WorldWideScience

Sample records for care nursing information

  1. How core nursing textbooks inform holistic spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    National and international health and nursing guidelines recommend that staff attend to patients' spiritual and religious needs, which suggests that spiritual care is an important aspect of holistic care. However, many nurses lack knowledge of the subject, and it is unclear whether core textbooks provide the information they need.

  2. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  3. Nurse-Led Trauma-Informed Correctional Care for Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, Elizabeth; Brage Hudson, Diane

    2016-07-01

    Incarcerated women are a vulnerable and unique population of special concern to nurses as they have high rates of mental illness. In this article, the authors discuss how trauma exposure contributes to mental illness in incarcerated women through abuse, socioeconomic factors, and the prison environment, how this trauma exposure manifests in the inmate survivor, and the related implications for practice. A history of trauma and victimization is related to complex mental health issues which affect the majority of justice-involved women. The correctional environment can exacerbate these issues. Nursing implications include discussion of the trauma-informed care model. The authors recommend a model of trauma-informed care named "the 4 Es" that can guide nurses in preparing a trauma-informed correctional environment and discuss the importance of nurse-led policy change in finding alternatives to incarceration for women with mental illness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Information and research needs of acute-care clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, M; Buttlar, L

    1996-01-01

    The majority of nurses surveyed used the library on a regular but limited basis to obtain information needed in caring for or making decisions about their patients. A minority indicated that the libraries in their own institutions totally met their information needs. In fact, only 4% depended on the library to stay abreast of new information and developments in the field. Many of the nurses had their own journal subscriptions, which could account in part for the limited use of libraries and the popularity of the professional journal as the key information source. This finding correlates with the research of Binger and Huntsman, who found that 95% of staff development educators relied on professional journal literature to keep up with current information in the field, and only 45% regularly monitored indexing-and-abstracting services. The present study also revealed that nurses seek information from colleagues more than from any other source, supporting the findings of Corcoran-Perry and Graves. Further research is necessary to clarify why nurses use libraries on a limited basis. It appears, as Bunyan and Lutz contend, that a more aggressive approach to marketing the library to nurses is needed. Further research should include an assessment of how the library can meet the information needs of nurses for both research and patient care. Options to be considered include offering library orientation sessions for new staff nurses, providing current-awareness services by circulating photocopied table-of-contents pages, sending out reviews of new monographs, inviting nurses to submit search requests on a topic, scheduling seminars and workshops that teach CD-ROM and online search strategies, and providing information about electronic databases covering topics related to nursing. Information on databases may be particularly important in light of the present study's finding that databases available in CD-ROM format are consulted very little. Nursing education programs should

  5. Critical care nurses' information-seeking behaviour during an unfamiliar patient care task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kristine M; Doran, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Critical care nurses complete tasks during patient care to promote the recovery or maintain the health of their patients. These tasks can be routine or non-routine to the nurse. Non-routine tasks are characterized by unfamiliarity, requiring nurses to seek additional information from a variety of sources to effectively complete the tasks. Critical care units are dynamic environments where decisions are often made by nurses under stress and time pressure because patient status changes rapidly. A non-routine task (e.g., administration of an unfamiliar medication) to the critical care nurse can impact patient care outcomes (e.g., increased time to complete task has consequences for the patient). In this article, the authors discuss literature reviewed on nurses' information-seeking and explore an information-seeking conceptual model that will be used as a guide to examine the main concepts found through the empirical evidence.

  6. 76 FR 63356 - Proposed Information Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY... forms of information technology. Title: Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel... registered nurses, nurse anesthetists, and other health care personnel. Affected Public: Business or other...

  7. Perception on Informed Consent Regarding Nursing Care Practices in a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, B; Shrestha, G K

    Background Consent for care procedures is mandatory after receipt of adequate information. It maintains patient's rights and autonomy to make thoughtful decisions. Poor communication often leads to poor health quality. Objective To assess hospitalized patients' perception on informed consent regarding nursing care practices in a tertiary care center. Method This is a descriptive cross-sectional study among 113 admitted patients conducted in February 2012 at Dhulikhel Hospital, Nepal. Patients of various wards were selected using purposive non-probability sampling with at least 3 days of hospitalization. Close ended structured questionnaire was used to assess patients' perception on three different areas of informed consent (information giving, opportunity to make decision and taking prior consent). Result Among the participants 71.6% perceived positively regarding informed consent towards nursing care practices with a mean score of 3.32 ± 1.28. Patients' perception on various areas of informed consent viz. information giving, opportunities to make specific decision and taking prior consent were all positive with mean values of 3.43±1.12, 2.88±1.23, 3.65±1.49 respectively. Comparison of mean perception of informed consent with various variables revealed insignificant correlation (p-value >0.05) for age, educational level and previous hospitalization while it was significant (p-value perception on informed consent towards nursing care practices. Communication skills of nurses affect the perception of patients' regardless of age, education level and past experiences.

  8. 76 FR 78738 - Agency Information Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel... INFORMATION: Title: Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel. OMB Control Number: 2900... determine locality pay system for certain health care personnel. VA medical facility Directors will use the...

  9. 77 FR 45719 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care... solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult day health care facilities... services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day health care to...

  10. Healthcare information technology and medical-surgical nurses: the emergence of a new care partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, An'Nita; Fisher, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare information technology in US hospitals and ambulatory care centers continues to expand, and nurses are expected to effectively and efficiently utilize this technology. Researchers suggest that clinical information systems have expanded the realm of nursing to integrate technology as an element as important in nursing practice as the patient or population being served. This study sought to explore how medical surgical nurses make use of healthcare information technology in their current clinical practice and to examine the influence of healthcare information technology on nurses' clinical decision making. A total of eight medical surgical nurses participated in the study, four novice and four experienced. A conventional content analysis was utilized that allowed for a thematic interpretation of participant data. Five themes emerged: (1) healthcare information technology as a care coordination partner, (2) healthcare information technology as a change agent in the care delivery environment, (3) healthcare information technology-unable to meet all the needs, of all the people, all the time, (4) curiosity about healthcare information technology-what other bells and whistles exist, and (5) Big Brother is watching. The results of this study indicate that a new care partnership has emerged as the provision of nursing care is no longer supplied by a single practitioner but rather by a paired team, consisting of nurses and technology, working collaboratively in an interdependent relationship to achieve established goals.

  11. Impact of Information and Communication Technologies on Nursing Care: Results of an Overview of Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, José; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Hudson, Emilie; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2017-04-25

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming an impetus for quality health care delivery by nurses. The use of ICTs by nurses can impact their practice, modifying the ways in which they plan, provide, document, and review clinical care. An overview of systematic reviews was conducted to develop a broad picture of the dimensions and indicators of nursing care that have the potential to be influenced by the use of ICTs. Quantitative, mixed-method, and qualitative reviews that aimed to evaluate the influence of four eHealth domains (eg, management, computerized decision support systems [CDSSs], communication, and information systems) on nursing care were included. We used the nursing care performance framework (NCPF) as an extraction grid and analytical tool. This model illustrates how the interplay between nursing resources and the nursing services can produce changes in patient conditions. The primary outcomes included nurses' practice environment, nursing processes, professional satisfaction, and nursing-sensitive outcomes. The secondary outcomes included satisfaction or dissatisfaction with ICTs according to nurses' and patients' perspectives. Reviews published in English, French, or Spanish from January 1, 1995 to January 15, 2015, were considered. A total of 5515 titles or abstracts were assessed for eligibility and full-text papers of 72 articles were retrieved for detailed evaluation. It was found that 22 reviews published between 2002 and 2015 met the eligibility criteria. Many nursing care themes (ie, indicators) were influenced by the use of ICTs, including time management; time spent on patient care; documentation time; information quality and access; quality of documentation; knowledge updating and utilization; nurse autonomy; intra and interprofessional collaboration; nurses' competencies and skills; nurse-patient relationship; assessment, care planning, and evaluation; teaching of patients and families; communication and care

  12. Deriving Information Requirements for a Smart Nursing System for Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanade, Kunal; Sasangohar, Farzan; Sutherland, Steven C; Alexander, Karen E

    The workplace environment for intensive care nursing is highly stressful, with long working hours and a dynamic workload that may induce fatigue. The resulting stress and fatigue may reduce nurses' efficiency and may contribute to medical errors. A smart wearable system is being designed to help nurses who experience high levels of stress and fatigue at work. This article documents the systematic process of deriving information requirements from 2 focus groups conducted separately with nurses and nurse managers working in various Southeastern Texas hospitals. While nurses expected functionality such as memory aid tools, health assessment, and stress-reducing exercises, nurse managers expected information about the overall status of the unit's fatigue/stress levels as well as nurses' communication and movement patterns. The derived information requirements will act as an objective assessment of needs and would set the stage for the design of a stress-monitoring tool.

  13. Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lusignan Simon

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK the health service is investing more than ever before in information technology (IT and primary care nurses will have to work with computers. Information about patients will be almost exclusively held in electronic patient records; and much of the information about best practice is most readily accessible via computer terminals. Objective To examine the influence of age and nursing profession on the level of computer use. Methods A questionnaire was developed to examine: access, training received, confidence and use of IT. The survey was carried out in a Sussex Primary Care Trust, in the UK. Results The questionnaire was sent to 109 nurses with a 64% response rate. Most primary care nurses (89% use their computer regularly at work: 100% of practice nurses daily, compared with 60% of district nurses and 59% of health visitors (p Conclusions Using computers in the surgery has become the norm for primary care nurses. However, nurses over 50, working out in the community, lack the confidence and skill of their younger and practice based colleagues.

  14. Impact of Information and Communication Technologies on Nursing Care: Results of an Overview of Systematic Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Côté, José; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Hudson, Emilie; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2017-01-01

    Background Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming an impetus for quality health care delivery by nurses. The use of ICTs by nurses can impact their practice, modifying the ways in which they plan, provide, document, and review clinical care. Objective An overview of systematic reviews was conducted to develop a broad picture of the dimensions and indicators of nursing care that have the potential to be influenced by the use of ICTs. Methods Quantitative, mixed-method, and qualitative reviews that aimed to evaluate the influence of four eHealth domains (eg, management, computerized decision support systems [CDSSs], communication, and information systems) on nursing care were included. We used the nursing care performance framework (NCPF) as an extraction grid and analytical tool. This model illustrates how the interplay between nursing resources and the nursing services can produce changes in patient conditions. The primary outcomes included nurses’ practice environment, nursing processes, professional satisfaction, and nursing-sensitive outcomes. The secondary outcomes included satisfaction or dissatisfaction with ICTs according to nurses’ and patients’ perspectives. Reviews published in English, French, or Spanish from January 1, 1995 to January 15, 2015, were considered. Results A total of 5515 titles or abstracts were assessed for eligibility and full-text papers of 72 articles were retrieved for detailed evaluation. It was found that 22 reviews published between 2002 and 2015 met the eligibility criteria. Many nursing care themes (ie, indicators) were influenced by the use of ICTs, including time management; time spent on patient care; documentation time; information quality and access; quality of documentation; knowledge updating and utilization; nurse autonomy; intra and interprofessional collaboration; nurses’ competencies and skills; nurse-patient relationship; assessment, care planning, and evaluation; teaching of patients

  15. 'Scraps': hidden nursing information and its influence on the delivery of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardey, M; Payne, S; Coleman, P

    2000-07-01

    What nurses commonly describe as 'scraps' are defined as the personalized recordings of information that is routinely made on any available piece of paper (hence scraps) or in small notebooks. The use of scraps is common in practice and has been noted in research from across the globe. Drawing on an empirical study it is argued that scraps are a unique combination of personal and professional knowledge that informs the delivery of care. The overall aim of the study was to discover how nurses define and communicate information about patients and the delivery of care to each other on an elderly care unit. The processes by which information was constructed and the organizational structure and interactions that influenced this were also identified. The research design was an ethnographic one that involved: observations of formal nursing end of shift reports (23 handovers) and informal interactions between nurses (146 hours); interviews (n + 34) with registered nurses, student nurses and nursing auxiliaries; and analysis of written records. Data were collected from five acute elderly care wards at a district general hospital in the south of England. A grounded theory analysis was undertaken which revealed that scraps may have a significant role in the communication of information and the delivery of care. Therefore a categorization of scraps within three main themes was undertaken. First, the analysis revealed the processes involved in the construction of scraps. Second, the content and role of scraps in influencing the delivery of care was exposed. Finally, the potentially confidential nature of scraps and consequent problems of storage and disposal was recognized. The findings are discussed in relation to a suggested model of the interrelationship between paperwork, scraps, handovers and the delivery of nursing care. It is concluded that scraps are significant in facilitating nursing care and that this should be recognized in research, education and practice.

  16. Primary health-care nurses and Internet health information-seeking: Access, barriers and quality checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Jean; Strong, Alison; Chan, Helen; Hanna, Sue; Huntington, Annette

    2016-02-01

    Online information is a critical resource for evidence-based practice and patient education. This study aimed to establish New Zealand nurses' access and evaluation of online health information in the primary care context using a postal questionnaire survey; there were 630 respondents from a random sample of 931 nurses. The majority of respondents were satisfied with work access to online information (84.5%, n = 501) and searched for online information at least several times a week (57.5%, n = 343). The major barrier to online information seeking was insufficient time, but 68 respondents had no work online information access. The level of nursing qualification was significantly correlated with computer confidence and information quality checking. A range of information evaluation approaches was used. Most nurses in study accessed and evaluated Internet information in contrast to the findings of earlier studies, but there were barriers preventing universal integration into practice. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Exploring the impact of health information technology on communication and collaboration in acute care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashen, Margaret S; Bradley, Victoria; Farrell, Ann; Murphy, Judy; Schleyer, Ruth; Sensmeier, Joyce; Dykes, Patricia C

    2006-01-01

    A focus group using nursing informatics experts as informants was conducted to guide development of a survey to explore the impact of health information technology on the role of nurses and interdisciplinary communication in acute care settings. Through analysis of focus group transcripts, five key themes emerged: information, communication, care coordination, interdisciplinary relationships, workflow, and practice effectiveness and efficiency. This served as the basis for development of a survey that will investigate perceptions of acute care providers across the United States regarding the impact of health information technology on the role of nurses and interdisciplinar communication in acute care settings. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of survey development including analysis of transcripts, emergence of key themes, and the processes by which the themes will be employed to inform survey development.

  18. Exploring nurses' experiences of prescribing in secondary care: informing future education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrafton, Jane; McKinnon, John; Kane, Roslyn

    2012-07-01

    To explore the experiences of secondary care nurse prescribers to establish how prescribing is employed and what its benefits and disadvantages are perceived to be. Nurse prescribing has developed rapidly since it inception almost 20 years ago and there is a significant body of research evaluating its implementation in primary care. Recent expansion of non-medical prescribing rights has prompted nurses in secondary care establishments to become prescribers. Evaluation of nurse prescribing in this new environment is required, if practice is to be informed and advanced. The lack of such evaluations in the published literature was the impetus for this study. A cross-sectional qualitative study. A convenience sample of nurse prescribers was interviewed using a single broad question to prompt elaboration. Transcribed interviews were analysed using Colaizzi's procedural steps. Three main themes emerged from the analysis: motivations behind becoming a nurse prescriber; benefits and limitations of prescribing education and continuing professional development and prescribing in practice. Nurses felt nurse prescribing offers clear benefits in relation to patient care. Where nurses were not prescribing, finance arrangements between different NHS trusts appear to be a significant barrier to its successful implementation of prescribing in practice. Nurse prescribing is strongly believed to be the domain of the experienced nurse. There is a clear need for ongoing evaluation of all aspects of nurse prescribing. This paper makes key recommendations on the future development and delivery of programmes of education for nurse prescribers and for the delivery of safe and effective prescribing in practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The extent to which core nursing textbooks inform holistic spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Neill, Freda; Sheaf, Greg

    2016-09-01

    National and international professional health and nursing guidelines recommend that attention should be given to the spiritual and religious needs of patients. This suggests that spiritual care is an important aspect of holistic patient care that needs to be considered and supported, if relevant, in a healthcare context. However, many nurses lack knowledge and awareness of the subject, and it is unclear to what extent core textbooks provide the information they need. This article reports on a study that explored the extent to which contemporary core nursing textbooks support and advocate the provision of spiritual care by nurses. Its findings suggest there is a lack of consistency in the inclusion of spirituality in these texts, and few refer specifically to the need for spiritual assessment tools or referral to chaplains. As more attention is given to patients' spiritual needs, the guidance given by nursing textbooks needs to be more substantive and consistent.

  20. Transmission of Information for Effective Continuing Nursing Care -Report#1-

    OpenAIRE

    村松, 照美; 依田, 純子; 安達, 弘子; Terumi, Muramatsu; Junko, Yoda; Hiroko, Adachi; ムラマツ, テルミ; Muramatsu, Terumi; ヨダ, ジュンコ; Yoda, Junko; アダチ, ヒロコ; Adachi, Hiroko

    1999-01-01

    Nursing clinical practice provides nursing students with not only academic knowledge but also op-portunities for human growth. Though any studies have been conducted so for regarding topics achieved through nursing clinical practice courses, many researches focused on the academic goals in clinical courses, or on topics discussed from the instructors' point of view. To investigate what nurs-ing students think and what they could learn over clinical practice courses will be useful to construct...

  1. Impacts of information and communication technologies on nursing care: an overview of systematic reviews (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, José

    2015-05-23

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) used in the health sector have well-known advantages. They can promote patient-centered healthcare, improve quality of care, and educate health professionals and patients. However, implementation of ICTs remains difficult and involves changes at different levels: patients, healthcare providers, and healthcare organizations. Nurses constitute the largest health provider group of the healthcare workforce. The use of ICTs by nurses can have impacts in their practice. The main objective of this review of systematic reviews is to systematically summarize the best evidence regarding the effects of ICTs on nursing care. We will include all types of reviews that aim to evaluate the influence of ICTs used by nurses on nursing care. We will consider four types of ICTs used by nurses as a way to provide healthcare: management systems, communication systems, information systems, and computerized decision support systems. We will exclude nursing management systems, educational systems, and telephone systems. The following types of comparisons will be carried out: ICT in comparison with usual care/practice, ICT compared to any other ICT, and ICT versus other types of interventions. The primary outcomes will include nurses' practice environment, nursing processes/scope of nursing practice, nurses' professional satisfaction as well as nursing sensitive outcomes, such as patient safety, comfort, and quality of life related to care, empowerment, functional status, satisfaction, and patient experience. Secondary outcomes will include satisfaction with ICT from the nurses and patients' perspective. Reviews published in English, French, or Spanish from 1 January 1995 will be considered. Two reviewers will independently screen the title and abstract of the papers in order to assess their eligibility and extract the following information: characteristics of the population and setting, type of interventions (e.g., type of ICTs and service

  2. Health information needs of professional nurses required at the point of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Ricks

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional nurses work in dynamic environments and need to keep up to date with relevant information for practice in nursing to render quality patient care. Keeping up to date with current information is often challenging because of heavy workload, diverse information needs and the accessibility of the required information at the point of care. Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore and describe the information needs of professional nurses at the point of care in order to make recommendations to stakeholders to develop a mobile library accessible by means of smart phones when needed. Method: The researcher utilised a quantitative, descriptive survey design to conduct this study. The target population comprised 757 professional nurses employed at a state hospital. Simple random sampling was used to select a sample of the wards, units and departments for inclusion in the study. A convenience sample of 250 participants was selected. Two hundred and fifty structured self-administered questionnaires were distributed amongst the participants. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results: A total of 136 completed questionnaires were returned. The findings highlighted the types and accessible sources of information. Information needs of professional nurses were identified such as: extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis, multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, HIV, antiretrovirals and all chronic lifestyle diseases. Conclusion: This study has enabled the researcher to identify the information needs required by professional nurses at the point of care to enhance the delivery of patient care. The research results were used to develop a mobile library that could be accessed by professional nurses.

  3. Health information needs of professional nurses required at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Esmeralda; ten Ham, Wilma

    2015-06-11

    Professional nurses work in dynamic environments and need to keep up to date with relevant information for practice in nursing to render quality patient care. Keeping up to date with current information is often challenging because of heavy workload, diverse information needs and the accessibility of the required information at the point of care. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the information needs of professional nurses at the point of care in order to make recommendations to stakeholders to develop a mobile library accessible by means of smart phones when needed. The researcher utilised a quantitative, descriptive survey design to conduct this study. The target population comprised 757 professional nurses employed at a state hospital. Simple random sampling was used to select a sample of the wards, units and departments for inclusion in the study. A convenience sample of 250 participants was selected. Two hundred and fifty structured self-administered questionnaires were distributed amongst the participants. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. A total of 136 completed questionnaires were returned. The findings highlighted the types and accessible sources of information. Information needs of professional nurses were identified such as: extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis, multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, HIV, antiretrovirals and all chronic lifestyle diseases. This study has enabled the researcher to identify the information needs required by professional nurses at the point of care to enhance the delivery of patient care. The research results were used to develop a mobile library that could be accessed by professional nurses.

  4. Information revolution in nursing and health care: educating for tomorrow's challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooker, B M; Richardson, S S

    1994-06-01

    Current emphasis on the national electronic highway and a national health database for comparative health care reporting demonstrates society's increasing reliance on information technology. The efficient electronic processing and managing of data, information, and knowledge are critical for survival in tomorrow's health care organization. To take a leadership role in this information revolution, informatics nurse specialists must possess competencies that incorporate information science, computer science, and nursing science for successful information system development. In selecting an appropriate informatics educational program or to hire an individual capable of meeting this challenge, nurse administrators must look for the following technical knowledge and skill set: information management principles, system development life cycle, programming languages, file design and access, hardware and network architecture, project management skills, and leadership abilities.

  5. The Value of Library and Information Services in Nursing and Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard Marshall, Joanne; Morgan, Jennifer; Klem, Mary Lou; Thompson, Cheryl; Wells, Amber

    2014-08-18

    Libraries are a primary resource for evidence-based practice. This study, using a critical incident survey administered to 6,788 nurses at 118 hospitals, sought to explore the influence of nurses' use of library resources on both nursing and patient outcomes. In this article, the authors describe the background events motivating this study, the survey methods used, and the study results. They also discuss their findings, noting that use of library resources showed consistently positive relationships with changing advice given to patients, handling patient care differently, avoiding adverse events, and saving time. The authors discuss the study limitations and conclude that the availability and use of library and information resources and services had a positive impact on nursing and patient outcomes, and that nurse managers play an important role both by encouraging nurses to use evidence-based library resources and services and by supporting the availability of these resources in healthcare settings.

  6. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leadership positions are very important to maintaining quality care in the nursing home. Here are some things to look for ... symptoms, and health problems. May 2013 Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in ...

  7. Informed Strangers: Witnessing and Responding to Unethical Care as Student Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Engel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nursing students occupy a unique perspective in clinical settings because they are informed, through education, about how patient care ought to happen. Given the brevity of placements and their “visiting status” in clinical sites, students are less invested in the ethos of specific sites. Subsequently, their perspectives of quality care are informed by what should happen, which might differ from that of nurses and patients. The purpose of this study was to identify predominant themes in patient care, as experienced by students, and the influence that these observations have on the development of their ethical reasoning. Using a qualitative descriptive approach in which 27 nursing student papers and three follow-up in-depth interviews were analyzed, three main themes emerged: Good employee, poor nurse; damaged care; and negotiating the gap. The analysis of the ethical situations in these papers suggests that students sometimes observe care that lacks concern for the dignity, autonomy, and safety of patients. For these student nurses, this tension led to uncertainty about patient care and their eventual profession.

  8. Incorporation of Sexual Violence in Nursing Curricula Using Trauma-Informed Care: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoGiudice, Jenna A; Douglas, Sherifa

    2016-04-01

    One in five women will experience sexual violence in their lifetime. As a consequence of this violence, survivors face health care concerns such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and gynecologic problems. Nurses are at the forefront of health care delivery to survivors of sexual violence, yet literature about nursing curricula addressing sexual violence is scant. A holistic, single-case study from a student survivor about the impact of sexual violence, being taught from a trauma-informed care perspective, is presented. The powerful case study highlights the personal and professional benefits stemming from a sexual violence curriculum being taught from a trauma-informed care lens. The student survivor reports personal growth and an understanding of herself, as well as a new framework with which to care for patients who have experienced sexual violence. In preparation to deliver care to sexual violence survivors, students must be educated about the prevalence, long-term sequela, and health care needs of survivors, which can be effectively done using the model of trauma-informed care. The student's case suggests that discussing sexual violence is imperative for one's own healing and contribution to the nursing profession. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Family centred care before and during life-sustaining treatment withdrawal in intensive care: A survey of information provided to families by Australasian critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranse, Kristen; Bloomer, Melissa; Coombs, Maureen; Endacott, Ruth

    2016-11-01

    A core component of family-centred nursing care during the provision of end-of-life care in intensive care settings is information sharing with families. Yet little is known about information provided in these circumstances. To identify information most frequently given by critical care nurses to families in preparation for and during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. An online cross-sectional survey. During May 2015, critical care nurses in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete the Preparing Families for Treatment Withdrawal questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics to identify areas of information most and least frequently shared with families. Cross tabulations with demographic data were used to explore any associations in the data. From the responses of 159 critical care nurses, information related to the emotional care and support of the family was most frequently provided to families in preparation for and during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. Variation was noted in the frequency of provision of information across body systems and their associated physical changes during the dying process. Significant associations (pnursing experience and critical care experiences and some of the information items most and least frequently provided. The provision of information during end-of-life care reflects a family-centred care approach by critical care nurses with information pertaining to emotional care and support of the family paramount. The findings of this study provide a useful framework for the development of interventions to improve practice and support nurses in communicating with families at this time. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health... day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day...

  11. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes): Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... home and adult day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and...

  12. Informational Support to Family Members of Intensive Care Unit Patients: The Perspectives of Families and Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeeni, Mina; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Mohammadi, Nooredin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The receiving information about the patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is classified among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. Meeting the informational needs of families is a major goal for intensive care workers. Delivering honest, intelligible and effective information raises specific challenges in the stressful setting of the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this qualitative study was to explain perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. Method: Using a conventional content analysis approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants to explore their perspectives of providing informational support to families of ICU patients. A purposeful sampling method was used to recruit nineteen family members of thirteen patients hospitalized in the ICU and twelve nurses from three teaching hospitals. In general, 31 persons participated in this study. Data collection continued to achieve data saturation. Findings: A conventional content analysis of the data produced three categories and seven sub-categories. The three main categories were as followed, a) providing information, b) handling information and c) using information. Providing information had three sub-categories consisting of “receiving admission news”, “receiving truthful and complete information” and receiving general information. Handling information had two sub-categories consisting ‘keeping information” and “gradual revelation”. Lastly, using information has two sub-categories consisting of “support of patient” and “support of family members”. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. It also determines the nurses’ need to know more about the influence of their supportive role on family’s ICU patients informing. In addition, the results of present

  13. Evaluation of organizational support for use of online information resources in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Zahra; Kazemzadeh, Farzaneh

    2014-12-01

    While there is general agreement concerning the barriers to use online information resources in nursing decisions, there have not been any studies that demonstrate how healthcare organizations have overcome these obstacles in developing countries. The purpose of this present study was to evaluate organizational support of healthcare organizations after introducing information technology for the use of online information resources in nursing care. This study was performed on nurses and nursing students in hospitals affiliated to the Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The findings showed that the use of online information resources was not adequately supported by healthcare social networks and the role of leadership has received minimal attention. There appears to be little confidence in the usefulness of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing care in Iranian society. The development of organizational norms for EBP behavior within an organization is important, and in order to monitor the development of these behaviors, the cultural competence in the healthcare institutions should be assessed and measured. However, it is far more difficult to develop a robust design, which encompasses the implementation of EBP across an entire organization. Such studies are highly complex and would need to be adapted as the organization changed, in addition, they would be likely to take considerable time to complete. Nevertheless, such studies are essential if a full understanding of organizational approaches to promoting EBP in developing countries is to occur. © 2014 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Nurses' Perceptions of Their Relationships with Informal Carers in Institutional Respite Care for Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Salin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of their collaboration and relationships with family members in institutional respite care for the elderly. The family has a particularly important role in respite care, which is an extension of care provided at home. However no published studies were found on this subject. The data were collected through qualitative interviews (N=22. Content analysis of the nurses’ descriptions of their collaboration with family members yielded four main categories as follows: (1 conscious ignoring, (2 attempting to understand the family’s situation, (3 hinting at private family matters, and (4 being a friend. The results lend support to earlier findings which emphasize the complexity of relationships between nurses and family carers. A novel finding here is that these relationships may also develop into friendships. Greater emphasis must be placed on primary nursing so that the nurse and informal carer can build up a genuine relationship of trust. If periods of respite care are to help older people and their families to manage independently, it is imperative that nurses have the opportunity to visit their patients at home.

  15. Concept caring in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Drahošová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this literature review was to search for qualitative studies focusing on the concept of caring in nursing, to analyse them and to synthesize knowledge that concerns the definition of the concept of caring in nursing from the point of view of nurses and patients. Design: Review. Methods: Qualitative studies were searched for systematically in the electronic databases Academic Search Complete (EBSCO, CINAHL, Medline, Science Direct, and the Wiley Library Online, according to set criteria and defined key words for the period 1970-2015. Seven selected articles were analysed after selection of documents with the aid of a sorting chart. Results: Nurses understand caring in nursing as a relationship with patients which is characterised on the nurses' part by an individual and empathetic approach, attentiveness, experience and sensitivity. Through caring, active communication takes place, providing information which reduces anxiety and leads to the breaking down of barriers. This relationship helps protect patients' autonomy, dignity and comfort. It requires experience on the part of nurses, and it is influenced by the environment. The nurses' personal qualities (what professional knowledge, attitudes and skills they have and their availability, reliability, and emotional and physical support are important to patients. Conclusion: The concept of caring is a content specific interpersonal process which is characterized by the professional knowledge, skills, personal maturity, and interpersonal sensitivity of nurses, which result in the protection, emotional support, and the meeting of bio-psycho-social needs of patients. The results of the overview study could contribute to an explanation and understanding of the nature of caring as a fundamental feature of the discipline of nursing.

  16. Developing nursing care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Helen

    2016-02-24

    This article aims to enhance nurses' understanding of nursing care plans, reflecting on the past, present and future use of care planning. This involves consideration of the central theories of nursing and discussion of nursing models and the nursing process. An explanation is provided of how theories of nursing may be applied to care planning, in combination with clinical assessment tools, to ensure that care plans are context specific and patient centred.

  17. Experiences of registered nurses with regard to accessing health information at the point-of-care via mobile computing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Esmeralda; Benjamin, Valencia; Williams, Margaret

    2015-11-19

    The volume of health information necessary to provide competent health care today has become overwhelming. Mobile computing devices are fast becoming an essential clinical tool for accessing health information at the point-of-care of patients. This study explored and described how registered nurses experienced accessing information at the point-of-care via mobile computing devices (MCDs). A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was used. Ten in-depth interviews were conducted with purposively sampled registered nurses employed by a state hospital in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Tesch's data analysis technique. Ethical principles were adhered to throughout the study. Guba's model of trustworthiness was used to confirm integrity of the study. Four themes emerged which revealed that the registered nurses benefited from the training they received by enabling them to develop, and improve, their computer literacy levels. Emphasis was placed on the benefits that the accessed information had for educational purposes for patients and the public, for colleagues and students. Furthermore the ability to access information at the point-of-care was considered by registered nurses as valuable to improve patient care because of the wide range of accurate and readily accessible information available via the mobile computing device. The registered nurses in this study felt that being able to access information at the point-of-care increased their confidence and facilitated the provision of quality care because it assisted them in being accurate and sure of what they were doing.

  18. Does the Use of Nursing-Care Services Reduce the Information about Dementia Patients Provided by Their Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Nakamura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rate of use of nursing-care services has been increasing dramatically in recent years with the upgrading of the public long-term care insurance system in Japan. We addressed how the increased use of the nursing-care services might affect the information on the patients provided by their caregivers. Methods: A questionnaire survey of 531 family caregivers caring for dementia patients at home was carried out to investigate how the use of these services might affect the information about the patients provided by the caregivers. The survey revealed that the use of the nursing-care services reduced the burden (quality, quantity, time of nursing care, and feeling on the caregivers. Results: According to the observation provided by the caregivers, the patients’ behaviors and activities at home tended to decrease. These results indicated that the use of the nursing-care services resulted in a reduction in the opportunity for and the time spent on observation of the patients by the caregivers, making it more difficult for the caregiver to provide an appropriate assessment of the patient’s condition. Conclusions: We discussed the impact of the use of the nursing-care services on the Clinician’s Interview-Based Impression of Change plus (CIBIC-plus rating. Due to the reduction in the time spent on nursing care and in the opportunity for observation of the patient’s activities of daily living by the caregiver resulting from the use of the nursing-care services, it is difficult to obtain an accurate picture of the patient’s clinical condition using the CIBIC-plus, probably leading to an inappropriate CIBIC-plus rating.

  19. Informed Family Member Involvement to Improve the Quality of Dementia Care in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A; Bonner, Alice; Compher, Christina; Paice, Kelli; Field, Terry; Mazor, Kathleen; Hunnicutt, Jacob N; Lapane, Kate L; Gurwitz, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    To describe the extent to which nursing homes engaged families in antipsychotic initiation decisions in the year before surveyor guidance revisions were implemented. Mixed-methods study based on semistructured interviews. U.S. nursing homes (N = 20) from five CMS regions (III, IV, VI, VIII, IX). Family members of nursing home residents (N = 41). Family member responses to closed- and open-ended questions regarding involvement in resident care and antipsychotic initiation. Two researchers used a content analytical approach to code open responses to themes of family involvement in behavior management, decision-making, knowledge of risks and benefits, and informed consent. Fifty-four percent of family members felt highly involved in decisions about behavior management. Forty-two percent recalled being asked how to manage resident behavior without medication, and 17% recalled receipt of information about antipsychotic risks and benefits. Sixty-six percent felt highly involved in the process of initiating antipsychotic medication; 24% reported being asked for input into the antipsychotic initiation decision and knowing before the antipsychotic was started. Under existing federal regulations but before guidance revisions were implemented in 2013, more than 40% of families reported being involved in nonpharmacological behavior management of family members, but fewer than one in four reported being involved throughout the entire antipsychotic prescribing process. Interventions that standardize family engagement and promote adherence to existing federal regulations are needed. This discussion builds on these findings to weigh the policy options of greater enforcement of existing regulations versus enactment of new legislation to address this challenging issue. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Experiences of registered nurses with regard to accessing health information at the point-of-care via mobile computing devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Ricks

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The volume of health information necessary to provide competent health care today has become overwhelming. Mobile computing devices are fast becoming an essential clinical tool for accessing health information at the point-of-care of patients.Objectives: This study explored and described how registered nurses experienced accessing information at the point-of-care via mobile computing devices (MCDs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was used. Ten in–depth interviews were conducted with purposively sampled registered nurses employed by a state hospital in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Tesch’s data analysis technique. Ethical principles were adhered to throughout the study. Guba’s model of trustworthiness was used to confirm integrity of the study.Results: Four themes emerged which revealed that the registered nurses benefited from the training they received by enabling them to develop, and improve, their computer literacy levels. Emphasis was placed on the benefits that the accessed information had for educational purposes for patients and the public, for colleagues and students. Furthermore the ability to access information at the point-of-care was considered by registered nurses as valuable to improve patient care because of the wide range of accurate and readily accessible information available via the mobile computing device.Conclusion: The registered nurses in this study felt that being able to access information at the point-of-care increased their confidence and facilitated the provision of quality care because it assisted them in being accurate and sure of what they were doing.

  1. Leveraging data to transform nursing care: insights from nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; White, Peggy; Hayes, Laureen; Lo, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to gain insight into how nurse leaders are influencing the use of performance data to improve nursing care in hospitals. Two themes emerged: getting relevant, reliable, and timely data into the hands of nurses, and the leaders' ability to "connect the dots" in working with different stakeholders. Study findings may inform nurse leaders in their efforts to leverage data to transform nursing care.

  2. 'Clinical Chatter': every nurse informed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbott, Carolyn; Watson, Lynn; Tariman, Joseph; Sorenson, Matthew

    2017-05-01

    To assess the acceptability and usability of a standardised communication tool for nurses. Communication is key in health care. On a daily, if not hourly, basis, nursing staff is inundated with new information regarding tools and resources, practice changes and the work environment. However, there is currently no standardised messaging or delivery method to effectively communicate new information. Even with a plethora of communication tools such as flyers, posters, emails, unit huddles and unit meetings, there is no means to guarantee attendance to crucial information. Descriptive, cross-sectional online survey, implemented at a nonacademic, suburban hospital with 280 nurses. The Clinical Chatter, an online tool developed by nursing leadership to standardise messages regarding the organisation, new tools and resources, professional development, recognition and unit updates, was delivered to each nurse on a weekly basis followed by administration of Acceptability and Usability scales. The Clinical Chatter tool has adequate acceptability and usability as a method of communication among nurses in a hospital organisation. Sociodemographic variables of age and years of experience had no statistically significant association with perceived acceptance and usefulness of the tool. The findings indicate that the Clinical Chatter tool can be used as a standardised communication tool to deliver key information among nurses working in a hospital organisation. Nursing leadership must establish and support a clear communication system to enhance patient care and outcomes and improve nursing job satisfaction. Communication is vital to advancing health care. Lack of communication among nursing has been linked to unsafe patient care: medication errors, unhealthy work environments and decreased nurse retention rates. Clinical Chatter is an effective communication tool for presentation of institutional information to nursing personnel. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. [Use of a tool for record of child and family health information and nurse's practice in basic health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Juliana Coelho; de Mello, Débora Faleiros; Lunardelo, Simone Renata

    2006-01-01

    Children's growth and development process is influenced by different factors and the family is considered as its primary context. This descriptive study aims at describing the elaboration and use of a tool in basic health care, aimed at observing, interviewing and registering data of children and families in nursing practice. Study participants were 10 families with children between 0 and 24 months of age. Data were collected by consulting patient records, interviews and observation. Based on a previous bibliographic review, an instrument was constructed and applied, which revealed possibilities for the systematization of nursing care, information organization and better health interventions.

  5. Improving Nursing Home Care through Feedback On PerfoRMance Data (INFORM): Protocol for a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Norton, Peter G; Ginsburg, Liane R; Anderson, Ruth A; Cummings, Greta G; Lanham, Holly J; Squires, Janet E; Taylor, Deanne; Wagg, Adrian S; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2017-01-10

    Audit and feedback is effective in improving the quality of care. However, methods and results of international studies are heterogeneous, and studies have been criticized for a lack of systematic use of theory. In TREC (Translating Research in Elder Care), a longitudinal health services research program, we collect comprehensive data from care providers and residents in Canadian nursing homes to improve quality of care and life of residents, and quality of worklife of caregivers. The study aims are to a) systematically feed back TREC research data to nursing home care units, and b) compare the effectiveness of three different theory-based feedback strategies in improving performance within care units. INFORM (Improving Nursing Home Care through Feedback On PerfoRMance Data) is a 3.5-year pragmatic, three-arm, parallel, cluster-randomized trial. We will randomize 67 Western Canadian nursing homes with 203 care units to the three study arms, a standard feedback strategy and two assisted and goal-directed feedback strategies. Interventions will target care unit managerial teams. They are based on theory and evidence related to audit and feedback, goal setting, complex adaptive systems, and empirical work on feeding back research results. The primary outcome is the increased number of formal interactions (e.g., resident rounds or family conferences) involving care aides - non-registered caregivers providing up to 80% of direct care. Secondary outcomes are a) other modifiable features of care unit context (improved feedback, social capital, slack time) b) care aides' quality of worklife (improved psychological empowerment, job satisfaction), c) more use of best practices, and d) resident outcomes based on the Resident Assessment Instrument - Minimum Data Set 2.0. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately after the 12-month intervention period, and 18 months post intervention. INFORM is the first study to systematically assess the effectiveness of different

  6. Nursing Information System (NIS): A Tool for Qualitative Nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing health care cost, nurse shortages, high patient acuity and the need for more accuracy in care create the need for an effective Nursing Information System. This paper therefore highlights the relevance of NIS in enhancing professional growth and efficiency in nursing practice. It also opens up the anticipated ...

  7. The impact of home care nurses' numeracy and graph literacy on comprehension of visual display information: implications for dashboard design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Onorato, Nicole; Barrón, Yolanda; Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David

    2018-02-01

    To explore home care nurses' numeracy and graph literacy and their relationship to comprehension of visualized data. A multifactorial experimental design using online survey software. Nurses were recruited from 2 Medicare-certified home health agencies. Numeracy and graph literacy were measured using validated scales. Nurses were randomized to 1 of 4 experimental conditions. Each condition displayed data for 1 of 4 quality indicators, in 1 of 4 different visualized formats (bar graph, line graph, spider graph, table). A mixed linear model measured the impact of numeracy, graph literacy, and display format on data understanding. In all, 195 nurses took part in the study. They were slightly more numerate and graph literate than the general population. Overall, nurses understood information presented in bar graphs most easily (88% correct), followed by tables (81% correct), line graphs (77% correct), and spider graphs (41% correct). Individuals with low numeracy and low graph literacy had poorer comprehension of information displayed across all formats. High graph literacy appeared to enhance comprehension of data regardless of numeracy capabilities. Clinical dashboards are increasingly used to provide information to clinicians in visualized format, under the assumption that visual display reduces cognitive workload. Results of this study suggest that nurses' comprehension of visualized information is influenced by their numeracy, graph literacy, and the display format of the data. Individual differences in numeracy and graph literacy skills need to be taken into account when designing dashboard technology.

  8. Use of personal phones by senior nursing students to access health care information during clinical education: staff nurses' and students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann-Price, Ruth A; Kennedy, Lynn D; Godwin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Research indicates that having electronic resources readily available increases learners' ability to make clinical decisions and confidence in patient care. This mixed-method, descriptive pilot study collected data about senior prelicensure nursing students using smartphones, a type of mobile electronic device (MED), in the clinical area. The smartphones contained nursing diagnosis, pharmacology, and laboratory information; an encyclopedia; and the MEDLINE database. Student (n = 7) data about smartphone use during a 10-week clinical rotation were collected via student-recorded usage logs and focus group recordings. Staff nurses' (n = 5) perceptions of students' use of smartphones for clinical educational resources were collected by anonymous survey. Both the focus group transcript and staff surveys were evaluated and the themes summarized by content analysis. Positive results and barriers to use, such as cost and technological comfort levels, are discussed. The results may help nurse educators and administrators initiate further research of MEDs as a clinical resource. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. A CIS (Clinical Information System) Quality Evaluation Tool for Nursing Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Ah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate the quality of a clinical information system (CIS) conceived by nurses and conduct a pilot test with the developed tool as an initial assessment. CIS quality is required for successful implementation in information technology (IT) environments. The study started with the realization that…

  10. [Nursing care in prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Providing information to patient's families on the end of life process in the intensive care unit. Nursing evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Fernández, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Informing is a process that includes many aspects and when it involves a family member at the end of life it becomes a complicated matter, not only for giving the information, but also for the mood of family members. Thus, the information should be adapted to the language and education of the patient and family. That information must be proper and suitable to the moment. To describe the aspects of information offered to relatives of patients in the end of life process in Intensive Care Units (ICU), and to determine the nursing evaluation in this process. To evaluate the professionals' attitude on this subject. An observational study conducted on nurses in pediatric and adult ICU nurses of a large public health hospital complexes in the city of Madrid. The data was collected using a questionnaire on the evaluation of care of children who died in pediatric ICU. The majority of the nurses, 71% (159), said that the information was given in a place alone with the doctor. More than half (52.4%, 118) considered that the information was sufficient/insufficient depending on the day. Significant differences were found as regards the behavior of the staff at the time of a death in (P<.01), with pediatric ICU professionals being more empathetic. ICU nurses believe that the information is appropriate for the prognosis and adapted to the patient situation. They also consider the place where the information is given and the attitude of the professionals in the end of life process are adequate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Critical care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracup, K

    1987-01-01

    The research pertaining to the delivery of nursing care in the ICU was reviewed to describe: the impact of the unit structure and organization, including policies and procedures, on patients, nurses, and families; the process of critical care nursing; the outcomes of critical care nursing; some of the ethical issues germane to the care of the critically ill patient. Although these areas of inquiry are quite diverse, a number of similarities can be identified. The most obvious of the similarities was that, with few exceptions, the studies pertaining to delivery of nursing care were performed by researchers from a variety of disciplines other than nursing, including medicine, psychology, public health, and economics. In many instances, such as the studies of patients' stress experiences in ICUs, these efforts enhanced our knowledge of the phenomena and complemented or replicated the efforts of nurse researchers. Unfortunately, in some areas nurse researchers were quite absent, with the result that the studies lacked a nursing perspective. For example, the large body of knowledge related to the effects of critical care on patient outcome reflected medicine's orientation toward cure. While it is important to measure the effect of nursing care in the ICU on patient survival, the effect of nursing efforts on short- and long-term quality of life, functional status, and health maintenance is also critical and remains unknown. Nurse researchers need to build on the data base already acquired about critical care. Even more important, they need to fashion programs of research focused on the concepts central to the discipline of nursing. A second similarity relates to the increasing quality of the reported research over the past decade. In general, early descriptive studies were conducted in a single critical care unit with a small and often biased sample. These gave way to more carefully designed, multicenter studies, although lack of randomization procedures continued to be

  13. Ageing, nursing and care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isolde Woittiez; Evelien Eggink; Jedid-Jah Jonker; Klarita Sadiraj

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Vergrijzing, verpleging en verzorging. All the expectations are that the ageing of the Dutch population will continue over the coming years. This has consequences for the demand, use and costs of care. This applies in particular for home care and for nursing and care homes,

  14. Nursing Supervisors Perception on quality of Nursing Care in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afcor Jupitor

    hand, and on the other, the country's need for their services and ability to employ, support and ... competence relevant to country needs and ... At the end of the questionnaire information was sought on migration of nurses and the challenges and demands of nursing education and quality of nursing care in each regional.

  15. Nursing care community health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Acosta-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Process Nursing Care (PAE is a systematic tool that facilitates the scientificity of care in community practice nurse, the application of scientific method in community practice, allows nursing to provide care in logical, systematic and comprehensive reassessing interventions to achieve the proposed results. It began with the valuation of Marjory Gordon Functional Patterns and then at the stage of diagnosis and planning North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC is interrelate. It is a descriptive and prospective study. Diagnosis was made by applying the instruments measuring scale of the socio-demographic characteristics, symptom questionnaire for early detection of mental disorders in the community and appreciation for functional patterns. The PAE includes more frequent diagnoses, criteria outcomes, indicators, interventions and activities to manage community issues. alteration was evidenced in patterns: Adaptation and Stress Tolerance, Self-perception-Self-concept-, Role-Relationships, sleep and rest and Perception and Health Management. A standardized NANDA-NIC-NOC can provide inter care holistic care from the perspective of community mental health with a degree of scientific nature that frames the professional work projecting the individual, family and community care.

  16. Nurses' use of mobile devices to access information in health care environments in australia: a survey of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Allen, Penny

    2014-12-10

    The growth of digital technology has created challenges for safe and appropriate use of mobile or portable devices during work-integrated learning (WIL) in health care environments. Personal and professional use of technology has outpaced the development of policy or codes of practice for guiding its use at the workplace. There is a perceived risk that portable devices may distract from provision of patient or client care if used by health professionals or students during employment or WIL. This study aimed to identify differences in behavior of undergraduate nurses in accessing information, using a portable or mobile device, when undertaking WIL compared to other non-work situations. A validated online survey was administered to students while on placement in a range of health care settings in two Australian states. There were 84 respondents, with 56% (n=47) reporting access to a mobile or portable device. Differences in use of a mobile device away from, compared with during WIL, were observed for non-work related activities such as messaging (Pshopping on the Internet (P=.01), conducting personal business online (P=.01), and checking or sending non-work related texts or emails to co-workers (P=.04). Study-related activities were conducted more regularly away from the workplace and included accessing University sites for information (P=.03) and checking or sending study-related text messages or emails to friends or co-workers (P=.01). Students continued to access nursing, medical, professional development, and study-related information away from the workplace. Undergraduate nurses limit their access to non-work or non-patient centered information while undertaking WIL. Work-related mobile learning is being undertaken, in situ, by the next generation of nurses who expect easy access to mobile or portable devices at the workplace, to ensure safe and competent care is delivered to their patients.

  17. Nursing diagnosis in intenzive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Bartošová, Simona

    2013-01-01

    v AJ: This diploma thesis deals with the field of nursing diagnosis in internal intensive care units. The theoretical part describes the basics of the nursing process and mainly focuses on the nursing diagnosis. Subsequently, it informs the reader about history, development and structure of the NANDA Taxonomy II. The main part of the thesis consists of a quantitative survey which aims at general nurses' knowledge about the nursing diagnosis NANDA - International. It also comments on how nursi...

  18. [Care and nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favetta, Véronique; Feuillebois-Martinez, Brigitte

    2011-12-01

    The notion of care is the main thread of the nurses' initial training. What are the theoretical references on which these teachings on care and caring are based in order to guide the learning and its implementation during the interview with the patient? Each professional exercises his profession with a personal vision, but the history of the profession reflects the evolution of the society to which it belongs. Thus the care theories shed a new light on the framework of thinking related to caring and care today. For the implementation of the training engineering related to the new curriculum, the trainers at ISFI (Institution for the nursing care training) of Pontoise wanted to question the concepts and theories on which the teaching of clinical reasoning can be based and thus work on the links existing between their own experiences of caring and their missions of accompaniment and transmission based on the respect of the potentialities presented by the students.

  19. Person-centred care in nursing documentation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Broderick, Margaret C

    2012-12-07

    BACKGROUND: Documentation is an essential part of nursing. It provides evidence that care has been carried out and contains important information to enhance the quality and continuity of care. Person-centred care (PCC) is an approach to care that is underpinned by mutual respect and the development of a therapeutic relationship between the patient and nurse. It is a core principle in standards for residential care settings for older people and is beneficial for both patients and staff (International Practice Development in Nursing and Healthcare, Chichester, Blackwell, 2008 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). However, the literature suggests a lack of person-centredness within nursing documentation (International Journal of Older People Nursing 2, 2007, 263 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nursing documentation in long-term care, to determine whether it reflected a person-centred approach to care and to describe aspects of PCC as they appeared in nursing records. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study using the PCN framework (Person-centred Nursing; Theory and Practice, Oxford, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010) as the context through which nursing assessments and care plans were explored. RESULTS: Findings indicated that many nursing records were incomplete, and information regarding psychosocial aspects of care was infrequent. There was evidence that nurses engaged with residents and worked with their beliefs and values. However, nursing documentation was not completed in consultation with the patient, and there was little to suggest that patients were involved in decisions relating to their care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The structure of nursing documentation can be a major obstacle to the recording of PCC and appropriate care planning. Documentation

  20. Caring in Nursing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary Brigid

    2015-01-01

    Caring science has been identified and examined in the discipline of nursing for over 40 years. Within this period, the topic has been analyzed and studied resulting in theories, models, books, and articles published nationally and internationally. Although advancements have been made in caring knowledge development, opportunities to integrate caring science into all aspects of nursing abound, including the specialty of nursing professional development. The focus of this article is to present ways in which nursing professional development specialists may incorporate caring science into practice, using Ray's (2010) Transcultural Caring Dynamics in Nursing and Health Care model as an exceptional exemplar for understanding, awareness, and choice for nurses and patients.

  1. Ten years of the national genetic diabetes nurse network: a model for the translation of genetic information into clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, M; Colclough, K; Ellard, S; Hattersley, A T

    2014-04-01

    Increasing technological advances have resulted in the recognition of a range of genetic conditions not traditionally seen by clinical genetics teams. This has implications for the education of other healthcare professionals who may have insufficient knowledge to identify or support families with these conditions. The national genetic diabetes nurse (GDN) project, which trains diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs), was started in 2002 to increase awareness of monogenic diabetes among healthcare professionals across the UK. This paper describes the development and evaluation of the first 10 years of this project, indicating that GDNs have increased diagnostic referral rates and supported local families through diagnosis and treatment changes across the UK. The GDN project has proved an effective, innovative means of disseminating new genetic information from a centre of excellence and is suggested as a model for the successful and rapid dissemination of genetic information into routine clinical care in other conditions.

  2. Application of a smartphone nurse call system for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Ting; Liu, Yi-Fang; Fu, Zi-Xuan; Liu, Kuang-Chung; Chien, Sou-Hsin; Lin, Chin-Lon; Lin, Pi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, a patient presses the nurse call button and alerts the central nursing station. This system cannot reach the primary care nurse directly. The aim of this study was to apply a new smartphone system through the cloud system and information technology that linked a smartphone and a mobile nursing station for nursing care service. A smartphone and mobile nursing station were integrated into a smartphone nurse call system through the cloud and information technology for better nursing care. Waiting time for a patient to contact the most responsible nurse was reduced from 3.8 min to 6 s. The average time for pharmacists to locate the nurse for medication problem was reduced from 4.2 min to 1.8 min by the new system. After implementation of the smartphone nurse call system, patients received a more rapid response. This improved patients' satisfaction and reduced the number of complaints about longer waiting time due to the shortage of nurses.

  3. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Palliative Care: Delivering Comprehensive Oncology Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Constance

    2015-11-01

    To describe palliative care as part of comprehensive oncology nursing care. A review of the palliative care, oncology, and nursing literature over the past 10 years. Palliative care is mandated as part of comprehensive cancer care. A cancer diagnosis often results in distress in the physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and emotional domains of care. Oncology nurses are essential in providing palliative care from diagnosis to death to patients with cancer. They address the myriad aspects of cancer. With palliative care skills and knowledge, oncology nurses can provide quality cancer care. There are many opportunities in which oncology nurses can promote palliative care. Oncology nurses must obtain knowledge and skills in primary palliative care to provide comprehensive cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of nursing participation in the design of a critical care information system: a case study in a Chinese hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanhong; Zhou, Ranyun; Wu, Qiong; Huang, Xiaodi; Chen, Xinli; Wang, Weiwei; Wang, Xun; Xu, Hua; Zheng, Jing; Qian, Siyu; Bai, Changqing; Yu, Ping

    2017-12-06

    Intensive care information systems (ICIS) are continuously evolving to meet the ever changing information needs of intensive care units (ICUs), providing the backbone for a safe, intelligent and efficient patient care environment. Although beneficial for the international advancement in building smart environments to transform ICU services, knowledge about the contemporary development of ICIS worldwide, their usage and impacts is limited. This study aimed to fill this knowledge gap by researching the development and implementation of an ICIS in a Chinese hospital, nurses' use of the system, and the impact of system use on critical care nursing processes and outcomes. This descriptive case study was conducted in a 14-bed Respiratory ICU in a tertiary hospital in Beijing. Participative design was the method used for ICU nurses, hospital IT department and a software company to collaboratively research and develop the ICIS. Focus group discussions were conducted to understand the subjective perceptions of the nurses toward the ICIS. Nursing documentation time and quality were compared before and after system implementation. ICU nursing performance was extracted from the annual nursing performance data collected by the hospital. A participative design process was followed by the nurses in the ICU, the hospital IT staff and the software engineers in the company to develop and implement a highly useful ICIS. Nursing documentation was fully digitized and was significantly improved in quality and efficiency. The wrong data, missing data items and calculation errors were significantly reduced. Nurses spent more time on direct patient care after the introduction of the ICIS. The accuracy and efficiency of medication administration was also improved. The outcome was improvement in ward nursing performance as measured by ward management, routine nursing practices, disinfection and isolation, infection rate and mortality rate. Nurses in this ICU unit in China actively

  6. Home-care nurses' perceptions of unmet information needs and communication difficulties of older patients in the immediate post-hospital discharge period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Katrina M; Handler, Steven M; Ligons, Frank M; Hochheiser, Harry

    2013-04-01

    To understand home-care nurses' perceptions of the post-hospitalisation information needs and communication problems of older patients, and how these factors might contribute to undesirable outcomes including poor patient reintegration into prior living environments and unplanned hospital readmissions. A ranked list of information needs experienced by patients was developed by two Nominal Group Technique (NGT) sessions from the perspective of home-care nurses. The list was combined with results from previously published work to develop a web-based survey administered to home-care nurses to elicit perceptions of patients' post-hospitalisation information needs. Seventeen nurses participated in the NGT sessions, producing a list of 28 challenges grouped into five themes: medications, disease/condition, non-medication care/treatment/safety, functional limitations and communication problems. The survey was sent to 220 home-care nurses, with a 54.1% (119/220) response rate. Respondents identified several frequent, high-impact information and communication needs that have received little attention in readmission literature, including information about medication regimens; the severity of their condition; the hospital discharge management process; non-medication care regimens such as wound care, use of durable medical equipment and home safety; the extent of care needed; and which providers are best suited to provide that care. Responses also identified several communication difficulties that may play a role in readmissions. Information needs and communication problems identified by home-care nurses expanded upon and reinforced results from prior studies. These results might be used to develop interventions that may improve information sharing among clinicians, patients and caregivers during care transitions to ensure patient reintegration into prior living environments, potentially preventing unplanned hospital readmissions.

  7. Information model for learning nursing terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nytun, Jan Pettersen; Fossum, Mariann

    2014-01-01

    Standardized terminologies are introduced in healthcare with the intention of improving information quality, which is important for enhancing the quality of healthcare itself. The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) is a unified language system that presents an ontology for nursing terminology; it is meant for documentation of nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions and patient outcomes. This paper presents an information model and an application for teaching nursing students how to use ICNP to assist in the planning of nursing care. The model is an integration of ICNP and our catalog ontology, patient journal ontology, and ontology defining task sets. The application for learning nursing terminology offers descriptions of patient situations and then prompts the student to supply nursing statements for diagnoses, goals and interventions. The nursing statements may be selected from catalogues containing premade solutions based on ICNP, or they may be constructed directly by selecting terms from ICNP.

  8. Reaching Agreement: The Structure & Pragmatics of Critical Care Nurses' Informal Argument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, Debra A.; Brem, Sarah K.

    2008-01-01

    The hospital critical care unit provides an authentic, high-stakes setting for studying reasoning, argumentation, and discourse. In particular, it allows examination of structural and pragmatic features of informal collaborative argument created while participants are engaged in familiar, meaningful activities central to their work. The nursing…

  9. Missed Nursing Care in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Eileen T; de Cordova, Pamela B; Barton, Sharon; Singh, Shweta; Agosto, Paula D; Ely, Beth; Roberts, Kathryn E; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-07-01

    A growing literature suggests that missed nursing care is common in hospitals and may contribute to poor patient outcomes. There has been scant empirical evidence in pediatric populations. Our objectives were to describe the frequency and patterns of missed nursing care in inpatient pediatric settings and to determine whether missed nursing care is associated with unfavorable work environments and high nurse workloads. A cross-sectional study using registered nurse survey data from 2006 to 2008 was conducted. Data from 2187 NICU, PICU, and general pediatric nurses in 223 hospitals in 4 US states were analyzed. For 12 nursing activities, nurses reported about necessary activities that were not done on their last shift because of time constraints. Nurses reported their patient assignment and rated their work environment. More than half of pediatric nurses had missed care on their previous shift. On average, pediatric nurses missed 1.5 necessary care activities. Missed care was more common in poor versus better work environments (1.9 vs 1.2; P < .01). For 9 of 12 nursing activities, the prevalence of missed care was significantly higher in the poor environments (P < .05). In regression models that controlled for nurse, nursing unit, and hospital characteristics, the odds that a nurse missed care were 40% lower in better environments and increased by 70% for each additional patient. Nurses in inpatient pediatric care settings that care for fewer patients each and practice in a professionally supportive work environment miss care less often, increasing quality of patient care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  11. Critical care nursing practice and education in Rwanda | Munyiginya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical care nursing practice and education in Rwanda is a young specialty. There are very few critical care nurses practising in either hospital or academic settings, and typically nurses taking care of critically ill patients receive only a brief period of informal education prior to practising. Intensive care units are found ...

  12. The relation of critical care nurses' information-seeking behaviour with perception of personal control, training, and non-routineness of the task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kristine; Doran, Diane; Nagle, Lynn M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between (1) critical care nurses' information-seeking behaviour and the non-routineness of tasks; and (2) the extent to which nurses' perception of their problem-solving abilities when completing patient care tasks, moderate the relationship between information-seeking behaviour and non-routineness of tasks. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A random sample (n = 177) of critical care nurses working in hospital settings was selected from the College of Nurses of Ontario (CNO) database. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Previous information-seeking training (p = 0.008), non-routineness of the task (p = 0.018), and the perception of the problem-solving ability domain of personal control (p = 0.040) had positive relationships with information-seeking behaviour. The development of problem-solving skills such as personal control, in addition to information-seeking training is essential so critical care nurses will have the skills to aid their information needs when faced with the completion of non-routine tasks.

  13. Employability of Nursing Care Graduates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barbara Donik; Majda Pajnkihar; Mojca Bernik

    2015-01-01

    In Slovenia, the higher education institution for nursing started exploring employability opportunities in nursing care in connection with the achievement of competencies from students’ and employers’ point of view...

  14. Employability of Nursing Care Graduates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barbara Donik; Majda Pajnkihar; Mojca Bernik

    2015-01-01

      Starting points: In Slovenia, the higher education institution for nursing started exploring employability opportunities in nursing care in connection with the achievement of competencies from students' and employers' point of view...

  15. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  16. Critical Care Nurses' Knowledge of Confidentiality Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Angela B; Kjervik, Diane K

    2016-05-01

    Health care legislation can be difficult to understand and apply in critical situations where patients may not be physically capable of autonomous control of confidential health information. Nurses are often the first to encounter confidential information about patients. To explore critical care nurses' knowledge of federal and North Carolina state legislation regarding confidentiality. This descriptive, qualitative study included 12 critical care nurses who were asked to describe their knowledge of federal confidentiality legislation and specific knowledge of North Carolina's confidentiality legislation. Critical care nurses were knowledgeable about federal confidentiality laws but demonstrated a need for further education about state-specific legislation. Nurses' application of confidentiality legislation demonstrates their knowledge of confidentiality legislation. To continue the trusting relationship that nurses have traditionally held with patients and patients' families, it is imperative for nurses to remain current about confidentiality legislation. Through education both before and after licensure, correct application of legislation can be achieved. Further research can aid in exploring the intersection between health care legislation and ethics. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Facilitating nurses’ knowledge of the utilisation of reflexology in adults with chronic diseases to enable informed health education during comprehensive nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Christa van der Walt; Belinda Scrooby; Elna Steenkamp

    2012-01-01

    An integrative literature review of identified scientific evidence, published from January 2000 to December 2008, of the utilisation of reflexology as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities to promote well-being and quality of life in adults with chronic diseases was done to facilitate nurses to give informed health education during comprehensive nursing care to patients with chronic diseases. Selected accessible databases were searched purposefully for research articles (<...

  18. Caring in pediatric emergency nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Hounchell, Melanie; Pettinichi, Jeanne; Mattei, Jennifer; Rose, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    An environment committed to providing family-centered care to children must be aware of the nurse caring behaviors important to parents of children. This descriptive study assessed the psychometrics of a revised version of the Caring Behaviors Assessment (CBA) and examined nurse caring behaviors identified as important to the parents of pediatric patients in a pediatric emergency department. Jean Watson's theory of human caring provided the study's theoretical underpinnings. The instrument psychometrics was determined through an index of content validity (CVI) and internal consistency reliability. The instrument was determined to be valid (CVI = 3.75) and reliable (Cronbach's alpha = .971). The revised instrument was completed by a stratified, systematic random sample of 300 parents of pediatric emergency patients. Participants rated the importance of each item for making the child feel cared for by nurses. Individual survey item means were computed. Items with the highest means represented the most important nurse caring behaviors. Leading nurse caring behaviors centered on carative factors of "human needs assistance" and "sensitivity to self and others." Nearly all nurse caring behaviors were important to the parents of pediatric patients, although some behaviors were not priority. It is important for nurses to provide family-centered care in a way that demonstrates nurse caring.

  19. Spirituality in self-care for intensive care nursing professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Dezorzi,Luciana Winterkorn; Crossetti,Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how spirituality permeates the process of caring for oneself and for others in the intensive care scenario from nursing professionals' point of view. This study used the qualitative approach of Cabral's Creative-Sensitive Method to guide information production and analysis in nine art and experience workshops. Nine nursing caregivers from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital participated in the study. This article presents one of the topics tha...

  20. Factors Influencing Active Family Engagement in Care Among Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Breanna; Hickman, Ronald; McAndrew, Natalie; Daly, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Critical care nurses are vital to promoting family engagement in the intensive care unit. However, nurses have varying perceptions about how much family members should be involved. The Questionnaire on Factors That Influence Family Engagement was given to a national sample of 433 critical care nurses. This correlational study explored the impact of nurse and organizational characteristics on barriers and facilitators to family engagement. Study results indicate that (1) nurses were most likely to invite family caregivers to provide simple daily care; (2) age, degree earned, critical care experience, hospital location, unit type, and staffing ratios influenced the scores; and (3) nursing work-flow partially mediated the relationships between the intensive care unit environment and nurses' attitudes and between patient acuity and nurses' attitudes. These results help inform nursing leaders on ways to promote nurse support of active family engagement in the intensive care unit. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN MISSED NURSING CARE

    OpenAIRE

    Kalisch, Beatrice J.; Tschannen, Dana; Lee, Hyunhwa; Friese, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Quality of nursing care across hospitals is variable, and this variation can result in poor patient outcomes. One aspect of quality nursing care is the amount of necessary care omitted. This paper reports on the extent and type of nursing care missed and the reasons for missed care. The MISSCARE Survey was administered to nursing staff (n = 4086) who provide direct patient care in ten acute care hospitals. Missed nursing care patterns, as well as reasons for missing care (labor resources, mat...

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy and nursing care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Adam

    2011-04-27

    Modified electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a controlled medical procedure in which a seizure is induced in an anaesthetized patient to produce a therapeutic effect. ECT is the most acutely effective treatment available for affective disorders and is more effective than antidepressant drugs. Although in use for 70 years, ECT continues to attract controversy and there is considerable stigma associated with its use that often overshadows the empirical evidence for its effectiveness. One way to overcome this is for health professionals to be educated about contemporary ECT practice. Patients need to make informed decisions when consenting to ECT and this process can be influenced by preconceived ideas and scientific fact. It is, therefore, essential that nurses possess sufficient information to help patients make rational and informed treatment decisions and be able to care for both the clinical and psychological needs of patients treated with ECT. This review outlines the nursing role in ECT and summarizes the main aspects of contemporary ECT practice relevant to general and psychiatric nursing practice.

  3. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice...

  4. The Value of Nursing Care: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Tracey K; Patrician, Patricia A; Loan, Lori A

    2017-04-13

    To report an analysis of the concept of value of nursing care. Value-based health care delivery and reimbursement models are focused on value as a product of quality and cost. Nursing care provides tangible and intangible contributions to patient and organizational outcomes. The nursing profession must be able to proactively and effectively communicate the value of nursing care. Concept analysis. Thirty-five separate sources were chosen from database searches of CINAHL Complete and ABI/INFORM Complete. Key terms utilized for the search were "nursing value" OR "nursing care value" OR "value of nursing". Caron and Bowers' (2000) dimensional analysis method was used as a guide for the project. Dimensions identified from this concept analysis included: (a) economic, (b) relational, and (c) societal. Direct care nurses experience the relational and societal dimensions of the value of nursing care. Patients and/or families experience the relational dimension of value in nursing care. Health care administrators, third-party payers, and nurse researchers interpret value from the economic dimension. Future nursing research should better quantify the economic value of nursing care. Qualitative research which focuses on how patients and families experience the value of nursing care would also contribute to further refinement of this concept. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. FastStats: Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Nursing Home Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ...

  6. Evaluating a new model of nurse-led emergency department mental health care in Australia; perspectives of key informants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, Timothy; D'Abrew, Natalie; Acret, Louise; White, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Mental health nurse services have existed in Emergency Departments (ED) for many years. However, there is considerable variation in the way these services operate, and no standardised model of care has been articulated. To evaluate an extended hours nurse practitioner-led mental health liaison nurse (MHLN) service based in an ED in Sydney Australia. As part of a larger mixed-methods study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of ED patients and nursing, medical and psychiatry staff (N = 46). Newly recruited MHLNs were interviewed at the commencement and conclusion of the study period. This paper presents the qualitative component from the evaluation. The new service was met with high levels of approval by patients and staff. MHLN team members were challenged by their new role but considered the service reduced waiting times, provided therapeutic benefits, and enhanced communication and support for emergency staff. A nurse practitioner-led extended hours MHLN service embedded within the ED team structure provides prompt and effective access to specialised mental health care for people with 'undifferentiated health problems' and removes a significant workload from nursing and medical staff. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The caring encounter in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Gunilla; Nyström, Lisbet; Kasén, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The concept 'encounter' occurs in caring literature as a synonym for dialogue and relation describing deeper levels of interaction between patient and nurse. In nursing and caring research, the concept 'caring encounter' is often used without further reflection on the meaning of the concept. Encounters are, however, continuously taking place in the world of caring, which calls for a clarification of the concept. This study is an analysis of the concept of caring encounter in nursing from the patients' and nurses' point of view. Rodgers' evolutionary view guided the concept analysis within the theoretical perspective of caritative caring. Peer-reviewed articles in English published between 1990 and 2014 were retrieved from the databases: CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect (Elsevier), Springer Link, Primo Central (Ex Libris) and Academic Search Premier (EBSCO) using different combinations of encounter, caring and nursing as keywords. In all, 28 articles related to caring encounters were included in the analysis after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Ethical considerations: This study was conducted according to good scientific practice. Four antecedents to the caring encounter are found in the nurse's way of being: a reflective way of being; openness, sensitivity, empathy and ability to communicate; confidence, courage and professionalism; and showing respect and supporting dignity. The attributes are as follows: being there, uniqueness and mutuality. As a consequence, the caring encounter influences both patient and nurse. The caring encounter is an encounter between two equal persons where one is nurse and the other is patient. They encounter in mutuality, in true presence, and both have allowed themselves to be the person they are. The results clarify the conceptual differences between relationship and caring communion as the mutuality in the caring encounter differs from the dependence on the other pronounced in the relationship.

  8. Employability of Nursing Care Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donik Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting points: In Slovenia, the higher education institution for nursing started exploring employability opportunities in nursing care in connection with the achievement of competencies from students’ and employers’ point of view. This article highlights the importance of monitoring nursing graduates’ employability. Its aim is to examine the employability of nursing care graduates based on the self-evaluation of competences obtained during the last study year and to establish a link between the self-evaluation of competences and students’ academic performance.

  9. Registered Nurses in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D.; Wagner, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care m...

  10. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  11. "Burnout" in intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S M; McMurray, A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between burnout components and selected demographic variables in a group of intensive care unit nurses. This research hopes to heighten awareness of both intensive care nurses and hospital administrators of the importance of burnout in their work setting. A descriptive correlational study design was used to examine the extent of burnout according to selected demographic variables. Sixty-eight intensive care nurses from two hospitals and critical care courses at one university completed a demographic data form and the research questionnaire of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests. Study results indicated low to moderate levels of total component scores in all intensive care nurses and on all three subscales of the assessment instrument. Results also indicated that, in this sample, younger nurses (20-29 years of age), separated and divorced nurses, and staff who work full time in ICUs were the most prone to emotional exhaustion. These research findings recommend support for ICU nurses to prevent burnout in their work setting. Further research is necessary to examine what kinds of working environments (job related stress) are effective in mitigating burnout amongst staff in the intensive care field.

  12. Blood donor: nursing care plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The standardized nursing care plan can be used as a means through which the nurse will assess and identify the particular needs of the blood donor.To draw up the care plan, we have conducted the evaluation on the basis of the Marjory Gordon’s functional health patterns.The more prevailing diagnosis according to the NANDA taxonomy have been identified, results have been established according to the NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomy, and nursing interventions have been suggested according to the NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification taxonomy. Also, certain potential complications, which are infrequent, must be observed and controlled in the blood donation process. Our main aim with this article has been to offer to professionals resources that grant to the caring activity scientific rigor, professional recognition and an unique and valid tool to evaluate the assistance with the best levels of quality for the blood donor.

  13. Nurses' training in prehospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Rosana Chami; Ramos, Laís Helena; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2008-01-01

    The performance of nurses in prehospital care (PHC) assumes acquiring specific competences. The objectives of the present study were to verify nurses' opinion on theoretical knowledge and nursing skills necessary for the practice in pre-hospital setting and to analyze them according to their clinical practice. In this descriptive study, the opinion of nurses, from public pre-hospital care services of the City of São Paulo, was collected through a questionnaire and the data of the clinical practice using forms. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was mentioned more often as basic knowledge (84%), and the most frequent procedure was oxygen therapy (15.5%). The analysis of nurses' opinion indicated that the basic topics were related to situations that demanded making decisions, readiness and skill under stress or caring for a specific population, making training important in this area.

  14. Towards evidence-based palliative care in nursing homes in Sweden: a qualitative study informed by the organizational readiness to change theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Per; Wallerstedt, Birgitta; Behm, Lina; Ahlström, Gerd

    2018-01-04

    Sweden has a policy of supporting older people to live a normal life at home for as long as possible. Therefore, it is often the oldest, most frail people who move into nursing homes. Nursing home staff are expected to meet the existential needs of the residents, yet conversations about death and dying tend to cause emotional strain. This study explores organizational readiness to implement palliative care based on evidence-based guidelines in nursing homes in Sweden. The aim was to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based palliative care in nursing homes. Interviews were carried out with 20 managers from 20 nursing homes in two municipalities who had participated along with staff members in seminars aimed at conveying knowledge and skills of relevance for providing evidence-based palliative care. Two managers responsible for all elderly care in each municipality were also interviewed. The questions were informed by the theory of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC). ORC was also used as a framework to analyze the data by means of categorizing barriers and facilitators for implementing evidence-based palliative care. Analysis of the data yielded ten factors (i.e., sub-categories) acting as facilitators and/or barriers. Four factors constituted barriers: the staff's beliefs in their capabilities to face dying residents, their attitudes to changes at work as well as the resources and time required. Five factors functioned as either facilitators or barriers because there was considerable variation with regard to the staff's competence and confidence, motivation, and attitudes to work in general, as well as the managers' plans and decisional latitude concerning efforts to develop evidence-based palliative care. Leadership was a facilitator to implementing evidence-based palliative care. There is a limited organizational readiness to develop evidence-based palliative care as a result of variation in the nursing home staff's change efficacy

  15. Intelligence Care: A Nursing Care Strategy in Respiratory Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-11-01

    Working in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) is multidimensional that requires nurses with special attributes to involve with the accountability of the critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to explore the appropriate nursing care strategy in the RICU in order to unify and coordinate the nursing care in special atmosphere of the RICU. This conventional content analysis study was conducted on 23 health care providers working in the RICU of Sina and Shariati hospitals affiliated to Tehran university of medical sciences and the RICU of Baqiyatallah university of medical sciences from August 2012 to the end of July 2013. In addition to in-depth semistructured interviews, uninterrupted observations, field notes, logs, patient's reports and documents were used. Information saturation was determined as an interview termination criterion. Intelligence care emerged as a main theme, has a broad spectrum of categories and subcategories with bridges and barriers, including equality of bridges and barriers (contingency care, forced oriented task); bridges are more than barriers (human-center care, innovative care, cultural care, participatory care, feedback of nursing services, therapeutic-professional communication, specialized and independent care, and independent nurse practice), and barriers are higher than bridges (personalized care, neglecting to provide proper care, ineffectiveness of supportive caring wards, futility care, nurse burnout, and nonethical-nonprofessional communications). Intelligence care is a comprehensive strategy that in addition to recognizing barriers and bridges of nursing care, with predisposing and precipitating forces it can convert barriers to bridges.

  16. Nursing care and collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, Sheila G

    2002-05-01

    This article argues that the time is right for nurses in the UK to become the case managers in all healthcare settings. The re-launch of family health nursing, as a model for the organization and delivery of nursing care in the community, and the advent of the GP practice-based self-managed integrated nursing teams, offer the means by which to take up the opportunities presented by recent legislation and the national strategies for promoting partnership working and collaborative practice. Nurses could approach this by combining their current involvement with developing the single assessment process for older people with the overall development of interprofessional collaborative practice across all boundaries in health and social services. Despite the new opportunities, this will not be straightforward because of the still existing problems associated with the health and social care divide. In order to generate high quality care, it is imperative for nurses and their patients that the profession gains control and ownership of its own policy, remit and practice. Nursing care should be defined according to the patient's condition, so that their dependency level, diagnostic picture and potential for rehabilitation govern the eligibility criteria for health or social care and not the level of technicality in the task itself.

  17. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  18. Palliative Care: Opportunities for Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambayan, Ayda Gan

    2018-01-01

    Ayda G. Nambayan, PhD, RN is the Training Consultant for The Ruth Foundation for Palliative and Hospice Care. Prior to this, she held various positions as a Consultant for Advanced Education and Training at Makati Medical Center, Philippines; a curriculum and distance learning developer for www.Cure4Kids.org, the educational website of the International Outreach Program of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, TN. In 2002, she retired from a faculty position from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she taught Adult Health Nursing for 25 years. Her nursing degrees were from the University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines, Teacher's College, Columbia University in New York, NY and The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL. Among her many professional awards include the Oncology Nursing Society's Pearl Moore Making a Difference Award in Oncology Nursing, International Award for Contributions in Cancer Care and the End of Life Nursing Education Consortium award for Pediatric Education.

  19. Palliative Care Professional Development for Critical Care Nurses: A Multicenter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Noort, Janice; Pearson, Diana; Boyle, Deborah; Grywalski, Michelle; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Moore, Eric; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Mitchell, William; Edmonds, Kyle; Fairman, Nathan; Joseph, Denah; MacMillan, John; Milic, Michelle M; Miller, Monica; Nakagawa, Laura; O'Riordan, David L; Pietras, Christopher; Thornberry, Kathryn; Pantilat, Steven Z

    2017-09-01

    Integrating palliative care into intensive care units (ICUs) requires involvement of bedside nurses, who report inadequate education in palliative care. To implement and evaluate a palliative care professional development program for ICU bedside nurses. From May 2013 to January 2015, palliative care advanced practice nurses and nurse educators in 5 academic medical centers completed a 3-day train-the-trainer program followed by 2 years of mentoring to implement the initiative. The program consisted of 8-hour communication workshops for bedside nurses and structured rounds in ICUs, where nurse leaders coached bedside nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. Primary outcomes were nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills in surveys, and nurses' identification of palliative care needs during coaching rounds. Each center held at least 6 workshops, training 428 bedside nurses. Nurses rated their skill level higher after the workshop for 15 tasks (eg, responding to family distress, ensuring families understand information in family meetings, all P palliative care needs and created plans to address them. Communication skills training workshops increased nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills. Coaching rounds supported nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Implementing the SCCM Family-Centered Care Guidelines in Critical Care Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Franck, Linda S; Scruth, Elizabeth A; Harvey, Maurene A; Swoboda, Sandra M; Davidson, Judy E

    2017-01-01

    Family-centered care is an important component of holistic nursing practice, particularly in critical care, where the impact on families of admitted patients can be physiologically and psychologically burdensome. Family-centered care guidelines, developed by an international group of nursing, medical, and academic experts for the American College of Critical Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine, explore the evidence base in 5 key areas of family-centered care. Evidence in each of the guideline areas is outlined and recommendations are made about how critical care nurses can use this information in family-centered care practice. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. Informed palliative care in nursing homes through the interRAI Palliative Care instrument: a study protocol based on the Medical Research Council framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2014-12-05

    Nursing homes are important locations for palliative care. Through comprehensive geriatric assessments (CGAs), evaluations can be made of palliative care needs of nursing home residents. The interRAI Palliative Care instrument (interRAI PC) is a CGA that evaluates diverse palliative care needs of adults in all healthcare settings. The evaluation results in Client Assessment Protocols (CAPs: indications of problems that need addressing) and Scales (e.g. Palliative Index for Mortality (PIM)) which can be used to design, evaluate and adjust care plans. This study aims to examine the effect of using the interRAI PC on the quality of palliative care in nursing homes. Additionally, it aims to evaluate the feasibility and validity of the interRAI PC. This study covers phases 0, I and II of the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for designing and evaluating complex interventions, with a longitudinal, quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design and with mixed methods of evaluation. In phase 0, a systematic literature search is conducted. In phase I, the interRAI PC is adapted for use in Belgium and implemented on the BelRAI-website and a practical training is developed. In phase II, the intervention is tested in fifteen nursing homes. Participating nursing homes fill out the interRAI PC during one year for all residents receiving palliative care. Using a pretest-posttest design with quasi-random assignment to the intervention or control group, the effect of the interRAI PC on the quality of palliative care is evaluated with the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS). Psychometric analysis is conducted to evaluate the predictive validity of the PIM and the convergent validity of the CAP 'Mood' of the interRAI PC. Qualitative data regarding the usability and face validity of the instrument are collected through focus groups, interviews and field notes. This is the first study to evaluate the validity and effect of the interRAI PC in nursing homes, following a methodology

  2. Evidence-based Nursing in the IED: From Caring to Curing?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jette Ernst

    2016-01-01

    .... It is illuminated how two opposing approaches to nursing of hhumanisticallyand pluralistically oriented caring, and evidence-based scientifically oriented curing inform nursing in the department...

  3. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing care. 409.21 Section 409.21 Public Health... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a registered...

  4. Informal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alice de Boer; Marjolein Broese van Groenou; Joost Timmermans

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Mantelzorg. People in the Netherlands provide help on a large scale to other members of their household, relatives and friends who are temporarily chronically ill or who are dying. This report describes what informal carers do, why they provide help, what support they receive

  5. Nursing perspectives on palliative care 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Margaret I; Fliedner, Monika C; O'Connor, Margaret

    2015-07-01

    Nurses have an integral role in promoting and providing early palliative care. The provision of palliative care is aligned to the basic tenants of nursing in providing holistic care to individuals and family members. In many parts of the world nurses are the primary health care provider in a community and a primary link between patients and other members of the heath care team. Unfortunately, access to accredited palliative care education remains a challenge for nurses.

  6. Nurses' Spirituality Improves Caring Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Abu; Nursalam; Adriani, Merryana; Kusnanto; Qomariah, Siti Nur; Hidayati, Laily; Pratiwi, Ika Nur; Ni'mah, Lailatun

    2017-01-01

    Caring is a behavior of giving holistic assistance to individuals. In fact, this important behavior still has not routinely performed in current nursing practice. Personality and sipirituality are important factors in forming one's caring behavior. Spirituality is a passion or impulse to perform noble action. The objective of this study was to…

  7. [Promoting citizenship through nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Dirce Stein; Backes, Marli Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2009-01-01

    This study is the result of the project: networks care and social entrepreneurship: the autonomy and social commitment of nurses. The purpose of this qualitative study is to comprehend the meaning of nursing care as a social enterprising practice. The Grounded Theory was used as a methodological reference and the interview, conducted with 35 participants as technique of data collection. Data codification led to the central theme: Viewing Nursing Care as a Social Enterprising Practice. This theme is complemented by the category, characterized the cause condition: the social integration through the creation a political identity that expresses your involvement. The results showed that is necessary to learn and have a deep dialogic knowledge. In order to consolidate popular participation as a citizenship ideal, a critical professional attitude, base don the combination of care with liberty, participation end autonomy.

  8. Impact of Healthcare Information Technology on Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscotty, Ronald J; Kalisch, Beatrice; Gracey-Thomas, Angel

    2015-07-01

    To report additional mediation findings from a descriptive cross sectional study to examine if nurses' perceptions of the impact of healthcare information technology on their practice mediates the relationship between electronic nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The study used a descriptive design. The sample (N = 165) was composed of registered nurses working on acute care hospital units. The sample was obtained from a large teaching hospital in Southeast Michigan in the fall of 2012. All eligible nursing units (n = 19) were included. The MISSCARE Survey, Nursing Care Reminders Usage Survey, and the Impact of Healthcare Information Technology Scale were used to collect data to test for mediation. Mediation was tested using the method described by Baron and Kenny. Multiple regression equations were used to analyze the data to determine if mediation occurred between the variables. Missed nursing care, the outcome variable, was regressed on the predictor variable, reminder usage, and the mediator variable impact of technology on nursing practice. The impact of healthcare information technology (IHIT) on nursing practice negatively affected missed nursing care (t = -4.12, p impact of healthcare information technology mediates the relationship between nursing care reminder use and missed nursing care. The findings are beneficial to the advancement of healthcare technology in that designers of healthcare information technology systems need to keep in mind that perceptions regarding impacts of the technology will influence usage. Many times, information technology systems are not designed to match the workflow of nurses. Systems built with redundant or impertinent reminders may be ignored. System designers must study which reminders nurses find most useful and which reminders result in the best quality outcomes. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dukyoo; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2016-10-01

    A nursing record focused on sexual health care for patients with cancer could encourage oncology nurses to provide sexual health care for oncology patients in a simple and effective manner. However, existing electronic information systems focus on professional use and not sexual health care, which could lead to inefficiencies in clinical practice. To examine the effects of a sexual health care nursing record on the attitudes and practice of oncology nurses. Twenty-four full-time registered nurses caring for oncology patients were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups in Korea. The researchers developed a sexual health care record and applied it to the intervention group for one month. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test. Content analysis was used to analyze interviews. Oncology nurses using the sexual health care record had significantly higher levels of sexual health care practice at 4 weeks post-intervention as compared to those who provided usual care to patients with cancer. A sexual health care record may have the potential to facilitate oncology nurses' practice of sexual health care. This study highlighted the importance of using SHC records with oncology patients to improve nursing practice related to sexuality issues. A nursing record focused on SHC for patients with cancer could make it easier and more effective for oncology nurses to provide such care to their patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors Influencing Active Family Engagement in Care Among Critical Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Breanna; Hickman, Ronald; McAndrew, Natalie; Daly, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Critical care nurses are vital to promoting family engagement in the intensive care unit. However, nurses have varying perceptions about how much family members should be involved. The Questionnaire on Factors That Influence Family Engagement was given to a national sample of 433 critical care nurses. This correlational study explored the impact of nurse and organizational characteristics on barriers and facilitators to family engagement. Study results indicate that (1) nurses were most likely to invite family caregivers to provide simple daily care; (2) age, degree earned, critical care experience, hospital location, unit type, and staffing ratios influenced the scores; and (3) nursing workflow partially mediated the relationships between the intensive care unit environment and nurses’ attitudes and between patient acuity and nurses’ attitudes. These results help inform nursing leaders on ways to promote nurse support of active family engagement in the intensive care unit. PMID:28592476

  11. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Rapin; Danielle D’Amour; Carl-Ardy Dubois

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2...

  12. Critical Care Specialty Elective: Nursing 401A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Cheri A.

    This course guide describes an elective speciality course on critical/intensive care nursing. A rationale for the course is followed by general information, including a description of the theoretical and clinical course components, an enumeration of major goals and objectives, a detailed outline of the units of instruction, a calendar of…

  13. Developing an information systems strategy for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callanan, K M; Hughes, S J

    1995-01-01

    With the rapidly changing health care environment and information technology advances, organizations need to engage in strategic, planned change in order to allocate limited resources, achieve the organization's goals, and fulfill its mission [1]. One of the most important aspects of the organization's planned strategies for change concerns the information systems. The involvement of the nursing department in this process is critical. This poster presentation will communicate how nurses can develop an information systems strategic plan that will enable them to play an active role as contributors and vital participants in the strategic and business planning processes for information systems. This information systems strategy for nursing will: a) provide direction and purpose, b) guide nursing in identifying the kinds of information technology needed, c) assist in timely implementation of a system that supports nursing, and d) identify desired outcomes and benefits of an information system. The nursing information systems plan must be built on, and support, the organization's mission and business plan and integrate into the over-all information systems plans [2]. Components of the nursing strategic plan include the nursing mission statement and vision, an assessment of the current environment to identify supporting technology needed to achieve the nursing vision, expectations/anticipated outcomes, environmental considerations, and special staffing/expertise considerations. The nursing vision and mission statement is an articulation of the overall direction and purpose of the nursing organization. An assessment of the nursing organization, problem areas, opportunities for growth, the physical environment, existing systems, communications requirements, and resources is carried out to help identify areas where new technologies and automated methods of managing information could be applied. Special staffing and expertise not currently available in the organization, but

  14. A concept analysis of holistic nursing care in paediatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Tjale

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Holistic nursing care is widely advocated and is espoused in the philosophy of the South African Nursing Council. This concept is unclear, variously interpreted and poorly understood in paediatric nursing. This study was undertaken to examine the meaning of holistic nursing care and to develop a framework for holistic nursing care, which can be utilised in nurse education settings and in clinical nursing practice in the context of paediatric nursing. A qualitative, interpretive, explorative and contextual research design was used. An evolutionary concept analysis was undertaken to clarify the concept “holistic nursing care” in paediatric nursing in three Johannesburg hospitals. Rodgers’ (1989, 2000 evolutionary method was utilised to analyse the concept.

  15. Nursing practice of palliative care with critically ill older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacher, Joan E

    2014-03-01

    Palliative care is emerging as an alternative care paradigm for critically ill older patients in the critical care setting. Critical care nurses are well positioned to take on a leadership role in reconceptualizing care in the critical care unit, and creating the space and opportunity for palliative care. This article provides information on the practice of palliative care with critically ill older adults along with evidence-based content and resources, allowing critical care nurses to advocate for palliative care in their own work environments accompanied by the necessary resources that will support efficient implementation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Information structure and organisation in change of shift reports: An observational study of nursing hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Hunt, Tara; Parush, Avi; Ellis, Jacqueline; Thomas, Margot; Rashotte, Judy

    2015-06-01

    Patient hand-offs involve the exchange of critical information. Ineffective hand-offs can result in reduced patient safety by leading to wrong treatment, delayed diagnoses or other outcomes that can negatively affect the healthcare system. The objectives of this study were to uncover the structure of the information conveyed during patient hand-offs and look for principles characterising the organisation of the information. With an observational study approach, data was gathered during the morning and evening nursing change of shift hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Content analysis identified a common meta-structure used for information transfer that contained categories with varying degrees of information integration and the repetition of high consequence information. Differences were found in the organisation of the hand-off structures, and these varied as a function of nursing experience. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential benefits of computerised tools which utilise standardised structure for information transfer and the implications for future education and critical care skill acquisition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spirituality in self-care for intensive care nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezorzi, Luciana Winterkorn; Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how spirituality permeates the process of caring for oneself and for others in the intensive care scenario from nursing professionals' point of view. This study used the qualitative approach of Cabral's Creative-Sensitive Method to guide information production and analysis in nine art and experience workshops. Nine nursing caregivers from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital participated in the study. This article presents one of the topics that emerged during this process: spirituality in self-care, which is evidenced in the daily practices that take place through prayers, close contact with nature, as well as in the sense of connection with a Higher Power that provides peace, welfare, and greater strength to ICU caregivers' life and work. Self-knowledge emerged as an essential practice in caring for oneself, in order to deliver better care to others.

  18. Nursing Supervisors Perception on quality of Nursing Care in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guided by this perspective, the purpose of this study were to assess (a) any nursing imbalance and shortage and (b) the quality of nursing education and nursing care in Ethiopia. Methods: A cross-sectional approach was utilized. Health department supervisor nurse (or the equivalent) respondents (n= 70) were recruited ...

  19. Informed consent: the nurse's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, N

    1996-01-01

    The author builds upon the concept of informed consent whereby the patient agrees to undergo experimental medical procedures. Ideally, the doctor will inform the patient fully on the proposed treatment so as to assure the patient's right to participate intelligently and freely in the decisions regarding his treatment. The nurse is drawn into the doctor-patient relationship in cases where the patient seeks her counsel because he feels insufficiently informed by the doctor, or because the nurse becomes aware of inadequacies in the information-giving process. She is then faced by the nurse's dilemma: a conflict between the loyalties she owes to her patient and to her physician team mate. A work sheet is presented which can help the nurse decide upon the proper course of action in solving this dilemma, guided by her personal and professional beliefs and by specific ethical concepts in the Code for Nurses. Solution of the dilemma and attainment of informed consent requires willing cooperation between doctor and nurse. Both can develop the skills for imparting information to the patient under difficult conditions and for verifying its comprehension by the patient. Both must learn to respect the patient's decision and to temper their professional skills with sensitivity, a strong moral sense and a deep respect for their fellow human beings.

  20. The hidden treasure in nursing leadership: informal leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Marty; Parslow, Susan; Smart, Marcia

    2011-05-01

    The goal of the present article was to generate awareness of characteristics of informal leaders in healthcare with the emphasis on nurses in acute care settings. There is limited research or literature regarding informal leaders in nursing and how they positively impact nursing management, the organization and, ultimately, patient care. Identification of nurses with leadership characteristics is important so that leadership development and mentoring can occur within the nursing profession. More than ever, nursing needs energetic, committed and dedicated leaders to meet the challenges of the healthcare climate and the nursing shortage. This requires nurse leaders to consider all avenues to ensure the ongoing profitability and viability of their healthcare facility. This paper discusses clinical nurses as informal leaders; characteristics of the informal nurse leader, the role they play, how they impact their unit and how they shape the organization.   Informal nurse leaders are an underutilized asset in health care. If identified early, these nurses can be developed and empowered to impact unit performance, efficiency and environmental culture in a positive manner. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. The critical care nurse's role in end-of-life care: issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Nikolaos; Clifford, Collette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the challenges critical care nurses face when looking after patients needing End-of-Life (EoL) care in critical care environments. Critical care nurses frequently provide care to patients who fail to respond to treatments offered to support and prolong life. The dying phase for individuals in critical care settings, commonly after withholding/withdrawing treatment, is very short posing great demands on critical care nurses to provide physical and emotional support to both patients and their families. Despite the existence of recognized care planning frameworks that may help nurses in providing EoL care, these are not used by all units and many nurses rely on experience to inform practice. A number of aspects such as communication, patient/family-centred decision-making, continuity of care, emotional/spiritual support and support for health professionals have been indicated as contributing factors towards the provision of effective EoL care. These are considered from the perspective of critical care nursing. Skills development in key aspects of care provision may improve the provision of EoL care for critical care patients and their families. Critical care nurses have an essential role in the provision of effective EoL care; however, this dimension of their role needs further exploration. It is noted that educational opportunities need to be provided for critical care nurses to increase the knowledge on planning and delivering EoL care. To inform this evaluation of current EoL care provision in critical care is necessary to address a knowledge deficit of the needs of nurses who seek to support patients and their families at a critical time. © 2011 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2011 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  2. Care and nursing explained

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Timmermans; I. Woittiez

    2004-01-01

    Original title: Verpleging en verzorging verklaard. One of the main changes to the care funded through the Dutch Exceptional Medical Expenses Act (AWBZ) is the transition from supply-driven to demand-led care. The disadvantage of demand-led care - from the perspective of cost control - is that

  3. Nursing Care Disparities in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Eileen T; Staiger, Douglas; Edwards, Erika Miles; Smith, Jessica G; Rogowski, Jeannette A

    2017-09-14

    To describe the variation across neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in missed nursing care in disproportionately black and non-black-serving hospitals. To analyze the nursing factors associated with missing nursing care. Survey of random samples of licensed nurses in four large U.S. states. This was a retrospective, secondary analysis of 1,037 staff nurses in 134 NICUs classified into three groups based on their percent of infants of black race. Measures included the average patient load, individual nurses' patient loads, professional nursing characteristics, nurse work environment, and nursing care missed on the last shift. Survey data from a Multi-State Nursing Care and Patient Safety Study were analyzed (39 percent response rate). The patient-to-nurse ratio was significantly higher in high-black hospitals. Nurses in high-black NICUs missed nearly 50 percent more nursing care than in low-black NICUs. Lower nurse staffing (an additional patient per nurse) significantly increased the odds of missed care, while better practice environments decreased the odds. Nurses in high-black NICUs face inadequate staffing. They are more likely to miss required nursing care. Improving staffing and workloads may improve the quality of care for the infants born in high-black hospitals. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. Monitoring quality of care in nursing homes and making information available for the general public: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Moulin, Monique F M T; van Haastregt, Jolanda C M; Hamers, Jan P H

    2010-03-01

    To improve quality of care, nursing homes need to assess and monitor their performance. This study aims to gain insight in the availability and contents of publicly accessible quality systems in northwestern Europe and the USA. This study employed a systematic search consisting of searching bibliographic sources from 2005 to September 2009, personal communication with experts, a conventional internet search, and hand-searching of references. Ten out of the 14 included countries use a quality systems. There is a large variety in type and number of indicators assessed. In general more attention is paid to the assessment of structure and process indicators, compared to outcome indicators. The countries differ in the way the results are made available to the general public. It can be concluded that monitoring and publicizing data on quality of care in nursing homes is becoming increasingly widespread. However, the systems still need further development and refinement. The systems need to be further developed regarding validity and reliability. Furthermore, the uniformity of the systems should be increased, more attention must be paid to the assessment of patient satisfaction, and additional insight must be gained in the user-friendliness of the systems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Practical statistics for nursing and health care

    CERN Document Server

    Fowler, Jim; Chevannes, Mel

    2002-01-01

    Nursing is a growing area of higher education, in which an introduction to statistics is an essential component. There is currently a gap in the market for a 'user-friendly' book which is contextulised and targeted for nursing. Practical Statistics for Nursing and Health Care introduces statistical techniques in such a way that readers will easily grasp the fundamentals to enable them to gain the confidence and understanding to perform their own analysis. It also provides sufficient advice in areas such as clinical trials and epidemiology to enable the reader to critically appraise work published in journals such as the Lancet and British Medical Journal. * Covers all basic statistical concepts and tests * Is user-friendly - avoids excessive jargon * Includes relevant examples for nurses, including case studies and data sets * Provides information on further reading * Starts from first principles and progresses step by step * Includes 'advice on' sections for all of the tests described.

  6. An investigation on task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems for nursing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ju-Ling; Chen, Rai-Fu

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates factors affecting the fit between nursing tasks and mobile nursing information systems and the relationships between the task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems and nurse performance from the perspective of task-technology fit. Survey research recruited nursing staffs as subjects from selected case hospital. A total of 310 questionnaires were sent out, and 219 copies were obtained, indicating a valid response rate of 70.6%. Collected data were analyzed using the structural equation modeling technique. Our study found that dependence tasks have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.234, Pinformation identification (γ=0.478, Pinformation acquisition (γ=0.213, Pintroduction of mobile nursing information systems in assisting nursing practices can help facilitate both independent and dependent nursing tasks. Our study discovered that the supporting functions of mobile nursing information systems have positive effects on information integration and interpretation (γ=0.365, Pinformation acquisition (γ=0.253, Pinformation systems have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.318, Pinformation integration and interpretation (γ=0.143, Pinformation identification (β=.055, Pinformation acquisition (β=.176, Pinformation integration and interpretation (β=.706, Pinformation systems have positive effects on nursing performance, indicating 83.2% of totally explained variance. As shown, the use of mobile nursing information systems could provide nursing staffs with real-time and accurate information to increase efficiency and effectiveness in patient-care duties, further improving nursing performance.

  7. The use of online information resources by nurses*†

    OpenAIRE

    Wozar, Jody A.; Worona, Paul C.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the results of an informal needs assessment, the Usage of Online Information Resources by Nurses Project was designed to provide clinical nurses with accurate medical information at the point of care by introducing them to existing online library resources through instructional classes. Actual usage of the resources was then monitored for a set period of time.

  8. The effect of a nurse led telephone supportive care programme on patients' quality of life, received information and health care contacts after oesophageal cancer surgery-A six month RCT-follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Marlene; Ivarsson, Bodil; Klefsgård, Rosemarie; Persson, Kerstin; Jakobsson, Ulf; Johansson, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Following oesophagectomy, a major surgical procedure, it is known that patients suffer from severely reduced quality of life and have an unmet need for postoperative support. Still, there is a lack of research testing interventions aiming to enhance the patients' life situation after this surgical procedure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a nurse led telephone supportive care programme on quality of life (QOL), received information and the number of healthcare contacts compared to conventional care following oesophageal resection for cancer. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial (RCT) aiming to test the effect of a nurse led telephone supportive care program compared to conventional care. Patient assessments were conducted at discharge, 2 weeks, 2, 4 and 6 months after discharge and comprised evaluation of QOL, received information and the number of health care contacts. Statistical testing were conducted with repeated measurements analysis of variance to test if there were differences between the groups during follow-up. The results show that the intervention group was significantly more satisfied with received information for items concerning the information they received about things to do to help yourself, written information and for the global information score. The control group scored significantly higher on the item regarding wishing to receive more information and wish to receive less information. No effect of the intervention was shown on QOL or number of health care contacts. Proactive nurse-led telephone follow-up has a significant positive impact on the patients' experience of received information. This is likely to have a positive effect on their ability to cope with a life that may include remaining side effects and adverse symptoms for a long time after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Critical care nursing organizations and activities: a fourth worldwide review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G; Fulbrook, P; Kleinpell, R; Schmollgruber, S; Alberto, L

    2015-12-01

    To examine the activities and concerns of critical care nurses and professional critical care nursing organizations around the world and to identify expectations held of nursing leaders and policy makers to help address their concerns. This study is the fourth worldwide review of its type. Previous surveys were undertaken in 2001, 2005 and 2009. An online descriptive survey was emailed to 88 potential participants from countries with critical care nursing organizations or known critical care nursing leaders. Responses were downloaded into Survey Monkey™ (Version 22) and analysed by geographical region and income level. Fifty-nine respondents from 58 countries completed the questionnaire, of whom 43 had critical care nursing organizations established in their countries and 29 were members of the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses. The services provided by the organizations to be of most value were national conferences, website, professional representation, and practice standards and guidelines. Professional policies had been developed by some organizations on workforce, education and practice, while almost half provided their members with either a newsletter or journal. Collectively, the most important issues for critical care nurses were working conditions, provision of formal practice guidelines and competencies, staffing levels and access to quality education programmes. Important issues continue to challenge the specialty of critical care nursing as new developments, priorities, clinical issues and other global events and influences impact critical care nursing worldwide. This study will help guide nursing leaders and policy makers to address the needs of critical care nurses and their patients. Collaborative approaches between the specialty, nursing leaders and health policy advisors will assist to inform appropriate change in areas recommended for further action. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  10. Substitution of Formal and Informal Home Care Service Use and Nursing Home Service Use: Health Outcomes, Decision-Making Preferences, and Implications for a Public Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Ching; Yamada, Tetsuji; Nakashima, Taeko; Chiu, I-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this study are: (1) to empirically identify decision-making preferences of long-term health-care use, especially informal and formal home care (FHC) service use; (2) to evaluate outcomes vs. costs based on substitutability of informal and FHC service use; and (3) to investigate health outcome disparity based on substitutability. The methods of ordinary least squares, a logit model, and a bivariate probit model are used by controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and physical/mental health factors to investigate outcomes and costs based substitutability of informal and formal health-care use. The data come from the 2013 Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement (JSTAR), which is designed by Keizai-Sangyo Kenkyu-jo, Hitotsubashi University, and the University of Tokyo. The JSTAR is a globally comparable data survey of the elderly. There exists a complement relationship between the informal home care (IHC) and community-based FHC services, and the elasticity's ranges from 0.18 to 0.22. These are reasonable results, which show that unobservable factors are positively related to IHC and community-based FHC, but negatively related to nursing home (NH) services based on our bivariate probit model. Regarding health-care outcome efficiency issue, the IHC is the best one among three types of elderly care: IHC, community-based FHC, and NH services. Health improvement/outcome of elderly with the IHC is heavier concentrated on IHC services than the elderly care services by community-based FHC and NH care services. Policy makers need to address a diversity of health outcomes and efficiency of services based on providing services to elderly through resource allocation to the different types of long-term care. A provision of partial or full compensation for elderly care at home is recommendable and a viable option to improve their quality of lives.

  11. Substitution of Formal and Informal Home Care Service Use and Nursing Home Service Use: Health Outcomes, Decision-Making Preferences, and Implications for a Public Health Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ching Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThe purposes of this study are: (1 to empirically identify decision-making preferences of long-term health-care use, especially informal and formal home care (FHC service use; (2 to evaluate outcomes vs. costs based on substitutability of informal and FHC service use; and (3 to investigate health outcome disparity based on substitutability.Methodology and dataThe methods of ordinary least squares, a logit model, and a bivariate probit model are used by controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and physical/mental health factors to investigate outcomes and costs based substitutability of informal and formal health-care use. The data come from the 2013 Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement (JSTAR, which is designed by Keizai-Sangyo Kenkyu-jo, Hitotsubashi University, and the University of Tokyo. The JSTAR is a globally comparable data survey of the elderly.ResultsThere exists a complement relationship between the informal home care (IHC and community-based FHC services, and the elasticity’s ranges from 0.18 to 0.22. These are reasonable results, which show that unobservable factors are positively related to IHC and community-based FHC, but negatively related to nursing home (NH services based on our bivariate probit model. Regarding health-care outcome efficiency issue, the IHC is the best one among three types of elderly care: IHC, community-based FHC, and NH services. Health improvement/outcome of elderly with the IHC is heavier concentrated on IHC services than the elderly care services by community-based FHC and NH care services.ConclusionPolicy makers need to address a diversity of health outcomes and efficiency of services based on providing services to elderly through resource allocation to the different types of long-term care. A provision of partial or full compensation for elderly care at home is recommendable and a viable option to improve their quality of lives.

  12. Spiritual care : implications for nurses' professional responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Post, Doeke; Jochemsen, Henk

    Aim. This paper aimed to gain insight into the spiritual aspects of nursing care within the context of health care in the Netherlands and to provide recommendations for the development of care in this area and the promotion of the professional expertise of nurses. Background. International nursing

  13. Basic nursing care: retrospective evaluation of communication and psychosocial interventions documented by nurses in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvé-Udina, Maria-Eulàlia; Pérez, Esperanza Zuriguel; Padrés, Núria Fabrellas; Samartino, Maribel Gonzalez; García, Marta Romero; Creus, Mònica Castellà; Batllori, Núria Vila; Calvo, Cristina Matud

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of psychosocial aspects of basic nursing care, as e-charted by nurses, when using an interface terminology. An observational, multicentre study was conducted in acute wards. The main outcome measure was the frequency of use of the psychosocial interventions in the electronic nursing care plans, analysed over a 12 month retrospective review. Overall, 150,494 electronic care plans were studied. Most of the intervention concepts from the interface terminology were used by registered nurses to illustrate the psychosocial aspects of fundamentals of care in the electronic care plans. The results presented help to demonstrate that the interventions of this interface terminology may be useful to inform psychosocial aspects of basic and advanced nursing care. The identification of psychosocial elements of basic nursing care in the nursing documentation may lead to obtain a deeper understanding of those caring interventions nurses consider essential to represent nurse-patient interactions. The frequency of psychosocial interventions may contribute to delineate basic and advanced nursing care. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Information-seeking behavior of nursing students and clinical nurses: implications for health sciences librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Cheryl; Stanley, Ellen E

    2005-04-01

    This research was conducted to provide new insights on clinical nurses' and nursing students' current use of health resources and libraries and deterrents to their retrieval of electronic clinical information, exploring implications from these findings for health sciences librarians. Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data from twenty-five nursing students and twenty-five clinical nurses. Nursing students and clinical nurses were most likely to rely on colleagues and books for medical information, while other resources they frequently cited included personal digital assistants, electronic journals and books, and drug representatives. Significantly more nursing students than clinical nurses used online databases, including CINAHL and PubMed, to locate health information, and nursing students were more likely than clinical nurses to report performing a database search at least one to five times a week. Nursing students made more use of all available resources and were better trained than clinical nurses, but both groups lacked database-searching skills. Participants were eager for more patient care information, more database training, and better computer skills; therefore, health sciences librarians have the opportunity to meet the nurses' information needs and improve nurses' clinical information-seeking behavior.

  15. Conformity of nurse prescribing to care needs: nurses' understanding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marília Silveira Faeda; Márcia Galan Perroca

    2017-01-01

    Submission: 04-07-2016 Approval: 11-02-2016 ABSTRACT Objective: investigate the understanding of nurses on nurse prescribing conformity to the care needs of hospitalized patients and factors associated with that conformity. Method...

  16. Knowledge of Palliative Care Among Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaile, Samantha; Alshehri, Hanan H; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nursing undergraduate students' knowledge with regard to palliative care in Saudi Arabia. A quantitative descriptive research study was conducted by the use of validated tool. A total of 204 students were included in the study. There is little evidence in Saudi Arabia to demonstrate if nursing undergraduates receives education on palliative care. The results indicate that 57.9% of the nursing undergraduates had received educational sessions and 42.1% of nursing undergraduates did not. In conclusion, palliative care nursing education is crucial to improve quality of patient care in nursing practices. It is recommended that a palliative care education should be integrated within the nursing programme courses. Hence, in order to improve students' knowledge of palliative care, course content should cover the principles of palliative care as a part of any nursing bachelor programme.

  17. Spiritual care in nursing: an overview of published international research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Nell; McSherry, Wilfred

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of 80 papers on research into spiritual care in nursing between 2006 and 2010, to enable nurses and nurse managers to make use of evidence available to them to improve quality of care and implement best practice. Research into spiritual care has grown rapidly since a review of the field in 2006. The CINAHL database was used to search for 'spirituality' OR 'spiritual care' AND 'nursing, looking for original research papers involving health-care practitioners. Research is discussed in the following themes: nursing education; care of health-care practitioners, including nurses; descriptive and correlational research; assessment tools used in research; palliative care and oncology; culture and spiritual care research. Future research should take into account the risks of research that does not involve patients and the need for research that is translatable into contexts other than the setting under study. Spiritual care research has implications for staff training and education, staff motivation and health, organisational culture, best practice, quality of care and, most importantly, for the health of patients. Nurse managers, and indeed all involved in management of nursing, should use this growing body of evidence to inform their spiritual care training, planning and delivery. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Perceptions of patients and nurses towards nurse caring behaviors in coronary care units in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Ferdous H; AbuAlRub, Raeda; Ayasreh, Ibrahim R A

    2013-11-01

    To (1) identify the perceptions of Jordanian patients who suffer from coronary artery diseases towards nurse caring behaviours in critical care units; (2) identify the perceptions of Jordanian nurses who work in critical care units towards nurse caring behaviours; and (3) compare the perceptions of both patients and nurses towards nurse caring behaviours in critical care units. Caring is an important concept in nursing, when nursing behaviours were perceived by patients as caring behaviours, and thus, their satisfaction with the quality of care can be improved. Therefore, it is important for nurses to be knowledgeable about the caring behaviours as perceived by patients who complained from coronary artery diseases themselves. A descriptive comparative design was used. A convenience sample of 150 patients who complained from coronary artery diseases and 60 critical care unit nurses completed the demographic form and the Caring Behavior Assessment scale. Patients in critical care units perceived physical and technical behaviours as most important caring behaviours, whereas nurses in critical care units perceived teaching behaviours as most important caring behaviours. There were significant differences between patient participants' and nurse participants' perceptions towards four subscales of Caring Behavior Assessment scale that should be considered when caring for patients with coronary artery diseases. Patients with coronary artery diseases need well-trained and clinically competent nurses to meet their needs. 'Spiritual needs' was an important nurse caring behaviour that should be emphasised in nursing practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Homophobia and nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, A

    Homophobia, according to Blumenfield (1992) is both the belief that heterosexuality is or should be the only acceptable sexual orientation and the fear and hatred of those who are sexually attracted to those of the same sex. This definition forms the basis for this article, which explores whether living in a homophobic society affects the mental health of gay people and whether gay people are able to access appropriate services should they suffer from a mental illness. The article also examines whether nurses hold homophobic attitudes and if so, the extent to which these affect their work with mentally ill gay clients.

  20. Use of electronic information systems in nursing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Saranto, Kaija; Kivinen, Tuula

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the use of electronic information systems in their daily work. Several kinds of software are used for administrative and information management purposes in health care organizations, but the issue has been studied less from nurse managers' perspective. The material for this qualitative study was acquired according to the principles of focus group interview. Altogether eight focus groups were held with 48 nurse managers from both primary and specialized health care organizations. The nurse managers were asked in focus groups to describe the use of information systems in their daily work in addition to some other themes. The material was analyzed by inductive content analysis using ATLAS.ti computer program. The main category "pros and cons of using information systems in nursing management" summarized the nurse managers' perceptions of using electronic information systems. The main category consisted of three sub-categories: (1) nurse managers' perceptions of the use of information technology; (2) usability of management information systems; (3) development of personnel competencies and work processes. The nurse managers made several comments on the implementation of immature electronic information systems which caused inefficiencies in working processes. However, they considered electronic information systems to be essential elements of their daily work. Furthermore, the nurse managers' descriptions of the pros and cons of using information systems reflected partly the shortcomings of strategic management and lack of coordination in health care organizations. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Spirituality and spiritual care from a Careful Nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Therese Connell

    2012-12-01

    To provide a brief historical background of spirituality in nursing and describe spiritual care from the perspective of the Careful Nursing philosophy and professional practice model. The previously overshadowed role of spirituality in modern nursing has re-emerged and been widely debated. Less attention has been given to how spiritual care is implemented in practice. Findings from historical research. Elaboration of a previously derived Careful Nursing concept and dimensions as a model of spiritual nursing practice values. In spite of the diversity of nurses' philosophical beliefs about spirituality, common ground can be found when these are translated into spiritual nursing practice values. Spiritual care in nursing is primarily expressed in the attitudes and actions of nursing practice guided by spiritual nursing values, particularly recognition of human dignity, kindness, compassion, calmness, tenderness, and nurses' caring for themselves and one another. Spirituality is timelessly interwoven with nursing and health. Careful Nursing suggests a spiritual values model that could be useful in assisting nurses to reach a shared understanding of spirituality and a spiritual approach to nursing practice. Spiritual nursing values can be shared and developed in practical ways so that they become truly integrated into everyday nursing practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Moral distress in Turkish intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagozoglu, Serife; Yildirim, Gulay; Ozden, Dilek; Çınar, Ziynet

    2017-03-01

    Moral distress is a common problem among professionals working in the field of healthcare. Moral distress is the distress experienced by a professional when he or she cannot fulfill the correct action due to several obstacles, although he or she is aware of what it is. The level of moral distress experienced by nurses working in intensive care units varies from one country/culture/institution to another. However, in Turkey, there is neither a measurement tool used to assess moral distress suffered by nurses nor a study conducted on the issue. The study aims to (a) validate the Turkish version of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised to be used in intensive care units and to examine the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the scale, and (b) explore Turkish intensive care nurses' moral distress level. The sample of this methodological, descriptive, and cross-sectional design study comprises 200 nurses working in the intensive care units of internal medicine and surgical departments of four hospitals in three cities in Turkey. The data were collected with the Socio-Demographic Characteristics Form and The Turkish Version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised. Ethical considerations: The study proposal was approved by the ethics committee of the Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University. All participating nurses provided informed consent and were assured of data confidentiality. In parallel with the original scale, Turkish version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised consists of 21 items, and shows a one-factor structure. It was determined that the moral distress total and item mean scores of the nurses participating in the study were 70.81 ± 48.23 and 3.36 ± 4.50, respectively. Turkish version of Moral Distress Scale-Revised can be used as a reliable and valid measurement tool for the evaluation of moral distress experienced by nurses working in intensive care units in Turkey. In line with our findings, it can be said that nurses suffered low level of moral distress

  3. Conformity of nurse prescribing to care needs: nurses' understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2017-04-01

    investigate the understanding of nurses on nurse prescribing conformity to the care needs of hospitalized patients and factors associated with that conformity. a descriptive study, with a quantitative approach, was conducted at 20 in-patient units of a teaching hospital in the state of São Paulo. The participants (N=139) answered a semi-structured questionnaire. For 43 (30.9%) nurses, nurse prescribing is always in line with patients' care needs. The fields of body care and elimination, skin and mucosa care and investigation and monitoring were the most frequently addressed. in the perception of most nurses, nurse prescribing does not conform with patients' health heeds. The establishment of strategies to improve prescribing quality is recommended, as well as the development of permanent qualification programs and the systematic use of instruments for assessment of patients' care demands regarding nursing.

  4. Nurse Physiotherapy in Medical Home Care

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlářová, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis is centred on theme medical home care, importace of nurse physiotherapy and significance nurse physiotherapy by patiens in medical home care. It look on wide of use at illnies cerebral apoplexy, the theses of nurse physiotherapy and some suggestions and tips how the nurse physiotherapy instruments use for patients by cerebral apoplexy. Substance of the bachelor's thesis make research of use nurse physioterapy by medical workers and of knowledge how utilize in medical home ca...

  5. A family nursing educational intervention supports nurses and families in an adult intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenberger, Sandra K; Sanders, Marita

    2016-11-01

    The family experience of critical illness is filled with distress that may have a lasting impact on family coping and family health. A nurse can become a source of comfort that helps the family endure. Yet, nurses often report a lack of confidence in communicating with families and families report troubling relationships with nurses. In spite of strong evidence supporting nursing practice focused on the family, family nursing interventions often not implemented in the critical care setting. This pilot study examined the influence of an educational intervention on nurses' attitudes towards and confidence in providing family care, as well as families' perceptions of support from nurses in an adult critical care setting. An academic-clinical practice partnership used digital storytelling as an educational strategy. A Knowledge to Action Process Framework guided this study. Results of pre-intervention data collection from families and nurses were used to inform the educational intervention. A convenience sample of family members completed the Iceland Family Perceived Support Questionnaire (ICE-FPSQ) to measure perception of support provided by nurses. Video, voice, and narrative stories of nurses describing their experiences caring for family members during a critical illness and family members' experiences with a critically ill family member also guided education plans. When comparing the pre and post results of the Family Nurse Practice Scale (FNPS), nurses reported increased confidence, knowledge, and skill following the educational intervention. Qualitative data from nurses reported satisfaction with the educational intervention. Findings suggest that engaging nurses in educational opportunities focused on families while using storytelling methods encourages empathic understandings. Academic-clinician teams that drive directions show promise in supporting families and nurses in critical care settings. Plans are moving forward to use this study design and methods in

  6. Iranian nurses' professional competence in spiritual care in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Zehtabchi, Samira; Fini, Ismail Azizi

    2017-06-01

    The holistic approach views the human as a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual being. Evidence suggests that among these dimensions, the spiritual one is largely ignored in healthcare settings. This study aimed to evaluate Iranian nurses' perceived professional competence in spiritual care, the relationship between perceived competence and nurses' personal characteristics, and barriers to provide spiritual care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2014. Participants and research context: The study population consisted of nurses working in teaching hospitals in Kashan city. Using a stratified, systematic random method, 250 samples were selected from a total of 1400 nurses. An indigenous instrument was used to assess the nurses' competencies in spiritual care. Ethical considerations: A research ethics committee approved the study. All the participants were briefed on the study aims, were assured of the confidentiality of their personal information, and signed a written informed consent. Among a total of 250 nurses, 239 answered the questionnaire completely, and in total, 23%, 51%, and 26% had poor, moderate, and favorable competence in spiritual care, respectively. No significant differences were found between the mean competence scores of spiritual care in terms of gender, marital status, employment status, and level of qualification. Significant difference was found between nurses' overall score of competence in spiritual care and receiving training on spiritual care, nurses' position, and the ward they worked in. Confirming the findings of the international literature, this study puts light on the situation of nurses' perceived competence and barriers to providing spiritual care in Iran as an eastern and Islamic context. Three-quarters of the nurses had moderate or unfavorable competence in spiritual care. Due to the crucial role of spiritual care in quality of care and patient satisfaction, nurses should be trained and supported to provide spiritual care.

  7. [Training and information for freelance nurses, all life long].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laot-Cabon, Sylvie; Flahault, Antoine; Rothan-Tondeur, Monique

    2011-12-01

    Nursing practice demands ever greater levels of skill, including from those providing home nursing care. A study was carried out, in 2008, within the French national institute for health and medical research (INSERM), in the context of a research master, to assess the differences in freelance nurses' approach to training and information research according to the type of practice (up to 2 nurses versus more than 2 nurses). The study shows that the method of practice influences the amount of work. The dynamics of formation is, in turn, lower for all nurses, mainly due to lack of time.

  8. A Concept Analysis of Palliative Care Nursing: Advancing Nursing Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Amanda J; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Smeltzer, Suzanne C

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing specifies that all nurses must be prepared to deliver high-quality palliative care upon entry into practice. To achieve this aim, a clear understanding of palliative care nursing is needed. The Walker and Avant model for concept analysis was used to review and analyze relevant literature from 2000 to 2016. The authors utilized findings of this extensive review to develop a concept model and other practical resources for guiding nurses, educators, and researchers in applying and evaluating competence in the delivery of high-quality palliative nursing care.

  9. Relationship-based nursing care and destructive demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Margareth; Friberg, Febe

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between the nurse and the patient is understood as fundamental in nursing care. However, numerous challenges can be related to the provision of relationship-based nursing care. Challenges exist when nurses do not respond adequately to the patient's appeal for help. Moreover, challenges arising in the nurse-patient relationship can be understood as more destructive demands from the patient to the nurse, thus begging inquiry into such a relationship. The overall aim is to explore and argue the relevance of problematizing destructive demands evident within relationship-based nursing care. This theoretical article explores destructive demands based on the phenomenological philosophy of the Danish theologian and philosopher Knud E. Løgstrup and provides examples of nurses' experiences in everyday nursing care. The examples are drawn from a Norwegian empirical study based on a hermeneutical research design. Participants and research context: Data consisted of qualitative interviews and qualitative follow-up interviews with 13 nurses with varying work experience within the primary and secondary somatic and psychiatric health service, from inside as well as outside institutions. Ethical consideration: The original empirical study was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. Information was given and consent was obtained from the participants. Two themes are described: strong impressions formed in meetings with patients and persistent concern over the burden of work and ability to endure. Destructive demands related to relationship-based nursing care are discussed along two lines, first, by further elucidating nurses' everyday experiences connected to destructive demands and, second, by highlighting the significance of including destructive demands within the relationship-based nursing care. Including destructive demands related to relationship-based nursing care is of particular significance in enabling the proposition that radical, one

  10. Professional and cultural conflicts for intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Sevald; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study exploring intensive care nurses' experiences of conflicts related to practical situations when they encounter culturally diverse families of critically ill patients. Conflicts can arise in critical care settings as a result of differing cultural and professional values. Nurses and families with diverse cultural backgrounds bring beliefs and understandings to the care situation that can have an impact on the care process. Such families are challenged in their efforts to maintain traditions, while some nurses are not sufficiently culturally aware. A limited number of studies have focused on such conflicts. Sixteen critical care nurses took part in multistage focus group interviews conducted from October 2005 to June 2006. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The main theme, 'conflict between professional nursing practice and family cultural traditions', was based on three pairs of conflicting themes: 'culturally based need to participate actively in the care vs. nurses' professional perceptions of themselves as total care providers'; 'nurses' professional obligation to provide comprehensible information vs. culturally based communication difficulties and responses to illness'; and 'families' needs for cultural norms and self-determination vs. nurses' professional responsibility for the clinical environment'. In addition, each pair of themes contained several sub-themes. Nurses need to negotiate with culturally diverse family members to address conflicts. In their encounters with such families, they should establish a balance between ethnocentricity and cultural sensitivity. An implication for practice is to increase nurses' competence in assessment of diversity.

  11. Supporting evidence-based practice for nurses through information technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane M; Haynes, R Brian; Kushniruk, André; Straus, Sharon; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Hall, Linda McGillis; Dubrowski, Adam; Di Pietro, Tammie; Newman, Kristine; Almost, Joan; Nguyen, Ha; Carryer, Jennifer; Jedras, Dawn

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the usability of mobile information terminals, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) or Tablet personal computers, to improve access to information resources for nurses and to explore the relationship between PDA or Tablet-supported information resources and outcomes. The authors evaluated an initiative of the Nursing Secretariat, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, which provided nurses with PDAs and Tablet PCs, to enable Internet access to information resources. Nurses had access to drug and medical reference information, best practice guidelines (BPGs), and to abstracts of recent research studies. The authors took place over a 12-month period. Diffusion of Innovation theory and the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) model guided the selection of variables for study. A longitudinal design involving questionnaires was used to evaluate the impact of the mobile technologies on barriers to research utilization, perceived quality of care, and on nurses' job satisfaction. The setting was 29 acute care, long-term care, home care, and correctional organizations in Ontario, Canada. The sample consisted of 488 frontline-nurses. Nurses most frequently consulted drug and medical reference information, Google, and Nursing PLUS. Overall, nurses were most satisfied with the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO) BPGs and rated the RNAO BPGs as the easiest resource to use. Among the PDA and Tablet users, there was a significant improvement in research awareness/values, and in communication of research. There was also, for the PDA users only, a significant improvement over time in perceived quality of care and job satisfaction, but primarily in long-term care settings. It is feasible to provide nurses with access to evidence-based practice resources via mobile information technologies to reduce the barriers to research utilization.

  12. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  13. Power and caring: a dialectic in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, A R

    1996-09-01

    The tension between power and caring in nursing is evident through the volume of nursing literature related to power and powerlessness and through nurses' discomfort with notions of power. A dialectical examination of the concepts of power and caring reveals that at one level they appear to be polar opposites. Additional layers of the dialectic reflect different relationships between power and caring until they are seen as intertwined and mutually generative concepts in an approach to caring labeled "empowered caring".

  14. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  15. Negotiating Care in the Special Care Nursery: Parents' and Nurses' Perceptions of Nurse-Parent Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Liz; Taylor, Tara; Watson, Bernadette; Fenwick, Jennifer; Dordic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff are an important source of support for parents of a hospitalized preterm infant. This study aimed to describe parents' and nurses' perceptions of communicating with each other in the context of the special care nursery. A qualitative descriptive design was employed. Thirty two parents with a newborn admitted to one of two special care nurseries in Queensland, Australia participated, and 12 nurses participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the interviews. Nurses and parents focused on similar topics, but their perceptions differed. Provision of information and enabling parenting were central to effective communication, supported by an appropriate interpersonal style by nurses. Parents described difficulties accessing or engaging nurses. Managing enforcement of policies was a specific area of difficulty for both parents and nurses. The findings indicated a tension between providing family-centered care that is individualized and based on family needs and roles, and adhering to systemic nursery policies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Perception of futile care and caring behaviors of nurses in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Somaye; Esmaeali, Ravanbakhsh; Jafari, Hedayat; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2017-01-01

    Futile medical care is considered as the care or treatment that does not benefit the patient. Staff of intensive care units experience moral distress when they perceive the futility of care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the relationship between perceptions of nurses regarding futile medical care and their caring behaviors toward patients in the final stages of life admitted to intensive care units. This correlation, analytical study was conducted with 181 nursing staff of the intensive care units of health centers affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Mazandaran, Iran. The data collection tool included a three-part questionnaire containing demographic characteristics form, perception of futile care questionnaire, and caring behaviors inventory. To analyze the data, statistical tests and central indices of tendency and dispersion were investigated using SPSS, version 19. Pearson's correlation coefficient, partial correlation, t-test, and analysis of variance tests were performed to assess the relationship between the variables. Ethical considerations: The study was reviewed by the ethics committee of the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Informed consent was obtained from participants. Our findings illustrated that the majority of nurses (65.7%) had a moderate perception of futile care, and most of them (98.9%) had desirable caring behaviors in taking care of patients in the final stages of life. The nurses believed that psychosocial aspects of care were of utmost importance. There was a significant negative relationship between perception of futile care and caring behavior. Given the moderate perception of nurses concerning futile care, and its negative impact on caring behaviors toward patients, implementing suitable interventions for minimizing the frequency of futile care and its resulting tension seems to be mandatory. It is imperative to train nurses on adjustment mechanisms and raise their awareness as to situations

  17. Operation Safe Haven: the needs of nurses caring for refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Rhonda; Emrys, Elisabeth; Finney Lamb, Cathryn; Eagar, Sandy; Smith, Mitchell

    2003-06-01

    Nurses played a significant role in providing care to Kosovar and East Timorese refugees at the East Hills Reception Centre in Sydney, Australia, during Operation Safe Haven in 1999-2000. To ascertain the needs of nurses in this setting, 13 nurses participated in two focus group interviews, and two in-depth interviews were conducted with nursing managers. Qualitative thematic analysis was conducted on the resulting transcripts. Nurses reported that, overall, they had the necessary clinical skills but needed specific refugee health profiles and training in culturally competent and trauma-sensitive care. The nurses experienced trauma-related, cultural, environmental and role-related stressors. They used a variety of informal psychosocial supports but reported the need for ongoing counselling and debriefing. While clinical skills were considered important, nurses identified other factors as having more impact on their ability to provide comprehensive care for traumatized refugees, particularly their role as client advocates.

  18. Nurses' views of patient participation in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiano, Georgia; Bucknall, Tracey; Marshall, Andrea; Guinane, Jessica; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    To explore nurses' views of patient participation in nursing care on medical wards. Nurses have frequent contact with patients, highlighting their potential role in enabling patient participation. However, some nurses' actions and attitudes act as barriers, failing to achieve core requirements of patient participation. Discovering nurses' views may assist in developing strategies to encourage patient participation in hospitals. Interpretive study. Twenty nurses were recruited from four medical wards, located in two Australian hospitals. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted between November 2013-March 2014 and analysed using content analysis. Five categories emerged from the nurses' views. The first category, acknowledging patients as partners, showed nurses respected patients as legitimate participants. In the second category, managing risk, nurses emphasized the need to monitor participation to ensure rules and patient safety were maintained. Enabling participation was the third category, which demonstrated nurses' strategies that enhanced patients' participation. The fourth category was hindering participation; encapsulating nurses' difficulty in engaging patients with certain characteristics. In the final category, realizing participation, nurses believed patients could be involved in physical activities or clinical communication. Nurses have a crucial role in promoting patient participation. Through acknowledging and enabling participation, nurses may facilitate patient participation in a range of nursing activities. The nurse's role in enacting participation is complex, having to accommodate each patient's risks and characteristics, highlighting the need for good assessment skills. Education, policy and research strategies are essential to foster nurses' pivotal role in patient participation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Emergency Nurses' Perspectives: Factors Affecting Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Carol L; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2016-05-01

    Caring is a universal phenomenon. However, as a result of higher patient acuity and staff shortages within the chaotic ED environment, caring behaviors may be in peril. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the meaning of caring from the perspective of emergency nurses. Exploring nurses' perspectives of caring is central to improving staffing and retention issues in this unique work environment. As part of a larger study, a subsample of emergency nurses who work in public hospitals in Manitoba, Canada (n = 17) were interviewed. A qualitative descriptive design was used to gain insight into the caring perspectives of nurses by asking them, "What does caring meaning to you?" and "What affects caring in your practice in the emergency department?" Emerging themes were extracted through analysis of audio tapes and transcripts. Advocacy and holistic care emerged as major themes in the meaning of caring for emergency nurses. Caring was affected by a number of factors, including workload, lack of time, staffing issues, shift work, and lack of self-care. However, lack of management support was the most consistent hindrance to caring identified by study participants. Caring continues to be a unifying concept in nursing; however, influencing factors continue to undermine caring for emergency nurses. Caring is not subsidiary to nursing; it is the central core of nursing. Therefore, fostering a caring working environment is essential for nurses to practice holistic nursing care. It is also imperative to job satisfaction and the retention of emergency nurses. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nurse staffing, quality of nursing care and nurse job outcomes in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hyun; June, Kyung Ja; Kim, Yun Mi; Cho, Yong Ae; Yoo, Cheong Suk; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Sung, Young Hee

    2009-06-01

    To examine the relationship between nurse staffing and nurse-rated quality of nursing care and job outcomes. Nurse staffing has been reported to influence patient and nurse outcomes. A cross-sectional study with a survey conducted August-October 2007. The survey included 1365 nurses from 65 intensive care units in 22 hospitals in Korea. Staffing was measured using two indicators: the number of patients per nurse measured at the unit level and perception of staffing adequacy at the nurse level. Quality of care and job dissatisfaction were measured with a four-point scale and burnout measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to determine the relationships between staffing and quality of care and job outcomes. The average patient-to-nurse ratio was 2.8 patients per nurse. A fifth of nurses perceived that there were enough nurses to provide quality care, one third were dissatisfied, half were highly burnt out and a quarter planned to leave in the next year. Nurses were more likely to rate quality of care as high when they cared for two or fewer patients (odds ratio, 3.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-9.31) or 2.0-2.5 patients (odds ratio, 2.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.52), compared with having more than three patients. Perceived adequate staffing was related to a threefold increase (odds ratio, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 2.22-3.97) in the odds of nurses' rating high quality and decreases in the odds of dissatisfaction (odds ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.40), burnout (odds ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.73) and plan to leave (odds ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.56). Nurse staffing was associated with quality of care and job outcomes in the context of Korean intensive care units. Adequate staffing must be assured to achieve better quality of care and job outcomes.

  1. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  2. Palliative care nursing interventions in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z; Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Eaton, Linda H; Rue, Tessa; Hong, Elizabeth; Coenen, Amy

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the nursing interventions that nurses in Thailand identify as most important in promoting dignified dying. This study used a cross-sectional descriptive design. A total of 247 Thai nurses completed a paper-and-pencil survey written in Thai. The survey included both demographic questions and palliative care interventions, listed with summative rating scales, from the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) catalogue Palliative Care for Dignified Dying. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. The five most important nursing interventions to promote dignified dying, ranked by average importance rating, were (a) maintain dignity and privacy, (b) establish trust, (c) manage pain, (d) establish rapport, and (e) manage dyspnea. This research identified the palliative care nursing interventions considered most important by nurses in Thailand to promote dignified dying. The ICNP catalogue Palliative Care for Dignified Dying can be used for planning and managing palliative nursing care in Thailand.

  3. [Nursing care perspectives and foresights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecordier, Didier; Jovic, Ljiljana

    2016-12-01

    As a continuation of its work and of the seminar on nursing sciences education in 2014, the “Association de recherche en soins infirmiers” (Arsi) organized a seminar on the 3rd and-4th of June 2016 in Nantes entitled : “nursing : perspectives and foresights”. More than fifty participants from the francophone area representing various sectors of practice : clinical, teaching, management and students gathered to debate and produce benchmarks to support the development of nursing sciences in France and to draw future directions for clinical practice and training. The successive sessions made it possible to reflect, to confront opinions, to make proposals and to identify the terms of the problematic of care and nursing knowledge today and the methodological elements relating to foresight. At the end of this very creative seminar, new avenues of reflection emerged shifting our usual look at the nurse profession. Orientations for training and practice have been defined with different stakes depending on the level of training and professional commitment. The strong links between professional, scientific and academic discipline have also been clarified, highlighting the importance to hold a high theoretical and scientific requirement, rigorous clinical practice, strong professional commitment and effective leadership.

  4. Nurses' and nursing assistants' reports of missed care and delegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravlin, Gayle; Phoenix Bittner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Measure RNs' and nursing assistants' reports of frequency and reasons for missed nursing care and identify factors related to successful delegation. Routine nursing tasks were identified as the most commonly occurring omissions. Reasons for omissions included poor utilization of staff resources, time required for the nursing interventions, poor teamwork, ineffective delegation, habit, and denial. Quantitative, descriptive design. Widespread reports of missed care included turning, ambulating, feeding, mouth care, and toileting. Frequently reported reasons were unexpected increase in volume or acuity, heavy admission or discharge activity, and inadequate support staff. Factors affecting successful delegation were communication and relationship, nursing assistant competence and knowledge, and attitude and workload. Nurse leaders must focus on implementing strategies to mitigate factors and the consequences of care omissions, including poor patient outcomes. An analysis of point-of-care delivery system failures and ineffective processes is essential.

  5. Health Care Information System (HCIS) Data File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data was derived from the Health Care Information System (HCIS), which contains Medicare Part A (Inpatient, Skilled Nursing Facility, Home Health Agency (Part A...

  6. Filipino Nurses' Spirituality and Provision of Spiritual Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M; Achaso, Romeo H; Cachero, Geifsonne S; Mohammad, Mary Rose A

    2016-12-01

    This study was to explore the perceptions of Filipino nurses' spirituality and the provision of spiritual nursing care. A descriptive, cross-sectional, and quantitative study was adopted for this study. The study was conducted in the Philippines utilizing a convenience sample of 245 nurses. Nurses' Spirituality and Delivery of Spiritual Care (NSDSC) was used as the main instrument. The items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to nurses' perception of spirituality were Item 7, "I believe that God loves me and cares for me," and Item 8, "Prayer is an important part of my life," with mean scores of 4.87 (SD = 1.36) and 4.88 (SD = 1.34), respectively. Items on NSDSC with higher mean scores related to the practice of spiritual care were Item 26, "I usually comfort clients spiritually (e.g., reading books, prayers, music, etc.)," and Item 25, "I refer the client to his/her spiritual counselor (e.g., hospital chaplain) if needed," with mean scores of 3.16 (SD = 1.54) and 2.92 (SD = 1.59). Nurse's spirituality correlated significantly with their understanding of spiritual nursing care (r = .3376, p ≤ .05) and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3980, p ≤ .05). Positive significant correlations were found between understanding of spiritual nursing care and delivery of spiritual nursing care (r = .3289, p ≤ .05). For nurses to better provide spiritual nursing care, they must care for themselves through self-awareness, self-reflection, and developing a sense of satisfaction and contentment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Specialist palliative care nursing and the philosophy of palliative care: a critical discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn; Gardiner, Clare; Ingleton, Christine

    2017-07-02

    Nursing is the largest regulated health professional workforce providing palliative care across a range of clinical settings. Historically, palliative care nursing has been informed by a strong philosophy of care which is soundly articulated in palliative care policy, research and practice. Indeed, palliative care is now considered to be an integral component of nursing practice regardless of the specialty or clinical setting. However, there has been a change in the way palliative care is provided. Upstreaming and mainstreaming of palliative care and the dominance of a biomedical model with increasing medicalisation and specialisation are key factors in the evolution of contemporary palliative care and are likely to impact on nursing practice. Using a critical reflection of the authors own experiences and supported by literature and theory from seminal texts and contemporary academic, policy and clinical literature, this discussion paper will explore the influence of philosophy on nursing knowledge and theory in the context of an evolving model of palliative care.

  8. Nursing supervision for care comprehensiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Silva, Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Alves, Larissa Roberta; Silva, Maria Ferreira da; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques

    2017-01-01

    To reflect on nursing supervision as a management tool for care comprehensiveness by nurses, considering its potential and limits in the current scenario. A reflective study based on discourse about nursing supervision, presenting theoretical and practical concepts and approaches. Limits on the exercise of supervision are related to the organization of healthcare services based on the functional and clinical model of care, in addition to possible gaps in the nurse training process and work overload. Regarding the potential, researchers emphasize that supervision is a tool for coordinating care and management actions, which may favor care comprehensiveness, and stimulate positive attitudes toward cooperation and contribution within teams, co-responsibility, and educational development at work. Nursing supervision may help enhance care comprehensiveness by implying continuous reflection on including the dynamics of the healthcare work process and user needs in care networks. refletir a supervisão de enfermagem como instrumento gerencial do enfermeiro para integralidade do cuidado, considerando suas potencialidades e limitações no cenário atual. estudo reflexivo baseado na formulação discursiva sobre a supervisão de enfermagem, apresentando conceitos e enfoques teóricos e/ou práticos. limitações no exercício da supervisão estão relacionadas à organização dos serviços de saúde embasada no modelo funcional e clínico de atenção, assim como possíveis lacunas no processo de formação do enfermeiro e sobrecarga de trabalho. Quanto às potencialidades, destaca-se a supervisão como instrumento de articulação de ações assistenciais e gerenciais, que pode favorecer integralidade da atenção, estimular atitudes de cooperação e colaboração em equipe, além da corresponsabilização e promoção da educação no trabalho. supervisão de enfermagem pode contribuir para fortalecimento da integralidade do cuidado, pressupondo reflexão cont

  9. Nursing Activities Score: nursing work load in a burns Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Bernadete Camuci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the nursing work load in a Burns Intensive Care Unit according to the Nursing Activities Score.METHOD: an exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The Nursing Activities Score was used for data collection between October 2011 and May 2012, totalling 1,221 measurements, obtained from 50 patients' hospital records. Data for qualitative variables was described in tables; for the quantitative variables, calculations using statistical measurements were used.RESULTS: the mean score for the Nursing Activities Score was 70.4% and the median was 70.3%, corresponding to the percentage of the time spent on direct care to the patient in 24 hours.CONCLUSION: the Nursing Activities Score provided information which involves the process of caring for patients hospitalized in a Burns Intensive Care Unit, and indicated that there is a high work load for the nursing team of the sector studied.

  10. Nursing Activities Score: nursing work load in a burns Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuci, Marcia Bernadete; Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    to evaluate the nursing work load in a Burns Intensive Care Unit according to the Nursing Activities Score. an exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The Nursing Activities Score was used for data collection between October 2011 and May 2012, totalling 1,221 measurements, obtained from 50 patients' hospital records. Data for qualitative variables was described in tables; for the quantitative variables, calculations using statistical measurements were used. the mean score for the Nursing Activities Score was 70.4% and the median was 70.3%, corresponding to the percentage of the time spent on direct care to the patient in 24 hours. the Nursing Activities Score provided information which involves the process of caring for patients hospitalized in a Burns Intensive Care Unit, and indicated that there is a high work load for the nursing team of the sector studied.

  11. ICU nurses' experiences in providing terminal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Laura; Young, Anne; Symes, Lene; Haile, Brenda; Walsh, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    At least 1 in 5 Americans die while using intensive care service-a number that is expected to increase as society ages. Many of these deaths involve withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining therapies. In these situations, the role of intensive care nurses shifts from providing aggressive care to end-of-life care. While hospice and palliative care nurses typically receive specialized support to cope with death and dying, intensive care nurses usually do not receive this support. Understanding the experiences of intensive care nurses in providing care at the end of life is an important first step to improving terminal care in the intensive care unit (ICU). This phenomenological research study explores the experiences of intensive care nurses who provide terminal care in the ICU. The sample consisted of 18 registered nurses delivering terminal care in an ICU that participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Colaizzi's steps for data analysis were used to identify themes within the context of nursing. Three major themes consisted of (1) barriers to optimal care, (2) internal conflict, and (3) coping. Providing terminal care creates significant personal and professional struggles among ICU nurses.

  12. Nursing textbooks need to inform about spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-21

    Considering the spiritual needs of patients is an important aspect of holistic patient care. However, many nurses lack knowledge and awareness of the subject, and spirituality is not strongly featured as a key part of holistic care in core nursing textbooks. The author argues that guidance given by nursing textbooks needs to be more applicable to practice.

  13. Assessing the Impact of Telemedicine on Nursing Care in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Barden, Connie; Rincon, Teresa; McCarthy, Mary; Zapatochny Rufo, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Information on the impact of tele-intensive care on nursing and priority areas of nursing care is limited. To conduct a national benchmarking survey of nurses working in intensive care telemedicine facilities in the United States. In a 2-phased study, an online survey was used to assess nurses' perceptions of intensive care telemedicine, and a modified 2-round Delphi study was used to identify priority areas of nursing. In phase 1, most of the 1213 respondents agreed to strongly agreed that using tele-intensive care enables them to accomplish tasks more quickly (63%), improves collaboration (65.9%), improves job performance (63.6%) and communication (60.4%), is useful in nursing assessments (60%), and improves care by providing more time for patient care (45.6%). Benefits of tele-intensive care included ability to detect trends in vital signs, detect unstable physiological status, provide medical management, and enhance patient safety. Barriers included technical problems (audio and video), interruptions in care, perceptions of telemedicine as an interference, and attitudes of staff. In phase 2, 60 nurses ranked 15 priority areas of care, including critical thinking skills, intensive care experience, skillful communication, mutual respect, and management of emergency patient care. The findings can be used to further inform the development of competencies for tele-intensive care nursing, match the tele-intensive care nursing practice guidelines of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, and highlight concepts related to the association's standards for establishing and sustaining healthy work environments. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Quality nursing care in dementia specific care units: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Julia; Ward, Louise; Gwinner, Karleen

    2017-01-01

    Background The concept of quality nursing care in a dementia specific unit is perceived as being subject to the interpretation of individuals, nurses and healthcare organisations. As the number of dementia diagnoses increases, understanding what constitutes quality nursing care within dementia specific care units is vital to inform policy makers and healthcare organisations globally. Efforts to identify quality nursing care and improve dementia care within dementia specific care units, may significantly reduce the financial and emotional burden of care-giving and improve the quality of life for individuals living with dementia. This scoping review aimed to examine current literature to gain an understanding of what constitutes quality nursing care in a dementia specific care unit. Design and methods Five electronic databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, ProQuest, Social Sciences Citation Index and Ovid) were used to search for articles published in English between 2011 and 2016 focusing on a definition of quality nursing care within dementia specific care units. Twenty journal articles were identified. From these articles, two content themes were identified: Challenges in the provision of quality nursing care in dementia specific care units, and Standardised approach to quality nursing care in a dementia specific care unit. The articles contained the following research designs, controlled pre-test and post-test design ( n = 1), focus group interviews ( n = 1), cross sectional survey ( n = 6), semi structured interviews ( n = 3), narrative review ( n = 1), survey ( n = 2), literature review ( n = 3), systematic review ( n = 1), and prospective longitudinal cohort study ( n = 2). Conclusions The concept of quality nursing care in a dementia specific unit remains subject to the interpretation of individuals, nurses and healthcare organisations, with current literature unable to provide a clear definition. Further research into what constitutes

  15. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the ICU Explore Explore New Nurses Experienced Nurses Educators/Managers Advanced Practice Membership As a new member of AACN who is also new to critical care, you belong to a group of committed professionals ...

  16. Inspirational, meaningful care quality nursing across Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    In Scotland, geography and social conditions are placing demands on nurses' ingenuity. As RCN Scotland Director Theresa Fyffe says: 'Nurses in Scotland are constantly overcoming the challenges thrown at them by our health and social care system and diverse geography.

  17. Nursing teams caring for hospitalised older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Sherry; Baumbusch, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    To offer an explanation of how registered nurses' are providing care to hospitalised older adults in nursing teams comprised of a variety of roles and educational levels. Around the globe economic pressures, nursing shortages and increased patient acuity have resulted in tasks being shifted to healthcare workers with less education and fewer qualifications than registered nurses. In acute care hospitals, this often means reducing the number of registered nurses and adding licensed practical nurses and care aides (also referred to as unregulated healthcare workers) to the nursing care team. The implications of these changes are not well understood especially in the context of hospitalised older adults, who are complex and the most common care recipients. Thematic analysis of data that were collected in a previous grounded theory study to provide an opportunity in-depth analysis of how nurses provided care to hospitalised older adults within nursing teams. Data collected in western Canada on two hospital units in two different health authorities were analysed in relation to how nursing teams provide care. Hand coding and thematic analysis were employed. The themes of scrutinised skill mix and working together highlighted how the established nursing value of reciprocity is challenging to enact in teams with a variety of scopes of practice. The value of reciprocity both aided and hindered the nursing team in engaging in team behaviours to effectively manage patient care. Educators and leaders could assist the nursing care team in re-thinking how they engage in teamwork by providing education about roles and communication techniques to support teams and ultimately improve nursing care. The value of reciprocity within nursing teams needs to be re-examined within the context of team members with varying abilities to reciprocate in kind. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Nursing therapeutics: Teaching student nurses care, compassion and empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Cliff; Percy, Marcus; Hughes, Jane

    2015-05-01

    Debate continues regarding whether humanitarian values such as care and compassion can be taught or are innate in individuals who wish to become nurses. To undertake a discursive review of the literature on caring, compassion and empathy. To understand the teaching and learning issues associated with these concepts. To design and implement an Undergraduate Unit of study which addresses the development of caring, compassion and empathy in student nurses. MEDLINE, CINAHL, and a wide range of literature including books and governmental reports were used for a discursive narrative review. Caring, compassion and empathy are ill-defined; however healthcare users are clear that they know when nurses use skills and attitudes associated with these concepts. Evidence is available to show that caring, compassion and empathy can be taught and there are tools available to measure them in neophytes through their training. Central to the androgogical embedding of these concepts into nursing curricula is the development of therapeutic relationships. It is possible to develop materials to enable student nurses to learn how to care using compassion and empathy. Nursing therapeutics is a term devised to describe how student nurses can exploit the therapeutic potential of any patient contact especially when related to specific and routine nursing interventions. Muetzel's model for understanding therapeutic relationships is one framework that can be adopted to help student nurses to appreciate how to build patient relationships and encourage them to move towards therapeutic advantage using care, compassion and empathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Caring in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Maria; Häggström, Elisabeth; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Pöder, Ulrika

    2017-01-01

    Autonomy and participation are threatened within the group of older people living in nursing homes. Evidence suggests that healthcare personnel act on behalf of older people but are still excluding them from decision-making in everyday care. The purpose was to describe registered nurses' experience of caring for older people in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation. A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach was used. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. Analysis was inspired by Giorgi's method. Participants and research context: A total of 13 registered nurses from 10 nursing homes participated. Ethical considerations: Ethical approval was obtained from the Regional Research Ethics Committee. Informed consent was achieved and confidentiality guaranteed. The essence of caring for older people in nursing homes to promote autonomy and participation consisted of registered nurses' awareness of older people's frailty and the impact of illness to support health and well-being, and awareness of acknowledgement in everyday life and trusting relationships. Paying attention to older people by being open to the persons' wishes were aspects that relied on registered nurses' trusting relationships with older people, their relatives and surrounding healthcare personnel. The awareness reflected challenges in caring to promote older people's right to autonomy and participation in nursing homes. Registered nurses' strategies, hopes for and/or concerns about development of everyday life in nursing homes were revealed and mirrored their engagement in caring for older people. Awareness of older people's frailty in nursing homes and the importance of maintained health and well-being were described as the main source for promoting autonomy and participation. Everyday life and care in nursing homes needs to be addressed from both older people's and healthcare personnel's perspectives, to promote autonomy and participation for residents

  20. Nursing-Sensitive Indicators in Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Kathleen; Battaglia, Rosemarie; Start, Rachel; Mastal, Margaret F; Matlock, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    Ambulatory nursing care can be difficult to comprehend in all its complexity. In August 2013, the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing commissioned a task force to identify nursing-sensitive indicators specific to ambulatory care settings. Given the great variation in settings, staff mix, patient populations, role dimensions, skill sets, documentation systems, and resources, determining metrics that apply across the entire continuum of care is a daunting task. However, it is incumbent upon nurse leaders to define the metrics that will promote the value of the registered nurse in ambulatory practice and care coordination. Once initial measures are identified, piloted, and validated, the infrastructure can be created for ongoing benchmarking and collaboration. The long-term goal is to leverage professional nursing practice, based in the ambulatory care setting, to improve quality, safety, and cost in health care.

  1. Nurse Jackie and the politics of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This essay considers Nurse Jackie, one of several recent television shows, including HawthoRNe, and Mercy, that features a nurse as the main character. All 3 shows premiered in 2009 and challenged nursing's longstanding invisibility and misrepresentation on television. Although the plots of each show corrected problematic aspects of nursing's usual media representation, only Nurse Jackie remains on the air. In this paper, I analyze why Nurse Jackie succeeded where the other 2 shows did not, considering the representational politics of care on television and in the national context where health care remains a significant concern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Searching electronically for information on transcultural nursing and health subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Margaret; Burr, Jennifer; Janetos, Deborah H

    2004-07-01

    With the proliferation of electronic resources available to search for subjects related to transcultural nursing and health, nurses must keep abreast of computer-based tools that enable them to quickly and efficiently obtain information on a variety of topics. This article provides suggestions for narrowing and focusing a search on transcultural nursing and related subjects using important research databases such as Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). Information about additional useful databases such as Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and Psychological Abstracts (PsycINFO) is also provided. In the article, selected examples of Internet sites of interest in transcultural nursing and health are identified and described in brief annotations. Web sites for U.S. government agencies, organizations, and commercial groups that concern transcultural nursing and health care are cited. Global transcultural health and nursing Internet resources also are included.

  3. Environmentally safe health care agencies: nursing's responsibility, Nightingale's Legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner-McRae, Hollie; McRae, Glenn; Jas, Victoria

    2007-05-31

    Florence Nightingale and subsequent nurse scholars have written about the impact of the environment on human health. Nightingale described, and staked out, the nurse's role in optimizing environments for healing. Since Nightingale's time numerous scholars have documented that environmental conditions play a major role in the health of individuals and populations. As nurses become more informed about the environment as a determinant of human health, they will be able to advocate more effectively for environmental conditions that promote health. This article provides both theoretical and practical perspectives to integrate environmental concerns into nursing practice. It recommends specific actions nurses can undertake to improve the environment within the health care setting. In particular the article provides a historical review of an environmental focus in nursing, discusses ways to manage both upstream waste and downstream waste (solid, biohazard, and hazardous chemical wastes) so as to decrease environmental pollution, and recommends specific nursing actions to promote a healthy environment within our health care agencies.

  4. Dependency in autonomous caring--night nurses' working conditions for caring in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Christine; Fagerberg, Ingegerd; Asp, Margareta

    2010-06-01

    Few research studies have focused on nurses' working conditions for caring provided at night, and these studies have mainly described nurses' work in hospital settings, not in a municipal, social-care context. In Swedish municipal care, nurses have responsibility for hundreds of older people in need of care. This working condition compromises caring encounters; instead the nurses' caring is mainly mediated through care staff (or relatives). In considering that caring based on caring encounters is fundamental to ethical nursing practice questions leads to the aim: to explore Swedish municipal night nurses' experiences of their working conditions for caring in nursing. All municipal night-duty nurses (n = 7) in a medium-sized community in Sweden participated in interviews, while six of them also wrote diaries. Thematic content analysis has been used in analysing the data. The findings revealed that the nurses experienced their working conditions for caring in nursing in the themes of Dependency in the Organisation and Other Staff, Vocational Responsibility, Deficiency in Conditions for Caring and Autonomous Caring. The findings illustrate privileged, as well as, poor working conditions for caring in nursing. The nurses' role as consultants emerge as their main function. The consultant function implies that nurses do not participate in ordinary bed-side caring, which makes it easier for them to find time for caring in situations that arise when nurses' skills, expertise and authority are called upon. Conversely the consultancy function entails short-term solution of complex caring problems, which can signify deficient caring due to prevailing working conditions. The findings also point to nurses' possible problems in fulfilling their own and vocational demands for ethics in the practice of caring in nursing related to existing working conditions.

  5. Triggers and nursing influences on delirium in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jinshi; Jin, Yinji; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-06-28

    Among care providers, nurses have the most influence on the occurrence of delirium in patients. To identify and investigate the risk factors associated with delirium and analyse the nurse's influence on delirium, a secondary data analysis approach was used with clinical data from the electronic medical record and health care provider data from the management information systems of a university hospital. Data of 3284 patients (delirium = 688, non-delirium = 2596) hospitalized in the medical and surgical intensive care units containing 2178 variables were analysed. Donabedian's structure-process-outcome model was applied to categorize the factors for multilevel hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Sixteen factors (10 patient factors, 1 provider factor, 1 environmental factor, 2 nursing intervention factors and 2 medical intervention factors) were identified as significant in the final model. Longer intensive care unit experience of nurses did not decrease the risk of delirium. Greater number of nursing intervention needs and greater use of restraints were associated with an increased risk of delirium. The duration of nursing career did not affect the reduction of the risk of delirium. Nurses should therefore endeavour to acquire nursing experience specific for delirium care and attend training courses for delirium management. © 2016 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  6. Involving relatives in ICU patient care: critical care nursing challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Bridget; Moroney, Tracey

    2015-04-01

    To identify the barriers critical care nurses experience to relative involvement in intensive care unit patient care. Previous studies have discussed the experiences of relatives visiting an intensive care unit, the needs of relatives in the intensive care environment, critical care nurse and relative interaction, intensive care unit visiting policies and the benefits of including relatives in patient care. The barriers that critical care nurses experience to relative involvement in patient care have received minimal exploration. Critical care nurses were recruited for a mixed methods study. An explanatory mixed method design was used, with two phases. Phase 1 was Quantitative and Phase 2 was Qualitative. Data collection occurred over five months in 2012-2013. Phase 1 used an online questionnaire (n = 70), and semi-structured interviews (n = 6) were conducted in Phase 2. Phase 1 participants were 70 critical care nurses working in Australian intensive care units and six critical care nurses were recruited from a single Sydney intensive care unit for Phase 2. Through sequential data collection, Phase 1 results formed the development of Phase 2 interview questions. Participants reported various barriers to relative involvement in critically ill patient care. Factors related to the intensive care unit patient, the intensive care unit relative, the critical care nurse and the intensive care environment contributed to difficulties encompassing relative involvement. This study has identified that when considering relative involvement in patient care, critical care nurses take on a paternalistic role. The barriers experienced to relative involvement result in the individual critical care nurse deciding to include or exclude relatives from patient care. Knowledge of the barriers to relative involvement in critically ill patient care may provide a basis for improving discussion on this topic and may assist intensive care units to implement strategies to reduce barriers.

  7. Considering nursing resource as "caring time'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, H A; McWilliam, C L

    1996-04-01

    The present constrained economic climate faced by health care agencies underscores the need for nurse administrators to have an in-depth appreciation of how nursing services are being used. The purpose of this investigation was to increase the understanding of nursing as a resource. Using phenomenological research methodology, the investigator purposefully selected six patients and a chain sample of 14 professionals responsible for their care, including nurses, nurse managers and physicians. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews, document reviews, and participant observation. The inductive interpretation depicts the nature of nursing resource to be "caring time'. Caring was understood primarily in terms of time and was experienced by all participants as "spending time'. Caring time was spent through "being with' and "doing to/doing for' the patient. Study participants experienced tension with regard to how best to spend precious "caring time'. Nursing resource was inextricably linked to both quantitative and qualitative expressions of nursing, and "being with' patients was a highly valued, under-allocated, and unintentionally provided component of nursing resource. The researcher concluded that nursing administrators, nurse managers and practitioners all have leadership roles to play in achieving recognition, allocation and promotion of caring time within their agencies.

  8. Nurses' experience of caring for inmate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Constance S

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a study of the experience of caring for prisoners through examining the everyday experience of nurses' delivering health care to inmate patients in a correctional setting. Prisons are most often viewed as places for punishment, while the goals of health and healing, and prevention of diseases in correctional facilities are often neglected. Nurses who deliver health care to prisoners are challenged to do so in a caring relationship that will facilitate their health and healing. The literature on the nature of prison nursing indicates that delivering health care to inmates must be carefully balanced against the need for security, and is affected by factors such as custody staff values, staff education, nursing management, and organizational practices. In-depth interviews were carried out with nine Registered Nurses who had been employed in a variety of correctional institutions throughout their careers, and analysed thematically using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Findings. Nurses' caring was experienced as an attempt to negotiate the boundaries between the cultures of custody and caring. Facing complex challenges and a number of limitations on the nurse-patient relationship, nurses strived to find a way to care for their inmate patients. Environmental risk meant that caution and vigilance were essential and these nurses demonstrated courage and persevered for the sake of their inmate patients. The findings make clear the challenging and frustrating experience of nurses' caring for inmate patients in restrictive settings. As a result, there are implications for nursing practice, education, and research to assure the best possible health outcomes for inmate patients, the integrity of caring nursing practice, and the safety of both nurses and patients.

  9. Diagnoses, Drugs, and Treatment Are the Main Information Needs of Primary Care Physicians and Nurses, and the Internet Is the Information Source Most Commonly Used to Meet These Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Perryman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Clarke, M. A., Belden, J. L., Koopman, R. J., Steege, L. M., Moore, J. L., Canfield, S. M., & Kim, M. S. (2013. Information needs and information-seeking behaviour analysis of primary care physicians and nurses: A literature review. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 30(3, 178-190. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hir.12036 Abstract Objective – To improve information support services to health practitioners making clinical decisions by reviewing the literature on the information needs and information seeking behaviours of primary care physicians and nurses. Within this larger objective, specific questions were 1 information sources used; 2 differences between the two groups; and 3 barriers to searching for both groups. Design – Literature review. Setting – SCOPUS, CINAHL, OVID Medline, and PubMed databases. Subjects – Results from structured searches in four bibliographic databases on the information needs of primary care physicians and nurses. Methods – Medical Subject Heading (MeSH and keyword search strategies tailored to each of four databases were employed to retrieve items pertinent to research objectives. Concepts represented in either controlled or natural language vocabularies included “information seeking behaviour, primary health care, primary care physicians and nurses” (p. 180. An initial yield of 1169 items was filtered by language (English only, pertinence to study objectives, publication dates (2000-2012, and study participant age (>18. After filtering, 47 articles were examined and summarized, and recommendations for further research were made. Main Results – Few topical differences in information needed were identified between primary care physicians and nurses. Across studies retrieved, members of both groups sought information on drugs, diagnoses, and therapy. The Internet (including bibliographic databases and web-based searching was the source of information most frequently mentioned, followed by

  10. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibbald, B.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Reeves, D.

    2006-01-01

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected

  11. Spiritual Nursing Care Education An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Hand, Mikel

    The failure of nursing schools to integrate spiritual nursing care education into the curriculum has contributed to a lack in nurses' spiritual care ability. Developing, integrating, and testing a Spiritual Care Nursing Education strategy in an Associates of Science nursing program significantly increased the perceived spiritual care competence of student nurses. Utilizing a faculty team to develop learning activities to address critical spiritual care attributes offers a method to integrate spiritual nursing care content throughout the curriculum in ASN and BSN programs.

  12. Nursing and en route care: history in time of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R Scott; Connelly, Linda K

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the en route caregiver is to provide critical care in military helicopters for wounded Warriors. This care minimizes the effects of the wounds and injuries, and improves morbidity and mortality. This article will focus on the history of Army Nursing en route care. From World War II through Vietnam, and continuing through the War on Terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan, Army nurses served in providing en route care in military airplanes and helicopters for patients being transported to higher echelons of care. From aid stations on the battlefield to forward surgical teams which provide life, limb, and eyesight saving care, to the next higher level of care in combat support hospitals, these missions require specialized nursing skills to safely care for the high acuity patients. Before the en route care concept existed, there was not a program to train nurses in these critical skills. There was also a void of information about patient outcomes associated with the nursing assessment and care provided during helicopter medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) of such unstable patients, and the consequent impact on the patient's condition after transport. The role of critical care nurses has proven to be essential and irreplaceable in providing full-spectrum care to casualties of war, in particular, the postsurgical patients transferred from one surgical facility to another in theatre. However, we have only recently developed the concepts over the required skill set, training, equipment, functionality, evidenced-based care, and sustainability of nursing in the en route care role. Much of the work to quantify and qualify nursing care has been done by individuals and individual units whose lessons-learned have only recently been captured.

  13. Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Care Continuity in Day Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renholm, Marja; Suominen, Tarja; Puukka, Pauli; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-12-01

    The increase in day surgery has brought about a significant change in patient care and care continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyze nurses' perceptions of the realization of continuity of care in day surgery. Continuity of care is examined from the perspectives of time, flow, co-ordination flow, caring relationship flow, and information flow. Descriptive study. A questionnaire including demographics and questions about continuity of care was completed by 83 of the 120 eligible nurses (response rate, 69%) in one hospital district in Finland. According to the nurses, continuity of patient care is mostly well realized. On the day of surgery, information flow was the domain that was best realized. In the opinion of the nurses, continuity of care was least realized at home before surgery and at home during the period after surgery. Based on nurses' perceptions, continuity of care was relatively well realized. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Incontinence care in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Manuela; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2015-09-01

    To describe the quality of incontinence care in nursing homes. Main outcome measures were: (1) availability of structural quality indicators on ward and institutional levels; (2) use of nursing interventions as quality indicators on a process level; (3) prevalence of incontinence as an outcome indicator. Incontinence in older people is a major problem in nursing care that presents a high workload for nurses, increases costs and places a high burden on affected individuals. The availability of structural indicators, and the use of nursing interventions, is recommended to improve the quality of care. Only limited amounts of reliable and valid data are available regarding the quality of incontinence care in nursing homes. A cross-sectional multicentre study in 16 nursing homes (N = 1302) in 2013. A standardized and validated questionnaire was used for data collection. Each resident was assessed by two trained nurses. The primary outcome of the study indicated that structural indicators, such as the availability of information brochures, are limited in nursing homes. On a process level, the provision of body worn pads or underlay pads to protect beds or chairs were most frequently used and training interventions were only delivered to a small proportion of residents with incontinence. The prevalence of all types of incontinence, particularly double incontinence, was high (69·2%). Due to the high prevalence of double incontinence and low rate of training interventions regarding this type of incontinence, ongoing efforts to improve the quality of incontinence care are warranted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Leadership, Education and Awareness: A Compassionate Care Nursing Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Anne H

    2015-03-01

    The Canadian Nurses' Association Code of Ethics (2008) and the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) Standards of Practice for Registered Nurses (CRNNS 2011) identify the provision of safe, compassionate, competent and ethical care as one of nursing's primary values and ethical responsibilities. While compassion has historically been viewed as the essence of nursing, there is concern that this has become an abstract ideal, rather than a true reflection of nursing practice. This paper describes a compassionate care initiative undertaken by the CRNNS and the initial outcomes of these educational workshops. This work is informed by an exploration of the multiplicity of factors that have brought this issue to the fore for nursing regulators, educators, administrators, the public as well as front-line staff. The two most significant areas of learning reported by workshop participants included understanding the connection between mindfulness, non-judgmental care and compassion/self-compassion and recognizing possibilities for action related to compassionate care, even in the face of personal and environmental constraints. Implications for nursing regulators and leaders include consideration of their roles and responsibilities in supporting nurses to meet professional practice standards, such as provision of compassionate care. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  16. Critical thinking, delegation, and missed care in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Nancy Phoenix; Gravlin, Gayle

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how nurses use critical thinking to delegate nursing care. Nurses must synthesize large amounts of information and think through complex and often emergent clinical situations when making critical decisions about patient care, including delegation. A qualitative, descriptive study was used in this article. Before delegating, nurses reported considering patient condition, competency, experience, and workload of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). Nurses expected UAP to report significant findings and have higher level knowledge, including assessment and prioritizing skills. Successful delegation was dependent on the relationship between the RN and the UAP, communication, system support, and nursing leadership. Nurses reported frequent instances of missed or omitted routine care. Findings from this project provide insight into factors that influence delegation effectiveness. These can guide CNOs and frontline nurse leaders to focus on implementing strategies to mitigate the consequence of missed care. Ineffective delegation of basic nursing care can result in poor patient outcomes, potentially impacting quality measures, satisfaction, and reimbursement for the institution.

  17. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Nursing students' self-efficacy in providing transcultural care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Janet; Downie, Jill; Nathan, Pauline

    2004-08-01

    The aim of any health care service is to provide optimal quality care to clients and families regardless of their ethnic group. As today's Australian society comprises a multicultural population that encompasses clients with different cultural norms and values, this study examined undergraduate nursing students' self-efficacy in providing transcultural nursing care. A sample of 196 nursing students enrolled in the first and fourth year of a pre-registration nursing program in a Western Australian University were invited to participate in a survey incorporating a transcultural self-efficacy tool (TSET) designed by Jeffery [Unpublished instrument copyrighted by author, 1994]. The findings revealed that fourth year students, exposed to increased theoretical information and clinical experience, had a more positive perception of their self-efficacy in providing transcultural nursing skills than the first year students. In addition, the study found that age, gender, country of birth, languages spoken at home and previous work experience did not influence the nursing students' perception of self-efficacy in performing transcultural care. The study supports the notion that educational preparation and relevant clinical experience is important in providing nursing students with the opportunity to develop self-efficacy in performing effective and efficient transcultural nursing in today's multicultural health care system. It is for this reason that educators need to focus on providing students with relevant theoretical information and ensure sufficient clinical exposure to support student learning in the undergraduate program.

  19. Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; L Tz N, Kim; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt; Eriksson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  20. Virtual Nursing Avatars: Nurse Roles and Evolving Concepts of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Miriam Bowers; Shaw, Peggy

    2016-08-15

    Advances in computer software have provided interactive tools that perform many of the duties once in the domain of the nursing profession. Sometimes referred to as 'virtual nursing avatars,' the duties delegated to this technology include facilitating check-ins for patients and coaching patients as they make lifestyle changes. Researchers continue to develop computer applications for virtual nurse avatars. As computers and smartphones take on tasks once in the domain of humans, the roles of nurses will evolve. The arc of this evolution will be determined by the limits of technology, evolving concepts of care, and changing population needs. In this article, the authors share examples of nursing avatar applications, discuss concerns about virtual nurse avatars, reinforce nursing as a caring profession, present avatars as caring agents, and consider the future of nursing avatars. They conclude that, although virtual nurse avatars can perform some nursing tasks in an acceptable manner, they are limited in their ability to make complex judgments and engage in collaboration.

  1. Understanding critical care nurses' autonomy in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharmeh, Mahmoud

    2017-10-02

    Purpose The aim of this study was to describe Jordanian critical care nurses' experiences of autonomy in their clinical practice. Design/methodology/approach A descriptive correlational design was applied using a self-reported cross-sectional survey. A total of 110 registered nurses who met the eligibility criteria participated in this study. The data were collected by a structured questionnaire. Findings A majority of critical care nurses were autonomous in their decision-making and participation in decisions to take action in their clinical settings. Also, they were independent to develop their own knowledge. The study identified that their autonomy in action and acquired knowledge were influenced by a number of factors such as gender and area of practice. Practical implications Nurse's autonomy could be increased if nurses are made aware of the current level of autonomy and explore new ways to increase empowerment. This could be offered through classroom lectures that concentrate on the concept of autonomy and its implication in practice. Nurses should demonstrate autonomous nursing care at the same time in the clinical practice. This could be done through collaboration between educators and clinical practice to help merge theory to practice. Originality/value Critical care nurses were more autonomous in action and knowledge base. This may negatively affect the quality of patient care and nurses' job satisfaction. Therefore, improving nurses' clinical decision-making autonomy could be done by the support of both hospital administrators and nurses themselves.

  2. [Information security in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ködmön, József; Csajbók, Zoltán Ernő

    2015-07-05

    Doctors, nurses and other medical professionals are spending more and more time in front of the computer, using applications developed for general practitioners, specialized care, or perhaps an integrated hospital system. The data they handle during healing and patient care are mostly sensitive data and, therefore, their management is strictly regulated. Finding our way in the jungle of laws, regulations and policies is not simple. Notwithstanding, our lack of information does not waive our responsibility. This study summarizes the most important points of international recommendations, standards and legal regulations of the field, as well as giving practical advices for managing medical and patient data securely and in compliance with the current legal regulations.

  3. First impressions of the nurse and nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, S; Garrison, C; Lind, C; Hilton, H G

    1997-06-01

    Patients (N = 1,180), nurses (N = 918), and administrators (N = 332) in 22 acute care hospitals across the country were surveyed regarding their first impression of the professional image communicated by nurses' uniforms. The Nurse Image Scale, with pictures of the same nurse in nine different uniforms, was used as the data gathering tool. A comparison of the mean score of each uniform as rated by all respondents (N = 2,430) showed the white pant uniform with stethoscope was rated significantly higher than other uniforms. The white pant uniform with cap, dress with cap, pants suit, and dress with stethoscope scored closely in a second place grouping. The white dress uniform and street clothes with laboratory coat tied for third place. Colored designer scrubs and white pants with colored top scored lowest. Ratings of patients, nurses, and administrators were similar, although patients tended to rank some uniforms significantly differently than nurses and administrators. The nurse in the pant uniform with stethoscope was most preferred for care. Least preferred was the nurse in colored scrubs and street clothes with lab coat. These findings point to the need for nurses to be differentiated from auxiliary health care personnel and to project a professional image in a competitive health care environment.

  4. Does nursing assistant certification increase nursing student's confidence level of basic nursing care when entering a nursing program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stombaugh, Angie; Judd, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nursing student's confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program after implementation of required nursing assistant certification for program admission. In addition, the relationship between being employed as a nursing assistant and confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program was explored. A Likert-scale survey assessing confidence levels of basic nursing care was sent to 156 nursing students admitted to a nursing program prior to their first nursing course. Confidence level with nursing skills, nursing assistant employment, and length of nursing assistant employment were assessed. Students were most confident in hand washing (M = 5.87, SD = 0.36), gloving and gowning (M =5.46, SD = 0.75), making an unoccupied bed (M = 5.38, SD = 0.88), and oral temperature (M = 5.30, SD = 0.87). Students were least confident in the fitting for cane (M = 1.74, SD = 1.16) and ambulation with crutches on steps (M =1.81, SD = 1.27). Nursing assistant employment increased student confidence with basic nursing care. Nursing programs cannot assume that students are prepared in basic nursing care based on a nursing assistant certification. © 2014.

  5. Information Literacy in a Digital Era: Understanding the Impact of Mobile Information for Undergraduate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Glynda J; Furlong, Karen E; Secco, Loretta

    2016-01-01

    Recent entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for Registered Nurses in Canada mean nurse educators need educational strategies to promote student competency within the rapidly evolving informatics field. A collaborative research team from three Canadian nursing programs completed a mixed method survey to describe how nursing students used mobile nursing information support and the extent of this support for learning. The Mobile Information Support Evaluation Tool (MISET) assessed Usefulness/Helpfulness, Information Literacy Support, and Use of Evidence-Based Sources. The quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed to describe students' perspectives and the ways they used mobile resources in learning situations. Findings suggest nursing students mainly accessed mobile resources to support clinical learning, and specifically for task-oriented information such as drug medication or patient conditions/diagnoses. Researchers recommend a paradigm shift whereby educators emphasize information literacy in a way that supports evidence-based quality care.

  6. Patient's perception towards quality nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B S; Shrestha, S; Thulung, B K

    2014-01-01

    Quality nursing care remains an important role for patients because nurses are involved in almost every aspect of client's care in hospital. Nurses interact with patients more often than any other health care personnel in a hospital. Patients express their requirements in terms of what they need, want, prefer, expect and demand with respect to the nursing service they receive. The main objective of this study was to identify the Patient's Perception towards Quality Nursing Care. A descriptive quantitative and qualitative research design was adopted; study areas were Bir-hospital and Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH). Non probability purposive sampling technique with semi structured interview questionnaire including Likert Scale was used to collect the data. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Overall perception of respondents about nursing care (nurses' behavior, safety and security and admission procedure) is positive as 182 (91%) perceived positively, whereas 18 (9%) perceived negatively (not positive). There is no significant difference of perception in relation to total nursing care by sex, education and occupation status of the respondents as highest percentage of respondents had positive perception. It can be concluded that most of the respondents showed positive attitude towards quality nursing care in both hospitals.

  7. Information Processing in Nursing Information Systems: An Evaluation Study from a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Shahrokhi, Nafiseh; Saremian, Marzieh; Garavand, Ali; Birjandi, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, information technology has been introduced in the nursing departments of many hospitals to support their daily tasks. Nurses are the largest end user group in Hospital Information Systems (HISs). This study was designed to evaluate data processing in the Nursing Information Systems (NISs) utilized in many university hospitals in Iran. This was a cross-sectional study. The population comprised all nurse managers and NIS users of the five training hospitals in Khorramabad city (N = 71). The nursing subset of HIS-Monitor questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were analyzed by the descriptive-analytical method and the inductive content analysis. The results indicated that the nurses participating in the study did not take a desirable advantage of paper (2.02) and computerized (2.34) information processing tools to perform nursing tasks. Moreover, the less work experience nurses have, the further they utilize computer tools for processing patient discharge information. The "readability of patient information" and "repetitive and time-consuming documentation" were stated as the most important expectations and problems regarding the HIS by the participating nurses, respectively. The nurses participating in the present study used to utilize paper and computerized information processing tools together to perform nursing practices. Therefore, it is recommended that the nursing process redesign coincides with NIS implementation in the health care centers.

  8. Spiritual Experiences of Muslim Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Ercan; Samancioglu, Sevgin; Kilic, Serap Parlar

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the experiences and perceptions of intensive care nurses (ICNs) about spirituality and spiritual care, as well as the effective factors, and increase the sensitivity to the subject. In this study, we examined spiritual experiences, using McSherry et al. (Int J Nurs Stud 39:723-734, 2002) Spirituality and spiritual care rating scale (SSCRS), among 145 ICNs. 44.8% of the nurses stated that they received spiritual care training and 64.1% provided spiritual care to their patients. ICNs had a total score average of 57.62 ± 12.00 in SSCRS. As a consequence, it was determined that intensive care nurses participating in the study had insufficient knowledge about spirituality and spiritual care, but only the nurses with sufficient knowledge provided the spiritual care to their patients.

  9. Development and validation of an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ok-Hee; Yoo, Yang-Sook; Yun, Sun-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-Hye

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate an eye care educational programme for intensive care unit nurses. Eye care guidelines and protocols have been developed for increasing eye care implementation in intensive care units. However, the guidelines lack consistency in assessment or intervention methodology. This was a one-sample pre/postprogramme evaluation study design for testing the effects of the eye care educational programme, developed for and applied to intensive care unit nurses, on their levels of knowledge and awareness. The eye care educational programme was developed based on literature review and survey of educational needs. Thirty intensive care unit nurses served as subjects for the study. The levels of eye care-related knowledge, awareness and practice were enhanced following the implementation of the educational programme. Moreover, satisfaction with the educational programme was high. It is necessary to intensify eye care education aimed at new nurses who are inexperienced in intensive care unit nursing and provide continuing education on the latest eye care methods and information to experienced nurses. The eye care educational programme developed in this study can be used as a strategy to periodically assess the eye status of patients and facilitate the appropriate eye care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Perception of Nursing Care: View of Saudi Arabian Female Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    ‘Values are principles and standards that have meaning and worth to an individual, family, group, or community’ (Purnell & Paulanka 1998: 3). Values are central to the care provided by nurses. The provision of nursing care within the context of value clarification, has been explored from various...... perspectives, however, as values vary within cultures, there is a limited range of studies reflecting on Saudi Arabian nurses’ perspectives of nursing care. Through a Heideggerian phenomenological research design, six nurses were enrolled through purposive sampling. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews, which...... were audio tape-recorded, were chosen as the methods of data collection. A seven stage framework approach was applied to analyse and organise the research findings in three conceptual themes: values in context of Islam, the nurse-patient relationship, and identity’s influence on being in the world...

  11. Operational Failures Detected by Frontline Acute Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kathleen R; Engh, Eileen P; Tubbs-Cooley, Heather; Conley, Deborah Marks; Cupit, Tammy; D'Errico, Ellen; DiNapoli, Pam; Fischer, Joleen Lynn; Freed, Ruth; Kotzer, Anne Marie; Lindgren, Carolyn L; Marino, Marie Ann; Mestas, Lisa; Perdue, Jessica; Powers, Rebekah; Radovich, Patricia; Rice, Karen; Riley, Linda P; Rosenfeld, Peri; Roussel, Linda; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Searle-Leach, Linda; Shonka, Nicole M; Smith, Vicki L; Sweatt, Laura; Townsend-Gervis, Mary; Wathen, Ellen; Withycombe, Janice S

    2017-06-01

    Frontline nurses encounter operational failures (OFs), or breakdowns in system processes, that hinder care, erode quality, and threaten patient safety. Previous research has relied on external observers to identify OFs; nurses have been passive participants in the identification of system failures that impede their ability to deliver safe and effective care. To better understand frontline nurses' direct experiences with OFs in hospitals, we conducted a multi-site study within a national research network to describe the rate and categories of OFs detected by nurses as they provided direct patient care. Data were collected by 774 nurses working in 67 adult and pediatric medical-surgical units in 23 hospitals. Nurses systematically recorded data about OFs encountered during 10 work shifts over a 20-day period. In total, nurses reported 27,298 OFs over 4,497 shifts, a rate of 6.07 OFs per shift. The highest rate of failures occurred in the category of Equipment/Supplies, and the lowest rate occurred in the category of Physical Unit/Layout. No differences in OF rate were detected based on hospital size, teaching status, or unit type. Given the scale of this study, we conclude that OFs are frequent and varied across system processes, and that organizations may readily obtain crucial information about OFs from frontline nurses. Nurses' detection of OFs could provide organizations with rich, real-time information about system operations to improve organizational reliability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Nursing diagnoses in a Brazilian intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Lucena, Amália; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite

    2006-01-01

    To identify the nursing diagnoses and their most frequent related factors or risk factors in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Descriptive cross-sectional study with information from 991 admissions to an ICU during a 6-month period. Sixteen nursing diagnoses resulting from hospitalization were most frequently identified; six had percentages greater than 40% with 29 related/risk factors. The resulting averages were 6.9 diagnoses per hospitalization and 1.2 related/risk factors per nursing diagnoses. The nursing diagnoses identified seemed to be common to the clinical practice of nursing and their fundamental related/risk factors to precise clinical judgment, thus providing a basis for interventions for a desired outcome. The findings have contributed to the development of the standardized nursing language usage in Brazilian nursing practices.

  13. Equity in nursing care: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooddehghan, Zahra; ParsaYekta, Zohreh; Nasrabadi, Alireza N

    2017-01-01

    Equity in providing care is also a major value in the nursing profession. Equitable care aims to provide the entire population with safe, efficient, reliable, and quality nursing services at all levels of health. This study was conducted to explain the process of the realization of equity in nursing care. This qualitative study uses Glaser's approach to grounded theory. Participants and research context: Sample selection began with convenience sampling and continued with purposive sampling. A total of 27 people were ultimately selected as the study subjects. Data were mainly collected through unstructured in-depth individual interviews plus observation and field notes. The data were then analyzed using the "Six C's" coding family of Glaser. Ethical considerations: The study protocol was approved by the Tehran University of Medical Sciences (91D1302870). Written informed consent was also obtained from all subjects. According to the findings, participants' main concern in providing equitable care is the rationing of nursing care. The identification of participants' main concern led to the emergence of the core category of the study, that is, "nurses' domination." The other categories revolving around the core category were conceptualized according to the six C's coding family: "nurses being dominated," "nurses' ineffective power in the health system," "low attention to equitable care in health system," "lack of clarity in measuring equitable care," "the health structure's inconsistency with equity," and "the inefficiency of the care system." There is a mutual relationship between providing fair care and nurses' perceptions of equity. Nurses who have themselves experienced equity can provide their patients the experience of equity. This mutual relationship is actualized in a context in which fair care is clearly defined and demanded.

  14. [Standardisation of nursing care amongst patients in prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Delgado, M M

    2014-01-01

    To develop the Standardized Nursing Care Process format amongst patients in a prison. Observational, descriptive study, conducted on a sample of thirty patients in Soria Prison between March and June 2011. We collected information via a review of medical records and conducted an interview of nursing assessments using functional patterns. Subsequent nursing diagnoses and interrelated problems were obtained using NANDA taxonomy. The subsequent use of NIC and NOC taxonomy marked the activities and performance criteria for each diagnosis, in the same way as for interrelated problems. The nursing diagnoses found in the patient sample analyzed, and the frequency thereof, reveal peculiarities in terms of the health care needs of the prison population, which makes it possible to standardize nursing care plans for the population under study.

  15. [Refusal of nursing care, the legal perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisman, Jérôme

    2016-10-01

    The refusal of nursing care forms part of the freedom offered to anyone wanting to refuse, consciously and knowingly, any form of nursing care such as washing, the taking of medication or hospitalisation. However, limits are fixed by law as well as by case law. Are we totally free in the expression of our will? Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  17. Care management in nursing within emergency care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane; Vieira Hermida, Patrícia Madalena; da Silva Copelli, Fernanda Hannah; Guedes Dos Santos, José Luís; Lorenzini Erdmann, Alacoque; Regina de Andrade, Selma

    2015-12-01

    Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  18. Collaborative HIV care in primary health care: nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngunyulu, R N; Peu, M D; Mulaudzi, F M; Mataboge, M L S; Phiri, S S

    2017-12-01

    Collaborative HIV care between the nurses and traditional health practitioners is an important strategy to improve health care of people living with HIV. To explore and describe the views of nurses regarding collaborative HIV care in primary healthcare services in the City of Tshwane, South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive design was used to explore and describe the views of nurses who met the study's inclusion criteria. In-depth individual interviews were conducted to collect data from purposively selected nurses. Content analysis was used to analyse data. Two main categories were developed during the data analysis stage. The views of nurses and health system challenges regarding collaborative HIV care. The study findings revealed that there was inadequate collaborative HIV care between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners. It is evident that there is inadequate policy implementation, monitoring and evaluation regarding collaboration in HIV care. The study findings might influence policymakers to consider the importance of collaborative HIV care, and improve the quality of care by strengthening the referral system and follow-up of people living with HIV and AIDS, as a result the health outcomes as implied in the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 might be improved. Training and involvement of traditional health practitioners in the nursing and health policy should be considered to enhance and build a trustworthy working relationship between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners in HIV care. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Linking Unit Collaboration and Nursing Leadership to Nurse Outcomes and Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chenjuan; Shang, Jingjing; Bott, Marjorie J

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the effects of unit collaboration and nursing leadership on nurse outcomes and quality of care. Along with the current healthcare reform, collaboration of care providers and nursing leadership has been underscored; however, empirical evidence of the impact on outcomes and quality of care has been limited. Data from 29742 nurses in 1228 units of 200 acute care hospitals in 41 states were analyzed using multilevel linear regressions. Collaboration (nurse-nurse collaboration and nurse-physician collaboration) and nursing leadership were measured at the unit level. Outcomes included nurse job satisfaction, intent to leave, and nurse-reported quality of care. Nurses reported lower intent to leave, higher job satisfaction, and better quality of care in units with better collaboration and stronger nursing leadership. Creating a care environment of strong collaboration among care providers and nursing leadership can help hospitals maintain a competitive nursing workforce supporting high quality of care.

  20. Facilitating change among nursing assistants in long term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Francois; Etheridge, Francis; Couturier, Yves

    2012-11-09

    In this article, the authors consider the implementation of change in long term care organizations (LTCOs) and present their study describing the process by which new nursing assistants are informally integrated into LTCOs in Quebec, Canada. The study method included 23 in-depth interviews with nursing assistants in two long term care centres. The findings enabled the authors to describe the informal process by which new nursing assistants are integrated into LTCOs and the manner in which informal work strategies enhance the work of nursing care, thus enabling the nursing assistants to manage heavy workloads. The authors discuss whether this teamwork is a deterrent to change or a lever for change and address issues regarding the collective structure of nursing assistant teams. Implications for practice include a Five-Step Innovation Plan. In conclusion, the authors propose that organizational change among nursing assistants in a LTCO is best accomplished when the leaders consider the nursing assistants' strong sense of community to be a change engine rather than a change obstacle.

  1. [Hospice palliative care education for nursing students, nurses, and advanced nursing practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Shu; Ying, Wan-Ping; Chao, Co-Shi Chantal

    2009-02-01

    The aim of hospice palliative education care is to train nurses in hospice philosophy, terminal care skills, nursing care competencies, and professional reliability. Student nurses, staff nurses, and advanced practice nurses must be taught through a proper sequence, from novice to expert. Working together with patients and their families, nurses can educate and care for the physical, social and spiritual needs of terminally ill patients. Currently, problems faced in hospice palliative care education include: 1. The lack of a systematic plan focusing on hospice palliative care and terminal care in nursing schools; 2. The absence of comfort care, communications, ethics, and other relevant issues in extant education and training; 3. The limited number of institutes that currently provide in-service training; 4. The shortage of teachers proficient in both hospice care knowledge and practice; and 5. The current overdependence on traditional nursing education models, which hinders student nurse originality and delays staff nurse growth. Faced with the present issues, self-reflection, localization, and multiple teaching strategies should be the critical developmental directions of hospice palliative education. In order to improve terminal care quality, it is also important to integrate practice, education, and research in order to train more hospice palliative nurses.

  2. Supporting palliative care clients who live alone: Nurses' perspectives on improving quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar M; Breen, Lauren J; Skett, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Terminally ilL people who live alone at home are disadvantaged in terms of their places of care and death and health outcomes. There is a need to trial models of care that can extend the period of care at home for as long as possible for this group. The objective was to explore the experiences of nurses providing care to terminally ill clients who live at home alone and who were receiving either additional care aide support or a personal alarm through an RCT. Nine nurses in a home-based palliative care service in Western Australia completed a questionnaire (82% response rate). Client willingness to accept additional support from care aides, development of rapport between the client and care staff, and willingness to use the alarm appropriately all influenced the effectiveness of the models of care. These models of care may negate the need for frequent nurses' visits when nurses feeL confident that the care aide can pass on relevant information or that the client will use the alarm when required. Both models of care assisted in meeting the challenges to care provision; however, further larger trials are needed to test whether these might translate into granting clients their wishes regarding places of terminal care and death. This study is the first account of nurses' perspectives on service provision to support palliative care clients who live alone. It has prompted changes in practice and will inform service planning for this growing and challenging population group.

  3. Use of the nursing interventions classification by critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titler, M G; Bulechek, G M; McCloskey, J C

    1996-08-01

    A survey of 111 critical care nurses was carried out to determine the frequency with which they perform each of the 336 interventions in the NIC. Forty-nine interventions were used at least daily, indicating a set of core interventions unique to critical care practice. These findings have implications for critical care practice, education, and research.

  4. [Rehabilitation and nursing-care robots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisuka, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    In the extremely aged society, rehabilitation staff will be required to provide ample rehabilitation training for more stroke patients and more aged people with disabilities despite limitations in human resources. A nursing-care robot is one potential solution from the standpoint of rehabilitation. The nursing-care robot is defined as a robot which assists aged people and persons with disabilities in daily life and social life activities. The nursing-care robot consists of an independent support robot, caregiver support robot, and life support robot. Although many nursing-care robots have been developed, the most appropriate robot must be selected according to its features and the needs of patients and caregivers in the field of nursing-care.

  5. Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Registered Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirsten Haugaard; Turner, de Sales

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Nurses The purpose of this study was to explore how Danish registered nurses understand the phenomenon of spiritual care and how their understanding impacts on their interventions with their patients. Nurses are responsible for the provision of care which...... approach rooted in the philosophy of Gadamer was chosen as methodology. In-depth interviews were used as data collection tool, and six registered nurses who worked within hospital settings in Denmark were interviewed. The findings revealed that deep knowing of the patients were essential before nurses...... would engage in provision of spiritual care. The participants acknowledged that their understanding of spirituality influenced their provision of spiritual care, which was recognized as a challenge requiring the nurse’s initiative and courage. Spirituality was primarily understood as a patient’s private...

  6. Models of Care in Geriatric Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhenn, Peggy S; Perrin, Sylvie; McCarthy, Alexandra L

    2016-02-01

    To review models of care for older adults with cancer, with a focus on the role of the oncology nurse in geriatric oncology care. International exemplars of geriatric oncology nursing care are discussed. Published peer reviewed literature, Web-based resources, professional society materials, and the authors' experience. Nursing care for older patients with cancer is complex and requires integrating knowledge from multiple disciplines that blend the sciences of geriatrics, oncology, and nursing, and which recognizes the dimensions of quality of life. Oncology nurses can benefit from learning key skills of comprehensive geriatric screening and assessment to improve the care they provide for older adults with cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management for nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    A. Aziz Alimul Hidayat; M. Kes

    2015-01-01

    Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management is an integration model in nursing care records, especially records nursing assessment and diagnosis in one format. This model can reduce the duration of the recording in nursing care, and make it easier for students to understand the nursing diagnosis, so that nursing interventions more effective. The purpose of this paper was to describes the form integration documentation of nursing assessmen...

  8. Spiritual care in nursing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, M; Ahmadi, F; Mohammadi, E; Kazemnejad, A

    2014-06-01

    Around the world, spiritual care in nursing is a critical part of providing holistic care, but within our profession, there is a lack of certainty over the meaning of spirituality and delivery of spiritual care, including nurses thinking of spirituality as religion. We adopted the eight-step Walker and Avant's concept analysis approach to provide a definition of the concept, searching and analysing international and national online databases. Inclusion criterion included that articles were published between 1950 and 2012 in English or Persian language. Finally, 151 articles and 7 books were included in the analysis. The attributes of spiritual care are healing presence, therapeutic use of self, intuitive sense, exploration of the spiritual perspective, patient-centredness, meaning-centred therapeutic intervention and creation of a spiritually nurturing environment. Spiritual care is a subjective and dynamic concept, a unique aspect of care that integrates all the other aspects. It emerges in the context of nurses' awareness of the transcendent dimension of life and reflects a patient's reality. The provision of spiritual care leads to positive consequences such as healing for patients and promotion of spiritual awareness for nurses. The conceptual definition of spiritual care provided in this study can help clinical nurses, educators and nurse managers to develop and implement evidence-based health policies, comprehensive staff training programmes and practical quality assessment guidelines to try to ensure that all nurses are competent to include relevant spiritual care in practice. A comprehensive definition of the concept of spiritual care ensued. The findings can facilitate further development of nursing knowledge and practice in spiritual care and facilitate correction of common misconceptions about the provision of spiritual care. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Special informal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wittenberg; M.H. Kwekkeboom; A.H. de Boer

    2012-01-01

    Original title: Bijzondere mantelzorg The notion of informal care generally conjures up a picture of care provided to older persons by relatives and friends. However, people with psychiatric problems or intellectual disabilities also receive a great deal of care from those close to them. As

  10. Drug information resources used by nurse practitioners and collaborating physicians at the point of care in Nova Scotia, Canada: a survey and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Misener Ruth

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Keeping current with drug therapy information is challenging for health care practitioners. Technologies are often implemented to facilitate access to current and credible drug information sources. In the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, legislation was passed in 2002 to allow nurse practitioners (NPs to practice collaboratively with physician partners. The purpose of this study was to determine the current utilization patterns of information technologies by these groups of practitioners. Methods Nurse practitioners and their collaborating physician partners in Nova Scotia were sent a survey in February 2005 to determine the frequency of use, usefulness, accessibility, credibility, and current/timeliness of personal digital assistant (PDA, computer, and print drug information resources. Two surveys were developed (one for PDA users and one for computer users and revised based on a literature search, stakeholder consultation, and pilot-testing results. A second distribution to nonresponders occurred two weeks following the first. Data were entered and analysed with SPSS. Results Twenty-seven (14 NPs and 13 physicians of 36 (75% recipients responded. 22% (6 returned personal digital assistant (PDA surveys. Respondents reported print, health professionals, and online/electronic resources as the most to least preferred means to access drug information, respectively. 37% and 35% of respondents reported using "both print and electronic but print more than electronic" and "print only", respectively, to search monograph-related drug information queries whereas 4% reported using "PDA only". Analysis of respondent ratings for all resources in the categories print, health professionals and other, and online/electronic resources, indicated that the Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties and pharmacists ranked highly for frequency of use, usefulness, accessibility, credibility, and current/timeliness by both groups of

  11. Caring science and human caring theory: transforming personal and professional practices of nursing and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This article explores some of the latest developments of the emergence of Caring Science as the moral, theoretical, and philosophical foundation for nursing, leading to transformative personal/professional practices. Through nurse's taking responsibility for advancing nursing qua nursing, practitioners, patients, and systems alike are witnessing a revolution in nursing, which is restoring the heart of nursing and health care through theory-guided philosophical practices of heart-centered love and caring as the foundation for healing.

  12. The Role of Preference on Outcomes of People Receiving Evidence-Informed Community Wound Care in Their Home or in a Nurse-Clinic Setting: A Cohort Study (n = 230

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret B. Harrison

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study followed a cohort of community-dwelling individuals receiving wound-care in a large urban-rural region. During a randomized control trial (RCT evaluating outcomes of receiving care in a nurse-clinic or at home, many approached were willing to participate if they could choose their location of care. This provided a unique opportunity to enroll them as a “choice” cohort, following them in the same manner as the trial participants but allowing them to select their setting of care. The objective was to investigate the role of preference and location of care on care outcomes, including satisfaction with care, healing, health-related quality of life (HRQL, pain, and resource use. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of 126 individuals enrolled in an RCT to receive care at home or in a nurse-clinic (Allocated group, and an additional 104 who received care at home or in a nurse-clinic based on their preference (Choice group. Mobile individuals with a leg ulcer of venous or mixed venous etiology, referred for community leg ulcer care, were eligible. Specially-trained nurses provided care to both groups using an evidence-informed protocol. Baseline data included socio-demographic, circumstance-of-living and a detailed wound assessment. Mean age of the cohort was 68 years. Satisfaction, healing, recurrence, pain, HRQL, and resource utilization did not differ between groups. If available, individuals should have an option of care venue given almost half of those approached indicated a clear preference for clinic or home. With outcomes being similar, health care planners and decision-makers, as well as individuals and their families, can feel confident that the setting of care will not impact the outcomes. However, larger studies in other contexts are needed to explore the interaction between choice and setting.

  13. Licensed practical nurse scope of practice and quality of nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine; Thorpe, Joshua M; McConnell, Eleanor S

    2013-01-01

    Although higher levels of registered nurse (RN) staffing in nursing homes are related to better care quality, licensed practical nurses (LPNs) provide most licensed-nursing care; prior research is mixed regarding how this influences quality. The nature of LPN practice, and RN direction of that practice, follows in part from state nurse practice acts (NPAs). Among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the aims of this study were to describe regulatory differences in how LPNs contribute to nursing assessment, care planning, delegation and supervision, and RN practice in these domains and to explore how these regulatory differences relate to quality of care in nursing homes. The study design was a sequential explanatory mixed-methods design of NPAs and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid quality measures of long-stay nursing home residents. In the qualitative strand, 51 NPAs and related administrative code were analyzed to classify guidance on RN and LPN practice; then, the coded data were transformed to quantitative indicators of specificity regarding LPN and RN scope of practice. In the quantitative strand, state NPA data were linked to facility-level Centers for Medicare and Medicaid staffing and quality measures (N = 12,698 facilities) for cross-sectional, quantitative analyses. States varied considerably in how NPAs guided LPN and RN scope of practice. NPA differences were related to quality indicators of resident pain, catheter use, weight loss, and restraints, even when accounting for nursing home staff mix. Care quality was better in states where the NPA clearly described LPN scope, but only when there was also greater RN availability (p nursing practice regulations moves beyond traditional staffing measures to inform understanding of the effects of the RN-to-LPN staffing ratio on quality of care in nursing homes.

  14. Mobile computing and the quality of home care nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Moreault, Marie-Pierre; Poba-Nzaou, Placide; Nahas, Georgette; Templier, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the introduction of mobile computing on the quality of home care nursing practice in Québec. The software, which structured and organized the nursing activities in patients' homes, was installed sequentially in nine community health centres. The completeness of the nursing notes was compared in 77 paper records (pre-implementation) and 73 electronic records (post-implementation). Overall, the introduction of the software was associated with an improvement in the completeness of the nursing notes. All 137 nurse users were asked to complete a structured questionnaire. A total of 101 completed questionnaires were returned (74% response rate). Overall, the nurses reported a very high level of satisfaction with the quality of clinical information collected. A total of 57 semi-structured interviews were conducted and most nurses believed that the new software represented a user-friendly tool with a clear and understandable structure. A postal questionnaire was sent to approximately 1240 patients. A total of 223 patients returned the questionnaire (approximately 18% response rate). Overall, patients felt that the use of mobile computing during home visits allowed nurses to manage their health condition better and, hence, provide superior care services. The use of mobile computing had positive and significant effects on the quality of care provided by home nurses.

  15. Effects of technology on nursing care and caring attributes of a sample of Iranian critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherian, Behnaz; Sabzevari, Sakineh; Mirzaei, Tayebeh; Ravari, Ali

    2017-04-01

    To examine the association between attitudes of critical care nurses about influences of technology and their caring attributes. In a cross-sectional study, firstly the psychometric properties of caring attributes questionnaire, which was developed to examine caring attributes of a sample of international nurses, was refined in a sample of 200 critical care nurses working in educational hospitals of a city in the southwest of Iran. Results of factor analysis with Varimax rotation decreased 60 items of caring attributes to 47 items which loaded under five subscales of caring negation, caring compassionate, caring advocacy, caring essence and caring communication. Secondly, attitudes of these nurses toward influences of technology on nursing care were assessed using a 22-item questionnaire, developed by the study researchers. Finally, the association between scores of caring attributes and attitudes toward influences of technology of this sample was determined. There was a positive association between caring attributes and influences of technology among our study nurses. Caring attributes scores were higher in female single nurses. Although caring attributes' scores had decreased along with age and work experience, caring commitment was higher in older more experienced nurses. Furthermore, female nurses had a better attitude toward influences of technology on their care. In contrast, younger and less experienced nurses had negative views on the effects of technology on nursing care. Continuing education and life-long learning on application of new technological equipment in nursing care and harmonising their use with caring values are necessary for nursing students and registered nurses to ensure delivering a patient-centred care, in a technologically driven environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The transition from 'informed patient' care to 'patient informed' care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    We are in the midst of a real change in the application of information technology to support the delivery of healthcare. We are seeing a shift from the 'informed patient' which has resulted from improved access to healthcare information, primarily from the Web, to the 'participative patient' as we move into Web 2.0 territory. The last decade has seen significant strides in the application of healthcare information to support patient care including: Increased access to healthcare related information by the patient through access to healthcare information on the Web (1.0). The development of electronic patient/health records. Improved access to knowledge for care professionals has enabled the dissipation of professional clinical skills with the introduction of nurse practitioners and increased use of therapies. Improved access to patient related information across disciplines is beginning to enable the shift from acute based to community based care. The introduction of home care technologies has enabled self monitoring in supporting self care. There are also developments in the way care is provided with an increasing diversity of healthcare providers with the challenges this has presented in exchanging patient related information to support continuity of care. We are now at another major turning point that could present greater challenges for healthcare professionals, organisations and the patient or client. These developments include: The application of information sharing services commonly referred to as Web 2.0. As a result we are seeing a transition from the 'informed patient' to the 'participative patient' that will present increasing challenges for healthcare professionals and healthcare organisations in adapting care to embrace this evolution. New entrants to the ehealth market are now emerging such as Google and Microsoft who are competing to 'own' the 'healthcare consumer'. Open source solutions for EPR/EHRs are now emerging that will challenge the

  17. Evaluating home health care nursing outcomes with OASIS and NOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julia Stocker; Barkauskas, Violet; Keenan, Gail

    2008-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and responsiveness of the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) to the effects of home healthcare nursing interventions. A quasi-experimental before-after study was conducted using a sample of 106 home healthcare participants referred to one of seven participating Midwest home healthcare agencies for treatment of a cardiac condition. Patient outcomes data were collected at home healthcare admission and discharge using OASIS and NOC. Nursing intervention data were collected at each visit using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). Intervention intensity was calculated by totaling the number of NIC interventions provided over the episode of care. Neither OASIS nor NOC were sensitive to the effects of home healthcare nursing as measured by intervention intensity. The OASIS was not responsive to clinically discernable changes in patient outcomes; while the NOC was responsive to patient status change in the outcome categories including activities of daily living, cardiopulmonary status, coping, and illness management behavior. Outcome measures that are more condition-specific and discipline-specific are more responsive to the effects of home healthcare nursing. Further research is needed to identify and refine outcome measures that are sensitive and responsive to the effects of nursing care in home health and other nursing settings. The use of outcome measures that are more sensitive and responsive to nursing are more effective in guiding nursing practice.

  18. Pediatric nurses' ethical difficulties in the bedside care of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kwisoon; Kim, Yoonjung; Yang, Yoonseo

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric nurses experience ethically difficult situations in their everyday work. Several studies have been conducted to reveal ethical issues among pediatric nurses; we do not think their ethical difficulties have been explored sufficiently from their own perspective. This study aimed to explore the ethical difficulties faced by pediatric nurses during bedside care for hospitalized children. A phenomenological approach was used to collect and analyze interview data from 14 female pediatric nurses in South Korea. Ethical considerations: Ethical review was obtained from an ethics committee. The participants were informed about the aim of the study, and voluntary participation, anonymous response, and confidentiality were explained to them. Three themes emerged from the analysis: ethical numbness in a task-oriented context, negative feelings toward family caregivers, and difficulty in expressing oneself in an authoritative climate. We need to develop strategies to manage ethical difficulties at an institutional level. Furthermore, it is important that pediatric nurses have the opportunity to communicate with fellow nurses and other medical staff regarding ethical difficulties. In addition, cultivation of pediatric nurses' moral, ethical, and philosophical thinking patterns requires the immediate provision of continuous education in nursing ethics at the site of clinical nursing, time to discuss ethical difficulties, and other supportive measures. Findings indicated that, to provide high-quality patient-centered care, we should enhance nurses' ethical sensitivity and autonomy and improve the ethical climate in hospitals.

  19. Recommendations for culturally sensitive nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josipovic, P

    2000-06-01

    Australia's health care clientele reflects the diversity of this multicultural society. Patients and health care professionals have expectations of health care which may not be met to their satisfaction or needs. The perceived inadequacies of and increased demands on the Australian health care system are reflected in the literature and by active political lobbying. Thus, there is an urgent need to investigate how the health care system can be improved and how recommendations from research can be put into place. One mechanism that may provide some of the changes required is to use the skills, experience and qualifications of culturally and linguistically diverse nurses. This paper, which is based on a descriptive ethnographic research project, will provide insight for utilizing this valuable and available resource, and how nursing education curricula can be modified to adequately incorporate transcultural nursing practices, so that nurses can meet the challenges of caring for Australia's multicultural population.

  20. Art, science, or both? Keeping the care in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmine, Tayray

    2009-12-01

    Nursing is widely considered as an art and a science, wherein caring forms the theoretical framework of nursing. Nursing and caring are grounded in a relational understanding, unity, and connection between the professional nurse and the patient. Task-oriented approaches challenge nurses in keeping care in nursing. This challenge is ongoing as professional nurses strive to maintain the concept, art, and act of caring as the moral center of the nursing profession. Keeping the care in nursing involves the application of art and science through theoretical concepts, scientific research, conscious commitment to the art of caring as an identity of nursing, and purposeful efforts to include caring behaviors during each nurse-patient interaction. This article discusses the profession of nursing as an art and a science, and it explores the challenges associated with keeping the care in nursing.

  1. Shifting cardiovascular care to nurses results in structured chronic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouwens, Elvira; van Lieshout, Jan; van den Hombergh, Pieter; Laurant, Miranda; Wensing, Michel

    2014-07-01

    To explore nurse involvement in cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) in primary care and how this involvement was associated with the degree of structured chronic illness care. A cross-sectional observational study in 7 European countries. Five aspects of nurse involvement in CVRM and 35 specific components of structured chronic illness care were documented in 202 primary care practices in Austria, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, and Switzerland. An overall measure for chronic care management, range 0 to 5, was constructed, derived from elements of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Random coefficient regression modeling was used to explore associations. A majority of practices involved nurses for organization of CVRM in administrative tasks (82.2 %), risk factor monitoring (78.5%) and patient education (57.1%). Fewer practices involved nurses in defining protocol and the organization for CVRM (45%) or diagnosis and treatment (34.6%). With an increasing number of tasks handled by nurses, overall median adoption of CCM increased from 2.7 (95% CI, 1.5-3.6) to 4.2 (95% CI, 3.8-4.1). When the number of nurse tasks increased by 1, the adoption of CCM increased by 0.13 (P involvement had high adoption of CCM, while variation of adoption of CCM across practices reduced substantially with an increasing level of nurse involvement. Nurses were involved in the delivery of CVRM in varying degrees. Higher involvement of nurses was associated with higher degree of structured chronic illness care, with less variation.

  2. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  3. Towards a theory of quality nursing care for patients with cancer through hermeneutic phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Andreas; Papadopoulos, I Rena; Beadsmoore, Alan

    2009-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study to describe the attributes of quality nursing narrated by a sample of patients with cancer, their advocates and their nurses. Quality nursing care is a multifaceted concept which is open to interpretation. Studies show that while nurses are striving to succeed in providing quality care for their patients and the patients are urging for better nursing care, the complexity in understanding the concept often causes confusion among patients and nurses. The study was a phenomenological hermeneutical study based on the ideas of the French Philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Twenty-five patients with cancer, six advocates and twenty cancer nurses were recruited in Cyprus by a purposive method. The informants were encouraged to narrate their lived experiences of receiving and providing quality nursing care. A discussion follows whether the findings can be regarded as a theory of quality in cancer care. Based on the informants' narratives the following six attributes of quality nursing care materialized: a) being valued, b) being respected c) being cared for by communicative and supportive nurses, d) being confirmed, e) being cared for religiously and spiritually and f) belonging. The six attributes can be proposed as a descriptive theory of quality nursing care within the tension between empirical data and pre-understanding. The theory emphasizes the existential needs such as communicated with, being respected, and being cared for which should be considered important when providing nursing care to patients with cancer.

  4. Women's perceptions of Nurse-Midwives' caring behaviours during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interventions are needed which foster awareness where nurses become more sensitive to the mothers' emotional needs in an equally sensitive health care system. There is also need for more research into care provided following perinatal deaths in resource-poor settings to increase the evidence-base for informed and ...

  5. Perception of Nurses about Palliative Care: Experience from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nurses play a major role all over the world in the palliative care team. Aim: The aim of this study was to ... The questionnaire sought information about the sociodemographic profile of respondents, their knowledge of definition and philosophy of palliative care among other things. Descriptive statistics was used ...

  6. Insights on compassion and patient-centred nursing in intensive care: A constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimowicz, Samantha; Perry, Lin; Lewis, Joanne

    2017-12-21

    To explore patient-centred nursing, compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue from intensive care nurses' perspectives. Compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue can influence critical care nurses' decisions to either continue or leave the profession, and could impact the compassionate patient-centred nursing care patients receive during their ICU admission. This qualitative research design was informed by Charmaz's Grounded Theory Constructivist methodology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 critical care nurses of two ICUs in Australia during 2016. Interview data were analysed using grounded theory processes. Findings reflected positive and negative impacts on critical care nurses' ability to deal compassionately with their patients. Effects on patient-centred nursing and critical care nurses' own well-being were revealed. A core category of "Expectations" emerged, explaining the tension between critical care nurses' biomedical, clinical skills and knowledge versus compassionate, patient-centred nursing care. This tension was clarified and expanded in subcategories of "Life in the Balance," "Passion and Pressure," "Understanding and Advocacy" and "Tenacity and Fragility". Providing patient-centred nursing may enhance critical care nurses' experience of compassion satisfaction, in turn impacting delivery of compassionate patient-centred nursing to generate a virtuous circle. Critical care nurses who feel respected and supported by their management team and colleagues experience feelings of compassion satisfaction, leading to greater engagement and care towards their patient. Systematically addressing critical care nurses' needs to successfully balance biomedical with compassionate nursing care may lead to greater well-being in the critical care nursing workforce and improve patient experience of intensive care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eeden, Karin; Moeke, Dennis; Bekker, René

    2016-09-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible for the daily care of the residents and account for a significant proportion of the total labor expenses. In practice, the lack of reliable data makes it difficult for nursing home managers to make informed staffing decisions. The focus of this study lies on the 'care on demand' process in a Belgian nursing home. Based on the analysis of real-life 'call button' data, a queueing model is presented which can be used by nursing home managers to determine the number of care workers required to meet a specific service level. Based on numerical experiments an 80/10 service level is proposed for this nursing home, meaning that at least 80 percent of the clients should receive care within 10 minutes after a call button request. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to develop a quantitative model for the 'care on demand' process in a nursing home.

  8. Nursing futility, managing medicine: Nurses' perspectives on the transition from life-prolonging to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Good, Phillip; Lwin, Zarnie

    2015-07-24

    The shift from life-prolonging and palliative care can be fraught with interpersonal complexities as patients face dilemmas around mortality and the dying process. Nurses can play a central role in managing these moments, often with a focus on promoting and enhancing communication around: the meaning of palliative care, the nature of futility and the dying process more broadly. These sites of nurse-patient communication can be highly charged and pose unique challenges to nurses including how to balance nursing perspectives versus those of other stakeholders including doctors. Here, drawing on interviews with nurses, we explore their accounts of communication about futility and the process of transitioning to palliative care. The interviews reveal nurses' perspectives on the following: the art of conversing around futility and managing patient resistance, the influence of guilt and individual biographies in shaping communication, the importance of non-verbal and the informal in communication, the impact of conflicting organisational expectations on nurses and the process of learning to effectively communicate. We argue that these transitional moments articulate important, and at times problematic, aspects of contemporary nursing and nurse-medical relations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Shifting cardiovascular care to nurses results in structured chronic care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouwens, E.; Lieshout, J. van; Hombergh, P. van den; Laurant, M.; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore nurse involvement in cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) in primary care and how this involvement was associated with the degree of structured chronic illness care. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional observational study in 7 European countries. METHODS: Five aspects of nurse

  10. Caring: theoretical perspectives of relevance to nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCance, T V; McKenna, H P; Boore, J R

    1999-12-01

    Caring as a central concept within nursing has led to the development of several caring theories, the most well known being Madeleine Leininger's Theory of Culture Care and Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring, both of which were formulated in the 1970s. This paper explores a total of four caring theories: the two established theories presented by Leininger and Watson, Simone Roach's theory developed in the 1980s, and a recent caring theory developed by Boykin & Schoenhofer. A comparison of these theories is presented drawing on a number of criteria, namely: origin of theory, scope of theory, definition of caring, description of nursing, key concepts of the theory, and goal/outcome. Additionally, simplicity as a central component of internal structure is examined in relation to each. Based on this analysis, similarities and differences are highlighted, concluding with a discussion of the utility of the caring theories within nursing practice.

  11. Palliative Care Nursing Interventions in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Eaton, Linda H.; Rue, Tessa; Hong, Elizabeth; Coenen, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to describe the nursing interventions that nurses in Thailand identify as most important in promoting dignified dying. Design This study used a cross-sectional descriptive design. Method A total of 247 Thai nurses completed a paper-and-pencil survey written in Thai. The survey included both demographic questions and palliative care interventions, listed with summative rating scales, from the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) catalogue Palliative Care for Dignified Dying. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Findings The five most important nursing interventions to promote dignified dying, ranked by average importance rating, were (a) maintain dignity and privacy, (b) establish trust, (c) manage pain, (d) establish rapport, and (e) manage dyspnea. Conclusions This research identified the palliative care nursing interventions considered most important by nurses in Thailand to promote dignified dying. Implications for Practice The ICNP catalogue Palliative Care for Dignified Dying can be used for planning and managing palliative nursing care in Thailand. PMID:24014487

  12. Cultural Awareness: Nursing Care of Iraqi Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Petra; Edge, Bethany; Agazio, Janice; Prue-Owens, Kathy

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the cultural factors that have an impact on military nursing care for Iraqi patients. The results were part of a larger study in which the purpose was to understand nurses' experiences of delivery of care for Iraqi patients. Three focus groups, consisting of military registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, were used to generate rich descriptions of experiences in a military combat support hospital in Iraq. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis methods. Culturally, the differences between the Iraqi patients and the nurses included variations in communication, diet, and beliefs and values in reference to gender and patient dependency. The findings indicated that the nurses need language skills and cultural customs and beliefs training to provide care to culturally diverse patients. In addition, support services, such as dieticians, need to be involved in the plan of care to address applicable cultural issues. Implementation of learning to provide nurses language skills and cultural awareness of the diet, customs and beliefs of Iraqi people as well as the economic, political, and social factors that have an impact on their lives will promote quality nursing care and optimal health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Delivering compassionate care in intensive care units: nurses' perceptions of enablers and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jenny; Winch, Sarah; Strube, Petra; Mitchell, Marion; Henderson, Amanda

    2016-12-01

    Compassion is core to nursing practice. Nurses' expression of compassion is a complex interaction informed by the nurse, the patient and the practice environment. The aim of this study was to identify personal, professional and organizational factors, intensive care nurses, in a major metropolitan facility in Australia, identified as enabling or disabling them to be compassionate. Intensive care nurses (n = 171) reflected on their experiences during 'compassion cafés' conducted in 2015. Qualitative, reflexive methods were used to explore ICU nurses' perceptions of enablers and barriers. Nurses documented their perceptions, which were thematically analysed. Meanings were subsequently verified with participants. The findings identified multiple factors both inside and outside the workplace that constrained or enabled nurses' ability to be compassionate. Two main factors inside the workplace were culture of the team, in particular, support from colleagues and congruency in work practices and decision-making, and connections with patients and families. Outside the workplace, nurses were influenced by their values about care and lifestyle factors such as family demands. Nurses capacity to be compassionate is a complex interplay between nursing knowledge and expectations, organizational structures and lifestyle factors. The responsibility for 'compassionate' care is a shared one. Nurses need to be cognizant of factors that are enabling or inhibiting their ability to be compassionate. Healthcare leaders have a responsibility to provide structural support (staffing, education and space) that assist nurses to deliver compassionate care and where appropriate cater for nurses needs so that they are better able to be compassionate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. "I just think that we should be informed" a qualitative study of family involvement in advance care planning in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Lisbeth; Lillemoen, Lillian

    2016-11-10

    As part of the research project "End-of-life Communication in Nursing Homes. Patient Preferences and Participation", we have studied how Advance Care Planning (ACP) is carried out in eight Norwegian nursing homes. The concept of ACP is a process for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of progressive illness, anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. While an individualistic autonomy based attitude is at the fore in most studies on ACP, there is a lack of empirical studies on how family members' participation and involvement in ACP- conversations may promote nursing home patients' participation in decisions on future treatment and end-of-life care. Based on empirical data and family ethics perspectives, the purpose of this study is to add insights to the complexity of ACP-conversations and illuminate how a family ethics perspective may improve the quality of the ACP and promote nursing home patients' participation in advance care planning. Participant observations of ACP-conversations in eight nursing homes. The observations were followed by interviews with patients and relatives together on how they experienced being part of the conversation, and expressing their views on future medical treatment, hospitalization and end-of-life issues. We found that the way nursing home patients and relatives are connected and related to each other, constitutes an intertwined unit. Further, we found that relatives' involvement and participation in ACP- conversations is significant to uncover, and give the nursing home staff insight into, what is important in the nursing home patient's life at the time. The third analytical theme is patients' and relatives' shared experiences of the dying and death of others. Drawing on past experiences can be a way of introducing or talking about death. An individual autonomy approach in advance care planning should be complemented with a family ethics approach. To be open to family ethics when planning for the

  15. Effects of nursing process-based simulation for maternal child emergency nursing care on knowledge, attitude, and skills in clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Shin, Gisoo

    2016-02-01

    Since previous studies on simulation-based education have been focused on fundamental nursing skills for nursing students in South Korea, there is little research available that focuses on clinical nurses in simulation-based training. Further, there is a paucity of research literature related to the integration of the nursing process into simulation training particularly in the emergency nursing care of high-risk maternal and neonatal patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of nursing process-based simulation on knowledge, attitudes, and skills for maternal and child emergency nursing care in clinical nurses in South Korea. Data were collected from 49 nurses, 25 in the experimental group and 24 in the control group, from August 13 to 14, 2013. This study was an equivalent control group pre- and post-test experimental design to compare the differences in knowledge, attitudes, and skills for maternal and child emergency nursing care between the experimental group and the control group. The experimental group was trained by the nursing process-based simulation training program, while the control group received traditional methods of training for maternal and child emergency nursing care. The experimental group was more likely to improve knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for clinical judgment about maternal and child emergency nursing care than the control group. Among five stages of nursing process in simulation, the experimental group was more likely to improve clinical skills required for nursing diagnosis and nursing evaluation than the control group. These results will provide valuable information on developing nursing process-based simulation training to improve clinical competency in nurses. Further research should be conducted to verify the effectiveness of nursing process-based simulation with more diverse nurse groups on more diverse subjects in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crucial contextual attributes of nursing leadership towards a care ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin; Stenberg, Maja

    2017-06-01

    It is of importance to understand and communicate caring ethics as a ground for qualitative caring environments. Research is needed on nursing attributes that are visible in nursing leadership since it may give bases for reflections related to the patterns of specific contexts. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of crucial attributes in nursing leadership toward an ethical care of patients in psychiatric in-patient settings. The design of the study was descriptive and qualitative with a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. Participants and research context: The study comprised focus group interviews with nurses working in indoor psychiatric care who participated after giving informed consent. Ethical considerations: Since the topic and informants are not labeled as sensitive and subject to ethical approval, it is not covered by the ethics committee's aim and purpose according to Swedish law. However, careful procedures have been followed according to ethics expressed in the Declaration of Helsinki. When identifying the thematic structures, analysis resulted in three major themes: To supply, including the following aspects: to supply evidence, to supply common space, and to supply good structures; To support, including the following aspects: to be a role model, to show appreciation and care, and to harbor; To shield, including the following aspects: to advocate, to emit non-tolerance of unethical behavior, and to reprove. Leadership is challenging for nurses and plays an important role in ethical qualitative care. These findings should not be understood as a description about nurse manager's role, which probably has different attributes and more focus on an organizational level. Making the understanding about crucial attributes explicit, the nurse may receive confirmation and recognition of crucial attributes for ethical care in order to move toward an ethical care.

  17. Facilitating nurses’ knowledge of the utilisation of reflexology in adults with chronic diseases to enable informed health education during comprehensive nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elna Steenkamp

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An integrative literature review of identified scientific evidence, published from January 2000 to December 2008, of the utilisation of reflexology as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM modalities to promote well-being and quality of life in adults with chronic diseases was done to facilitate nurses to give informed health education during comprehensive nursing care to patients with chronic diseases. Selected accessible databases were searched purposefully for research articles (N = 1171. Pre-set inclusion criteria were applied during the study selection process. The methodological study quality was reviewed and appraised with appropriate tools from the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP and the American Dietetic Association’s (ADA Evidence analysis manual (n = 21. Evidence extraction, analysis and synthesis of studies (n = 18 were done through the evidence class rating and level of strength as prescribed in the manuals of ADA and CASP. Findings indicate statistically significant reduction in the frequency of seizures in patients with intractable epilepsy, an improvement of sensory and urinary symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis and clinically significant reduction of anxiety and pain in patients with cancer and fibromyalgia syndrome. These findings can be utilised by nurses to inform patients with these chronic diseases about alternative ways of treatment. Opsomming ‘n Geïntegreerde literatuur oorsig van ge-identifiseerde wetenskaplike bewyse, gepubliseer vanaf Januarie 2000 tot Desember 2008, was gedoen oor die gebruik van refleksologie as aanvullende en alternatiewe behandelingsmodalitieit om welsyn en lewenskwaliteit te bevorder by volwassenes met kroniese siekte om verpleegkundiges te fasiliteer om ingeligte gesondheidsvoorligting te gee gedurende omvattende verpleegsorg aan pasiente met kroniese siektes. Geselekteerde toeganklike databasisse was doelbewustelik deursoek vir navorsingsartikels (N = 1171. Vooraf

  18. Sleep and nursing care activities in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritmala-Castren, Marita; Virtanen, Irina; Leivo, Sanna; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the quality of sleep of non-intubated patients and the night-time nursing care activities in an intensive care unit. The study also aimed to evaluate the effect of nursing care activities on the quality of sleep. An overnight polysomnography was performed in 21 alert, non-intubated, non-sedated adult patients, and all nursing care activities that involved touching the patient were documented by the bedside nurse. The median (interquartile range) amount of sleep was 387 (170, 486) minutes. The portion of deep non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep varied from 0% to 42% and REM sleep from 0% to 65%. The frequency of arousals and awakenings varied from two to 73 per hour. The median amount of nursing care activities was 0.6/h. Every tenth activity presumably awakened the patient. Patients who had more care activities had more light N1 sleep, less light N2 sleep, and less deep sleep. Nursing care was often performed while patients were awake. However, only 31% of the intervals between nursing care activities were over 90 min. More attention should be paid to better clustering of care activities. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Optimizing enactment of nursing roles: redesigning care processes and structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson K

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Karen Jackson,1 Deborah E White,2 Jeanne Besner,1 Jill M Norris21Health Systems and Workforce Research Unit, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaBackground: Effective and efficient use of nursing human resources is critical. The Nursing Role Effectiveness Model conceptualizes nursing practice in terms of key clinical role accountabilities and has the potential to inform redesign efforts. The aims of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate a job redesign intended to optimize the enactment of registered nurse (RN clinical role accountabilities.Methods: A job redesign was developed and implemented in a single medical patient care unit, the redesign unit. A mixed-methods design was used to evaluate the job redesign; a second medical patient care unit served as a control unit. Data from administrative databases, observations, interviews, and demographic surveys were collected pre-redesign (November 2005 and post-redesign (October 2007.Results: Several existing unit structures and processes (eg, model of care delivery influenced RNs' ability to optimally enact their role accountabilities. Redesign efforts were hampered by contextual issues, including organizational alignment, leadership, and timing. Overall, optimized enactment of RN role accountabilities and improvements to patient outcomes did not occur, yet this was predictable, given that the redesign was not successful. Although the results were disappointing, much was learned about job redesign.Conclusion: Potential exists to improve the utilization of nursing providers by situating nurses' work in a clinical role accountability framework and attending to a clear organizational vision and well-articulated strategic plan that is championed by leaders at all levels of the organization. Health care leaders require a clear understanding of nurses' role accountabilities, support in managing change, and

  20. Advanced nurse roles in UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Bonnie; Laurant, Miranda G; Reeves, David

    2006-07-03

    Nurses increasingly work as substitutes for, or to complement, general practitioners in the care of minor illness and the management of chronic diseases. Available research suggests that nurses can provide as high quality care as GPs in the provision of first contact and ongoing care for unselected patients. Reductions in cost are context dependent and rarely achieved. This is because savings on nurses' salaries are often offset by their lower productivity (due to longer consultations, higher patient recall rates, and increased use of tests and investigations). Gains in efficiency are not achieved when GPs continue to provide the services that have been delegated to nurses, instead of focusing on the services that only doctors can provide. Unintended consequences of extending nursing roles include loss of personal continuity of care for patients and increased difficulties with coordination of care as the multidisciplinary team size increases. Rapid access to care is, however, improved. There is a high capital cost involved in moving to multidisciplinary teams because of the need to train staff in new ways of working; revise legislation governing scope of practice; address concerns about legal liability; and manage professional resistance to change. Despite the unintended consequences and the high costs, extending nursing roles in primary care is a plausible strategy for improving service capacity without compromising quality of care or health outcomes for patients.

  1. Classification systems in nursing : Formalizing nursing knowledge and implications for nursing information systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, WTF; Epping, PJMM; Abraham, IL

    The development of nursing information systems (NIS) is often hampered by the fact that nursing lacks a unified nursing terminology and classification system. Currently there exist various initiatives in this area. We address the question as to how current initiatives in the development of nursing

  2. Futurism in nursing: Technology, robotics and the fundamentals of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Mandy M; Barnard, Alan

    2017-09-21

    To explore the concept of futurism and the emergence of robotics in relation to the fundamentals of care, highlighting how nurses need a more anticipatory and contemporary position towards technology to maintain relevance in the future. The future of nursing in Western countries will soon be linked with the emergence of robotics for efficient and cost-effective provision of fundamental care. Their emergence and roles with care of the body and more broadly assisting people with their daily living activities has enormous implications for the profession and health care. Despite this importance, how nursing understands and will respond to technological trends and developments is insufficiently reflected in the professions discourse. A discursive article. Literature from nursing fundamentals of care/fundamental care, information science, technology, humanities and philosophy informed the arguments in this article. This article examines the intersection of futurism and the fundamentals of care, and how adopting an anticipatory and posthuman perspective towards technological-care integration is necessary amidst a robot revolution in the techno-era. Nurses are currently challenged to understand, prioritise and deliver fundamental care. Health systems are challenged by a lack of care predicated by shortfalls in skilled staff and deficiencies in staff mobilisation. Both challenges can be compounded or alleviated by further integration of technology, but to maximise benefit requires forethought and understanding. This article can help open needed dialogue around planning for the future and is a call to action for the nursing profession to conceptualise its position on exponential technological growth and fundamental care provision. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Intensive care unit nurses' opinions about euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaş, Gülşah; Oztunç, Gürsel; Nazan Alparslan, Z

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to gain opinions about euthanasia from nurses who work in intensive care units. The research was planned as a descriptive study and conducted with 186 nurses who worked in intensive care units in a university hospital, a public hospital, and a private not-for-profit hospital in Adana, Turkey, and who agreed to complete a questionnaire. Euthanasia is not legal in Turkey. One third (33.9%) of the nurses supported the legalization of euthanasia, whereas 39.8% did not. In some specific circumstances, 44.1% of the nurses thought that euthanasia was being practiced in our country. The most significant finding was that these Turkish intensive care unit nurses did not overwhelmingly support the legalization of euthanasia. Those who did support it were inclined to agree with passive rather than active euthanasia (P = 0.011).

  4. Clinical Nurse Specialist Perceptions' of Spiritual Care: Nurses Need Support, Care Falls Short.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mitzi M; Harris, Karen; Hale, Deborah L

    The clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is positioned to influence spiritual care at three levels of practice: patient, nurse, and system. This study, the first to explore CNS spiritual care, reports on CNSs' perceptions in providing spiritual care. Four themes were extracted from interview data: 1) Providing direct spiritual support for patients, 2) Nurses need support in providing spiritual care, 3) Using existing resources, and 4) Spiritual care falls short. Not one CNS mentioned barriers to their direct provision of spiritual care. Results support that CNSs can improve spiritual care delivery.

  5. Palliative care nursing in rural and urban community settings: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Brazil, Kevin; Wilson, Donna M; Willison, Kathleen; Marshall, Denise; Taniguchi, Alan; Williams, Allison

    2011-07-01

    Nurses have key roles in the coordination and delivery of community-based palliative care. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between rural and urban community nurses' delivery of palliative care services. A survey was distributed to 277 nurses employed by a community agency in Ontario, Canada, and a 60% response rate was obtained. Nurses reported spending 27% of their time providing palliative care. Rural and urban nurses had similar roles in palliative care but rural nurses spent more time travelling and were more confident in their ability to provide palliative care. Both groups of nurses reported moderate job satisfaction and moderate satisfaction with the level of interdisciplinary collaboration in their practice. Several barriers to and facilitators of optimal palliative care provision were identified. The study results provide information about the needs of nurses that practise in these settings and may provide a basis for the development of strategies to address these needs.

  6. Show Your Stuff and Watch Your Tone: Nurses' Caring Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Ruth A; Clukey, Lory; Roberts, Melanie; Henderson, Ann

    2017-03-01

    Although it is perceived as essential, documentation of caring behaviors executed by nurses is rarely done. To facilitate what is important to patients and their family members, we need to understand what behaviors are perceived as caring or not caring. To explore perceptions of nurses' caring behaviors among intubated patients and their family members. A phenomenological study of 14 patients who were intubated, restrained, sedated, and received pain medication in an acute cardiovascular intensive care unit. The 14 patients and 8 of their family members were interviewed about their perceptions of this experience. A semistructured interview guide was used. Data were analyzed by using an inductive method consistent with qualitative research. Themes that emerged most often were providing information, providing reassurance, demonstrating proficiency, and being present. Other behaviors identified as caring behaviors were nurses giving guidance and using a soothing tone of voice. Behavior that was contrary to the perception of caring appeared as isolated incidents. These included negative attitude, interrupting sleep, not receiving information, and poor pain management. When patients and family members are asked directly about their experience, valuable insight is gained into what they perceive as caring and what contributes to recovery as perceived by those in crisis and in high-intensity medical settings. Capturing these data is elemental to designing high-quality, safe environments that facilitate healing. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  7. Nursing care in fast-track surgery strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kozieł

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many study results have been published confirming an improvement in the outcomes of treatment related with management of patients within the fast-track surgery programme. Early postoperative rehabilitation is possible provided there is engagement of a multi-disciplinary team, including well-educated nurses. Today, a diversion can be observed from traditional nursing on behalf of a coordinated, holistic approach, while more attention is paid to the, thus far marginalised, psychosocial aspects of care. The objective of the study is to discuss the basic assumptions of fast track surgery with respect to nursing care, with particular emphasis placed on the educational function. Modern nursing within the short-track surgery programme should focus on the provision of patients with care consisting of preliminary information concerning the perioperative period, social and psychological support, counselling in the area of home convalescence, and procedures in the case of complications.

  8. [Professionals' training and refusal of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Corinne

    2016-10-01

    A patient's refusal of nursing care concerns the caregivers. Future professionals must be prepared for it and student nurses are trained to deal with such situations. It is also important to empower patients and support them in their choice. This article presents the example of the Haute École Robert Schuman in Libramont, Belgium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Nursing delegation. Implications for home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Janet A; Tripp, Emily

    2002-09-01

    Consumers are advocating for client-directed care and are influencing legislation that regulates delegation within nurse practice acts. Almost 18 months ago, the Visiting Nurse Association of Texas implemented the delegation of insulin administration for appropriate patients. Results indicate that the program is a success and the time invested in developing the program was well spent.

  10. Evaluating Nurses' Satisfaction With Two Nursing Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajouei, Reza; Abbasi, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Evaluating user satisfaction is one of the methods to ensure the usability of information systems. Considering the importance of nursing information systems in patient health, the objective of this study is to evaluate nurses' satisfaction with two widely used nursing information systems (Peyvand Dadeh and Tirazhe) in Iran. This descriptive-analytical study was done on 230 nurses in all teaching hospitals of Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Data were collected using an augmented version of a questionnaire developed by IBM. Data were analyzed by SPSS.16 using descriptive and analytical statistical methods including t test, analysis of variance, and Pearson correlation coefficient. The mean of overall satisfaction with the two systems was 61 ± 2.2 and 74 ± 2.4, respectively. The mean of satisfaction with different systems dimensions, that is, ease of use, information quality, and interface quality, was, respectively, 24 ± 1.9, 26 ± 9.7, and 12 ± 4.7 for Tirazhe and 29 ± 1.1, 39 ± 1.04 and 13 ± 5.3 for Peyvand Dadeh system. Nurses' satisfaction with both systems was at a medium level. The majority of nurses were relatively satisfied with the information quality and user interface quality of these systems. The results suggest that designing nursing information systems in accordance with their users' need improves usability. Hence, policy and decision makers of healthcare institutions should invest on usability when purchasing such systems.

  11. [Psychology of nursing personnel in home care nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergler, R

    1995-04-01

    In a random survey questions were put to 100 employees of home care centers (51 qualified nursing staff, 28 assistants and/or trainees, 21 young people doing community service as an alternative to military service). (1) The job motivation is primarily of a private nature: social commitment, achievement motivation, being responsible for solving diverse human problems are at the centre of job orientation. (2) Huge disappointments (neglect of patients, stress, arrangement of working hours, bureaucracy, lack of self-responsibility) are in 62% of the cases the reasons for changing from a clinic to the home care centre. (3) The psychological results of home care nursing are only positive in 62% of the cases; 26% have thought of giving notice, 37% would not choose their job again. (4) The training qualification for home care nursing is only adequate for 60% of those questioned; deficiencies are experienced with regard to consulting competence, gerontopsychiatry, specific knowledge about illnesses, legal questions. Essential further training is neglected. Also initial instruction in the home care service is to a great extent unsatisfactory. (5) For economic reasons it is frequently necessary to limit daily care to basic nursing; the patients' communicative needs have to ignored. One's occupational self-importance dwindles away; the job increasingly becomes an everyday stress factor. (6) The high risk of infection in the case of home-care patients is considered to be above-average (bedsores, infection risks with regard to changing bandages/catheters, anuspraeter aids, incontinence, fungal diseases, food risks: not keeping to diets, food not suitable for the elderly, lack of appropriate storage for leftovers. (7) Nursing staff, as well as patients, regard soap, cleansing lotion, shampoo, tooth brushes and toothpaste as the main items for personal hygiene, for the prevention and treatment of bedsores. Beyond that, compared with nursing staff, patients have a greater need for

  12. Spiritual nursing care: A concept analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia V. Monareng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the concept ‘spiritual nursing care’ has its roots in the history of the nursing profession, many nurses in practice have difficulty integrating the concept into practice. There is an ongoing debate in the empirical literature about its definition, clarity and application in nursing practice. The study aimed to develop an operational definition of the concept and its application in clinical practice. A qualitative study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses render spiritual nursing care. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit the sample. Individual and focus group interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Trustworthiness was ensured through strategies of truth value, applicability, consistency and neutrality. Data were analysed using the NUD*IST power version 4 software, constant comparison, open, axial and selective coding. Tech’s eight steps of analysis were also used, which led to the emergence of themes, categories and sub-categories. Concept analysis was conducted through a comprehensive literature review and as a result ‘caring presence’ was identified as the core variable from which all the other characteristics of spiritual nursing care arise. An operational definition of spiritual nursing care based on the findings was that humane care is demonstrated by showing caring presence, respect and concern for meeting the needs not only of the body and mind of patients, but also their spiritual needs of hope and meaning in the midst of health crisis, which demand equal attention for optimal care from both religious and nonreligious nurses.

  13. Explanatory model for nursing and care 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jedid-Jah Jonker; Klarita Sadiraj; Isolde Woittiez; Michiel Ras; Meike Morren

    2007-01-01

    Original title: Verklaringsmodel verpleging en verzorging 2007. Population ageing means the demand for and take-up of care is likely to increase sharply in the coming years. Older people make particularly heavy use of home care, nursing homes and care homes, collectively referred to as

  14. Nurse work environment and quality of care by unit types: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chenjuan; Olds, Danielle M; Dunton, Nancy E

    2015-10-01

    Nursing unit is the micro-organization in the hospital health care system in which integrated patient care is provided. Nursing units of different types serve patients with distinct care goals, clinical tasks, and social structures and norms. However, empirical evidence is sparse on unit type differences in quality of care and its relation with nurse work environment. Nurse work environment has been found as an important nursing factor predicting nurse and patient outcomes. To examine the unit type differences in nurse-reported quality of care, and to identify the association between unit work environment and quality of care by unit types. This is a cross-sectional study using nurse survey data (2012) from US hospitals nationwide. The nurse survey collected data on quality of care, nurse work environment, and other work related information from staff nurses working in units of various types. Unit types were systematically classified across hospitals. The unit of analysis was the nursing unit, and the final sample included 7677 units of 14 unit types from 577 hospitals in 49 states in the US. Multilevel regressions were used to assess the relationship between nurse work environment and quality of care across and by unit types. On average, units had 58% of the nurses reporting excellent quality of care and 40% of the nurses reporting improved quality of care over the past year. Unit quality of care varied by unit types, from 43% of the nurses in adult medical units to 73% of the nurses in interventional units rating overall quality of care on unit as excellent, and from 35% of the nurses in adult critical care units to 44% of the nurses in adult medical units and medical-surgical combined units reporting improved quality of care. Estimates from regressions indicated that better unit work environments were associated with higher quality of care when controlling various hospital and unit covariates; and this association persisted among units of different types. Unit

  15. Fatigue in Intensive Care Nurses and Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Sevim; Taşdemir, Nurten; Kurt, Aylin; İlgezdi, Ebru; Kubalas, Özge

    2017-10-01

    Fatigue negatively affects the performance of intensive care nurses. Factors contributing to the fatigue experienced by nurses include lifestyle, psychological status, work organization and sleep problems. To determine the level of fatigue among nurses working in intensive care units and the related factors. This descriptive study was conducted with 102 nurses working in intensive care units in the West Black Sea Region of Turkey. Data were collected between February and May 2014 using a personal information form, the Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index. The intensive care nurses in the study were found to be experiencing fatigue. Significant correlations were observed between scores on the VAS-F Fatigue and anxiety (p=0.01), depression (p=0.002), and sleep quality (pcare nurses' levels of fatigue. These results can be of benefit in taking measures which may be used to reduce fatigue in nurses, especially the fatigue related to work organization and social life.

  16. [Hospitality as an expression of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho; Waterkemper, Roberta; Kempfer, Silvana Silveira; Carraro, Telma Elisa; Radünz, Vera

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative research whose purpose was to reflect and argue about the relationship between hospitality, care and nursing according to experiences of PhD students. The research was developed from theoretic and practical meeting carried through by disciplines "the care in Nursing and Health" of PhD nursing Program at Santa Catarina Federal University. Its chosen theoretical frame of Hospitality perspective while nursing care. Data were collected applying a semi-structured questionnaire at ten doctoral students. The analysis of the data was carried through under the perspective of the content analysis according to Bardin. Hospitality it is imperative for the individuals adaptation in the hospital context or any area where it is looking for health care.

  17. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  18. [Promoting the holistic dimension of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schivre, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    Ingrid Schivre's nursing practice in an emergency department has evolved towards more relaxing approaches which allow for a greater focus on the notion of caring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Interventions to support people with dementia and their informal caregivers during the transition from home care to nursing home care – a protocol for a systematic review / Interventionen zur Unterstützung von Menschen mit Demenz und ihren Angehörigen während des Übergangs von der häuslichen Pflege ins Pflegeheim – ein Studienprotokoll für eine systematische Übersichtsarbeit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Christian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The transition from home care to nursing home care is a significant event in the life of a person with dementia and also for informal caregiver, who deal with many crises and changes.

  20. Facilitating nurses’ knowledge of the utilisation of reflexology in adults with chronic diseases to enable informed health education during comprehensive nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa van der Walt

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An integrative literature review of identified scientific evidence, published from January 2000 to December 2008, of the utilisation of reflexology as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM modalities to promote well-being and quality of life in adults with chronic diseases was done to facilitate nurses to give informed health education during comprehensive nursing care to patients with chronic diseases. Selected accessible databases were searched purposefully for research articles (N = 1171. Pre-set inclusion criteria were applied during the study selection process. The methodological study quality was reviewed and appraised with appropriate tools from the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP and the American Dietetic Association’s (ADA Evidence analysis manual (n = 21. Evidence extraction, analysis and synthesis of studies (n = 18 were done through the evidence class rating and level of strength as prescribed in the manuals of ADA and CASP. Findings indicate statistically significant reduction in the frequency of seizures in patients with intractable epilepsy, an improvement of sensory and urinary symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis and clinically significant reduction of anxiety and pain in patients with cancer and fibromyalgia syndrome. These findings can be utilised by nurses to inform patients with these chronic diseases about alternative ways of treatment.

    Opsomming

    ‘n Geïntegreerde literatuur oorsig van ge-identifiseerde wetenskaplike bewyse, gepubliseer vanaf Januarie 2000 tot Desember 2008, was gedoen oor die gebruik van refleksologie as aanvullende en alternatiewe behandelingsmodalitieit om welsyn en lewenskwaliteit te bevorder by volwassenes met kroniese siekte om verpleegkundiges te fasiliteer om ingeligte gesondheidsvoorligting te gee gedurende omvattende verpleegsorg aan pasiente met kroniese siektes. Geselekteerde toeganklike databasisse was

  1. Conducting Nursing Research to Advance and Inform Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Edward, Jean

    2016-11-01

    The primary roles of nurse scientists in conducting health policy research are to increase knowledge in the discipline and provide evidence for informing and advancing health policies with the goal of improving the health outcomes of society. Health policy research informs, characterizes, explains, or tests hypotheses by employing a variety of research designs. Health policy research focuses on improving the access to care, the quality and cost of care, and the efficiency with which care is delivered. In this article, we explain how nurses might envision their research in a policy process framework, describe research designs that nurse researchers might use to inform and advance health policies, and provide examples of research conducted by nurse researchers to explicate key concepts in the policy process framework. Health policies are well informed and advanced when nurse researchers have a good understanding of the political process. The policy process framework provides a context for improving the focus and design of research and better explicating the connection between research evidence and policy. Nurses should focus their research on addressing problems of importance that are on the healthcare agenda, work with interdisciplinary teams of researchers, synthesize, and widely disseminate results.

  2. Information technology: building nursing intellectual capital for the information age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Roy L

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is evolving from a task-based industry to a knowledge-based one. To gain and retain value as intellectual capital, nursing likewise must evolve from a vocation of task performers to a profession of knowledge-workers. Information technology can transform nursing tasks into nursing knowledge.

  3. Strategic enhancement of nursing students information literacy skills: interdisciplinary perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Phyllis D; Fogel, Joshua; Hicks, Pauline; Wright, Laura; Tyler, Indira

    2007-01-01

    Nursing students are required to keep abreast of evolving new health care information. It is important for nursing students to develop the skills and knowledge to access nursing and medical databases for their professional growth and development to perform evidence-based practice. A collaborative approach between faculty and librarians is one way to ensure the success of students in acquiring the skills on how to access and use new health care information. The collaborators of this paper discuss strategies of how to conduct database searches for research articles. This paper is written in collaboration with faculty, librarians, and a doctoral student who have experience teaching nursing students at a historically black college and/or university, or at minority serving institutions.

  4. Modelling Digital Knowledge Transfer: Nurse Supervisors Transforming Learning at Point of Care to Advance Nursing Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Mather

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Limited adoption of mobile technology for informal learning and continuing professional development within Australian healthcare environments has been explained primarily as an issue of insufficient digital and ehealth literacy of healthcare professionals. This study explores nurse supervisors’ use of mobile technology for informal learning and continuing professional development both for their own professional practice, and in their role in modelling digital knowledge transfer, by facilitating the learning and teaching of nursing students in the workplace. A convenience sample of 27 nurse supervisors involved with guiding and supporting undergraduate nurses participated in one of six focus groups held in two states of Australia. Expanding knowledge emerged as the key theme of importance to this group of clinicians. Although nurse supervisors regularly browsed Internet sources for learning and teaching purposes, a mixed understanding of the mobile learning activities that could be included as informal learning or part of formal continuing professional development was detected. Participants need educational preparation and access to mobile learning opportunities to improve and maintain their digital and ehealth literacy to appropriately model digital professionalism with students. Implementation of mobile learning at point of care to enable digital knowledge transfer, augment informal learning for students and patients, and support continuing professional development opportunities is necessary. Embedding digital and ehealth literacy within nursing curricula will promote mobile learning as a legitimate nursing function and advance nursing practice.

  5. Organization of Hospital Nursing, Provision of Nursing Care, and Patient Experiences with Care in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Bruyneel (Luk); B. Li (Baoyue); D. Ausserhofer (Dietmar); E.M.E.H. Lesaffre (Emmanuel); I. Dumitrescu (Irina); H.L. Smith (Herbert L.); D.M. Sloane (Douglas M.); L.H. Aiken (Linda); W. Sermeus (Walter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis study integrates previously isolated findings of nursing outcomes research into an explanatory framework in which care left undone and nurse education levels are of key importance. A moderated mediation analysis of survey data from 11,549 patients and 10,733 nurses in 217 hospitals

  6. Caring behaviour perceptions from nurses of their first-line nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao; Liu, Yilan; Zeng, Qingsong

    2015-12-01

    Nursing is acknowledged as being the art and science of caring. According to the theory of nursing as caring, all persons are caring but not every behaviour of a person is caring. Caring behaviours in the relationship between first-line nurse managers and Registered Nurses have been studied to a lesser extent than those that exist between patients and nurses. Caring behaviour of first-line nurse managers from the perspective of Registered Nurses is as of yet unknown. Identifying caring behaviours may be useful as a reference for first-line nurse managers caring for nurses in a way that nurses prefer. To explore first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours from the perspective of Registered Nurses in mainland China. Qualitative study, using descriptive phenomenological approach. Fifteen Registered Nurses recruited by purposive sampling method took part in in-depth interviews. Data were analysed according to Colaizzi's technique. Three themes of first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours emerged: promoting professional growth, exhibiting democratic leadership and supporting work-life balance. A better understanding of the first-line nurse managers' caring behaviours is recognised. The three kinds of behaviours have significant meaning to nurse managers. Future research is needed to describe what first-line nurse managers can do to promote nurses' professional growth, increase the influence of democratic leadership, as well as support their work-life balance. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Quality of Nursing Care Based on Analysis of Nursing Performance and Nurse and Patient Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Muhith, Abdul; Nursalam, Nursalam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses who frequently often contact to patients and most of their time serve patients in 24 hours, have an important role in caring for the patient. Patient satisfaction as quality indicator is the key success for competitiveness of service in hospital. The aim of this research was to develop nursing service quality model based on the nursing performance, nurse and patient satisfaction. Method: The research method used cross sectional study, at 14 wards of Gresik Hospital. Resea...

  8. Understanding spirituality and spiritual care in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Caldeira, Sílvia

    2017-01-25

    Spirituality is a complex concept that has different meanings for different people. Spiritual care is a fundamental aspect of nursing and attending to the spiritual needs of patients may improve their health outcomes. This article, the first in a series of three, explores various definitions of spirituality, and the importance of spirituality and spiritual care in healthcare settings. The second article of this series provides an in-depth exploration of the assessment of patients' spiritual care needs, and the third and final article in this short series discusses spiritual care nursing interventions.

  9. Rethinking and integrating nephrology palliative care: a nephrology nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Mortality rates for people with chronic kidney disease are worse than most cancers. High symptom burden, multiple comorbidities and advanced age are common among people receiving renal care. It is, therefore, not surprising that among the nephrology community, awareness is growing regarding the need for nephrology palliative care. This article offers a perspective of the current "state of the art" of nephrology palliative care and its relationship to nephrology nursing. A literature review and communication with experts in the field inform this perspective. Understanding the emerging field of nephrology palliative care gives nephrology nurses a clearer position from which to rethink their role in integrating nephrology and palliative care. Implementing compassionate, ethical and effective palliative care for patients and families living with kidney disease offers hope for improved quality of living and of dying for these patients and their families, and for the renal professionals who care for them.

  10. Are nurses expected to have information technology skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn

    2013-09-01

    This article discusses the knowledge management skills required by nurses in the context of the government's information strategy for England and Wales, which highlights the importance of managing data in providing efficient health care. It also reports on a study that looked at whether employers' job descriptions and person specifications include the need for basic information and communication technology skills outlined in the NHS knowledge and skills framework (Agenda for Change Project Team 2004), and the degree to which these skills are regarded as important to good nursing care.

  11. Nursing Students' Willingness to Care for Older Adults in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Mei-Ju; Shyu, Meei-Ling; Wang, Shou-Yu; Chuang, Hsiu-Ching; Chuang, Yeu-Hui

    2016-03-01

    The possibilities that nurses will take care of persons 65 years of age or older in hospitals and communities are increasing due to a growing aged population. Nursing students should be prepared to face the challenges of their future practice. Therefore, factors associated with nursing students' willingness to care for older adults need to be identified. This study aimed to explore Taiwanese nursing students' willingness to work with older persons and factors associated with this. A cross-sectional research design was used. Stratified sampling was applied to recruit participants from seven nursing schools in northern, central, southern, and eastern areas of Taiwan. There were 612 nursing students who successful completed the questionnaire including demographic data, the Attitudes Toward the Elderly Scale, and the Willingness Toward the Elderly Care Scale. Data were collected between November 2012 and January 2013. A stepwise regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of nursing students' willingness to care for older adults. The mean score of nursing students' attitudes toward older people was 73.86 (SD = 8.9), with a range of 44-106. The mean score on the willingness to care for older adults was 55.01 (SD = 6.4), with a range of 36-75. The length of time with older adults per week (r = 0.12, p = .003) and grandparents having served as caregivers during the students' childhood (t = -2.147, β = .032) were both positively associated with the willingness to care for older adults. The best predictors of nursing students' willingness to care for older adults were students' attitudes toward older adults (β = 0.38, p nursing students had neutral to slightly favorable attitudes toward working with older adults. Nursing students' positive attitudes about older adults, paying attention to issues related to older adults, and having been a volunteer that served older people were predictors of their willingness to care for older persons. Appropriate and

  12. Palliative care communication in oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Ragan, Sandra L

    2013-04-01

    Oncology nurses consistently exhibit distress when communicating about end-of-life topics with patients and families. Poor communication experiences and processes correlate with emotional distress, moral distress, and work-related stress. The National Consensus Project (NCP) for Quality Palliative Care developed clinical practice guidelines to establish quality standards for the practice of palliative care. NCP's guidelines are expressly intended as an interdisciplinary document and are representative of the inherent interdisciplinary nature of palliative care. Communication's value to palliative and oncology nursing is unique because those two specialties include a high frequency of challenging interactions for patients, families, and healthcare professionals. The COMFORT communication curriculum, a holistic model for narrative clinical communication in practice developed for use in early palliative care, is posed as a resource for oncology nurses with a series of practice case examples presented against the backdrop of NCP's eight domains of quality palliative care.

  13. Moral sensitivity in Primary Health Care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Zoboli, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone; Vieira, Margarida M

    2017-04-01

    to characterize the profile and describe the moral sensitivity of primary health care nurses. this is a quantitative, transversal, exploratory, descriptive study. The data were collected through the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire translated and adapted to Brazil. 100 primary health care nurses participated, from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The data collection took place during the months of March and July 2016, in an online form. The analysis of the data occurred through descriptive statistical analysis. the nurses had an average moral sensitivity of 4.5 (out of 7). The dimensions with the greatest moral sensitivity were: interpersonal orientation, professional knowledge, moral conflict and moral meaning. the nurses of Rio Grande do Sul have a moderate moral sensitivity, which may contribute to a lower quality in Primary Health Care.

  14. Intensive care nurses' experiences of end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisorio, Leah C; Langley, Gayle C

    2016-04-01

    To explore intensive care nurses' experiences of end-of-life care in adult intensive care units. An exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach was utilised. Purposive sampling method was used to select nurse participants (n=24) working at the selected intensive care units in the three academic affiliated, tertiary specialist hospitals in the Johannesburg and Pretoria regions, South Africa. Using a focus group guide, three focus group discussions were conducted. Data were analysed using the long-table approach (Krueger and Casey, 2000). Trustworthiness of the study was ensured by following the criteria set out by Lincoln and Guba (1985). Five major themes related to nurses' experiences of end-of-life care emerged. These included: "difficulties we experience", "discussion and decision making", "support for patients", "support for families" and "support for nurses". End-of-life care can be difficult and a challenging process. Nevertheless, this study has highlighted some of the interventions and support systems that could be incorporated for improved caring process. Whereas the dying patients and their families need to be continuously supported, critical care nurses too need to be taken care of for them to continue providing the best possible end-of-life care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nursing care in a high-technological environment: Experiences of critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunlind, Adam; Granström, John; Engström, Åsa

    2015-04-01

    Management of technical equipment, such as ventilators, infusion pumps, monitors and dialysis, makes health care in an intensive care setting more complex. Technology can be defined as items, machinery and equipment that are connected to knowledge and management to maximise efficiency. Technology is not only the equipment itself, but also the knowledge of how to use it and the ability to convert it into nursing care. The aim of this study is to describe critical care nurses' experience of performing nursing care in a high technology healthcare environment. Qualitative, personal interviews were conducted during 2012 with eight critical care nurses in the northern part of Sweden. Interview transcripts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes with six categories emerged. The technology was described as a security that could facilitate nursing care, but also one that could sometimes present obstacles. The importance of using the clinical gaze was highlighted. Nursing care in a high technological environment must be seen as multi-faceted when it comes to how it affects CCNs' experience. The advanced care conducted in an ICU could not function without high-tech equipment, nor could care operate without skilled interpersonal interaction and maintenance of basal nursing. That technology is seen as a major tool and simultaneously as a barrier to patient-centred care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Northern nursing practice in a primary health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukic, Adele; Keddy, Barbara

    2002-12-01

    This paper explicates the nature of outpost nursing work, and/or the day-to-day realities of northern nursing practice in a primary health care setting in Canada. The study was carried out to systematically explore the work of nurses in an indigenous setting. Institutional ethnography, pioneered by Dorothy Smith was the methodology used to guide this research. The theoretical perspective of this methodology does not seek causes or links but intends to explicate visible practices. It is intended to explicate the social organization of specific discourses that inform work processes of nurses working in remote indigenous communities. The data originated from various sources including spending 2 weeks in a northern remote community shadowing experienced nurses, taking field notes and audio taping interviews with these nurses. One of the two researchers was a northern practice nurse for many years and has had taught in an outpost nursing programme. As part of the process, texts were obtained from the site as data to be incorporated in the analysis. The lived experiences have added to the analytical understanding of the work of nurses in remote areas. Data uncovered documentary practices inherent to the work setting which were then analysed along with the transcribed interviews and field notes derived from the on-site visit. Identifying disjuncture in the discourse of northern nursing and the lived experience of the nurses in this study was central to the research process. The results indicated that the social organization of northern community nursing work required a broad generalist knowledge base for decision making to work effectively within this primary health care setting. The nurse as 'other' and the invisibility of nurses' work of building a trusting relationship with the community is not reflected in the discourse of northern nursing. Trust cannot be quantified or measured yet it is fundamental to working effectively with the community. The nurses in this study

  17. Exploring Nurses’ Knowledge and Experiences Related to Trauma-Informed Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehudis Stokes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Trauma-informed care is an emerging concept that acknowledges the lasting effects of trauma. Nurses are uniquely positioned to play an integral role in the advancement of trauma-informed care. However, knowledge related to trauma-informed care in nursing practice remains limited. The purpose of this article is to present the results of a qualitative study which explored nurses’ understandings and experiences related to trauma-informed care. Seven semistructured interviews were conducted with nurses and four categories emerged from the analysis: (a Conceptualizing Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care, (b Nursing Care and Trauma, (c Context of Trauma-Informed Care, and (d Dynamics of the Nurse–Patient Relationship in the Face of Trauma. These findings highlight important considerations for trauma-informed care including the complex dynamics of trauma that affect care, the need to push knowledge about trauma beyond mental health care, and noteworthy parallels between nursing care and trauma-informed care.

  18. Palliative care nurses' views on euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoort, Charlotte; Gastmans, Chris; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette

    2004-09-01

    In debates on euthanasia legalization in Belgium, the voices of nurses were scarcely heard. Yet studies have shown that nurses are involved in the caring process surrounding euthanasia. Consequently, they are in a position to offer valuable ideas about this problem. For this reason, the views of these nurses are important because of their palliative expertise and their daily confrontation with dying patients. The aim of this paper is to report a study of the views of palliative care nurses about euthanasia. A grounded theory approach was chosen, and interviews were carried out with a convenience sample of 12 palliative care nurses in Flanders (Belgium). The data were collected between December 2001 and April 2002. The majority of the nurses were not a priori for or against euthanasia, and their views were largely dependent on the situation. What counted was the degree of suffering and available palliative options. Depending on the situation, we noted both resistance and acceptance towards euthanasia. The underlying arguments for resistance included respect for life and belief in the capabilities of palliative care; arguments underlying acceptance included the quality of life and respect for patient autonomy. The nurses commented that working in palliative care had a considerable influence on one's opinion about euthanasia. In light of the worldwide debate on euthanasia, it is essential to know how nurses, who are confronted with terminally ill patients every day, think about it. Knowledge of these views can also contribute to a realistic and qualified view on euthanasia itself. This can be enlightening to the personal views of caregivers working in a diverse range of care settings.

  19. Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basic student nurse perceptions about clinical instructor caring. Gerda-Marie Meyer, Elsabe Nel, Charlene Downing. Abstract. Background: Caring is the core of nursing and should be cultivated in student nurses. However, there are serious concerns about the caring concern in the clinical environment and in nursing ...

  20. Teamwork as a nursing competence at Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena Henriques Camelo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim in this study was to identify how Intensive Care Unit nurses perceive professional competences in thecare team. Methodology. Qualitative multiple case study with an exploratory focus. The sample consisted of 24 nurses from Intensive Care Units (ICU at two large hospitals. To collect the information, direct observation and - structured, non-structuredand participant - interviews were used. Results. Ninety-six percent of the participants were women, 79% were less than 40 years old, and 63% possessed less than five years of professional experience in ICU. Data analysis revealed three study categories: teamwork as a nursing management tool, improving teamwork, and interpersonal communication for teamwork. Conclusion. At the ICU where the nurses work, a teamwork strategy is observed, which demands cooperation and participation by other disciplines.

  1. Roles of nurses and parents caring for hospitalised children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedells, Ella; Bevan, Ann

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews the literature on nurses' and parents' self-perceived roles when caring for hospitalised children, focusing on research conducted since the Department of Health published the National Service Framework for Children: Standard for Hospital Services in 2003. Three main themes emerge from the review: nurses' perceptions, parents' perceptions, and negotiation. Clarification of what nurses and parents consider to be their respective roles when caring for hospitalised children is a prerequisite for negotiation of those roles. The family's background, life experiences and circumstances influence the effectiveness of negotiation between nurses and parents. The article explores potential barriers to negotiation, including poor communication and failure to provide information. Limitations of the research and the implications for practice are considered.

  2. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management1

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Johanson da Silva; Josete Luzia Leite; Carmen Gracinda Silvan Scochi; Leila Rangel da Silva; Thiago Privado da Silva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management. METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical con...

  3. Nurses' caring and empathy in Jordanian psychiatric hospitals: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadidi, Majdi M B; Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Nurses working in psychiatric hospitals need to acquire the skills of therapeutic communication and empathy, and have higher levels of caring. The present study aims to investigate the level of caring and empathy among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was utilized to collect data from 205 nurses recruited from three psychiatric hospitals in Jordan. The Background Information Questionnaire, Modified Caring Dimensions Inventory, and Toronto Empathy Questionnaire were administered to the recruited participants. The findings revealed that the sampled nurses had a high level of caring and empathy. Significant correlations were found between caring and having a specialized training in mental health nursing, and having organizational and managerial support. However, no significant correlations were found between empathy and participants' characteristics. Specialized training in mental health nursing, having organizational and managerial support, and empathy were found predictors for caring. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care.

  5. Pressure Injury Knowledge in Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donna M; Neelon, Lisa; Kish-Smith, Kathleen; Whitney, Laura; Burant, Christopher J

    The purpose of this study was to identify pressure injury knowledge in critical care nurses related to prevention and staging following multimodal education initiatives. Postintervention descriptive study. The sample comprised 32 RNs employed in medical intensive care/coronary intensive care or surgical intensive care units. The study setting was a 237-bed Veterans Affairs acute care hospital in the Midwestern United States. Critical care RNs were asked to participate in this project over a 3-week period following a multimodal 2-year education initiative. Nurses completed the paper version of the 72-item Pieper-Zulkowski Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Test (PZ-PUKT) to determine pressure injury knowledge level. Calculated mean cumulative scores and subscores for items related to prevention and staging, respectively. Pearson correlations were used to examine associations between nursing staff characteristics and the PZ-PUKT prevention and staging scores. The cumulative score on the PZ-PUKT was 51.66 (72%); nurses with 5 to 10 years' experience had a higher mean score than nurses with experiences of 20 years or more (mean ± SD = 54.25 ± 4.37 vs 49.5 ± 7.12), but the difference was not statistically significant. Nurses scored higher on the staging system-related items as compared to the prevention-related items (81% vs 70%). Nurses achieved higher staging subscale scores if they were younger (r =-0.41, P care unit (r = 0.37, P < .05). Study findings indicate gaps in knowledge related to pressure injury practice; participants had greater knowledge of staging rather than prevention. Cumulative and subscale findings can be used to direct educational efforts needed to improve and maintain an effective pressure injury prevention program.

  6. Ethical challenges when intensive care unit patients refuse nursing care: A narrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Eva Martine; Sørlie, Venke

    2016-03-01

    Less sedated and more awake patients in the intensive care unit may cause ethical challenges. The purpose of this study is to describe ethical challenges registered nurses experience when patients refuse care and treatment. Narrative individual open interviews were conducted, and data were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method developed for researching life experiences. Three intensive care registered nurses from an intensive care unit at a university hospital in Norway were included. Norwegian Social Science Data Services approved the study. Permission was obtained from the intensive care unit leader. The participants' informed and voluntary consent was obtained in writing. Registered nurses experienced ethical challenges in the balance between situations of deciding on behalf of the patient, persuading the patient and letting the patient decide. Ethical challenges were related to patients being harmful to themselves, not keeping up personal hygiene and care or hindering critical treatment. It is made apparent how professional ethics may be threatened by more pragmatic arguments. In recent years, registered nurses are faced with increasing ethical challenges to do no harm and maintain dignity. Ethically challenging situations are emerging, due to new targets including conscious and aware critical care patients, leaving an altered responsibility on the registered nurses. Reflection is required to adjust the course when personal and professional ideals no longer are in harmony with the reality in the clinical practice. RNs must maintain a strong integrity as authentic human beings to provide holistic nursing care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ2 tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( pclusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  8. Priming the pipeline: creating aspirations for new graduate nurses to enter ambulatory care nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sheila A

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and projected length of the nursing shortage coupled with the increasing demand for ambulatory care nurses requires that novel strategies to attract and recruit new ambulatory care nurses be implemented. Planning and implementation strategies aimed at the current pool of student nurses are discussed in detail. Initiatives to elicit support of current ambulatory care nurses, deans, directors and faculty of schools of nursing are also presented along with options for evaluation of such initiatives.

  9. Generational differences in acute care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widger, Kimberley; Pye, Christine; Cranley, Lisa; Wilson-Keates, Barbara; Squires, Mae; Tourangeau, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Generational differences in values, expectations and perceptions of work have been proposed as one basis for problems and solutions in recruitment and retention of nurses. This study used a descriptive design. A sample of 8207 registered nurses and registered practical nurses working in Ontario, Canada, acute care hospitals who responded to the Ontario Nurse Survey in 2003 were included in this study. Respondents were categorized as Baby Boomers, Generation X or Generation Y based on their birth year. Differences in responses among these three generations to questions about their own characteristics, employment circumstances, work environment and responses to the work environment were explored. There were statistically significant differences among the generations. Baby Boomers primarily worked full-time day shifts. Gen Y tended to be employed in teaching hospitals; Boomers worked more commonly in community hospitals. Baby Boomers were generally more satisfied with their jobs than Gen X or Gen Y nurses. Gen Y had the largest proportion of nurses with high levels of burnout in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Baby Boomers had the largest proportion of nurses with low levels of burnout. Nurse managers may be able to capitalize on differences in generational values and needs in designing appropriate interventions to enhance recruitment and retention of nurses.

  10. Knowledge and nursing practice of critical care nurses caring for patients with delirium in intensive care units in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Farhan, Ne'ameh Abbas; Othman, Elham Hani; Yacoub, Mohammed Ibrahim

    2010-12-01

    Delirium can have serious consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. An extensive literature review showed that delirium is not well understood, recognized, or managed by medical and nursing professionals. The goal for this study was to determine the level of knowledge and management skills among critical care nurses caring for patients with delirium who were treated in intensive care units (ICUs) in Jordan. A total of 232 critical care nurses, employed in different ICUs in Jordan, completed self-reported questionnaires. The nurses in critical care units who completed the questionnaires identified a need for more delirium-specific knowledge and skills to assess and manage this condition more effectively. To enhance health outcomes for patients treated in the ICU who have delirium, nurses need to receive education on current assessment and management modalities. These regular education programs should be complemented with evaluative research focusing on both nursing care and patient outcomes. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Different Kinds of Overview in Nurses' information work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle; Hansen, Linda M; Dolva, Julia

    2007-01-01

    , evening or night shift, ii an individual, professional overview in order to envi-sion the course of care events within their hours of duty, and iii. an overview of the situation of each individual patient. The nurses gather information from numerous sources, verbally as well as written on paper......Nurses search for different kinds of overview in their use of data for clinical care. This study of nurses’ shift of duties on a internal medical ward points to three kinds of overview: i. an overview in the beginning of their duty in order to plan and distribute the coming work tasks of their day...... or electronically. The identification and descriptions of clinical constellations of data can inform on system design in order to improve on usability and utility of information systems in clinical practices. Qualitative methods of observations and focus group interviews were used studying the logic of nurses...

  12. Perioperative nurses' perceptions of caring practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, S A

    1995-02-01

    This study was designed to determine how caring is practiced in perioperative nursing. The theory of nursing by M. Jean Watson, RN, PhD, FAAN, provided the conceptual framework for the study. The researcher used a qualitative, descriptive methodology to analyze data collected in audiotaped interviews with five perioperative nurses and used standard qualitative research procedures for transcribing and analyzing the interview data. The five study participants identified their perceptions of caring behaviors with conscious and unconscious patients in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. They described the essential structure of caring as the establishment of a human care relationship and provision of a supportive, protective, and/or corrective psychological, physical, and spiritual environment.

  13. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013). We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research.

  14. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Rapin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013. We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research.

  15. Introducing Information Literacy Competency Standards for Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Sue F; Hyde, Loree; Planchon Wolf, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The Association for College and Research Libraries published the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Nursing (ILCSN) in January 2014, written by a task force of the Health Sciences Interest Group of the American Library Association. The ILCSN describes skills ranging from basic to advanced information research competencies for students enrolled in nursing programs at all levels and for professional nurses. This article guides administrators and faculty in use of the standards to design programs and coursework in information skills to support evidence-based practice.

  16. Picture of informal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alice de Boer

    2005-01-01

    Original title: Kijk op informele zorg. Many people assume that the giving of informal care to the sick and disabled is in decline. This is blamed among other things on the growing labour participation of women. In reality, however, this assumption is incorrect: the percentage of people

  17. Striving for good nursing care: nurses' experiences of do not resuscitate orders within oncology and hematology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Mona; Hedström, Mariann; Höglund, Anna T

    2014-12-01

    Within oncology and hematology care, patients are sometimes considered to have such a poor prognosis that they can receive a do not resuscitate order from the physician responsible, stipulating that neither basic nor advanced coronary pulmonary rescue be performed in the event of a cardiac arrest. Studies on do not resuscitate decisions within oncology and hematology units, focusing on the specific role of the nurse in relation to these decisions, are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate hematology and oncology nurses' experiences and perceptions of do not resuscitate orders, in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the nurses' specific role in these decisions. A qualitative, descriptive methodology with individual semi-structured interviews was used. A total of 15 nurses from eight hematology/oncology wards in four hospitals in Sweden were interviewed individually. In accordance with national regulations, an ethical review was not required for this study. The research followed international guidelines for empirical research, as outlined in the Helsinki Declaration. The nurses strived for good nursing care through balancing harms and goods and observing integrity and quality of life as important values. Experienced hindrances for good care were unclear and poorly documented decisions, uninformed patients and relatives, and disagreements among the caregivers and family. The nurses expressed a need for an ongoing discussion on do not resuscitate decisions, including all concerned parties. In order to provide good nursing care, nurses need clear and well-documented do not resuscitate orders, and patients and relatives need to be well informed and included in the decisions. To increase the understanding for each other's opinions within the medical team, regular ethical discussions are required. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    . Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health...... care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. METHOD: Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge...

  19. Patient safety issues in advanced practice nursing students' care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Cook, Sarah; John, Rita Marie; Larson, Elaine; Stone, Patricia W; Sullivan, Caroline; Bakken, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify and characterize patient safety issues across advanced practice nursing (APN) care settings including ambulatory care visits. A total of 162 registered nurses enrolled in an APN education program completed an online survey. Respondents reported patient safety issues related to diagnosis or management and treatment in almost half of 489 encounters. The most common issues were clinician communication problems with patients, which occurred during 42.4% of encounters. Adoption of information technology may be a pathway for improving patient safety issues in APN practice settings.

  20. Interruptions and multitasking in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Aebersold, Michelle

    2010-03-01

    The environment surrounding registered nurses (RNs) has been described as fast-paced and unpredictable, and nurses' cognitive load as exceptionally heavy. Studies of interruptions and multitasking in health care are limited, and most have focused on physicians. The extent and type of interruptions and multitasking of nurses, as well as patient errors, were studied using a natural-setting observational field design. The study was conducted in seven patient care units in two Midwestern hospitals--an academic medical center and a community-based teaching hospital. A total of 35 nurses were observed for four-hour periods of time by experienced clinical nurses, who underwent training until they reached an interrater reliability of 0.90. In the 36 RN observations (total, 136 hours) 3,441 events were captured. There were a total of 1,354 interruptions, 46 hours of multitasking, and 200 errors. Nurses were interrupted 10 times per hour, or 1 interruption per 6 minutes. However, RNs in one of the hospitals had significantly more interruptions--1 interruption every 4 1/2 minutes in Hospital 1 (versus 1 every 13.3 minutes in Hospital 2). Nurses were observed to be multitasking 34% of the time (range, 23%- 41%). Overall, the error rate was 1.5 per hour (1.02 per hour in Hospital 1 and 1.89 per hour in Hospital 2). Although there was no significant relationship between interruptions, multitasking, and patient errors, the results of this study show that nurses' work environment is complex and error prone. RNs observed in both hospitals and on all patient care units experienced a high level of discontinuity in the execution of their work. Although nurses manage interruptions and multitasking well, the potential for errors is present, and strategies to decrease interruptions are needed.

  1. Facilitating safe care: a qualitative study of Iranian nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Bondas, Terese; Salsali, Mahvash; Jasper, Melanie; Turunen, Hannele

    2014-01-01

    Aim  The purpose of this study was to explore and describe how nurse leaders facilitate safe care from the perspectives of both nurses and nurse leaders. Background  The health-care system's success in improving patient safety pivots on nursing leadership. However, there is a lack of knowledge in the international literature about how nurse leaders facilitate provision of safe care and reaching the goal of a safe health-care system. Method  A qualitative design using a content analysis approach was applied for data gathering and analysis. In this study, 20 nurses (16 nurses and four head nurses) working in a referral teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran, were recruited through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews and 10 hours of structured observations were conducted to collect data. Results  The data analysis resulted in three main themes: 'providing environmental prerequisites for safe nursing practice', 'uniting and integrating health-care providers', and 'creating an atmosphere of safe care'. Conclusion  The results indicate that to facilitate providing safe care, nurse leaders should improve nurses' working conditions, develop the nurses' practical competencies, assign duties to nurses according to their skills and capabilities, administer appropriate supervision, improve health-care providers' professional relationships and encourage their collaboration, empower nurses and reward their safe practice. Implications for nursing management  Approaching the challenge of patient safety requires the health-care system to combine its efforts and strategies with nursing leadership in its vital role of facilitating safe care and improving patient safety. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Community health nursing, wound care, and...ethics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sue Ellen

    2003-09-01

    Because of changing demographics and other factors, patients receiving care for wounds, ostomies, or incontinence are being referred in increasing numbers to community health nursing organizations for initial or continued care. As home-based wound care becomes big business, little discussion is being focused on the moral and ethical issues likely to arise in the high-tech home setting. Progressively more complex and expensive home care relies on family members to take on complicated care regimens in the face of decreasing numbers of allowable skilled nursing home visits. A framework and a principle-based theory for reflection on the character and content of moral and ethical conflicts are provided to encourage informed and competent care of patients in the home. Common moral and ethical conflicts for WOC nurses in the United States are presented. These conflicts include issues of wound care supply procurement; use of documentation to maximize care or profit; problems of quality, care consistency, and caregiver consent; and dilemmas of tiered health care options. The advantages of a framework to address ethical conflicts are discussed.

  3. Enabling student nurses to use the information superhighway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, J A; Panzarine, S

    1998-04-01

    Nursing graduates must be sophisticated in the use of information technologies and understand how these technologies interface with various health care systems. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a newly developed Internet course, focusing on current information technologies, on 20 RN-to-MSN students. Author-developed instruments were used to measure weekly computer use, perceived computer skill, and knowledge related to the information superhighway. The Stronge & Brodt Nurses Attitudes Toward Computerization Questionnaire was used to assess attitudes toward computerization. Qualitative data was elicited using weekly evaluation forms. When compared to 23 students at a similar stage of their nursing program, quantitative findings indicated that, at the end of the semester, students in the pilot course had more computer knowledge, reported greater computer skill, and used computers more. Qualitative findings suggested that pilot students: * Were connected with nursing networks and expressed their intent to maintain these networks. * Were able to use current health information found on the Internet in their nursing practices. * Used skills learned in the pilot class to complete projects in other classes. * Communicated with classmates via the Internet, thus forming a potentially valuable professional support system. * Used the library and librarians early in their programs. * Understood the relevancy of telemedicine and the Internet to the future survival of nursing in a changing health care arena. While the authors caution that an adequate infrastructure must be available to support such an endeavor, they emphasize that knowledge of the relevancy and use of the information superhighway is crucial to the future survival of nursing in a rapidly changing health care arena.

  4. Hyperthyroidism during pregnancy: nursing care issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, J

    1996-06-01

    Untreated hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is associated with a high incidence of maternal and fetal complications. The perinatal nurse needs knowledge of the pathophysiology of this condition to implement a care plan. Antithyroid medications are used to restore the patient's normal thyroid function. Ongoing evaluation of clinical and laboratory data assists the nurse in recognizing the development and implementation of interventions for complications, such as thyroid crisis and heart failure, in the pregnant patient.

  5. Nursing care about child with traction

    OpenAIRE

    HEIMLICHOVÁ, Blanka

    2010-01-01

    This bachleor work being titled ?Nursing care of children with traction? consists of two sections. The first section deals with theory, i.e. it represents a theoretical part which focuses on anatomy of bones, specific fractures of children?s fractures, children's accident frequency rate, diagnostics and fracture therapy, nursing process, hospital schools and volunteers at children?s wards. The second section deals with research. For the purpose of the research two goals have been established ...

  6. [The nursing care of a suicidal patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Harold; Mykolow, Grégory; Guyodo, Josselin

    2017-04-01

    The management of a suicidal crisis falls within the scope of nursing care. There is a high rate of recurrence in the months following an attempted suicide. The nurse monitoring strategy, based on the principle of the 'recontacting' of patients, has been tested by the team of a post-emergency psychiatric unit of a university hospital. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. SARS among Critical Care Nurses, Toronto

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Mark; McGeer, Allison; Henry, Bonnie; Ofner, Marianna; Rose, David; Hlywka, Tammy; Levie, Joanne; McQueen, Jane; Smith, Stephanie; Moss, Lorraine; Smith, Andrew; Green, Karen; Walter, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    To determine factors that predispose or protect healthcare workers from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), we conducted a retrospective cohort study among 43 nurses who worked in two Toronto critical care units with SARS patients. Eight of 32 nurses who entered a SARS patient’s room were infected. The probability of SARS infection was 6% per shift worked. Assisting during intubation, suctioning before intubation, and manipulating the oxygen mask were high-risk activities. Consistently ...

  9. End of life care in nursing homes: Palliative drug prescribing and doctors' existential vulnerability

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Nursing homes are the main arena for end-of-life (EOL) care in Norway. Patients, their informal caregivers and academics alike have called for doctors more involved in EOL care, but the nursing home doctor’s role has been given relatively little attention in research. This thesis explores the doctor’s work with EOL care in nursing homes from the perspectives of EOL prescription changes (paper I); the effectiveness and safety of palliative prescriptions (paper II); and from...

  10. Empowering the "Cheerers": Role of Surgical Intensive Care Unit Nurses in Enhancing Family Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lauren; Gergen, Jessica; Wohlgemuth, Leah; Nolan, Marie T; Aslakson, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Supporting family resilience, the ability of families to rebound from stressful events, is a goal of family nursing. Critical care nurses act as liaisons between patients' families and other clinicians and thus are uniquely situated to promote family resilience. To explore how nurses perceive the experiences of long-stay surgical intensive care unit patients and their families in order to gain insights on how nurses could cultivate family resilience. A qualitative study including semistructured interviews (n = 13) and 4 focus groups (n = 17) with nurses in 3 surgical intensive care units in a large teaching hospital. Three themes were identified: expectations, support, and communication. Nurses noted that clinicians' and families' unrealistic expectations regarding the patient's recovery can foster false hope. Nurses recognized families as "cheerers" who provide support by being involved in patient care and observed how extensive family involvement can be beneficial to patients but overwhelming for families. Nurses noted that communication among providers, families, and patients is the cornerstone of creating meaningful relationships. Nurses stated that with many teams involved, discrepancies in information can occur and often confuse and disturb patients' families. Thus, nurses identified ways to enhance family resilience through routine and consistent communication. Nurses note unique stresses faced by families of patients in surgical intensive care units. Using the family resilience model, nurses can identify and enhance key family resilience factors. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  11. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-10-01

    The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains inadequate to prepare them for the social and healthcare needs of the elderly. To determine the essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care. First, a draft version of essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care (N=120) was developed and approved by experts, also members of the project steering committee. Second, a Delphi survey was conducted to determine the essential competencies. The Delphi panel consisted of eleven field experts (teachers/educational developers) working for different vocational education training colleges in the Netherlands. Ten panel members participated in a two-round consensus building process via email. A definitive set of 116 essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and 42 essential competencies for the initial education of care helpers were determined. The competencies in the definitive set are more in line with social and healthcare needs of the elderly like: autonomy, daily functioning prevention of health problems, healthy ageing and wellbeing, involvement of informal care, collaboration between professionals and informal care. The main challenge now is to translate these competencies into educational programmes for vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Recommendations are made for the implementation of these competencies in the Dutch vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Philosophy and conceptual framework: collectively structuring nursing care systematization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Eudinéia Luz; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; Bruggmann, Mario Sérgio; Luz, Susian Cássia Liz

    2017-03-30

    To build the Nursing Philosophy and Conceptual Framework that will support the Nursing Care Systematization in a hospital in southern Brazil with the active participation of the institution's nurses. Convergent Care Research Data collection took place from July to October 2014, through two workshops and four meetings, with 42 nurses. As a result, the nursing philosophy and conceptual framework were created and the theory was chosen. Data analysis was performed based on Morse and Field. The philosophy involves the following beliefs: team nursing; team work; holistic care; service excellence; leadership/coordination; interdisciplinary team commitment. The conceptual framework brings concepts such as: human being; nursing; nursing care, safe care. The nursing theory defined was that of Wanda de Aguiar Horta. As a contribution, it brought the construction of the institutions' nursing philosophy and conceptual framework, and the definition of a nursing theory.

  13. Ethical challenges in neonatal intensive care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandås, Maria; Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal nurses report a great deal of ethical challenges in their everyday work. Seemingly trivial everyday choices nurses make are no more value-neutral than life-and-death choices. Everyday ethical challenges should also be recognized as ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate which types of ethical challenges neonatal nurses experience in their day-to-day care for critically ill newborns. Data were collected through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis was applied to interpret the data. Six nurses from neonatal intensive care units at two Norwegian hospitals were interviewed on-site. The study is designed to comply with Ethical Guidelines for Nursing Research in the Nordic Countries and the Helsinki declaration. Findings suggest that nurses experience a diverse range of everyday ethical challenges related to challenging interactions with parents and colleagues, emotional strain, protecting the vulnerable infant, finding the balance between sensitivity and authority, ensuring continuity of treatment, and miscommunication and professional disagreement. A major finding in this study is how different agents involved in caring for the newborn experience their realities differently. When these realities collide, ethical challenges arise. Findings suggest that acting in the best interests of the child becomes more difficult in situations involving many agents with different perceptions of reality. The study presents new aspects which increases knowledge and understanding of the reality of nursing in a neonatal intensive care unit, while also demanding increased research in this field of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. State policies regarding nursing delegation and medication administration in child care settings: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heschel, Rhonda T; Crowley, Angela A; Cohen, Sally S

    2005-05-01

    Medication administration is an essential component of quality child care, and nurses play a central role in assuring high-quality training of child care providers. Through key informant interviews and review of public documents, this case study explored the development of state statutes and regulations for medication administration training of child care providers in the state of Connecticut, nursing liability issues related to the definition of this activity, and the role of the Connecticut State Board of Examiners for Nursing. This article also examines the interpretation of the nursing role within this context as delegation versus professional activity and the impact of such designation on nursing practice, child care providers' access to medication administration training by nurses, and children's health status in child care settings. As a result of this case study, the Connecticut State Board of Examiners for Nursing revised its policies, demonstrating an exemplar linkage among research, practice, and policy.

  15. Intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese intensive care patients: A hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robstad, Nastasja; Söderhamn, Ulrika; Fegran, Liv

    2017-06-21

    To obtain a deeper understanding of qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care. Admission of obese patients with complex healthcare needs to intensive care units is increasing. Caring for obese critically ill patients can be challenging and demanding for the intensive care nurse because of the patients' weight, critical situation and physical challenges. There is a gap in knowledge at present about qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients in intensive care units. A qualitative hermeneutic approach. The study took place in 2016 at intensive care units of two different hospitals. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 13 qualified intensive care nurses. The interviews were analysed according to a Gadamerian-inspired research method. Intensive care nurses perceived caring for obese intensive care patients as emotionally demanding owing to these patients' vulnerability, dissimilarity and physical challenges compared to normal weight patients. They experienced ambivalent feelings caring for these patients: while they endeavoured to provide good and equal care to all patients, they simultaneously held negative beliefs and attitudes towards obese patients. Furthermore, frustration arose among the intensive care nurses relating to the physically demanding care situations and an unwillingness to care for such patients among some colleagues. The qualified intensive care nurses' experiences of caring for obese patients revealed ambivalent feelings, attitudes and beliefs towards these patients, which must be considered in intensive care unit practice as well as in the education of these nurses. The results have implications for clinical practice with respect to increasing intensive care nurses' awareness of their attitudes and beliefs towards obese intensive care patients and to improve the education of these nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nurses' Perceptions of Nursing Care Documentation in the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tracey A.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) will soon become the standard for documenting nursing care. The EHR holds the promise of rapid access to complete records of a patient's encounter with the healthcare system. It is the expectation that healthcare providers input essential data that communicates important patient information to support quality…

  17. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AMONG INTENSIVE CARE NURSES: AN ETHNOGRAPHIC STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Bakhshi, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    Nurses are the main users of supplies and equipment applied in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) which are high-priced and costly. Therefore, understanding ICU nurses' experiences about resource management contributes to the better control of the costs. This study aimed to investigate the culture of nurses' working environment regarding the resource management in the ICUs in Iran. In this study, a focused ethnographic method was used. Twenty-eight informants among ICU nurses and other professional individuals were purposively selected and interviewed. As well, 400 hours of ethnographic observations as a participant observer was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using the methods described by Miles and Huberman (1994). Two main themes describing the culture of ICU nurses regarding resource management included (a) consumption monitoring and auditing, and (b) prudent use. The results revealed that the efforts for resource management are conducted in the conditions of scarcity and uncertainty in supply. ICU nurses had a sense of futurism in the supply and use of resources in the unit and do the planning through taking the rules and guidelines as well as the available resources and their values into account. Improper storage of some supplies and equipment was a reaction to this uncertain condition among nurses. To manage the resources effectively, improvement of supply chain management in hospital seems essential. It is also necessary to hold educational classes in order to enhance the nurses' awareness on effective supply chain and storage of the items in the unit stock.

  18. Developing a Web-Based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Lapp, Cathi; Hagle, Mary E

    2015-09-01

    Many hospital information systems have been developed and implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve patient care. Because of a growing awareness that the use of clinical information improves quality of care and patient outcomes, measuring tools (electronic and paper based) have been developed, but most of them require multiple steps of data collection and analysis. This necessitated the development of a Web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of care and its impact on patient outcomes and provides useful information to clinicians, administrators, researchers, and policy makers at the point of care. This pilot study developed a computer algorithm based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype Web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System. It successfully measured performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes successfully using clinical nursing data from the study site. Although Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System was tested with small data sets, results of study revealed that it has the potential to measure nurses' delivery of care and its impact on patient outcomes, while pinpointing components of nursing process in need of improvement.

  19. Congruence of perceptions among nursing leaders and staff regarding missed nursing care and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the congruence of the perceptions of unit-based nurse leaders (managers, advanced practice nurses) and nursing staff members (registered nurses, nursing assistants, unit secretaries) in acute care hospitals as to the extent and type of missed nursing care and nursing teamwork. Based on the leader-member exchange congruence framework (LMX), nursing staff and nursing leaders completed the MISSCARE Survey, and a segment of the participants completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey. The findings of this study show a lack of LMX congruence between leaders and nursing staff members. Nursing staff report less missed care and lower teamwork than do leaders, and nursing staff list more problems with having adequate material and labor resources than do leaders. LMX congruence has been associated with positive organizational outcomes.

  20. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Scope of Nursing Care in Polish Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Wysokiński

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The TISS-28 scale, which may be used for nursing staff scheduling in ICU, does not reflect the complete scope of nursing resulting from varied cultural and organizational conditions of individual systems of health care. Aim. The objective of the study was an attempt to provide an answer to the question what scope of nursing care provided by Polish nurses in ICU does the TISS-28 scale reflect? Material and Methods. The methods of working time measurement were used in the study. For the needs of the study, 252 hours of continuous observation (day-long observation and 3.697 time-schedule measurements were carried out. Results. The total nursing time was 4125.79 min. (68.76 hours, that is, 60.15% of the total working time of Polish nurses during the period analyzed. Based on the median test, the difference was observed on the level of χ2=16945.8, P<0.001 between the nurses’ workload resulting from performance of activities qualified into the TISS-28 scale and load resulting from performance of interventions within the scopes of care not considered in this scale in Polish ICUs. Conclusions. The original version of the TISS-28 scale does not fully reflect the workload among Polish nurses employed in ICUs.

  2. Difficulties and practices regarding information provision among Korean and Italian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravallo, F; Kim, K H; Han, Y H; Volta, A; Chiari, P; Taddia, P; Kim, J S

    2017-12-01

    To investigate nurses' opinions and practices of providing information in a global context through cultural comparison. Providing sufficient information to patients about nursing interventions and plans is essential for patient-centred care. While many countries have specific legislation making information delivery to patients a legal duty of nurses, no such legislation exists in both the Republic of Korea and Italy; nurses' only guidance is the deontological code. This was a cross-sectional survey study involving a convenience sample of 174 Korean nurses and 121 Italian nurses working in internal medicine and surgery at university hospitals. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire between February and November 2014. The questionnaire assessed demographic and professional characteristics, and difficulties and practices regarding information provision. Korean and Italian nurses significantly differed in all demographic and professional characteristics. More Korean than Italian participants reported that their role in providing information was well explained within their teams, but both groups reported the same level and type of difficulties in delivering information. Nurses in both countries regularly informed patients about medications and nursing procedures, but provided information about nursing care plans less frequently. Few nurses frequently provided information to relatives instead of patients. Despite cultural, demographic and professional differences between Korean and Italian nurses, their difficulties and practices in information delivery to patient were similar. Hospital managers and policymakers should be aware that nurse-patient communication can be impaired by organizational factors, patient characteristics or the interaction among providers. Educational interventions and strategies are needed to increase information provision to patients about nursing care plans. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Nurses\\' perception of caring behaviors in intensive care units in hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Caring is the core of nursing however, different individules have different perceptions of it. Continuous assessment and measurement of caring behaviors results in the identification of their problems. The careful planning of interventions and problem solving will improve care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' perception of caring behaviors in the intensive care units. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic study, 140 nurses were selected from intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, using the census method in 2012. The data collection tool was the Caring Behaviors Inventory for Elders (CBI-E. This questionnaire consisted of two parts including demographic information and 28 items related to care. Face and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire were provided by professionals, and after deletion of 4 items a 24-item questionnaire was provided. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to assess reliability (&alpha = 0.71. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18 and descriptive-analytic statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Based on the findings, nurses paid more attention to the physical–technical aspects (95.71 ± 12.76 of care in comparison to its psychosocial aspects (75.41 ± 27.91. Nurses had the highest score in care behavior of "timely performance of medical procedures and medication administration". Conclusion: Since nurses paid more attention to the technical aspects of care than its psychosocial aspects, by providing nurses with a correct perception of care, patients can be provided with needs-based care. This will increase patient satisfaction with nursing care, and indirectly result in the positive attitude of patients and society toward the nursing profession and its services. Moreover, nursing education officials can use these results to assist nurses in meeting

  4. Nutrition and dementia care: developing an evidence-based model for nutritional care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane L; Holmes, Joanne; Brooks, Cindy

    2017-02-14

    There is a growing volume of research to offer improvements in nutritional care for people with dementia living in nursing homes. Whilst a number of interventions have been identified to support food and drink intake, there has been no systematic research to understand the factors for improving nutritional care from the perspectives of all those delivering care in nursing homes. The aim of this study was to develop a research informed model for understanding the complex nutritional problems associated with eating and drinking for people with dementia. We conducted nine focus groups and five semi-structured interviews with those involved or who have a level of responsibility for providing food and drink and nutritional care in nursing homes (nurses, care workers, catering assistants, dietitians, speech and language therapists) and family carers. The resulting conceptual model was developed by eliciting care-related processes, thus supporting credibility from the perspective of the end-users. The seven identified domain areas were person-centred nutritional care (the overarching theme); availability of food and drink; tools, resources and environment; relationship to others when eating and drinking; participation in activities; consistency of care and provision of information. This collaboratively developed, person-centred model can support the design of new education and training tools and be readily translated into existing programmes. Further research is needed to evaluate whether these evidence-informed approaches have been implemented successfully and adopted into practice and policy contexts and can demonstrate effectiveness for people living with dementia.

  5. Teaching Nursing Care through Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treistman, Judith M.

    1986-01-01

    The author demonstrates through poetry samples how feminist poetry can help nursing students understand patient feelings and emotions while students take part in a clinical rotation in a women's health unit. Topics include aging, pregnancy, childbirth, and sense of "self." (CT)

  6. Nursing Intervention During Temporary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Judith B.

    1974-01-01

    The role of the professional nurse in asseviating or minimizing the separation anxiety and traumatic impact on families during temporary placement of a retarded child in a residential facility is seen in two case studies of girls 3 and 12 years of age. (Author/MC)

  7. Emergency department waiting room nurse role: A key informant perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kelli; Jackson, Debra; Plummer, Virginia; Elliott, Doug

    2017-02-01

    Emergency departments have become overcrowded with increased waiting times. Strategies to decrease waiting times include time-based key performance indicators and introduction of a waiting room nurse role. The aim of the waiting room nurse role is to expedite care by assessing and managing patients in the waiting room. There is limited literature examining this role. This paper presents results of semi-structured interviews with five key informants to explore why and how the waiting room nurse role was implemented in Australian emergency departments. Data were thematically analysed. Five key informants from five emergency departments across two Australian jurisdictions (Victoria and New South Wales) reported that the role was introduced to reduce waiting times and improve quality and safety of care in the ED waiting room. Critical to introducing the role was defining and supporting the scope of practice, experience and preparation of the nurses. Role implementation required champions to overcome identified challenges, including funding. There has been limited evaluation of the role. The waiting room nurse role was introduced to decrease waiting times and contributed to risk mitigation. Common to all roles was standing orders, while preparation and experience varied. Further research into the role is required. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The international migration of nurses in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfoot, Donald L; Houser, Ari N

    2008-01-01

    This article describes five major factors that are affecting patterns of international migration among nurses who work in long-term care settings: DEMOGRAPHIC DRIVERS: The aging of the populations in developed countries and the low to negative growth in the working-age population will increase the demand for international workers to provide long-term care services. GENDER AND RACE: A dual labor market of long-term care workers, increasingly made up of women of color, is becoming internationalized by the employment of migrating nurses from developing countries. CREDENTIALING: The process of credentialing skilled workers creates barriers to entry for migrating nurses and leads to "decredentialing" where registered nurses work as licensed practical nurses or aides. COLONIAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY: The colonial histories of many European countries and the United States have increased migration from former colonies in developing countries to former colonial powers. WORKER RECRUITMENT: Efforts to limit the recruitment of health care workers from some developing countries have had little effect on migration, in part because much of the recruitment comes through informal channels of family and friends.

  9. Exploring resilience in nurses caring for older persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronella Benadé

    2017-10-01

    Objectives: The objectives were to explore and describe the strengths and coping abilities of nurses caring for older persons and to formulate recommendations to strengthen their resilience. Methodology: An explorative, descriptive qualitative research design was used. An allinclusive sample of nurses caring for older persons in an urban setting in the North West Province, South Africa, participated in the study. During phase one, demographic information was obtained, and narratives were written (n = 43. Four focus group interviews were conducted in phase two (n = 17 and recommendations were formulated in phase three. Content analysis was used. Principal results: Participants experienced adverse working circumstances while caring for older persons and they needed resilience to balance the emotional nature of the work, work ethics, staff shortages, physical demands of the work and the dependency of the older persons. These nurses used personal, professional, contextual and spiritual strengths to handle adverse working conditions. Conclusions: By applying their personal, professional, contextual and spiritual strengths, nurses could further enhance these strengths and possibly their resilience. The participants' identified strengths were used to formulate recommendations to strengthen resilience of nurses caring for older persons.

  10. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmani Azad; Azimzadeh Roghaieh; Zamanzadeh Vahid; Valizadeh Leila

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study t...

  11. The emotional intelligence of registered nurses commencing critical care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Nagel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Critical care is described as complex, detailed healthcare in a unique, technologically rich environment. Critical care nursing requires a strong knowledge base and exceptional clinical and technological skills to cope in this demanding environment. Many registered nurses (RNs commencing work in these areas may lack resilience, and because of the stress of the critical care environment, coping mechanisms need to be developed. To prevent burnout and to enable critical care nurses to function holistically, emotional intelligence (EI is essential in the development of such coping mechanisms.Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the EI of RNs commencing work in critical care units in a private hospital group in Gauteng, South Africa.Method: The design used for this study was a quantitative descriptive survey. The target population were RNs commencing work in critical care units. Data were collected from RNs using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire – Short Form and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: The sample (n = 30 had a mean age of 32 years. Most of the participants (63% qualified through the completion of a bridging course between 2010 and 2012. The majority (62% of the sample had less than 2 years’ experience as RNs.Conclusion: The EI of RNs commencing work in a critical care environment was indicative of a higher range of Global EI, with the well-being factor scoring the highest, followed by the emotionality factor, then self-control, with the sociability factor scoring the lowest.

  12. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Barbara-Beate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices

  13. Ideologies and Research in Nursing Care. Nursing Education. Swedish Research on Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Goran

    Trends in nursing research in Sweden are first discussed in relation to nursing education. Beyond the university, two "roots" of nursing research are investigated: (1) The first studies included analysis of the working conditions of nursing care; and (2) Later research topics covered nurse-patient relations and patients' needs. The…

  14. Prison nursing: legal framework and care reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Baún, H

    2017-06-01

    Penitentiary Nursing has experienced during the last decades a deep transformation similar to that experienced by the rest of the Nursing. However, there is a great distance from the protective legislation. To analyze the main legal documents which regulate the functions of Penitentiary Nursing and to compare it with the health care reality of nurses in Spanish prisons. Narrative bibliographic review based on various sources such as Medline, Cuiden, Scielo, Dialnet, etc. Is selected 43 documents, due to its relevance with the theme object of study. Is rejected 4 articles for lack of the same. Analyzed documents regarding legal framework and functions of nursing in prisons in its different sections (health care, teaching, research and management). The functions currently carried out in prisons are the ones provided for by health care legislation outside the prison context, along with the internal administrative regulations established by prisons. The possibility should be reconsidered of integrating Prison Healthcare into the Public Healthcare System so as to guarantee equality of healthcare for persons deprived of liberty and to provide the same rights and obligations to health professionals working in this sector.

  15. Prison nursing: legal framework and care reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Carrasco-Baún

    Full Text Available Introduction: Penitentiary Nursing has experienced during the last decades a deep transformation similar to that experienced by the rest of the Nursing. However, there is a great distance from the protective legislation. Objective: To analyze the main legal documents which regulate the functions of Penitentiary Nursing and to compare it with the health care reality of nurses in Spanish prisons. Methodology: Narrative bibliographic review based on various sources such as Medline, Cuiden, Scielo, Dialnet, etc. Results: Is selected 43 documents, due to its relevance with the theme object of study. Is rejected 4 articles for lack of the same. Analyzed documents regarding legal framework and functions of nursing in prisons in its different sections (health care, teaching, research and management. Conclusion: The functions currently carried out in prisons are the ones provided for by health care legislation outside the prison context, along with the internal administrative regulations established by prisons. The possibility should be reconsidered of integrating Prison Healthcare into the Public Healthcare System so as to guarantee equality of healthcare for persons deprived of liberty and to provide the same rights and obligations to health professionals working in this sector.

  16. Voicing Ageism in Nursing Home Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine; Shaw, Clarissa; Lee, Alexandria; Kim, Sohyun; Dinneen, Emma; Turk, Margaret; Jao, Ying-Ling; Liu, Wen

    2017-09-01

    Elderspeak (i.e., infantilizing communication) is a common form of ageism that has been linked to resistiveness to care in nursing home residents with dementia. Nursing home staff use elderspeak by modifying speech with older residents based on negative stereotypes, which results in patronizing communication that provides a message of incompetence. The purpose of the current secondary analysis was to describe communication practices used by nursing home staff that reflect ageism. Transcripts of 80 video recordings of staff-resident communication collected during nursing home care activities were re-analyzed to identify specific elderspeak patterns, including diminutives, collective pronouns, tag questions, and reflectives. Elderspeak was used in 84% of transcripts, and specifically during bathing, dressing, oral care, and other activities. Collective pronoun substitution occurred most frequently-in 69% of recorded conversations. Subgroup analysis of the inappropriate terms of endearment found that "honey"/"hon" and "sweetheart"/"sweetie" were most commonly used. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(9), 16-20.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Critical care nurses' perception of nursing error and its causes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Peyrovi, Hamid; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht

    2014-01-01

    Nurses' perceptions of nursing error could affect their professional practice. The aim of the study was to explore critical care nurses' perceptions of nursing error and its causes. This was a qualitative study in which 12 critical care nurses were recruited through purposive sampling. The data were collected via in-depth interviews and analyzed through qualitative content analysis method (Elo & Kyngäs, 2008). Nursing error was deemed as an unavoidable issue which consisted of the lack of congruence with standards, doing extra-nursing tasks and giving care against the agreed-upon routines. Five categories emerged as the causes of error: individual reasons, work pressure, caring blindly, the uniqueness of caring environment and the lack of coordination among health care team members. The perception of nursing error is sort of unique; hence, managers should provide support for critical care nurses and pave the way for the prevention of errors.

  18. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A M M; Van Der Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive

  19. perception of indonesian nursing students regaring caring behavior and teaching characteristics of their clinical nursing instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    madiha mukhtar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Student’s learning and performance reflects the professional attitude, behavior, ethics and standards of their instructors. The aim of this study is to analyse the perception of Indonesian Nursing students regarding caring behavior and teaching characteristics of their CNIs. In this exploratory cross-sectional study, 149 Professional Nursing students from Regular program (Baccalaureate and Post diploma BSN and 15 Clinical Nursing Instructors were recruited from nursing faculty of public university located in Surabaya Indonesia. Data were collected by questionnaire and FGD was conducted to explore detailed information. In descriptive analysis: 6 % students perceived the caring behavior of their clinical instructors as low, 52.3% responds it as enough and 41.6 % considered it good. Teaching characteristics of CNI; 2.7% low, 26.8 as enough and 70.5 % good as perceived by their students. Data collected from students was analysed by using logistic regression test. Professional commitment with (P-value .038, motivation (P-value .010 and clinical placement environment (P-value .002 in main category (significance value is < 0.05 shows influence on perception of Indonesian nursing students regarding caring behaviour and teaching characteristics of their CNIs. In focused group discussion students’ recommended to increase the number of visits in clinical area and emphasises on bed side clinical demonstration. It can be concluded that students’ characteristics does have influence on their perception regarding caring behavior and clinical setting environment influence their perception regarding teaching characteristics of their CNIs.

  20. Patient satisfaction with hospital care and nurses in England: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas M; Ball, Jane; Bruyneel, Luk; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Griffiths, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To inform healthcare workforce policy decisions by showing how patient perceptions of hospital care are associated with confidence in nurses and doctors, nurse staffing levels and hospital work environments. Design Cross-sectional surveys of 66 348 hospital patients and 2963 inpatient nurses. Setting Patients surveyed were discharged in 2010 from 161 National Health Service (NHS) trusts in England. Inpatient nurses were surveyed in 2010 in a sample of 46 hospitals in 31 of the same 161 trusts. Participants The 2010 NHS Survey of Inpatients obtained information from 50% of all patients discharged between June and August. The 2010 RN4CAST England Nurse Survey gathered information from inpatient medical and surgical nurses. Main outcome measures Patient ratings of their hospital care, their confidence in nurses and doctors and other indicators of their satisfaction. Missed nursing care was treated as both an outcome measure and explanatory factor. Results Patients’ perceptions of care are significantly eroded by lack of confidence in either nurses or doctors, and by increases in missed nursing care. The average number of types of missed care was negatively related to six of the eight outcomes—ORs ranged from 0.78 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.90) for excellent care ratings to 0.86 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.95) for medications completely explained—positively associated with higher patient-to-nurse ratios (b=0.15, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19), and negatively associated with better work environments (b=−0.26, 95% CI −0.48 to −0.04). Conclusions Patients’ perceptions of hospital care are strongly associated with missed nursing care, which in turn is related to poor professional nurse (RN) staffing and poor hospital work environments. Improving RN staffing in NHS hospitals holds promise for enhancing patient satisfaction. PMID:29326193

  1. Scope of nursing care in Polish intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Mariusz; Ksykiewicz-Dorota, Anna; Fidecki, Wiesław

    2013-01-01

    The TISS-28 scale, which may be used for nursing staff scheduling in ICU, does not reflect the complete scope of nursing resulting from varied cultural and organizational conditions of individual systems of health care. The objective of the study was an attempt to provide an answer to the question what scope of nursing care provided by Polish nurses in ICU does the TISS-28 scale reflect? The methods of working time measurement were used in the study. For the needs of the study, 252 hours of continuous observation (day-long observation) and 3.697 time-schedule measurements were carried out. The total nursing time was 4125.79 min. (68.76 hours), that is, 60.15% of the total working time of Polish nurses during the period analyzed. Based on the median test, the difference was observed on the level of χ(2) = 16945.8,P Polish ICUs. The original version of the TISS-28 scale does not fully reflect the workload among Polish nurses employed in ICUs.

  2. Specifics of nursing care for a patient with nutritional stoma.

    OpenAIRE

    MUSILOVÁ, Klára

    2017-01-01

    Main goal of the thesis was to map out the specifics of nursing care for a patient with a nutritious stoma. Three research questions have been identified in connection to this goal. First research question was focused on mapping out the nursing care for a patient prior applying the nutritious stoma. Second research question was focusing on nursing care for a patient while the nutritious stoma is being applied, and the last third question researches the nursing care for a patient after applyin...

  3. Burnout syndrome in critical care nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Marie Cécile; Toullic, Philippe; Papazian, Laurent; Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Timsit, Jean-Francçois; Pochard, Frédéric; Chevret, Sylvie; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2007-04-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) associated with stress has been documented in health care professionals in many specialties. The intensive care unit (ICU) is a highly stressful environment. Little is known about BOS in critical care nursing staff. To identify determinants of BOS in critical care nurses. We conducted a questionnaire survey in France. Among 278 ICUs contacted for the study, 165 (59.4%) included 2,525 nursing staff members, of whom 2,392 returned questionnaires with complete Maslach Burnout Inventory data. Of the 2,392 respondents (82% female), 80% were nurses, 15% nursing assistants, and 5% head nurses. Severe BOS-related symptoms were identified in 790 (33%) respondents. By multivariate analysis, four domains were associated with severe BOS: (1) personal characteristics, such as age (odds ratio [OR], 0.97/yr; confidence interval [CI], 0.96-0.99; p=0.0008); (2) organizational factors, such as ability to choose days off (OR, 0.69; CI, 0.52-0.91; p=0.009) or participation in an ICU research group (OR, 0.74; CI, 0.56-0.97; p=0.03); (3) quality of working relations (1-10 scale), such as conflicts with patients (OR, 1.96; CI, 1.16-1.30; p=0.01), relationship with head nurse (OR, 0.92/point; CI, 0.86-0.98; p=0.02) or physicians (OR, 0.81; CI, 0.74-0.87; p=0.0001); and (4) end-of-life related factors, such as caring for a dying patient (OR, 1.39; CI, 1.04-1.85; p=0.02), and number of decisions to forego life-sustaining treatments in the last week (OR, 1.14; CI, 1.01-1.29; p=0.04). One-third of ICU nursing staff had severe BOS. Areas for improvement identified in our study include conflict prevention, participation in ICU research groups, and better management of end-of-life care. Interventional studies are needed to investigate these potentially preventive strategies.

  4. Exploring family experiences of nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the ICU: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noome, Marijke; Dijkstra, Boukje M; van Leeuwen, Evert; Vloet, Lilian C M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the experience(s) of family with the nursing aspects of End-of-life care in the intensive care unit after a decision to end life-sustaining treatment, and to describe what nursing care was most appreciated and what was lacking. A phenomenological approach including inductive thematic analysis was used. Twenty-six family members of deceased critically ill-patients were interviewed within two months after the patient's death about their experiences with nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. Most family members experienced nursing contribution to end-of-life care of the patient and themselves, especially supportive care. Families mentioned the following topics: Communication between intensive care nurses, critically ill patients and family; Nursing care for critically ill patients; Nursing care for families of critically ill patients; Pre-conditions. Families appreciated that intensive care nurses were available at any time and willing to answer questions. But care was lacking because families had for example, a sense of responsibility for obtaining information, they had problems to understand their role in the decision-making process, and were not invited by nurses to participate in the care. Most family appreciated the nursing EOLC they received, specifically the nursing care given to the patient and themselves. Some topics needed more attention, like information and support for the family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Telematics and nursing: does the German electronic Health Card improve patient care for persons with nursing needs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hübner, Ursula

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Current developments towards a German electronic Health Card raise the question whether the card is capable of improving care also for persons with special nursing needs including short-term as well as long-term care patients. The aging of the population - also in Germany - is coupled with an increase in the number of long-term care patients. They are patients who need medical as well as nursing care and who often need care provided by changing care settings (ambulatory care/home care vs. hospital during the course of their illness. Nursing Science has been recognizing the importance of an uninterrupted way of providing patient care (continuity of care as a central issue and has been developing concepts and instruments for case management and discharge management. Both approaches provide mechanisms proven under real life conditions for transferring patients safely from one to another setting. Although nursing telematics covers a wide range of topics, from semantic interoperability to telecare solutions, its primary applications, namely case management and discharge management, are only poorly supported by information and communication technology. It is therefore not surprising, that the electronic Health Card in Germany was planned without making any reference to case management and discharge management. Current concepts for the applications of the card simply ignore the scenario of transferring patients with special nursing needs between care settings. Though adjustments of the legal foundations of the electronic Health Card had been made recently, nurses will still not be able to exchange nursing summaries electronically by means of the card because nurses working in nursing homes and for ambulatory nursing services have no access rights for the data on the card. The full exploitation of the card and its potential for innovation does not only depend, however, on granting access rights to all nurses but also on issuing electronic Health

  6. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experiences of nursing students in caring for pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostak, Melahat Akgun; Mutlu, Aysel; Bilsel, Aysegul

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the experiences of nursing students in caring for paediatric cancer patients and their families. This qualitative survey was carried out with 14 students studying in the nursing department of the Faculty of Health Sciences of a university in Edirne, Turkey. Data were obtained through focus group interviews and evaluated based on a qualitative content analysis. It was determined that students, for the most part, experienced problems related to communication, sadness, helplessness, fear, anxiety, resentment and anger. In addition, the students were affected most often by effects of the disease and invasive procedures on paediatric cancer patients and their families during the process of caring for them in the oncology clinic. It would be useful to inform nursing students, prior to clinical practice, about the special needs of paediatric cancer patients and families who stay in oncology clinics, and to follow up with appropriate guidance during the clinical practices.

  8. Nursing Care of Pregnant Muslim Women During Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jena; Pomeroy, Mary; Reid, Davika; Zuniga, Julie

    There are approximately 3.3 million people of the Muslim faith living in the United States. This article explores how Muslim women observe their religious beliefs during pregnancy and discusses implications for nursing care of pregnant Muslim women during Ramadan. Although pregnant Muslim women can be exempt from fasting, many still choose to fast during Ramadan. Factors that influence a woman's decision to fast include gravity and parity, maternal education, maternal age, body mass index, comprehension of Islamic Law, and gestational trimester. Nurses can tailor their care of pregnant Muslim women to include episodes of fasting and help them make informed decisions regarding fasting during Ramadan. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  9. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpell, Ruth M; Ely, E Wesley; Grabenkort, Robert

    2008-10-01

    care management (n = 17), six focused on comparisons of care with physician care, five examined the impact of models of care including multidisciplinary and outcomes management models, and three assessed involvement and impact on reinforcement of practice guidelines, education, research, and quality improvement. Although existing research supports the use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in acute and critical care settings, a low level of evidence was found with only two randomized control trials assessing the impact of nurse practitioner care. Further research that explores the impact of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit setting on patient outcomes, including financial aspects of care is needed. In addition, information on successful multidisciplinary models of care is needed to promote optimal use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in acute and critical care settings.

  10. Psychological Care in Nursing Education and Practice: A Search for Definition and Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Helena M.

    1999-01-01

    A literature review and analysis of nursing textbooks found little agreement on definition and dimensions of psychological care in nursing. Most texts stress the importance of patients' need for information and education, with less agreement about emotional care, counseling, assessment, and support. (SK)

  11. [Glioblastoma and nursing care in neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Mathilde

    2017-02-01

    Nurses in neurosurgical departments play a critical role as they are involved in the first stages of the care pathway of patients with glioblastoma. Indeed, surgery enables a definitive histopathological diagnosis to be established and the size of the tumour to be significantly reduced, thereby improving the prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Nurses improve migraine management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Petra; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; de Jong, Gosse; Baarveld, Frans; van den Berg, J. S. Peter

    Introduction Migraine is a common disorder with a high burden. Adequate treatment results in improvement of quality of life. Migraine patients are mainly treated by general practitioners (GPs), but there is still room for improvement. This study investigated whether primary care nurses could improve

  13. Emergency Care Skills for Occupational Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh. Occupational Information Center.

    Designed for use in community colleges, technical colleges, and technical institutes, this manual contains a course for teaching emergency care skills to both licensed practical and registered nurses employed in occupational health. The manual consists of three sections. In section 1 the need for the course, its content, objectives, length,…

  14. Developing a prenatal nursing care International Classification for Nursing Practice catalogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Coenen, A; Tao, H; Jansen, K R; Jiang, A L

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a prenatal nursing care catalogue of International Classification for Nursing Practice. As a programme of the International Council of Nurses, International Classification for Nursing Practice aims to support standardized electronic nursing documentation and facilitate collection of comparable nursing data across settings. This initiative enables the study of relationships among nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions and nursing outcomes for best practice, healthcare management decisions, and policy development. The catalogues are usually focused on target populations. Pregnant women are the nursing population addressed in this project. According to the guidelines for catalogue development, three research steps have been adopted: (a) identifying relevant nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes; (b) developing a conceptual framework for the catalogue; (c) expert's validation. This project established a prenatal nursing care catalogue with 228 terms in total, including 69 nursing diagnosis, 92 nursing interventions and 67 nursing outcomes, among them, 57 nursing terms were newly developed. All terms in the catalogue were organized by a framework with two main categories, i.e. Expected Changes of Pregnancy and Pregnancy at Risk. Each category had four domains, representing the physical, psychological, behavioral and environmental perspectives of nursing practice. This catalogue can ease the documentation workload among prenatal care nurses, and facilitate storage and retrieval of standardized data for many purposes, such as quality improvement, administration decision-support and researches. The documentations of prenatal care provided data that can be more fluently communicated, compared and evaluated across various healthcare providers and clinic settings. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  15. A descriptive quantitative study on multi-ethnic patient satisfaction with nursing care measured by the Revised Humane Caring Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Mien Li; Ang, Emily N K; Chan, Yiong-Huak; He, Hong-Gu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2016-08-01

    To determine patients' satisfaction with nursing care during hospitalization. Limited studies reporting patients' satisfaction with quality of nursing care in Singapore. A descriptive study was conducted in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Data were collected from 270 adult patients using the Revised Humane Caring Scale. Patients were moderately satisfied with the nursing care. There were significant differences of patients' level of satisfaction between/among socio-demographic subgroups including ethnicity, gender, reasons for admission and disciplines. Chinese patients were least satisfied with nursing care. The patients were most satisfied with 'Respecting patient's feeling' (mean=82.29, SD=14.50) and least satisfied with 'Communication and participation' (mean=62.00, SD=16.46). Our results reinforced the need to pay more attention to patient information provision and effective communication, which could improve patient satisfaction. The multi-ethnic patients valued respect as an influential attribute in quality nursing care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of a spiritual care training for nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlasblom, J.P.; van der Steen, J.T.; Knol, D.L.; Jochemsen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that spiritual care is an essential part of nursing care according to many nursing definitions, it appears to be quite different in practice. A spirituality training for nurses may be necessary to give spiritual care the attention it deserves. In a trial a pre-tested "spirituality

  17. [Management of technology and its influence on nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo

    2007-01-01

    Currently, much nursing care adheres to a specific biomedical paradigm within the positivist framework. However, sometimes nursing care cannot be adapted to numerous human or vital conditions affecting our patients, their families or the environment in which nurses work. An specific example of these nursing interventions are those applied in intensive care units (ICU) where there is a large amount of technology and nursing care is specialized. Several questions that arise are whether the above-mentioned specialization is inherent to nurse care, whether technology management forms part of nursing care, whether this care has a non-nursing origin, and what is the source of nursing knowledge. The present article aims to provide basic knowledge to distinguish the nursing care performed in the ICU within the 2 predominant paradigms in current nursing: the biomedical and the holistic paradigms. The characteristics of nursing care in both paradigms are described and an integrated vision of these 2 paradigms and of nursing care with and without the use of technology is provided.

  18. Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age.

  19. An electronic delphi study to establish pediatric intensive care nursing research priorities in twenty European countries*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tume, Lyvonne N; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Wielenga, Joke M; Latour, Jos M

    2014-06-01

    To identify and to establish research priorities for pediatric intensive care nursing science across Europe. A modified three-round electronic Delphi technique was applied. Questionnaires were translated into seven different languages. European PICUs. The participants included pediatric intensive care clinical nurses, managers, educators, and researchers. In round 1, the qualitative responses were analyzed by content analysis and a list of research statements and domains was generated. In rounds 2 and 3, the statements were ranked on a scale of one to six (not important to most important). Mean scores and SDs were calculated for rounds 2 and 3. None. Round 1 started with 90 participants, with round 3 completed by 64 (71%). The seven highest ranking statements (≥ 5.0 mean score) were related to end-of-life care, decision making around forgoing and sustaining treatment, prevention of pain, education and competencies for pediatric intensive care nurses, reducing healthcare-associated infections, identifying appropriate nurse staffing levels, and implementing evidence into nursing practice. Nine research domains were prioritized, and these were as follows: 1) clinical nursing care practices, 2) pain and sedation, 3) quality and safety, 4) respiratory and mechanical ventilation, 5) child- and family-centered care, 6) ethics, 7) professional issues in nursing, 8) hemodynamcis and resuscitation, and 9) trauma and neurocritical care. The results of this study inform the European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care's nursing research agenda in the future. The results allow nurse researchers within Europe to encourage collaborative initiatives for nursing research.

  20. Iranian nurses' preparation for loss: finding a balance in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Mohammadi, Rakhshandeh; Oskouie, Sayede Fatemeh Haghdoost; Sandberg, Jonas

    2009-08-01

    To explore the nurse-patient interaction in terminally ill situations in acute care, focusing on the nurses' preparation for loss. Caring for dying patients can be a distressing and sometimes even threatening experience for nurses. Despite the vast body of literature on nurse/patient interaction and the quality of end-of-life care, few studies focus specifically on nurses' experience. A grounded theory approach was used to explore nurses' interaction with dying patients and their families and examine how nurses deal with situations in which the patient's death is inevitable. Eighteen nurses were interviewed up to three times each at three teaching hospitals in Isfahan, Iran, during autumn 2006. A shortlist of possible participants was obtained by means of theoretical sampling and those who had experienced the death of patients and were able to express their feelings verbally were selected. The results clarified a core consideration: striking a balance between restorative and palliative care, information and hope, expectations and abilities and intimacy and distance. Attaining a balance in caring for dying patients is a major challenge to nurses: it concerns not only their interactions with patients and their families, but also their perceptions of themselves and their actions in end-of-life care. In end-of-life care, it is important for nurses to be able to change the focus of their care when the patient's condition is diagnosed as irreversible. They also need to be well equipped to maintain a balance, thereby preparing themselves for the patient's forthcoming death.

  1. Patient safety in the care of hospitalised children: evidence for paediatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Wiliam; Silva, Manuela Usevicius Maia da; Peres, Merianny de Avila; Bandeira, Larissa Edom; Frantz, Elemara; Botene, Daisy Zanchi de Abreu; Predebon, Caroline Maier

    2017-05-04

    To describe evidence of international literature on the safe care of the hospitalised child after the World Alliance for Patient Safety and list contributions of the general theoretical framework of patient safety for paediatric nursing. An integrative literature review between 2004 and 2015 using the databases PubMed, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Scopus, Web of Science and Wiley Online Library, and the descriptors Safety or Patient safety, Hospitalised child, Paediatric nursing, and Nursing care. Thirty-two articles were analysed, most of which were from North American, with a descriptive approach. The quality of the recorded information in the medical records, the use of checklists, and the training of health workers contribute to safe care in paediatric nursing and improve the medication process and partnerships with parents. General information available on patient safety should be incorporated in paediatric nursing care.

  2. Where does practice nursing fit in primary health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annells, Merilyn

    2007-08-01

    Practice nursing is an integral and growing part of primary health care internationally and increasingly within the Australian health care system. The potential for practice nursing being considered as a specialty of community nursing, boundary issues in community nursing, and defining characteristics of practice nursing as a model of community-based nursing are discussed in this paper. As the author has worked as a practice nurse, personal reflections on the evolving practice nurse role are provided. Practice nursing is a dynamic entity and will continue to evolve in the primary health care setting. In order for practice nursing to meet the primary health care agenda, there is a need to incorporate a social model of health with the medical model of health and to promote research and scholarship to support this goal.

  3. The pivotal role of nurse managers, leaders and educators in enabling excellence in nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Robert; Pearce, Paddy; Grimwood, Karen; McSherry, Wilfred

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to present the findings from a discursive analysis of key issues associated with providing excellence in nursing care; and to provide an exemplar framework to support excellence in nursing care and describe the potential benefits when excellence in nursing care occurs. The challenge facing the nursing profession is in ensuring that the core principles of dignity, respect, compassion and person (people) centered care become central to all aspects of nursing practice. To regain the public and professional confidence in nursing, nurse leaders, managers and educators play a pivotal role in improving the image of nursing. Excellence in nursing care will only happen by ensuring that nurse managers, leaders and educators are able to respond to the complexity of reform and change by leading, managing, enabling, empowering, encouraging and resourcing staff to be innovative and entrepreneurial in practice. Creating healthcare environments that enable excellence in nursing care will not occur without the development of genuine shared working partnerships and collaborations between nurse managers, leaders and educators and their associated organizations. The importance of adopting an authentic sustainable leadership approach to facilitating and supporting frontline staff to innovate and change is imperative in restoring and evidencing that nurses do care and are excellent at what they do. By focusing attention on what resources are required to create a healthcare environment that enables compassion, safety and excellence in nursing care and what this means would be a reasonable start on the journey to excellence in nursing. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Spiritual care as perceived by Lithuanian student nurses and nurse educators: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklikiene, Olga; Vozgirdiene, Inga; Karosas, Laima M; Lazenby, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Political restrictions during 50years of Soviet occupation discouraged expressions of spirituality among Lithuanians. The aim of this paper is to describe Lithuanian nursing educators' and students' perception of spiritual care in a post-Soviet context. This cross-sectional study was carried out among student nurses and nursing educators at three universities and six colleges in Lithuania. The questionnaire developed by Scott (1959) and supplemented by Martin Johnson (1983) was distributed to 316 nursing students in the 3rd and 4th years of studies and 92 nurse educators (N=408). Student nurses and their educators rated general and professional values of religiousness equally; although students tended to dislike atheistic behavior more than educators. Four main categories associated with perceptions of spirituality in nursing care emerged from the student nurses: attributes of spiritual care, advantages of spiritual care, religiousness in spiritual care, and nurse-patient collaboration and communication. Themes from nurse educators paralleled the same first three themes but not the last one. Student nurses and nurse educators acknowledged the importance of spiritual care for patients as well as for care providers - nurses. In many cases spiritual care was defined by nursing students and nurse educators as faith and religiousness. Being a religious person, both for students and educators, or having spiritual aspects in students' personal lives influenced the perception of religious reflection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lack of ear care knowledge in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solheim J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jorunn Solheim,1 Olga Shiryaeva,1 Kari J Kvaerner2 1Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, 2C3 Centre for Connected Care, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Background: Rising life expectancy means an increase in the number of elderly people with hearing loss in the population. Many elderly people live in nursing homes, with varying care needs. A substantial proportion of these people will need help with their hearing aids and other hearing devices. Objective: The objective of the study has been to assess the knowledge, experience, skills, competence, and need for information of staff at nursing homes in relation to residents’ hearing loss and hearing aids. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-five employees at seven nursing homes participated in the study. The main approach was a descriptive study, using questionnaires. Results: The main findings are that 73% of informants found that many residents need help with their hearing aids. Only one-tenth report that they know enough about the residents’ hearing aids. Almost four out of five informants find that the residents become socially isolated as a result of hearing loss. Seventy-eight percent agree to some extent that more residents would benefit from hearing aids. Conclusion: Staff at nursing homes have insufficient knowledge about hearing loss and hearing aids. Increased focus on the elderly with hearing impairment in nursing homes is needed. Contact between nursing homes and audiological specialists should be improved to best follow-up hearing loss and hearing aids. Keywords: hearing aids, nursing staff, hearing impairment, institutionalized elderly

  6. Pathway to better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, Olga F; Kang, Youjeong; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-06-02

    Unlike the Magnet Recognition Program, the newer Pathway to Excellence Program designed to improve work environments in a broader range of organizations has not yet been the focus of substantial research. The purpose of the study was to examine the association of Pathway to Excellence Program Standards with better patient care quality and workforce outcomes in home care. Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses yielded informants from 871 home care agencies in the United States. Variables representing each of the 12 Pathway Standards were entered into logistic regression models to determine associations with better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. All Pathway Standards are strongly and significantly associated with better patient care and better workforce outcomes. Home care agencies with better-rated professional work environments consistently had better patient care and nurse workforce outcomes. This study validates the Pathway to Excellence Standards as important to patient care quality and nursing workforce outcomes in home care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Review: Factors Relating to Nurses' Caring Behaviors for Dying Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Prompahakul, Chuleeporn; Nilmanat, Kittikorn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, caring for patients at the end of life becomes an indicator of the quality of care in a hospital. Nurses are the key people to provide care for dying patients, therefore caring behaviors of nurses could affect the quality of care. To attain and maintain the quality of care at the end of life, factors that contribute to nurses' caring behaviors for dying patients needs to be addressed.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review factors relating to nurses' caring beh...

  8. The emotional intelligence of professional nurses commencing critical care nursing in private hospitals in Gauteng

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Yvette Juanita

    2015-01-01

    M.Cur. (Nursing Science) The primary objective of this study was to determine the emotional intelligence (EI) of, and make recommendations to facilitate an improvement in the EI of professional nurses commencing work in critical care units in private hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa. The quality of nursing care directly affects patient outcomes such as morbidity, mortality, adverse events as well as the total cost of care. This places the nurse central in good, comprehensive health care,...

  9. [Semantic Network Analysis of Online News and Social Media Text Related to Comprehensive Nursing Care Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Choi, Mona; Youm, Yoosik

    2017-12-01

    As comprehensive nursing care service has gradually expanded, it has become necessary to explore the various opinions about it. The purpose of this study is to explore the large amount of text data regarding comprehensive nursing care service extracted from online news and social media by applying a semantic network analysis. The web pages of the Korean Nurses Association (KNA) News, major daily newspapers, and Twitter were crawled by searching the keyword 'comprehensive nursing care service' using Python. A morphological analysis was performed using KoNLPy. Nodes on a 'comprehensive nursing care service' cluster were selected, and frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality were calculated and visualized with Gephi for the semantic network. A total of 536 news pages and 464 tweets were analyzed. In the KNA News and major daily newspapers, 'nursing workforce' and 'nursing service' were highly rated in frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality. On Twitter, the most frequent nodes were 'National Health Insurance Service' and 'comprehensive nursing care service hospital.' The nodes with the highest edge weight were 'national health insurance,' 'wards without caregiver presence,' and 'caregiving costs.' 'National Health Insurance Service' was highest in degree centrality. This study provides an example of how to use atypical big data for a nursing issue through semantic network analysis to explore diverse perspectives surrounding the nursing community through various media sources. Applying semantic network analysis to online big data to gather information regarding various nursing issues would help to explore opinions for formulating and implementing nursing policies.

  10. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds to improve trauma patient care-A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Fiona L; Mitchell, Marion

    2017-06-01

    Trauma patient management is complex and challenging for nurses in the Intensive Care Unit. One strategy to promote quality and evidence based care may be through utilising specialty nursing experts both internal and external to the Intensive Care Unit in the form of a nursing round. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds have the potential to improve patient care, collaboration and nurses' knowledge. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to improve trauma patient care and evaluate the nurses perception of improvement. The project included structured, weekly rounds that were conducted at the bedside. Nursing experts and others collaborated to assess and make changes to trauma patients' care. The rounds were evaluated to assess the nurse's perception of improvement. There were 132 trauma patients assessed. A total of 452 changes to patient care occurred. On average, three changes per patient resulted. Changes included nursing management, medical management and wound care. Nursing staff reported an overall improvement of trauma patient care, trauma knowledge, and collaboration with colleagues. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds utilizes expert nursing knowledge. They are suggested as an innovative way to address the clinical challenges of caring for trauma patients and are perceived to enhance patient care and nursing knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Conceptualisation of Nurses as Information Intermediaries for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that notwithstanding the life expectation of patients in palliative care, they still grapple with a wide spectrum of uncertainties for which they require answers to bring relief from anxiety. Nurses, appreciative of their role to relief anxiety, are often the only persons with whom patients have regular contact that can ...

  12. Burnout contagion among intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B; Le Blanc, Pascale M; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2005-08-01

    This paper reports a study investigating whether burnout is contagious. Burnout has been recognized as a problem in intensive care units for a long time. Previous research has focused primarily on its organizational antecedents, such as excessive workload or high patient care demands, time pressure and intensive use of sophisticated technology. The present study took a totally different perspective by hypothesizing that--in intensive care units--burnout is communicated from one nurse to another. A questionnaire on work and well-being was completed by 1849 intensive care unit nurses working in one of 80 intensive care units in 12 different European countries in 1994. The results are being reported now because they formed part of a larger study that was only finally analysed recently. The questionnaire was translated from English to the language of each of these countries, and then back-translated to English. Respondents indicated the prevalence of burnout among their colleagues, and completed scales to assess working conditions and job burnout. Analysis of variance indicated that the between-unit variance on a measure of perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was statistically significant and substantially larger than the within-unit variance. This implies that there is considerable agreement (consensus) within intensive care units regarding the prevalence of burnout. In addition, the results of multilevel analyses showed that burnout complaints among colleagues in intensive care units made a statistically significant and unique contribution to explaining variance in individual nurses' and whole units' experiences of burnout, i.e. emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Moreover, for both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was the most important predictor of burnout at the individual and unit levels, even after controlling for the impact of well-known organizational

  13. Nurses' Practice Environment and Their Job Satisfaction: A Study on Nurses Caring for Older Adults in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dong, Weizhen; Mauk, Kristen; Li, Peiying; Wan, Jin; Yang, Guang; Fang, Lyuying; Huan, Wan; Chen, Chun; Hao, Mo

    2015-01-01

    To examine the job satisfaction of nurses who are caring for older adults in healthcare settings in Shanghai, and to explore the underlying factors in order to explain and predict nurses' job satisfaction. China has the largest elderly population in the world, and its population is aging rapidly. Studies on job satisfaction of nurses providing care for the elderly in China can help to identify problem areas and develop strategies for the improvement of nurses' working conditions. However, to date, this subject matter has not been thoroughly studied in the Chinese context. Previous studies in other countries show that many factors impact nurses' job satisfaction, with the practice environment being a critical factor. There is a serious nursing shortage in China, especially in the big cities such as Shanghai. Given the increasing care demand of the aging population, learning about the job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults can provide essential information to help attract and retain nurses in this specialty area. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 444 nurses in 22 elderly care institutions in Shanghai. The Chinese version of the Index of Work Satisfaction (IWS) and the Nursing Practice Environment Scale were instruments used. Inferential statistical tests used to analyze the data included Spearman correlation analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and hierarchical regression tests. The average overall IWS (part B) score was 135.21 ± 19.34. Personality, job and organizational characteristics were found to be the most influential factors, and the practice environment was identified as having the strongest impact on job satisfaction (Beta = 0.494). Job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults in Shanghai is moderate, but the data suggest that this could be greatly increased if the nursing practice environment was improved.

  14. Nurses' Practice Environment and Their Job Satisfaction: A Study on Nurses Caring for Older Adults in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available To examine the job satisfaction of nurses who are caring for older adults in healthcare settings in Shanghai, and to explore the underlying factors in order to explain and predict nurses' job satisfaction.China has the largest elderly population in the world, and its population is aging rapidly. Studies on job satisfaction of nurses providing care for the elderly in China can help to identify problem areas and develop strategies for the improvement of nurses' working conditions. However, to date, this subject matter has not been thoroughly studied in the Chinese context. Previous studies in other countries show that many factors impact nurses' job satisfaction, with the practice environment being a critical factor. There is a serious nursing shortage in China, especially in the big cities such as Shanghai. Given the increasing care demand of the aging population, learning about the job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults can provide essential information to help attract and retain nurses in this specialty area.A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 444 nurses in 22 elderly care institutions in Shanghai. The Chinese version of the Index of Work Satisfaction (IWS and the Nursing Practice Environment Scale were instruments used. Inferential statistical tests used to analyze the data included Spearman correlation analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and hierarchical regression tests.The average overall IWS (part B score was 135.21 ± 19.34. Personality, job and organizational characteristics were found to be the most influential factors, and the practice environment was identified as having the strongest impact on job satisfaction (Beta = 0.494.Job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults in Shanghai is moderate, but the data suggest that this could be greatly increased if the nursing practice environment was improved.

  15. Care priorities- Registered Nurses' clinical daily work in municipal elderly care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell, Margaretha; Ziegert, Kristina; Kihlgren, Annica

    2013-06-01

    Common in Swedish elderly home care is that Registered Nurses work independently, and lead the care team without being a part of it. People involved in the care of the patient can be social services, physician, Registered Nurse (RN), nurses in inpatient care and family. In according to current model for nursing documentation RNs interventions is described as participation, information/education, support, environment, general care, training, observation/surveillance, special care drug administration and coordination. Time pressure is perceived as high, but the nurses have the opportunity to influence their daily work situation and make priorities. The purpose of this study was to investigate how RNs prioritise interventions in municipal elderly care settings. A quantitative descriptive method was used for the study. Data were collected during the months of April and October 2004 - 2008, using a web-based form. The nurses filled in patient's type of housing, performed interventions, and if the interventions were delegated. Interventions were described as keywords and were attributed a certain amount of time, calculated in previous time studies. The inclusion criteria were: all patients 80 years of age and older, in a municipality in south-western Sweden, who received some form of health care from a RN, or performed by non-certified staff by delegation. Results indicate that differences in priority could be observed, depending on the patient's gender, or whether the patient was living in independent or sheltered housing. Drug administration was prioritised for female patients, while coordination became a priority for patients living in ordinary housing. Support received the highest priority, regardless if the patient lived in ordinary or sheltered housing. However, it is not entirely clear what support signifies in municipal health care settings, and this issue would therefore require further investigation. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. Intensive care nursing in South Africa | de Beer | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various challenges face intensive care nursing in South Africa. This article describes the health care system of South Africa, with particular attention to intensive care nursing. It also describes the current state of intensive care and the challenges facing this sub-specialty of critical care.

  17. Critical care nurses' perceptions of and responses to moral distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Karen M

    2005-01-01

    Nurses frequently experience conflict regarding healthcare decisions, yet are expected to implement actions which they perceive to be morally wrong. Research has described the deleterious effects of this moral incongruency, coined moral distress, on nurses' well being and has identified it as a causative agent in nursing turnover, burnout, and nurses leaving the profession. Thus, it is known that moral distress has significant consequences for nurses, but does moral distress affect nurses' provision of care, and if so, how?

  18. Nurse-led shared care diabetes projects : lessons from the nurses' viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelberg, Irmgard M J G; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; van Wilderen, Loek J G P; Mur-Veeman, Ingrid M

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of four nurse practitioners specialised in diabetes care, in the development and implementation of two Dutch nurse-led shared care projects to improve quality of care. The focus is on the impeding factors involved. The nurses' views are compared to those of the 38

  19. Evaluating nurse staffing patterns and neonatal intensive care unit outcomes using Levine's Conservation Model of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Linda C; Alligood, Martha R

    2011-11-01

    To explore the influences of intensity of nursing care and consistency of nursing caregivers on health and economic outcomes using Levine's Conservation Model of Nursing as the guiding theoretical framework. Professional nursing practice models are increasingly being used although limited research is available regarding their efficacy. A structural equation modelling approach tested the influence of intensity of nursing care (direct care by professional nurses and patient-nurse ratio) and consistency of nursing caregivers on morbidity and resource utilization in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting using primary nursing. Consistency of nursing caregivers served as a powerful mediator of length of stay and the duration of mechanical ventilation, supplemental oxygen therapy and parenteral nutrition. Analysis of nursing intensity indicators revealed that a mix of professional nurses and assistive personnel was effective. Providing consistency of nursing caregivers may significantly improve both health and economic outcomes. New evidence was found to support the efficacy of the primary nursing model in the NICU. Designing nursing care delivery systems in acute inpatient settings with an emphasis on consistency of nursing caregivers could improve health outcomes, increase organizational effectiveness, and enhance satisfaction of nursing staff, patients, and families. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  1. Integrating Health Information Technology Safety into Nursing Informatics Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Cummings, Elizabeth; Kushniruk, Andre W; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-01-01

    Nursing informatics competencies are constantly changing in response to advances in the health information technology (HIT) industry and research emerging from the fields of nursing and health informatics. In this paper we build off the work of Staggers and colleagues in defining nursing informatics competencies at five levels: the beginning nurse, the experienced nurse, the nursing informatics specialist, the nursing informatics innovator and the nursing informatics researcher in the area of HIT safety. The work represents a significant contribution to the literature in the area of nursing informatics competency development as it extends nursing informatics competencies to include those focused on the area of technology-induced errors and HIT safety.

  2. Quality of Care for Patients With Diabetes and Mulitmorbidity Registered at Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heale, Roberta; Wenghofer, Elizabeth; James, Susan; Garceau, Marie-Luce

    2017-01-01

    Background Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics are a new model of primary healthcare in Ontario. Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics are distinctive in that nurse practitioners are the primary care providers working with an interprofessional team. There have been no evaluations of the quality of care within the Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic model. Purpose Evaluation of the Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic model, specifically for complex clinical presentations, will provide insights that may be used to inform improvements to the delivery of care in the Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which diabetes care was complete and to determine the impact of organizational tools, including electronic medical record tracking, diabetes care template, and referral to community programs, on the completeness of care for patients with diabetes and multimorbidity at Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics. Methods An audit of 30 charts was conducted at five different Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics (n = 150) for patients with diabetes and at least one other chronic condition. Indicators included patient and organizational characteristics as well as diabetes care items taken from diabetes clinical guidelines. Results Overall, care for patients with diabetes and multimorbidity in Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinics was complete. However, there were no significant associations between patient or organizational characteristics and the extent to which diabetes care was complete.

  3. Clinical nurse leader impact on microsystem care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam; Connelly, Cynthia D; Glaser, Dale; Brown, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The current fragmented healthcare system, characterized by a lack of collaborative, patient-centered care processes, creates significant barriers to providing quality patient care. The clinical nurse leader (CNL) is theorized to provide clinical leadership at the point-of-practice to maintain cross-disciplinary collaborative processes that lead to integrated quality care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of CNL integration into an acute care microsystem on care quality, as measured by patient satisfaction with care. A short interrupted time series design was used to measure patient satisfaction with multiple aspects of care 10 months before and 12 months after integration of the CNL role on a progressive care unit, compared with a control unit. Data were obtained from Press Ganey surveys, and analysis was completed using a publicly available program for short time series data streams. Clinical nurse leader implementation was correlated with significantly improved patient satisfaction with admission processes (r = + .63, p = .02) and nursing care (r = +.75, p = .004), including skill level (r = .83, p = .003) and keeping patients informed (r = .70, p = .003). There was no significant correlation with improved patient satisfaction with physician care (r = .31, p = .14) or discharge processes (r = .33, p = .23) postimplementation. Control data showed no significant changes in patient satisfaction measures throughout the study time frame. The positive correlation between CNL-mediated collaborative care processes and improvements in patient satisfaction with care quality provides empirical evidence of outcomes achievable through CNL implementation. Research is needed to explore the full range of achievable outcomes and to determine the specific processes by which these outcomes are realized.

  4. Information Seeking Behavior of the Nurses in Using Up-To-Date Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Aghazadeh Asl

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Nursing is one of the largest groups of health care providers that needs updated information to improve quality and quantity of health care services, clinical activities, etc. In the meantime, evidence-based databases (such as Up-To-Date Database significantly contribute to improve performance and efficiency of health services by providing the latest findings on health issues. The present study aimed to survey the information seeking behavior and information needs of nurses working in Ahvaz hospitals affiliated with Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in using Up-To-Date database. Material and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, the statistical population consisted of 1246 nurses working in hospitals of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences among which 293 nurses were selected. The required data were collected using a questionnaire developed by the researcher. Validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient as 0.71. Descriptive statistics and Kruskal-Wallis Test were used for data analysis. Results: The results showed that most of the nurses needed information about new developments in the field of nursing and medications. A majority of the nurses used simple searching technique to find the required information. Most of the nurses aimed to update their information using Up-To-Date Database. The main barrier to update information was shortage of time. Conclusion: Therefore, it is essential to teach information skills to nurses; so that they can access modern and updated information in the field of nursing and obtain

  5. Ethical issues in palliative care for nursing homes: Development and testing of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preshaw, Deborah Hl; McLaughlin, Dorry; Brazil, Kevin

    2017-10-20

    To develop and psychometrically assess a survey instrument identifying ethical issues during palliative care provision in nursing homes. Registered nurses and healthcare assistants have reported ethical issues in everyday palliative care provision. Identifying these issues provides evidence to inform practice development to support healthcare workers. Cross-sectional survey of Registered nurses and healthcare assistants in nursing homes in one region of the UK. A survey instrument, "Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes", was developed through the findings of qualitative interviews with Registered nurses and healthcare assistants in nursing homes and a literature review. It was reviewed by an expert panel and piloted prior to implementation in a survey in 2015 with a convenience sample of 596 Registered nurses and healthcare assistants. Descriptive and exploratory factor analyses were used to assess the underlying structure of the Frequency and Distress Scales within the instrument. Analysis of 201 responses (response rate = 33.7%) revealed four factors for the Frequency Scale and five factors for the Distress Scale that comprise the Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes. Factors common to both scales included "Processes of care," "Resident autonomy" and "Burdensome treatment." Additionally, the Frequency Scale included "Competency," and the Distress Scale included "Quality of care" and "Communication." The Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes instrument has added to the palliative care knowledge base by considering the ethical issues experienced specifically by Registered nurses and healthcare assistants within the nursing home. This research offers preliminary evidence of the psychometric properties of the Ethical issues in Palliative Care for Nursing homes survey instrument. The two largest factors highlight the need to address the organisational aspects of caring and provide training in negotiating conflicting

  6. Caring Behaviors: Perceptions of Acute Care Nurses and Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Beth Modic DNP. R.N., CDE; Sandra L. Siedlecki Ph.D., R.N.; Mary T. Quinn Griffin Ph.D., R.N. FAAN, ANEF; c Joyce J. Fitzpatrick Ph.D. R.N., FAAN

    2014-01-01

    Caring behaviors: Perceptions of acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of caring behaviors that influence the patient experience in acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes. Background: Nurses are the caregivers who render most of the direct care patients receive while they are hospitalized. Understanding what patients perceive as caring behaviors is essential in tailoring nursing interventi...

  7. Factors influencing home care nurse intention to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann; Patterson, Erin; Rowe, Alissa; Saari, Margaret; Thomson, Heather; MacDonald, Geraldine; Cranley, Lisa; Squires, Mae

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors affecting Canadian home care nurse intention to remain employed (ITR). In developed nations, healthcare continues to shift into community settings. Although considerable research exists on examining nurse ITR in hospitals, similar research related to nurses employed in home care is limited. In the face of a global nursing shortage, it is important to understand the factors influencing nurse ITR across healthcare sectors. A qualitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Focus groups were conducted with home care nurses. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Six categories of influencing factors were identified by home care nurses as affecting ITR: job characteristics; work structures; relationships/communication; work environment; nurse responses to work; and employment conditions. Findings suggest the following factors influence home care nurse ITR: having autonomy; flexible scheduling; reasonable and varied workloads; supportive work relationships; and receiving adequate pay and benefits. Home care nurses did not identify job satisfaction as a single concept influencing ITR. Home care nursing management should support nurse autonomy, allow flexible scheduling, promote reasonable workloads and create opportunities for team building that strengthen supportive relationships among home care nurses and other health team members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Humanistic Nursing Theory: application to hospice and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hung-Lan; Volker, Deborah L

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a discussion of the relevance of Humanistic Nursing Theory to hospice and palliative care nursing. The World Health Organization has characterized the need for expert, palliative and end-of-life care as a top priority for global health care. The specialty of hospice and palliative care nursing embraces a humanistic caring and holistic approach to patient care. As this resonates with Paterson and Zderad's Humanistic Nursing Theory, an understanding of hospice nurses' experiences can be investigated by application of relevant constructs in the theory. This article is based on Paterson and Zderad's publications and other theoretical and research articles and books focused on Humanistic Nursing Theory (1976-2009), and data from a phenomenological study of the lived experience of Taiwanese hospice nurses conducted in 2007. Theoretical concepts relevant to hospice and palliative nursing included moreness-choice, call-and-response, intersubjective transaction, uniqueness-otherness, being and doing and community. The philosophical perspectives of Humanistic Nursing Theory are relevant to the practice of hospice and palliative care nursing. By 'being with and doing with', hospice and palliative nurses can work with patients to achieve their final goals in the last phase of life. Use of core concepts from Humanistic Nursing Theory can provide a unifying language for planning care and describing interventions. Future research efforts in hospice and palliative nursing should define and evaluate these concepts for efficacy in practice settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. A narrative review of acute care nurses' experiences nursing patients with intellectual disability: underprepared, communication barriers and ambiguity about the role of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Peter; Gaffney, Ryan J; Wilson, Nathan J

    2017-06-01

    To describe how nurses experience caring for people with intellectual disability in an acute care setting. Recent advances in the care of people with intellectual disability in hospital are primarily based upon the experiences of people with intellectual disability and their caregivers. Little is known about the experiences of registered nurses caring for people with intellectual disability, yet the experiences of nurses in delivering care largely determine the quality of care experienced by people with intellectual disability and their caregivers. A narrative literature review using electronic database searches was conducted using variants of the terms disability, nursing and acute care. Through our reading of the recent literature describing the experiences of nurses caring for people with intellectual disability in an acute care setting, we have identified three themes: (1) nurses feel underprepared when caring for patients with intellectual disability, (2) nurses experience challenges when communicating with people with intellectual disability and (3) nurses have ambiguous expectations of paid and unpaid caregivers. The enablers of and barriers to the delivery of nursing care in acute care settings need to be made explicit and researchers and nurses need to collaborate in the development, implementation and evaluation of care delivery strategies. Nurses need to be adequately prepared to care for people with intellectual disability. Preparation should include dealing with the complexities of communicating with people with intellectual disability and practical experience of doing so in clinical and educational environments that ensure the safety and dignity of nurses and people with intellectual disability. Nurses need supportive strategies for developing therapeutic relationships with a range of informal and formal caregivers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Advance care planning: the role of the nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Ash; Samanta, Jo

    Advance care planning is a process designed to enable patients to discuss and record their values and treatment preferences to inform future care in the event that they lose decision-making capacity. Current law provides for the appointment of a proxy decision-maker under a Lasting Power of Attorney, or advance decisions for treatment refusal. A further option is a statement of wishes to record the values and views to be used to inform the determination of best interests. Nurses can play an invaluable role in facilitating open and frank discussion.

  11. Factors influencing nurse-assessed quality nursing care: a cross-sectional study in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Aungsuroch, Yupin

    2017-11-17

    To propose a hypothesized theoretical model and apply it to examine the structural relationships among work environment, patient-to-nurse ratio, job satisfaction, burnout, intention to leave and quality nursing care. Improving quality nursing care is a first consideration in nursing management globally. A better understanding of factors influencing quality nursing care can help hospital administrators implement effective programs to improve quality of services. Although certain bivariate correlations have been found between selected factors and quality nursing care in different study models, no studies have examined the relationships among work environment, patient-to-nurse ratio, job satisfaction, burnout, intention to leave and quality nursing care in a more comprehensive theoretical model. A cross-sectional survey. The questionnaires were collected from 510 Chinese nurses in four Chinese tertiary hospitals in January 2015. The validity and internal consistency reliability of research instruments were evaluated. Structural equation modelling was used to test a theoretical model. The findings revealed that the data supported the theoretical model. Work environment had a large total effect size on quality nursing care. Burnout largely and directly influenced quality nursing care, which was followed by work environment and patient-to-nurse ratio. Job satisfaction indirectly affected quality nursing care through burnout. This study shows how work environment past burnout and job satisfaction influences quality nursing care. Apart from nurses' work conditions of work environment and patient-to-nurse ratio, hospital administrators should pay more attention to nurse outcomes of job satisfaction and burnout when designing intervention programs to improve quality nursing care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. The relationship between organizational commitment and nursing care behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghneh, Mohammad Hossein Khalilzadeh; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Naderi, Manijeh; Shakeri, Nehzat; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Goyaghaj, Naser Sedghi

    2017-07-01

    Nursing care encompasses physical, emotional, mental and social needs, in order to improve a patient's health and wellbeing. Caring is the central core and the essence of nursing. The important issue of care is access to proper care and increasing patients' satisfaction. Job performance of nurses is affected by many factors including organizational commitment. This study aimed to determine the relationship between organizational commitment and nurses caring behavior. In this cross-sectional study, 322 nurses from selected Hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran were randomly selected and enrolled in the study in 2015. The self-reported data by nurses were collected through demographic characteristics questionnaire, Meyer & Allen organizational commitment model and Caring Behavior Inventory (CBI). Data were analyzed with SPSS statistical software version 20, using t-test and ANOVA. The majority of nurses (63%) were female. The mean score and standard deviation of organizational commitment and caring behavior of nurses were 74.12±9.61 and 203.1±22.46, respectively. The results showed a significantly positive correlation between organizational commitment and caring behavior (p=0.001). In this study the caring behavior of nurses with higher organizational commitment were significantly better than the others. Managers and nurse leaders should pay more attention to improve organizational commitment of nurses, in order to improve nurses' performance.

  13. Role of clinical nurse leadership in improving patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jill; Quillinan, Bernie; Carolan, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Leadership in nursing plays a crucial part in the provision of good patient care. However, the terms 'nursing leadership' and 'nursing management' are often confused. This article discusses the difficulties in defining 'clinical leadership', outlines its development in the Republic of Ireland, and identifies issues that must be addressed if clinical nurse leaders are to be effective.

  14. Handling Internet-Based Health Information: Improving Health Information Web Site Literacy Among Undergraduate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwen; Sun, Ran; Mulvehill, Alice M; Gilson, Courtney C; Huang, Linda L

    2017-02-01

    Patient care problems arise when health care consumers and professionals find health information on the Internet because that information is often inaccurate. To mitigate this problem, nurses can develop Web literacy and share that skill with health care consumers. This study evaluated a Web-literacy intervention for undergraduate nursing students to find reliable Web-based health information. A pre- and postsurvey queried undergraduate nursing students in an informatics course; the intervention comprised lecture, in-class practice, and assignments about health Web site evaluation tools. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and ANOVA signed-rank tests. Pre-intervention, 75.9% of participants reported using Web sites to obtain health information. Postintervention, 87.9% displayed confidence in using an evaluation tool. Both the ability to critique health Web sites (p = .005) and confidence in finding reliable Internet-based health information (p = .058) increased. Web-literacy education guides nursing students to find, evaluate, and use reliable Web sites, which improves their ability to deliver safer patient care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(2):110-114.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Trauma nursing in the German health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, Gertrud E; Kretschmer, Rainer A C

    2002-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the history and current practice of trauma nursing in the German health care system. A description of nursing education, skills, duties, and responsibilities of the nursing workforce is complemented by a brief description of the trauma system. As current demographic developments, structural changes, and medical progress result in a rapidly changing health care environment, tasks for nurses are becoming increasingly complex. The development of academic programs and extended nursing tasks are expected to help manage the upcoming changes and challenges in the manifold processes of patient-centered-nursing-care delivery.

  16. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues.

  17. Documentation and communication of nutritional care for elderly hospitalized patients: perspectives of nurses and undergraduate nurses in hospitals and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Kristin; Eide, Helene Kjøllesdal; Sortland, Kjersti; Almendingen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional care is a basic human right for all people. Nevertheless, undernourishment is known to be a frequent and serious health care problem among elderly hospitalized patients in Western Europe. Nutritional documentation contributes to ensuring proper nutritional treatment and care. Only a few studies have explored how nurses document nutritional care in hospitals, and between hospitals and nursing homes. Available research suggests that documentation practices are unsatisfactory. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses document nutritional treatment and care for elderly patients in hospitals and how nurses and undergraduate nurses communicate information about patients' nutritional status when elderly patients are transferred between hospital and nursing homes. A qualitative study was conducted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Data was collected in focus group interviews with 16 nurses in one large university hospital, and 11 nurses and 16 undergraduate nurses in five nursing homes associated with the university hospital. Participants from the university hospital represented a total of seven surgical and medical wards, all of which transferred patients to the associated nursing homes. The catchment area of the hospital and the nursing homes represented approximately 10% of the Norwegian population in heterogenic urban and rural municipalities. Data were coded and analysed thematically within the three contexts: self-understanding, critical common sense, and theoretical understanding. The results were summarized under three main themes 1) inadequate documentation of nutritional status on hospital admission, 2) inadequate and unsystematic documentation of nutritional information during hospital stay, 3) limited communication of nutritional information between hospital and nursing homes. The three main themes included seven sub-themes, which reflected the lack of nutritional screening and unsystematic documentation on admission and during

  18. Transforming nurse-patient relationships - A qualitative study of nurse self-disclosure in mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unhjem, Jeanette Varpen; Vatne, Solfrid; Hem, Marit Helene

    2017-11-29

    To describe what and why nurses self-disclose to patients in mental health care. Self-disclosure is common, but controversial and difficult to delineate. Extant research suggests that self-disclosure might have several potentially beneficial effects on therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome for patients in mental health care, but results are often mixed and limited by definitional inconsistencies. Qualitative descriptive study including data from 16 nurses taking part in participant observation, individual interviews and focus group interviews. Separate analyses resulted in four themes addressing the research question of what nurses self-disclose, and one main theme and four subthemes addressing why nurses self-disclose. The content of self-disclosure was captured in the four themes: Immediate family, Interests and activities, Life experiences, and Identity. In addition, results showed that disclosures were common among the nurses. Self-disclosure's potential to transform the nurse-patient relationship, making it more open, honest, close, reciprocal and equal, was the overarching reason why nurses shared personal information. The nurses also chose to self-disclose to share existential and everyday sentiments, to give real-life advice, because it felt natural and responsive to patients' question to do so. Nurse self-disclosure is common and covers a variety of personal information. Nurses have several reasons for choosing to self-disclose, most of which are connected to improving the nurse-patient relationship. Self-disclosure controversy can make it difficult for nurses to know if they should share personal information or not. Insights into the diversity of and reasons for nurse self-disclosure can help with deliberations on self-disclosure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Anesthesia information management systems: imperatives for nurse anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jessica J; White, Kathryn W; Westra, Bonnie L; Monsen, Karen A

    2014-10-01

    Informatics is a new science within healthcare and anesthesia that leverages computer technology to improve patient safety, the quality of care provided, and workload efficiency. In clinical anesthesia practice, appropriate application of informatics promotes data standardization and integrity, and supports clinical decision-making. This article describes current issues in anesthesia information management to support the critical need for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) to influence functionality, adoption, and use of an anesthesia information management system. The use of informatics tools and concepts should enable CRNAs to enhance their bedside vigilance, align their practice with evidence-based clinical guidelines, and provide cost-effective care for patients and healthcare systems.

  20. Nursing care of prisoners: staff views and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jane; Harris, Francesca; Condon, Louise; Kemple, Terry

    2010-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the views and experiences of nurses and other prison healthcare staff about their roles and the nursing care they provide to prisoners. Nurses have become the key providers of healthcare in prison settings in England, replacing the previous prison service-run system. However, there is very little evidence about the health services they provide to meet the health needs of prisoners. A ethnographic study was conducted. Participants were 80 healthcare staff working in 12 prisons of all security categories in England. Twelve individual interviews with general healthcare managers and 12 key informant focus group discussions with healthcare staff were undertaken in 2005 using a semi-structured interview schedule. Issues investigated included participants' thoughts and experiences of nursing roles and delivery of primary healthcare. The group discussions and interviews were analysed to identify emerging themes. Participants gave accounts of day-to-day processes and the healthcare routine. They saw their work as identifying and meeting the health needs of prisoners and maintaining their health, and identified major influences that shaped their daily work, including new ways of working in primary care. They identified how policy and organizational changes were affecting their roles, and acknowledged the conflict between the custody regime and healthcare delivery. The move towards a NHS-led primary healthcare service within prisons, predominantly delivered by nurses, has made positive changes to healthcare. Healthcare managers have benefited from the involvement of the local NHS in improving the health of prisoners.

  1. The Patient's View of Nursing Care after Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Ami; Kock, Marie-Louise; Persson, Jeanette; Werntoft, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pathway for patients with a hip fracture described in this study is a fast track. Many studies have focused on prevention of various complications but, so far, the patient's view of nursing care has not been highlighted. Aim. The aim of the study is to illuminate the patient's view on nursing care when treated for a hip fracture. Method. Ten patients were interviewed. A content analysis design was conducted. Findings. From the analysis, four main categories emerged: waiting times; pain/pain relief and mobilisation; attitude/information and sense of security; complications. Conclusion. Patients generally felt satisfied with the nursing provided. The staff created a feeling of security and showed interest and empathy for the patient. However, patients experienced a stressful waiting for surgery, and patients who developed confusion waited more than 24 hours for surgery. Therefore, waiting time must be decreased. Furthermore, patients' descriptions of a variety of pain problem show, for example, that good collaboration between the nurse and physiotherapist is critical for achieving good pain relief before mobilisation. Nursing staff need to be attentive and should elicit the patient's feelings through patient-focused communication in order to relieve anxiety about going home.

  2. Impact of Regular Nursing Rounds on Patient Satisfaction with Nursing Care

    OpenAIRE

    Negarandeh, Reza; Hooshmand Bahabadi, Abbas; Aliheydari Mamaghani, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of regular nursing rounds on patient satisfaction with nursing care. Methods: This was a controlled clinical trial in which 100 hospitalized patients in a medical surgical ward were allocated to control and experimental groups through convenience sampling. The experimental group received regular nursing rounds every 1–2 hours. Routine care was performed for the control group. Patient satisfaction with the quality of nursing care...

  3. Burnout syndrome in nurses in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino Eduardo dos Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify if nurses working in cardiac and general Intensive Care Units are subject to burnout, correlating it with demographic and occupational information. Methods: This is a descriptive exploratory, cross-sectional, prospective and correlational study utilizing  quantitative resources. The sample was composed of 34 nurses who answered the Maslach and Jackson inventory (MBI-HSS, which consists of 22 questions plus a questionnaire on demographic and occupational data. The study was carried out at a large private hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Rresults: Of 34 nurses, nine had high emotional exhaustion, nine high depersonalization, ten had a high score of reduced professional accomplishment (decreased personal fulfillment at work. Most nurses presented alterations in more than one dimension regarding burnout. Cconclusions: The majority of nurses presented burnout and there was a positive correlation between burnout and the variables: sex, advanced professional degrees, time working in nursing, workload and working at more than one hospital.

  4. Understanding organizational and cultural premises for quality of care in nursing homes: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2015-11-13

    Internationally, there are concerns about the quality of care in nursing homes. The concept of 'corporate culture' as an internal variable could be seen as the means to improve quality of care and quality of life for the residents. The aim of this article was to describe the nursing home culture from the staff's perspective and to include how the residents describe quality of care. An ethnographic design was employed. A purposive sample of four municipal public nursing homes in Norway with long-term care residents was included in the study. Data were collected by participant observation including informal conversation with the staff, and in-depth interviews with 15 residents using a narrative approach. The main findings were that organizational cultures could be seen as relatively stable corporate cultures described as 'personalities' with characteristics that were common for all nursing homes (conformity) and typical traits that were present in some nursing homes, but that they were also like no other nursing home (distinctiveness). Conformity ('Every nursing home is like all other nursing homes') meant that nursing home organizations formed their services according to a perception of what residents in general need and expect. Trait ('Every nursing home is like some other nursing homes') expressed typologies of nursing homes: residency, medical, safeguard or family orientation. The distinctness of each nursing home ('Every nursing home is like no other nursing home') was expressed in unique features of the nursing home; the characteristics of the nursing home involved certain patterns of structure, cultural assumptions and interactions that were unique in each nursing home. Nursing home residents experienced quality of care as 'The nursing home as my home' and 'Interpersonal care quality'. The resident group in the different types of nursing homes were unique, and the experience of quality of care seemed to depend on whether their unique needs and expectations

  5. [NURSING CARE TO A PATIENT WITH INTRAVESICAL TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos Espino, Míriam Paula; Tizón Bouza, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent in developed countries. It is the 4th most frequent cancer in men and the 9th in women. The main risk factor is the smoking habit and its main symptom is hematuria. One of the therapies used in its treatment is the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin intravesical (BCG). TO carry out a specific care plan to a patient treated with BCG and improve the information delivered to the patient and family. An observational study of a nursing plan of care through a clinical case. A bibliographical research was carried out in the main Spanish and English databases to collect articles published in the last 5 years. Subsequently, the studies of the Spanish M.a T Luis, C. Ferndndez and M.a V. Navarro were adopted in the model suggested by V. Henderson and NANDA, NIC and NOC taxonomy. The nursing assessment is performed through V. Henderson's 14 needs and the Collaboration Problem was detected: Hematuria, secondary to bladder cancer and the nursing diagnosis: . For the planning and execution the following NOC were selected: Knowledge: management of the cancer and Knowledge: therapeutic procedure, and the NIC and its corresponding activities and their evaluation. The Nursing Care Process application with a personalised and standardised language, guarantees a quality healthcare and continuity. Moreover, it sets common targets for the nursing team. It tries to show how an appropriate control of the symptoms can be carried out at home, when the cares are taught and organised by adapting the oral or written information to each patient.

  6. Palliative Care: Opportunities for Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Ayda Gan Nambayan

    2018-01-01

    Ayda G. Nambayan, PhD, RN is the Training Consultant for The Ruth Foundation for Palliative and Hospice Care. Prior to this, she held various positions as a Consultant for Advanced Education and Training at Makati Medical Center, Philippines; a curriculum and distance learning developer for www.Cure4Kids.org, the educational website of the International Outreach Program of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, TN. In 2002, she retired from a faculty position from the University of...

  7. The Filipino Nursing Students' Dilemmas in Geriatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Cruz, Andrei Angelo R.; Cruz, Angela Laurice G.; Cruz, Robert Edward D.; Cuarto, Jose Mari Nino L.

    2009-01-01

    The continually rising percentage of the elderly population and the demand for geriatric nursing care are dramatically related. While it is true that most undergraduate programs prepare nurses for the care of geriatric patients, most receive limited academic preparation in the nursing curriculum (Williams & Mezey, 2000). This is particularly…

  8. Experiences of registered nurses caring for patients with an open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The researcher observed that nurses prefer not to nurse patients with an open abdomen as they fear that the abdominal contents will protrude. The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the experiences of registered nurses taking care of patients with an open abdomen in intensive care in an academic hospital ...

  9. The critical care nursing workforce in Western Cape hospitals - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A global shortage of registered nurses (RNs) has been reported internationally, and confirmed in South Africa by the National Audit of Critical Care services. Critical care nurses (CCNs) especially are in great demand and short supply. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to quantify the nursing workforce ...

  10. Ethical issues for nurses providing perinatal care in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M L

    2000-09-01

    Ethical issues in perinatal nursing are complex in that two patients--mother and fetus--are considered. This work considers six areas of potential ethical conflict: conflict between the mother and fetus, informed consent, confidentiality, cultural conflicts, conflicts associated with managed care, and conflicts in childbirth education. Ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice are included. Strategies for resolving ethical conflicts in community practice settings are suggested.

  11. [Nursing care for intraoperative positioning injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chia-Wen; Lo, Hui-Min

    2011-10-01

    Few discussions have been published on appropriate surgery positioning. Ensuring the patient is in an appropriate pendulum position allows for optimal surgery scope exposition, puts the anesthetist in the closest proximity to the patient to monitor respiratory ventilation, helps maintain patient physiology security, and prevents surgical injury. A poor surgery pendulum position can result in patient injury. In the short-term, such injuries may cause neurotrosis, while over the long-term they may induce deep tissue pressure sores. This article discusses pendulum position injuries during surgery and provides suggestions for proper nursing care of patients undergoing surgical procedures. Clinical nursing staffs may reference this article to enhance patient care during and after surgery.

  12. Modeling and Measuring Caring Behaviors Among Nursing Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ava S.; Anderson, Stoerm E.

    2009-01-01

    The curriculum revolution of the 90s placed new emphasis on caring. Faculty modeling of caring behaviors is a key determinant in the development of caring in nursing students. The focus of this study was the need to evaluate the implementation of caring as a core value to be taught to students in nursing programs. The purpose of this project was…

  13. Contradictory views of nursing care among students at the end of their nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreciado Marañón, Antonia; Isla Pera, Mª Pilar

    2017-02-01

    To understand how nursing students at the end of their nursing education view nursing care. Although care is understood as the essence of nursing, it is often difficult for nurses to provide care, which demonstrates a contradiction between theory and practice. Moreover, it is unknown to what extent this contradiction is transmitted to future nursing professionals or how they view nursing care and its practice. Qualitative ethnographic research. The fieldwork was conducted between December 2010 - May 2012 in a university nursing school in Barcelona and two centres where students carry out most of their practical education. The data collection techniques were participant observation and focus groups. A thematic analysis was used. The students demonstrated contradictory views of nursing care. On one hand, they voiced a more theoretical, official definition where care is considered the core of the profession. On the other hand, they also expressed a view where the provision of care is not nurses' principal daily activity, a fact that did not surprise them. Students interpreted caring as an activity that has low value and that can be transferred unproblematically to other professionals. The contradictory views of care reveal a problem in the transmission of the definition of nursing to new generations of professionals and reflect a problematic professional reality where there is dissonance between how nursing is defined and how it is carried out in practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  15. Designing and validity evaluation of Quality of Nursing Care Scale in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraati, Mashaalah; Alavi, Negin Masoudi

    2014-01-01

    Quality of nursing care measurement is essential in critical care units. The aim of this study was to develop a scale to measure the quality of nursing care in intensive care units (ICUs). The 68 items of nursing care standards in critical care settings were explored in a literature review. Then, 30 experts evaluated the items' content validity index (CVI) and content validity ratio (CVR). Items with a low CVI score (nursing care scale in ICU (Quality of Nursing Care Scale- ICU) that was developed in this research had acceptable CVI and CVR.

  16. Nursing care for patients on the edge of life in nursing homes: obstacles are overshadowing opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Reidun; Hedelin, Birgitta; Athlin, Elsy

    2013-03-01

    Patients in nursing homes have comprehensive needs for nursing care and medical treatment. Most patients benefit from the treatment, but some are 'on the edge of life'-in a borderland between living and dying with an unpredictable outcome, and questions are sometimes raised whether to withhold/withdraw curative treatment. The aim was to describe nurses' conceptions of good nursing care, and how this could be carried out for patients on the edge of life in nursing homes. In order to discover variations in the nurses' understandings a phenomenographic approach was chosen. Phenomenography is concerned with qualitatively different ways of conceiving a phenomenon. Methods.  Fourteen nurses from two nursing homes were individually interviewed twice. A phenomenographic analysis was used. The outcome-space included two main categories. The first, 'good nursing care is to meet patients' needs for dignity,' included three description-categories: needs for 'preparedness', 'human relationship' and 'bodily comfort and safety'. The second, 'opportunities were overshadowed by obstacles' in carrying out nursing care encompassed three description-categories: 'organisational factors,''relational factors' and 'personal factors'. This study shows nurses' conceptions of the importance of good nursing care for comforting patients on the edge of life. Several obstacles related to resources, communication, cooperation and nurses' professional strength and power need to be overcome if good nursing care can be performed. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Perception of nurse caring, skills, and knowledge based on appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Ehret, Abigail; Ellis, Briana; Colon-Shoop, Sara; Linton, Jean; Metz, Stacie

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to assess differences among perceptions of patients, nurses, nursing faculty, and nursing students regarding nurse caring, skill, and knowledge based on attire and level of visible body art. People often make judgments (positive and negative) based on how a person appears. Given somewhat more flexible dress codes for nurses, we wondered what type of perceptions a variety of stakeholders would have of nurses in different levels of attire. A descriptive comparative design was used. A convenience sample of 240 patients, nurses, students, and faculty were surveyed regarding their perceptions of a nurse based on appearance. Multivariate analyses of variance were calculated to determine if participants' perception of nurse caring, skill, and knowledge differed by scrub type or level of body art. For the entire sample, the nurse wearing the solid scrub was rated significantly more skilled and knowledgeable than a nurse wearing print or T-shirt attire. Students rated the nurse wearing the solid scrub and print scrub significantly more skilled and knowledgeable. They rated the print scrub higher, with faculty rating it lower. Nurses rated the T-shirt attire more caring than faculty. Patients rated the T-shirt attire more skilled than faculty and students. All subjects rated the nurse with the most body art (piercings and visible tattoo) the least caring, skilled, and knowledgeable. Nurses rated the most amount of body art more caring than patients and faculty. Students rated the most amount of body art more caring than patients and faculty. The conflict between the right to self-expression and professional role expectations during nurse and patient interactions is a difficult one. However, because a nurse's appearance can impact perceptions during an encounter, dress codes in the acute care setting should take this into account. To be perceived as skilled and knowledgeable, nurses should wear a solid colored uniform with limited visible body

  18. The Culture of Nurses in a Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suegnèt Scholtz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Critical care nurses have to adapt to a fast-paced and stressful environment by functioning within their own culture. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the culture of critical care nurses with the purpose of facilitating recognition of wholeness in critical care nurses. The study had a qualitative, exploratory, descriptive, and contextual design. The ethnographic study included data triangulation of field notes written during 12 months of ethnographic observations, 13 interviews from registered nurses, and three completed diaries. Coding and analysis of data revealed patterns of behavior and interaction. The culture of critical care nurses was identified through patterns of patient adoption, armor display, despondency because of the demands to adjust, sibling-like teamwork, and non-support from management and medical doctors. An understanding of the complexity of these patterns of behavior and interaction within the critical care nursing culture is essential for transformation in the practice of critical care nursing.

  19. The Culture of Nurses in a Critical Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Suegnèt; Nel, Elsabe W.; Poggenpoel, Marie; Myburgh, Chris P. H.

    2016-01-01

    Critical care nurses have to adapt to a fast-paced and stressful environment by functioning within their own culture. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the culture of critical care nurses with the purpose of facilitating recognition of wholeness in critical care nurses. The study had a qualitative, exploratory, descriptive, and contextual design. The ethnographic study included data triangulation of field notes written during 12 months of ethnographic observations, 13 interviews from registered nurses, and three completed diaries. Coding and analysis of data revealed patterns of behavior and interaction. The culture of critical care nurses was identified through patterns of patient adoption, armor display, despondency because of the demands to adjust, sibling-like teamwork, and non-support from management and medical doctors. An understanding of the complexity of these patterns of behavior and interaction within the critical care nursing culture is essential for transformation in the practice of critical care nursing. PMID:28462324

  20. Experiences of Nurses Who Care for Women After Fetal Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutti, Marianne H; Polivka, Barbara; White, Susan; Hill, Janice; Clark, Paul; Cooke, Cathy; Clemens, Savannah; Abell, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    To examine the experiences of, meaning for, and personal consequences for obstetric, emergency, and surgical nurses caring for women after fetal death and to determine how these nurses use Swanson's caring processes in providing such care. Four focus groups. Two hospitals within the same health care system. Registered nurses (N = 24) working in the obstetric, surgery, or emergency departments. Swanson's Theory of Caring guided focus group questions that were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a continuously emergent process of data collection, data reduction, data display, and interpretation. All participants demonstrated all of Swanson's caring processes but used them preferentially according to situational exigencies and level of rapport with each woman. Nurses had positive and negative feelings associated with caring for women after fetal loss. Obstetric nurses provided relatively equal focus on all processes in the Theory of Caring except Maintaining Belief. Surgical and emergency department nurses focused primarily on the caring processes of Knowing and Doing For. The negative feelings reported by nurses mirror some emotions commonly associated with compassion fatigue. More research is needed to determine whether nurses caring for mothers experiencing fetal loss are at risk for compassion fatigue. Research is also needed to identify strategies and interventions to help nurses so they may continue to give the best care possible to these very vulnerable families without detriment to themselves. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Permanent care: 24 hours nursing care, our way to take care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Angelina Monteiro; Pennafort, Viviane Peixoto dos Santos; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima; Silveira, Lia Carneiro; de Freitas, Maria Célia; Queiroz, Maria Veraci Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical-reflexive study motivated by the epistemology of Gaston Bachelard and by the project "Thousand and one ways to take care in Nursing" by Maria José Coelho. We had as objective to trace new ways to take care in dialysis nursing, creating a system of cares offered to chronic kidney patients. Seven nursing cares that involve care of people in dialysis treatment were described: reception; bonding; specialized techniques; support to self-care; assessment of the treatment, facing the unstimulating routine; and citizenship rescue. Permanent care emerged, understood as an articulate and complementary relation between the scientific knowledge present in nursing care and the valorization of the other's essence, as a complex being in its whole.

  2. Iranian nursing students' perspectives regarding caring for elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian nursing students' perspectives regarding caring for elderly patients. A qualitative design, based on the content analysis approach, was used to collect and analyze the perspectives of 25 senior nursing students who were providing care for elderly patients in the medical and surgical wards of two teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. After using purposeful sampling to select the participants, semistructured interviews were held in order to collect the data. During the data analysis, two main themes and six subthemes emerged. The first theme was "the barriers to caring for elderly patients", with the subthemes of "policies and rules of the organization", "a lack of educational preparation", and "an inappropriate physical environment", and the second theme was "the facilitators to caring for elderly patients", with the subthemes of "religion and cultural norms", "role modeling", and "previous exposure to elderly patients". This study informs international audiences of the factors that influence the quality of care of elderly patients so that strategies can be devised in order to prepare nursing students to meet the physical and psychological needs of elderly patients. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Competence for older people nursing in care and nursing homes: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljunen, Outi; Välimäki, Tarja; Kankkunen, Päivi; Partanen, Pirjo

    2017-09-01

    People living in care and nursing homes are vulnerable individuals with complex needs; therefore, a wide array of nursing competence is needed to ensure their well-being. When developing the quality of care in these units, it is essential to know what type of competence is required for older people nursing. The aim of this integrative review was to identify the competence needed for older people nursing in licensed practical nurses' and registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes. Integrative literature review. We performed an integrative review using Whittemore and Knafl's method. The CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and Scopus databases were searched for studies published from 2006 to April 2016. We assessed the quality of the studies using Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools and analysed the data by applying qualitative content analysis. Ten articles were included in the review. Most of the studies focused on registered nurses' work. We identified five competence areas that are needed for older people nursing in registered nurses' work in care and nursing homes: attitudinal and ethical, interactional, evidence-based care, pedagogical, and leadership and development competence. Empirical evidence of competence requirements related to licensed practical nurses' work in these facilities was scarce. The competence required for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses should be clearly identified to support competence management in the care and nursing home context. Well-educated nursing staff are needed in care and nursing homes to provide high-quality care because comprehensive and advanced nurse competence is required to meet the needs of older people. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Preparing tomorrow's nursing home nurses: the wisconsin long term care clinical scholars program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This article reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working both with older adults and in nursing homes, while increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience.

  5. Preparing Tomorrow’s Nursing Home Nurses: The Wisconsin-Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Kim; Roberts, Tonya; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Roiland, Rachel; Gullickson, Colleen; Ryther, Brenda; Bowers, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to care for the growing population of older adults has become a national priority. The demand for long term care services is expected to double between 2000 and 2040, yet the field remains stigmatized as an undesirable place for highly-skilled nurses to work. Recent efforts to increase student preparation in geriatrics have been shown to improve student attitudes toward working with older adults and increase knowledge, but long term care settings remain unattractive to students. This paper reports on development, implementation and evaluation of The Wisconsin Long Term Care Clinical Scholars Program, a nursing home internship for baccalaureate nursing students. The program couples a paid nursing home work experience with an evidence-based long term care nursing curriculum. The program increased student preparation and interest in working with older adults and in nursing homes, while concurrently increasing the capacity of nursing homes to provide a positive student experience. PMID:25162659

  6. Knowledge management, health information technology and nurses' work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Paul H J; Ligthart, Paul E M; Schouteten, Roel L J

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge management (KM) extends the health information technology (HIT) literature by addressing its impact on creating knowledge by sharing and using the knowledge of health care professionals in hospitals. The aim of the study was to provide insight into how HIT affects nurses' explicit and tacit knowledge of their ongoing work processes and work engagement. Data were collected from 74 nurses in four wards of a Dutch hospital via a paper-and-pencil survey using validated measurement instruments. In a quasiexperimental research design, HIT was introduced in the two experimental wards in contrast to the two control wards. At the time of the HIT introduction, a pretest was administered in all four wards and was followed by a posttest after 3 months. Data were analyzed via partial least squares modeling. Generally, nurses' tacit knowledge (i.e., their insight into and their capacity to make sense of the work processes) appears to be a significant and strong predictor of their work engagement. In contrast, nurses' explicit knowledge (i.e., information feedback about patients and tasks) only indirectly affects work engagement via its effect on tacit knowledge. Its effect on work engagement therefore depends on the mediating role of tacit knowledge. Interestingly, introducing HIT significantly affects only nurses' explicit knowledge, not their tacit knowledge or work engagement. Nurses' tacit and explicit knowledge needs to be systematically distinguished when implementing HIT/KM programs to increase work engagement in the workplace. Tacit knowledge (insight into work processes) appears to be pivotal, whereas efforts aimed only at improving available information will not lead to a higher level of work engagement in nurses' work environments.

  7. The experiences of qualified critical care nurses regarding students working in critical care units

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    M.Cur. (Nursing Science (Critical Care)) Qualified critical care nurses are under internal and external stresses in the workplace, relating to role conflict, role ambiguity, increased workloads, the need for rapid decision making and the speedy delivery of care. However, having inexperienced students in critical care units put responsibility and additional stress on the qualified critical care nurses within the units. This may result in some of these qualified nurses not being willing to h...

  8. Relationships Between Nurse Staffing and Patients' Experiences, and the Mediating Effects of Missed Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hyun; Mark, Barbara A; Knafl, George; Chang, Hyoung Eun; Yoon, Hyo-Jeong

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the relationships between nurse staffing and patients' experiences, and to determine the mediating effects of patient-reported missed care on the relationship between nurse staffing and patients' experiences. The study included 362 nurses and 208 patients from 23 nursing units of six hospitals in South Korea. Nurse staffing was measured by patient-to-nurse ratios and by nurse- and patient-perceived staffing adequacy. Patients' experiences included adverse events, communication with nurses, and overall hospital rating. Patient-reported missed care was measured using the MISSCARE Survey-Patient with three domains: communication, basic care, and timely response. Lower nurse-perceived staffing adequacy was associated with more patient-reported missed communication. Lower patient-perceived staffing adequacy was associated with more missed care and adverse events, and a lower likelihood of experiencing good communication with nurses and of giving a high overall rating to the hospital. Patient-reported missed care mediated the relationship between nurse staffing and patients' experiences. Nurse staffing adequacy, particularly as perceived by patients, was significantly associated with patient-reported missed communication and basic care, as well as patients' experiences. Appropriate nurse staffing is required to reduce missed care and to improve patients' experiences. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. The Co-Existence of Technology and Caring in the Theory of Technological Competency as Caring in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locsin, Rozzano C

    2017-01-01

    The coexistence of technology and caring is best exemplified in nursing. The theory of Technological Competency as Caring in Nursing illuminates this coexistence as the essence of technology in health care premised on machine technologies as a generic concept of objects or things that are mechanical, organic, and electronic. With its timely development these technologies are continually imbued with artificial general intelligence. As such, the ultimate expression of machine technologies in nursing turns out to be autonomous robots (ARs) with future potentials of functions comparable to human persons. While theory-based nursing practice is essential to nursing care practice, quality human care, particularly with technologies assuming indispensable practice process mechanisms is critical. Some practice-based questions informing ARs and human person engagements in nursing care practice include, "Will ARs which are imbued with artificial intelligence replace nurses in their practice?" "What contributions to quality human health care will autonomous and artificially intelligent robots provide?" While these questions may reflect far-reaching ramifications of technologies in health care, it must also be acknowledged that these technologies are fundamental to the delivery of quality human health care now, and in the future. J. Med. Invest. 64: 160-164, February, 2017.

  10. The Role of Advanced Practice Nurses in Cancer Survivorship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Stacie; Dunne, Megan; McCabe, Mary S

    2015-11-01

    To review advanced practice nursing roles in planning, implementing, and evaluating survivorship care. Review of the literature, published articles, government and organizational reports. The increased focus on improving post-treatment cancer care presents opportunities for advanced practice nurses to meet the physical and psychosocial needs of cancer survivors. As experts in the comprehensive delivery of care, oncology advanced practice nurses are positioned to initiate, deliver, and evaluate survivorship care through innovative models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Needs of labor and delivery nurses caring for women undergoing pregnancy termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alyson; Swanson, Hilary; Frunchak, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    To explore the psychosocial, educational, and administrative support needs of labor and delivery (L&D) nurses who care for women undergoing pregnancy termination. A qualitative, descriptive design. This study was conducted on a L&D unit at a large, university-affiliated hospital in Quebec, Canada. A convenience sample of 10 L&D nurses participated in this study. Ages of participants ranged from 25 to 55 years, and experience on the unit ranged from 1 to 30 years. One-time, face-to-face interviews were conducted with each participant. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using inductive content analysis. Participants valued interpersonal support from nurse colleagues and guidance from experienced nurses in managing the emotional aspect of this care. They raised concerns about the effect of nursing workload and patient-to-nurse ratios on patient care. Nurses noted a desire for knowledge and skill-building through access to evidence-based literature, continuing education sessions, and workshops. They also expressed a need for more information regarding the genetic counseling process and community resources available to women undergoing pregnancy termination. Ensuring continuity of care through knowledge sharing related to genetic counseling and community resources creates the context for holistic patient care. Increased attention to the particular needs of L&D nurses providing care to women undergoing termination may enhance the quality and safety of care for this unique population. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  12. Patient Safety in Critical Care Unit: Development of a Nursing Quality Indicator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Camila S P; Barbosa, Sayonara F F

    2015-01-01

    This is a methodological study and technological production that aims to describe the development of a computerized system of nursing care quality indicators for the Intensive Care Unit. The study population consisted of a systems analyst and fifteen critical care nurses. For the development of the system we adopted some of the best practices of the Unified Process methodology using the Unified Modeling Language and the programming language Java Enterprise Edition 7. The system consists of an access menu with the following functions: Home (presents general information), New Record (records the indicator), Record (record search), Census (add information and indicators of the patient), Report (generates report of the indicators) and Annex (accesses the Braden Scale). This information system allows for measurement of the quality of nursing care and to evaluate patient safety in intensive care unit by monitoring quality indicators in nursing.

  13. The meaning of humanized nursing care for those participating in it: Importance of efforts of nurses and healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Salazar, Oscar Alberto

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to understand this study sought to understand the meaning of the experience of humanized nursing care from the perspective of patients, relatives, and nurses. This was an interpretative phenomenological study that included 16 adult participants and which was based on in-depth interviews to gather the information and on the procedures proposed by Cohen, Kahn, and Steeves to analyze the information. Efforts by healthcare institutions and nurses are key elements to advance from impersonal care toward humanized care because these will permit revising and eliminating the barriers present in the current exercise of caring. The results highlight the importance of the effort for humanized behavior from nurses, given that because they are human beings their behavior in the relationship with patients is not always have that connotation. Humanized care is not only supported on the human condition of nurses or on the institutional intentions, but on attitudes and on a disposition focused on the patient's wellbeing. Additionally, tensions in nursing care are solved through humanizing efforts.

  14. Caring for cancer patients with an intellectual disability: Attitudes and care perceptions of UK oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Samantha; Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Bramwell, Ros; Stevens-Gill, Debbie; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Caring for people with cancer or an intellectual disability (ID) is stressful: little is known about the combined impact of caring for cancer patients with an ID, though this is expected to be especially challenging. Eighty-three nurses, working in oncology or a related field (i.e. palliative care) were recruited. Perceptions of caring for patients with and without an ID were measured, alongside potentially confounding information about participant demographic characteristics and perceived stress. Participants felt less comfortable communicating with patients with an ID about their illness (F(1,82) = 59.52, p cancer patients with an ID may intensify this, already difficult, role. Through training and knowledge exchange, oncology nurse's confidence in communication, providing appropriate care, and positivity towards this patient group may be improved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Affecting factors and relationship between patients' attitudes towards the nursing profession and perceptions of nursing care in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midilli, Tulay Sagkal; Kirmizioglu, Tulay; Kalkim, Asli

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate affecting factors and the relationship between patients' attitudes towards the nursing profession and perceptions of nursing care. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, from September to November 2014, and comprised inpatients. Data was collected by using a patient information form, the attitude scale for the nursing profession and the patient perception of hospital experience with nursing care scale. SPSS 21 was used for data analysis. Of the 604 participants, 320(53%) were female and 266(44%) were aged 60 years or above. Mean satisfaction level on the patient perception scale was 70.79±6.69, and on the attitude scale 176.77±11.63. A positive, statistically significant relationship was found between the two scores (ppatient perception of nursing care, and gender and education level for patients' attitudes towards the nursing profession were the affecting factors (pcare satisfaction and positive attitudes towards the nursing profession increased while patients' perceptions of nursing care improved.

  16. Nurse-physician collaborative relationship on nurses' self-perceived job satisfaction in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C S; Hite, K J

    2001-01-01

    The dynamic restructuring of the healthcare environment from a primary acute care focus to an ambulatory care focus has prompted a migration of nurses to the ambulatory care setting. The predication of nursing job satisfaction is a complex process that has received little attention in the ambulatory care setting. The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship existed between the nurse-physician relationship and nurses' self-perceived job satisfaction in the ambulatory care setting. While study findings demonstrated there was no significant relationship between the nurse-physician relationship and nurses' self-perceived job satisfaction in the ambulatory care setting, it did confirm that registered nurses working in the ambulatory setting have a moderate level of job satisfaction. The lack of correlation between the nurse-physician relationship and job satisfaction may have been attributed to limitations such as a limited sample size and the nurses having a relationship with a smaller number of physicians in the ambulatory care setting. Recommendations to further understanding of the nurse-physician relationship included further descriptive studies of nurses working in the ambulatory care setting and further studies on job satisfaction of nurses.

  17. Challenges that specialist palliative care nurses encounter when caring for patients with advanced dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Jean; Murphy, Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    Specialist palliative care (SPC) has expanded recently in Ireland to incorporate diseases other than cancer, including dementia. Two care areas that pose specific challenges for SPC nurses when caring for people with advanced dementia are pain and nutrition/hydration. Assessment and management of pain for a patient who has advanced dementia differs greatly from that for a typical palliative care patient. Similarly, nutrition and hydration pose extraordinary ethical and practical dilemmas not encountered when caring for a patient without dementia. This paper reports a literature review which revealed that although evidence-based information related to each of these areas is available, it tends to be written from the perspective of health professionals with an interest in dementia rather than from the perspective of the SPC nurse. SPC nurses require evidence-based palliative care research to guide their practice, but such research appears to be limited for patients with advanced dementia. Knowledge from specialists in both dementia care and palliative care needs to be combined if we are to provide these patients with the best possible end-of-life care. Further research is required and evidenced-based guidelines need to be formulated.

  18. Levinas' Ethics of Caring: Implications and Limits in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Hye Kong, RN, PhD

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nursing scholars consider caring a key concept in understanding what is involved in nursing and believe that it is a major issue in nursing ethics. In this paper, the moral characteristics required for nursing care are described and these characteristics are discussed on the basis of taking responsibility for the Other, as described in Levinas' ethics. First of all, the altruistic aspect of care in terms of Levinas' ethics is examined. That is, a nurse should meet the needs of a person who is suffering, respond to them morally, and take responsibility. Levinas puts an emphasis on passive sensibilities that lead a nurse to respond to the needs of someone who is suffering, and also on the moral responsibility that encourages a nurse to empathize with others. However, his ethics cannot explain clearly how a nurse, as a moral subject with autonomy, forms a caring relationship with others.

  19. Holistic Nursing of Forensic Patients: A Focus on Spiritual Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Annamaria Bagnasco; Giuseppe Aleo; Barbara Delogu; Gianluca Catania; Loredana Sasso

    2016-01-01

    .... This discussion paper focuses on understanding how nurses deliver spiritual care in Italian prisons where there are often limited resources and where organizational priorities hinder the provision of holistic nursing...

  20. Acute and critical care nurses' perceptions of palliative care competencies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kenneth R; Roczen, Marisa L; Coyne, Patrick J; Wiencek, Clareen

    2014-06-01

    Competency development among acute and critical care nurses has focused primarily on the provision of life-sustaining care and less on the care of patients who fail to respond to life-prolonging treatments. Examining nurses' beliefs, perceptions, and experiences with patients' palliative care needs may improve continuing education programs, practice resources, educational curricula, and professional nursing practice. Survey methodology was used to conduct this pilot study. Forty-nine nurses completed a 33-item survey instrument in 2012. Respondents consisted of nurses attending a critical care continuing education event and graduate nursing students in an acute care nurse practitioner program. Statistical tests were used to examine differences in perceived importance of core competencies in palliative care. Findings from this study demonstrate variation in palliative care knowledge and perceived relative importance of core competencies needed in palliative care practice. This study provides preliminary data about knowledge differences among different nursing groups and a foundation for further study. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.