanda M; Holloway, Samantha; van Dijk, Nynke; Alves, Paulo; Legemate, Dink A; Ubbink, Dirk T; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-12-01

    Health care professionals responsible for patients with complex wounds need a particular level of expertise and education to ensure optimum wound care. However, uniform education for those working as wound care nurses is lacking. We aimed to reach consensus among experts from six European countries as to the competencies for specialised wound care nurses that meet international professional expectations and educational systems. Wound care experts including doctors, wound care nurses, lecturers, managers and head nurses were invited to contribute to an e-Delphi study. They completed online questionnaires based on the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists framework. Suggested competencies were rated on a 9-point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as an agreement of at least 75% for each competence. Response rates ranged from 62% (round 1) to 86% (rounds 2 and 3). The experts reached consensus on 77 (80%) competences. Most competencies chosen belonged to the domain 'scholar' (n = 19), whereas few addressed those associated with being a 'health advocate' (n = 7). Competencies related to professional knowledge and expertise, ethical integrity and patient commitment were considered most important. This consensus on core competencies for specialised wound care nurses may help achieve a more uniform definition and education for specialised wound care nurses. PMID:23374671

  4. Competencies of specialised wound care nurses: a European Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Anne M; Maaskant, Jolanda M; Holloway, Samantha; van Dijk, Nynke; Alves, Paulo; Legemate, Dink A; Ubbink, Dirk T; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-12-01

    Health care professionals responsible for patients with complex wounds need a particular level of expertise and education to ensure optimum wound care. However, uniform education for those working as wound care nurses is lacking. We aimed to reach consensus among experts from six European countries as to the competencies for specialised wound care nurses that meet international professional expectations and educational systems. Wound care experts including doctors, wound care nurses, lecturers, managers and head nurses were invited to contribute to an e-Delphi study. They completed online questionnaires based on the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists framework. Suggested competencies were rated on a 9-point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as an agreement of at least 75% for each competence. Response rates ranged from 62% (round 1) to 86% (rounds 2 and 3). The experts reached consensus on 77 (80%) competences. Most competencies chosen belonged to the domain 'scholar' (n = 19), whereas few addressed those associated with being a 'health advocate' (n = 7). Competencies related to professional knowledge and expertise, ethical integrity and patient commitment were considered most important. This consensus on core competencies for specialised wound care nurses may help achieve a more uniform definition and education for specialised wound care nurses.

  5. AwareCare: development and validation of an observational measure of awareness in people with severe dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Linda; Whitaker, Rhiannon; Quinn, Catherine; Jelley, Hannah; Hoare, Zoe; Woods, Bob; Downs, Murna; Wilson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Signs of sensory and perceptual awareness can be observed in people with very severe dementia, and may be influenced by the extent to which the environment offers appropriate stimulation. We developed an observational tool, AwareCare, which care staff can use to identify signs of awareness in residents with very severe dementia, based on the concept of the Wessex Head Injury Matrix (WHIM). Using WHIM items as a guide, and following focus groups with care staff and family members, an expert panel identified 28 environmental stimuli and 35 response categories for the initial version of AwareCare. After baseline assessments of cognition, well-being and quality of life were taken, 40 residents were observed individually for 30 minutes on 5 occasions. Based on the observational data, 10 stimulus categories and 14 response categories were identified for further analysis and formed the final version of AwareCare. All participants showed awareness to varying degrees. Social stimuli elicited the most responses. Greater awareness was associated with better cognitive function, self-care, mobility, and responsiveness, but not with proxy-rated quality of life. Understanding the nature of awareness in this group is an important element in ensuring appropriate levels of interaction and stimulation, and hence enhancing quality of care. PMID:22264147

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Community-Based Dementia Care Networks: The Dementia Care Networks' Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux-Charles, Louis; Chambers, Larry W.; Cockerill, Rhonda; Jaglal, Susan; Brazil, Kevin; Cohen, Carole; LeClair, Ken; Dalziel, Bill; Schulman, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The Dementia Care Networks' Study examined the effectiveness of four community-based, not-for-profit dementia networks. The study involved assessing the relationship between the types of administrative and service-delivery exchanges that occurred among the networked agencies and the network members' perception of the effectiveness of…

  7. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik von Elm

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

  8. Study of the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School on the nurses' caring ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao He; De-Ying Hu; Yi-Lan Liu; Li-Fen Wu; Lian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To understand the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School (CCWS) on the nurses' caring ability. Methods: Questionnaire 25 nurses of humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS using the Nkongho Caring Ability Inventory (CAI) before and after implement the humanistic nursing care model, including reform the systems of nursing care, introduce humanistic care model, implement the humanistic care, to measure the nurses' caring ability. Results: The nurses' caring ability had significantly developed on total, cognition dimension, courage dimension and patience dimension after all measures considered (p Conclusions: The humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS has a positive effect on the nurses' caring ability, not only to help build great relationships between nurses and patients but also to enhance the patients' satisfaction.

  9. Brain-oriented care in the NICU: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    With the advances of technology and treatment in the field of neonatal care, researchers can now study how the brains of preterm infants are different from full-term infants. The differences are significant, and the outcomes are poor overall for premature infants as a whole. Caregivers at the bedside must know that every interaction with the preterm infant affects brain development-it is critical to the developmental outcome of the infant. The idea of neuroprotection is not new to the medical field but is a fairly new idea to the NICU. Neuroprotection encompasses all interventions that promote normal development of the brain. The concept of brain-oriented care is a necessary extension of developmental care in the NICU. By following the journey of 26-week preterm twin infants through a case study, one can better understand the necessity of brain-oriented care at the bedside. PMID:25161134

  10. Ambivalent implications of health care information systems: a study in the Brazilian public health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Porto de Albuquerque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates social implications of the "SIGA" Health Care Information System (HIS in a public health care organization in the city of São Paulo. The evaluation was performed by means of an in-depth case study with patients and staff of a public health care organization, using qualitative and quantitative data. On the one hand, the system had consequences perceived as positive such as improved convenience and democratization of specialized treatment for patients and improvements in work organization. On the other hand, negative outcomes were reported, like difficulties faced by employees due to little familiarity with IT and an increase in the time needed to schedule appointments. Results show the ambiguity of the implications of HIS in developing countries, emphasizing the need for a more nuanced view of the evaluation of failures and successes and the importance of social contextual factors.

  11. A Longitudinal Study of Usability in Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldskov, Jesper; Skov, Mikael B.; Stage, Jan

    2010-01-01

    We report from a longitudinal laboratory-based usability evaluation of a health care information system. The purpose of the study was to inquire into the nature of usability problems experienced by novice and expert users, and to see to what extend usability problems of a health care information...... system may or may not disappear over time, as the nurses get more familiar with it-if time heals poor design? As our method for studying this, we conducted a longitudinal study with two key studies. A usability evaluation was conducted with novice users when an electronic patient record system was being...

  12. Century Scale Evaporation Trend: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounoui, Lahouari

    2012-01-01

    Several climate models with different complexity indicate that under increased CO2 forcing, runoff would increase faster than precipitation overland. However, observations over large U.S watersheds indicate otherwise. This inconsistency between models and observations suggests that there may be important feedbacks between climate and land surface unaccounted for in the present generation of models. We have analyzed century-scale observed annual runoff and precipitation time-series over several United States Geological Survey hydrological units covering large forested regions of the Eastern United States not affected by irrigation. Both time-series exhibit a positive long-term trend; however, in contrast to model results, these historic data records show that the rate of precipitation increases at roughly double the rate of runoff increase. We considered several hydrological processes to close the water budget and found that none of these processes acting alone could account for the total water excess generated by the observed difference between precipitation and runoff. We conclude that evaporation has increased over the period of observations and show that the increasing trend in precipitation minus runoff is correlated to observed increase in vegetation density based on the longest available global satellite record. The increase in vegetation density has important implications for climate; it slows but does not alleviate the projected warming associated with greenhouse gases emission.

  13. Integrating care coordination home telehealth and home based primary care in rural Oklahoma: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorocco, Kristen H; Bratkovich, Kristi L; Wingo, Rita; Qureshi, Saleem M; Mason, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to evaluate the benefits of integrating VA Care Coordination Home Telehealth and Telemental health within HBPC. A case study design was used to determine quality assurance and quality improvement of incorporating additional home telehealth equipment within Home Based Primary Care (HBPC). Veterans with complex medical conditions and their caregivers living in rural Oklahoma were enrolled. Veterans received the same care other HBPC patients received with the addition of home telehealth equipment. Members from the interdisciplinary treatment team were certified to use the telehealth equipment. Veterans and their caregivers were trained on use of the equipment in their homes. Standard HBPC program measures were used to assess the program success. Assessments from all disciplines on the HBPC team were at baseline, 3, and 6 months, and participants provided satisfaction and interview data to assess the benefits of integrating technology into standard care delivery within an HBPC program. Six veterans were enrolled (mean age = 72 yrs) with a range of physical health conditions including: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident, spinal cord injury, diabetes, hypertension, and syncope. Primary mental health conditions included depression, dementia, anxiety, and PTSD. Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination ranged from 18 to 30. Over a 6-month period, case studies indicated improvements in strength, social functioning, decreased caregiver burden, and compliance with treatment plan. This integration of CCHT and HBPC served previously underserved rural veterans having complex medical conditions and appears both feasible and clinically beneficial to veterans and their caregivers.

  14. Implementing Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders Team Care in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center: Lessons Learned and Effects Observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Cathy C; Myers, Laura J; Allen, Katie; Counsell, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE), a model of care that works in collaboration with primary care providers (PCPs) and patient-centered medical homes to provide home-based geriatric care management focusing on geriatric syndromes and psychosocial problems commonly found in older adults, improved care quality and reduced acute care use for high-risk, low-income older adults. To assess the effect of GRACE at a Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center (VAMC), veterans aged 65 and older from Marion County, Indiana, with PCPs from four of five VAMC clinics who were not on hospice or dialysis were enrolled in GRACE after discharge home from an acute hospitalization. After an initial home-based transition visit to GRACE enrollees, the GRACE team returned to conduct a geriatric assessment. Guided by 12 protocols and input from an interdisciplinary panel and the PCP, the GRACE team developed and implemented a veteran-centric care plan. Hospitalized veterans from the fifth clinic, who otherwise met enrollment criteria, served as a usual-care comparison group. Demographic, comorbidity, and usage data were drawn from VA databases. The GRACE and comparison groups were similar in age, sex, and burden of comorbidity, although predicted risk of 1-year mortality in GRACE veterans was higher. Even so, GRACE enrollment was associated with 7.1% fewer emergency department visits, 14.8% fewer 30-day readmissions, 37.9% fewer hospital admissions, and 28.5% fewer total bed days of care, saving the VAMC an estimated $200,000 per year after program costs during the study for the 179 veterans enrolled in GRACE. Having engaged, enthusiastic VA leadership and GRACE staff; aligning closely with the medical home; and accommodating patient acuity were among the important lessons learned during implementation. PMID:27305428

  15. [The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology [STROBE] statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, E. von; Altman, D.G.; Egger, M.;

    2008-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed......, researchers, and journal editors to draft a che-cklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop...... and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case...

  16. Structural equation modeling for observational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) represents a framework for developing and evaluating complex hypotheses about systems. This method of data analysis differs from conventional univariate and multivariate approaches familiar to most biologists in several ways. First, SEMs are multiequational and capable of representing a wide array of complex hypotheses about how system components interrelate. Second, models are typically developed based on theoretical knowledge and designed to represent competing hypotheses about the processes responsible for data structure. Third, SEM is conceptually based on the analysis of covariance relations. Most commonly, solutions are obtained using maximum-likelihood solution procedures, although a variety of solution procedures are used, including Bayesian estimation. Numerous extensions give SEM a very high degree of flexibility in dealing with nonnormal data, categorical responses, latent variables, hierarchical structure, multigroup comparisons, nonlinearities, and other complicating factors. Structural equation modeling allows researchers to address a variety of questions about systems, such as how different processes work in concert, how the influences of perturbations cascade through systems, and about the relative importance of different influences. I present 2 example applications of SEM, one involving interactions among lynx (Lynx pardinus), mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon), and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), and the second involving anuran species richness. Many wildlife ecologists may find SEM useful for understanding how populations function within their environments. Along with the capability of the methodology comes a need for care in the proper application of SEM.

  17. Relinquishing the Practices of a Lifetime: Observations on ageing, caring and literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hamilton

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on ethnographic and case study data from a variety of sources to explore the changing social practices of literacy across the lifespan. It explores the new literacy demands that people encounter with age when dealing with life events in a range of social domains. These include increased leisure; travel; changing family and peer relationships as a result of death and loss; issues of health and disability and accessing new technologies. It reveals how literacy is implicated in peoples' changing sense of time, place and history; how the older person’s identity as a literate actor may be interrupted by both institutional and informal processes of caring and their disengagement from spheres of activity that were previously central markers of their identity. Ageing thus involves both expansion and retreat from familiar literacy practices.

  18. Exploring self care in Tehran, Iran: A population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Eftekhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: self care empowers individuals to self manage their minor ailments, chronic conditions, and to exert more control over their lives. Self care includes activities such as influencing prevention, health maintenance, and treatment of illness by individuals, this study was conducted to assess views about self care among the general population living in south of Tehran. Materials and Methods: This survey was cross-sectional study by using of two-stage random cluster sampling, 1200 individuals aged 17 years and over was surveyed regarding self care. A structured closed validated questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were finally analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, Pearson Chi-square, Fisher exact test and linear by linear association. Questionnaire has totally five parts including knowledge, attitude, performance toward self care, views regarding general health and demographic characteristics as well. Furthermore; project number is 4276-62-02-85. Results: The mean age of subjects was 27.9 years (SD = 5.2; 50.2% ( n = 603 were female; 54% ( n = 643 were married (deleted, (55%, n = 658 reported that they were not knowledgeable about self care and (82%, n = 986 were interested in self care. Only 4% ( n = 53 of subjects indicated they drank ≥ 7 glasses of water daily; fewer reported they consumed at least five portions of fruits/vegetables daily (3%, n = 31; and (4%, n = 51 engaged in physical activity more than 3 h weekly. There were statistically significant relationships between knowledge and interest ( P < 0.01, knowledge and practice ( P < 0.001, and interest and practice regarding self care ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: The vast majority of subjects approximately two third felt satisfied with their health, most of subjects reported "feeling healthy" despite engaging in unhealthy life styles, it is revealed that more educated people, and likely those with more income, were interested in and knowledgeable regarding self care and were actually

  19. Implementation of integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 by two Dutch care groups : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien; Huizing, Anna; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Even though previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes of integrated care initiatives, it is not clear why and when integrated care works. This study aims to contribute to filling this knowledge gap by examining the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes by two Du

  20. Patient safety in primary care has many aspects: an interview study in primary care doctors and nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, S.; Laarhoven, E. van; Wolters, R.J.; Wetzels, R.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Scientific definitions of patient safety may be difficult to apply in routine health care delivery. It is unknown what primary care workers consider patient safety. This study aimed to clarify the concept of patient safety in primary care. METHODS: We held 29 semi-str

  1. Primary care clinicians' attitudes towards point-of-care blood testing: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, CH; Howick, J; Roberts, NW; Price, CP; Heneghan, C; Plüddemann, A; Thompson, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care blood tests are becoming increasingly available and could replace current venipuncture and laboratory testing for many commonly used tests. However, at present very few have been implemented in most primary care settings. Understanding the attitudes of primary care clinicians towards these tests may help to identify the barriers and facilitators to their wider adoption. We aimed to systematically review qualitative studies of primary care clinicians' attitudes to poi...

  2. Health care professionals' perceptions towards lifelong learning in palliative care for general practitioners: a focus group study

    OpenAIRE

    Pype, Peter; Symons, Linda; Wens, Johan; Van den Eynden, Bart; Stes, Ann; Deveugele, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a growing need for palliative care. The majority of palliative patients prefer their general practitioner (GP) to organize their palliative home care. General practitioners need a range of competences to perform this task. However, there has been no general description so far of how GPs keep these competences up-to-date. The present study explores current experiences, views and preferences towards training and education in palliative care among GPs, palliative home-care p...

  3. [Economic assessment, a field between clinical research and observational studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launois, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Health technology assessments propose to study the differential impact of health interventions in a complex care system which is characterised by the multitude of individual behaviours and the diverse nature of the institutions involved. Current systems for data collection lend themselves poorly to this rigorous analysis of efficacy of treatments in the actual situations where they are used. Randomised trials endeavour to neutralise any parasitic interference which could compromise testing for a causal relationship between the treatment administered and the result obtained. Their methodology which establishes the term ceteris paribus in the principle of good practice lends itself poorly to an analysis of individual behaviour. Observational studies are start from actual treatment situations to describe them as reliably as possible. By definition, however, these assume that the natural course of events is not deviated by any intervention. The absence of an experimental plan increases the likelihood of bias and makes it more difficult to test for causal relationships. They lend themselves poorly to testing for incremental efficacy. The two instruments to be preferred are decisional analysis and quasi-experimental studies. Decisional analysis help to avoid the problems of external validity associated with randomised clinical trials by associating parameters which are extracted from data obtained from everyday practice. Quasi-experimental studies or pragmatic trials are based on the reality of behaviour of the prescriber and his/her patients; their impact on efficacy, quality of life social costs of the disease and of treatments may be identified under normal conditions of use. PMID:12609811

  4. Mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somenath Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism is a disorder of calcium and phosphorus metabolism due to decreased secretion of parathyroid hormone. Hypoparathyroidism can be hereditary and acquired. Acquired hypoparathyroidism usually occurs following neck surgery (thyroid surgery or parathyroid surgery. Along with systemic manifestations, hypoparathyroidism produces some skin manifestations. Lack of study regarding mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism prompted us to undertake this study. To evaluate the mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism. An observational study done in a tertiary care hospital of Kolkata by comprehensive history taking, through clinical examination and relevant laboratory investigations. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. The commonest form of acquired hypoparathyroidism was neck surgery (thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy operation. Mucocutaneous manifestations were present in 76.19% of patients. The most frequent mucocutaneous manifestation was found in the hairs like the loss of axillary hair (61.9%, loss of pubic hair (52.38%, coarsening of body hair (47.62%, and alopecia areata (9.52%. The nail changes noted were brittle and ridged nail, followed by onycholysis, onychosezia, and onychomedesis. The most common skin features were xerotic skin in 11 patients (52.38%, followed by pellagra-like skin pigmentation, pustular psoriasis and acne form eruption, bullous impetigo, etc. Mucosa was normal in all the cases excepting the one which showed oral candidiasis.

  5. Antibiotic prescribing patterns in out-of-hours primary care: A population-based descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, L.; Moth, G.; Christensen, M.B.; Vedsted, P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To describe the frequency and characteristics of antibiotic prescribing for different types of contacts with the Danish out-of-hours (OOH) primary care service. Design. Population-based observational registry study using routine registry data from the OOH registration system on p

  6. A retrospective study of drug prescribing pattern in burns patients in a tertiary care rural hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palak Agrawal

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Females are more vulnerable to burn injuries. Polypharmacy was observed in prescriptions. Systemic antibiotic should be used with caution to prevent emergence of resistant microorganisms. Results of the present study indicate that some aspects of drug treatment need to be rationalized in order to achieve better patient care. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(6.000: 1446-1452

  7. Factors influencing job valuation: a comparative study of critical care and non-critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, W; Najman, J; Dunn, S

    2001-04-01

    This study sought to identify the relationship between three predictor variables, perceived collaboration with medical staff, autonomy and independent actions and an outcome, the value hospital nurses placed on their work. In total 189 critical care and 366 non-critical care nurses completed a mailed survey. Critical care nurses perceived themselves to have a more collaborative relationship with the medical staff, described performing actions independent of medical orders more frequently and perceived their jobs to have more value than non-critical care nurses. However the latter group perceived themselves to have more autonomy in their work. Within both groups collaboration and autonomy were significantly, but weak to moderately correlated with job valuation. Simply expanding the work hospital nurses do is unlikely to result in nurses valuing their jobs more, however promoting an environment of respect and sharing between the medical and nursing staff and supporting nurses when they act in an autonomous fashion may positively influence nurses' perceptions of their work. PMID:11223056

  8. Guided care: cost and utilization outcomes in a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Martha L; Griswold, Michael; Dunbar, Linda; Boyd, Cynthia M; Park, Margaret; Boult, Chad

    2008-02-01

    Guided Care (GC) is an enhancement to primary care that incorporates the operative principles of disease management and chronic care innovations. In a 6-month quasi-experimental study, we compared the cost and utilization patterns of patients assigned to GC and Usual Care (UC). The setting was a community-based general internal medicine practice. The participants were patients of 4 general internists. They were older, chronically ill, community-dwelling patients, members of a capitated health plan, and identified as high risk. Using the Adjusted Clinical Groups Predictive Model (ACG-PM), we identified those at highest risk of future health care utilization. We selected the 75 highest-risk older patients of 2 internists at a primary care practice to receive GC and the 75 highest-risk older patients of 2 other internists in the same practice to receive UC. Insurance data were used to describe the groups' demographics, chronic conditions, insurance expenditures, and utilization. Among our results, at baseline, the GC (all targeted patients) and UC groups were similar in demographics and prevalence of chronic conditions, but the GC group had a higher mean ACG-PM risk score (0.34 vs. 0.20, p insurance expenditures, hospital admissions, hospital days, and emergency department visits (p > 0.05). There were larger differences in insurance expenditures between the GC and UC groups at lower risk levels (at ACG-PM = 0.10, mean difference = $4340; at ACG-PM = 0.6, mean difference = $1304). Thirty-one of the 75 patients assigned to receive GC actually enrolled in the intervention. These results suggest that GC may reduce insurance expenditures for high-risk older adults. If these results are confirmed in larger, randomized studies, GC may help to increase the efficiency of health care for the aging American population. PMID:18279112

  9. Critical Observation on Methodologies of Select Doctoral Research Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Indrajit Goswami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to critically observe and interpret the methodological deficiencies as found in randomly selected 14 doctoral theses submitted to two different universities in India. Despite their serious deviation from the expected methodological standards, all those theses were accepted and approved by the universities and scholars concerned conferred with PhD degrees. Undoubtedly, those theses kept in the reference sections at the respective university libraries would potentially misguide and mislead the future researchers. Some of the common technical deficiencies, as have been noticed, include (1 absence of careful thoughts in framing research titles, (ii biased method of data collection, (ii absence of logical explanation in favour of sample size and sample selection process, (iii designing and execution of instrument for data collection, (iv theory formulation in terms of framing of objectives, hypotheses and operational definitions etc. The article attempts to present the critical observations on case-to-case basis so that their conceptual, instrumental and procedural deficiencies and deviations are easily understood by the academicians, researchers and students. The content of this article is divided in to three broad sections. The first section deals with an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods and their advantages and limitations. The next section deals with the review of the selected theses followed by conclusion and suggested remedial measures. The objective of this article is purely academic and its scope is limited to enhancement of quality of future research studies in the domains and related fields.

  10. Observational Study of Solar Magnetic Active Phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hongqi Zhang

    2006-06-01

    The electric current separated into two parts reflected the quantative properties of heterogeneity and chirality of magnetic field, and defined them as the shear and twist components of current. We analyze the basic configuration and evolution of superactive region NOAA 6580-6619-6659. It is found that the contribution of the twist component of current cannot be reflected in the normal analysis of the magnetic shear and gradient of the active regions. The observational evidence of kink magnetic ropes generated from the subatmosphere cannot be found completely in some super delta active regions.

  11. Maternal care in rural China: a case study from Anhui province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaohong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on prenatal care in China have focused on the timing and frequency of prenatal care and relatively little information can be found on how maternal care has been organized and funded or on the actual content of the visits, especially in the less developed rural areas. This study explored maternal care in a rural county from Anhui province in terms of care organization, provision and utilization. Methods A total of 699 mothers of infants under one year of age were interviewed with structured questionnaires; the county health bureau officials and managers of township hospitals (n = 10 and county level hospitals (n = 2 were interviewed; the process of the maternal care services was observed by the researchers. In addition, statistics from the local government were used. Results The county level hospitals were well staffed and equipped and served as a referral centre for women with a high-risk pregnancy. Township hospitals had, on average, 1.7 midwives serving an average population of 15,000 people. Only 10–20% of the current costs in county level hospitals and township hospitals were funded by the local government, and women paid for delivery care. There was no systematic organized prenatal care and referrals were not mandatory. About half of the women had their first prenatal visit before the 13th gestational week, 36% had fewer than 5 prenatal visits, and about 9% had no prenatal visits. A major reason for not having prenatal care visits was that women considered it unnecessary. Most women (87% gave birth in public health facilities, and the rest in a private clinic or at home. A total of 8% of births were delivered by caesarean section. Very few women had any postnatal visits. About half of the women received the recommended number of prenatal blood pressure and haemoglobin measurements. Conclusion Delivery care was better provided than both prenatal and postnatal care in the study area. Reliance on user fees gave

  12. Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections Observational European study (CIAO Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartelli Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complicated intra-abdominal infections are frequently associated with poor prognoses and high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. In order to describe the clinical, microbiological, and management-related profiles of both community-acquired and healthcare-acquired complicated intra-abdominal infections (IAIs, the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES, in collaboration with the Surgical Infections Society of Europe (SIS-E and other prominent European surgical societies, has designed the CIAO study. The CIAO study is a multicenter, observational study and will be carried out in various surgical departments throughout Europe. The study will include patients undergoing surgery or interventional drainage for complicated IAI.

  13. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation. PMID:26807853

  14. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care – a feasibility study with caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharin eHermenau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy of the training immediately before, directly after, and three months following the training workshop. The results showed high demand, good feasibility, high motivation and acceptance of caregivers. They reported improvements in caregiver-child relationships, as well as in the children’s behavior. Study 2 assessed exposure to maltreatment and the mental health of 28 orphans living in one institution in which all caregivers had been trained. The children were interviewed 20 months before, one month before, and three months after the training. Children reported a decrease in physical maltreatment and assessments showed a decrease in mental health problems. Our approach seems feasible under challenging circumstances and provides first hints for its efficacy. These promising findings call for further studies testing the efficacy and sustainability of this maltreatment prevention approach.

  15. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation.

  16. Geomagnetic Observations for Main Field Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Chulliat, A.; Mandea, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurements of the geomagnetic field have been made for more than 400 years, beginning with individual determinations of the angle between geographic and magnetic North. This was followed by the start of continuous time series of full vector measurements at geomagnetic observatories...... and the beginning of geomagnetic repeat stations surveys in the 19th century. In the second half of the 20th century, true global coverage with geomagnetic field measurements was accomplished by magnetometer payloads on low-Earth-orbiting satellites. This article describes the procedures and instruments...... for magnetic field measurements on ground and in space and covers geomagnetic observatories, repeat stations, automatic observatories, satellites and historic observations. Special emphasis is laid on the global network of geomagnetic observatories....

  17. Connection, Regulation, and Care Plan Innovation: A Case Study of Four Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Piven, Mary L.; Corazzini, Kirsten; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe how connections among nursing home staff impact the care planning process using a complexity science framework. We completed six-month case studies of four nursing homes. Field observations (n = 274), shadowing encounters (n = 69), and in-depth interviews (n = 122) of 390 staff at all levels were conducted. Qualitative analysis produced a conceptual/thematic description and complexity science concepts were used to produce conceptual insights. We observed that greater levels of sta...

  18. Cutaneous hypopigmentary disorders – An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalegowda Deepadarshan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypopigmented skin lesions is very common among people of all age groups. There are limited studies in India about evaluation of hypopigmented skin conditions. The aim of my study is to evaluate the different etiologies of cutaneous hypopigmentation. Aim: The present study was undertaken to find the relative incidence of the various disorders causing a hypopigmented lesion in a random sample of 200 cases and to study site, distribution and characteristics of the lesions. Methods: A random sample of 200 patients presenting with one or more hypopigmented lesions to the outpatient department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy in KVG Medical College and Hospital, Sullia from December 2011 to January 2013 was studied. Detailed history including address and occupation with special reference to onset and duration, preceding skin conditions, exposure to chemicals, topical application and family history was taken. Various characteristics of the lesion like site, size, number, distribution, surface and sensation were studied. After this samples were taken for relevant investigations like complete hemogram, biopsy, slit skin smear, KOH mount and assessed for the causes of hypopigmented lesions. Results: In our study, most common cause with cutaneous hypopigmentation was pityriasis versicolor, seen in 52%, followed by post inflammatory hypopigmentation in 32%, pre vitiligo in 6.5%, Hansen’s disease, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, nevus anemicus each in 2%, Woronoff’s ring in 1.5% and miscellaneous conditions in 2% of the cases. Commonest age group affected was 21-30 years. Males (49% and females (51% were almost equally affected. Conclusion: The study concludes that various conditions comes under hypopigmentary disorders. More common in young adults. Most common scaly condition was pityriasis versicolor and non scaly condition was pre vitiligo. Proper counseling and ruling out Hansen’s disease is required to alleviate the patient

  19. Treatment and follow-up results of children with electrical burn who observed in burn intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Aliosmanoğlu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical burns are infrequent relative to other injuries, but they are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess management and follow-up results of pediatric patients’ who observed in intensive care unit and also review the precautions for preventing electrical burns.Materials and methods: Totally 22 patients aged under 17 years who were observed in the burn intensive care unit of Şanlıurfa Education and Research Hospital during the period between July 2009-October 2010. Cases were investigated retrospectively. The patients’ age, gender, total burn surface area, length of stay in hospital, musculo-skeletal system complication, cardiovascular system complication, kidney damage and attempts were recorded.Results: Of the 22 cases, 19 (86.3% were male and 3 (13.7% were female. The mean age of the patients was 11.5 years. In 10 (45.4% children burns were occurred in workplace and working area and 12 (54.6% were occurred in the home environment. Depth of burns were third degree in 10 (45.4% children and second degree in 12 (54.6%. The mean percentage of burn surface area was 25.9%. The mean length of stay in hospital was 17 days. Debridement and grafting were performed to 12 (54.6% cases and 10 (45.4% children were treated with dressings. No patient had increased creatinine kinase levels, oliguria, myoglobuinuria and arrhythmia. The mean hospitalization time was 17 days.Conclusion: Nearly half of patients underwent debridement plus grafting. None of our patients developed renal failure other severe system dysfunction.

  20. Quality of Life in Depressed Patients in UK Primary Care: The FINDER Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lenox-Smith, Alan; Macdonald, Mark T. B.; Reed, Catherine; Tylee, Andre; Peveler, Robert; Quail, Deborah; Wildgust, Hiram J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of depression and its treatment on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a naturalistic, primary care setting in the UK. Methods The Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER) study was a European, 6-month, prospective, observational study designed to estimate HRQoL in patients with a clinical diagnosis of depression. This paper examines primary care patients recruited in the UK. HRQoL was measured at baseline and at 3 and 6 months afte...

  1. Compassion fatigue: A Study of critical care nurses in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Dikmen, Yurdanur; Aydın, Yasemin; Tabakoğlu, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the level of compassion fatigue which experienced by nurses who work in intensive care units and factors that affecting it.In a cross sectional design, critical nurses were surveyed by using questionnaire and  compassion fatigue (CF) subscale of the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL R-IV) to measure levels of compassion fatigueat a large National Education and ResearchHospital located in northwestof Turkey. A total of 69 critical care nurses part...

  2. A Comparative Study on the Palliative Care in Romania and France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana ENACHE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The palliative care has old tradition, as the single support and relief of suffering in terminally ill patients form, until the release of antibiotics and the development of modern medical technologies, investigation, diagnosis and treatment. In the 1960s the palliative care was officially recognized as a medical field, focused on the psycho-emotional and spiritual aspects without neglecting, however, the physical aspects of care. Further evolution differed on a country basis.The health insurance systems in Romania and France are based on the same principle of solidarity. The history of the two palliative care systems has close start. In this context, we propose a comparative study to identify the differences and similarities between the systems of palliative care in the two countries. Certain evaluation criteria were selected for this purpose, in order to ensure a complex approach for this type of service. We have used the methods of study documentation and direct observation through an internship performed in a clinic in France, Groupe Hospitalier Saint Augustine-Malestroit.In spite of the chronic low funding of the health system, non-challenging and lean health legislation, the system of palliative care has developed slowly, but progressively, in Romania. Though, the level of services is far below the needs. This is imposing a rigorous analysis of the factors affecting the quality of life of patients and the development of services strongly dependent on these.The French health care system is an example of good practice regarding availability of health care, health care related services, accessibility to the patient, and the legal frame: national policies, legislation, financial planning models and quality control, training and human resources, including the emotional and spiritual support like patient special needs, family support, support for pediatric patients and their families, religious and psychological assistance, staff issues.

  3. Integrated Care in College Health: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Cary; Sloan, Sarah K.; Vance, Mary; Brownson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This case study describes 1 international student's treatment experience with an integrated health program on a college campus. This program uses a multidisciplinary, mind-body approach, which incorporates individual counseling, primary care, psychiatric consultation, a mindfulness-based cognitive therapy class, and a meditation group.

  4. Intensive care medicine trainees' perception of professionalism: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mook, W.N. van; Grave, W.S. De; Gorter, S.L.; Zwaveling, J.H.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The Competency-Based Training program in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe identified 12 competency domains. Professionalism was given a prominence equal to technical ability. However, little information pertaining to fellows' views on professionalism is available. A nationwide qualitative study was

  5. Transforming Cultures of Care: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Karyn; Cross, David; Jones, Daren; Buff, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a small organizational case study highlighting the dimensions of trauma-informed care, the processes of organizational change, and the growth of caregiver expertise. The article is framed by the notion of caregiving cultures, which refers to the beliefs, languages, and practices of caregivers and caregiving organizations.…

  6. STUDY OF MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhya Devi; Madhuri; Sarada Bai; Srividya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A woman dies from complications of child birth every minute . The major causes for maternal mortality in India are uncontrolled fertility , inaccessibility or inadequate utilization of health care facilities , illiteracy , ignorance and gender discrimination . OBJECTIV ES: (1 ) To identify various causes of maternal deaths in a teaching hospital . (2 ) To study the profile of population attending the tertiary hos...

  7. What Is Popular Music Studies? Some Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloonan, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Popular Music Studies (PMS) is now taught in over 20 higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK and numerous others across the world. This article outlines the constituent parts of PMS in the UK and questions its status as a discipline in its own right. It concludes by arguing that, having established itself, PMS will need to deal with two key…

  8. Interprofessional rhetoric and operational realities: an ethnographic study of rounds in four intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the success of MIRs. We conducted a year-long comparative ethnographic study of interprofessional collaboration and patient and family involvement in four ICUs in tertiary academic hospitals in two American cities. The study included 576 h of observation of team interactions, 47 shadowing sessions and 40 clinician interviews. In line with best practices in ethnographic research, data collection and analysis were done iteratively using the constant comparative method. Member check was conducted regularly throughout the project. MIRs were implemented on all units with the explicit goals of improving team-based and patient-centered care. Operational conditions on the units, despite interprofessional commitment and engagement, appeared to thwart ICU teams from achieving these goals. Specifically, time constraints, struggles over space, and conflicts between MIRs' educational and care-plan-development functions all prevented teams from achieving collaboration and patient-involvement. Moreover, physicians' de facto control of rounds often meant that they resembled medical rounds (their historical predecessors), and sidelined other providers' contributions. This study suggests that the MIRs model, as presently practiced, might not be well suited to the provision of team-based, patient-centered care. In the interest of interprofessional collaboration, of the optimization of clinicians' time, of high-quality medical education and of patient-centered care, further research on interprofessional rounds models is needed. PMID:26704051

  9. Interprofessional rhetoric and operational realities: an ethnographic study of rounds in four intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Gropper, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Morning interprofessional rounds (MIRs) are used in critical care medicine to improve team-based care and patient outcomes. Given existing evidence of conflict between and dissatisfaction among rounds participants, this study sought to better understand how the operational realities of care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU) impact the success of MIRs. We conducted a year-long comparative ethnographic study of interprofessional collaboration and patient and family involvement in four ICUs in tertiary academic hospitals in two American cities. The study included 576 h of observation of team interactions, 47 shadowing sessions and 40 clinician interviews. In line with best practices in ethnographic research, data collection and analysis were done iteratively using the constant comparative method. Member check was conducted regularly throughout the project. MIRs were implemented on all units with the explicit goals of improving team-based and patient-centered care. Operational conditions on the units, despite interprofessional commitment and engagement, appeared to thwart ICU teams from achieving these goals. Specifically, time constraints, struggles over space, and conflicts between MIRs' educational and care-plan-development functions all prevented teams from achieving collaboration and patient-involvement. Moreover, physicians' de facto control of rounds often meant that they resembled medical rounds (their historical predecessors), and sidelined other providers' contributions. This study suggests that the MIRs model, as presently practiced, might not be well suited to the provision of team-based, patient-centered care. In the interest of interprofessional collaboration, of the optimization of clinicians' time, of high-quality medical education and of patient-centered care, further research on interprofessional rounds models is needed.

  10. Patient Safety Incidents in Hospice Care: Observations from Interdisciplinary Case Conferences

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Gage, Ashley; Dewsnap-Dreisinger, Mariah L.; Luetkemeyer, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the home hospice environment, issues arise every day presenting challenges to the safety, care, and quality of the dying experience. The literature pertaining to the safety challenges in this environment is limited.

  11. Developing ontologies in OWL: An observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Dzbor, Martin; Motta, Enrico; Buil-Aranda, C.; Gómez-Pérez, José Manuel; Görlitz, Olaf; Lewen, Holger

    2006-01-01

    As is known in the human-computer interaction (HCI) domain, interactions involve the user, the technology, and the ways they work together. We expand these notions to human-ontology interaction with the aim to investigate how users interact with the networked ontologies in a realistic ontology lifecycle. In this paper, we describe a user study that we have carried out in order to improve our understanding of the level of support provided by current ontology engineering tools in the context en...

  12. The boundaries of care work: a comparative study of professionals and volunteers in Denmark and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which two hospices--one located in Denmark and one in Australia--negotiate and determine the boundaries of volunteer workers vis-à-vis paid staff. A comparative case study approach was used to juxtapose organisations with similar activity fields located in different welfare state systems, i.e. a social democratic welfare state and a liberal welfare state. This study involved non-participant observation of volunteers at work and unstructured interviews with volunteers, staff and management in the hospices (n = 41). Data were collected between August 2012 and February 2013. Data were managed using NVivo and analysed thematically. A key finding is that volunteers in the Danish hospice were excluded from all direct care work due to the effective monopoly of the professional care providers, whereas the Australian volunteers participated in the provision of care to the extent that risk could be eliminated or mitigated to an acceptable level. The findings suggest two different models of the roles of volunteers in tension with professional care providers. Both models recognise that volunteers add to the level of care delivered by the organisations and allow for a discussion that moves away from the normative discussions of 'not taking somebody's job', while also recognising that volunteers must be more than just the 'nice extra' if they are to be of any real value to the organisation and to care receivers. PMID:25442013

  13. Cloud profiling radar design study for EarthCARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Teruaki; Ohno, Yuichi; Horie, Hiroaki; Kimura, Toshiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    EarthCARE Phase-A study was successfully conducted in collaboration between ESA and Japan (JAXA and NICT). In this study, high sensitivity Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) design with Doppler capability was studied and demonstrated that the CPR satisfies mission requirements, system resource and launcher constraint. As a result of the study, a nadir looking CPR at 94 GHz with a 2.5 m diameter antenna reflector is designed with sensitivity exceeding -36 dBZ of requirement at TOA with 10 km horizontal integration. The Doppler measurement is a new challenge to attain velocity accuracy less than 1 m/s in vertical direction. In parallel to the CPR system design, algorithm development efforts have been conducted through field campaign. A suite of measured quantities that are very similar combination to the EarthCARE data was collected and applied to the retrieval algorithm test.

  14. Patients’ perceptions of the meaning of good care in surgical care: a grounded theory study

    OpenAIRE

    Mako, Tünde; Svanäng, Pernilla; Bjerså, Kristofer

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients in surgical care have reported a fear of being discharged prior to sufficient recovery and a lack of control of their situation. Establishing the patient-nurse relationship is essential in the context of the care. The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare has established indicators for good care for comparison, evaluation and improvement of the quality of the health care system. These indicators are knowledge-based, appropriate, safe, effective and equal health care...

  15. Compassion fatigue: A Study of critical care nurses in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdanur Dikmen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the level of compassion fatigue which experienced by nurses who work in intensive care units and factors that affecting it. In a cross sectional design, critical nurses were surveyed by using questionnaire and  compassion fatigue (CF subscale of the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL R-IV to measure levels of compassion fatigueat a large National Education and ResearchHospital located in northwestof Turkey. A total of 69 critical care nurses participated in the study, for a response rate of 78%.A series of cross tab analyses examined the relationship between nurses demographics and compassion fatigue (CF subscale. To analyze the data further, participants were recategorized into 2 groups for CF scores: (1 higher than 17: high risk and (2 lower than 17: low risk. Findings show that critical care nurses were at high risk (52.7% and low risk (47.3% for CF. Nurses informed significant differences in compassion fatigue on the basis of age, years of critical care experience, working hours (weekly.

  16. Observational study of children with aerophagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loening-Baucke, Vera; Swidsinski, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Aerophagia is a rare disorder in children. The diagnosis is often delayed, especially when it occurs concomitantly with constipation. The aim of this report is to increase awareness about aerophagia. This study describes 2 girls and 7 boys, 2 to 10.4 years of age, with functional constipation and gaseous abdominal distention. The abdomen was visibly distended, nontender, and tympanitic in all. Documenting less distention on awakening helped to make the diagnosis. Air swallowing, belching, and flatulence were infrequently reported. The rectal examination often revealed a dilated rectal ampulla filled with gas or stool and gas. The abdominal X-ray showed gaseous distention of the colon in all and of the stomach and small bowel in 8 children. Treatment consisted of educating parents and children about air sucking and swallowing, encouraging the children to stop the excessive air swallowing, and suggesting to them not to use drinking straws and not to drink carbonated beverages. The aerophagia resolved in all in 2 to 20 months (mean=8 months). PMID:18445758

  17. Care planning and decision-making in teams in Swedish elderly care: a study of interprofessional collaboration and professional boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duner, Anna

    2013-05-01

    In front-line practice, joint working between different professionals in health/social care and rehabilitation is regarded as a means to reach a comprehensive assessment of the needs of the older care recipients, leading to decisions on appropriate care and services. The aim of this study was to examine professional collaboration and professional boundaries in interprofessional care planning teams. Two different care planning teams were studied, one performing care planning in the homes of older individuals and the other performing care planning for older people in hospital wards. The empirical data consisted of audio-recorded care planning meetings and interviews with the professionals in the teams. The integration between the professionals involved was most noticeable in the investigation and assessment phase, while it was lower in the planning phase and almost non-existent in decision-making. The home care planning team tended to work in a more integrated manner than the discharge planning team. The importance of clarifying the roles of all professions concerned with needs assessment and care planning for older people became evident in this study. PMID:23343434

  18. Volunteering in dementia care – a Norwegian phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn U

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulrika Söderhamn1, Bjørg Landmark2,3, Live Aasgaard2, Hilde Eide3, Olle Söderhamn11Center for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway; 2Institute of Research and Development for Nursing and Care Services, Municipality of Drammen, Drammen, Norway; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen, NorwayIntroduction: The number of people suffering from dementia will increase dramatically in the future, and this will be a great challenge and concern for health care services. It is assumed that volunteers will strengthen community health care services more in the future than they do today.Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate lived experiences of working as a volunteer in an activity center with adapted activities for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia.Methods: Qualitative interviews were implemented in a group of nine female volunteers from an activity center in southern Norway. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with a descriptive phenomenological method. Results: Volunteering in an activity center for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia was reported to provide experiences of being useful and feeling satisfied with performing a good job. It was an advantage for the volunteers to have had experiences from life in general, but also as a health professional or as being the next of kin of a dementia sufferer. It was important for the volunteers to focus on the dementia sufferer and show caring behavior, and interaction with and the appreciation of the health care professionals were also important. The volunteers were motivated by being able to have influence and participate in the planning of the work, to be a part of the social setting, and to learn. However, for some volunteers it was difficult to adjust to an appropriate role.Conclusion: In order to promote volunteering in a caring context, mutual

  19. Taking good care of myself: a qualitative study on self-care behavior among Chinese persons with a permanent colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hui; Songwathana, Praneed; Isaramalai, Sang-arun; Wang, Qingxi

    2014-12-01

    In Chinese culture, as a possible consequence of Confucianism, caring for the sick is considered a moral obligation of family members, while self-care is only the basis of fulfilling filial piety. This qualitative study aims to explore the self-care behavior among persons with a permanent colostomy in a Chinese cultural context of emphasizing the role of family caregiving. Data from in-depth interviews with seven Chinese adults at a university hospital in southwest China were analyzed using content analysis. Informants' self-care behavior was characterized by "taking good care of myself," which underlined individuals' efforts to manage colostomy-related impacts involving: (i) taking care of my colostomy with a proper degree of independence; (ii) taking care of my life by dealing with limitations; (iii) taking care of my mood in a positive way. Findings revealed that informants' self-care behavior was linked to their Confucian beliefs in family obligations, and also influenced by a happy-go-lucky outlook of life, a likely product of Taoism. The information is useful for nurses to design a culturally appropriate care plan to improve self-care behavior and proper family caregiving. PMID:25370020

  20. HOW TO DESCRIBE THE RESULTS OF OBSERVATIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shal'nova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Principles and fundamentals of proper presentation of observational epidemiological study results are focused. Principles of observational study publication developed by expert epidemiologists (STROBE statement are explained in detail.

  1. Who Needs to Be Allocated in ICU after Thoracic Surgery? An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Liana; Faresin, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background. The effective use of ICU care after lung resections has not been completely studied. The aims of this study were to identify predictive factors for effective use of ICU admission after lung resection and to develop a risk composite measure to predict its effective use. Methods. 120 adult patients undergoing elective lung resection were enrolled in an observational prospective cohort study. Preoperative evaluation and intraoperative assessment were recorded. In the postoperative period, patients were stratified into two groups according to the effective and ineffective use of ICU. The use of ICU care was considered effective if a patient experienced one or more of the following: maintenance of controlled ventilation or reintubation; acute respiratory failure; hemodynamic instability or shock; and presence of intraoperative or postanesthesia complications. Results. Thirty patients met the criteria for effective use of ICU care. Logistic regression analysis identified three independent predictors of effective use of ICU care: surgery for bronchiectasis, pneumonectomy, and age ≥ 57 years. In the absence of any predictors the risk of effective need of ICU care was 6%. Risk increased to 25–30%, 66–71%, and 93% with the presence of one, two, or three predictors, respectively. Conclusion. ICU care is not routinely necessary for all patients undergoing lung resection. PMID:27493477

  2. Who Needs to Be Allocated in ICU after Thoracic Surgery? An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The effective use of ICU care after lung resections has not been completely studied. The aims of this study were to identify predictive factors for effective use of ICU admission after lung resection and to develop a risk composite measure to predict its effective use. Methods. 120 adult patients undergoing elective lung resection were enrolled in an observational prospective cohort study. Preoperative evaluation and intraoperative assessment were recorded. In the postoperative period, patients were stratified into two groups according to the effective and ineffective use of ICU. The use of ICU care was considered effective if a patient experienced one or more of the following: maintenance of controlled ventilation or reintubation; acute respiratory failure; hemodynamic instability or shock; and presence of intraoperative or postanesthesia complications. Results. Thirty patients met the criteria for effective use of ICU care. Logistic regression analysis identified three independent predictors of effective use of ICU care: surgery for bronchiectasis, pneumonectomy, and age ≥ 57 years. In the absence of any predictors the risk of effective need of ICU care was 6%. Risk increased to 25–30%, 66–71%, and 93% with the presence of one, two, or three predictors, respectively. Conclusion. ICU care is not routinely necessary for all patients undergoing lung resection.

  3. Maryland Child Care Choices Study: Changes in Child Care Arrangements of Young Children in Maryland. Publication #2014-57

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Caroline; Davis, Elizabeth E.; Tout, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this series is to summarize key findings and implications from the Maryland Child Care Choices study, a longitudinal survey of parents who were applying for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in 2011. Families in the Maryland Child Care Choices study had at least one child age six or younger and lived in one of the…

  4. The Obstacles against Nurse-Family Communication in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a Qualitative Study

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    Zahra Hadian Shirazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Communication is one of the key principles in Family-Centered Care (FCC. Studies have shown some drawbacks in communication between families and nurses. Therefore, the present study aimed to recognize the obstacles against nurse-family communication in FCC in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on 8 staff nurses in 2 NICUs affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected using 8 deep semi-structured interviews and 3 observations. Then, they were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in identification of 3 main categories and 7 subcategories. The first category was organizational factors with 2 subcategories of educational domain (inadequate education, lack of a system for nursing student selection, and poor professionalization and clinical domain (difficult working conditions, lack of an efficient system for ongoing education and evaluation, and authoritarian management. The second category was familial factors with socio-cultural, psychological, and economic subcategories. The last category was the factors related to nurses with socio-cultural and psycho-physical subcategories.Conclusion: Identification of the obstacles against nurse-family communication helps managers of healthcare systems to plan and eliminate the challenges of effective communication. Besides, elimination of these factors leads to appropriate strategies in NICUs for effective application of FCC.

  5. Data Extraction and Management in Networks of Observational Health Care Databases for Scientific Research: A Comparison of EU-ADR, OMOP, Mini-Sentinel and MATRICE Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Gini, Rosa; Schuemie, Martijn; Brown, Jeffrey; Ryan, Patrick; Vacchi, Edoardo; Coppola, Massimo; Cazzola, Walter; Coloma, Preciosa; Berni, Roberto; Diallo, Gayo; Oliveira, José Luis; Avillach, Paul; Trifirò, Gianluca; Rijnbeek, Peter; Bellentani, Mariadonata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We see increased use of existing observational data in order to achieve fast and transparent production of empirical evidence in health care research. Multiple databases are often used to increase power, to assess rare exposures or outcomes, or to study diverse populations. For privacy and sociological reasons, original data on individual subjects can’t be shared, requiring a distributed network approach where data processing is performed prior to data sharing. Case Descriptions...

  6. An observational study on cough in children: epidemiology, impact on quality of sleep and treatment outcome

    OpenAIRE

    De Blasio, Francesco; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Rubin, Bruce K; De Danieli, Gianluca; Lanata, Luigi; Zanasi, Alessando

    2012-01-01

    Background Cough is one of the most frequent symptoms in children and is the most common symptom for which children visit a health care provider. Methods This is an observational study on acute cough associated with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in children. The study evaluates the epidemiology and impact of cough on quality of sleep and children's activities, and the outcome of cough with antitussive treatments in pediatric routine clinical practice. Study assessments were perform...

  7. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  8. Study of nurses′ knowledge about palliative care: A quantitative cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesan Prem; Harikesavan Karvannan; Kumar, Senthil P; Surulirajan Karthikbabu; Nafeez Syed; Vaishali Sisodia; Saroja Jaykumar

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies have documented that nurses and other health care professionals are inadequately prepared to care for patients in palliative care. Several reasons have been identified including inadequacies in nursing education, absence of curriculum content related to pain management, and knowledge related to pain and palliative care. Aims: The objective of this paper was to assess the knowledge about palliative care amongst nursing professionals using the palliative care knowledge tes...

  9. On-ward observations in neonatal intensive care: Towards safer supplemental oxygen & IV therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Eijk, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on supplemental oxygen therapy and intrave nous (IV) therapy in neonatal intensive care. Both therapies are essential, but potentially dangerous for (preterm) newborn infants. Supplemental oxygen therapy refers to the therapy where a gas mixture with >21% of oxy gen is

  10. Health care utilization and symptom severity in Ghanaian children--a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Krumkamp

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing health care utilization behavior for children with mild or severe disease symptoms in rural Ghana. Between March and September 2008 a cross-sectional health care utilization survey was conducted and 8,715 caregivers were interviewed regarding their intended behavior in case their children had mild or severe fever or diarrhea. To show associations between hospital attendance and further independent factors (e.g. travel distance or socio-economic status prevalence ratios were calculated for the four disease symptoms. A Poisson regression model was used to control for potential confounding. Frequency of hospital attendance decreased constantly with increasing distance to the health facility. Being enrolled in the national health insurance scheme increased the intention to attend a hospital. The effect of the other factors diminished in the Poisson regression if modeled together with travel distance. The observed associations weakened with increasing severity of symptoms, which indicates that barriers to visit a hospital are less important if children experience a more serious illness. As shown in other studies, travel distance to a health care provider had the strongest effect on health care utilization. Studies to identify local barriers to access health care services are important to inform health policy making as they identify deprived populations with low access to health services and to early treatment.

  11. Meanings and expressions of care and caring for elders in urban Namibian families: a transcultural nursing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuning, C J; Small, L F; van Dyk, A

    2000-09-01

    Since Namibia's Independence in 1990, the population of elders--persons 65 years old and older--in urban communities is growing steadily. As such, requests for home health care, health counselling, respite care and residential care for aging members of society are overwhelming nurses and the health care system. This study expands transcultural nursing knowledge by increasing understanding of generic (home-based) patterns of elder care that are practised and lived by urban Namibian families. Guided by Madeleine Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality and the ethnonursing research method, emic (insider) meanings and expressions of care and caring for elders in selected urban households have been transposed into five substantive themes. The themes, which depict what carring for elders means to urban families, include: 1 nurturing the health of the family, 2 trusting in the benevolence of life as lived, 3 honouring one's elders, 4 sustaining security and purpose for life amid uncertainty, and 5 living with rapidly changing cultural and social structures. These findings add a voice from the developing world to the evolving body of transcultural nursing knowledge. Synthesis of findings with professional care practices facilitates the creation of community-focussed models for provisioning culturally congruent nursing care to elders and their families in urban Namibia.

  12. Influenza immunization among Canadian health care personnel: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Sarah A.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza immunization coverage among Canadian health care personnel remains below national targets. Targeting this group is of particular importance given their elevated risk of influenza infection, role in transmission and influence on patients' immunization status. We examined influenza immunization coverage in health care personnel in Canada, reasons for not being immunized and the impact of "vaccinate-or-mask" influenza prevention policies. Methods: In this national cross-sectional study, we pooled data from the 2007 to 2014 cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey and restricted it to respondents who reported a health care occupation. Using bootstrapped survey weights, we examined immunization coverage by occupation and by presence of vaccinate-or-mask policies, and reasons for not being immunized. We used modified Poisson regression to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) of influenza immunization for health care occupations compared with the general working population. Results: For all survey cycles combined, 50% of 18 446 health care personnel reported receiving seasonal influenza immunization during the previous 12 months, although this varied by occupation type (range 4%-72%). Compared with the general working population, family physicians and general practitioners were most likely to be immunized (PR 3.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.76-3.59), whereas chiropractors, midwives and practitioners of natural healing were least likely (PR 0.17, 95% CI 0.10-0.30). Among those who were not immunized, the most frequently cited reason was the belief that influenza immunization is unnecessary. Introduction of vaccinate-or-mask policies was associated with increased influenza immunization among health care personnel. Interpretation: Health care personnel are more likely to be immunized against influenza than the general working population, but coverage remains suboptimal overall, and we observed wide variation by occupation type. More efforts

  13. Integration home care in the care chain: results from the EURHOMAP study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Demand for home care is expected to rise sharply across Europe as a result of trends of reduced institutional care and the ageing of populations. The increased volume and complexity in home care will challenge the coordination of services delivered in the home situation and the coordinat

  14. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bo Kim,1,2 Michelle A Lucatorto,3 Kara Hawthorne,4 Janis Hersh,5 Raquel Myers,6 A Rani Elwy,1,7 Glenn D Graham81Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial VA Hospital, Bedford, 2Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Office of Nursing Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, 4Chief Business Office, Purchased Care, Washington, DC, 5New England Veterans Engineering Resource Center, Boston, MA, 6SJ Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 7Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 8Specialty Care Services (10P4E, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP and the primary care provider (PCP is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1 what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2 how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts

  15. Exploring the usefulness of comprehensive care plans for children with medical complexity (CMC: a qualitative study

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    Adams Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Home model recommends that Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN receive a medical care plan, outlining the child’s major medical issues and care needs to assist with care coordination. While care plans are a primary component of effective care coordination, the creation and maintenance of care plans is time, labor, and cost intensive, and the desired content of the care plan has not been studied. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the usefulness and desired content of comprehensive care plans by exploring the perceptions of parents and health care providers (HCPs of children with medical complexity (CMC. Methods This qualitative study utilized in-depth semi-structured interviews and focus groups. HCPs (n = 15 and parents (n = 15 of CMC who had all used a comprehensive care plan were recruited from a tertiary pediatric academic health sciences center. Themes were identified through grounded theory analysis of interview and focus group data. Results A multi-dimensional model of perceived care plan usefulness emerged. The model highlights three integral aspects of the care plan: care plan characteristics, activating factors and perceived outcomes of using a care plan. Care plans were perceived as a useful tool that centralized and focused the care of the child. Care plans were reported to flatten the hierarchical relationship between HCPs and parents, resulting in enhanced reciprocal information exchange and strengthened relationships. Participants expressed that a standardized template that is family-centered and includes content relevant to both the medical and social needs of the child is beneficial when integrated into overall care planning and delivery for CMC. Conclusions Care plans are perceived to be a useful tool to both health care providers and parents of CMC. These findings inform the utility and development of a comprehensive care plan template as well as a model of how

  16. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care.

  17. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care. PMID:25852202

  18. The performance of integrated health care networks in continuity of care: a qualitative multiple case study of COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Waibel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrated health care networks (IHN are promoted in numerous countries as a response to fragmented care delivery by providing a coordinated continuum of services to a defined population. However, evidence on their effectiveness and outcome is scarce, particularly considering continuity across levels of care; that is the patient's experience of connected and coherent care received from professionals of the different care levels over time. The objective was to analyse the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients’ perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and continuity of relation in IHN of the public health care system of Catalonia.Methods: A qualitative multiple case study was conducted, where the cases are COPD patients. A theoretical sample was selected in two stages: (1 study contexts: IHN and (2 study cases consisting of COPD patients. Data were collected by means of individual, semi-structured interviews to the patients, their general practitioners and pulmonologists and review of records. A thematic content analysis segmented by IHN and cases with a triangulation of sources and analysists was carried out.Results: COPD patients of all networks perceived that continuity of clinical management was existent due to clear distribution of roles for COPD care across levels, rapid access to care during exacerbations and referrals to secondary care when needed; nevertheless, patients of some networks highlighted too long waiting times to non-urgent secondary care. Physicians generally agreed with patients, however, also indicated unclear distribution of roles, some inadequate referrals and long waiting times to primary care in some networks. Concerning continuity of information, patients across networks considered that their clinical information was transferred across levels via computer and that physicians also used informal communication mechanisms (e-mail, telephone; whereas

  19. UK pneumonectomy outcome study (UKPOS: a prospective observational study of pneumonectomy outcome

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    Davies Paul

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to assess the short term risks of pneumonectomy for lung cancer in contemporary practice a one year prospective observational study of pneumonectomy outcome was made. Current UK practice for pneumonectomy was observed to note patient and treatment factors associated with major complications. Methods A multicentre, prospective, observational cohort study was performed. All 35 UK thoracic surgical centres were invited to submit data to the study. All adult patients undergoing pneumonectomy for lung cancer between 1 January and 31 December 2005 were included. Patients undergoing pleuropneumonectomy, extended pneumonectomy, completion pneumonectomy following previous lobectomy and pneumonectomy for benign disease, were excluded from the study. The main outcome measure was suffering a major complication. Major complications were defined as: death within 30 days of surgery; treated cardiac arrhythmia or hypotension; unplanned intensive care admission; further surgery or inotrope usage. Results 312 pneumonectomies from 28 participating centres were entered. The major complication incidence was: 30-day mortality 5.4%; treated cardiac arrhythmia 19.9%; unplanned intensive care unit admission 9.3%; further surgery 4.8%; inotrope usage 3.5%. Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status ≥ P3, pre-operative diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO and epidural analgesia were collectively the strongest risk factors for major complications. Major complications prolonged median hospital stay by 2 days. Conclusion The 30 day mortality rate was less than 8%, in agreement with the British Thoracic Society guidelines. Pneumonectomy was associated with a high rate of major complications. Age, ASA physical status, DLCO and epidural analgesia appeared collectively most associated with major complications.

  20. Patients from across Europe have similar views on patient-centred care: an international multilingual qualitative study in infertility care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; D'Hooghe, T.M.; Sermeus, W.; Empel, I. van; Strohmer, H.; Wyns, C.; Santa-Cruz, D.; Nardo, L.G.; Kovatchki, D.; Vanlangenakker, L.; Garcia-Velasco, J.; Mulugeta, B.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International patient centredness concepts were suggested but never conceptualized from the patients' perspective. Previously, a literature review and a monolingual qualitative study defined 'patient-centred infertility care' (PCIC). The present study aimed to test whether patients from

  1. Diagnosis of Asthma in Primary Health Care: A Pilot Study

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    Karin C. Ringsberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with an asthma diagnosis have a poor controlled asthma. One explanation may be an incorrect diagnosis. Aim. The aim of the study was to diagnose and classify patients with non-infectious lower respiratory tract problems in primary health care using internationally applied diagnostic criteria and diagnostic tests. Patients and Methods. New adult patients visiting a primary health care centre due to lower airway problems were included. The diagnostic tests included FEV1, FVC, PEF, two questionnaires, methacholine test, and skin prick test. Results. The patients (n=43 could be divided into four groups: asthma (28%, asthma-like disorder (44%, idiopathic cough (12%, and a nonreversible bronchial obstructive group (16%. The asthma and asthma-like groups showed similar patterns of airway symptoms and trigger factors, not significantly separated by a special questionnaire. Phlegm, heavy breathing, chest pressure/pain, cough, and wheezing were the most common symptoms. Physical exercise and scents were the dominating trigger factors. Conclusions. Nonobstructive asthma-like symptoms seem to be as common as bronchial asthma in primary health care. Due to the similarities in symptoms and trigger factors the study supports the hypothesis that asthma and nonobstructive asthma-like disorders are integrated in the same “asthma syndrome,” including different mechanisms, not only bronchial obstruction.

  2. Observing health professionals' workflow patterns for diabetes care - First steps towards an ontology for EHR services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, M; Lasierra, N; Hoerbst, A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the flexibility from a user-perspective and enabling a workflow based interaction, facilitates an easy user-friendly utilization of EHRs for healthcare professionals' daily work. To offer such versatile EHR-functionality, our approach is based on the execution of clinical workflows by means of a composition of semantic web-services. The backbone of such architecture is an ontology which enables to represent clinical workflows and facilitates the selection of suitable services. In this paper we present the methods and results after running observations of diabetes routine consultations which were conducted in order to identify those workflows and the relation among the included tasks. Mentioned workflows were first modeled by BPMN and then generalized. As a following step in our study, interviews will be conducted with clinical personnel to validate modeled workflows.

  3. Quality of COPD care in hospital outpatient clinics in Denmark: The KOLIBRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, P.; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Munch, E.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in 22 hospital-based outpatient clinics in Denmark and evaluated if participation by the staff in an educational programme could improve the quality of care and adherence to the COPD guidelines. Methods: We performed two audits of the h......Background: We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in 22 hospital-based outpatient clinics in Denmark and evaluated if participation by the staff in an educational programme could improve the quality of care and adherence to the COPD guidelines. Methods: We performed two audits...... of the hospital records one year apart before and after the educational programme for the participating doctors and nurses. A total of 941 patient records were included in the first audit and 927 in the second. The indicators of quality of care comprised amongst others referral to pulmonary rehabilitation...... and not in accordance with the recently published guidelines both in the 1st and the 2nd audit. Yet, we observed a substantial improvement from the 1st to the 2nd audit. For example, referral to rehabilitation improved from 56.3 to 62.7% (p = 0.006) Assessment of BMI improved from 7.8 to 56.1% and assessment...

  4. Observations on the birth and subsequent care of twin offspring by a lone pair of wild emperor tamarins (Saguinus imperator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windfelder, T L

    2000-10-01

    The birth of emperor tamarin (Saguinus imperator) twins was observed in the wild. The mother was a member of lone pair in a marked population of emperor tamarins in the Manu National Park, Peru. This report describes the birth and provides subsequent information on infant care and survival. Despite some difficulties, this lone pair of relatively young, primiparous emperor tamarins was able to successfully raise twin offspring to the age of at least 1 month. PMID:11051446

  5. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann Paquette-Warren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design: Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants: The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method: Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings: Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion: Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting.

  6. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting: Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results Three main categories of experience were identified: 1 The health professionals' management, where a need to optimize was found. 2 Shared care, which was lacking. 3 The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs improvement and attention should be drawn to the "professionalization" of the relatives and the need to strike a balance between their needs, wishes and resources in end-of-life care and bereavement.

  7. A mobile hospice nurse teaching team’s experience: training care workers in spiritual and existential care for the dying - a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Tornøe, Kirsten; Danbolt, Lars Johan; Kvigne, Kari; Sørlie, Venke

    2015-01-01

    Background Nursing home and home care nursing staff must increasingly deal with palliative care challenges, due to cost cutting in specialized health care. Research indicates that a significant number of dying patients long for adequate spiritual and existential care. Several studies show that this is often a source of anxiety for care workers. Teaching care workers to alleviate dying patients’ spiritual and existential suffering is therefore important. The aim of this study is to illumin...

  8. Study Of Maternal And Fetal Outcome In Twin Gestation At Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Bangal, Vidyadhar B; Patel, Shrutiben M; Khairnar, Devendra N

    2012-01-01

    Twin gestation is considered as high risk pregnancy due to associated high maternal morbidity and perinatal mortality in comparison with singleton pregnancies .Overall, the rate of twin gestation is on rise due to inadvertent use of ovulation induction drugs in assisted reproductive techniques. This observational study was carried out to find the maternal and perinatal outcome in 100 cases of twin gestation delivered at tertiary care referral hospital over a period of fifteen months. It was o...

  9. Cost analysis of prenatal care using the activity-based costing model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesse, T; Golembeski, S; Potter, J

    1999-01-01

    The cost of prenatal care in a private nurse-midwifery practice was examined using the activity-based costing system. Findings suggest that the activities of the nurse-midwife (the health care provider) constitute the major cost driver of this practice and that the model of care and associated, time-related activities influence the cost. This pilot study information will be used in the development of a comparative study of prenatal care, client education, and self care.

  10. Cost Analysis of Prenatal Care Using the Activity-Based Costing Model: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gesse, Theresa; Golembeski, Susan; Potter, Jonell

    1999-01-01

    The cost of prenatal care in a private nurse-midwifery practice was examined using the activity-based costing system. Findings suggest that the activities of the nurse-midwife (the health care provider) constitute the major cost driver of this practice and that the model of care and associated, time-related activities influence the cost. This pilot study information will be used in the development of a comparative study of prenatal care, client education, and self care.

  11. A conceptual framework for interprofessional shared decision making in home care: Protocol for a feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Murray Mary-Anne; Fraser Kimberley; Dumont Serge; Desroches Sophie; Brière Nathalie; Stacey Dawn; Légaré France; Sales Anne; Aubé Denise

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Shared decision making (SDM) is fundamental to informed consent and client-centered care. So far, SDM frameworks have been limited to the client-physician dyad, even though care is increasingly delivered by interprofessional (IP) teams. IP collaboration is especially essential in home care, one of health care's most rapidly growing areas. This study will assess whether it is possible to practice SDM in IP home care. Methods/Design We will use a qualitative case study and a...

  12. Economic valuation of informal care in Asia: a case study of care for disabled stroke survivors in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riewpaiboon, Arthorn; Riewpaiboon, Wachara; Ponsoongnern, Kanyarat; Van den Berg, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    This study values informal care for disabled stroke survivors in Thailand. It applies the conventional recommended opportunity cost method to value informal care in monetary terms. Data were collected by means of face-to-face interviews conducted during 2006. The sample consisted of 101 disabled persons who had suffered a stroke at least six months prior to the interview, and who had a functional status score of less than 95 as measured by the Barthel Index. Average monthly time spent on informal care was 94.6 hours, and the major source of opportunity cost was forgone unpaid work (43.5%). The average monthly monetary value of informal care was 4642.6 baht, based on 2006 prices. This study shows that providing informal care involves a substantial opportunity cost, implying a hidden value to Thai society.

  13. Top 20 Research Studies of 2014 for Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Grad, Roland

    2015-09-01

    A team of primary care clinicians with expertise in evidence-based medicine performed monthly surveillance of more than 110 English-language clinical research journals during 2014, and identified 255 studies that had the potential to change how family physicians practice. Each study was critically appraised and summarized, focusing on its relevance to primary care practice, validity, and likelihood that it could change practice. A validated tool was used to obtain feedback from members of the Canadian Medical Association about the clinical relevance of each POEM (patient-oriented evidence that matters) and the benefits they expect for their practice. This article, the fourth installment in this annual series, summarizes the 20 POEMs based on original research studies judged to have the greatest impact on practice for family physicians. Key studies for this year include advice on symptomatic management and prognosis for acute respiratory infections; a novel and effective strengthening treatment for plantar fasciitis; a study showing that varenicline plus nicotine replacement is more effective than varenicline alone; a network meta-analysis concluding that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are preferred over angiotensin II receptor blockers; the clear benefits of initial therapy with metformin over other agents in patients with diabetes mellitus; and important guidance on the use of anticoagulants. PMID:26371571

  14. Challenges of Change: A Qualitative Study of Chronic Care Model Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Hroscikoski, Mary C.; Solberg, Leif I.; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.; Harper, Peter G.; McGrail, Michael P.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE The Chronic Care Model (CCM) provides a conceptual framework for transforming health care for patients with chronic conditions; however, little is known about how to best design and implement its specifics. One large health care organization that tried to implement the CCM in primary care provided an opportunity to study these issues.

  15. Efficiency of a Care Coordination Model: A Randomized Study with Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the efficiency of a social work care coordination model for stroke patients. Care coordination addresses patient care and treatment resources across the health care system to reduce risk, improve clinical outcomes, and maximize efficiency. Method: A randomly assigned, pre-post experimental design measured…

  16. EBM in primary care: a qualitative multicenter study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderón Carlos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine (EBM has made a substantial impact on primary care in Spain over the last few years. However, little research has been done into family physicians (FPs' attitudes related to EBM. The present study investigates FPs' perceptions of EBM in the primary care context. Methods This study used qualitative methodology. Information was obtained from 8 focus groups composed of 67 FPs from 47 health centers in 4 autonomous regions in Spain. Intentional sampling considered participants' previous education in EBM, and their experience as tutors in family medicine or working groups' members of the Spanish Society of Family Practice. Sociological discourse analysis was used with the support of the MAXqda software. Results were validated by means of triangulation among researchers and contrast with participants. Results Findings were grouped into three main areas: 1 The tug-of-war between the "science" of EBM and "experience" in the search for good clinical practice in primary care; 2 The development of EBM sensemaking as a reaction to contextual factors and interests; 3 The paradox of doubt and trust in the new EBM experts. The meaning of EBM was dynamically constructed within the primary care context. FPs did not consider good clinical practice was limited to the vision of science that EBM represents. Its use appeared to be conditioned by several factors that transcended the common concept of barriers. Along with concerns about its objectivity, participants showed a tendency to see EBM as the use of simplified guidelines developed by EBM experts. Conclusions The identification of science with EBM and its recognition as a useful but insufficient tool for the good clinical practice requires rethinking new meanings of evidence within the primary care reality. Beyond the barriers related to accessing and putting into practice the EBM, its reactive use can determine FPs' questions and EBM development in a direction not

  17. Fatal poisonings in Oslo: a one-year observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyerdahl Fridtjof

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute poisonings are common and are treated at different levels of the health care system. Since most fatal poisonings occur outside hospital, these must be included when studying characteristics of such deaths. The pattern of toxic agents differs between fatal and non-fatal poisonings. By including all poisoning episodes, cause-fatality rates can be calculated. Methods Fatal and non-fatal acute poisonings in subjects aged ≥16 years in Oslo (428 198 inhabitants were included consecutively in an observational multi-centre study including the ambulance services, the Oslo Emergency Ward (outpatient clinic, and hospitals, as well as medico-legal autopsies from 1st April 2003 to 31st March 2004. Characteristics of fatal poisonings were examined, and a comparison of toxic agents was made between fatal and non-fatal acute poisoning. Results In Oslo, during the one-year period studied, 103 subjects aged ≥16 years died of acute poisoning. The annual mortality rate was 24 per 100 000. The male-female ratio was 2:1, and the mean age was 44 years (range 19-86 years. In 92 cases (89%, death occurred outside hospital. The main toxic agents were opiates or opioids (65% of cases, followed by ethanol (9%, tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs (4%, benzodiazepines (4%, and zopiclone (4%. Seventy-one (69% were evaluated as accidental deaths and 32 (31% as suicides. In 70% of all cases, and in 34% of suicides, the deceased was classified as drug or alcohol dependent. When compared with the 2981 non-fatal acute poisonings registered during the study period, the case fatality rate was 3% (95% C.I., 0.03-0.04. Methanol, TCAs, and antihistamines had the highest case fatality rates; 33% (95% C.I., 0.008-0.91, 14% (95% C.I., 0.04-0.33, and 10% (95% C.I., 0.02-0.27, respectively. Conclusions Three per cent of all acute poisonings were fatal, and nine out of ten deaths by acute poisonings occurred outside hospital. Two-thirds were evaluated as accidental

  18. Observational and interventional study design types; an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Thiese, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate choice in study design is essential for the successful execution of biomedical and public health research. There are many study designs to choose from within two broad categories of observational and interventional studies. Each design has its own strengths and weaknesses, and the need to understand these limitations is necessary to arrive at correct study conclusions. Observational study designs, also called epidemiologic study designs, are often retrospective and are used...

  19. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedel Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Although collaborative team models (CTM improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs. The objectives of this study are to understand: (1 how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2 the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory. First, diffusion curves were developed for all 175 PCPs and 59 nurses practicing in one borough of Paris. Second, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 40 PCPs and 15 nurses to better understand the implementation dynamics. Results Diffusion curves showed that 3.5 years after the start of the implementation, 100% of nurses and over 80% of PCPs had adopted the CTM. The dynamics of the CTM's diffusion were different between the PCPs and the nurses. The slopes of the two curves are also distinctly different. Among the nurses, the critical mass of adopters was attained faster, since they adopted the CTM earlier and more quickly than the PCPs. Results of the semi-structured interviews showed that these differences in diffusion dynamics were mostly founded in differences between the PCPs' and the nurses' perceptions of the CTM's compatibility with norms, values and practices and its relative advantage (impact on patient management and work practices. Opinion leaders played a key role in the diffusion of the CTM among PCPs. Conclusion CTM diffusion is a social phenomenon that requires a major commitment by clinicians and a willingness to take risks; the role of opinion leaders is key. Paying attention to the notion of a critical mass of adopters is essential to developing implementation strategies that will accelerate the adoption process by clinicians.

  20. 乳腺癌护理过程中优质护理服务的作用解析%Observation on the Effect of Quality Care Breast Cancer Care in Process of Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽平

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate effect of quality care in breast cancer care process.Method: In our hospital, 85 breast cancer patients were selected as research subjects, using random double-blind study divided them into study groups (43 cases) and control group (42 cases), which were applied quality care and routine care respectively, after care, to observe care effect.Result: SAS, SDS score improvement of the study group were better than those of the control group (P<0.05);symptoms, the physiological function of the body, mind emotions, and social activities of daily living scores of the study group were higher those of the control group (P<0.05); complication rate of the study group was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05).Conclusion:Quality care in the process of implementing the conclusions of the breast cancer patients can effectively improve the psychological status of patients and reduce the complication rate.%目的:对乳腺癌护理过程中实施优质护理服务的作用进行探究。方法:选取本院收治的85例乳腺癌患者作为研究对象,应用随机双盲法将其分为研究组(43例)和对照组(42例),分别应用优质护理和常规护理,护理后,观察护理效果。结果:研究组患者的SAS、SDS评分改善情况明显优于对照组(P<0.05);研究组患者的自觉症状、躯体生理功能、心里情绪、日常生活以及社会活动等评分均高于对照组(P<0.05);研究组患者的并发症率显著低于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:对乳腺癌患者实施护理的过程中应用优质护理服务,能够有效改善患者的心理状况,降低并发症发生率。

  1. Validation and Evaluation of Two Observational Pain Assessment Tools in a Trauma and Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Topolovec-Vranic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that patients in the intensive care unit experience high levels of pain. While many of these patients are nonverbal at some point during their stay, there are few valid tools available to assess pain in this group.

  2. Support workers in social care in England: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthorpe, Jill; Martineau, Stephen; Moriarty, Jo; Hussein, Shereen; Stevens, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports the findings of a scoping study designed to describe the evidence base with regard to support workers in social care in the United Kingdom and to identify gaps in knowledge. Multiple bibliographic databases were searched for studies published since 2003. The results revealed that the support worker role, though not well-defined, could be characterised as one aimed at fostering independence among service users, undertaking tasks across social and health-care, and not being trained in, or a member of, a specific profession. The studies identified were predominantly small-scale qualitative projects which considered issues such as role clarity, training and pay, worker satisfaction, service user views and the amount of time support workers are able to spend with service users compared to other staff. The review concluded that the research base lacks longitudinal studies, there is definitional confusion and imprecision, and there is limited evidence about employment terms and conditions for support workers or about their accountability and performance. The desirability and value of training and how it is resourced need further analysis. It is concluded that moves to self-directed support or personalisation and the increased reliance on and use of support workers, in the form of personal assistants, call for closer scrutiny of the role. PMID:20345887

  3. Special observation in the care of psychiatric inpatients: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, L; Park, A

    2001-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a search of electronic databases for papers on special observation (SO). Published studies to date about SO are entirely descriptive. No evaluative research appears to have taken place, leaving the procedure based on clinical pragmatism and tradition. Something between 3%-20% of admissions receive some form of SO during their stay and the rate of usage varies widely between wards. SO is used as a method of controlling and containing the most disturbed patients who are considered to be imminently at risk of harming themselves or others. Such patients tend to be younger and suffering from acute psychosis or depression. Which professional staff have the authority to initiate and terminate SO varies from place to place, as does its duration. The financial costs have been crudely assessed and are reported to be very high, perhaps up to 20% of the nursing budget for a hospital. Further variation exists on who is allowed to carry out SO. Nurses frequently make unofficial modifications to the procedure based upon their own individual judgments and assessments, and policies vary widely among hospitals. There is little agreement between authorities on what nurses should do during SO, although there is some evidence that it can, under certain circumstances, be therapeutic. However there is also evidence that nurses find SO stressful and patients dislike it. PMID:11881179

  4. Health-care cost of diabetes in South India: A cost of illness study

    OpenAIRE

    Akari, Sadanandam; Mateti, Uday Venkat; Kunduru, Buchi Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to analyze the health-care cost by calculating the direct and indirect costs of diabetes with co-morbidities in south India. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted at Rohini super specialty hospital (India). Patient data as well as cost details were collected from the patients for a period of 6 months. The study was approved by the hospital committee prior to the study. The diabetic patients of age >18 years, either gender were inclu...

  5. Income Related Inequality of Health Care Access in Japan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Misuzu; Sato, Yasunori; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Sho; Hata, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the association between income level and health care access in Japan. Data from a total of 222,259 subjects (age range, 0-74 years) who submitted National Health Insurance claims in Chiba City from April 2012 to March 2014 and who declared income for the tax period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 were integrated and analyzed. The generalized estimating equation, in which household was defined as a cluster, was used to evaluate the association between equivalent income and utilization and duration of hospitalization and outpatient care services. A significant positive linear association was observed between income level and outpatient visit rates among all age groups of both sexes; however, a significantly higher rate and longer period of hospitalization, and longer outpatient care, were observed among certain lower income subgroups. To control for decreased income due to hospitalization, subjects hospitalized during the previous year were excluded, and the data was then reanalyzed. Significant inverse associations remained in the hospitalization rate among 40-59-year-old men and 60-69-year-old women, and in duration of hospitalization among 40-59 and 60-69-year-olds of both sexes and 70-74-year-old women. These results suggest that low-income individuals in Japan have poorer access to outpatient care and more serious health conditions than their higher income counterparts.

  6. Income Related Inequality of Health Care Access in Japan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Misuzu; Sato, Yasunori; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Sho; Hata, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the association between income level and health care access in Japan. Data from a total of 222,259 subjects (age range, 0-74 years) who submitted National Health Insurance claims in Chiba City from April 2012 to March 2014 and who declared income for the tax period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 were integrated and analyzed. The generalized estimating equation, in which household was defined as a cluster, was used to evaluate the association between equivalent income and utilization and duration of hospitalization and outpatient care services. A significant positive linear association was observed between income level and outpatient visit rates among all age groups of both sexes; however, a significantly higher rate and longer period of hospitalization, and longer outpatient care, were observed among certain lower income subgroups. To control for decreased income due to hospitalization, subjects hospitalized during the previous year were excluded, and the data was then reanalyzed. Significant inverse associations remained in the hospitalization rate among 40-59-year-old men and 60-69-year-old women, and in duration of hospitalization among 40-59 and 60-69-year-olds of both sexes and 70-74-year-old women. These results suggest that low-income individuals in Japan have poorer access to outpatient care and more serious health conditions than their higher income counterparts. PMID:26978270

  7. "Doctor, Why Didn't You Adopt My Baby?" Observant Participation, Care, and the Simultaneous Practice of Medicine and Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufrin, Carolyn

    2015-12-01

    Medical anthropology has long appreciated the clinical encounter as a rich source of data and a key site for critical inquiry. It is no surprise, then, that a number of physician-anthropologists have used their clinical insights to make important contributions to the field. How does this duality challenge and enhance the moral practice and ethics of care inherent both to ethnography and to medicine? How do bureaucratic and professional obligations of HIPAA and the IRB intersect with aspirations of anthropology to understand human experience and of medicine to heal with compassion? In this paper, I describe my simultaneous fieldwork and clinical practice at an urban women's jail in the United States. In this setting, being a physician facilitates privileged access to people and spaces within, garners easy trust, and enables an insider perspective more akin to observant participation than participant observation. Through experiences of delivering the infants of incarcerated pregnant women and of being with the mothers as they navigate drug addiction, child custody battles, and re-incarceration, the roles of doctor and anthropologist become mutually constitutive and transformative. Moreover, the dual practice reveals congruities and cracks in each discipline's ethics of care. Being an anthropologist among informants who may have been patients reworks expectations of care and necessitates ethical practice informed by the dual roles.

  8. "Doctor, Why Didn't You Adopt My Baby?" Observant Participation, Care, and the Simultaneous Practice of Medicine and Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufrin, Carolyn

    2015-12-01

    Medical anthropology has long appreciated the clinical encounter as a rich source of data and a key site for critical inquiry. It is no surprise, then, that a number of physician-anthropologists have used their clinical insights to make important contributions to the field. How does this duality challenge and enhance the moral practice and ethics of care inherent both to ethnography and to medicine? How do bureaucratic and professional obligations of HIPAA and the IRB intersect with aspirations of anthropology to understand human experience and of medicine to heal with compassion? In this paper, I describe my simultaneous fieldwork and clinical practice at an urban women's jail in the United States. In this setting, being a physician facilitates privileged access to people and spaces within, garners easy trust, and enables an insider perspective more akin to observant participation than participant observation. Through experiences of delivering the infants of incarcerated pregnant women and of being with the mothers as they navigate drug addiction, child custody battles, and re-incarceration, the roles of doctor and anthropologist become mutually constitutive and transformative. Moreover, the dual practice reveals congruities and cracks in each discipline's ethics of care. Being an anthropologist among informants who may have been patients reworks expectations of care and necessitates ethical practice informed by the dual roles. PMID:25697337

  9. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary...... care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where...... improvement and attention should be drawn to the "professionalization" of the relatives and the need to strike a balance between their needs, wishes and resources in end-of-life care and bereavement....

  10. An observational study of driver distraction in England.

    OpenAIRE

    Sullman, Mark J. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study set out to investigate the proportion of UK drivers who engage in some form of distracting behaviour whilst driving. Data were collected by roadside observation in six urban centres in the South of England. The observations took place on randomly selected roads at three different time periods during two consecutive Tuesdays. The data revealed that 14.4% of the 7168 drivers observed were found to be engaged in a distracting activity. The most frequently observed distraction was talk...

  11. Implementing a stepped-care approach in primary care: results of a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franx, G.C.; Oud, M.; Lange, J.; Wensing, M.J.; Grol, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 2004, 'stepped-care models' have been adopted in several international evidence-based clinical guidelines to guide clinicians in the organisation of depression care. To enhance the adoption of this new treatment approach, a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) was initiated in t

  12. Alarming signs of serious infections in febrile children: Studies in primary care and hospital emergency care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. van Ierland (Yvette)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Children constitute a substantial part of the workload of physicians in primary care and hospital emergency care. In the Netherlands, about 70% of the 3.9 million inhabitants less than 20 years of age had one or more contacts with their general practitioner (GP) in 2011

  13. Understanding Afghan healthcare providers: a qualitative study of the culture of care in a Kabul maternity hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, R.; van Teijlingen, E.; Ryan, K.; Holloway, I

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyse the culture of a Kabul maternity hospital to understand the perspectives of healthcare providers on their roles, experiences, values and motivations and the impact of these determinants on the care of perinatal women and their babies. Design Qualitative ethnographic study. Setting A maternity hospital, Afghanistan. Population Doctors, midwives and care assistants. Methods Six weeks of observation followed by 22 semi-structured interviews and four informal group discussion...

  14. Towards implementing coordinated healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care : a mixed method study

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Kristin; Bendtsen, Preben; Krevers, Barbro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary care is increasingly being encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. However, implementation has been suboptimal. Coordinated care could facilitate lifestyle promotion practice but more empirical knowledge is needed about the implementation process of coordinated care initiatives. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of a coordinated healthy lifestyle promotion initiative in a primary care setting. Methods: A mixed method, convergent, ...

  15. Self-care coping strategies in people with diabetes: a qualitative exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan Tony; Bradley Colin P; Collins Margaret M; Perry Ivan J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The management of diabetes self-care is largely the responsibility of the patient. With more emphasis on the prevention of complications, adherence to diabetes self-care regimens can be difficult. Diabetes self-care requires the patient to make many dietary and lifestyle changes. This study will explore patient perceptions of diabetes self-care, with particular reference to the burden of self-care and coping strategies among patients. Methods A maximum variation sample of ...

  16. A survey-based study of knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease among health care staff

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth Wendy; Fielding Elaine; Beattie Elizabeth; Gardner Anne; Moyle Wendy; Franklin Sara; Hines Sonia; MacAndrew Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Continued aging of the population is expected to be accompanied by substantial increases in the number of people with dementia and in the number of health care staff required to care for them. Adequate knowledge about dementia among health care staff is important to the quality of care delivered to this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge about dementia across a range of health care staff in a regional health service district. Methods K...

  17. Seniors’ perspectives on care: a case study of the Alex Seniors health clinic, Calgary

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Marta; Rypien, Candace; Drummond, Neil; Harasym, Patricia; Nixon, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary care initiatives face an imperative to not only reduce barriers to care for their patients but also to uniquely accommodate the complex needs of at-risk patient populations. Patient-centered multidisciplinary care team models for primary care, like the Alex Seniors Clinic, are one approach for providing comprehensive care for marginalized seniors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore patient perspectives on the responsiveness of the Alex Seniors Clinic to th...

  18. Experiences of Emotion Management in Medical Care (Case Study: Toronto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Kianpour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   This study lies at the intersection of the sociology of emotions and medical sociology, investigating emotion management among a rather unknown category of medical personnel –Hospital Chaplains. Sociologists of emotions seek to understand how emotions can be socially influenced in terms of both experience and expression. They believe emotions can be influenced by such institutions as culture and religion. As a result, not only do societies and subcultures have different patterns of expressing emotions according to their own norms and characteristics, but there are also different ways of managing emotions in social institutions. For example, in North American healthcare system, hospital chaplaincy is institutionalized, like other members of the medical team, to provide spiritual and religious care, which is often accompanied with emotional support, requiring therefore emotion management. In order to explore emotional experiences that chaplains undergo as a result of working in hospital and dealing with people who are emotionally overwhelmed, the author utilized insights from interactional and symbolic interactionist, phenomenological, and ethnomethodological approaches within the sociology of emotions and spoke with different chaplains from five faith traditions. The aim was to understand how chaplains perform interpersonal emotion management, what techniques, strategies and skills are involved in dealing with people’s emotions, and how performing emotion management in healthcare institutions brings religion and spirituality at the forefront of a secular society.       Material and Methods   This is a qualitative study based on in-depth interviewing with hospital chaplains working in different hospitals in the Toronto area. Toronto has a large number of hospitals and medical/healthcare institutions, most of which have a spiritual care department in which a number of full-time and part-time chaplains work to provide

  19. Barriers to and facilitators of care for hemodialysis patients; a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Nobahar, Monir; Tamadon, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients undergoing hemodialysis require direct and continuous care. Identifying the barriers to and factors facilitating hemodialysis care can improve care quality. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the barriers and facilitators of care for hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted as a qualitative study and it utilized content analysis approach. The study was performed in hemodialysis ward of Kowsar hospital in Semnan, in 2014. We used...

  20. STUDY OF MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Devi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A woman dies from complications of child birth every minute . The major causes for maternal mortality in India are uncontrolled fertility , inaccessibility or inadequate utilization of health care facilities , illiteracy , ignorance and gender discrimination . OBJECTIV ES: (1 To identify various causes of maternal deaths in a teaching hospital . (2 To study the profile of population attending the tertiary hospital . Methodology : A retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital over a period of 2 years (January 2013 - December 2014 and data was analysed manually using case sheets and maternal death audit forms . RESULTS: In the study period , there were 11636 deliveries and 97 maternal deaths . The direct causes accounted for 77 maternal deaths with haemorrhage , hype rtension and sepsis as leading causes of maternal mortality . Conclusion : Emphasis on health education , need for regular antenatal checkups and proper training of health personnel is required to reduce maternal mortality .

  1. Chronic illness and multimorbidity among problem drug users: a comparative cross sectional pilot study in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Walter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although multimorbidity has important implications for patient care in general practice, limited research has examined chronic illness and health service utilisation among problem drug users. This study aimed to determine chronic illness prevalence and health service utilisation among problem drug users attending primary care for methadone treatment, to compare these rates with matched \\'controls\\' and to develop and pilot test a valid study instrument. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of patients attending three large urban general practices in Dublin, Ireland for methadone treatment was conducted, and this sample was compared with a control group matched by practice, age, gender and General Medical Services (GMS) status. RESULTS: Data were collected on 114 patients. Fifty-seven patients were on methadone treatment, of whom 52(91%) had at least one chronic illness (other then substance use) and 39(68%) were prescribed at least one regular medication. Frequent utilisation of primary care services and secondary care services in the previous six months was observed among patients on methadone treatment and controls, although the former had significantly higher chronic illness prevalence and primary care contact rates. The study instrument facilitated data collection that was feasible and with minimal inter-observer variation. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is common among problem drug users attending general practice for methadone treatment. Primary care may therefore have an important role in primary and secondary prevention of chronic illnesses among this population. This study offers a feasible study instrument for further work on this issue. (238 words).

  2. Chronic illness and multimorbidity among problem drug users: a comparative cross sectional pilot study in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Walter

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Although multimorbidity has important implications for patient care in general practice, limited research has examined chronic illness and health service utilisation among problem drug users. This study aimed to determine chronic illness prevalence and health service utilisation among problem drug users attending primary care for methadone treatment, to compare these rates with matched \\'controls\\' and to develop and pilot test a valid study instrument. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of patients attending three large urban general practices in Dublin, Ireland for methadone treatment was conducted, and this sample was compared with a control group matched by practice, age, gender and General Medical Services (GMS) status. RESULTS: Data were collected on 114 patients. Fifty-seven patients were on methadone treatment, of whom 52(91%) had at least one chronic illness (other then substance use) and 39(68%) were prescribed at least one regular medication. Frequent utilisation of primary care services and secondary care services in the previous six months was observed among patients on methadone treatment and controls, although the former had significantly higher chronic illness prevalence and primary care contact rates. The study instrument facilitated data collection that was feasible and with minimal inter-observer variation. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is common among problem drug users attending general practice for methadone treatment. Primary care may therefore have an important role in primary and secondary prevention of chronic illnesses among this population. This study offers a feasible study instrument for further work on this issue. (238 words).

  3. Children in Self-Care: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Martha

    Before- and after-school care arrangements for third- and fifth-grade students were investigated, with specific attention given to the extent of self-care arrangements, satisfaction levels of parents and children using self-care, and variables contributing to satisfaction. The sample included 675 students attending Newington Elementary School in…

  4. Informal and Formal Kinship Care Populations: A Study in Contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Beth; Thomas, Rebecca

    1996-01-01

    Contrasts a group of informal kinship care providers in Philadelphia (KIDS'n'KIN Program) with two "formal" kinship care groups in Baltimore and California, examining similarities and differences in child and caregiver demographies and service needs. Presents the program's response to the needs of informal kinship care providers. (Author/SD)

  5. Students experienced help from preservative care. A reflective case study of two nursing students caring from a nursing framework on good care for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S. Jukema

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practice of nursing is shaped partly by nurses’ professional perspective of good care, guided by a nursing framework. An example is the framework of preservative care, which defines good nursing care for vulnerable older people in nursing homes. Currently we lack an understanding of how this framework could help nurses in training; it may be a useful developmental aid for undergraduate nursing students but so far there are no empirical data to support this. Aim: The purpose of this study is to explore how helpful a particular framework can be in the learning journey of two undergraduate nursing students. The study draws on narrative and reflective accounts, guided by the question: ‘How does preservative care as a framework of good care help two undergraduate nursing students develop their caring for older people?’ Methods: This was a reflective case study, in which two students – experienced registered nurses (non-graduates following a part-time education programme – reflected on their practices, using preservative care as a framework for taking care of older people. They kept reflective journals and received constructive feedback from the author of the preservative care framework (the first author. Their data were analysed in three steps. Findings: Both students reported gaining profound help from the framework in their evaluations of daily practices, although they rated the help differently in terms of demanding and rewarding experiences. The framework was particularly helpful in developing qualities in three domains: person-centredness, professional role and specific nursing competencies. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate how using a particular nursing framework made a difference to the practice of two undergraduate nursing students. Exploring the meaning and place of particular nursing frameworks in nursing education is necessary to establish their potential benefits for students. Implications for

  6. Intensive care delirium - effect on memories and health-related quality of life - a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Tønnesen, Else K; Videbech, Poul;

    2013-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of delirium in the intensive care unit on health-related quality of life, healthcare dependency and memory after discharge and to explore the association between health-related quality of life and memories, patient diaries and intensive care unit...... follow-up. BACKGROUND: Up to 83% of intensive care unit patients experience delirium. In addition to increased risk of mortality, morbidity and cognitive impairment, the experience itself is unpleasant. A number of studies have focused on memories associated with delirium, but the association between...... delirium, memories and health-related quality needs further investigation. DESIGN: We used an observational multicentre design with telephone interviews. METHODS: Adult intensive care unit patients (n = 360) were consecutively recruited and interviewed using the intensive care unit-Memory Tool one week...

  7. Concatenation of observed grasp phases with observer's distal movements: a behavioural and TMS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa De Stefani

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at determining how actions executed by two conspecifics can be coordinated with each other, or more specifically, how the observation of different phases of a reaching-grasping action is temporary related to the execution of a movement of the observer. Participants observed postures of initial finger opening, maximal finger aperture, and final finger closing of grasp after observation of an initial hand posture. Then, they opened or closed their right thumb and index finger (experiments 1, 2 and 3. Response times decreased, whereas acceleration and velocity of actual finger movements increased when observing the two late phases of grasp. In addition, the results ruled out the possibility that this effect was due to salience of the visual stimulus when the hand was close to the target and confirmed an effect of even hand postures in addition to hand apparent motion due to the succession of initial hand posture and grasp phase. In experiments 4 and 5, the observation of grasp phases modulated even foot movements and pronunciation of syllables. Finally, in experiment 6, transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to primary motor cortex 300 ms post-stimulus induced an increase in hand motor evoked potentials of opponens pollicis muscle when observing the two late phases of grasp. These data suggest that the observation of grasp phases induced simulation which was stronger during observation of finger closing. This produced shorter response times, greater acceleration and velocity of the successive movement. In general, our data suggest best concatenation between two movements (one observed and the other executed when the observed (and simulated movement was to be accomplished. The mechanism joining the observation of a conspecific's action with our own movement may be precursor of social functions. It may be at the basis for interactions between conspecifics, and related to communication between individuals.

  8. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations – from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. Methods We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Results Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Conclusions Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets

  9. Top 20 Research Studies of 2015 for Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Grad, Roland

    2016-05-01

    In 2015, a group of primary care clinicians with expertise in evidence-based practice performed monthly surveillance of more than 110 English-language clinical research journals. They identified 251 studies that addressed a primary care question and had the potential to change practice if valid (patient-oriented evidence that matters, or POEMs). Each study was critically appraised and disseminated to subscribers via e-mail, including members of the Canadian Medical Association who had the option to use a validated tool to assess the clinical relevance of each POEM and the benefits they expect for their practice. This article, the fifth installment in this annual series, summarizes the 20 POEMs based on original research studies judged to have the greatest clinical relevance for family physicians. Key recommendations include questioning the need for backup throat cultures; avoiding early imaging and not adding cyclobenzaprine or oxycodone to naproxen for patients with acute low back pain; and encouraging patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain to walk. Other studies showed that using a nicotine patch for more than eight weeks has little benefit; that exercise can prevent falls that cause injury in at-risk older women; and that prostate cancer screening provides a very small benefit, which is outweighed by significant potential harms of screening and associated follow-up treatment. Additional highly rated studies found that tight glycemic control provides only a small cardiovascular benefit in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at the expense of hypoglycemic episodes; that treating mild hypertension can provide a modest reduction in stroke and all-cause mortality; that sterile gloves are not needed for minor uncomplicated skin procedures; that vasomotor symptoms last a mean of 7.4 years; and that three regimens have been shown to provide the best eradication rates for Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:27175953

  10. Developing a framework of service convenience in health care: An exploratory study for a primary care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzovic, Sven; Kuppelwieser, Volker

    2016-01-01

    From retail health clinics and online appointment scheduling to (mobile) kiosks that enable patient check-in and automate the collection of copays and open balances, convenience has become an important topic in the health care sector over the last few years. While service convenience has also gained much interest in academia, one common limitation is that authors have adopted a "goods-centered" perspective focusing primarily on retail settings. Results of this exploratory study reveal that health care service convenience encompasses seven different dimensions: decision, access, scheduling, registration and check-in, transaction, care delivery, and postconsultation convenience. Implications and future research suggestions are discussed. PMID:27215644

  11. Changes in primary care physician’s management of low back pain in a model of interprofessional collaborative care: an uncontrolled before-after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mior Silvano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracking how clinicians treat patients provides an opportunity to explore how the clinical management of common musculoskeletal disorders evolves over time. We present an uncontrolled before-after study of a primary care physician’s management of low back pain and describe how his involvement in an interprofessional collaborative practice was associated with a change in the management of patients with low back pain. Method Data from the electronic medical record of one primary care physician who participated in a study of a model of chiropractic-medical collaboration were retrospectively collected. Records of a sample of consecutive patients prior to the start (i.e. pre-study, n = 51 and at the end of the collaborative study (i.e. study, n = 49 were collected. Results Demographics were similar in both groups but median number of physician visits (2.5 and 1.0, average prescriptions per patients (1.24 and 0.47, and total number of narcotic prescriptions (14 and 6 differed between pre-study and study groups, respectively. Separate analysis of only the records of low back pain study patients revealed that 61% were referred for chiropractic care during the study period. Patients who were not referred had more neurological deficits and leg pain but back pain severity and average number of prescriptions was about the same. Referred patients in the study group had about 25% fewer physician visits and imaging requests. Conclusion Based on this study of a single primary care physician, we hypothesize that doctors may change their prescribing behaviours and consultation rate for patients with low back pain when engaged in interprofessional collaborative care. Further research is required to test this observation in the population.

  12. Alarming signs of serious infections in febrile children: Studies in primary care and hospital emergency care

    OpenAIRE

    van Ierland, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Children constitute a substantial part of the workload of physicians in primary care and hospital emergency care. In the Netherlands, about 70% of the 3.9 million inhabitants less than 20 years of age had one or more contacts with their general practitioner (GP) in 2011. Primary out-ofhours care is annually visited by approximately 600,000 children younger than 14 years of age and hospital emergency departments (EDs) by nearly 400,000 children in this age group. F...

  13. Research designs and making causal inferences from health care studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Jankowski, Katherine R B

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the major types of research designs used in healthcare research, including experimental, quasi-experimental, and observational studies. Observational studies are divided into survey studies (descriptive and correlational studies), case-studies and analytic studies, the last of which are commonly used in epidemiology: case-control, retrospective cohort, and prospective cohort studies. Similarities and differences among the research designs are described and the relative strength of evidence they provide is discussed. Emphasis is placed on five criteria for drawing causal inferences that are derived from the writings of the philosopher John Stuart Mill, especially his methods or canons. The application of the criteria to experimentation is explained. Particular attention is given to the degree to which different designs meet the five criteria for making causal inferences. Examples of specific studies that have used various designs in chaplaincy research are provided.

  14. Interpreting the quality of health care database studies on the comparative effectiveness of oral anticoagulants in routine care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneeweiss S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Schneeweiss, Krista F Huybrechts, Joshua J Gagne Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Background: Dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, has now been available for 2 years in the US for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, and direct Xa inhibitors are also starting to enter the market. Studies examining the effects of new oral anticoagulants in health care databases are beginning to emerge. The purpose of this study was to describe the validity of early published observational studies on the comparative safety and effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation. Methods: We identified published nonrandomized post-marketing studies (articles or conference abstracts or posters and critically appraised their internal validity, with a particular focus on their ability to control confounding and other biases. Results: Two full-length journal articles, three conference posters, two conference presentation abstracts, and a US Food and Drug Administration analysis form the basis of the early comparative effectiveness and safety experience with new oral anticoagulants. Some published studies exhibit substantial biases and have insufficient precision for several important endpoints. Several studies suffer from biases arising from comparing ongoing users of the older drug, warfarin, who seem to tolerate it, to initiators of the new treatment who may have switched from warfarin or have had no prior experience with anticoagulants. Analyses tended to not adjust or not adjust adequately for confounding, and unsound propensity score application was also observed. Several studies introduced selection bias by excluding patients who died during follow-up and by restricting the study population to those with continuous database enrollment following cohort entry. We

  15. Oral care may reduce pneumonia in the tube-fed elderly: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2014-10-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most important diseases in terms of mortality in the elderly. In particular, bedridden patients who are forbidden oral ingestion during enteral nutrition may have a poor outcome resulting from a respiratory infection. Oral hygiene can play a positive role in preventing aspiration pneumonia in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of oral hygiene for bedridden and tube-fed patients at an increased risk of pneumonia. This retrospective study was conducted from July 2011 to June 2013 on a long-term-care hospital unit. The oral care protocol (OCP) intervention commenced in July 2012, during the study period. The subjects of this study were 63 elderly patients with a mean age of 81.7 years. Thirty-one patients were enrolled in the OCP intervention group, and the mean observation length was 130.4 days; the mean observation length for the 32 patients in the control group was 128.4 days. The incidence of pneumonia and the numbers of days with a recorded fever, antibiotics administration, blood tests, and radiological examinations were reduced from 1.20 to 0.45, 24.57 to 17.48, 25.52 to 10.12, 10.91 to 6.54, and 6.33 to 3.09 %, respectively. These reductions were significantly less in the OCP intervention group. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that daily oral care for tube-fed patients who do not receive nutrition by mouth reduced the incidence of pneumonia. In addition to patients consuming food by mouth, all tube-fed patients require dedicated oral care to maintain healthy oral conditions.

  16. Stigma in abortion care: application to a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Allyson

    2011-02-01

    A recent research study found that being more directly involved in medical abortion places greater demands on the nurses. The demands required by nurses working in abortion care may be increased by the stigma attached to such an antisocial action. This paper presents an application of stigma theory, as espoused by Goffman, based on a qualitative research study on abortion. It is argued that women attending for abortion are stigmatised and nurses, although 'wise', have an affiliate stigma through their close association with the procedure. It is proposed that the situation can be ameliorated by addressing stigma at policy, local and personal levels. Examples from other areas of practice are outlined for possible application to practice.

  17. Connecting Primary Health Care: A Comprehensive Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudloo, Mehran; Abolhassani, Farid; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin

    2016-07-01

    The collection of data within the primary health care facilities in Iran is essentially paper-based. It is focused on family's health, monitoring of non-infectious and infectious diseases. Clearly due to the paper-based nature of the tasks, timely decision making at most can be difficult if not impossible. As part of an on-going electronic health record implementation project at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, for the first time in the region, based on a comprehensive pilot project, four urban healthcare facilities are connected to their headquarters and beyond, covering all aspects of primary health care, for the last four years. Without delving into the technical aspects of its software engineering processes, the progress of the implementation is reported, selection of summarized data is presented, and experience gained thus far are discussed. Four years passed and if time is any important reason to go by, then it is safe to accept that the software architecture and electronic health record structural model implemented are robust and yet extensible. Aims and duration of a pilot study should be clearly defined prior to start and managed till its completion. Resistance to change and particularly to information technology, apart from its technical aspects, is also based on human factors. PMID:27424015

  18. Study protocol: Intensive care anxiety and emotional recovery (Icare) - A prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, M.; Aitken, L. M.; Cooke, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Survivors of intensive care units (ICUs) commonly present with symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during recovery. A number of factors have been identified as predictors of these adverse emotional outcomes, but the role of state anxiety during critical illness in the development of these emotional problems remains unknown. Purpose The Intensive Care Anxiety and Emotional Recovery (ICARe) study protocol proposes the development of a s...

  19. Eating Disorders in the General Practice : A Case-Control Study on the Utilization of Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Son, Gabrielle E.; Hoek, Hans W.; Van Hoeken, Daphne; Schellevis, Francois G.; Van Furth, Eric F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate primary care utilization between patients with an eating disorder (ED) and other patient groups, and between the ED subgroups anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Method The present study was an observational casecontrol study. In total, 167 patients with ED were

  20. Identifying Markers of Dignity-Conserving Care in Long-Term Care: A Modified Delphi Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve N Thompson

    Full Text Available Ensuring that people living in nursing homes (NHs are afforded with dignity in their daily lives is an essential and humane concern. Promoting dignity-conserving care is fundamentally important. By nature, however, this care is all-encompassing and holistic, and from current knowledge it is challenging to create explicit strategies for measuring dignity-conserving care. In practice the majority of current NH indicators of quality care are derived from information that is routinely collected on NH residents using the RAI-Minimum Data Set (MDS. In this regard, issues that are more tangible to resident dignity such as being treated with respect, compassion, and having opportunities to engage with others are not adequately captured in current NH quality of care indicators. An initial set of markers was created by conducting an integrative literature review of existing markers and indicators of dignity in the NH setting. A modified Delphi process was used to prioritize essential dignity-conserving care markers for use by NH providers, based on factors such as the importance to fostering a culture of dignity, the impact it may have on the residents, and how achievable it is in practice. Through this consensus building technique, we were able to develop a comprehensive set of markers that capture the range and diversity of important dignity-conserving care strategies for use in NHs. The final 10 markers were judged as having high face validity by experts in the field and have explicit implications for enhancing the provision of daily dignified care to NH residents. These markers make an important addition to the traditional quality indicators used in the NH setting and as such, bridge an important gap in addressing the psychosocial and the less easily quantified needs of NH residents.

  1. Primary care COPD patients compared with large pharmaceutically-sponsored COPD studies: an UNLOCK validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarije L Kruis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guideline recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are based on the results of large pharmaceutically-sponsored COPD studies (LPCS. There is a paucity of data on disease characteristics at the primary care level, while the majority of COPD patients are treated in primary care. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the external validity of six LPCS (ISOLDE, TRISTAN, TORCH, UPLIFT, ECLIPSE, POET-COPD on which current guidelines are based, in relation to primary care COPD patients, in order to inform future clinical practice guidelines and trials. METHODS: Baseline data of seven primary care databases (n=3508 from Europe were compared to baseline data of the LPCS. In addition, we examined the proportion of primary care patients eligible to participate in the LPCS, based on inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Overall, patients included in the LPCS were younger (mean difference (MD-2.4; p=0.03, predominantly male (MD 12.4; p=0.1 with worse lung function (FEV1% MD -16.4; p<0.01 and worse quality of life scores (SGRQ MD 15.8; p=0.01. There were large differences in GOLD stage distribution compared to primary care patients. Mean exacerbation rates were higher in LPCS, with an overrepresentation of patients with ≥ 1 and ≥ 2 exacerbations, although results were not statistically significant. Our findings add to the literature, as we revealed hitherto unknown GOLD I exacerbation characteristics, showing 34% of mild patients had ≥ 1 exacerbations per year and 12% had ≥ 2 exacerbations per year. The proportion of primary care patients eligible for inclusion in LPCS ranged from 17% (TRISTAN to 42% (ECLIPSE, UPLIFT. CONCLUSION: Primary care COPD patients stand out from patients enrolled in LPCS in terms of gender, lung function, quality of life and exacerbations. More research is needed to determine the effect of pharmacological treatment in mild to moderate patients. We encourage future guideline makers to involve primary care

  2. Negative health care experiences of immigrant patients: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stronks Karien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative events are abusive, potentially dangerous or life-threatening health care events, as perceived by the patient. Patients' perceptions of negative events are regarded as a potentially important source of information about the quality of health care. We explored negative events in hospital care as perceived by immigrant patients. Methods Semi-structured individual and group interviews were conducted with respondents about negative experiences of health care. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a framework method. A total of 22 respondents representing 7 non-Dutch ethnic origins were interviewed; each respondent reported a negative event in hospital care or treatment. Results Respondents reported negative events in relation to: 1 inadequate information exchange with care providers; 2 different expectations between respondents and care providers about medical procedures; 3 experienced prejudicial behavior on the part of care providers. Conclusions We identified three key situations in which negative events were experienced by immigrant patients. Exploring negative events from the immigrant patient perspective offers important information to help improve health care. Our results indicate that care providers need to be trained in adequately exchanging information with the immigrant patient and finding out specific patient needs and perspectives on illness and treatment.

  3. QUALICOPC, a multi-country study evaluating quality, costs and equity in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, W.L.; Boerma, W.G.; Kringos, D.S.; Maeseneer, J. De; Gress, S.; Heinemann, S.; Rotar-Pavlic, D.; Seghieri, C.; Svab, I.; Berg, M.J. van den; Vainieri, M.; Westert, G.P.; Willems, S.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The QUALICOPC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe) study aims to evaluate the performance of primary care systems in Europe in terms of quality, equity and costs. The study will provide an answer to the question what strong primary care systems entail and which effects

  4. QUALICOPC, a multi-country study evaluating quality, costs and equity in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schäfer, W.L.A.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Maeseneer, J. de; Gress, S.; Heinemann, S.; Rotar-Pavlic, D.; Seghieri, C.; Svab, I.; Berg, M.J. van den; Vainieri, M.; Westert, G.P.; Willems, S.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The QUALICOPC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe) study aims to evaluate the performance of primary care systems in Europe in terms of quality, equity and costs. The study will provide an answer to the question what strong primary care systems entail and which effects primary c

  5. What Makes for Good Collaboration and Communication in Maternity Care? A Scoping Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helmond, L.; Korstjens, I.; Mesman, J.; Nieuwenhuijze, M.; Horstman, K.; Scheepers, H.; Spaanderman, M.; Keulen, J.; de Vries, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good communication and collaboration are critical to safe care for mothers and babies. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with good collaboration and communication among maternity care professionals and between both professionals and parents. METHOD: Scoping study. We searched Pub

  6. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie L W Spoorenberg

    Full Text Available Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through "Embrace," an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach.Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1 Experiences with aging, with the themes "Struggling with health," "Increasing dependency," "Decreasing social interaction," "Loss of control," and "Fears;" and 2 Experiences with Embrace, with the themes "Relationship with the case manager," "Interactions," and "Feeling in control, safe, and secure". The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants' ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system.The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging.

  7. Oral and dental health in Huntington's disease - an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Saft, Carsten; Andrich, Jürgen; Müller, Thomas; Becker, Julia; Jackowski, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Background Only a few case reports and case series dealing with oral and dental health care are available in literature until now. The aim of the present pilot study was to determine the status of dental health in comparison to matched controls and to heighten the neurologists’ and dentists’ awareness of the oral aspects of the disease. Methods 42 Huntington’s disease (HD) participants were scored according to the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale. The dental status was assessed by us...

  8. Hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care, with and without an intermediate care hospital – a qualitative study of health professionals’ experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unni Alice Dahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intermediate care is an organisational approach to improve the coordination of health care services between health care levels. In Central Norway an intermediate care hospital was established in a municipality to improve discharge from a general hospital to primary health care. The aim of this study was to investigate how health professionals experienced hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care with and without an intermediate care hospital.  Methods: A qualitative study with data collected through semi-structured focus groups and individual interviews. Results: Discharge via the intermediate care hospital was contrasted favourably compared to discharge directly from hospital to primary health care. Although increased capacity to receive patients from hospital and prepare them for discharge to primary health care was viewed as a benefit, professionals still requested better communication with the preceding care level concerning further treatment and care for the elderly patients. Conclusions: The intermediate care hospital reduced the coordination challenges during discharge of elderly patients from hospital to primary health care. Nevertheless, the intermediate care was experienced more like an extension of hospital than an included part of primary health care and did not meet the need for communication across care levels.

  9. The EULAR Study Group for Registers and Observational Drug Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kearsley-Fleet, Lianne; Závada, Jakub; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), a study group of investigators representing European biologic DMARD (bDMARD) registers was convened. The purpose of this initial assessment was to collect and compare a cross section of patient characteristics...

  10. Do Effects of Early Child Care Extend to Age 15 Years? Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Belsky, Jay; Burchinal, Margaret; Steinberg, Laurence; Vandergrift, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Relations between nonrelative child care (birth to 4 1/2 years) and functioning at age 15 were examined (N = 1,364). Both quality and quantity of child care were linked to adolescent functioning. Effects were similar in size as those observed at younger ages. Higher quality care predicted higher cognitive-academic achievement at age 15, with…

  11. Advantages of a Warfarin Protocol for Long-term Care Pharmacists: a Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sargent, Randall; Brocklebank, Cynthia; Tam-Tham, Helen; Williamson, Tyler; Quail, Patrick; Turner, Diana; Drummond, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Background Warfarin is an anticoagulant prescribed to 12% of long-term care residents to reduce the risk of thrombo-embolism. This study used indicators to compare warfarin management by pharmacists to usual care. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study comparing a pharmacist-managed warfarin protocol with usual care of qualified warfarin recipients at long-term care facilities (two protocol, one control) in Calgary, Alberta. We compared the proportion of international normalized ratio ...

  12. Caval filters in intensive care: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, F; Di Gennaro, TL; Torino, A; Petruzzi, J; d’Elia, A; Fusco, P; Marfella, R; Lettieri, B

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of a caval vein filter (CVF) peri-implant monitoring protocol in order to reduce pulmonary embolism (PE) mortality and CVF-related morbidity. Background The reduction in mortality from PE associated with the use of CVF is affected by the risk of increase in morbidity. Therefore, CVF implant is a challenging prophylactic or therapeutic option. Nowadays, we have many different devices whose rational use, by applying a strict peri-implant monitoring protocol, could be safe and effective. Materials and methods We retrospectively studied 62 patients of a general Intensive Care Unit (ICU) scheduled for definitive, temporary, or optional bedside CVF implant. A peri-implant monitoring protocol including a phlebocavography, an echo-Doppler examination, and coagulation tests was adopted. Results In our study, no thromboembolic recurrence was registered. We implanted 48 retrievable and only 20 definitive CVFs. Endothelial adhesion (18%), residual clot (5%), cranial or caudal migration (6%), microbial colonization of the filter in the absence of clinical signs of infection (1%), caval thrombosis (1%), and pneumothorax (1%) were reported. Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) was reported (8%) as early complication. All patients with DVT had a temporary or optional filter implanted. However, in our cohort, definitive CVFs were reserved only to 32% of patients and they were not associated with DVT as complication. Conclusion CVF significantly reduces iatrogenic PE without affecting mortality. Generally, ICU patients have a transitory thromboembolic risk, and so the temporary CVF has been proved to be a first-line option to our cohort. A careful monitoring may contribute to a satisfactory outcome in order to promote CVF implant as a safe prophylaxis option. PMID:25395837

  13. Team Interactions in Specialized Palliative Care Teams: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Klarare, Anna; Hagelin, Carina Lundh; Fürst, Carl Johan; Fossum, Bjoorn

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. Aim: The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in special...

  14. Nurse Practitioner Mental Health Care in the Primary Context: A Californian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theane Theophilos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In America, mental health needs surpass the availability of specialized providers. This vulnerable population also has other obstacles for comprehensive care including gaps in medical coverage, stigma, economic barriers, and a geographical mal‑distribution of qualified mental health professionals. A wide availability of primary care providers, including primary care and family nurse practitioners, are well-positioned to deliver integrated mental and physical health care. A case study from a Southern California Coachella Valley primary care clinic with integrated services is used to demonstrate the much-needed approach of care to address health disparities that face low‑income immigrants, migrant workers, and others without access to specialized care centers and providers. It is argued that mental health care should be part of all holistic treatment provided by primary care and family nurse practitioners. This has implications for curricula and practice development.

  15. Resource Use Study in COPD (RUSIC): A prospective Study to Quantify the Effects of COPD Exacerbations on Health Care Resource Use Among COPD Patients

    OpenAIRE

    J Mark FitzGerald; Haddon, Jennifer M; Carole Bradley-Kennedy; Lisa Kuramoto; Ford, Gordon T; The RUSIC Study Group

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in health care resource use (HRU) in Canada, particularly in resources associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).OBJECTIVE: To identify HRU due to exacerbations of COPD.METHODS: A 52-week, multicentre, prospective, observational study of HRU due to exacerbations in patients with moderate to severe COPD was performed. Patients were recruited from primary care physicians and respirologists in urban and rural cent...

  16. Projected Image and Observed Behavior of Physicians in Terminal Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family, Gilla

    1993-01-01

    Reports on abandoned study examining potential benefits of psychotherapy to terminal cancer patients. Preliminary feasibility study found physicians' attitudes toward their dying patients as reformed and progressive. Interest shown by physicians did not translate into tangible research effort in spite of active pursuit by investigator over period…

  17. Modelling catchment areas for secondary care providers: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Simon; Wardlaw, Jessica; Crouch, Susan; Carolan, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    Hospitals need to understand patient flows in an increasingly competitive health economy. New initiatives like Patient Choice and the Darzi Review further increase this demand. Essential to understanding patient flows are demographic and geographic profiles of health care service providers, known as 'catchment areas' and 'catchment populations'. This information helps Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to review how their populations are accessing services, measure inequalities and commission services; likewise it assists Secondary Care Providers (SCPs) to measure and assess potential gains in market share, redesign services, evaluate admission thresholds and plan financial budgets. Unlike PCTs, SCPs do not operate within fixed geographic boundaries. Traditionally, SCPs have used administrative boundaries or arbitrary drive times to model catchment areas. Neither approach satisfactorily represents current patient flows. Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming and can be challenging for healthcare managers to exploit. This paper presents three different approaches to define catchment areas, each more detailed than the previous method. The first approach 'First Past the Post' defines catchment areas by allocating a dominant SCP to each Census Output Area (OA). The SCP with the highest proportion of activity within each OA is considered the dominant SCP. The second approach 'Proportional Flow' allocates activity proportionally to each OA. This approach allows for cross-boundary flows to be captured in a catchment area. The third and final approach uses a gravity model to define a catchment area, which incorporates drive or travel time into the analysis. Comparing approaches helps healthcare providers to understand whether using more traditional and simplistic approaches to define catchment areas and populations achieves the same or similar results as complex mathematical modelling. This paper has demonstrated, using a case study of Manchester, that when estimating

  18. Providing end-of-life care in care homes for older people: a qualitative study of the views of care home staff and community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Cassie; Stewart, Frances; Thompson, Genevieve; Hall, Sue

    2013-02-01

    The study aimed to explore the views of care home staff (CHS) and community nurses (CNs) on providing end-of-life care (EOLC) in care homes. Participants were randomly selected and qualitative interviews conducted with 80 CHS and 10 CNs. Themes emerging from the data included the following: The meaning of EOLC; starting EOLC; dying in the care home; stress of providing EOLC; improving EOLC; and the role of the CN. CHS felt that planning for the end of life was important before residents reached the dying phase, which some found difficult to determine. Although CHS wished to avoid residents being transferred to hospital to die, they acknowledged that improvements in their skills and the resources available to them were needed to manage EOLC effectively. CNs were critical of the EOLC provided in some care homes, reporting tensions over their relationship with CHS. As the number of older people who die in care homes increases, there is a need to overcome these barriers to provide good EOLC. PMID:25473926

  19. The adoption of the Reference Framework for diabetes care among primary care physicians in primary care settings: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Wang, Harry H X; Kwan, Mandy W M; Chan, Wai Man; Fan, Carmen K M; Liang, Miaoyin; Li, Shannon Ts; Fung, Franklin D H; Yeung, Ming Sze; Chan, David K L; Griffiths, Sian M

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has been increasing both globally and locally. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are in a privileged position to provide first contact and continuing care for diabetic patients. A territory-wide Reference Framework for Diabetes Care for Adults has been released by the Hong Kong Primary Care Office in 2010, with the aim to further enhance evidence-based and high quality care for diabetes in the primary care setting through wide adoption of the Reference Framework.A valid questionnaire survey was conducted among PCPs to evaluate the levels of, and the factors associated with, their adoption of the Reference Framework.A total of 414 completed surveys were received with the response rate of 13.0%. The average adoption score was 3.29 (SD 0.51) out of 4. Approximately 70% of PCPs highly adopted the Reference Framework in their routine practice. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that the PCPs perceptions on the inclusion of sufficient local information (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.748, 95%CI 1.597-14.115, P = 0.005) and reduction of professional autonomy of PCPs (aOR = 1.859, 95%CI 1.013-3.411, P = 0.045) were more likely to influence their adoption level of the Reference Framework for diabetes care in daily practices.The overall level of guideline adoption was found to be relatively high among PCPs for adult diabetes in primary care settings. The adoption barriers identified in this study should be addressed in the continuous updating of the Reference Framework. Strategies need to be considered to enhance the guideline adoption and implementation capacity. PMID:27495018

  20. Do Effects of Early Child Care Extend to Age 15 Years? Results From the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    OpenAIRE

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Belsky, Jay; Burchinal, Margaret; Vandergrift, Nathan; STEINBERG, LAURENCE

    2010-01-01

    Relations between nonrelative child care (birth to 4 ½ years) and functioning at age 15 were examined (N = 1364). Both quality and quantity of child care were linked to adolescent functioning. Effects were similar in size as those observed at younger ages. Higher quality care predicted higher cognitive-academic achievement at age 15, with escalating positive effects at higher levels of quality. The association between quality and achievement was mediated, in part, by earlier child care effect...

  1. Retrospective Study of the Survival of Patients who Underwent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Daniel Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical and evolutive characteristics of patients admitted in an intensive care unit after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, identifying prognostic survival factors.METHODS: A retrospective study of 136 patients admitted between 1995 and 1999 to an intensive care unit, evaluating clinical conditions, mechanisms and causes of cardiopulmonary arrest, and their relation to hospital mortality.RESULTS: A 76% mortality rate independent of age and sex was observed. Asystole was the most frequent mechanism of death, and seen in isolation pulmonary arrest was the least frequent. Cardiac failure, need for mechanical ventilation, cirrhosis and previous stroke were clinically significant (p<0.01 death factors.CONCLUSION: Prognostic factors supplement the doctor's decision as to whether or not a patient will benefit from cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  2. Bacteriological study of urinary tract infection in antenatal care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Ritu, Singh Brij N, Begum Rehana, Yadav Ramesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims & Objective: To isolate and diagnose the Uropathogens and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern in anti-natal care patient suffering from Urinary tract Infections. Material and Methods: 150 samples were collected by consent pregnant women between the age group of 18 to 40 years. A midstream clean catch is adequate, provided by all pregnant women’s through given careful instructions. For enumeration of bacteria we perform standard loop techniques method. The number of colonies counted or estimated, and this number used to calculate the number of viable bacteria per ml of urine. The bacterial strains were identified by colonies character stick, gram staining, morphological and biochemical character. The bacterial strains identification was done up to genus and species level. The antibiotics sensitivity test of bacterial strains was done as per CLSI guidelines by Kirby-Baure Disc Diffusion Methods. Results: The significant bactiurea was found in 50 patients among 150 patients used. The most commonly isolated bacteria was Escherichia coli 23(40% Klebsiellaaerogens 11 (22% Staphylococcus aureus 10 (20% Pseudomonas aerugenosa 4(8%.The incidence of bacteriuria among in their first pregnancy was 22.2%.The higher incidence of UTI in 2nd and 3rd trimester was found to have 31.4% & 40%. These studies were showing high level of resistance to first line antibiotics such as Cotrimaxozole. Conclusion: To minimizing the complication of the pregnant women should be educated about the physiology of pregnancy clinical presentation includes asymptomatic bacteria, acute cystitis & pyelonephritis. Pregnant women should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria by urine culture and treated with appropriate antibiotics. After the post treatment pregnant women should be examine again to confirm post treatment urine sterility.

  3. The PERS(2) ON score for systemic assessment of symptomatology in palliative care: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, E K; Berghoff, A S; Schur, S; Maehr, B; Schrank, B; Simanek, R; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Watzke, H H

    2016-07-01

    The comprehensive assessment of symptoms is the basis for effective, individualised palliative treatment. Established scoring systems provide in-depth information but are often lengthy and hence unsuitable. We introduce the PERS(2) ON score as a short and practically feasible score to evaluate symptom burden. Fifty patients admitted to a Palliative Care Unit rated seven items, i.e. pain, eating (loss of appetite/weight loss), rehabilitation (physical impairment), social situation (possibility for home care), suffering (anxiety/burden of disease/depression), O2 (dyspnoea) and nausea/emesis, on a scale ranging from 0 (absence) to 10 (worst imaginable), resulting in a score ranging from 0 to 70. Assessments were performed at admission, 7 days after admission and at the day of discharge. Symptom intensity scores were calculated, and change over time was evaluated. A significant improvement was observed from the PERS²ON score between admission and 7 days (P evaluation to evaluation on the day of discharge was observed (P = 0.001; paired t-test). This study provides initial evidence that the PERS²ON score is both feasible and sensitive to changes of the most prominent symptoms in palliative care. It may be useful in clinical practice to direct palliative treatment strategies and provide targeted symptom management. PMID:26564404

  4. Do integrated care structures foster processes of integration? A quasi-experimental study in frail elderly care from the professional perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Janse, Benjamin; Huijsman, Robbert; de Kuyper, Ruben Dennis Maurice; Fabbricotti, Isabelle Natalina

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explores the processes of integration that are assumed to underlie integrated care delivery. Design A quasi-experimental design with a control group was used; a new instrument was developed to measure integration from the professional perspective. Setting and participants Professionals from primary care practices and home-care organizations delivering care to the frail elderly in the Walcheren region of the Netherlands. Intervention An integrated care intervention specifi...

  5. Impact of the primary care curriculum and its teaching formats on medical students’ perception of primary care: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Christopher; Maisonneuve, Hubert; Pfarrwaller, Eva; Audétat, Marie-Claude; Birchmeier, Alain; Herzig, Lilli; Bischoff, Thomas; Sommer, Johanna; Haller, Dagmar M

    2016-01-01

    Background Switzerland is facing an impending primary care workforce crisis since almost half of all primary care physicians are expected to retire in the next decade. Only a minority of medical students choose a primary care specialty, further deepening the workforce shortage. It is therefore essential to identify ways to promote the choice of a primary care career. The aim of the present study was to explore students’ views about the undergraduate primary care teaching curriculum and differ...

  6. Overall satisfaction of health care users with the quality of and access to health care services: a cross-sectional study in six Central and Eastern European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Stepurko, Tetiana; Pavlova, Milena; Groot, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The measurement of consumer satisfaction is an essential part of the assessment of health care services in terms of service quality and health care system responsiveness. Studies across Europe have described various strategies health care users employ to secure services with good quality and quick access. In Central and Eastern European countries, such strategies also include informal payments to health care providers. This paper analyzes the satisfaction of health care users with...

  7. Leadership in the clinical workplace: what residents report to observe and supervisors report to display: an exploratory questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    van der Wal, Martha A.; Scheele, Fedde; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Within the current health care system, leadership is considered important for physicians. leadership is mostly self-taught, through observing and practicing. Does the practice environment offer residents enough opportunities to observe the supervisor leadership behaviours they have to learn? In the current study we investigate which leadership behaviours residents observe throughout their training, which behaviours supervisors report to display and whether residents and supervisor...

  8. Poor communication may impair optimal asthma care : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moffat, Mandy; Cleland, Jennifer; van der Molen, Thys; Price, David

    2007-01-01

    Background. Despite asthma being primarily managed in general practice and primary care, there is little research into the issues and tools which may impact on managing poorly controlled asthma in this setting. Objective. To explore the views of health care professionals (HCPs) towards asthma guidel

  9. The explanatory models of depression and anxiety in primary care: a qualitative study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gracy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biggest barrier to treatment of common mental disorders in primary care settings is low recognition among health care providers. This study attempts to explore the explanatory models of common mental disorders (CMD with the goal of identifying how they could help in improving the recognition, leading to effective treatment in primary care. Results The paper describes findings of a cross sectional qualitative study nested within a large randomized controlled trial (the Manas trial. Semi structured interviews were conducted with 117 primary health care attendees (30 males and 87 females suffering from CMD. Main findings of the study are that somatic phenomena were by far the most frequent presenting problems; however, psychological phenomena were relatively easily elicited on probing. Somatic phenomena were located within a biopsychosocial framework, and a substantial proportion of informants used the psychological construct of ‘tension’ or ‘worry’ to label their illness, but did not consider themselves as suffering from a ‘mental disorder’. Very few gender differences were observed in the descriptions of symptoms but at the same time the pattern of adverse life events and social difficulties varied across gender. Conclusion Our study demonstrates how people present their illness through somatic complaints but clearly link their illness to their psychosocial world. However they do not associate their illness to a ‘mental disorder’ and this is an important phenomenon that needs to be recognized in management of CMD in primary settings. Our study also elicits important gender differences in the experience of CMD.

  10. Burnout and personality in intensive care: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, K E; Land, Tatjana

    2003-01-01

    Previous research into the causes of burnout has mainly been concerned with external triggers, such as onerous work criteria or organizational or social influences. Factors such as individual reactions and personality have largely been ignored as a possible etiology of burnout. In preparation for a long-term study, this general cross-sectional study investigates the relationship between burnout and personality variables. Different personality variables that have a possible impact on burnout were determined in a number of prestudies. The data were gathered from 119 people working in intensive care units. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used as well as certain subscales of the following personality questionnaires: Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), Inventory of Aggressivity (IA), Trier Personality Questionnaire (TPQ), Scales of Control (SC), Locus of Control (LC), and the Logo-test (LOGO). The scales of mental health, respectively Psychoprotection, external locus of control, and neuroticism, were confirmed as being statistically relevant concerning burnout. The application and significance of this study for future burnout research are discussed.

  11. Issues of reporting in observational studies in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Jan M; O'Connor, Annette M

    2014-02-15

    Observational studies are common in veterinary medicine; the results may be used to inform decision-making, future research, or as inputs to systematic reviews or risk assessment. To be of use, the results must be published, all of the outcomes that were assessed must be included in the publication, and the research (methods and results) must be reported in sufficient detail that the reader can evaluate the internal and external validity. In human healthcare, concerns about the completeness of reporting - and evidence that poor reporting is associated with study results - have led to the creation of reporting guidelines; these include the STROBE statement for observational studies. There is evidence from a limited body of research that there also are reporting inadequacies in veterinary observational studies. There are differences between human and veterinary observational studies that might be relevant to recommendations for reporting. Such differences include: the use of observational studies in animal populations for simultaneously estimating disease frequency and risk-factor identification; the distinction between the animal owners who consent to participate and the animals that are the study subjects; and the complexity of organizational levels inherent in animal research (in particular, for studies in livestock species). In veterinary medicine, it is common to have clustering within outcomes (due to animal grouping) and clustering of predictor variables. We argue that there is a compelling need for the scientific community involved in veterinary observational studies to use the STROBE statement, use an amended version of STROBE, or to develop and use reporting guidelines that are specific to veterinary medicine to improve reporting of these studies.

  12. Effectiveness of a Care Coordination Model for Stroke Survivors: A Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborne, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of systematically integrating biopsychosocial interventions with coordinated delivery of care for outpatients recovering from stroke. Care coordination coordinates resources across the health care system and routinely addresses the psychological and social risks affecting patient outcomes, while monitoring…

  13. Need for mental health care in adolescents and its determinants : The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.; Wiegersma, P.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although a great deal of evidence is available on the patterns and determinants of unmet health care needs among adolescents with mental health problems, little is known about the factors that influence the need for care. The aim of this study is to assess the occurrence of need for care

  14. Transforming Medical Care: Case Study of an Exemplary, Small Medical Group

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Leif I.; Hroscikoski, Mary C.; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.; Harper, Peter G.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Most published descriptions of organizations providing or improving quality of care concern large medical groups or systems; however, 90% of the medical care in the United States is provided by groups of no more than 20 physicians. We studied one such group to determine the organizational and cultural attributes that seem related to its achievements in care quality.

  15. Adherence to self-care in patients with heart failure in the HeartCycle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stut W

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wim Stut,1 Carolyn Deighan,2 John G Cleland,3 Tiny Jaarsma4 1Philips Research Europe, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 2The Heart Manual Department, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, UK; 3National Heart and Lung Institute, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals Imperial College, London, UK; 4Department of Social and Welfare studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel online education and coaching program to promote self-care among patients with heart failure. In this program, education and coaching content is automatically tailored to the knowledge and behavior of the patient. Patients and methods: The evaluation of the program took place within the scope of the HeartCycle study. This multi-center, observational study examined the ability of a third generation telehealth system to enhance the management of patients recently (<60 days admitted to the hospital for worsening heart failure or outpatients with persistent New York Heart Association (NYHA Functional Classification III/IV symptoms. Self-reported self-care behavior was assessed at baseline and study-end by means of the 9-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior scale. Adherence to daily weighing, blood pressure monitoring, and reporting of symptoms was determined by analyzing the system’s database. Results: Of 123 patients enrolled, the mean age was 66±12 years, 66% were in NYHA III and 79% were men. Self-reported self-care behavior scores (n=101 improved during the study for daily weighing, low-salt diet, physical activity (P<0.001, and fluid restriction (P<0.05. Average adherence (n=120 to measuring weight was 90%±16%, to measuring blood pressure was 89%±17% and to symptom reporting was 66%±32%. Conclusion: Self-reported self-care behavior scores improved significantly during the period of observation, and the objective evidence of adherence to daily weight and blood pressure measurements was

  16. Measuring the adequacy of antenatal health care: a national cross-sectional study in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Darney, Blair G; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To propose an antenatal care classification for measuring the continuum of health care based on the concept of adequacy: timeliness of entry into antenatal care, number of antenatal care visits and key processes of care. Methods In a cross-sectional, retrospective study we used data from the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) in 2012. This contained self-reported information about antenatal care use by 6494 women during their last pregnancy ending in live birth. Antenatal care was considered to be adequate if a woman attended her first visit during the first trimester of pregnancy, made a minimum of four antenatal care visits and underwent at least seven of the eight recommended procedures during visits. We used multivariate ordinal logistic regression to identify correlates of adequate antenatal care and predicted coverage. Findings Based on a population-weighted sample of 9 052 044, 98.4% of women received antenatal care during their last pregnancy, but only 71.5% (95% confidence interval, CI: 69.7 to 73.2) received maternal health care classified as adequate. Significant geographic differences in coverage of care were identified among states. The probability of receiving adequate antenatal care was higher among women of higher socioeconomic status, with more years of schooling and with health insurance. Conclusion While basic antenatal care coverage is high in Mexico, adequate care remains low. Efforts by health systems, governments and researchers to measure and improve antenatal care should adopt a more rigorous definition of care to include important elements of quality such as continuity and processes of care. PMID:27274597

  17. Comparing Dutch Case management care models for people with dementia and their caregivers: The design of the COMPAS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacNeil Vroomen Janet

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dementia care in the Netherlands is shifting from fragmented, ad hoc care to more coordinated and personalised care. Case management contributes to this shift. The linkage model and a combination of intensive case management and joint agency care models were selected based on their emerging prominence in the Netherlands. It is unclear if these different forms of case management are more effective than usual care in improving or preserving the functioning and well-being at the patient and caregiver level and at the societal cost. The objective of this article is to describe the design of a study comparing these two case management care models against usual care. Clinical and cost outcomes are investigated while care processes and the facilitators and barriers for implementation of these models are considered. Design Mixed methods include a prospective, observational, controlled, cohort study among persons with dementia and their primary informal caregiver in regions of the Netherlands with and without case management including a qualitative process evaluation. Inclusion criteria for the cohort study are: community-dwelling individuals with a dementia diagnosis who are not terminally-ill or anticipate admission to a nursing home within 6 months and with an informal caregiver who speaks fluent Dutch. Person with dementia-informal caregiver dyads are followed for two years. The primary outcome measure is the Neuropsychiatric Inventory for the people with dementia and the General Health Questionnaire for their caregivers. Secondary outcomes include: quality of life and needs assessment in both persons with dementia and caregivers, activity of daily living, competence of care, and number of crises. Costs are measured from a societal perspective using cost diaries. Process indicators measure the quality of care from the participant’s perspective. The qualitative study uses purposive sampling methods to ensure a wide variation of

  18. Maternity or catastrophe: a study of household expenditure on maternal health care in India

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Using data from 60th round of the National Sample Survey, this study attempts to measure the incidence and intensity of ‘catastrophic’ maternal health care expenditure and examines its socio-economic correlates in urban and rural areas separately. Additionally, it measures the effect of maternal health care expenditure on poverty incidence and examines the factors associated with such impoverishment due to maternal health care payments. We found that maternal health care expenditure in urban ...

  19. The strength of primary care in Europe : an international comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kringos, D.S.; Boerma, W. G. W.; Bourgueil, Y.; Cartier, T.; Dedeu, T; Hasvold, T.; Groenewegen, P.P.; et al, [No Value

    2013-01-01

    Background A suitable definition of primary care to capture the variety of prevailing international organisation and service-delivery models is lacking. Aim Evaluation of strength of primary care in Europe. Design and setting International comparative cross-sectional study performed in 2009–2010, involving 27 EU member states, plus Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, and Turkey. Method Outcome measures covered three dimensions of primary care structure: primary care governance, economic conditions ...

  20. Obstacles to continuity of care in young mental health service users' pathways - an explorative study

    OpenAIRE

    Ådnanes, Marian; Steihaug, Sissel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Users of mental health services often move between different primary and specialised health and care services, depending on their current condition, and this often leads to fragmentation of care. The aim of this study was to map care pathways in the case of young adult mental health service users and to identify key obstacles to continuity of care.Method: Quarterly semi-structured interviews were performed with nine young adults with mental health difficulties, following their pat...

  1. Study of Access and Quality of Care in For-Profit PACE

    OpenAIRE

    David Jones; Nancy Duda; Bob Schmitz; Sandi Nelson; Chelsea Swete; Alex Bryce; Jared Coopersmith; Karen CyBulski

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes a study to address quality of and access to care for participants of for-profit Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) organizations. The PACE model allows people who otherwise need a nursing home-level of care to remain in the community by providing health care and related support services, such as social supports, meals and chore services, and transportation.

  2. [Field study of nursing care quality. Interaction and asepsis in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brataas, H V

    1996-01-01

    Competence as communication skills and as skilled practice of asepsis were studied by observing four nurses while interacting with patients and performing intravenous procedures. Nurses were observed using sterile equipment for methods of intravenous therapy. Asepsis is performed frequently, but through misunderstanding in the learning of asepsis or improper model learning the nurses may establish incorrect routines. When performing procedures, unexpected factors can distract both the expert and the inexperienced, resulting in a failure to apply basic aseptic techniques. The nurses showed an interest in the patient by listening and giving responses. Nurses may control interactions with the patient by using undesirable communication skills which include incomplete sentences, incomplete explanations and closed questions. Asked to evaluate their own behavior, the nurses did not estimate whether or not the appropriate skills were applied in observed situations. To improve the quality of nursing care performance it is recommended to further develop and apply skill training programs.

  3. A Comparative Study of Structural and Process Quality in Center-Based and Family-Based Child Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigras, Nathalie; Bouchard, Caroline; Cantin, Gilles; Brunson, Liesette; Coutu, Sylvain; Lemay, Lise; Tremblay, Melissa; Japel, Christa; Charron, Annie

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to determine whether center-based and family-based child care services differ with respect to process quality, as measured by the Educative Quality Observation Scales ("EQOS", Bourgon and Lavallee 2004a, b, c), for groups of children 18 months old and younger. It also seeks to identify structural variables associated with process…

  4. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G;

    2014-01-01

    to improve the reporting of observational studies and facilitates critical appraisal and interpretation of studies by reviewers, journal editors and readers. This explanatory and elaboration document is intended to enhance the use, understanding, and dissemination of the STROBE Statement. The meaning...

  5. Learning the 'SMART' way... results from a pilot study evaluating an interprofessional acute care study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of patients requiring critical care are now being managed outside of critical care facilities. There is evidence that staff looking after these patients lack the necessary knowledge and skills to care for them safely, and that effective pre-registration education can play a significant role in addressing these shortfalls in nurses' knowledge and skills. A team from Sheffield Hallam University, in collaboration with the University of Sheffield, developed a pilot one day interprofessional acute illness programme which was called SMART® (Student Management of Acute illness - Recognition and Treatment). To evaluate the pilot programme, 16 student doctors and 72 student nurses were recruited. A pre- and post-course questionnaire based on the Featherstone et al. (2005) evaluation of ALERT was used to ascertain the students' general level of knowledge of the deteriorating patient, their experiences of and confidence in caring for an acutely unwell patient, and their level of comfort with interprofessional working. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students' levels of knowledge, their levels of confidence and their comfort with interprofessional working all rose after undertaking the programme. The pilot study has a number of implications for the future teaching and learning of acute care clinical skills, within a theoretically based curriculum.

  6. SABRE observations of Pi2 pulsations: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Bradshaw

    Full Text Available The characteristics of substorm-associated Pi2 pulsations observed by the SABRE coherent radar system during three separate case studies are presented. The SABRE field of view is well positioned to observe the differences between the auroral zone pulsation signature and that observed at mid-latitudes. During the first case study the SABRE field of view is initially in the eastward electrojet, equatorward and to the west of the substorm-enhanced electrojet current. As the interval progresses, the western, upward field-aligned current of the substorm current wedge moves westward across the longitudes of the radar field of view. The westward motion of the wedge is apparent in the spatial and temporal signatures of the associated Pi2 pulsation spectra and polarisation sense. During the second case study, the complex field-aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the pulsation generation region move equatorward into the SABRE field of view and then poleward out of it again after the third pulsation in the series. The spectral content of the four pulsations during the interval indicate different auroral zone and mid-latitude signatures. The final case study is from a period of low magnetic activity when SABRE observes a Pi2 pulsation signature from regions equatorward of the enhanced substorm currents. There is an apparent mode change between the signature observed by SABRE in the ionosphere and that on the ground by magnetometers at latitudes slightly equatorward of the radar field of view. The observations are discussed in terms of published theories of the generation mechanisms for this type of pulsation. Different signatures are observed by SABRE depending on the level of magnetic activity and the position of the SABRE field of view relative to the pulsation generation region. A twin source model for Pi2 pulsation generation provides the clearest explanation of the signatures observed.

  7. Childhood Maltreatment and Prospectively Observed Quality of Early Care as Predictors of Antisocial Personality Disorder Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenyu; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Easterbrooks, M Ann; Zhao, Xudong; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the separate contributions of maltreatment and ongoing quality of parent-child interaction to the etiology of antisocial personality features using a prospective longitudinal design. 120 low-income young adults (aged 18-23) were assessed for extent of ASPD features on the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis-Axis II, for presence of maltreatment on the Conflict Tactics Scale, Traumatic Experiences Scale, and Adult Attachment Interview, and for referral in infancy to parent-infant clinical services. Fifty-six of these families had been studied longitudinally since the first year of life. In infancy, attachment disorganization and disrupted mother-infant interaction were assessed; in middle childhood, disorganized-controlling attachment behaviors were reliably rated. In kindergarten and second grade, behavior problems were assessed by teacher report. In cross-sectional analyses, maltreatment was significantly associated with ASPD features but did not account for the independent effect of early referral to parent-infant services on ASPD features. In longitudinal analyses, maternal withdrawal in infancy predicted the extent of ASPD features twenty years later, independently of childhood abuse. In middle childhood, disorganized attachment behavior and maladaptive behavior at school added to prediction of later ASPD features. Antisocial features in young adulthood have precursors in the minute-to-minute process of parent-child interaction beginning in infancy.

  8. Care-of-Self in Undergraduate Nursing Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Pamela F; Gatto, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Poor management of care-of-self behaviors can contribute to job dissatisfaction, burnout, and attrition in nurses. This pilot study, designed to explore self-care among nursing students, was used to examine feasibility for a future long-term study. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. The data suggest a downward trend of care-of-self behaviors as students assume more responsibility for care of others. Findings substantiate the need for development and implementation of care-of-self-promoting interventions in order to increase lifelong health-promoting behaviors.

  9. A mixed methods observational simulation-based study of interprofessional team communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Nielsen, Kurt; Musaeus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Interprofessional team communication has been identified as an important focus for safety in medical emergency care. However, in-depth insight into the complexity of team communication is limited. Video observational studies might fill a gap in terms of understanding the meaning of specific...... communication interactions and link team performance to patient outcome. This study had two aims. First, to develop a theory-based evaluation instrument that measures and qualifies team communication. And second, to investigate the quality and content of summaries and re-evaluations evolving step wise and...

  10. Caval filters in intensive care: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro F

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available F Ferraro,1 TL Di Gennaro,1 A Torino,1 J Petruzzi,1 A d’Elia,1 P Fusco,1 R Marfella,2 B Lettieri1 1Department of Anesthesiological, Surgical and Emergency Sciences, 2Department of Geriatrics and Metabolic Diseases, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a caval vein filter (CVF peri-implant monitoring protocol in order to reduce pulmonary embolism (PE mortality and CVF-related morbidity.Background: The reduction in mortality from PE associated with the use of CVF is affected by the risk of increase in morbidity. Therefore, CVF implant is a challenging prophylactic or therapeutic option. Nowadays, we have many different devices whose rational use, by applying a strict peri-implant monitoring protocol, could be safe and effective.Materials and methods: We retrospectively studied 62 patients of a general Intensive Care Unit (ICU scheduled for definitive, temporary, or optional bedside CVF implant. A peri-implant monitoring protocol including a phlebocavography, an echo-Doppler examination, and coagulation tests was adopted.Results: In our study, no thromboembolic recurrence was registered. We implanted 48 retrievable and only 20 definitive CVFs. Endothelial adhesion (18%, residual clot (5%, cranial or caudal migration (6%, microbial colonization of the filter in the absence of clinical signs of infection (1%, caval thrombosis (1%, and pneumothorax (1% were reported. Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT was reported (8% as early complication. All patients with DVT had a temporary or optional filter implanted. However, in our cohort, definitive CVFs were reserved only to 32% of patients and they were not associated with DVT as complication.Conclusion: CVF significantly reduces iatrogenic PE without affecting mortality. Generally, ICU patients have a transitory thromboembolic risk, and so the temporary CVF has been proved to be a first-line option to our cohort. A careful monitoring may contribute to a satisfactory

  11. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  12. Effect of the Uganda Newborn Study on care-seeking and care practices: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Waiswa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Care for women and babies before, during, and after the time of birth is a sensitive measure of the functionality of any health system. Engaging communities in preventing newborn deaths is a promising strategy to achieve further progress in child survival in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective: To assess the effect of a home visit strategy combined with health facility strengthening on uptake of newborn care-seeking, practices and services, and to link the results to national policy and scale-up in Uganda. Design: The Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST was a two-arm cluster-randomised controlled trial in rural eastern Uganda. In intervention villages volunteer community health workers (CHWs were trained to identify pregnant women and make five home visits (two during pregnancy and three in the first week after birth to offer preventive and promotive care and counselling, with extra visits for sick and small newborns to assess and refer. Health facility strengthening was done in all facilities to improve quality of care. Primary outcomes were coverage of key essential newborn care behaviours (breastfeeding, thermal care, and cord care. Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered as a clinical trial, number ISRCTN50321130. Results: The intervention significantly improved essential newborn care practices, although many interventions saw major increases in both arms over the study period. Immediate breastfeeding after birth and exclusive breastfeeding were significantly higher in the intervention arm compared to the control arm (72.6% vs. 66.0%; p=0.016 and 81.8% vs. 75.9%, p=0.042, respectively. Skin-to-skin care immediately after birth and cord cutting with a clean instrument were marginally higher in the intervention arm versus the control arm (80.7% vs. 72.2%; p=0.071 and 88.1% vs. 84.4%; p=0.023, respectively. Half (49.6% of the mothers in the intervention arm waited more than 24 hours to bathe the baby, compared to 35.5% in

  13. Retention in a public health care system with free access to treatment: a Danish nationwide HIV cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, Marie; Engsig, Frederik N; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: We aimed to assess retention of HIV infected individuals in the Danish health care system over a 15-year period. METHODS:: Loss to follow-up (LTFU) was defined as 365 days without contact to the HIV care system. Data were obtained from the nationwide Danish HIV Cohort study, The Danish...... National Hospital Registry and The Danish Civil Registration System. Incidence rates (IR), risk factors for LTFU and return to care and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were estimated using Poisson regression analyses. RESULTS:: We included 4,745 HIV patients who were followed for 36,692 person-years. Patients...... were retained in care 95.0% of person-years under observation, increasing to 98.1% after initiation of antiretroviral treatment (HAART). The overall IR/100 person-years for first episode of LTFU was 2.6 (95% CI: 2.5-2.8) and was significantly lower after initiation of HAART (1.2 (95% CI: 1...

  14. Characteristics of evolving models of care for arthritis: A key informant study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veinot Paula

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of arthritis is increasing in the face of diminishing health human resources to deliver care. In response, innovative models of care delivery are developing to facilitate access to quality care. Most models have developed in response to local needs with limited evaluation. The primary objective of this study is to a examine the range of models of care that deliver specialist services using a medical/surgical specialist and at least one other health care provider and b document the strengths and challenges of the identified models. A secondary objective is to identify key elements of best practice models of care for arthritis. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of key informants with expertise in arthritis from jurisdictions with primarily publicly-funded health care systems. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach to identify common types of models of care, strengths and challenges of models, and key components of arthritis care. Results Seventy-four key informants were interviewed from six countries. Five main types of models of care emerged. 1 Specialized arthritis programs deliver comprehensive, multidisciplinary team care for arthritis. Two models were identified using health care providers (e.g. nurses or physiotherapists in expanded clinical roles: 2 triage of patients with musculoskeletal conditions to the appropriate services including specialists; and 3 ongoing management in collaboration with a specialist. Two models promoting rural access were 4 rural consultation support and 5 telemedicine. Key informants described important components of models of care including knowledgeable health professionals and patients. Conclusion A range of models of care for arthritis have been developed. This classification can be used as a framework for discussing care delivery. Areas for development include integration of care across the continuum, including primary

  15. Aged Residential Care Health Utilisation Study (ARCHUS: a randomised controlled trial to reduce acute hospitalisations from residential aged care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Susan J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For residents of long term care, hospitalisations can cause distress and disruption, and often result in further medical complications. Multi-disciplinary team interventions have been shown to improve the health of Residential Aged Care (RAC residents, decreasing the need for acute hospitalisation, yet there are few randomised controlled trials of these complex interventions. This paper describes a randomised controlled trial of a structured multi-disciplinary team and gerontology nurse specialist (GNS intervention aiming to reduce residents’ avoidable hospitalisations. Methods/Design This Aged Residential Care Healthcare Utilisation Study (ARCHUS is a cluster- randomised controlled trial (n = 1700 residents of a complex multi-disciplinary team intervention in long-term care facilities. Eligible facilities certified for residential care were selected from those identified as at moderate or higher risk of resident potentially avoidable hospitalisations by statistical modelling. The facilities were all located in the Auckland region, New Zealand and were stratified by District Health Board (DHB. Intervention The intervention provided a structured GNS intervention including a baseline facility needs assessment, quality indicator benchmarking, a staff education programme and care coordination. Alongside this, three multi-disciplinary team (MDT meetings were held involving a geriatrician, facility GP, pharmacist, GNS and senior nursing staff. Outcomes Hospitalisations are recorded from routinely-collected acute admissions during the 9-month intervention period followed by a 5-month follow-up period. ICD diagnosis codes are used in a pre-specified definition of potentially reducible admissions. Discussion This randomised-controlled trial will evaluate a complex intervention to increase early identification and intervention to improve the health of residents of long term care. The results of this trial are expected in early

  16. Out of care and into care again: A Danish register‐based study of children placed in out-of‐home care before their third birthday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ubbesen, Mads Bonde; Petersen, Liselotte; Mortensen, Preben Bo;

    2012-01-01

    personal identification numbers to link several registration systems. The study population was defined as all children from entry cohorts in 1991–2001 who entered the Danish out-of-home care systembefore their third birthday (n=3928). Graphs of cumulative incidences are used to de- scribe the processes...

  17. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience. PMID:25533732

  18. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience.

  19. On-scene time and outcome after penetrating trauma: an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamillia S.; Petersen, John Asger; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    prehospital setting. Follow-up data were obtained from a national administrative database. The primary end point was 30-day survival. Results Of the 467 patients registered, 442 (94.6%) were identified at the 30-day follow-up, of whom 40 (9%) were dead. A higher mortality was found among patients treated on...... observational cohort study of penetrating trauma patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit in Copenhagen with a 30-day follow-up. Between January 2002 and September 2009, data were prospectively registered regarding the anatomical location of the trauma, time intervals and procedures performed in the...... On-scene time might be important in penetrating trauma, and ALS procedures should not delay transport to definite care at the hospital....

  20. INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO ROP: STUDY FROM NEONATAL CARE UNIT- SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthiyaeni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to identify the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity among the preterm neonates treated at neonatal unit and to evaluate the associated risk factors for ROP. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of Department of Paediatrics at Chengalpattu Medical College. During the study period, 159 babies were treated at the NICU and 111 babies were discharged from the unit. Among those babies who were discharged, 14 neonates were lost for followup for ROP screening. This lost to followup was 12.6% of the study population. In this study 97 infants were screened, out of which 18 infants had ROP. The rate of ROP is 18.6% in our institution and 2 out of 18 babies had threshold ROP (11.1%, who were treated with Laser therapy

  1. Dutch care innovation units in elderly care: A qualitative study into students' perspectives and workplace conditions for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeren, Miranda; Volbeda, Patricia; Niessen, Theo J H; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-03-01

    To promote workplace learning for staff as well as students, a partnership was formed between a residential care organisation for older people and several nursing faculties in the Netherlands. This partnership took the form of two care innovation units; wards where qualified staff, students and nurse teachers collaborate to integrate care, education, innovation and research. In this article, the care innovation units as learning environments are studied from a student perspective to deepen understandings concerning the conditions that facilitate learning. A secondary analysis of focus groups, held with 216 nursing students over a period of five years, revealed that students are satisfied about the units' learning potential, which is formed by various inter-related and self-reinforcing affordances: co-constructive learning and working, challenging situations and activities, being given responsibility and independence, and supportive and recognisable learning structures. Time constraints had a negative impact on the units' learning potential. It is concluded that the learning potential of the care innovation units was enhanced by realising certain conditions, like learning structures and activities. The learning potential was also influenced, however, by the non-controllable and dynamic interaction of various elements within the context. Suggestions for practice and further research are offered. PMID:26694313

  2. Dutch care innovation units in elderly care: A qualitative study into students' perspectives and workplace conditions for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeren, Miranda; Volbeda, Patricia; Niessen, Theo J H; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-03-01

    To promote workplace learning for staff as well as students, a partnership was formed between a residential care organisation for older people and several nursing faculties in the Netherlands. This partnership took the form of two care innovation units; wards where qualified staff, students and nurse teachers collaborate to integrate care, education, innovation and research. In this article, the care innovation units as learning environments are studied from a student perspective to deepen understandings concerning the conditions that facilitate learning. A secondary analysis of focus groups, held with 216 nursing students over a period of five years, revealed that students are satisfied about the units' learning potential, which is formed by various inter-related and self-reinforcing affordances: co-constructive learning and working, challenging situations and activities, being given responsibility and independence, and supportive and recognisable learning structures. Time constraints had a negative impact on the units' learning potential. It is concluded that the learning potential of the care innovation units was enhanced by realising certain conditions, like learning structures and activities. The learning potential was also influenced, however, by the non-controllable and dynamic interaction of various elements within the context. Suggestions for practice and further research are offered.

  3. In the Belly of the Beast: A Case Study of Social Work in a Managed Care Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa S. Patchner

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The employment of social workers within managed care organizations is a new phenomenon. As such, this case study utilized an exploratory-descriptive design that assessed social workers as case managers within a Medicaid HMO. The semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and participant observation suggested that the use of case management services, delivered primarily by social workers,was effective in addressing the bio-psychosocial needs of Medicaid consumers within a provider-driven HMO. Study findings recommend specific knowledge and skills that social workers need in order to prepare for practice within managed care environments.

  4. HEMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS IN DENGUE FEVER – AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malathesha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue is a major preventable and treatable cause of morbidity and mortality among children and adults that occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical regions. Early diagnosis of dengue is important for provision of specific care which ensures marked reduction in the morbidity of the disease itself. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate hematological changes in serologically proven patients with clinical manifestations of Dengue in Bapuji & Chigateri Hospital, Davangere. METHODS: Clinical, hematological and serological information from Patients diagnosed with dengue infection in Bapuji & Chigateri hospital Davangere from April 2013 -June 2013. RESULTS: 221 cases of classic dengue predominated (90.2%, with mild clinical manifestations lacking complications. The main hematological findings were raised hematocrit (79.6%, lymphocytosis (66% monocytosis (84.6%, basophilia (52.9%, thrombocytopenia (100% and atypical lymphocytes (87%. In dengue hemorrhagic fever, thrombocytopenia was more prolonged and the number of atypical lymphocytes was higher, while the other hematological abnormalities presented daily evolution similar to those in classic dengue. The hematological changes observed in dengue presented according to the clinical course of the disease and its severity

  5. Midwives’ views on factors that contribute to health care inequalities among immigrants in Sweden: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhavan Sharareh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in the Swedish health care system have increased. Most indicators suggest that immigrants have significantly poorer health than native Swedes. The purpose of this study was to explore the views of midwives on the factors that contribute to health care inequality among immigrants. Methods Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with ten midwives. These were transcribed and related categories identified through content analysis. Results The interview data were divided into three main categories and seven subcategories. The category “Communication” was divided into subcategories “The meeting”, “Cultural diversity and language barriers” and “Trust and confidence”. The category “Potential barriers to the use of health care services” contained two subcategories, “Seeking health care” and “Receiving equal treatment”. Finally, the category “Transcultural health care” had subcategories “Education on transcultural health care” and “The concept”. Conclusions This study suggests that midwives believe that health care inequality among immigrants can be the result of miscommunication which may arise due to a shortage of meeting time, language barriers, different systems of cultural beliefs and practices and limited patient-caregiver trust. Midwives emphasized that education level, country of origin and length of stay in Sweden play a role when an immigrant seeks health care. Immigrants face more difficulties when seeking health care and in receiving adequate levels of care. However, different views among the midwives were also observed. Some midwives were sensitive to individual and intra-group differences, while some others viewed immigrants as a group of “others”. Midwives’ beliefs about subgroup-specific health services vs. integrating immigrants’ health care into mainstream health care services should be investigated further. Patients

  6. Integrated care as an organisational challenge: an exploratory case study (poster presentation)

    OpenAIRE

    Pless, Sam; Dessers, Ezra; Corvers, Benny; Van Hootegem, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Integrated care is aimed towards more demand-driven and cost-conscious health systems. The multidisciplinary research project CORTEXS brings together expertise on organization sciences and integrated care [1]. Aims: In order to gain a better grasp of the connection of the concept of integrated care with principles of organisational design, we conducted an exploratory case study on task division and allocation in a regional hospital [2]. Case study: The study is specifica...

  7. Violence towards health care workers in a Public Health Care Facility in Italy: a repeated cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnavita Nicola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence at work is one of the major concerns in health care activities. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence in a general health care facility in Italy and to assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial factors, thereby providing a basis for appropriate intervention. Methods All health care workers from a public health care facility were invited to complete a questionnaire containing questions on workplace violence. Three questionnaire-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted. The response rate was 75 % in 2005, 71 % in 2007, and 94 % in 2009. The 2009 questionnaire contained the VIF (Violent Incident Form for reporting violent incidents, the DCS (demand/control/support model for job strain, the Colquitt 20 item questionnaire for perceived organizational justice, and the GHQ-12 General Health Questionnaire for the assessment of mental health. Results One out of ten workers reported physical assault, and one out of three exposure to non-physical violence in the workplace in the previous year. Nurses and physicians were the most exposed occupational categories, whereas the psychiatric and emergency departments were the services at greatest risk of violence. Workers exposed to non-physical violence were subject to high job strain, low support, low perceived organizational justice, and high psychological distress. Conclusion Our study shows that health care workers in an Italian local health care facility are exposed to violence. Workplace violence was associated with high demand and psychological disorders, while job control, social support and organizational justice were protective factors.

  8. The relationship between organizational culture of nursing staff and quality of care for residents with dementia: questionnaire surveys and systematic observations in nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, A.P.A. van; Gerritsen, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the 1990s, several studies have shown that organizational culture is an important characteristic in long-term care. However, at the moment little is known about organizational culture and its relationship with quality of care. OBJECTIVES: In this study, the relationship between org

  9. Study of white-light flares observed by Hinode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Min Wang

    2009-01-01

    White-light flares are considered to be the most energetic flaring events that are observable in the optical broad-band continuum of the solar spectrum. They have not been commonly observed. Observations of white-light flares with sub-arcsecond resolution have been very rare. The continuous high resolution observations of Hinode provide a unique opportunity to systematically study the white-light flares with a spatial resolution around 0.2 arcsec. We surveyed all the flares above GOES magnitude C5.0 since the launch of Hinode in 2006 October. 13 of these kinds of flares were covered by the Hinode G-band observations. We analyzed the peak contrasts and equivalent areas (calculated via integrated excess emission contrast) of these flares as a function of the GOES X-ray flux, and found that the cut-off visibility is likely around M1 flares under the observing limit of Hinode. Many other observational and physical factors should affect the visibility of white-light flares; as the observing conditions are improved, smaller flares are likely to have detectable white-light emissions. We are cautious that this limiting visibility is an overestimate, because G-band observations contain emissions from the upper atmosphere.Among the 13 events analyzed, only the M8.7 flare of 2007 June 4 had near-simultaneous observations in both the G-band and the blue continuum. The blue continuum had a peak contrast of 94% vs. 175% in G-band for this event. The equivalent area in the blue continuum is an order of magnitude lower than that in the G-band. Very recently, Jess et al.studied a C2.0 flare with a peak contrast of 300% in the blue continuum. Compared to the events presented in this letter, that event is probably an unusual white-light flare: a very small kernel with a large contrast that can be detected in high resolution observations.

  10. Association between child-care and acute diarrhea: a study in Portuguese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the influence of the type of child-care on the occurrence of acute diarrhea with special emphasis on the effect of children grouping during care. METHODS: From October 1998 to January 1999 292 children, aged 24 to 36 months, recruited using a previously assembled cohort of newborns, were evaluated. Information on the type of care and occurrence of diarrhea in the previous year was obtained from parents by telephone interview. The X² and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare proportions and quantitative variables, respectively. The risk of diarrhea was estimated through the calculation of incident odds ratios (OR and their respective 95% confidence intervals (95% CI, crude and adjusted by unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Using as reference category children cared individually at home, the adjusted ORs for diarrhea occurrence were 3.18, 95% CI [1.49, 6.77] for children cared in group at home, 2.28, 95% CI [0.92, 5.67] for children cared in group in day-care homes and 2.54, 95% CI [1.21, 5.33] for children cared in day-care centers. Children that changed from any other type of child-care setting to child-care centers in the year preceding the study showed a risk even higher (OR 7.65, 95% CI [3.25, 18.02]. CONCLUSIONS: Group care increases the risk of acute diarrhea whatsoever the specific setting.

  11. Protopathic bias in observational studies on statin effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Huupponen, Risto; Ruokoniemi, Päivi; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja

    2009-01-01

    Protopathic bias in observational studies on statin effectiveness phone: +350-40-3552901 (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, University of Turku - 20014 - Turku - FINLAND (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio - POB 1627 - 70211 - Kuopio - FINLAND (Korhonen, Maarit Jaana) Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, University of T...

  12. An in-depth analysis of theoretical frameworks for the study of care coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Van Houdt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complex chronic conditions often require long-term care from various healthcare professionals. Thus, maintaining quality care requires care coordination. Concepts for the study of care coordination require clarification to develop, study and evaluate coordination strategies. In 2007, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality defined care coordination and proposed five theoretical frameworks for exploring care coordination. This study aimed to update current theoretical frameworks and clarify key concepts related to care coordination. Methods: We performed a literature review to update existing theoretical frameworks. An in-depth analysis of these theoretical frameworks was conducted to formulate key concepts related to care coordination.Results: Our literature review found seven previously unidentified theoretical frameworks for studying care coordination. The in-depth analysis identified fourteen key concepts that the theoretical frameworks addressed. These were ‘external factors’, ‘structure’, ‘tasks characteristics’, ‘cultural factors’, ‘knowledge and technology’, ‘need for coordination’, ‘administrative operational processes’, ‘exchange of information’, ‘goals’, ‘roles’, ‘quality of relationship’, ‘patient outcome’, ‘team outcome’, and ‘(interorganizational outcome’.Conclusion: These 14 interrelated key concepts provide a base to develop or choose a framework for studying care coordination. The relational coordination theory and the multi-level framework are interesting as these are the most comprehensive.

  13. Observational studies of transiting extrasolar planets (invited review)

    OpenAIRE

    Southworth, J.

    2014-01-01

    The study of transiting extrasolar planets is only 15 years old, but has matured into a rich area of research. I review the observational aspects of this work, concentrating on the discovery of transits, the characterisation of planets from photometry and spectroscopy, the Homogeneous Studies project, starspots, orbital obliquities, and the atmospheric properties of the known planets. I begin with historical context and conclude with a glance to a future of TESS, CHEOPS, Gaia and PLATO.

  14. Observer study to evaluate the simulation of mammographic calcification clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero

    2016-03-01

    Numerous breast phantoms have been developed to be as realistic as possible to ensure the accuracy of image quality analysis, covering a greater range of applications. In this study, we simulated three different densities of the breast parenchyma using paraffin gel, acrylic plates and PVC films. Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate calcification clusters. From the images acquired with a GE Senographe DR 2000D mammography system, we selected 68 regions of interest (ROIs) with and 68 without a simulated calcification cluster. To validate the phantom simulation, we selected 136 ROIs from the University of South Florida's Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Seven trained observers performed two observer experiments by using a high-resolution monitor Barco mod. E-3620. In the first experiment, the observers had to distinguish between real or phantom ROIs (with and without calcification). In the second one, the observers had to indicate the ROI with calcifications between a pair of ROIs. Results from our study show that the hydroxyapatite calcifications had poor contrast in the simulated breast parenchyma, thus observers had more difficulty in identifying the presence of calcification clusters in phantom images. Preliminary analysis of the power spectrum was conducted to investigate the radiographic density and the contrast thresholds for calcification detection. The values obtained for the power spectrum exponent (β) were comparable with those found in the literature.

  15. Factors associated with anxiety in critically ill patients: A prospective observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, M. I.; Cooke, M.; Macfarlane, B; Aitken, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an unpleasant emotion that most intensive care patients experience. This emotion is an important issue in intensive care settings because of its prevalence, adverse effects and severity. Little is known about the factors associated with state and trait anxiety during critical illness. Objectives: To describe the patterns of state anxiety reported by intensive care patients, and identify factors associated with state and trait anxiety. Design: Prospective observ...

  16. Pityriasis versicolor: A clinicomycological and epidemiological study from a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sudip

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pityriasis versicolor is a mild, chronic, usually asymptomatic superficial fungal infection of the stratum corneum, caused by Malassezia yeasts. The purpose of the present study is to assess the clinical profile of a group of patients with pityriasis versicolor and to find out the epidemiological characteristics in this part of India as well as any association, if any, with other diseases. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 110 consecutive patients of pityriasis versicolor were evaluated clinically and diagnosis was confirmed mycologically at a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata. All data were recorded in a predesigned, pretested semi-structured schedule. The total duration of study period was 12 months. Results: Majority of the patients were young adults. Most of the patients were asymptomatic. There is prominent seasonal variation of the patients with a peak in August and September months. Most of the lesions were hypopigmented scaly macules and were KOH positive. Most commonly involved sites were chest, face and back. Seborrheic dermatitis sometimes coexisted with pityriasis versicolor and a number of patients also had diabetes mellitus and immunosuppressive conditions. Conclusions: Overall, the clinicomycological and epidemiological profile of pityriasis versicolor infection as observed in a tertiary care setting in eastern India does not differ significantly from those observed by previous workers elsewhere.

  17. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Poortaghi; Salsali; Ebadi; Rahnavard; Maleki

    2015-01-01

    Background Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. Objectives This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checkl...

  18. A quality management model for integrated care: results of a Delphi and Concept Mapping study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Minkman; K. Ahaus; I. Fabbricotti; U. Nabitz; R. Huijsman

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the elements and clusters of a quality management model for integrated care. In order to develop the model a combination of three methods were applied. A literature study was conducted to identify elements of integrated care. In a Delphi study experts comme

  19. A quality management model for integrated care : results of a Delphi and Concept Mapping study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkman, Mirella; Ahaus, Kees; Fabbricotti, Isabelle; Nabitz, Udo; Huijsman, Robbert

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the elements and clusters of a quality management model for integrated care. In order to develop the model a combination of three methods were applied. A literature study was conducted to identify elements of integrated care. In a Delphi study experts comme

  20. Technology acceptance for an Intelligent Comprehensive Interactive Care (ICIC) system for care of the elderly: a survey-questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alice M K; Chang, Wei-Han; Ke, Pei-Chih; Huang, Chun-Kai; Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Chang, Hsien-Tsung; Shieh, Wann-Yun; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The key components of caring for the elderly are diet, living, transportation, education, and safety issues, and telemedical systems can offer great assistance. Through the integration of personal to community information technology platforms, we have developed a new Intelligent Comprehensive Interactive Care (ICIC) system to provide comprehensive services for elderly care. The ICIC system consists of six items, including medical care (physiological measuring system, Medication Reminder, and Dr. Ubiquitous), diet, living, transportation, education (Intelligent Watch), entertainment (Sharetouch), and safety (Fall Detection). In this study, we specifically evaluated the users' intention of using the Medication Reminder, Dr. Ubiquitous, Sharetouch, and Intelligent Watch using a modified technological acceptance model (TAM). A total of 121 elderly subjects (48 males and 73 females) were recruited. The modified TAM questionnaires were collected after they had used these products. For most of the ICIC units, the elderly subjects revealed great willingness and/or satisfaction in using this system. The elderly users of the Intelligent Watch showed the greatest willingness and satisfaction, while the elderly users of Dr. Ubiquitous revealed fair willingness in the dimension of perceived ease of use. The old-old age group revealed greater satisfaction in the dimension of result demonstrability for the users of the Medication Reminder as compared to the young-old and oldest-old age groups. The women revealed greater satisfaction in the dimension of perceived ease of use for the users of Dr. Ubiquitous as compared to the men. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of gender, age, and education level in the other dimensions. The modified TAM showed its effectiveness in evaluating the acceptance and characteristics of technologic products for the elderly user. The ICIC system offers a user-friendly solution in telemedical care and improves the quality of

  1. Study of Problems Arising during Perioperative Care of Postoperative Endophthalmitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyi Lin; Yue Cai; Jiehui Huang; Ronghua Ye

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.To discuss the problems in perioperative nursing care for patients with postoperative infectious endophthalmitis. Methods: The medical records of 34 patients (35 eyes) pre-senting with infectious endophthalmitis at Zhongshan Oph-thalmic Center,.Sun Yat-sen University between April 2002 and December 2013 were collected to analyze preoperative and postoperative nursing care for endophthalmitis after ocular surgery. Results:Thirty-four patients (35 eyes) developed complications of infectious endophthalmitis after surgery..Thirty-three cases were successfully cured and only one patient (1 eye) was un-treated due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Conclusion: Perioperative nursing care plays a pivotal role in preventing and controlling the incidence and development of postoperative infectious endophthalmitis.

  2. Profiling dizziness in older primary care patients: an empirical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelien Dros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diagnostic approach to dizzy, older patients is not straightforward as many organ systems can be involved and evidence for diagnostic strategies is lacking. A first differentiation in diagnostic subtypes or profiles may guide the diagnostic process of dizziness and can serve as a classification system in future research. In the literature this has been done, but based on pathophysiological reasoning only. OBJECTIVE: To establish a classification of diagnostic profiles of dizziness based on empirical data. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 417 consecutive patients of 65 years and older presenting with dizziness to 45 primary care physicians in the Netherlands from July 2006 to January 2008. METHODS: We performed tests, including patient history, and physical and additional examination, previously selected by an international expert panel and based on an earlier systematic review. We used the results of these tests in a principal component analysis for exploration, data-reduction and finally differentiation into diagnostic dizziness profiles. RESULTS: Demographic data and the results of the tests yielded 221 variables, of which 49 contributed to the classification of dizziness into six diagnostic profiles, that may be named as follows: "frailty", "psychological", "cardiovascular", "presyncope", "non-specific dizziness" and "ENT". These explained 32% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: Empirically identified components classify dizziness into six profiles. This classification takes into account the heterogeneity and multicausality of dizziness and may serve as starting point for research on diagnostic strategies and can be a first step in an evidence based diagnostic approach of dizzy older patients.

  3. The relationship of primary health care use with persistence of insomnia: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Hayward Richard A; Jordan Kelvin P; Croft Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Prevalence of insomnia symptoms in the general population is high. Insomnia is linked with high health care use and within primary care there are a number of treatment options available. The objective of this study was to determine the association of persistence and remission of insomnia with primary health care using a longitudinal study. Methods A postal survey of registered adult (over 18 years) populations of five UK general practices, repeated after 1 year, linked to ...

  4. Impact of the ‘Artful Moments’ Intervention on Persons with Dementia and Their Care Partners: a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzan, Afeez Abiola; Humphrey, Janis; Kilgour-Walsh, Laurie; Moros, Katherine L.; Murray, Carmen; Stanners, Shannon; Montemuro, Maureen; Giangregorio, Aidan; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Engaging with art can be valuable for persons living with dementia. ‘Artful Moments’ was a collaborative project undertaken by the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the Behavioural Health Program at Hamilton Health Sciences that sought to develop and implement a program of arts-based activities for persons in the middle-to-late stages of dementia who exhibit behavioural symptoms and for their accompanying care partners. Methods This pilot study employed a qualitative descriptive design. Eight participants were observed during multiple art sessions to evaluate their level of engagement in the program. Care partners also completed a questionnaire describing their experience. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify themes. Results For program participants, factors that promoted continued interest and engagement in art included: care partner involvement, group activities, opportunities to share opinions, validation of their personhood, and increased engagement over time. Care partners observed improvements in participants’ creativity, communication, relationship forming, and task accomplishment, and some reported reduced stress. Conclusions ‘Artful Moments’ promoted engagement and expression in persons in the middle-to-late stages of dementia, as well as having benefits for their care partners. Limitations of the study included a small convenience sample drawn from one hospital setting. PMID:27403209

  5. Barriers to care for Cambodian patients with diabetes: results from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrew, Megan R; Taing, Elizabeth; Cohen, Marya J; Betancourt, Joseph R; Pasinski, Roger; Green, Alexander R

    2013-05-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in diabetes care have been well documented. While root causes have been explored for some minority groups, less is known about smaller immigrant populations such as Cambodians. In this study, we sought to explore the potential barriers to care for Cambodian patients with diabetes. We conducted five focus groups with three study groups: health care providers, bilingual Khmer frontline staff, and Cambodian patients with diabetes. Focus groups findings revealed that certain cultural beliefs, low health literacy, and language barriers strongly affect Cambodian patients' understanding of diabetes and self-management, as well as clinicians' ability to care effectively for Cambodian patients with diabetes. Our study supports previous literature and also adds several new insights not previously described. We recommend education for health care providers on patient-centered, cross-cultural care with an emphasis on the needs of Cambodians as well as culturally appropriate diabetes education for patients.

  6. GP and nurses' perceptions of how after hours care for people receiving palliative care at home could be improved: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Miles Gail; O'Connor Margaret M; Tan Heather M; Klein Britt; Schattner Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary health care providers play a dominant role in the provision of palliative care (PC) in Australia but many gaps in after hours service remain. In some rural areas only 19% of people receiving palliative care achieve their goal of dying at home. This study, which builds on an earlier qualitative phase of the project, investigates the gaps in care from the perspective of general practitioners (GPs) and PC nurses. Methods Questionnaires, developed from the outcomes of ...

  7. SPECTRUM OF POISONING IN CHILDREN: STUDY FROM TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To understand pattern of poisoning in different age group in tertiary child care center and quantify burden of poisoning in pediatric admissions and mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective observation study. SETTING: Tertiary care center for children. METHODS: All the children admitted with diagnosis of acute poisoning between January 2013 and June 2015 was studied. RESULTS: There were 332 admissions due to poisoning during the study period (5.4% of total admissions. Mortality due to poisoning was 7, i.e. , 1.97% of all - cause mortality. 2.1% of poisonings died during the study period where a s overall mortality from all causes was 5.71%. House hold Products topped the list with 112 cases, followed by agricultural products (88 cases, animal bites and stings (69 cases, drugs (48 cases and industrial compounds (7 cases. Majority of admissions were in summer seasons 31% of all poisoning followed by rainy season. CONCLUSIONS: Incidence of acute poisoning in childhood has not changed significantly over time. Organophosphorus compounds, phosphides and drugs poisoning peak during adolescence and is particularly alarming. Conditions such as free availability of these compounds, co morbid conditions of adolescents, adolescent stressors have to be addressed

  8. CHATURBEEJA IN PRIMARY DYSMENORRHOEA (KASHTARTAVA: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiman Kamini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In folk medicines, Chaturbeeja(combination of seeds of four plants i.e Trigonella Foenum-graecum, Lepidium sativum , Nigella sativa, Trachyspermum ammi in equal quantity has been traditionally used for variety of applications including treatment of Dysmenorrhoea, the most common gynaecological symptom reported by women. To promote the proper use of such medicines and to determine their potential as sources for new drugs, it is essential to study medicinal plants, which have folklore reputation in a more intensified way. A Single blind, prospective observational clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Chaturbeeja powder in Primary Dysmenorrhoea (Kashtartava. 25 patients were administered Chaturbeeja powder in a single dose of 3g with hot water at night, 7 days before starting of menstruation till 3rd day of the menstruation cycle. After assessing the results it was observed that12 patients were markedly improved, 8 moderately improved and 5 were improved.

  9. The new worlds observer: The astrophysics strategic mission concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cash W.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We present some results of the Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study for the New Worlds Observer (NWO. We show that the use of starshades is the most effective and affordable path to mapping and understanding our neighboring planetary systems, to opening the search for life outside our solar system, while serving the needs of the greater astronomy community. A starshade-based mission can be implemented immediately with a near term program of technology demonstration.

  10. The new worlds observer: The astrophysics strategic mission concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, W.

    2011-07-01

    We present some results of the Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study for the New Worlds Observer (NWO). We show that the use of starshades is the most effective and affordable path to mapping and understanding our neighboring planetary systems, to opening the search for life outside our solar system, while serving the needs of the greater astronomy community. A starshade-based mission can be implemented immediately with a near term program of technology demonstration.

  11. Patient satisfaction concerning implant-supported prostheses: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno César de Vasconcelos GURGEL; Ana Luísa de Barros PASCOAL; Bruno Luiz Menezes de SOUZA; Poliana Medeiros Cunha DANTAS; Sheyla Christinne Lira MONTENEGRO; Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli da Costa OLIVEIRA; Calderon, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to assess the degree of patient satisfaction toward implant-supported prostheses. A questionnaire was used with two scales (one consisting of detailed adjectival and the other of numerical responses) regarding chewing, esthetics, speaking, comfort and overall satisfaction. The scales were administered to a sample of 147 patients treated with implants and prostheses. The data were submitted to the Kappa statistic and the Chi-square test to analyze the as...

  12. What Makes a Good Palliative Care Physician? A Qualitative Study about the Patient's Expectations and Needs when Being Admitted to a Palliative Care Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva K Masel

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to examine a patients' knowledge of palliative care, b patients' expectations and needs when being admitted to a palliative care unit, and c patient's concept of a good palliative care physician.The study was based on a qualitative methodology, comprising 32 semistructured interviews with advanced cancer patients admitted to the palliative care unit of the Medical University of Vienna. Interviews were conducted with 20 patients during the first three days after admission to the unit and after one week, recorded digitally, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using NVivo 10 software, based on thematic analysis enhanced with grounded theory techniques.The results revealed four themes: (1 information about palliative care, (2 supportive care needs, (3 being treated in a palliative care unit, and (4 qualities required of palliative care physicians. The data showed that patients lack information about palliative care, that help in social concerns plays a central role in palliative care, and attentiveness as well as symptom management are important to patients. Patients desire a personal patient-physician relationship. The qualities of a good palliative care physician were honesty, the ability to listen, taking time, being experienced in their field, speaking the patient's language, being human, and being gentle. Patients experienced relief when being treated in a palliative care unit, perceived their care as an interdisciplinary activity, and felt that their burdensome symptoms were being attended to with emotional care. Negative perceptions included the overtly intense treatment.The results of the present study offer an insight into what patients expect from palliative care teams. Being aware of patient's needs will enable medical teams to improve professional and individualized care.

  13. Quality standards for real-world research. Focus on observational database studies of comparative effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Nicolas; Reddel, Helen; Martin, Richard; Brusselle, Guy; Papi, Alberto; Thomas, Mike; Postma, Dirjke; Thomas, Vicky; Rand, Cynthia; Chisholm, Alison; Price, David

    2014-02-01

    Real-world research can use observational or clinical trial designs, in both cases putting emphasis on high external validity, to complement the classical efficacy randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high internal validity. Real-world research is made necessary by the variety of factors that can play an important a role in modulating effectiveness in real life but are often tightly controlled in RCTs, such as comorbidities and concomitant treatments, adherence, inhalation technique, access to care, strength of doctor-caregiver communication, and socio-economic and other organizational factors. Real-world studies belong to two main categories: pragmatic trials and observational studies, which can be prospective or retrospective. Focusing on comparative database observational studies, the process aimed at ensuring high-quality research can be divided into three parts: preparation of research, analyses and reporting, and discussion of results. Key points include a priori planning of data collection and analyses, identification of appropriate database(s), proper outcomes definition, study registration with commitment to publish, bias minimization through matching and adjustment processes accounting for potential confounders, and sensitivity analyses testing the robustness of results. When these conditions are met, observational database studies can reach a sufficient level of evidence to help create guidelines (i.e., clinical and regulatory decision-making).

  14. An interdisciplinary-interuniversity health care team management decision-making case study course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, R J; Arlinghaus, E J; Rowe, K W

    1985-01-01

    An elective case study course involving graduate students from various health profession disciplines from two universities was developed in order to provide a forum for health care teams to discuss the philosophical and functional impact of situations and their alternative solutions. The case studies stressed various aspects of the decision-making process and were nonclinical/technical but health care administratively oriented in nature. Course evaluations manifest that participants from each discipline improved their problem-solving and leadership abilities, and created a cross-fertilization of knowledge and understanding of the various health care disciplines and their perspectives that each brings to the health care system.

  15. A Prospective Validation Study of a Rainbow Model of Integrated Care Measurement Tool in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milawaty Nurjono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The conceptual ambiguity of the integrated care concept precludes a full understanding of what constitutes a well-integrated health system, posing a significant challenge in measuring the level of integrated care. Most available measures have been developed from a disease-specific perspective and only measure certain aspects of integrated care. Based on the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care, which provides a detailed description of the complex concept of integrated care, a measurement tool has been developed to assess integrated care within a care system as a whole gathered from healthcare providers’ and managerial perspectives. This paper describes the methodology of a study seeking to validate the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care measurement tool within and across the Singapore Regional Health System. The Singapore Regional Health System is a recent national strategy developed to provide a better-integrated health system to deliver seamless and person-focused care to patients through a network of providers within a specified geographical region. Methods: The validation process includes the assessment of the content of the measure and its psychometric properties. Conclusion: If the measure is deemed to be valid, the study will provide the first opportunity to measure integrated care within Singapore Regional Health System with the results allowing insights in making recommendations for improving the Regional Health System and supporting international comparison.

  16. Observation Study of Aerosol Radiative Properities over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jietai; LI Chengcai

    2006-01-01

    With a simplified radiation balance model, study is performed of aerosol direct radiation forcing in relation to its optical properties and surface reflectance, indicating that with the thickened aerosol layer the earth-atmosphere system may increase or weaken the solar radiation albedo, depending upon different combinations of aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ω0), asymmetry factor (g), and surface albedo (αg)rather than relying directly on the aerosol optical depth (δ), which has its value just in proportion to the changed range of albedo alone.As indicated by the model results, systematic observations of aerosol radiative properties are required to make quantitative study of aerosol direct radiative forcing. Observational research of the properties has been undertaken based on ground and space measurements over China, including ground-based sunphotometeraerosol optical depth (AOD), nephelometer-aerosol scattering coefficients, aethalometer-aerosol absorption coefficients, and MODIS products-retrieved AOD. The satellite retrieved AOD is validated against in situ sun photometer measured AOD, ind icating that for eastern China remote sensing given AODs are acceptable owing mainly to lower surface reflectance there whereas for poor vegetation in the north of China the surface reflectance may be underestimated in AOD retrieval. However, appropriate modification of the scheme of aerosol remote sensing is likely to improve the retrieval accuracy. The aerosol single scattering albedo in dry condition is around 0.80 from surface-measured scattering and absorption coefficients. It requires further studies based on more observations to improve our understanding of the issue.

  17. Bridging the Gap between Primary Care and Specialized Mental Health Care. A mixed method study of the quality of referral information and the referral letters’ potential impact on quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Hartveit, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Background. A major cause of adverse events in health care is insufficient information transference between health professionals. Despite the cardinal role of referral letters as the means of communication between primary care and specialized mental health care, earlier studies have shown that these letters often lack essential information. The impact of this lack of communication on patient care is unknown. The present study primarily aims to explore what information referral letters from pr...

  18. Pursuing an Ethic of Care: A Case Study of One Female Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Rachelle G.

    2009-01-01

    This instrumental case study explores how the Ethic of Care is experienced within one Midwestern school system as an alternative approach to traditional school system hierarchical infrastructures. Through the qualitative tradition of portraiture (Lawrence-Lightfoot & Davis, 1997), this study documents the caring leadership actions, behaviors and…

  19. Establishing contact and gaining trust : an exploratory study of care avoidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schout, Gert; de Jong, Gideon; Zeelen, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Title. Establishing contact and gaining trust: an exploratory study of care avoidance. Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore the competencies especially deep-rooted personal qualities - of care providers who succeed in making contact and gaining trust with clients who are incli

  20. Impact of communication skills training on parents perceptions of care: intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Laulund, Lone W

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the effects of communication-skills training for healthcare professionals on parents' perceptions of information, care and continuity.......This paper is a report of a study of the effects of communication-skills training for healthcare professionals on parents' perceptions of information, care and continuity....

  1. Explaining governmental involvement in home care across Europe: an international comparative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Kroneman, M.; Boerma, W.G.W.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of governments in the home care sector strongly varies across Europe. This study aims to explain the differences through the conditions for the involvement of informal care and governments in society; wealth and the demographic structure. As this study could combine qualitative data

  2. Cultural Adequecy of the Care Dependency Scale for Older Persons in Egypt : A Delphi Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boggatz, Thomas; Farid, Tamer; Dijkstra, Ate; Lohrmann, Christa; Dassen, T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine the cultural adequateness of the Arabic version of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS), an internationally used instrument to measure care needs by either self-reports or external assessment. Method: A Delphi study in two rounds about the Arabic version was

  3. Caregiver Involvement in the Education of Youth in Foster Care: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisse, Kay; Tyre, Ashli

    2013-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of caregiver involvement in the education of youth in foster care. In this study, foster caregivers reported that they are involved in the education of children in their care and participate in at-home involvement activities more often than at-school involvement activities. Caregivers in this study…

  4. The Patients Assessment Chronic Illness Care (PACIC questionnaire in The Netherlands: a validation study in rural general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermsen Jan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with chronic illness receive health care in primary care settings, so a challenge is to provide well-structured chronic care in these settings. Our aim was to develop and test a Dutch version of the PACIC questionnaire, a measure for patient reported structured chronic care. Methods Observational study in 165 patients with diabetes or COPD from four general practices (72% response rate. Patients completed a written questionnaire, which included instruments for assessing chronic illness care (PACIC, evaluations of general practice (Europep, enablement (PEI, and individual characteristics. Results The patients had a mean age of 68.0 years and 47% comprised of women. Twenty-two to 35% of responding patients did not provide answers to specific items in the PACIC. In 11 items the lowest answering category was used by 30% or more of the responders and in 6 items the highest answering category was used by this number of responders. Principal factor analysis identified the previously defined five domains reasonably well. Cronbach's alpha per domain varied from 0.71 to 0.83, and the intraclass coefficient from 0.66 to 0.91. Diabetes patients reported higher presence of structured chronic care for 14 out of the 20 PACIC items. The effect of patient evaluations of general practice on the PACIC score was positive (b = 0.72, p Conclusion A translated and validated Dutch version of the PACIC questionnaire is now available. Further research on its validity is recommended.

  5. Learning the meaning of care: a case study in a geriatric home in Upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggatz, Thomas; Dassen, Theo

    2006-04-01

    Geriatric care is a new phenomenon in Egypt. This study investigates how Egyptian caregivers experience their work and how they conceive its meaning. A qualitative case study in a geriatric home in Upper Egypt was conducted using structured interviews with 10 staff members and content analysis according to Mayring. Performing care required learning to overcome initial experiences of fear, disgust, and sexual taboo. Care was perceived as a laborious repetition. Its ideal form was described as a reaction to a demand combined with kind patience and a family-like relationship. Christian and female values allowed coping with experienced problems and alleviated conflicts between traditional gender roles and care of male residents. Traditional values helped to adapt to the requirements of providing care. Sexual taboos may reduce willingness to provide care, but traditional values may encourage caregivers.

  6. Organizational climate and hospital nurses' caring practices: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Geneviève; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Clarke, Sean P

    2014-06-01

    Organizational climate in healthcare settings influences patient outcomes, but its effect on nursing care delivery remains poorly understood. In this mixed-methods study, nurse surveys (N = 292) were combined with a qualitative case study of 15 direct-care registered nurses (RNs), nursing personnel, and managers. Organizational climate explained 11% of the variation in RNs' reported frequency of caring practices. Qualitative data suggested that caring practices were affected by the interplay of organizational climate dimensions with patients and nurses characteristics. Workload intensity and role ambiguity led RNs to leave many caring practices to practical nurses and assistive personnel. Systemic interventions are needed to improve organizational climate and to support RNs' involvement in a full range of caring practices.

  7. Study of some defects observed in the hexagonal liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polarising microscopy study of the disclinations in an hexagonal discotic liquid crystal (hexa-pentoxy-triphenylene) allows us to confirm the theory of the developable domains and the existence of the disclinations as involute of the circle. The absence of the lines S = 1 leads us to propose a model of core in which the energetic instability of these lines is emphasized. The nature of the core is discussed: it is probably filled with hexagonal liquid crystal. Moreover the birefringence Δn is measured and a first estimate of the anchoring energies of the discotic both on the glass and in contact with the air is given. The Michelson interferometry study of the interaction between the disclinations and the free surface has allowed to observe a strong anisotropy of the interfacial tension. At last a study of the walls leads to a classification according to the matching angle and to a first estimate of the penetration distance λ. A similar study has been undertaken in an inverse middle liquid crystalline phase (Na dioctylsulfosuccinate). A strong dependence of the elastic constants with the water concentration is observed. The micellar → hexagonal transition is studied. (author)

  8. Community-based, interdisciplinary geriatric care team satisfaction with an electronic health record: a multimethod study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina S; Bowles, Kathryn H; Lehmann, Harold P; Abbott, Patricia A; Weiner, Jonathan P

    2012-06-01

    This multimethod study measured the impact of an electronic health record (EHR) on clinician satisfaction with clinical process. Subjects were 39 clinicians at a Program of All-inclusive Care for Elders (PACE) site in Philadelphia utilizing an EHR. Methods included the evidence-based evaluation framework, Health Information Technology Research-Based Evaluation Framework, which guided assessment of clinician satisfaction with surveys, observations, follow-up interviews, and actual EHR use at two points in time. Mixed-methods analysis of findings provided context for interpretation and improved validity. The study found that clinicians were satisfied with the EHR; however, satisfaction declined between time periods. Use of EHR was universal and wide and was differentiated by clinical role. Between time periods, EHR use increased in volume, with increased timeliness and decreased efficiency. As the first EHR evaluation at a PACE site from the perspective of clinicians who use the system, this study provides insights into EHR use in the care of older people in community-based healthcare settings. PMID:22411417

  9. Differences in COPD patient care by primary family caregivers: an age-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Ching Hsiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because Taiwan has the fastest aging rate among developed countries, care for the elderly is becoming more prominent in the country. Primary family caregivers play an important role in patient health and health promotion behavior. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, an age-related disease, is a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality and can be a long-term burden for family members; however, little attention has been given to the differences in COPD care between elder caregivers and other caregivers. This study aimed to investigate the differences between elder family caregivers and non-elder family caregivers caring for COPD patients in Taiwan, including caring behavior, caregiver response, and caring knowledge. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2007 and January 2008; 406 primary family caregivers of COPD patients from the thoracic outpatient departments of 6 hospitals in north-central Taiwan were recruited to answer questionnaires measuring COPD characteristics, care behavior, caregiver response, and COPD knowledge. All questionnaires, which addressed caregiver knowledge, care behaviors, and care reactions, were shown to have acceptable validity and reliability, and the data were analyzed using univariate and generalized linear model techniques. RESULTS: The elder caregivers group had 79 participants, and the non-elder caregivers comprised 327 participants. The COPD-related knowledge scale results were positively correlated with the family caregiver caring behavior scale, suggesting that better COPD-related knowledge among family caregivers may result in improved caring behavior. After adjusting for all possible confounding factors, the elder caregivers had significantly lower COPD-related knowledge than the non-elder caregivers (P<0.001. However, there were no significant differences in the family caregiver caring behavior scale or the caregiver reaction assessment scale

  10. Informal Caregivers' Experiences and Needs When Caring for a Relative With Heart Failure: An Interview Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gusdal, A. K.; Josefsson, K.; Adolfsson, E. T.; Martin, L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Informal caregivers play an important role for persons with heart failure in strengthening medication adherence, encouraging self-care, and identifying deterioration in health status. Caring for a relative with heart failure can affect informal caregivers' well-being and cause caregiver burden. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore informal caregivers' experiences and needs when caring for a relative with heart failure living in their own home. Methods: The...

  11. The health and social consequences of an alcohol related admission to critical care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    McPeake, Joanne; Forrest, Ewan; Quasim, Tara; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of critical care on future alcohol-related behaviour. Further, it aimed to explore patterns of recovery for patients with and without alcohol use disorders beyond the hospital environment. Design: In-depth, semistructured interviews with participants ( patients) 3–7 months post intensive care discharge. Setting: The setting for this study was a 20-bedded mixed intensive care unit (ICU), in a large teaching hospital in Scotland. On admission, patients ...

  12. Program Implementation in the Prison System: An Organizational Study of the Chronic Care Model Program

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This study provides evidence of a successful implementation of a not-for-profit operational model within a public setting. The federal government placed a receiver in charge of improving health care within the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. To achieve the receivership's goals, a chronic care model from the not-for-profit sector was selected and implemented to improve the delivery of health care to inmates. The data suggest that operational programs developed outsi...

  13. A study on morbidity and mortality pattern of poisoning in tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    C. Paranthakan; P. K. Govindarajan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The poisoning due to various reasons commonly occurs among population. Normally tertiary care hospitals receive large numbers of referral. During treatment many die due to poisoning. Objectives of the study were to find out the magnitude of admissions due to poisoning and to find out various type of poisoning and related mortality. Methods: The secondary data was collected from records available in Intensive care unit of toxicology department of tertiary care hospital. The adm...

  14. The quality of childbirth care in China: women’s voices: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Raven, Joanna; van den Broek, Nynke; TAO, FANGBIAO; Kun, Huang; Tolhurst, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of improved utilisation of health care and outcomes, rapid socio-economic development and health system reform in China, it is timely to consider the quality of services. Data on quality of maternal health care as experienced by women is limited. This study explores women’s expectations and experiences of the quality of childbirth care in rural China. Methods Thirty five semi-structured interviews and five focus group discussions were conducted with 69 women who had ...

  15. Functional prognosis of dizziness in older adults in primary care: a prospective cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Dros, J.; Maarsingh, O.R.; Beem, L.; van der Horst, H.E.; Riet, G. ter; Schellevis, F G; van Weert, H.C.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the 6-month functional prognosis of dizziness in older adults in primary care, to identify important predictors of dizziness-related impairment, and to construct a score to assist risk prediction. Design: Prospective cohort study with 6-month follow-up. Setting: Twenty-four primary care practices in the Netherlands. Participants: Four hundred seventeen older adults (mean age 78.5, range 65–95, 74% female) presenting consecutively to primary care with dizziness. Meas...

  16. Role construction and boundaries in interprofessional primary health care teams: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    MacNaughton, Kate; Chreim, Samia; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background The move towards enhancing teamwork and interprofessional collaboration in health care raises issues regarding the management of professional boundaries and the relationship among health care providers. This qualitative study explores how roles are constructed within interprofessional health care teams. It focuses on elucidating the different types of role boundaries, the influences on role construction and the implications for professionals and patients. Methods A comparative case...

  17. Health and social consequences of an alcohol-related admission to critical care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    McPeake, Joanne; Forrest, Ewan; Quasim, Tara; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of critical care on future alcohol-related behaviour. Further, it aimed to explore patterns of recovery for patients with and without alcohol use disorders beyond the hospital environment. Design In-depth, semistructured interviews with participants (patients) 3–7 months post intensive care discharge. Setting The setting for this study was a 20-bedded mixed intensive care unit (ICU), in a large teaching hospital in Scotland. On admission, patients were allocate...

  18. MEETING Spiritual Needs: A STUDY USING THE SPIRITUAL CARE COMPETENCE SCALE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Ann N; Williams, Wesley E; Hurley, Shelia

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare literature suggests that many nurses fail to address patients' spiritual needs and/or identify signs of spiritual distress. A study was conducted to explore whether nurses in a medical center possessed the knowledge to assess patients' spirituality and design and implement a plan of spiritual care. The Spiritual Care Competence Scale was used to assess competence in spiritual care assessment and implementation; professionalization and improving quality; personal support and patient counseling; referral; attitude toward patient spirituality; and communication of spiritual needs.

  19. Impact of a 2-Day Critical Care Ultrasound Course during Fellowship Training: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vi Am Dinh; Giri, Paresh C.; Inimai Rathinavel; Emilie Nguyen; David Hecht; Ihab Dorotta; H. Bryant Nguyen; Chrissian, Ara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the increasing utilization of point-of-care critical care ultrasonography (CCUS), standards establishing competency for its use are lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-day CCUS course implementation on ultrasound-naïve critical care medicine (CCM) fellows. Methods. Prospective evaluation of the impact of a two-day CCUS course on eight CCM fellows' attitudes, proficiency, and use of CCUS. Ultrasound competency on multiple organ system...

  20. Benefits and problems of electronic information exchange as perceived by health care professionals: an interview study

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesman Floris J; Verheij Robert A; Zwaanswijk Marieke; Friele Roland D

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Various countries are currently implementing a national electronic patient record (n-EPR). Despite the assumed positive effects of n-EPRs, their overall adoption remains low and meets resistance from health care providers. This study aims to increase our understanding of health care providers' attitude towards the n-EPR, by investigating their perceptions of the benefits and problems of electronic information exchange in health care and the n-EPR in particular. Methods The...

  1. Five year prognosis in patients with angina identified in primary care: incident cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, B. S.; Simpson, C.R.; McLernon, D.J.; Murphy, A W; Hannaford, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the risk of acute myocardial infarction, invasive cardiac procedures, and mortality among patients with newly diagnosed angina over five years. DESIGN: Incident cohort study of patients with primary care data linked to secondary care and mortality data. SETTING: 40 primary care practices in Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: 1785 patients with a diagnosis of angina as their first manifestation of ischaemic heart disease, 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2001. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ...

  2. Access to specialty care in autism spectrum disorders-a pilot study of referral source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Therese

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, a medical home model has been shown to improve the outcomes for children with special health care needs. As part of this model, primary care physicians provide comprehensive medical care that includes identification of delayed and/or atypical development in children and coordination of care with specialists. However, it is not clear if families of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD rely on the medical home model for care of their child to the same extent as families of children with other special health care needs. This study aims to add to the understanding of medical care for children with ASD by examining the referral source for specialty care. Methods This retrospective study was accomplished by evaluating parent completed intake data for children with ASD compared to those with other neurological disorders in a single physician Pediatric Neurology Practice at a major urban medical center in Northern New Jersey. To account for referral bias, a similar comparison study was conducted using a multispecialty ASD practice at the same medical center. Parent reported "source of referral" and "reason for the referral" of 189 ASD children and 108 non-ASD neurological disordered children were analyzed. Results The specialty evaluations of ASD were predominantly parent initiated. There were significantly less referrals received from primary care physicians for children with ASD compared to children with other neurodevelopmental disorders. Requirement of an insurance referral was not associated with a primary care physician prompted specialty visit.We identified different patterns of referral to our specialty clinics for children with ASD vs. children with other neurolodevelopmental disorders. Conclusion The majority of the families of children with ASD evaluated at our autism center did not indicate that a primary care physician initiated the specialty referral. This study suggests that families of

  3. Prepare and prevent rather than repair and repent: Study of maternal mortality in tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Mundkur

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Maternal death signifies the quality of healthcare provided in the population. It is the young, relatively healthy women who die of various reasons. Audit of such mortality would prevent the recurrence by taking appropriate measures. Aims: To find the causes of maternal mortality. Settings and Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods : All maternal deaths in a tertiary care referral center from January 2007 to September 2012 were studied for their demographic profile and causes of death. Results: All 62 women were referred from other healthcare units. Twenty-nine patients died within 24 h of admission and 33 women died after 24 h of admission. Death of 34 patients was due to direct obstetric causes and of 26 patients due to indirect obstetric causes. There were 2 maternal deaths due to accidental causes. Conclusions: The corrective action to prevent the recurrence of such deaths should be taken. Sepsis was found to be the commonest cause for maternal mortality followed by hemorrhage. It important to note that, in the present study, all mothers received antenatal care, had hospital delivery (none had home delivery, no teenage pregnancy or grand multigravidas, and no obstructed labor or rupture uterus, and yet they died. There is a change in the trend of causes of maternal mortality. Strengthening of the first referral units with equipment, blood bank, and adequately competent staff should be of prime importance. Continued medical education of the medial personnel at the periphery is required. Maternal deaths occur in inspite of atenatal care and hospital delivery which is alarming. Contributing factors may be delay in referral or the travel which should be looked in to inorder to minimize such death of young women.

  4. Obtaining a critical care pharmacist position: a marketing case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, T P; Wu, B; Nakagawa, R S

    1993-06-01

    Marketing theory is used to explain how Pharmacy Department managers at a Vancouver-area hospital secured a new ICU pharmacist position in a period of severe fiscal constraint. Market segmentation, target marketing and pull marketing strategy were combined to obtain support for the new position. Improved drug information services for ICU nurses were promoted to Nursing Administration and enhanced pharmacotherapy monitoring was promoted to the two critical care physicians primarily responsible for patient care in the ICU. These physicians and Nursing Administration voiced their support for the new position to the V.P. of Nursing (the functional officer for Pharmacy), who then promoted the new position to Hospital Administration. A half-time DUR commitment by the ICU pharmacist was offered to Hospital Administration, expanding this already successful service and guaranteeing cost recovery for the new position. Hospital Administration approved the new ICU clinical pharmacist position in a budget which saw other hospital departments lose several positions. PMID:10126865

  5. Current sedation and monitoring practice for colonoscopy: an International Observational Study (EPAGE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froehlich, F; Harris, JK; Wietlisbach, V;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varies between centers and over time. Knowledge of current practice is needed to ensure quality of care and help focus future research. The objective of this study was to examine sedation and monitoring practice...... in endoscopy centers internationally. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient. RESULTS: 6004 patients were...... included in this study, of whom 53 % received conscious/moderate sedation during colonoscopy, 30 % received deep sedation, and 17 % received no sedation. Sedation agents most commonly used were midazolam (47 %) and opioids (33 %). Pulse oximetry was done during colonoscopy in 77 % of patients, blood...

  6. Plastic Neuroscience: Studying What the Brain Cares About

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph eDumit

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on Allan Newell’s You can’t play 20 questions with nature and win, this article proposes that neuroscience needs to go beyond binary hypothesis testing and design experiments that follow what neurons care about. Examples from Lettvin et. al. are used to demonstrate that one can experimentally play with neurons and generate surprising results. In this manner, brains are not confused with persons, rather, persons are understood to do things with their brains.

  7. Intrathecal analgesia and palliative care: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen S Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal analgesia is an interventional form of pain relief with definite advantages and multiple complications. Administration of intrathecal analgesia needs a good resource setting and expertise. Early complications of intrathecal analgesia can be very distressing and managing these complications will need a high degree of knowledge, technical expertise and level of experience. Pain control alone cannot be the marker of quality in palliative care. A holistic approach may need to be employed that is more person and family oriented.

  8. Expanding access to primary care without additional budgets? A case study from Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Paul; Flessa, Steffen

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the impact of increased access to primary care on provider costs in the rural health district of Nouna, Burkina Faso. This study question is crucial for health care planning in this district, as other research work shows that the population has a higher need for health care services. From a public health perspective, an increase of utilisation of first-line health facilities would be necessary. However, the governmental budget that is needed to finance improved access was not known. The study is based on data of 2004 of a comprehensive provider cost information system. This database provides us with the actual costs of each primary health care facility (Centre de Santé et de Promotion Sociale, CSPS) in the health district. We determine the fixed and variable costs of each institution and calculate the average cost per service unit rendered in 2004. Based on the cost structure of each CSPS, we calculate the total costs if the demand for health care services increased. We conclude that the total provider costs of primary care (and therefore the governmental budget) would hardly rise if the coverage of the population were increased. This is mainly due to the fact that the highest variable costs are drugs, which are fully paid for by the customers (Bamako Initiative). The majority of other costs are fixed. Consequently, health care reforms that improve access to health care institutions must not fear dramatically increasing the costs of health care services. PMID:18197447

  9. Linking Indigenous Knowledge and Observed Climate Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Chief Clarence; Bynum, Nora; Johnson, Liz; King, Ursula; Mustonen, Tero; Neofotis, Peter; Oettle, Noel; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Sakakibara, Chie; Shadrin, Chief Vyacheslav; Vicarelli, Marta; Waterhouse, Jon; Weeks, Brian

    2010-01-01

    We present indigenous knowledge narratives and explore their connections to documented temperature and other climate changes and observed climate change impact studies. We then propose a framework for enhancing integration of these indigenous narratives of observed climate change with global assessments. Our aim is to contribute to the thoughtful and respectful integration of indigenous knowledge with scientific data and analysis, so that this rich body of knowledge can inform science, and so that indigenous and traditional peoples can use the tools and methods of science for the benefit of their communities if they choose to do so. Enhancing ways of understanding such connections are critical as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment process gets underway.

  10. Training on a vascular interventional simulator: an observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiology registrars were observed performing a left renal artery angioplasty using a proprietary training simulator up to five times during their first year of training. Total procedure time, fluoroscopy times, and metric information from the machine were recorded. Each step of the procedure was judged by an observer and a mistake profile was generated. Fifty-two runs were completed by 12 trainees. The mean procedure time decreased from 16.6 min to 9.8 min over the five runs. The number of mistakes ranged from zero to ten and the mean number of mistakes made varied from 0.7 to 2.6 per procedure without any particular trend. Our study demonstrates that training on the simulator does improve performance. The mistakes made throughout training indicates the potential benefit from further simulator training. It remains unclear how to integrate this form of training in current educational programs. (orig.)

  11. Clinico-epidemiological study of pityriasis versicolor in a rural tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeema Tabaseera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study was conducted to know the incidence of pityriasis versicolor in relation to age, sex, seasons and occupation in a rural set up. Methods: A total of 105 patients of pityriasis versicolor were clinically evaluated and confirmed mycologically at central lab in a tertiary care hospital in South India. The obtained data was recorded and analysed accordingly. Results: Male preponderance was observed in the study. Disease was most pronounced in younger age group (21-30 years especially students. 61.9% of patients sought medical advice on cosmetic grounds while 38% had pruritis. Chest was the commonest site of affection followed by neck and back. Conclusion: Early identification of the yeast by simple laboratory techniques would help prevent recurrences, systemic complications and cosmetological problems which are high especially among the students and younger age groups. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1438-1440

  12. This article has been retracted and is available online only: Exploration of Iranian intensive care nurses' experience of end-of-life care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran, John; Scholes, Julie

    2012-01-01

    RETRACTION: The following article from Nursing in Critical Care, 'Exploration of Iranian intensive care nurses' experience of end-of-life care: a qualitative study' by Sina Valiee, Reza Negarandeh and Nahid Dehghan Nayeri, published online on 9 May 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors and the journal Editors. The retraction has been agreed due to errors in the manuscript handling process which meant that an early version of the article was published that did not include all the amendments made as part of the peer review process. John Albarran and Julie Scholes Editors Nursing in Critical Care REFERENCE Valiee, S., Negarandeh, R. and Dehghan Nayeri, N. (2012), Exploration of Iranian intensive care nurses' experience of end-of-life care: a qualitative study. Nursing in Critical Care. doi: 10.1111/j.1478-5153.2012.00505.x.

  13. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II: a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Venrooij Janine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU. From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II. This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS. Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care.

  14. Anaesthesia care for emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding. A nationwide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Patricia; Haahr Raunkjær, Camilla; Møller, Morten Hylander;

    2016-01-01

    describe the prevalence and inter-hospital variation of anaesthesia care in Denmark and identify clinical predictors for choosing anaesthesia care. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This population-based cohort study included all emergency EGDs for PUB in adults during 2012-2013. About 90-day all-cause mortality after...... of the endoscopist. Some 16.7% of the patients undergoing EGD with anaesthesia care died within 90 days after the procedure, compared to 9.8% of the patients who had no anaesthesia care, adjusted OR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.25-1.83). Comparing the two hospitals with the most frequent (98.6% of al EGDs) and least frequent...... EGD was estimated by crude and adjusted logistic regression. Clinical predictors of anaesthesia care were identified in another logistic regression model. RESULTS: Some 3.056 EGDs performed at 21 hospitals were included; 2074 (68%) received anaesthesia care and 982 (32%) were managed under supervison...

  15. Quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke - A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman, A.; Pedersen, Lars; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager;

    2008-01-01

    National Indicator Project, a quality improvement initiative with participation of all Danish hospital departments caring for patients with stroke, we identified 29,573 patients hospitalized with stroke between January 13, 2003 and October 31, 2005. Quality of care was measured in terms of 7 specific......-response relationship between the number of quality of care criteria met and mortality; the lowest mortality rate was found among patients whose care met all criteria compared with patients whose care failed to meet any criteria (ie, adjusted 30-day mortality rate ratios: 0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.24-0.66). When......Background: The relationship between process and outcome measures among patients with stroke is unclear. Objectives: To examine the association between quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke in a nationwide population-based follow-up study. Methods: Using data from The Danish...

  16. Newly diagnosed incident dizziness of older patients: a follow-up study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dizziness is a common complaint of older patients in primary care, yet not much is known about the course of incident dizziness. The aim of the study was to follow-up symptoms, subjective impairments and needs of older patients (≥65 with incident dizziness and to determine predictors of chronic dizziness. Furthermore, we analysed general practitioners' (GPs' initial diagnoses, referrals and revised diagnoses after six months. Methods An observational study was performed in 21 primary care practices in Germany, including a four-week and six-month follow-up. A questionnaire comprising characteristic matters of dizziness and a series of validated instruments was completed by 66 participants during enrolment and follow-up (after 1 month and 6 months. After six months, chart reviews and face-to-face interviews were also performed with the GPs. Results Mean scores of dizziness handicap, depression and quality of life were not or only slightly affected, and did not deteriorate during follow-up; however, 24 patients (34.8% showed a moderate or severe dizziness handicap, and 43 (62.3% showed a certain disability in terms of quality of life at the time of enrolment. In multivariate analysis, n = 44 patients suffering from chronic dizziness (dependent variable, i.e. relapsing or persistent at six months initially had a greater dizziness handicap (OR 1.42, 95%CI 1.05-1.47 than patients with transient dizziness. GPs referred 47.8% of the patients to specialists who detected two additional cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Conclusions New-onset dizziness relapsed or persisted in a considerable number of patients within six months. This was difficult to predict due to the patients' heterogeneous complaints and characteristics. Symptom persistence does not seem to be associated with deterioration of the psychological status in older primary care patients. Management strategies should routinely consider BPPV as

  17. Endotoxin Elimination in Patients with Septic Shock: An Observation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamik, Barbara; Zielinski, Stanislaw; Smiechowicz, Jakub; Kübler, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endotoxin elimination with an adsorption column in patients with septic shock and endotoxemia. The elimination therapy was guided by a new bedside method of measuring endotoxin activity (EA). Intensive care unit (ICU) patients with septic shock and suspected Gram-negative infection were consecutively added to the study group within the first 24 h. Endotoxin elimination was performed using hemoperfusion with the Alteco LPS Adsorber. The primary endpoint was improvement in organ function within the first 24 h of treatment. A secondary objective was to assess the usefulness of a new method of measuring EA to help guide endotoxin elimination therapy. Out of 64 patients 18 had a high baseline EA [0.70 EA units (0.66-0.77)]. Those patients had endotoxin elimination treatment in addition to conventional medical therapy. At 24 h after endotoxin elimination, the EA had decreased to 0.56 EA units (0.43-0.77), (p = 0.005); MAP increased from 69 (62-80) to 80 mm Hg (68-88), (p = 0.002), and noradrenaline use decreased from 0.28 (0.15-0.80) to 0.1 μg/kg/min (0.00-0.70) at the same time (p = 0.04). The SOFA score had decreased from 11 (9-15) to 9 (7-14) points 24 h after endotoxin elimination (p = 0.01) with a median delta SOFA -2 points. Endotoxin elimination did not have a significant effect on the ICU length of stay or ICU mortality. Effective endotoxin elimination resulted in a significant improvement in hemodynamic parameters and of organ function. The application of the EA assay was useful for the bedside monitoring of endotoxemia in critically ill ICU patients.

  18. Organization position statements and the stance of "studied neutrality" on euthanasia in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, palliative care and related organizations have increasingly adopted a stance of "studied neutrality" on the question of whether euthanasia should be legalized as a bona fide medical regimen in palliative care contexts. This stance, however, has attracted criticism from both opponents and proponents of euthanasia. Pro-euthanasia activists see the stance as an official position of indecision that is fundamentally disrespectful of a patient's right to "choose death" when life has become unbearable. Some palliative care constituents, in turn, are opposed to the stance, contending that it reflects an attitude of "going soft" on euthanasia and as weakening the political resistance that has hitherto been successful in preventing euthanasia from becoming more widely legalized. In this article, attention is given to examining critically the notion and possible unintended consequences of adopting a stance of studied neutrality on euthanasia in palliative care. It is argued that although palliative care and related organizations have an obvious stake in the outcome of the euthanasia debate, it is neither unreasonable nor inconsistent for such organizations to be unwilling to take a definitive stance on the issue. It is further contended that, given the long-standing tenets of palliative care, palliative care organizations have both a right and a responsibility to defend the integrity of the principles and practice of palliative care and to resist demands for euthanasia to be positioned either as an integral part or logical extension of palliative care.

  19. Nurse′s perceptions of physiotherapists in critical care team: Report of a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranati Gupte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional relationship plays a major role in effective patient care. Specialized units such as critical care require multidisciplinary care where perception about every members role may affect the delivery of patient care. The objective of this study was to find out nurses′ perceptions of the role of physiotherapists in the critical care team. Methods: Qualitative study by using semi-structured interview was conducted among the qualified nurses working in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital. The interview consisted of 19 questions divided into 3 sections. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. In-depth content analysis was carried out to identify major themes in relation to the research question. Results: Analysis identified five major issues which included role and image of a physiotherapist, effectiveness of treatment, communications, teamwork, and interprofessional relations. Physiotherapists were perceived to be an important member of the critical team with the role of mobilizing the patients. The respondents admitted that there existed limitations in interprofessional relationship. Conclusion: Nurses perceived the role of physiotherapist in the critical care unit as an integral part and agreed on the need for inclusion of therapist multidisciplinary critical care team.

  20. Serum YKL-40 and gestational diabetes - an observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gybel-Brask, Dorte; Johansen, Julia S; Christiansen, Ib J;

    2016-01-01

    To examine serum YKL-40 in women developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In the present large observational cohort study of 1179 pregnant women, we determined serum YKL-40 four times during pregnancy (at gestational age 12, 20, 25, and 32 weeks). Pregnancy outcome was obtained from medical...... records. Sixty-eight women (5.8%) developed GDM. Serum YKL-40 increased from gestational age (GA) 12 weeks and the following weeks in the women who developed GDM and was independent of BMI, parity, and maternal age (OR = 2.69, 95% CI: 1.45-5.00, p = 0.002). No association was found between serum YKL-40...

  1. How safe do teenagers behave on Facebook? An observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Vanderhoven

    Full Text Available The substantial use of social network sites by teenagers has raised concerns about privacy and security. Previous research about behavior on social network sites was mostly based on surveys and interviews. Observational research overcomes problems inherent to this research method, for example social desirability. However, existing observational research mostly focuses on public profiles of young adults. Therefore, the current observation-study includes 1050 public and non-public Facebook-profiles of teenagers (13-18 to investigate (1 what kind of information teenagers post on their profile, (2 to what extent they protect this information using privacy-settings and (3 how much risky information they have on their profile. It was found that young people mostly post pictures, interests and some basic personal information on their profile. Some of them manage their privacy-settings as such that this information is reserved for friends' eyes only, but a lot of information is accessible on the friends-of-friends' pages. Although general risk scores are rather low, more detailed analyses show that teenagers nevertheless post a significant amount of risky information. Moreover, older teenagers and girls post more (risky information while there are no differences in applying privacy settings. We found no differences in the Facebook behavior of teenagers enrolled in different education forms. Implications of these results are discussed.

  2. Study of a microflare observed with SUMER and TRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontikakis, C.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    We study a GOES-A1 microflare, observed in active region NOAA 8541 on May 15, 1999 with TRACE images, SUMER spectra and MDI magnetograms. In TRACE filtergrams of 171A and 195A, the microflare is composed of two interacting, 20Mm long, loops. SUMER observations include four spectral lines: the Si II 1533A (a chromospheric line), the C IV 1548A, 1550 A (transition region lines) and the Ne VIII 770 A (a coronal line). These spectra record the impulsive stage of the microflare, which appears as a bright feature at the west footpoint of the TRACE loops. In an area adjacent to the microflare we observe, for the first time on the solar disk, a region where the lines intensity ratio 1548A/1550A equals to 4 which means that resonant scattering dominates the emission process. Over the microflare, the SUMER spectral lines are blue shifted, indicating upflows due to explosive evaporation, as well as red shifted, indicating, cooling downward motions. Moreover, the C IV microflare spectral profiles, indicate upflows of ~200 km/s even if most of them are damaged due to the SUMER detector over exposure, while the Si II 1533A profiles are self-reversed due to opacity effects.

  3. Palliative care physicians′ religious / world view and attitude towards euthanasia: A quantitative study among flemish palliative care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Broeckaert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To Study the religious and ideological views and practice of Palliative Care physician towards Euthanasia. Materials and Methods: An anonymous self administered questionnaire approved by Flemish Palliative Care Federation and its ethics steering group was sent to all physicians(n-147 working in Flemish Palliative Care. Questionnaire consisted of three parts. In first part responded were requested to provide demographic information. In second part the respondents were asked to provide information concerning their religion or world view through several questions enquiring after religious or ideological affiliation,religious or ideological self-definition, view on life after death, image of God, spirituality, importance of rituals in their life, religious practice, and importance of religion in life. The third part consisted of a list of attitudinal statements regarding different treatment decisions in advanced disease on which the respondents had to give their opinion using a five-point Likert scale.99 physician responded. Results: We were able to distinguish four clusters: Church-going physicians, infrequently church-going physicians, atheists and doubters. We found that like the Belgian general public, many Flemish palliative care physicians concoct their own religious or ideological identity and feel free to drift away from traditional religious and ideological authorities. Conclusions: In our research we noted that physicians who have a strong belief in God and express their faith through participation in prayer and rituals, tend to be more critical toward euthanasia. Physicians who deny the existence of a transcendent power and hardly attend religious services are more likely to approve of euthanasia even in the case of minors or demented patients. In this way this study confirms the influence of religion and world view on attitudes toward euthanasia.

  4. Staff perception on biomedical or health care waste management: a qualitative study in a rural tertiary care hospital in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Chandra Joshi

    Full Text Available Health care or biomedical waste, if not managed properly, can be of high risk to the hospital staff, the patients, the community, public health and the environment, especially in low and middle income settings where proper disposal norms are often not followed. Our aim was to explore perceptions of staff of an Indian rural tertiary care teaching hospital on hospital waste management.A qualitative study was conducted using 10 focus group discussions (FGDs, with different professional groups, cleaning staff, nurses, medical students, doctors and administrators. The FGD guide included the following topics: (i role of Health Care Waste Management (HCWM in prevention of health care associated infections, (ii awareness of and views about HCWM-related guidelines/legislation, (iii current HCWM practices, (iv perception and preparedness related to improvements of the current practices, and (v proper implementation of the available guidelines/legislation. The FGDs were recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated to English (when conducted in Hindi and analysed using content analysis.Two themes were identified: Theme (A, 'Challenges in integration of HCWM in organizational practice,' with the categories (I Awareness and views about HCWM, (II Organizational practices regarding HCWM, and (III Challenges in Implementation of HCWM; and Theme (B, 'Interventions to improve HCWM,' with three categories, (I Educational and motivational interventions, (II Organizational culture change, and (III Policy-related interventions.A gap between knowledge and actual practice regarding HCWM was highlighted in the perception of the hospital staff. The participants suggested organizational changes, training and monitoring to address this. The information generated is relevant not merely to the microsystem studied but to other institutions in similar settings.

  5. Pharmacoepidemiological Study on Cerebrovascular Accident in Tertiary Care Hospital

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    Prathyusha GR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States (US and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability. Incidence of ischemic stroke is higher than hemorrhagic stroke. The aim is to conduct pharmacoepidemiology study on cerebrovascular accident patient by evaluating the use and the effects of drugs, and quantification of adverse drug reactions, drug utilization studies to improve the quality and use of medicines. A prospective observational study was conducted in department of general medicine and ICU at Mallareddy hospital, data was collected from 130 patients and it was proposed to be conducted for 6 months. Among 130 patients 78(60% are males and 52(40% are females. Among all age groups major number of CVA patients was seen in 60-69 years (30%. Among them 92% of strokes are Ischemic majorly seen in both males and females and8% strokes are hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke (94.87% is majorly seen in 60-69 yr age group. Among various risk factors Hypertension (36.43% is the major risk factor found in males (60% and females (40%.Antiplatelet drugs (25.75% are the highest number of drugs given in patients 71.27% in males and 28.72% in females. Highest numbers of drugs are given in 50-59yrs age group and are antiplatelets. As a clinical pharmacist 16 adverse drug reactions and 25 drug interactions are reported. Proper patient counselling is needed to reduce hypertension and to reduce the risk for cerebrovascular accident. Among all antiplatelet drugs are majorly given in males and lipid lowering drugs in females.

  6. Pharmacotherapy of elderly patients in everyday anthroposophic medical practice: a prospective, multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockelbrink Angelina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacotherapy in the older adult is a complex field involving several different medical professionals. The evidence base for pharmacotherapy in elderly patients in primary care relies on only a few clinical trials, thus documentation must be improved, particularly in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM like phytotherapy, homoeopathy, and anthroposophic medicine. This study describes diagnoses and therapies observed in elderly patients treated with anthroposophic medicine in usual care. Methods Twenty-nine primary care physicians in Germany participated in this prospective, multicenter observational study on prescribing patterns. Prescriptions and diagnoses were reported for each consecutive patient. Data were included if patients were at least 60 years of age. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with anthroposophic prescriptions. Results In 2005, a total of 12 314 prescriptions for 3076 patients (68.1% female were included. The most frequent diagnoses were hypertension (11.1%, breast cancer (3.5%, and heart failure (3.0%. In total, 30.5% of the prescriptions were classified as CAM remedies alone, 54.4% as conventional pharmaceuticals alone, and 15.1% as a combination of both. CAM remedies accounted for 41.7% of all medications prescribed (35.5% anthroposophic. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR for receiving an anthroposophic remedy was significantly higher for the first consultation (AOR = 1.65; CI: 1.52-1.79, treatment by an internist (AOR = 1.49; CI: 1.40-1.58, female patients (AOR = 1.35; CI: 1.27-1.43, cancer (AOR = 4.54; CI: 4.12-4.99, arthropathies (AOR = 1.36; CI: 1.19-1.55, or dorsopathies (AOR = 1.34; CI: 1.16-1.55 and it decreased with patient age (AOR = 0.97; CI: 0.97-0.98. The likelihood of being prescribed an anthroposophic remedy was especially low for patients with hypertensive diseases (AOR = 0.36; CI: 0.32-0.39, diabetes mellitus (AOR = 0.17; CI: 0

  7. Integrated dementia care in The Netherlands: a multiple case study of case management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkman, Mirella M N; Ligthart, Suzanne A; Huijsman, Robbert

    2009-09-01

    The number of dementia patients is growing, and they require a variety of services, making integrated care essential for the ability to continue living in the community. Many healthcare systems in developed countries are exploring new approaches for delivering health and social care. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse a new approach in extensive case management programmes concerned with long-term dementia care in The Netherlands. The focus is on the characteristics, and success and failure factors of these programmes.A multiple case study was conducted in eight regional dementia care provider networks in The Netherlands. Based on a literature study, a questionnaire was developed for the responsible managers and case managers of the eight case management programmes. During 16 semistructured face-to-face interviews with both respondent groups, a deeper insight into the dementia care programmes was provided. Project documentation for all the cases was studied. The eight programmes were developed independently to improve the quality and continuity of long-term dementia care. The programmes show overlap in terms of their vision, tasks of case managers, case management process and the participating partners in the local dementia care networks. Differences concern the targeted dementia patient groups as well as the background of the case managers and their position in the local dementia care provider network. Factors for success concern the expert knowledge of case managers, investment in a strong provider network and coherent conditions for effective inter-organizational cooperation to deliver integrated care. When explored, caregiver and patient satisfaction was high. Further research into the effects on client outcomes, service use and costs is recommended in order to further analyse the impact of this approach in long-term care. To facilitate implementation, with a focus on joint responsibilities of the involved care providers, policy

  8. Impact of Utilization of Maternal Health care services: A study of Ganda Community in urban slums in Raipur, Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Thakur

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1.To study the impact of utilization of maternal health care services among the Ganda mothers an urban slums community. 2. To find out the factors influencing the utilization of maternal health care services. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Setting: 6 urban slums of Raipur Districts. Sample size: All 160 available lactating mothers (15-49 years age. Statistical Analysis: Proportions and Chi-square. Observation: Most (63% mothers received full antenatal check-up, 76.2% had received 2 dose of TT injection, and only 29% consumed prescribed IFA tablets. Majority (80.6% of mothers had delivered at home and 91.4 % of the deliveries were conducted by senior ladies. The important factors associated with low utilization of antenatal care services were belonging to mother’s education, occupation and parity. Conclusion: The present study revealed low utilization of maternal health care practices among the study population; especially in case of consumption of IFA tables and delivery practices. The study can provide new insight for policy makers to devote resources for achieving the best possible quality of maternal and child health services.

  9. A conceptual framework for interprofessional shared decision making in home care: Protocol for a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Mary-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared decision making (SDM is fundamental to informed consent and client-centered care. So far, SDM frameworks have been limited to the client-physician dyad, even though care is increasingly delivered by interprofessional (IP teams. IP collaboration is especially essential in home care, one of health care's most rapidly growing areas. This study will assess whether it is possible to practice SDM in IP home care. Methods/Design We will use a qualitative case study and a quantitative survey to capture the macro, meso and micro levels of stakeholders in home care. The case study will follow the knowledge-to-action process framework to evaluate the work of an IP home care team at a Quebec City health center. Sources of data will include one-on-one interviews with patients, family caregivers or surrogates and significant others, and administrators; a focus group of home care health professionals; organizational documents; and government policies and standards. The interview guide for the interviews and the focus group will explore current practices and clinical problems addressed in home care; factors that could influence the implementation of the proposed IP approach to SDM; the face and content validity of the approach; and interventions to facilitate the implementation and evaluation of the approach. The survey will ask 300 health professionals working in home care at the health center to complete a questionnaire based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour that measures their intentions to engage in an IP approach to SDM. We will use our analysis of the individual interviews, the focus group and the survey to elaborate a toolkit for implementing an IP approach to SDM in home care. Finally, we will conduct a pilot study in Alberta to assess the transferability of our findings. Discussion We believe that developing tools to implement IP SDM in home care is essential to strengthening Canada's healthcare system and furthering

  10. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "A Rolls-Royce of Day Care." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    The Amalgamated Day Care Center is an independent trust established through a collective bargaining agreement between the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, AFL-CIO, and the employers of the garment industry. The free center, open from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., is located near the Chicago garment industries to minimize transportation problems…

  11. The strength of primary care in Europe : an international comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, D.S.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Bourgueil, Y.; Cartier, T.; Dedeu, T.; Hasvold, T.; Groenewegen, P.P.; et al, [No Value

    2013-01-01

    Background A suitable definition of primary care to capture the variety of prevailing international organisation and service-delivery models is lacking. Aim Evaluation of strength of primary care in Europe. Design and setting International comparative cross-sectional study performed in 2009–2010, in

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection and dyspepsia in primary care : studies on diagnosis and guideline implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, Catherine Friderieke

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis various studies on the management of patients presenting with dyspepsia in primary care are described. Of all patients presenting with dyspepsia, only a minority has organic disease. Roughly 25% of the dyspeptic patients presenting in primary care is referred for endoscopy. At endosco

  13. Promoting Collaboration in Health Care Teams through Interprofessional Education: A Simulation Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Ozgur

    2013-01-01

    This simulation study explores how the integration of interprofessional components into health care curriculum may impact professional stereotyping and collaborative behavior in care delivery teams comprised of a physician, a registered nurse, a physician's assistant, a physical therapist, and a radiation therapist. As part of the agent-based…

  14. Neonatal Intensive Care for Low Birthweight Infants: Costs and Effectiveness. Health Technology Case Study 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    After a brief introduction delineating the scope of the case study, chapter 1 summarizes findings and conclusions about the costs and effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in the United States. Chapter 2 inventories the national supply of neonatal intensive care units and describes recent trends in use and costs. Chapter 3 reviews mortality and…

  15. Analysis of risk factors of stillbirth: a hospital based study in a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh Shyam

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Majority of the risk factors found in the present study were preventable. Stillbirth rate can be reduced by proper management of these risk factors during antenatal care and intrapartum care. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(2.000: 525-529

  16. Outcomes for depression and anxiety in primary care and details of treatment : a naturalistic longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Marijn A.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Hilbink-Smolders, Mirrian; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Laurant, Miranda G. H.; van der Meer, Klaas; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence as to whether or not guideline concordant care in general practice results in better clinical outcomes for people with anxiety and depression. This study aims to determine possible associations between guideline concordant care and clinical outcomes in general pr

  17. Outcomes for depression and anxiety in primary care and details of treatment: a naturalistic longitudinal study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Hilbink-Smolders, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Meer, K. van der; Marwijk, H.W.J. van; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence as to whether or not guideline concordant care in general practice results in better clinical outcomes for people with anxiety and depression. This study aims to determine possible associations between guideline concordant care and clinical outcomes in general pr

  18. An explorative study of factors contributing to the job satisfaction of primary care midwives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warmelink, J.C.; Hoijtink, K.; Noppers, M.; Wiegers, T.A.; Cock, T.P. de; Klomp, T.; Hutton, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: the main objectives of our study was to gain an understanding of how primary care midwives in the Netherlands feel about their work and to identify factors associated with primary care midwives׳ job satisfaction and areas for improvement. Design: a qualitative analysis was used, based on

  19. Community occupational therapy for older patients with dementia and their care givers: cost effectiveness study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graff, M.J.L.; Adang, E.M.M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Dekker, J.; Jonsson, L.; Thijssen, M.; Hoefnagels, W.H.L.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of community based occupational therapy compared with usual care in older patients with dementia and their care givers from a societal viewpoint. DESIGN: Cost effectiveness study alongside a single blind randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Memory clinic,

  20. Home or hospital birth: a prospective study of midwifery care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegers, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    A large scale study on maternity care in the Netherlands, describing many facets of midwifery care in relation to the preferred place of birth (at home or in hospital), the obstetric result, and the experiences of childbirth. In the Netherlands only women with low risk pregnancies are free to cho

  1. An Empirical Typology of Residential Care/Assisted Living Based on a Four-State Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nan Sook; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Eckert, J. Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Residential care/assisted living describes diverse facilities providing non-nursing home care to a heterogeneous group of primarily elderly residents. This article derives typologies of assisted living based on theoretically and practically grounded evidence. Design and Methods: We obtained data from the Collaborative Studies of Long-Term…

  2. A criterion-related validity study of the nursing-care dependency (NCD) scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Buist, G.; Dassen, Th.W.N.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine some aspects of the criterion-related validity of the Nursing-Care Dependency (NCD) scale. This 15-item counting scale has recently been developed for assessing the care dependency of demented or mentally handicapped in-patients. Its criterion-related validit

  3. Benefits and problems of electronic information exchange as perceived by health care professionals: an interview study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Verheij, R.A.; Wiesman, F.J.; Friele, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various countries are currently implementing a national electronic patient record (n-EPR). Despite the assumed positive effects of n-EPRs, their overall adoption remains low and meets resistance from health care providers. This study aims to increase our understanding of health care prov

  4. Interorganizational health care systems implementations: an exploratory study of early electronic commerce initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, F C; Ginzberg, M J

    2001-01-01

    Changing business practices, customers needs, and market dynamics have driven many organizations to implement interorganizational systems (IOSs). IOSs have been successfully implemented in the banking, cotton, airline, and consumer-goods industries, and recently attention has turned to the health care industry. This article describes an exploratory study of health care IOS implementations based on the voluntary community health information network (CHIN) model.

  5. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  6. Worthy Work, Unlivable Wages: The National Child Care Staffing Study, 1988-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitebook, Marcy; Howes, Carollee; Phillips, Deborah

    In 1988, the National Child Care Staffing Study first gathered information on staffing and quality from a sample of child care centers in five metropolitan areas--Atlanta, Boston, Detroit, Phoenix, and Seattle--and returned for updated information in 1992. In 1997, directors of the original sample of centers still in operation were contacted again…

  7. Impact of Janani Suraksha Yojana on Institutional Delivery Rate and Maternal Morbidity and Mortality: An Observational Study in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev K. Gupta; Pal, Dinesh K.; Tiwari, Rajesh; Garg, Rajesh; Shrivastava, Ashish K.; Sarawagi, Radha; Patil, Rajkumar; Agarwal, Lokesh; Gupta, Prashant; Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2012-01-01

    The Government of India initiated a cash incentive scheme—Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY)—to promote institutional deliveries with an aim to reduce maternal mortality ratio (MMR). An observational study was conducted in a tertiary-care hospital of Madhya Pradesh, India, before and after implementation of JSY, with a sample of women presenting for institutional delivery. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the total number of institutional deliveries before and after implementatio...

  8. Complete control, direct observation and study of molecular super rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Extremely fast rotating molecules carrying significantly more energy in their rotation than in any other degree of freedom are known as "super rotors". It has been speculated that super rotors may exhibit a number of unique and intriguing properties. Theoretical studies showed that ultrafast molecular rotation may change the character of molecular scattering from solid surfaces, alter molecular trajectories in external fields, make super rotors surprisingly stable against collisions, and lead to the formation of gas vortices. New ways of molecular cooling and selective chemical bond breaking by ultrafast spinning have been proposed. Owing to the fundamental laws of nature, bringing a large number of molecules to fast, directional and synchronous rotation is rather challenging. As a result, only indirect evidence of super rotors has been reported to date. Here we demonstrate the first controlled creation, direct observation and study of molecular super rotors. Using intense laser pulses tailored to produce an ...

  9. Empirical study of sensor observation services server instances

    CERN Document Server

    Tamayo, Alain; Granell, Carlos; Huerta, Joaquín; 10.1007/978-3-642-19789-5_10

    2011-01-01

    The number of Sensor Observation Service (SOS) instances available online has been increasing in the last few years. The SOS specification standardises interfaces and data formats for exchanging sensor-related in-formation between information providers and consumers. SOS in conjunction with other specifications in the Sensor Web Enablement initiative, at-tempts to realise the Sensor Web vision, a worldwide system where sensor networks of any kind are interconnected. In this paper we present an empirical study of actual instances of servers implementing SOS. The study focuses mostly in which parts of the specification are more frequently included in real implementations, and how exchanged messages follows the structure defined by XML Schema files. Our findings can be of practical use when implementing servers and clients based on the SOS specification, as they can be optimized for common scenarios.

  10. Spacelab Science Results Study. Volume 1; External Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    Some of the 36 Spacelab missions were more or less dedicated to specific scientific disciplines, while other carried a eclectic mixture of experiments ranging from astrophysics to life sciences. However, the experiments can be logically classified into two general categories; those that make use of the Shuttle as an observing platform for external phenomena (including those which use the Shuttle in an interactive mode) and those which use the Shuttle as a microgravity laboratory. This first volume of this Spacelab Science Results study will be devoted to experiments of the first category. The disciplines included are Astrophysics, Solar Physics, Space Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Earth Sciences. Because of the large number of microgravity investigations, Volume 2 will be devoted to Microgravity Sciences, which includes Fluid Physics, Combustion Science, Materials Science, and Biotechnology, and Volume 3 will be devoted to Space Life Sciences, which studies the response and adaptability of living organisms to the microgravity environment.

  11. An Observational Study of Entrainment Rate in Deep Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohao Guo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates entrainment rate and investigates its relationships with cloud properties in 156 deep convective clouds based on in-situ aircraft observations during the TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment field campaign over the western Pacific. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the probability density function of entrainment rate, the relationships between entrainment rate and cloud microphysics, and the effects of dry air sources on the calculated entrainment rate in deep convection from an observational perspective. Results show that the probability density function of entrainment rate can be well fitted by lognormal, gamma or Weibull distribution, with coefficients of determination being 0.82, 0.85 and 0.80, respectively. Entrainment tends to reduce temperature, water vapor content and moist static energy in cloud due to evaporative cooling and dilution. Inspection of the relationships between entrainment rate and microphysical properties reveals a negative correlation between volume-mean radius and entrainment rate, suggesting the potential dominance of homogeneous mechanism in the clouds examined. In addition, entrainment rate and environmental water vapor content show similar tendencies of variation with the distance of the assumed environmental air to the cloud edges. Their variation tendencies are non-monotonic due to the relatively short distance between adjacent clouds.

  12. Equivalência semântica, conceitual e de itens do Observable Indicators of Nursing Home Care Quality Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Ivan Fonseca de Oliveira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo As Instituições de Longa Permanência para Idosos (ILPI são uma importante alternativa de cuidado no mundo, porém o Brasil ainda não dispõe de instrumento válido para monitorar a qualidade dessas instituições. Portanto, o objetivo do presente artigo é descrever as etapas iniciais da adaptação transcultural do Observable Indicators of Nursing Home Care Quality Instrument (IOQ usado para avaliar a qualidade do cuidado nas ILPI. Realizou-se a equivalência conceitual e de itens para avaliar a pertinência e a viabilidade do IOQ à realidade nacional através do Índice de Validade do Conteúdo (IVC. Em seguida, cumpriu-se a equivalência operacional, a idiomática e a semântica. Esta última tem 5 fases: (1 duas traduções e (2 duas respectivas retraduções; (3 apreciação formal; (4 revisão; e (5 aplicação do pré-teste em três ILPI. Modificações importantes foram realizadas para garantir a validade do IOQ. O IVC do instrumento referentes ao contexto brasileiro foi de 94,3% (viabilidade e 95,3% (relevância. O IOQ mostrou-se compreensível e de fácil aplicação no pré-teste. A adaptação transcultural do IOQ contribui para avaliação e melhoria da qualidade nas ILPI brasileiras, mas os resultados devem ser complementados mediante avaliação psicométrica.

  13. Pathways to Care for Critically Ill or Injured Children: A Cohort Study from First Presentation to Healthcare Services through to Admission to Intensive Care or Death.

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Hodkinson; Andrew Argent; Lee Wallis; Steve Reid; Rafael Perera; Sian Harrison; Matthew Thompson; Mike English; Ian Maconochie; Alison Ward

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Critically ill or injured children require prompt identification, rapid referral and quality emergency management. We undertook a study to evaluate the care pathway of critically ill or injured children to identify preventable failures in the care provided. Methods A year-long cohort study of critically ill and injured children was performed in Cape Town, South Africa, from first presentation to healthcare services until paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission or emergency dep...

  14. Temperature variability during delirium in ICU patients: an observational study.

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    Arendina W van der Kooi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Delirium is an acute disturbance of consciousness and cognition. It is a common disorder in the intensive care unit (ICU and associated with impaired long-term outcome. Despite its frequency and impact, delirium is poorly recognized by ICU-physicians and -nurses using delirium screening tools. A completely new approach to detect delirium is to use monitoring of physiological alterations. Temperature variability, a measure for temperature regulation, could be an interesting component to monitor delirium, but whether temperature regulation is different during ICU delirium has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ICU delirium is related to temperature variability. Furthermore, we investigated whether ICU delirium is related to absolute body temperature. METHODS: We included patients who experienced both delirium and delirium free days during ICU stay, based on the Confusion Assessment method for the ICU conducted by a research- physician or -nurse, in combination with inspection of medical records. We excluded patients with conditions affecting thermal regulation or therapies affecting body temperature. Daily temperature variability was determined by computing the mean absolute second derivative of the temperature signal. Temperature variability (primary outcome and absolute body temperature (secondary outcome were compared between delirium- and non-delirium days with a linear mixed model and adjusted for daily mean Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale scores and daily maximum Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores. RESULTS: Temperature variability was increased during delirium-days compared to days without delirium (β(unadjusted=0.007, 95% confidence interval (CI=0.004 to 0.011, p<0.001. Adjustment for confounders did not alter this result (β(adjusted=0.005, 95% CI=0.002 to 0.008, p<0.001. Delirium was not associated with absolute body temperature (β(unadjusted=-0.03, 95% CI=-0.17 to 0

  15. Unintentional child neglect: literature review and observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Emily; Billick, Stephen B

    2015-06-01

    Child abuse is a problem that affects over six million children in the United States each year. Child neglect accounts for 78% of those cases. Despite this, the issue of child neglect is still not well understood, partially because child neglect does not have a consistent, universally accepted definition. Some researchers consider child neglect and child abuse to be one in the same, while other researchers consider them to be conceptually different. Factors that make child neglect difficult to define include: (1) Cultural differences; motives must be taken into account because parents may believe they are acting in the child's best interests based on cultural beliefs (2) the fact that the effect of child abuse is not always immediately visible; the effects of emotional neglect specifically may not be apparent until later in the child's development, and (3) the large spectrum of actions that fall under the category of child abuse. Some of the risk factors for increased child neglect and maltreatment have been identified. These risk factors include socioeconomic status, education level, family composition, and the presence of dysfunction family characteristics. Studies have found that children from poorer families and children of less educated parents are more likely to sustain fatal unintentional injuries than children of wealthier, better educated parents. Studies have also found that children living with adults unrelated to them are at increased risk for unintentional injuries and maltreatment. Dysfunctional family characteristics may even be more indicative of child neglect. Parental alcohol or drug abuse, parental personal history of neglect, and parental stress greatly increase the odds of neglect. Parental depression doubles the odds of child neglect. However, more research needs to be done to better understand these risk factors and to identify others. Having a clearer understanding of the risk factors could lead to prevention and treatment, as it would allow

  16. Digital transformation in home care. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Sandy; Costanzo, Diane; Flynn, Ann Marie; Reidy, Agatha; Tronni, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Simply implementing software and technology does not assure that an organization's targeted clinical and financial goals will be realized. No longer is it possible to roll out a new system--by solely providing end user training and overlaying it on top of already inefficient workflows and outdated roles--and know with certainty that targets will be met. At Virtua Health's Home Care, based in south New Jersey, implementation of their electronic system initially followed this more traditional approach. Unable to completely attain their earlier identified return on investment, they enlisted the help of a new role within their health system, that of the nurse informaticist. Knowledgeable in complex clinical processes and not bound by the technology at hand, the informaticist analyzed physical workflow, digital workflow, roles and physical layout. Leveraging specific tools such as change acceleration, workouts and LEAN, the informaticist was able to redesign workflow and support new levels of functionality. This article provides a view from the "finish line", recounting how this role worked with home care to assimilate information delivery into more efficient processes and align resources to support the new workflow, ultimately achieving real tangible returns. PMID:19195281

  17. Health care for irregular migrants: pragmatism across Europe. A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauvrin Marie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health services in Europe face the challenge of delivering care to a heterogeneous group of irregular migrants (IM. There is little empirical evidence on how health professionals cope with this challenge. This study explores the experiences of health professionals providing care to IM in three types of health care service across 16 European countries. Results Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals in 144 primary care services, 48 mental health services, and 48 Accident & Emergency departments (total n = 240. Although legal health care entitlement for IM varies across countries, health professionals reported facing similar issues when caring for IM. These issues include access problems, limited communication, and associated legal complications. Differences in the experiences with IM across the three types of services were also explored. Respondents from Accident & Emergency departments reported less of a difference between the care for IM patients and patients in a regular situation than did respondents from primary care and mental health services. Primary care services and mental health services were more concerned with language barriers than Accident & Emergency departments. Notifying the authorities was an uncommon practice, even in countries where health professionals are required to do this. Conclusions The needs of IM patients and the values of the staff appear to be as important as the national legal framework, with staff in different European countries adopting a similar pragmatic approach to delivering health care to IM. While legislation might help to improve health care for IM, more appropriate organisation and local flexibility are equally important, especially for improving access and care pathways.

  18. The inter-relationship between formal and informal care: a study in France and Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Howard; Attias-Donfut, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether formal care services delivered to frail older people's homes in France and Israel substitute for or complement informal support. The two countries have comparable family welfare systems but many historical, cultural and religious differences. Data for the respondents aged 75 or more years at the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) were analysed. Regressions were examined of three patterns of care from outside the household: informal support only, formal support only and both formal and informal care, with the predictor variables including whether informal help was provided by a family member living in the household. The results revealed that about one-half of the respondents received no help at all (France 51%, Israel 55%), about one-tenth received care from a household member (France 8%, Israel 10%), and one-third were helped by informal carers from outside the household (France 34%, Israel 33%). More French respondents (35%) received formal care services at home than Israelis (27%). Most predictors of the care patterns were similar in the two countries. The analysis showed that complementarity is a common outcome of the co-existence of formal and informal care, and that mixed provision occurs more frequently in situations of greater need. It is also shown that spouse care-givers had less formal home-care supports than either co-resident children or other family care-givers. Even so, spouses, children and other family care-givers all had considerable support from formal home-delivered care.

  19. The inter-relationship between formal and informal care: a study in France and Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    LITWIN, HOWARD; ATTIAS-DONFUT, CLAUDINE

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether formal care services delivered to frail older people’s homes in France and Israel substitute for or complement informal support. The two countries have comparable family welfare systems but many historical, cultural and religious differences. Data for the respondents aged 75 or more years at the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) were analysed. Regressions were examined of three patterns of care from outside the household: informal support only, formal support only and both formal and informal care, with the predictor variables including whether informal help was provided by a family member living in the household. The results revealed that about one-half of the respondents received no help at all (France 51%, Israel 55%), about one-tenth received care from a household member (France 8%, Israel 10%), and one-third were helped by informal carers from outside the household (France 34%, Israel 33%). More French respondents (35%) received formal care services at home than Israelis (27%). Most predictors of the care patterns were similar in the two countries. The analysis showed that complementarity is a common outcome of the co-existence of formal and informal care, and that mixed provision occurs more frequently in situations of greater need. It is also shown that spouse care-givers had less formal home-care supports than either co-resident children or other family care-givers. Even so, spouses, children and other family care-givers all had considerable support from formal home-delivered care. PMID:23316096

  20. Exploring the Utility of Ultra-Brief Delirium Assessments in a Nonintensive Care Geriatric Population: The GEM Study

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, James S.; Doering, Tracey; Gordon, Sharon; Svetlana K Eden; Shintani, Ayumi; Schnelle, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine how an ultra-brief structured tool that would require usually less than a minute for delirium assessment compares with a clinical assessment based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) in a geriatric postacute care (PAC) rehabilitation unit. Design: Prospective observational cohort study. Setting: Postacute geriatric hospital ward of a Veteran’s Affairs hospital. Participants: Consecutively admitted patients between 50 and 100 years old for inpatient postacu...