WorldWideScience

Sample records for care management program

  1. Program management of telemental health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkins, A

    2001-01-01

    Telemedicine is a new adjunct to the delivery of health care services that has been applied to a range of health care specialties, including mental health. When prospective telemedicine programs are planned, telemedicine is often envisaged as simply a question of introducing new technology. The development of a robust, sustainable telemental health program involves clinical, technical, and managerial considerations. The major barriers to making this happen are usually how practitioners and patients adapt successfully to the technology and not in the physical installation of telecommunications bandwidth and the associated hardware necessary for teleconsultation. This article outlines the requirements for establishing a viable telemental health service, one that is based on clinical need, practitioner acceptance, technical reliability, and revenue generation. It concludes that the major challenge associated with the implementation of telemental health does not lie in having the idea or in taking the idea to the project stage needed for proof of concept. The major challenge to the widespread adoption of telemental health is paying sufficient attention to the myriad of details needed to integrate models of remote health care delivery into the wider health care system.

  2. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  3. Development of a chronic care ostomy self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long-term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality-of-life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies.

  4. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  5. Responses of Canada's health care management education programs to health care reform initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, D E; Lay, C M

    2000-01-01

    Canada's provincial health care systems have been experiencing significant changes, mostly through horizontal integration achieved by merging hospitals, and, in a few cases, through vertical integration of public health, long term care, home care and hospital services. The government motivation for forcing these changes seems to have been primarily financial. In a few cases, the integration seems to have resulted in a stable and successful outcome, but, in most others, there has been destabilization, and in some, there has been chaos. The question posed in this research was how the five accredited Canadian graduate programs in health care management were responding to these changes. Two of the programs have recently made major changes in structure and/or delivery processes, following careful examination of their perceived environments. One has rationalized by subdividing courses. Another is repatriating courses from the business school in order to achieve more health-related content. Four of the five programs have added a number of courses in the last few years, or plan to do so in the next year or two, either because of accreditation criteria or student or faculty interest. The program directors viewed the educational requirements for clinicians and non-clinicians as being identical. In spite of the major structural changes, and the resulting destabilization of the health care organizations (and even governments), none of the programs emphasized the changes as factors in their plans for program changes. They expressed some concern about the possibility of fads as opposed to significant changes. It may be that these changes are dealt with in the content of individual courses. This aspect was not examined by the survey nor by interviews with the directors. Each of the programs has emphasized its own niche, with no consensus about changes required.

  6. Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Programs; Medicaid Managed Care, CHIP Delivered in Managed Care, and Revisions Related to Third Party Liability. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This final rule modernizes the Medicaid managed care regulations to reflect changes in the usage of managed care delivery systems. The final rule aligns, where feasible, many of the rules governing Medicaid managed care with those of other major sources of coverage, including coverage through Qualified Health Plans and Medicare Advantage plans; implements statutory provisions; strengthens actuarial soundness payment provisions to promote the accountability of Medicaid managed care program rates; and promotes the quality of care and strengthens efforts to reform delivery systems that serve Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries. It also ensures appropriate beneficiary protections and enhances policies related to program integrity. This final rule also implements provisions of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) and addresses third party liability for trauma codes.

  7. The chronic care model versus disease management programs: a transaction cost analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Jennifer; Mark, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The present article applies transaction cost analysis as a framework for better understanding health plans' decisions to improve chronic illness management by using disease management programs versus redesigning care within physician practices.

  8. 76 FR 34541 - Child and Adult Care Food Program Improving Management and Program Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... memorandums are available on the FNS Web site at http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Care/Regs-Policy/Policy/Memoranda....gov/cnd/care/Management/79-2.pdf . Finally, after publishing each of the interim rules, the...

  9. The effect of nursing management development program on clinical competency in coronary care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Vaezi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are the main members in nursing cares and nursing managers can improve their clinical competency by applying better leadership skills. This study carried out to determine the effect of nursing management program on clinical competency of nurses in a coronary care unit (CCU.Methods: A quasi-experimental study was carried out in two educational hospitals in Yazd- Iran. These hospitals were allocated randomly in case and control hospitals. 25 matched nurses were selected by convenience sampling from both case and control hospitals. The clinical competency of nurses was measured by related questioners consisted of two dimensions caring and care management behaviors by self-evaluation and head nurse evaluation in case and control groups. Then, the intervention was implemented in four stages including nurse's development, managers' development, adaptation and supervision period during four months in the case group. After intervention, clinical competency of nurses was measured in both groups.Results: The results showed that before intervention more than 80% of nurses in two groups was in the moderate clinical competency level and they were proficient based on Benner's skill acquisition model. After intervention, nurses' clinical competency improved to higher level in case group but it didn't change in control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Creating necessary modifications in nursing environments through the management development program by head nurses may improve nurses' clinical competency.

  10. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gill Lewin,1 Karyn Concanen,2 David Youens3 1School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Silver Chain Group, Osborne Park, WA, Australia; 3Faculty of Health Science, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: The Home Independence Program (HIP, an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably

  11. Clinical metric and medication persistency effects: evidence from a Medicaid care management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gregory D; Leary, Fredric; Medina, Wendie; Donnelly, Shawn; Warnick, Kathleen

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to estimate clinical metric and medication persistency impacts of a care management program. The data sources were Medicaid administrative claims for a sample population of 32,334 noninstitutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind, or disabled patients with diagnosed conditions of asthma, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or heart failure between 2005 and 2009. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test the hypothesis that exposure to a care management intervention increased the likelihood of having the appropriate medication or procedures performed, as well as increased medication persistency. Statistically significant clinical metric improvements occurred in each of the 5 conditions studied. Increased medication persistency was found for beta-blocker medication for members with coronary artery disease, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker and diuretic medications for members with heart failure, bronchodilator and corticosteroid medications for members with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and aspirin/antiplatelet medications for members with diabetes. This study demonstrates that a care management program increases the likelihood of having an appropriate medication dispensed and/or an appropriate clinical test performed, as well as increased likelihood of medication persistency, in people with chronic conditions.

  12. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice.

  13. Pilot program to improve self-management of patients with heart failure by redesigning care coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jessica D; O'Neal, Daniel J; Siddharthan, Kris; Neugaard, Britta I

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested both an educational and a care coordination element of health care to examine if better disease-specific knowledge leads to successful self-management of heart failure (HF). Background. The high utilization of health care resources and poor patient outcomes associated with HF justify tests of change to improve self-management of HF. Methods. This prospective study tested two components of the Chronic Care Model (clinical information systems and self-management support) to improve outcomes in the self-management of HF among patients who received intensive education and care coordination during their acute care stay. A postdischarge follow-up phone call assessed their knowledge of HF self-management compared to usual care patients. Results. There were 20 patients each in the intervention and usual care groups. Intervention patients were more likely to have a scale at home, write down their weight, and practice new or different health behaviors. Conclusion. Patients receiving more intensive education knew more about their disease and were better able to self-manage their weight compared to patients receiving standard care.

  14. AIDS Drug Assistance Programs: managers confront uncertainty and need to adapt as the Affordable Care Act kicks in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Erika G; Meehan, Terence; Schackman, Bruce R

    2013-06-01

    With the Affordable Care Act set to expand insurance coverage to millions more Americans next year, existing discretionary health programs that receive federal support might find themselves competing for funds as the health reform law is fully implemented. To assess the implications the Affordable Care Act might have for discretionary health programs, we focused on state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs, which provide free medications to low-income HIV patients. We conducted semistructured interviews with program managers from twenty-two states. Many of the managers predicted that their programs will change focus to provide "wrap-around services," such as helping newly insured clients finance out-of-pocket expenses, including copayments, deductibles, and premiums. Although program managers acknowledged that they must adapt to a changing environment, many said that they were overwhelmed by the complexity of the Affordable Care Act, and some expressed fear that state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs would be eliminated entirely. To remain viable, such programs must identify and justify the need for services in the context of the Affordable Care Act and receive sufficient political support and funding.

  15. Innovating in health care management education: development of an accelerated MBA and MPH degree program at Yale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Forman, Howard P; Pistell, Anne F; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2015-03-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges.

  16. Quality management in nuclear medicine for better patient care: the IAEA program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Pascual, Thomas; Paez, Diana; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes the practice of nuclear medicine among its Member States with a focus on quality and safety. It considers quality culture as a part of the educational process and as a tool to reduce heterogeneity in the practice of nuclear medicine, and in turn, patient care. Sensitization about quality is incorporated in all its delivery mechanisms. The Agency has developed a structured peer-review process called quality management (QM) audits in nuclear medicine practices to help nuclear medicine facilities improve their quality through this voluntary comprehensive audit process. The process is multidisciplinary, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine practice with a focus on the patient. It complements other QM and accreditation approaches developed by professional societies or accreditation agencies. The Agency is committed to propagate its utility and assist in the implementation process. Similar auditing programs for practice in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, called QUADRIL and QUATRO, respectively, are also in place. Necessary amendments in the auditing process and content are incorporated based on technological and practice changes with time. The reader will become familiar with the approach of the Agency on QM in nuclear medicine and its implementation process to improve patient care.

  17. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rannou François

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women and 14 care providers (6 women: 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers.

  18. How effective are programs at managing transition from hospital to home? A case study of the Australian transition care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Leonard C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing demand for acute care services due in part to rising proportions of older people and increasing rates of chronic diseases has led to new models of post-acute care for older people that offer coordinated discharge, ongoing support and often a focus on functional restoration. Overall, review of the literature suggests there is considerable uncertainty around the effectiveness and resource implications of the various model configurations and delivery approaches. In this paper, we review the current evidence on the efficacy of such programs, using the Australian Transition Care Program as a case study. Discussion The Australian Transition Care Program was established at the interface of the acute and aged care sectors with particular emphasis on transitions between acute and community care. The program is intended to enable a significant proportion of care recipients to return home, rather than prematurely enter residential aged care, optimize their functional capacity, and reduce inappropriate extended lengths of hospital stay for older people. Broadly, the model is configured and targeted in accordance with programs reported in the international literature to be effective. Early evaluations suggest good acceptance of the program by hospitals, patients and staff. Ultimately, however, the program's place in the array of post-acute services should be determined by its demonstrated efficacy relative to other services which cater for similar patient groups. Summary Currently there is a lack of robust evaluation to provide convincing evidence of efficacy, either from a patient outcome or cost reduction perspective. As the program expands and matures, there will be opportunity to scrutinise the systematic effects, with lessons for both Australian and international policy makers and clinical leaders.

  19. Implications of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) programs for managed care pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Gaurang; Chon, Ashley; Johnson, Nik; Kidder, Phyllis A; Lee, Peter; Leung, Kevin; Ma, Ingrid; Ness, Stacey; Sampsel, Elizabeth; Schlaifer, Marissa; Seifert, Randall; Sternaman, Debora B

    2012-04-01

    In the last 2 decades, health care management has been challenged by more aggressive therapy, the increased number of specialty medications, and more stringent guidelines to monitor adverse events or health risk. To promote patient safety, various communication requirements are mandated to increase the risk awareness of patients and physicians. These include black-box warnings, "Dear Health Care Provider" letters, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Talk Papers, MedGuides, and Risk Minimization Action Plans (RiskMAPs).

  20. Towards Excellence in Asthma Management: Final report of an eight-year program aimed at reducing care gaps in asthma management in Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Dorval, Eileen; Labrecque, Manon; Turgeon, Michel; Montague, Terrence; Thivierge, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Asthma care in Canada and around the world persistently falls short of optimal treatment. To optimize care, a systematic approach to identifying such shortfalls or ‘care gaps’, in which all stakeholders of the health care system (including patients) are involved, was proposed. METHODS: Several projects of a multipartner, multidisciplinary disease management program, developed to optimize asthma care in Quebec, was conducted in a period of eight years. First, two population maps were produced to identify regional variations in asthma-related morbidity and to prioritize interventions for improving treatment. Second, current care was evaluated in a physician-patient cohort, confirming the many care gaps in asthma management. Third, two series of peer-reviewed outcome studies, targeting high-risk populations and specific asthma care gaps, were conducted. Finally, a process to integrate the best interventions into the health care system and an agenda for further research on optimal asthma management were proposed. RESULTS: Key observations from these studies included the identification of specific patterns of noncompliance in using inhaled corticosteroids, the failure of increased access to spirometry in asthma education centres to increase the number of education referrals, the transient improvement in educational abilities of nurses involved with an asthma hotline telephone service, and the beneficial effects of practice tools aimed at facilitating the assessment of asthma control and treatment needs by general practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: Disease management programs such as Towards Excellence in Asthma Management can provide valuable information on optimal strategies for improving treatment of asthma and other chronic diseases by identifying care gaps, improving guidelines implementation and optimizing care. PMID:18818784

  1. Training of Unskilled Child Care Providers: An In-House Program to Overcome Management's Financial Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brian

    An in-house staff development program was designed and implemented for unskilled child caregivers employed at Tiny Tots Educare Academies, Inc., a privately owned and operated child care center located in Ellenton, Florida. Employees had little knowledge of child development and other topics related to early childhood education and, therefore,…

  2. Empowering the dementia care workforce to manage behavioral symptoms of dementia: Development and training outcomes from the VOICE Dementia Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E; Young, David; Dash, Kim

    2016-07-25

    Nonpharmacological approaches for managing behavioral symptoms of dementia remain widely underutilized, due in part to near-universal training needs reported by dementia caregivers in recent research. This article examines the development, core components, and initial outcomes of an evidence-informed, competency-based training program in the prevention and management of behavioral symptoms of dementia among care managers and nurses within an aging services system. The Vital Outcomes Inspired by Caregiver Engagement (VOICE) Dementia Care Training Program was developed based on identification of state-of-the-art approaches to managing behaviors through expert review of the literature and structured needs assessment. Results reveal robust improvements in knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy among training participants, with largest effect sizes (d = 1.8) on domains of knowledge and self-efficacy to manage behaviors. Findings support the feasibility and effectiveness of training in improving the abilities and confidence of aging services providers in dementia care and, specifically, in the nonpharmacological management of dementia-related behaviors.

  3. The formation, elements of success, and challenges in managing a critical care program: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Andre, Arthur

    2015-04-01

    Leaders of critical care programs have significant responsibility to develop and maintain a system of intensive care. At inception, those clinician resources necessary to provide and be available for the expected range of patient illness and injury and throughput are determined. Simultaneously, non-ICU clinical responsibilities and other expectations, such as education of trainees and participation in hospital operations, must be understood. To meet these responsibilities, physicians must be recruited, mentored, and retained. The physician leader may have similar responsibilities for nonphysician practitioners. In concert with other critical care leaders, the service adopts a model of care and assembles an ICU team of physicians, nurses, nonphysician providers, respiratory therapists, and others to provide clinical services. Besides clinician resources, leaders must assure that services such as radiology, pharmacy, the laboratory, and information services are positioned to support the complexities of ICU care. Metrics are developed to report success in meeting process and outcomes goals. Leaders evolve the system of care by reassessing and modifying practice patterns to continually improve safety, efficacy, and efficiency. Major emphasis is placed on the importance of continuity, consistency, and communication by expecting practitioners to adopt similar practices and patterns. Services anticipate and adapt to evolving expectations and resource availability. Effective services will result when skilled practitioners support one another and ascribe to a service philosophy of care.

  4. The role of disease management in pay-for-performance programs for improving the care of chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beich, Jeff; Scanlon, Dennis P; Ulbrecht, Jan; Ford, Eric W; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A

    2006-02-01

    To date, pay-for-performance programs targeting the care of persons with chronic conditions have primarily been directed at physicians and provide an alternative to health plan-sponsored chronic disease management (DM) programs. Both approaches require similar infrastructure, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages for program implementation. Pay-for-performance programs use incentives based on patient outcomes; however, an alternative system might incorporate measures of structure and process. Using a conceptual framework, the authors explore the variation in 50 diabetes DM programs using data from the 2002 National Business Coalition on Health's eValue8 Request for Information (RFI). The authors raise issues relevant to the assignment of accountability for patient outcomes to either health plans or physicians. They analyze the association between RFI scores measuring structures and processes, and HEDIS diabetes intermediate outcome measures. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of using the RFI scores as an alternative metric for pay-for-performance programs are discussed.

  5. Incorporating person centred care principles into an ongoing comprehensive cancer management program: An experiential account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallath Nandini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates a definite positive impact on treatment outcomes when an integrative approach that focuses on symptom control and quality of life is provided along with the standard therapeutic regimens. However implementation or practice of this approach is not seen widely due to the culture of medical training and practice. This article presents the initial development of a program for incorporating integrative care principles into an ongoing comprehensive cancer care program at a tertiary centre. The key purpose of the program being to develop, facilitate, and establish comprehensive and holistic processes including palliative care principles, that would positively enhance the quantity and quality of life of the person with disease, as well as create an environment that reflects and sustains this approach. The vision, objectives, goals, strategies, activities and results within the 7 months of implementation are documented. The new learnings gained during the process have also been noted in the hope that the model described may be used to conceptualize similar care giving facilities in other centres.

  6. Use of the emergency department for less-urgent care among type 2 diabetics under a disease management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Leann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study analyzed the likelihood of less-urgent emergency department (ED visits among type 2 diabetic patients receiving care under a diabetes disease management (DM program offered by the Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division (LSU HCSD. Methods All ED and outpatient clinic visits made by 6,412 type 2 diabetic patients from 1999 to 2006 were extracted from the LSU HCSD Disease Management (DM Evaluation Database. Patient ED visits were classified as either urgent or less-urgent, and the likelihood of a less-urgent ED visit was compared with outpatient clinic visits using the Generalized Estimating Equation methodology for binary response to time-dependent variables. Results Patients who adhered to regular clinic visit schedules dictated by the DM program were less likely to use the ED for less urgent care with odds ratio of 0.1585. Insured patients had 1.13 to 1.70 greater odds of a less-urgent ED visit than those who were uninsured. Patients with better-managed glycated hemoglobin (A1c or HbA1c levels were 82 times less likely to use less-urgent ED visits. Furthermore, being older, Caucasian, or a longer participant in the DM program had a modestly lower likelihood of less-urgent ED visits. The patient's Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI, gender, prior hospitalization, and the admitting facility showed no effect. Conclusion Patients adhering to the DM visit guidelines were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent problems. Maintaining normal A1c levels for their diabetes also has the positive impact to reduce less-urgent ED usages. It suggests that successful DM programs may reduce inappropriate ED use. In contrast to expectations, uninsured patients were less likely to use the ED for less-urgent care. Patients in the DM program with Medicaid coverage were 1.3 times more likely to seek care in the ED for non-emergencies while commercially insured patients were nearly 1.7 times more likely to do so. Further

  7. Program Evaluation of Health Care Management: Is it adjusted for Students Needs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Farzianpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Since improving the quality of high education is the final purpose of educational evaluation and an internal evaluation can make it possible to judge the quality of high education and achieve the goal of educational systems, in this study an internal evaluation in health care management department of Allied Medical Sciences Faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, which is responsible for training health care management Students, was conducted. Approach: The study was a descriptive and cross-sectional one which was done in an applied manner in health care management department in 2006. The participants in the study included the manager of the department, the members of evaluation committee (3 people, Faculty board members (5 people, all the students, graduate students (20 people and four experts. Nine questions were the tool used in the study. The questions were approved, considering reliability and validity, by means of the internal evaluation software of ministry of health, treatment and medical education. Regarding final approvement, 85- percent Cronoch,s alpha was obtained. To score the questions in the questionnaire, the researchers used likert choice scale (from completely undesirable to completely desirable. At the end, the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS software. Results: Findings indicated that the faculty board members had the highest utility (70% and the research factor the lowest (36.6%. Conclusion: Considering the factors evaluated, the utility of the department under study was rather high. The SWOT analysis shows that the department can obtain higher scores in later evaluations.

  8. Managed care demands flexibility, creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The definition of hospice care is changing as home care providers come under managed care regulations. Hospice care for AIDS patients is demanding, requiring extra time from home care providers. The managed care cost-cutting measures require creativitity and patience. The Visiting Nurses and Hospice of San Francisco (VNH) has held seminars to help providers adapt to managed care.

  9. Geography Undergraduate Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estaville, Lawrence E.; Brown, Brock J.; Caldwell, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Vision and mission statements are the foundation for the types of undergraduate degrees departments confer as well as other types of academic programs such as pre-major, certificate, and distance education curricula. Critical to each department should be careful administration of course selections and offerings and management of academic majors,…

  10. The Nordic maintenance care program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, Stefan; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    of maintenance care. Previous studies have identified chiropractors' choices of case management strategies in response to different case scenarios. However, the rationale for these management strategies is not known. In other words, when presented with both the case, and different management strategies......Maintenance care is a well known concept among chiropractors, although there is little knowledge about its exact definition, its indications and usefulness. As an initial step in a research program on this phenomenon, it was necessary to identify chiropractors' rationale for their use......, there was consensus on how to match these, but if only the management strategies were provided, would chiropractors be able to define the cases to fit these strategies? The objective with this study was to investigate if there is a common pattern in Finnish chiropractors' case management of patients with low back...

  11. Health care marketing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P D

    1979-01-01

    Health Care Marketing Management is the process of understanding the needs and the wats of a target market. Its purpose is to provide a viewpoint from which to integrate the analysis, planning, implementation (or organization) and control of the health care delivery system.

  12. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis : utilization and valuation by patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; van Geel, Bjoern M.; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I.; van der Kruijk, Ruud A.; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M.; Baart, Jacoba C.; Visser, Leo H.; Arnoldus, Edo P.; Gilhuis, Herman Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Heerings, Marco; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background: MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis. Methods: To assess the utilization and valuation by persons with multiple sclerosis, we held an online survey among those who had used the program for at least

  13. Implementing a pediatric asthma program: enabling self-care management through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaie-Waliser, Maryam; Mersman, Cynthia; Lincoln, Priscilla

    2004-09-01

    This article provides an overview of asthma prevalence among children, presents a summary of asthma triggers based on past research, outlines the essential components of a pediatric asthma home care model implemented by a large urban home health agency, and details the types of clinical documentation needed for care plan development and monitoring of asthma in the home.

  14. The Nordic maintenance care program: case management of chiropractic patients with low back pain – defining the patients suitable for various management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmqvist Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance care is a well known concept among chiropractors, although there is little knowledge about its exact definition, its indications and usefulness. As an initial step in a research program on this phenomenon, it was necessary to identify chiropractors' rationale for their use of maintenance care. Previous studies have identified chiropractors' choices of case management strategies in response to different case scenarios. However, the rationale for these management strategies is not known. In other words, when presented with both the case, and different management strategies, there was consensus on how to match these, but if only the management strategies were provided, would chiropractors be able to define the cases to fit these strategies? The objective with this study was to investigate if there is a common pattern in Finnish chiropractors' case management of patients with low back pain (LBP, with special emphasis on long-term treatment. Methods Information was obtained in a structured workshop. Fifteen chiropractors, members of the Finnish Chiropractors' Union, and present at the general assembly, participated throughout the entire workshop session. These were divided into five teams each consisting of 3 people. A basic case of a patient with low back pain was presented together with six different management strategies undertaken after one month of treatment. Each team was then asked to describe one (or several suitable case(s for each of the six strategies, based on the aspects of 1 symptoms/findings, 2 the low back pain history in the past year, and 3 other observations. After each session the people in the groups were changed. Responses were collected as key words on flip-over boards. These responses were grouped and counted. Results There appeared to be consensus among the participants in relation to the rationale for at least four of the management strategies and partial consensus on the rationale for the

  15. Managing as blended care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, H

    1994-09-01

    As part of a research project on managerial work based on a new model of the roles, the head nurse of a hospital unit was observed during a working day. Her work is described, with reference especially to the roles of leading, linking, controlling, and doing. Conclusions are drawn about the advantages of a craft style of management as opposed to the more traditional "boss" or professional styles. The author also discusses what those in general management can learn from those in nursing management, which seems best practiced out in the open, on one's feet, as a kind of blended care.

  16. Managed care and economic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, J E

    1996-09-01

    Over the past several decades, health care delivery in the United States evolved in an environment lacking marketplace constraints. The unforeseen result was the current health care crisis--uncontrolled costs, shrinking access, and redundant technological capabilities. Managed care is a strategy to impose fiscal constraints on health care delivery. A diagrammatic analysis of the economic dynamics between consumers and producers in an open marketplace is compared with that of patients, providers, and payers under the health care scheme that produced the health care crisis and under managed care. Patient demands, expectations, and needs for health care are not subject to fiscal constraint under managed care since the dislinkage between consumer and payer still exits. Managed care does not impose true open marketplace fiscal constraints on health care delivery. Furthermore, any solution to the US health care crisis that used true marketplace fiscal constraints would necessitate fundamental changes in societal values concerning individual rights to health care.

  17. Medicaid Program; The Use of New or Increased Pass-Through Payments in Medicaid Managed Care Delivery Systems. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    This rule finalizes changes to the pass-through payment transition periods and the maximum amount of pass-through payments permitted annually during the transition periods under Medicaid managed care contract(s) and rate certification(s). This final rule prevents increases in pass-through payments and the addition of new pass-through payments beyond those in place when the pass-through payment transition periods were established, in the final Medicaid managed care regulations effective July 5, 2016.

  18. Managed care under siege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R A

    1999-10-01

    Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) are frequently criticized for their marketing mistakes. Often that criticism is leveled against an implicit benchmark of an ideal competitive market or an ideal system of government provision. But any accurate assessment in the choice of health care organizations always requires a comparative measure of error rates. These are high in the provision of health care, given the inherent uncertainties in both the cost and effectiveness of treatment. But the continuous and rapid evolution of private health care mechanisms is, in the absence of regulation, more likely to secure access and contain costs than any system of government regulation. State regulation is subject to the risk of capture and to the sluggish and acquisitive behavior of state run monopolies. The proposed fixes for the MCOs (rights to specialists, access to physicians outside the network, guaranteed emergency room access) are likely, when imposed from without, to cost more than they are worth. The long-term risk is that markets will fail under regulation, paving the way for greater losses from massive government control of the health care delivery system.

  19. Characteristics, management and attainment of lipid target levels in diabetic and cardiac patients enrolled in Disease Management Program versus those in routine care: LUTZ registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmann Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2002 the sick funds in Germany have widely implemented disease management programs (DMPs for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and coronary heart disease (CHD. Little is known about the characteristics, treatment and target attainment lipid levels of these patients enrolled in DMPs compared to patients in routine care (non-DMP. Methods In an open, non-interventional registry (LUTZ in Germany, 6551 physicians documented 15,211 patients with DM (10,110 in DMP, 5101 in routine care and 14,222 (6259 in DMP, 7963 in routine care over a follow-up period of 4 months. They received the NCEP ATP III guidelines as a reminder on lipid level targets. Results While demographic characteristics of DMP patients were similar to routine care patients, the former had higher rates of almost all cardiovascular comorbidities. Patients in DMPs received pharmacological treatment (in almost all drug classes more often than non-DMP patients (e.g. antiplatelets: in DM 27.0% vs 23.8%; in CHD 63.0% vs. 53.6%. The same applied for educational measures (on life style changes and diet etc.. The rate of target level attainment for low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C 1c values were slightly lowered during follow-up, without substantial differences between DMP and non-DMP patients. Conclusion Patients with DM, and (to a greater extent with CHD in DMPs compared to non-DMP patients in routine care have a higher burden of comorbidities, but also receive more intensive pharmacological treatment and educational measures. The present data support that the substantial additional efforts in DMPs aimed at improving outcomes resulted in quality gains for achieving target LDL-C levels, but not for BP or HbA1c. Longer-term follow-up is needed to substantiate these results.

  20. The Nordic maintenance care program – case management of chiropractic patients with low back pain: A survey of Swedish chiropractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgensen Kristian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chiropractic treatment for low back pain (LBP can often be divided into two phases: Initial treatment of the problem to attempt to remove pain and bring it back into its pre-clinical or maximum improvement status, and "maintenance care", during which it is attempted to maintain this status. Although the use of chiropractic maintenance care has been described and discussed in the literature, there is no information as to its precise indications. The objective of this study is to investigate if there is agreement among Swedish chiropractors on the overall patient management for various types of LBP-scenarios, with a special emphasis on maintenance care. Method The design was a mailed questionnaire survey. Members of the Swedish Chiropractors' Association, who were participants in previous practice-based research, were sent a closed-end questionnaire consisting of nine case scenarios and six clinical management alternatives and the possibility to create one's own alternative, resulting in a "nine-by-seven" table. The research team defined its own pre hoc choice of "clinically logical" answers based on the team's clinical experience. The frequency of findings was compared to the suggestions of the research team. Results Replies were received from 59 (60% of the 99 persons who were invited to take part in the study. A pattern of self-reported clinical management strategies emerged, largely corresponding to the "clinically logical" answers suggested by the research team. In general, patients of concern would be referred out for a second opinion, cases with early recovery and without a history of previous low back pain would be quickly closed, and cases with quick recovery and a history of recurring events would be considered for maintenance care. However, also other management patterns were noted, in particular in the direction of maintenance care. Conclusion To a reasonable extent, Swedish chiropractors participating in this

  1. Joint Program Management Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    the Engieermg and Manufacuring Devopment Phase. Nfilestoae HI- Develommen Annros Devopment approval marks a significant step for any program, but it is...to review concept formulaton. Systems Engilneertn As with service programs, systems engineering in joint program management is an essential tool . I...MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK On=e wd Umawtaiutt As discussed in Chapter 7, systems analysis of relationships is a usef tool for joint program managers. The joint

  2. Managing acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J S

    1993-02-01

    In the last few years, much medical-facility construction has been driven by what insurers want. Hospitals have built facilities for well-reimbursed procedures and closed money-losing ones. Health-maintenance organizations increasingly expect to hold down costs by making prepayment arrangements with doctors and their hospitals. President Clinton has pledged early action on health-care reform, which will likely change planners' priorities. Whether the nation goes to Clintonian "managed competition" or a Canadian-style nationwide single-payer system (the two most likely options), the projects on these pages reflect two large-scale trends that are likely to continue: the movement of more procedures from inpatient to outpatient facilities and the separation of treatment functions from ordinary office and administrative tasks so that the latter are not performed in the same high-cost buildings as technology-intensive procedures. Various schemes that make care more "patient-centered" have been tried and been shown to speed healing, even for outpatients, but such hard-to-quantify issues get short shrift in an era of knee-jerk cost containment. The challenge in tomorrow's healthcare universe--whatever it becomes--will be to keep these issues on the table.

  3. Effectiveness of the blended care self-management program “Partner in Balance” for early-stage dementia caregivers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Boots, Lizzy M. M.; De Vugt, Marjolein E; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Verhey, Frans R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefits of e-health support for dementia caregivers are becoming increasingly recognized. Reaching early-stage dementia caregivers could prevent high levels of burden and psychological problems in them in the later stages of dementia. An iterative step-wise approach was employed to develop the blended care self-management program “Partner in Balance” for early-stage dementia caregivers. The design of a study evaluating the process characteristics and effects is presented. Meth...

  4. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel van Dijk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programs (DMP aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs.Research design and methods: Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (N=316 and data from electronic medical records (EMR (N=9023, and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard.Results: On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. 96% contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs.Conclusion: Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  5. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel van Dijk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programs (DMP aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs. Research design and methods: Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (N=316 and data from electronic medical records (EMR (N=9023, and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard. Results: On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. 96% contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs. Conclusion: Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  6. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E.; Verheij, Robert A.; Swinkels, Ilse C.S.; Rijken, Mieke; Schellevis, François G.; Groenewegen, Peter P.; de Bakker, Dinny H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Disease management programs (DMP) aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs. Research design and methods Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (n=316) and data from electronic medical records (EMR) (n=9023), and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard. Results On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. Ninety-six percent contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs. Conclusion Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care. PMID:22359520

  7. Construction program management

    CERN Document Server

    Delaney, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Although construction is one of the largest industries in the United States, it lags behind other industries in its implementation of modern management techniques such as those contained in the Standard for Program Management (the Standard) by the Project Management Institute (PMI(R)). Construction Program Management details the successful use of the PMI(R) approach for the construction of capital programs. It demonstrates, through case studies, how implementation of PMI's set of tools and techniques can improve the chances of program success. Exploring tactical and strategic management method

  8. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  9. Managed Care, Ethics, and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses issues of managed care and ethics and how they relate to counseling. Specifically reviews a recent article published in "The Counseling Psychologist" (2000). Explores implications for counselors and counselor educators. (Author/GCP)

  10. Structuring managed care joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L

    1995-08-01

    Providers that undertake joint ventures to secure managed care contracts must understand the important governance, operational, legal, and political issues involved. Careful planning in all these areas can help ensure that the joint venture will meet its goals and avoid problems such as inappropriately negotiated contracts and legal violations.

  11. Pain management in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Girbes, Armand

    2013-10-01

    The core challenge of pain management in neurocritical care is to keep the patient comfortable without masking or overlooking any neurological deterioration. Clearly in patients with a neurological problem there is a conflict of clinical judgement and adequate pain relief. Here we review the presentation, assessment, and development of pain in the clinical spectrum of patients with associated neurological problems seen in a general intensive care setting. Many conditions predispose to the development of chronic pain. There is evidence that swift and targeted pain management may improve the outcome. Importantly pain management is multidisciplinary. The available non-invasive, pharmacological, and invasive treatment strategies are discussed.

  12. A primary care, multi-disciplinary disease management program for opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain and a high burden of psychiatric comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-cancer pain is a common problem that is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidity and disability. The effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary pain management program was tested in a 3 month before and after trial. Methods Providers in an academic general medicine clinic referred patients with chronic non-cancer pain for participation in a program that combined the skills of internists, clinical pharmacists, and a psychiatrist. Patients were either receiving opioids or being considered for opioid therapy. The intervention consisted of structured clinical assessments, monthly follow-up, pain contracts, medication titration, and psychiatric consultation. Pain, mood, and function were assessed at baseline and 3 months using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale scale (CESD and the Pain Disability Index (PDI. Patients were monitored for substance misuse. Results Eighty-five patients were enrolled. Mean age was 51 years, 60% were male, 78% were Caucasian, and 93% were receiving opioids. Baseline average pain was 6.5 on an 11 point scale. The average CESD score was 24.0, and the mean PDI score was 47.0. Sixty-three patients (73% completed 3 month follow-up. Fifteen withdrew from the program after identification of substance misuse. Among those completing 3 month follow-up, the average pain score improved to 5.5 (p = 0.003. The mean PDI score improved to 39.3 (p Conclusions A primary care disease management program improved pain, depression, and disability scores over three months in a cohort of opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Substance misuse and depression were common, and many patients who had substance misuse identified left the program when they were no longer prescribed opioids. Effective care of patients with chronic pain should include rigorous assessment and treatment of these comorbid disorders and intensive efforts to insure follow up.

  13. Program Management Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawadiak, Yuri; Wong, Alan; Maluf, David; Bell, David; Gurram, Mohana; Tran, Khai Peter; Hsu, Jennifer; Yagi, Kenji; Patel, Hemil

    2007-01-01

    The Program Management Tool (PMT) is a comprehensive, Web-enabled business intelligence software tool for assisting program and project managers within NASA enterprises in gathering, comprehending, and disseminating information on the progress of their programs and projects. The PMT provides planning and management support for implementing NASA programmatic and project management processes and requirements. It provides an online environment for program and line management to develop, communicate, and manage their programs, projects, and tasks in a comprehensive tool suite. The information managed by use of the PMT can include monthly reports as well as data on goals, deliverables, milestones, business processes, personnel, task plans, monthly reports, and budgetary allocations. The PMT provides an intuitive and enhanced Web interface to automate the tedious process of gathering and sharing monthly progress reports, task plans, financial data, and other information on project resources based on technical, schedule, budget, and management criteria and merits. The PMT is consistent with the latest Web standards and software practices, including the use of Extensible Markup Language (XML) for exchanging data and the WebDAV (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning) protocol for collaborative management of documents. The PMT provides graphical displays of resource allocations in the form of bar and pie charts using Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Application (VBA) libraries. The PMT has an extensible architecture that enables integration of PMT with other strategic-information software systems, including, for example, the Erasmus reporting system, now part of the NASA Integrated Enterprise Management Program (IEMP) tool suite, at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PMT data architecture provides automated and extensive software interfaces and reports to various strategic information systems to eliminate duplicative human entries and minimize data integrity

  14. Pain management improves care and revenue: an interview with ProCare Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F N; Walsh, C

    2000-01-01

    As provider and managed care organizations continue to look for better ways to control costs and improve patient outcomes, disease management programs are getting an increasing share of their attention. One often-over-looked area with significant potential to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance revenues is pain management. It has been estimated that at least 40 percent of senior citizens suffer from chronic pain, and as the population ages, the number of chronic pain sufferers will only increase. Pain management companies have been forming to meet the current and future demand for comprehensive pain management programs. One such company is ProCare Systems, a single-specialty physician practice management company based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. HFM spoke with Fred N. Davis, MD, president and cofounder of ProCare Systems, and Cyndy Walsh, ProCare System's CEO, about pain management programs and the patient care and financial impact they can effect.

  15. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: utilization and valuation by patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongen PJ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Peter Joseph Jongen,1,2 Ludovicus G Sinnige,3 Björn M van Geel,4 Freek Verheul,5 Wim I Verhagen,6 Ruud A van der Kruijk,7 Reinoud Haverkamp,8 Hans M Schrijver,9 Jacoba C Baart,10 Leo H Visser,11 Edo P Arnoldus,12 Herman Jacobus Gilhuis,13 Paul Pop,14 Monique Booy,15 Marco Heerings,16 Anton Kool,17 Esther van Noort17 1Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, 2MS4 Research Institute, Nijmegen, 3Multiple Sclerosis Centre Leeuwarden, Medical Centre Leeuwarden, Leeuwarden, 4Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Alkmaar, Alkmaar, 5Department of Neurology, Groene Hart Hospital, Gouda, 6Department of Neurology, Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, 7Department of Neurology, Slingeland Hospital, Doetinchem, 8Department of Neurology, Zuwe Hofpoort Hospital, Woerden, 9Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, 10Department of Neurology, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Almelo-Hengelo, 11Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, 12Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, Tweesteden Hospital, 13Department of Neurology, Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Delft, 14Department of Neurology, Viecuri Medical Centre, Venlo-Venray, 15Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 16MH Advies en organisatiebureau, Assen, 17Curavista bv, Geertruidenberg, the Netherlands Background: MSmonitor is an interactive web-based program for self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis.Methods: To assess the utilization and valuation by persons with multiple sclerosis, we held an online survey among those who had used the program for at least 1 year. We evaluated the utilization and meaningfulness of the program’s elements, perceived use of data by neurologists and nurses, and appreciation of care, self-management, and satisfaction.Results: Fifty-five persons completed the questionnaire (estimated response rate 40%. The

  16. Price elasticity and pharmaceutical selection: the influence of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Salkever, David S

    2003-07-01

    State Medicaid programs are turning increasingly to managed care to control expenditures, although the types of managed care programs in use have changed dramatically. Little is known about the influence of the shifting Medicaid managed care arena on treatment decisions. This paper investigates factors affecting the selection of treatments for depression by providers participating in either of two Medicaid managed care programs. Of particular interest is the influence of medication price on the choice of treatment, since one vehicle through which managed care organizations can reduce total expenditures is by increasing the price sensitivity of participating providers. We take a new approach by phrasing the problem as a discrete choice, using a nested multinomial logit model for the analyses. Contrary to earlier literature, we find some evidence that physicians in both programs do take price into consideration when selecting among treatment options. HMO providers in particular demonstrate increased price sensitivity in the two most commonly prescribed categories of antidepressants.

  17. Priority interventions to improve the management of chronic non-cancer pain in primary care: a participatory research of the ACCORD program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalonde L

    2015-04-01

    , difficulties in access to health professionals and services, and patient empowerment needs. Based on the nominal group discussions, the following priority interventions were identified: interdisciplinary continuing education, interdisciplinary treatment approach, regional expert leadership, creation and definition of care paths, and patient education programs. Conclusion: Barriers to optimal management of CNCP in primary care are numerous. Improving its management cannot be envisioned without considering multifaceted interventions targeting several dimensions of the Chronic Care Model and focusing on both clinicians and patients. Keywords: chronic pain, community-based participatory research, health service accessibility, patient-centered care, primary health care

  18. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  19. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis L. Kodner

    2015-01-01

    The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP) was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each). It started during the first phase at Massachusett...

  20. Challenges for Managed Care from 340B Contract Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, Adam J

    2016-03-01

    The federal 340B Drug Pricing Program has expanded rapidly, with important yet still unmeasured impact on both managed care practice and policies. Notably, providers increasingly rely on external, contract pharmacies to extend 340B pricing to a broad set of patients. In 2014, 1 in 4 U.S. retail, mail, and specialty pharmacy locations acted as contract pharmacies for 340B-covered entities. This commentary discusses crucial ways in which 340B growth is affecting managed care pharmacy through formulary rebates, profits from managed care paid prescriptions, disruption of retail pharmacy networks, and reduced generic dispensing rates. Managed care should become more engaged in the discussion on how the 340B program should evolve and offer policy proposals to mitigate the challenges being encountered. There is also an urgent need for objective, transparent research on the 340B program's costs, benefits, and implications for managed care pharmacy and practice.

  1. The disease management program for type 2 diabetes in Germany enhances process quality of diabetes care - a follow-up survey of patient's experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Bussche Hendrik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In summer 2003 a disease management program (DMP for type 2 diabetes was introduced on a nationwide basis in Germany. Patient participation and continuity of care within the DMP are important factors to achieve long-term improvements in clinical endpoints. Therefore it is of interest, if patients experience any positive or negative effects of the DMP on their treatment that would support or hamper further participation. The main objective of the study was to find out if the German Disease Management Program (DMP for type 2 diabetes improves process and outcome quality of medical care for patients in the light of their subjective experiences over a period of one year. Methods Cohort study with a baseline interview and a follow-up after 10.4 ± 0.64 months. Data on process and outcome measures were collected by telephone interviews with 444 patients enrolled and 494 patients not enrolled in the German DMP for type 2 diabetes. Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results DMP enrolment was significantly associated with a higher process quality of care. At baseline enrolled patients more often reported that they had attended a diabetes education course (OR = 3.4, have ≥ 4 contacts/year with the attending physician (OR = 3.3, have at least one annual foot examination (OR = 3.1 and one referral to an ophthalmologist (OR = 3.4 and possess a diabetes passport (OR = 2.4. Except for the annual referral to an ophthalmologist these parameters were also statistically significant at follow-up. In contrast, no differences between enrolled and not enrolled patients were found concerning outcome quality indicators, e.g. self-rated health, Glycated hemoglobin (GHb and blood pressure. However, 16-36% of the DMP participants reported improvements of body weight and/or GHb and/or blood pressure values due to enrolment - unchanged within one year of follow-up. Conclusions In the light of patient's experiences the DMP

  2. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongen PJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peter Joseph Jongen,1,2 Ludovicus G Sinnige,3 Björn M van Geel,4 Freek Verheul,5 Wim l Verhagen,6 Ruud A van der Kruijk,7 Reinoud Haverkamp,8 Hans M Schrijver,9 J Coby Baart,10 Leo H Visser,11 Edo P Arnoldus,12 H Jacobus Gilhuis,13 Paul Pop,14 Monique Booy,15 Wim Lemmens,16 Rogier Donders,16 Anton Kool,17 Esther van Noort17 1Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University Groningen, Groningen, 2MS4 Research Institute, Nijmegen, 3Multiple Sclerosis Centre Leeuwarden, Medical Centre Leeuwarden, Leeuwarden, 4Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Alkmaar, Alkmaar, 5Department of Neurology, Groene Hart Hospital, Gouda, 6Department of Neurology, Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, 7Department of Neurology, Slingeland Hospital, Doetinchem, 8Department of Neurology, Zuwe Hofpoort Hospital, Woerden, 9Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Westfries Gasthuis, Hoorn, 10Department of Neurology, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Almelo-Hengelo, 11Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, St Elisabeth Hospital, 12Multiple Sclerosis Centre Midden Brabant, Tweesteden Hospital, Tilburg, 13Department of Neurology, Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Delft, 14Department of Neurology, Viecuri Medical Centre, Venlo-Venray, 15Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 16Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, 17Curavista bv, Geertruidenberg, the Netherlands Background: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009–2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor for (self-monitoring, self-management and integrated, multidisciplinary care in MS.Methods: The notions underlying the MSmonitor concept and the program’s elements are described. We analyze MSmonitor’s role in the self-management of fatigue by retrospective

  3. Legal implications of managed care arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, W A; Epstein, D M

    1994-09-01

    Prior to the 1980s, managed care was virtually nonexistent as a force in health care. Presently, 64 percent of employees in America are covered by managed care plans, including health maintenance organizations (20 percent) and preferred provider organizations (44 percent). In contrast, only 29 percent of employees were enrolled in managed care plans in 1988 and only 47 percent in 1991. To date, the primary reason for this incredible growth in managed care has been economic-market pressure to reduce health care costs. For the foreseeable future, political pressures are likely to fuel this growth, as managed care is at the center of President Clinton's national health care plan. Although there are numerous legal issues surrounding managed care, this article focuses primarily on antitrust implications when forming managed care entities. In addition, the corporate practice of medicine doctrine, certain tax issues, and the fraud and abuse laws are discussed.

  4. Russia air management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, T.G. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NC (United States); Markin, S. [Ministry of Environmental Protection and Natural Resources, Moscow (Sweden); Kosenkova, S.V. [Volgograd Environmental Services Administration, Volgograd (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The Russia Air Management Program is in the second year of a four-year cooperative program between the Russian Ministry of Environmental Protection and Natural Resources (MEPNR) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to improve national institutions, policies, and practices for air quality management in Russia. This program is part of the Environmental Policy and Technology project being conducted by the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Russia Air Management Program will pilot the application of potential air program improvements in the important industrial City of Volgograd which will enable the development, practical demonstration and evaluation of alternative approaches for improving AQM policies and practices in Russia. Volgograd has a progressive and environmentally enlightened local government, a diverse industrial base and a relatively healthy economy. It is located south of Moscow on the Volga River and was proposed by the Ministry of Environmental Protection and Natural Resources. It was selected after a site visit and a series of discussions with the Ministry, Volgograd officials, the World Bank and the EPA. Following the pilot, RAMP will work to facilitate implementation of selected parts of the pilot in other areas of Russia using training, technology transfer, and public awareness. (author)

  5. Management Recommendations: Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management recommendations are a product of the decision support tool for the Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM). The provides tall and mixed grass management...

  6. A Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Psycho-Education (B-CBE Program for Managing Stress and Anxiety of Main Family Caregivers of Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vico Chung Lim Chiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Having a loved one in the intensive care unit (ICU is a stressful event, which may cause a high level of anxiety to the family members. This could threaten their wellbeing and ability to support the patients in, or after discharge from, the ICU. To investigate the outcomes of a brief cognitive-behavioral psycho-education program (B-CBE to manage stress and anxiety of the main family caregivers (MFCs, a pragmatic quasi-experimental study involving 45 participants (treatment group: 24; control group: 21 was conducted in an ICU. The Depression and Anxiety Stress Scale and the Critical Care Family Need Inventory were used to evaluate the primary outcomes on stress and anxiety, and satisfaction with family needs. The treatment group reported significantly better improvement in the information satisfaction score compared to the control group (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.09. Overall main effects were observed on the stress (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.20, anxiety (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.18, depression (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13, support satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13, and comfort satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.11 scores. The experience of this study suggest that MFCs are in great need of additional support like B-CBE to manage their stress and anxiety. Given the brevity of B-CBE, it is practical for critical care nurses to deliver and MFCs to take within the industrious context of an ICU. More studies are needed to investigate these types of brief psychological interventions.

  7. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts.

  8. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  9. Towards Excellence in Asthma Management: Final Report of an Eight-Year Program Aimed at Reducing Care Gaps in Asthma Management in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Asthma care in Canada and around the world persistently falls short of optimal treatment. To optimize care, a systematic approach to identifying such shortfalls or ‘care gaps’, in which all stakeholders of the health care system (including patients are involved, was proposed.

  10. Managed consumerism in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  11. Managing depression in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kerry A.; Wolfe, Vicky V.; Fisman, Sandra; DePace, JoAnne; Steele, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ practice patterns for managing depression and mental health concerns among adolescent and adult patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING London, Ont, a mid-sized Canadian city. PARTICIPANTS One hundred sixty-three family physicians identified through the London and District Academy of Medicine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Practice patterns for managing depression, including screening, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, shared care, and training needs. RESULTS Response rate was 63%. Family physicians reported spending a substantial portion of their time during patient visits (26% to 50%) addressing mental health issues, with depression being the most common issue (51% to 75% of patients with mental health issues). About 40% of respondents did routine mental health screening, and 60% screened patients with risk factors for depression. Shared care with mental health professionals was common (care was shared for 26% to 50% of patients). Physicians and patients were moderately satisfied with shared care, but were frustrated by long waiting lists and communication barriers. Most physicians provided psychotherapy to patients in the form of general advice. Differences in practice patterns were observed; physicians treated more adults than adolescents with depression, and they reported greater comfort in treating adults. Although 33% of physicians described using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), they reported having little training in CBT. Moderate interest was expressed in CBT training, with a preference for a workshop format. CONCLUSION Although 40% of family physicians routinely screen patients for mental health issues, depression is often not detected. Satisfaction with shared care can be increased through better communication with mental health professionals. Physicians’ management of adolescent patients can be improved by further medical training, consultation, and collaboration with mental health professionals

  12. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  13. Managed care innovation and new product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C S; Schuster, T B

    1994-01-01

    This article explores recent innovative activity by managed care payor plans nationwide with particular emphasis on emerging, new relationships between the plans and their purchasers, enrollees, provider panels, and competitors. Because they already practice what advocates of health care reform are now preaching, many managed care plans are leading the charge to transform our health care delivery and financing systems.

  14. NPS TINYSCOPE Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    orbit and the rotation of the Earth and Moon . The planets will also perturb the orbits with Jupiter and Venus acting as the primary sources...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NPS TINYSCOPE Program Management 6. AUTHOR( S ) Christopher Gordon Turner 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING

  15. Pharmacist credentialing in pain management and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juba, Katherine M

    2012-10-01

    A credential is documented evidence of a pharmacist's qualifications; while credentialing is the method used to acquire, confirm, determine, and document a pharmacist's qualifications to practice. Voluntary credentials are important in clinical pharmacy specialties to ensure proficiency in caring for patients with complex pharmacotherapy needs. This article discusses current and future pharmacy pain management and palliative care credentialing opportunities. Pharmacists wishing to pursue voluntary pain management and palliative care credentialing may elect to take a multidisciplinary pain credentialing exam offered by the American Society of Pain Educators (ASPE) or American Academy of Pain Management (AAPM) and/or complete an American Society of Health System Pharmacists (ASHP) Postgraduate Year 2 (PGY2) pain management and palliative care pharmacy residency. A palliative care credentialing exam is not currently available to pharmacists. Efforts are underway within the pharmacy profession to standardize the board certification process, design a pain and palliative certificate program, and create a specialty pain management and palliative care board certification examination.

  16. Integrated Financial Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pho, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Having worked in the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch of the Financial Management Division for the past 3 summers, I have seen the many changes that have occurred within the NASA organization. As I return each summer, I find that new programs and systems have been adapted to better serve the needs of the Center and of the Agency. The NASA Agency has transformed itself the past couple years with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program (IFMP). IFMP is designed to allow the Agency to improve its management of its Financial, Physical, and Human Resources through the use of multiple enterprise module applications. With my mentor, Joseph Kan, being the branch chief of the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch, I have been exposed to several modules, such as Travel Manager, WebTads, and Core Financial/SAP, which were implemented in the last couple of years under the IFMP. The implementation of these agency-wide systems has sometimes proven to be troublesome. Prior to IFMP, each NASA Center utilizes their own systems for Payroll, Travel, Accounts Payable, etc. But with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program, all the "legacy" systems had to be eliminated. As a result, a great deal of enhancement and preparation work is necessary to ease the transformation from the old systems to the new. All this work occurs simultaneously; for example, e-Payroll will "go live" in several months, but a system like Travel Manager will need to have information upgraded within the system to meet the requirements set by Headquarters. My assignments this summer have given me the opportunity to become involved with such work. So far, I have been given the opportunity to participate in projects resulting from a congressional request, several bankcard reconciliations, updating routing lists for Travel Manager, updating the majordomo list for Travel Manager approvers and point of contacts, and a NASA Headquarters project involving

  17. Effects of a Hypertension Management Program by Seongcheon Primary Health Care Post in South Korea: An Analysis of Changes in the Level of Knowledge of Hypertension in the Period from 2004 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In Han; Kim, Sang-A; Park, Woong-Sub

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a hypertension management program provided by a primary health care post located in a distant rural area in South Korea on the level of knowledge of hypertension. The panel data consisted of a total of 319 people or the entire population aged above 40 years of five villages located in…

  18. A Plan for the Reorganization of the Family Practice Program at Irwin Army Community Hospital Using a Managed Care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-25

    35 Reliability and Validity .............................. 35 III . REULTS ................................................... 36...Fanily Practice iii I would like to express my appreciation to the many people who helped me during the Adinis•rative Fesidency and in omgpleting...beneficiary population, the program needs to be structured to meet the expanded role. This • • • •• • • I Family Practice 5 paper exanie *s the existing

  19. Disabling health care? Medicaid managed care and people with disabilities in America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid, America's largest government-funded health insurance program, plays a pivotal role in providing health services to eight million adults with disabilities. Since the mid-1990s, many Medicaid programs have aggressively introduced managed care, which reconfigures service delivery using...... business principles. Most states have insufficient experience in developing managed care plans for Medicaid beneficiaries with disabilities. Middle-aged adults with physical disabilities present their own constellation of health care issues that is not readily appreciated in health and social services....... The purpose of the study was to understand their experiences in accessing physical health care services and to ascertain the effects of managed care on their health and well-being. This study found beneficiaries encounter numerous barriers in accessing preventative, treatment, and acute care services. Overall...

  20. Shared Heritage: An Intergenerational Child Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkeye Area Community Action Program, Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This report describes ways in which older persons may become involved in the field of home child care. It is intended to provide (1) detailed information on an intergenerational child care (IGCC) program; (2) general information relating to intergenerational contacts and home child care; and (3) "how-to" information for agencies planning…

  1. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-01-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative.

  2. Spirulina in health care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management.

  3. Reservoir Engineering Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.H.; Schwarz, W.J.

    1977-12-14

    The Reservoir Engineering Management Program being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory includes two major tasks: 1) the continuation of support to geothermal reservoir engineering related work, started under the NSF-RANN program and transferred to ERDA at the time of its formation; 2) the development and subsequent implementation of a broad plan for support of research in topics related to the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs. This plan is now known as the GREMP plan. Both the NSF-RANN legacies and GREMP are in direct support of the DOE/DGE mission in general and the goals of the Resource and Technology/Resource Exploitation and Assessment Branch in particular. These goals are to determine the magnitude and distribution of geothermal resources and reduce risk in their exploitation through improved understanding of generically different reservoir types. These goals are to be accomplished by: 1) the creation of a large data base about geothermal reservoirs, 2) improved tools and methods for gathering data on geothermal reservoirs, and 3) modeling of reservoirs and utilization options. The NSF legacies are more research and training oriented, and the GREMP is geared primarily to the practical development of the geothermal reservoirs. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Blogging and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Alderman, Barbara; Todd, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    The use of blogs in the workplace has emerged as a communication tool that can rapidly and simultaneously connect managers with their employees, customers, their peers, and other key stakeholders. Nowhere is this connection more critical than in health care, especially because of the uncertainty surrounding health care reform and the need for managers to have access to timely and authentic information. However, most health care managers have been slow to join the blogging bandwagon. This article examines the phenomenon of blogging and offers a list of blogs that every health care manager should read and why. This article also presents a simplified step-by-step process to set up a blog.

  5. An innovative night service program in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, J; Narayan, M C

    1997-05-01

    Comprehensive night service by a home care agency has resulted in increased customer satisfaction and referrals to the agency. The description of this innovative night nurse program includes the job requirements and duties of a visiting night nurse and the tools the nurse uses to accomplish the task of nighttime care delivery. The use of self-directed work groups and mentorship to manage the demands of night service are discussed. Continuity of care, nurse safety, professional development, and program cost also are addressed.

  6. Glossary of Managed Care Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care provided to a patient by a health care provider. The medical record includes notes from physician visits, hospitalization records, test results, and consultations by specialists. Each health care provider who treats a patient usually creates and maintains ...

  7. Urban-Rural Differences in the Effect of a Medicare Health Promotion and Disease Self-Management Program on Physical Function and Health Care Expenditures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hongdao; Wamsley, Brenda; Liebel, Diane; Dixon, Denise; Eggert, Gerald; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent health promotion and disease self-management intervention on physical function and health care expenditures among Medicare beneficiaries. To determine if these outcomes vary by urban or rural residence. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from a 22-month randomized controlled trial of a health…

  8. Assessment of an enhanced program for depression management in primary care: a cluster randomized controlled trial. The INDI project (Interventions for Depression Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Josep M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most depressed patients are attended at primary care. However, there are significant shortcomings in the diagnosis, management and outcomes of these patients. The aim of this study is to determine whether the implementation of a structured programme for managing depression will provide better health outcomes than usual management. Methods/Design Design: A cluster-randomized controlled trial involving two groups, one of which is the control group consisting of patients who are treated for depression in the usual way and the other is the intervention group consisting of patients on a structured programme for treating depression. Setting: 20 primary care centres in the province of Tarragona (Spain Sample: 400 patients over 18 years of age who have experienced an episode of major depression (DSM-IV and who need to initiate antidepressant treatment Intervention: A multi-component programme with clinical, educational and organisational procedures that includes training for the health care provider and evidence-based clinical guidelines. It also includes primary care nurses working as care-managers who provide educational and emotional support for the patients and who are responsible for active and systematic clinical monitoring. The programme aims to improve the primary care/specialized level interface. Measurements: The patients will be monitored by telephone interviews. The interviewer will not know which group the patient belongs to (blind trial. These interviews will be given at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. Main variables: Severity of the depressive symptoms, response rate and remission rate. Analysis: Outcomes will be analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis and the unit of analysis will be the individual patient. This analysis will take into account the effect of study design on potential lack of independence between observations within the same cluster. Discussion The effectiveness of caring for depression in primary care can be

  9. TWRS Configuration management program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vann, J.M.

    1996-06-03

    The TWRS Configuration Management Program Plan (CMPP) integrates technical and administrative controls to establish and maintain consistency among requirements, product configuration, and product information for TWRS products during all life cycle phases. This CMPP will be used by TWRS management and configuration management personnel to establish and manage the technical and integrated baselines and controls and status changes to those baselines.

  10. DEFENSE PROGRAMS RISK MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin PREDA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past years defense programs have faced delays in delivering defense capabilities and budget overruns. Stakeholders are looking for ways to improve program management and the decision making process given the very fluid and uncertain economic and political environment. Consequently, they have increasingly resorted to risk management as the main management tool for achieving defense programs objectives and for delivering the defense capabilities strongly needed for the soldiers on the ground on time and within limited defense budgets. Following a risk management based decision-making approach the stakeholders are expected not only to protect program objectives against a wide range of risks but, at the same time, to take advantage of the opportunities to increase the likelihood of program success. The prerequisite for making risk management the main tool for achieving defense programs objectives is the design and implementation of a strong risk management framework as a foundation providing an efficient and effective application of the best risk management practices. The aim of this paper is to examine the risk management framework for defense programs based on the ISO 31000:2009 standard, best risk management practices and the defense programs’ needs and particularities. For the purposes of this article, the term of defense programs refers to joint defense programs.

  11. What Works In Chronic Care Management : The Case Of Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sochalski, Julie; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Laramee, Ann; McMurray, John J. V.; Naylor, Mary D.; Rich, Michael W.; Riegel, Barbara; Stewart, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The evidence base of what works in chronic care management programs is underdeveloped. To fill the gap, we pooled and reanalyzed data from ten randomized clinical trials of heart failure care management programs to discern how program delivery methods contribute to patient outcomes. We found that pa

  12. Future developments in health care performance management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crema M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. Keywords: health care, lean management, clinical risk management, quality, health care processes

  13. FLUOR HANFORD SAFETY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARVIN, L. J.; JENSEN, M. A.

    2004-04-13

    This document summarizes safety management programs used within the scope of the ''Project Hanford Management Contract''. The document has been developed to meet the format and content requirements of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses''. This document provides summary descriptions of Fluor Hanford safety management programs, which Fluor Hanford nuclear facilities may reference and incorporate into their safety basis when producing facility- or activity-specific documented safety analyses (DSA). Facility- or activity-specific DSAs will identify any variances to the safety management programs described in this document and any specific attributes of these safety management programs that are important for controlling potentially hazardous conditions. In addition, facility- or activity-specific DSAs may identify unique additions to the safety management programs that are needed to control potentially hazardous conditions.

  14. Economic value evaluation in disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Reicher, Sima; Shani, Mordechai

    2008-05-01

    Chronic disease management has been a rapidly growing entity in the 21st century as a strategy for managing chronic illnesses in large populations. However, experience has shown that disease management programs have not been able to demonstrate their financial value. The objectives of disease management programs are to create quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and to establish a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them. In order to illuminate the essence of disease management and its components, as well as the complexity and the problematic nature of performing economic calculations of their profitability and value, we collected data from several reports that dealt with the economic intervention of disease management programs. The disease management economic evaluation is composed of a series of steps, including the following major categories: data/information technology, information generation, assessment/recommendations, actionable customer plans, and program assessment/reassessment. We demonstrate the elements necessary for economic analysis. Disease management is one of the most innovative tools in the managed care environment and is still in the process of being defined. Therefore, objectives should include the creation of quality measures, such as principles and guidelines, and the establishment of a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them.

  15. The Nordic maintenance care program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Brandborg-Olsen, Dorthe; Albert, Hanne;

    2013-01-01

    To describe and interpret Danish Chiropractors' perspectives regarding the purpose and rationale for using MC (maintenance care), its content, course and patient characteristics.......To describe and interpret Danish Chiropractors' perspectives regarding the purpose and rationale for using MC (maintenance care), its content, course and patient characteristics....

  16. Primary care quality management in Uzbekistan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Baymirova, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Uzbek government has a central role in primary care quality management. On paper, many quality management structures and procedures exist. Now, primary care practice should follow, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – has shown. The results have bee

  17. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  18. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookbinder, Marilyn; McHugh, Marlene E

    2010-09-01

    There is a need for generalist- and specialist-level palliative care clinicians proficient in symptom management and care coordination. Major factors contributing to this need include changed disease processes and trajectories, improved medical techniques and diagnostic testing, successful screening for chronic conditions, and drugs that often prolong life. The rapid progressive illnesses and deaths that plagued the first half of the twentieth century have been replaced in the twenty-first century by increased survival rates. Conditions that require ongoing medical care beyond a year define the current chronic illness population. Long years of survival are often accompanied by a reduced quality of life that requires more medical and nursing care and longer home care. This article reviews the management of selected symptoms in palliative and end of life care.

  19. The role of managed care organizations in obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaecher, Kenneth L

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, obesity is characterized as this century's greatest healthcare threat. The American Medical Association and several other large organizations now classify obesity as a disease. Several federal initiatives are in the planning stages, have been approved, or are being implemented to address the disease. Obesity poses challenges for all healthcare stakeholders. Diet and exercise often are insufficient to create the magnitude of change patients and their attending healthcare providers need. Managed care organizations (MCOs) have 3 tools that can help their members: health and wellness programs focusing on lifestyle changes, prescription weight-loss drugs, and bariatric surgical interventions. MCOs are addressing changes with national requirements and are responding to the availability of new weight-loss drugs to help their members achieve better health. A number of factors either deter or stimulate the progress of weight loss therapy. Understanding how MCOs are key to managing obesity at the local level is important for healthcare providers. It can help MCOs and individual healthcare providers develop and coordinate strategies to educate stakeholders and better manage overall care.

  20. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  1. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Strategic Plan Federal Initiatives Career Opportunities Contact Us Administration on Aging (AoA) Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program ( ... Prevention HIV/AIDS Nutrition Services Oral Health Elder Justice & Adult Protective Services Elder Justice Coordinating Council Prevention ...

  2. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis: concept, content, and pilot results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, P.J.; Sinnige, L.G.; Geel, B.M. van; Verheul, F.; Verhagen, W.I.; Kruijk, R.A. van der; Haverkamp, R.; Schrijver, H.M.; Baart, J.C.; Visser, L.H.; Arnoldus, E.P.J.; Gilhuis, H.J.; Pop, P.; Booy, M.; Lemmens, W.; Donders, R.; Kool, A.; Noort, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009-2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-)monitoring, self-man

  3. The interactive web-based program MSmonitor for self-management and multidisciplinary care in multiple sclerosis : concept, content, and pilot results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; van Geel, Bjoern M.; Verheul, Freek; Verhagen, Wim I.; van der Kruijk, Ruud A.; Haverkamp, Reinoud; Schrijver, Hans M.; Baart, J. Coby; Visser, Leo H.; Arnoldus, Edo P.; Gilhuis, H. Jacobus; Pop, Paul; Booy, Monique; Lemmens, Wim; Donders, Rogier; Kool, Anton; van Noort, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a growing need to offer persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) possibilities for self-management and to integrate multidisciplinary health data. In 2009-2014 we developed a patient-reported outcome based, interactive, web-based program (MSmonitor) for (self-) monitoring, self-ma

  4. Communicating Risk to Program Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, C. Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Program Managers (PM) can protect program resources and improve chances of success by anticipating, understanding and managing risks. Understanding the range of potential risks helps one to avoid or manage the risks. A PM must choose which risks to accept to reduce fire fighting, must meet the expectations of stakeholders consistently, and avoid falling into costly "black holes" that may open. A good risk management process provides the PM more confidence to seize opportunities save money, meet schedule, even improve relationships with people important to the program. Evidence of managing risk and sound internal controls can mean better support from superiors for the program by building a trust and reputation from being on top of issues. Risk managers have an obligation to provide the PM with the best information possible to allow the benefits to be realized (Small Business Consortium, 2004). The Institute for Chartered Accountants in England and Wales sees very important benefits for companies in providing better information about what they do to assess and manage key business risks. Such information will: a) provide practical forward-looking information; b) reduce the cost of capital; c) encourage better risk management; and d) improve accountability for stewardship, investor protection and the usefulness of financial reporting. We are particularly convinced that enhanced risk reporting will help listed companies obtain capital at the lowest possible cost (The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England &Wales, June 2002). Risk managers can take a significant role in quantifying the success of their department and communicating those figures to executive (program) management levels while pushing for a broader risk management role. Overall, risk managers must show that risk management work matters in the most crucial place-the bottom line- as they prove risk management can be a profit center (Sullivan, 2004).

  5. No exodus: physicians and managed care networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Reschovsky, James D

    2006-05-01

    After remaining stable since 1996-97, the percentage of U.S. physicians who do not contract with managed care plans rose from 9.2 percent in 2000-01 to 11.5 percent in 2004-05, according to a national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). While physicians have not left managed care networks in large numbers, this small but statistically significant increase could signal a trend toward greater out-of-pocket costs for patients and a decline in patient access to physicians. The increase in physicians without managed care contracts was broad-based across specialties and other physician and practice characteristics. Compared with physicians who have one or more managed care contracts, physicians without managed care contracts are more likely to have practiced for more than 20 years, work part time, lack board certification, practice solo or in two-physician groups, and live in the western United States. The study also found substantial variation in the proportion of physicians without managed care contracts across communities, suggesting that local market conditions influence decisions to contract with managed care plans.

  6. The Marshall Islands Data Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, A.C.; Conrado, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report is a resource document of the methods and procedures used currently in the Data Management Program of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. Since 1973, over 60,000 environmental samples have been collected. Our program includes relational database design, programming and maintenance; sample and information management; sample tracking; quality control; and data entry, evaluation and reduction. The usefulness of scientific databases involves careful planning in order to fulfill the requirements of any large research program. Compilation of scientific results requires consolidation of information from several databases, and incorporation of new information as it is generated. The success in combining and organizing all radionuclide analysis, sample information and statistical results into a readily accessible form, is critical to our project.

  7. Future developments in health care performance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance.

  8. Breast Cancer Screening in a Low Income Managed Care Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer among the population of low income women who have incomes less than 200% of the national poverty level...34Journal for Health Care for the Poor and Underserved" (see appendix). Entitled "Difficulty in Reaching Low Income Women for Screening Mammography...useful insights for future program planning and research design. Keywords: screening mammography, low income , managed care and barriers Poverty is

  9. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-07-01

    This program summary book is a compendium of project summaries submitted by principal investigators in the Environmental Management Science Program and Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program). These summaries provide information about the most recent project activities and accomplishments. All projects will be represented at the workshop poster sessions, so you will have an opportunity to meet with the researchers. The projects will be presented in the same order at the poster session as they are presented in this summary book. Detailed questions about an individual project may be directed to the investigators involved.

  10. Management in oral health in the line of maternal child care: Analysis of Program ‘Sorria Bombeirinho’ Dental Polyclinic of the Fire Brigade of the Federal District, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Nascimento SILVA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral health can not be separated from general health and directly influences the quality of life and self-esteem of the individual. Preventive programs accompanying children from birth are fundamental to the development of a healthy dentition without caries or other sequelae due to para- functional habits. Moreover, it is very important that the manager understands the user’s view in relation to the health service, so that it feels safe and welcomed. This study aimed to examine the program of maternal and child dental care Dental Polyclinic line in the Fire Brigade of the Federal District (PODON - CBMDF. Thus, we evaluated the perception of those responsible for children 0-2 years attending the first phase of the program in the period 2011-2013 and oral health conditions thereof. This research was exploratory, using a quantitative approach, the applied nature, where there was a field study, occurring in 2 steps: a questionnaire to managers and analysis of medical records of patients. Microsoft Excel 2007 software was used for statistical analysis. After tabulation and interpretation thereof, a report was made, and the same was delivered to program management. The questionnaire to parents identified that they are very satisfied with the actions and services of the program and the institution. The analysis of the records showed that of the 75 children studied, 67 (89 % had oral disease during follow-up. Thus, the program appears to be effective in preventing early childhood caries in early childhood.

  11. What are purchasers looking for in managed care quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, E H

    1993-01-01

    Spurred by competition and the growth of managed care, providers are seeking new approaches for satisfying the needs of health care purchases. Increasingly, these purchasers are focusing on the value of managed care arrangements, especially the degree to which they manage quality. Underlying the emerging focus on quality are concerns about "undercare," potential legal liability, and the economics of quality. Purchasers are sensitive to the quality of service and the experience of their patients, as well as the clinical quality of the care they receive, and many employers are now engaged in a systematic effort to assess both of these dimensions of quality. The emergence of national data banks, practice standards, and accreditation programs offers additional tools for strengthening provider accountability for quality.

  12. Managed care and the infectious diseases specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, A D; Slama, T G; Berman, S; Braun, P; Burke, J P; Cherney, A; Gross, P A; Harris, P; Reid-Hatton, M; Hoffman, R; Joseph, P; Lawton, S; Massanari, R M; Miller, Z I; Osheroff, W J; Poretz, D; Shalowitz, M; Simmons, B; Turner, J P; Wade, B; Nolet, B R

    1996-08-01

    There is growing demand to contain health care costs and to reassess the value of medical services. The traditional hospital, academic, and research roles of the infectious disease (ID) specialist are threatened, yet there is an increasing need for expertise because of growing antimicrobial resistance and emerging pathogens. Opportunities exist to develop and expand services for the care of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and in infection control, epidemiology, outcomes research, outpatient intravenous therapy, and resource management. It is important for ID physicians to appreciate the principles involved in managed care and the areas in which ID services can be valuable. To be effective, physicians need to know about tools such as practice guidelines, physician profiling, outcomes monitoring, computerized information management, risk sharing, networking, and marketing, as well as related legal issues. With a positive attitude toward learning, application, and leadership, ID physicians can redefine their role and expand their services through managed care.

  13. Medicare Managed Care plan Performance, A Comparison...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The study evaluates the performance of Medicare managed care, Medicare Advantage, Plans in comparison to Medicare fee-for-service Plans in three states with...

  14. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Making it local: Beacon Communities use health information technology to optimize care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R; Lobach, David F; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C; Turske, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks--including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation--the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability.

  16. Using care plans to better manage multimorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Mark AJ Morgan; Coates, Michael J; Dunbar, James A

    2015-01-01

    Background The health care for patients having two or more long-term medical conditions is fragmented between specialists, allied health professionals, and general practitioners (GPs), each keeping separate medical records. There are separate guidelines for each disease, making it difficult for the GP to coordinate care. The TrueBlue model of collaborative care to address key problems in managing patients with multimorbidity in general practice previously reported outcomes on the managemen...

  17. Future developments in health care performance management

    OpenAIRE

    Crema M; Verbano C

    2013-01-01

    Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to...

  18. Developing a strategic marketing plan for physical and occupational therapy services: a collaborative project between a critical access hospital and a graduate program in health care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A; Deshmukh, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a marketing plan for the Physical and Occupational Therapy (PT/OT) department at a Critical Access Hospital (CAH). We took the approach of understanding and analyzing the rural community and health care environment, problems faced by the PT/OT department, and developing a strategic marketing plan to resolve those problems. We used hospital admissions data, public and physician surveys, a SWOT analysis, and tools to evaluate alternative strategies. Lack of awareness and negative perception were key issues. Recommended strategies included building relationships with physicians, partnering with the school district, and enhancing the wellness program.

  19. Primary care quality management in Slovenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Bulc, M.

    2008-01-01

    Of all GPs in Slovenia 86% are not interested in activities to systematically improve care. A clear national quality policy, further education for care managers and financial incentives for GPs could change the picture, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO

  20. Asset management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wison, P.; Newman, G. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    In order to understand our assets we have been assessing the condition of the units in our nuclear power plants developing asset life management options on a component by component basis. We have concluded that with the right work and planning we will be able to manage the units in a way that balances capacity requirements over the long term and at the same time manage the demand on critical resources. Major component replacement outages include Installing/removing bulkheads, pressure tube and calandria tube replacement, feeder replacement, steam generator replacement, supporting facilities and infrastructure, reactor inspections and maintenance including tooling enhancements, additional non reactor systems inspection & testing and continued research and analysis. These plans will have to take into account cost, resource and capacity requirements.

  1. Participative management in health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muller

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The need and demand for the highest-quality management of all health care delivery activities requires a participative management approach. The purpose with this article is to explore the process of participative management, to generate and describe a model for such management, focusing mainly on the process of participative management, and to formulate guidelines for operationalisation of the procedure. An exploratory, descriptive and theory-generating research design is pursued. After a brief literature review, inductive reasoning is mainly employed to identify and define central concepts, followed by the formulation of a few applicable statements and guidelines. Participative management is viewed as a process of that constitutes the elements of dynamic interactive decision-making and problem-solving, shared governance, empowerment, organisational transformation, and dynamic communication within the health care organisation. The scientific method of assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation is utilised throughout the process of participative management.

  2. Aircrew team management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerison, Charles; Mccann, Dick; Davies, Rod

    1987-01-01

    The key features of the Aircrew Team Management Workshop which was designed for and in consultation with Trans Australia Airlines are outlined. Five major sections are presented dealing with: (1) A profile of the airline and the designers; (2) Aircrew consultation and involvement; (3) Educational design and development; (4) Implementation and instruction; and (5) Evaluation and assessment. These areas are detailed.

  3. The renal palliative care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuso, Philip

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with a 25-year history of type 2 diabetes presents for long-term treatment options. His estimated glomerular filtration rate is 16 mL per minute per 1.73 m(2) of body-surface area. His history is remarkable for ischemic coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, peripheral artery disease, mild dementia, and colon cancer. He has been admitted to the hospital 4 times in the last 6 months. How should his case be managed?

  4. Natural Resources Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-24

    Program, activity, or opportunity dependent on the natural environment. Examples are hunting, fishing, trapping, picnick- ing, birdwatching , off-road...fair market value. d. Planned forest products sales shall continue on land reported as excess until actual disposal or transfer occurs. When forested

  5. Managing diversity in the health care workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Newman Giger, J

    1999-03-01

    Cultural diversity is increasing in the United States as increasing numbers of minorities enter the United States from abroad, and cultural diversity is especially prevalent in the health care workplace. In fact, the health care professions are particularly interested in the presence of minorities among caregivers because this often enhances the cultural competence of care delivery. Nevertheless, subtle discrimination can still be found, and managers must be alert that such behavior is not tolerated. Use of the Giger-Davidhizar Cultural Assessment Model can provide managers with information needed to respond to diversity among staff appropriately.

  6. Telemedicine and telepresence for trauma and emergency care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, R; Weinstein, R S; Porter, J M; Ziemba, M; Judkins, D; Ridings, D; Nassi, R; Valenzuela, T; Holcomb, M; Leyva, F

    2007-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is long-standing, but only in recent years has it been applied to the specialities of trauma, emergency care, and surgery. Despite being relatively new, the concept of teletrauma, telepresence, and telesurgery is evolving and is being integrated into modern care of trauma and surgical patients. This paper will address the current applications of telemedicine and telepresence to trauma and emergency care as the new frontiers of telemedicine application. The University Medical Center and the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) in Tucson, Arizona have two functional teletrauma and emergency telemedicine programs and one ad-hoc program, the mobile telemedicine program. The Southern Arizona Telemedicine and Telepresence (SATT) program is an inter-hospital telemedicine program, while the Tucson ER-link is a link between prehospital and emergency room system, and both are built upon a successful existing award winning ATP and the technical infrastructure of the city of Tucson. These two programs represent examples of integrated and collaborative community approaches to solving the lack of trauma and emergency care issue in the region. These networks will not only be used by trauma, but also by all other medical disciplines, and as such have become an example of innovation and dedication to trauma care. The first case of trauma managed over the telemedicine trauma program or "teletrauma" was that of an 18-month-old girl who was the only survival of a car crash with three fatalities. The success of this case and the pilot project of SATT that ensued led to the development of a regional teletrauma program serving close to 1.5 million people. The telepresence of the trauma surgeon, through teletrauma, has infused confidence among local doctors and communities and is being used to identify knowledge gaps of rural health care providers and the needs for instituting new outreach educational programs.

  7. Total quality management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, S C

    1994-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM), continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality control are terms that are becoming very familiar to workers in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to discuss these terms and the concepts they describe. The origins of TQM and the keen interest in its application to the health care environment today are addressed. In other environments, TQM has shown significant increases in productivity while increasing effectiveness. Its application to the health care environment is the provision of the best possible care through continuously improving service to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the customer. The customer in the health care environment could be the patient, staff, physician and community serviced by the hospital. Characteristics of the new organizational structure are reviewed. Established techniques and processes are commonly used to identify process-improvement opportunities to assist the manager in continuously evaluating quality trends.

  8. Short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery predict program sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-01-01

    Empirical evidence on sustainability of programs that improve the quality of care delivery over time is lacking. Therefore, this study aims to identify the predictive role of short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery on program sustainability. In this longitudinal study, professionals [2010 (T0): n=218, 55% response rate; 2011 (T1): n=300, 68% response rate; 2012 (T2): n=265, 63% response rate] from 22 Dutch disease-management programs completed surveys assessing quality of care and program sustainability. Our study findings indicated that quality of chronic care delivery improved significantly in the first 2 years after implementation of the disease-management programs. At T1, overall quality, self-management support, delivery system design, and integration of chronic care components, as well as health care delivery and clinical information systems and decision support, had improved. At T2, overall quality again improved significantly, as did community linkages, delivery system design, clinical information systems, decision support and integration of chronic care components, and self-management support. Multilevel regression analysis revealed that quality of chronic care delivery at T0 (pquality changes in the first (pmanagement programs based on the chronic care model improved the quality of chronic care delivery over time and that short and long term changes in the quality of chronic care delivery predicted the sustainability of the projects.

  9. Job redesign and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Elizabeth J

    2007-01-01

    Health care supervisors and managers are often asked to redesign jobs in their departments. Frequently, little information accompanies the directive. This article lists sources of change in work and defines key terms. Also reviewed are factors that supervisors and managers can weigh in their redesigns. The article suggests actions aligned to common problems in the work environment. Finally, guidelines for a practical, step-by-step approach are provided. For health care supervisors and managers, the key to a successful job redesign is to achieve the unique balance of factors that matches the situation.

  10. Improving managed care value through customer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Dennis J

    2002-06-01

    The ability of managed care providers to deliver high-quality customer service to managed care customers depends on their adoption of basic customer-service principles. To apply these principles effectively, providers need to understand and work to exceed the particular needs and expectations of these customers, which include boards of directors, senior executives, physicians, healthcare providers, clinical and patient financial services managers and staff, employers, brokers, and patients. Although these needs and expectations can be predicted to some extent, providers would be wise to implement regular surveys of customers and an open procedure for soliciting customer feedback about service issues. Better customer service for the broad range of managed care customers translates into higher levels of employer and patient satisfaction, which ultimately benefits providers.

  11. The Care management Information system for the home Care Network (SI GESCAD): support for care coordination and continuity of care in the Brazilian Unified health system (SUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Maria Raquel Gomes Maia; Gottems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Vasconcelos Filho, José Eurico; Silva, Kênia Lara; Gamarski, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The present article describes the development of the initial version of the Brazilian Care Management Information System for the Home Care Network (SI GESCAD). This system was created to enhance comprehensive care, care coordination and the continuity of care provided to the patients, family and caretakers of the Home Care (HC) program. We also present a reflection on the contributions, limitations and possibilities of the SI GESCAD within the scope of the Home Care Network of the Brazilian Unified Health System (RAS-AD). This was a study on technology production based on a multi-method protocol. It discussed software engineering and human-computer interaction (HCI) based on user-centered design, as well as evolutionary and interactive software process (prototyping and spiral). A functional prototype of the GESCAD was finalized, which allowed for the management of HC to take into consideration the patient's social context, family and caretakers. The system also proved to help in the management of activities of daily living (ADLs), clinical care and the monitoring of variables associated with type 2 HC. The SI GESCAD allowed for a more horizontal work process for HC teams at the RAS-AD/SUS level of care, with positive repercussions on care coordination and continuity of care.

  12. NASA's management concept for the Space Shuttle Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the Shuttle Program organization and management concepts suggests the necessity of careful measurements of contractor schedules, cost and technical performance, and program modification control to keep both the development and operating cost of the Program at the lowest possible level. Maximum use of the contractors' own management systems and the utilization of new technologies, procedures and materials during space operations are also envisaged as contributors to the reduction of costs per flight to acceptable limits.

  13. Multidisciplinary management of complex care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Deborah; Fuller, Jeffrey; Wagner, Scott; Friis, Leanne; Tyrell, Bill

    2009-02-01

    Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. Multidisciplinary teams are one way of making the most of the rural workforce. In this paper, the advantages of multidisciplinary care in terms of patient outcomes, clinician satisfaction and system efficiency are considered with reference to an innovative rural multidisciplinary model that highlights how these positive outcomes can be achieved. Ways of developing the capacity of the future workforce for work in multidisciplinary teams are discussed.

  14. Equipment Obsolescence Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, J.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Operators are challenged with securing reliable supply channels for safety related equipment due to equipment obsolescence. Many Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have terminated production of spare parts and product life-cycle support. The average component life cycles are much shorter than the NPP design life, which means that replacement components and parts for the original NPP systems are not available for the complete design life of the NPPs. The lack or scarcity of replacement parts adversely affects plant reliability and ultimately the profitability of the affected NPPs. This problem is further compounded when NPPs pursue license renewal and approval for plant-life extension. A reliable and predictable supply of replacement co components is necessary for NPPs to remain economically competitive and meet regulatory requirements and guidelines. Electrical and I and C components, in particular, have short product life cycles and obsolescence issues must be managed pro actively and not reactively in order to mitigate the risk to the NPP to ensure reliable and economic NPP operation. (Author)

  15. Dyspepsia management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, JC; Arents, NLA; van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2003-01-01

    Background: Dyspepsia is common in western society. Prompt endoscopy is imperative in all patients with sinister symptoms or if symptoms first appear after the age of 50-55 years, but the optimal management of younger patients with uncomplicated dyspepsia is still open to debate. Methods: The litera

  16. Quality of Care Provided by a Comprehensive Dementia Care Comanagement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lee A; Tan, Zaldy; Wenger, Neil S; Cook, Erin A; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather E; Serrano, Katherine S; Roth, Carol P; Reuben, David B

    2016-08-01

    Multiple studies have shown that quality of care for dementia in primary care is poor, with physician adherence to dementia quality indicators (QIs) ranging from 18% to 42%. In response, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Health System created the UCLA Alzheimer's and Dementia Care (ADC) Program, a quality improvement program that uses a comanagement model with nurse practitioner dementia care managers (DCM) working with primary care physicians and community-based organizations to provide comprehensive dementia care. The objective was to measure the quality of dementia care that nurse practitioner DCMs provide using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE-3) and Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement QIs. Participants included 797 community-dwelling adults with dementia referred to the UCLA ADC program over a 2-year period. UCLA is an urban academic medical center with primarily fee-for-service reimbursement. The percentage of recommended care received for 17 dementia QIs was measured. The primary outcome was aggregate quality of care for the UCLA ADC cohort, calculated as the total number of recommended care processes received divided by the total number of eligible quality indicators. Secondary outcomes included aggregate quality of care in three domains of dementia care: assessment and screening (7 QIs), treatment (6 QIs), and counseling (4 QIs). QIs were abstracted from DCM notes over a 3-month period from date of initial assessment. Individuals were eligible for 9,895 QIs, of which 92% were passed. Overall pass rates of DCMs were similar (90-96%). All counseling and assessment QIs had pass rates greater than 80%, with most exceeding 90%. Wider variation in adherence was found among QIs addressing treatments for dementia, which patient-specific criteria triggered, ranging from 27% for discontinuation of medications associated with mental status changes to 86% for discussion about acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Comprehensive

  17. Space program management methods and tools

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnulo, Marcello; Balduccini, Mauro; Nasini, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Beginning with the basic elements that differentiate space programs from other management challenges, Space Program Management explains through theory and example of real programs from around the world, the philosophical and technical tools needed to successfully manage large, technically complex space programs both in the government and commercial environment. Chapters address both systems and configuration management, the management of risk, estimation, measurement and control of both funding and the program schedule, and the structure of the aerospace industry worldwide.

  18. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  19. A Triage Approach to Managing a Two Year Wait-List in a Chronic Pain Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Clark

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Individuals with chronic pain referred to specialist chronic pain management programs frequently wait months to years for assessment and care. In the authors' pain management program, approximately 600 patients are on the waiting list. An innovative recommendation program to encourage and educate referring physicians to continue active care of pain during this waiting period was developed.

  20. The knowledge management on the elderly care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arve, Seija; Ovaskainen, Païvi; Randelin, I.; Alin, Jouni; Rautava, Païvi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The elderly care pathway from the public health emergency unit to the university hospital and back home needs rationalising. Another purpose is to utilise the information of the electronic patient record system in care coordination. Theory The processed knowledge from the electronic patient record system enables the geriatric professionals to deal with the information of the elderly care pathway effectively and to develop the care in a patient-centred way. Methods All the 75-year-old or older patients who had visited the emergency unit of Turku health care centre were analysed. The data were collected from the Pegasos® electronic patient record system. The method used was time-series analysis. Statistical analyses were run on SAS System for Windows, release 9.1. Results Twenty-three thousand-three hundred and seventy-two older patients visited the emergency unit and 25% of them were referred to hospital, less to the Turku city hospital, more to the university hospital. The information of transitions into the local organisations could be followed, but there were many information gaps in transitions to the university hospital. Conclusion Older people are cared for in the university hospital too often. The expensive care begins at the emergency unit and leads to the long-term institutional care. The care pathway of older patients has to be based on professional capability, co-operation and knowledge management.

  1. Establishing an education program for chronic wound care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Fu, Xiaobing

    2012-12-01

    Chronic wounds in China are an important issue. However, wound care knowledge and the skill of health care professionals varies among hospitals and cities. The Chinese Tissue Repair Society (CTRS) has developed a 3-year training program in wound care in China that is sponsored by the World Diabetes Foundation and the Coloplast Access to Healthcare foundation. The project focuses on training physicians and nurses in wound care for patients with diabetic mellitus and other chronic skin wounds. In the past 2 years, 1618 health care professionals, including 915 physicians and 703 nurses, have been trained. Participants are from more than 200 hospitals in 21 provinces. About 1200 patients per month, on average, have benefited from this project. In total, 13 hospitals have become training bases to continue the education program. The aim of the program is to help Chinese medical professionals efficiently manage chronic wounds, thereby shortening the wound healing time, reducing the amputation rate and treatment costs, and improving quality of life.

  2. Understanding performance management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Lisa; Boaden, Ruth

    2017-02-13

    Purpose Principal-agent theory (PAT) has been used to understand relationships among different professional groups and explain performance management between organisations, but is rarely used for research within primary care. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether PAT can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care. Design/methodology/approach Purposive sampling was used to identify a range of general practices in the North-west of England. Interviews were carried out with directors, managers and clinicians in commissioning and regional performance management organisations and within general practices, and the data analysed using matrix analysis techniques to produce a case study of performance management. Findings There are various elements of the principal-agent framework that can be applied in primary care. Goal alignment is relevant, but can only be achieved through clear, strategic direction and consistent interpretation of objectives at all levels. There is confusion between performance measurement and performance management and a tendency to focus on things that are easy to measure whilst omitting aspects of care that are more difficult to capture. Appropriate use of incentives, good communication, clinical engagement, ownership and trust affect the degree to which information asymmetry is overcome and goal alignment achieved. Achieving the right balance between accountability and clinical autonomy is important to ensure governance and financial balance without stifling innovation. Originality/value The principal-agent theoretical framework can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care; although it is likely that only partial goal alignment will be achieved, dependent on the extent and level of alignment of a range of factors.

  3. Managing the myths of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Myths impede the effective management of health care, for example that the system is failing (indeed, that is a system), and can be fixed by detached social engineering and heroic leadership, or treating it more like a business. This field needs to reframe its management, as distributed beyond the "top"; its strategy as venturing, not planning; its organizing as collaboration beyond control, and especially itself, as a system beyond its parts.

  4. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Sport Management Graduate Programs: Characteristics of Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the characteristics that enable graduate sport management programs to achieve their objectives. Surveys of sport management educators found they agreed on 11 characteristics that indicated a sport management program's effectiveness. Respondents believed an effective program should produce sport managers, not…

  6. Risk Management Programs for Defense Acquisition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The audit objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of risk management programs for Defense acquisition systems. Specifically, we determined whether DoD risk management policies and procedures for Defense acquisition systems were effectively implemented and what impact risk management programs bad on reducing program risks and costs. We also reviewed management controls as they applied to the audit objectives.

  7. Management of asthma in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honkoop, Pieter Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common non-communicable respiratory disease. In this thesis we analysed three different management strategies for adult patients with asthma in primary care. In the first, we targeted the currently recommended aim of ‘Controlled asthma’, which means patients experience hardly any symptom

  8. Knowledge management: organizing nursing care knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane A; Willson, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Almost everything we do in nursing is based on our knowledge. In 1984, Benner (From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley; 1984) described nursing knowledge as the culmination of practical experience and evidence from research, which over time becomes the "know-how" of clinical experience. This "know-how" knowledge asset is dynamic and initially develops in the novice critical care nurse, expands within competent and proficient nurses, and is actualized in the expert intensive care nurse. Collectively, practical "know-how" and investigational (evidence-based) knowledge culminate into the "knowledge of caring" that defines the profession of nursing. The purpose of this article is to examine the concept of knowledge management as a framework for identifying, organizing, analyzing, and translating nursing knowledge into daily practice. Knowledge management is described in a model case and implemented in a nursing research project.

  9. Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Child Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Kalmar, Evie; Leonard, Victoria; Flint, Mary Louise; Kuo, Devina; Davidson, Nita; Bradman, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Young children and early care and education (ECE) staff are exposed to pesticides used to manage pests in ECE facilities in the United States and elsewhere. The objective of this pilot study was to encourage child care programs to reduce pesticide use and child exposures by developing and evaluating an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Toolkit for…

  10. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Portfolio Management 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for program portfolio management, including the program portfolio management process, program analysis, performance assessment, stakeholder interactions, and cross-cutting issues.

  11. Home audit program: management manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    Many public power systems have initiated home energy audit programs in response to the requests of their consumers. The manual provides smaller public power systems with the information and specific skills needed to design and develop a program of residential energy audits. The program is based on the following precepts: locally owned public systems are the best, and in many cases the only agencies available to organize and coordinate energy conservation programs in many smaller communities; consumers' rights to energy conservation information and assistance should not hinge on the size of the utility that serves them; in the short run, public power systems of all sizes should offer residential energy conservation assistance to their consumers, because such assistance is desirable, necessary, and in the public interest; and in the long run, such programs will complement national energy goals and will produce economic benefits for both consumers and the public power system. A detailed description of home audit program planning, organization, and management are given. (MCW)

  12. Should health care managers adopt Theory Z?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranski, S R; Kwon, I W; Walker, W R; Unger, M

    1986-04-01

    Health care administrators should carefully consider the situations in which they apply management methods used in industry, since such methods may not be effective in motivating certain groups of hospital employees. Physicians, for example, may display little loyalty to the health care organization, even though as a group they exert significant influence on policies, standards, and administration. As a result, management styles such as Theory Z that focus on holistic concern, individual decision-making responsibility, and long-term employment guarantees may fail to interest them. Nurses also may be reluctant to commit themselves to an organization because of the high rate of turnover in their profession in recent years. Support staff, however, probably would be receptive to management techniques that offer security through long-term employment guarantees. Other factors necessary for the effective use of Theory Z industrial management techniques are a clear hierarchy with well-defined reporting relationships, moderately specialized career paths, and trust among employees that the organization's concern for their welfare is genuine. The key consideration, however, in applying any theory is that only those aspects which best serve the organization's needs should be adopted.

  13. Total quality in acute care hospitals: guidelines for hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthof, B

    1991-08-01

    Quality improvement can not focus exclusively on peer review and the scientific evaluation of medical care processes. These essential elements have to be complemented with a focus on individual patient needs and preferences. Only then will hospitals create the competitive advantage needed to survive in an increasingly market-driven hospital industry. Hospital managers can identify these patients' needs by 'living the patient experience' and should then set the hospital's quality objectives according to its target patients and their needs. Excellent quality program design, however, is not sufficient. Successful implementation of a quality improvement program further requires fundamental changes in pivotal jobholders' behavior and mindset and in the supporting organizational design elements.

  14. Advances in migraine management: implications for managed care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodick, David W; Lipsy, Robert J

    2004-05-01

    Migraine headache is a disabling disease that poses a significant societal burden. Stratified care and early intervention are current strategies for migraine management. It has been shown that early treatment with triptans in select patients can improve treatment outcomes. Triptans are selective 5-HT receptor agonists that are specific and effective treatments in the management of migraine, and they meet the acute treatment goal of rapid relief with minimal side effects. Triptans are associated with improved quality of life. Factors such as speed of onset, need for a second triptan dose, and patient satisfaction should be considered in the selection of a specific triptan treatment. Appropriate treatment can decrease costs. The patient's migraine history and response to prior therapy should be considered when selecting acute treatment. Cost-effectiveness models can be used to understand the effect of treatment choices on health care budgets. The direct cost per migraine episode, driven primarily by the need for rescue medications, is important to include in economic models. All aspects of effectiveness (efficacy, tolerability, and cost) should be considered to reduce overall managed care expenditures for migraine treatment. The improved clinical profiles of the triptans provide substantial value to managed care organizations.

  15. Alzheimer's disease care management plan: maximizing patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinkman, Anna

    2005-03-01

    Nurse practitioners have the potential to significantly impact the care of patients with dementia. Healthcare providers can now offer patients medications that will control symptoms and prolong functioning. As a result of ongoing contact with patients, NPs play an important role in assessing and screening patients for AD and educating the patients, families, and caregivers about the disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic, progressive illness that requires long-term management. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with available medications and appreciate the need to individualize therapy to maximize efficacy and minimize potential adverse drug reactions.

  16. 30 CFR 401.12 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 401.12 Section 401.12 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR STATE WATER RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM Application and Management Procedures § 401.12 Program management. (a) Upon approval of each fiscal...

  17. 20 CFR 638.800 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program management. 638.800 Section 638.800... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.800 Program management. (a) The Job Corps Director shall establish and use internal program management procedures...

  18. 10 CFR 800.002 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program management. 800.002 Section 800.002 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOANS FOR BID OR PROPOSAL PREPARATION BY MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISES SEEKING DOE CONTRACTS AND ASSISTANCE General § 800.002 Program management. Program management responsibility...

  19. 14 CFR 1214.1706 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program management. 1214.1706 Section 1214... Participants § 1214.1706 Program management. The Associate Administrator for Space Flight is responsible for program management under the direction of the Committee chairperson....

  20. 30 CFR 402.13 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 402.13 Section 402.13... WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Application, Evaluation, and Management Procedures § 402.13 Program management. (a) After the conclusion of negotiations, the USGS will transmit a grant...

  1. 78 FR 75581 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... MANAGEMENT Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the Affordable Insurance Exchanges; Announcement AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice of... Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the Affordable Insurance...

  2. Problems identified by dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care when using a self-management program : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve; Zuidema, Sytse; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Dees, Marianne; Hermsen, Pieter; Kempen, Gertrudis; Graff, Maud

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gain insights into the problems of dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care. Insights into these problems are essential for developing adequate policies which address the needs of the increasing population of dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care. METHODS: A

  3. The INTERACT Quality Improvement Program: An Overview for Medical Directors and Primary Care Clinicians in Long-Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouslander, Joseph G.; Bonner, Alice; Herndon, Laurie; Shutes, Jill

    2014-01-01

    INTERACT is a publicly available quality improvement program that focuses on improving the identification, evaluation, and management of acute changes in condition of nursing home residents. Effective implementation has been associated with substantial reductions in hospitalization of nursing home residents. Familiarity with and support of program implementation by medical directors and primary care clinicians in the nursing home setting are essential to effectiveness and sustainability of the program over time. In addition to helping nursing homes prevent unnecessary hospitalizations and their related complications and costs, and thereby continuing to be or becoming attractive partners for hospitals, health care systems, managed care plans, and ACOs, effective INTERACT implementation will assist nursing homes in meeting the new requirement for a robust QAPI program which is being rolled out by the federal government over the next year. PMID:24513226

  4. Medicaid and Managed Care: Key Data, Trends, and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are now in publicly traded plans (Figure 2). Distribution of Medicaid MCO Enrollment by Selected MCO Characteristics ... to managed care for this purpose. Managed care companies are also planning for 2014, positioning themselves to ...

  5. [Inefficient management of personal health in oral anticoagulation. Home nursing care in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Castañón, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes an 83 year-old immobilised patient with multiple diseases and on polypharmacy. Nursing care is developed at home. The patient is included in patient care programs for the anticoagulated and polymedicated patient. Nursing assessments were made using the Marjory Gordon functional health patterns, by which we identified, among others, problems related to non-compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Nurse's Diagnosis was: Ineffective Management of own health. With the support of NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy we determined the nursing objectives and interventions. The expected results of the Care Plan were achieved. Polypharmacy in the elderly can lead to treatment problems, increasing hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality and health expenditure Nursing care at home is a continuous development process and is increasing due to aging of the population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, as well as the increased life expectancy. It is estimated that in 2030, 24% of the Spanish population will be over 64 years. The physical, sensory, cognitive and chronic disabilities of aging make this type of care necessary. It is a major element in the comprehensive care of these patients, by checking the correct use of medication, symptom control, helping them to be autonomous in managing their disease and establishing a fluid relationship between the patients and their family.

  6. Better team management--better team care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, P; Powney, B

    1994-01-01

    Team building should not be a 'bolt-on' extra, it should be a well planned, integrated part of developing teams and assisting their leaders. When asked to facilitate team building by a group of NHS managers we developed a framework which enabled individual members of staff to become more effective in the way they communicated with each other, their teams and in turn within the organization. Facing the challenge posed by complex organizational changes, staff were able to use 3 training days to increase and develop their awareness of the principles of teamwork, better team management, and how a process of leadership and team building could help yield better patient care.

  7. Kulm WMD Management Actions 2004 Monitoring Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management actions for the monitoring program at Kulm Wetland Management District for 2004. Habitat management objectives for 2004 include rejuvenating plant growth,...

  8. 40 CFR 130.11 - Program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 130.11 Section 130... PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.11 Program management. (a) State agencies may apply for grants under sections 106, 205(j) and 205(g) to carry out water quality planning and management activities....

  9. Identifying wound prevalence using the Mobile Wound Care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Judi; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Mitchell, Eleanor; Steers, Nicole; Khalil, Hanan

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the prevalence of wounds within health care systems is a challenging and complex undertaking. This is often compounded by the clinicians' training, the availability of the required data to collect, incomplete documentation and lack of reporting of this type of data across the various health care settings. To date, there is little published data on wound prevalence across regions or states. This study aims to identify the number and types of wounds treated in the Gippsland area using the Mobile Wound Care (MWC™) program. The MWC program has enabled clinicians in Gippsland to collect data on wounds managed by district nurses from four health services. The main outcomes measured were patient characteristics, wound characteristics and treatment characteristics of wounds in Gippsland. These data create several clinical and research opportunities. The identification of predominant wound aetiologies in Gippsland provides a basis on which to determine a regional wound prospective and the impact of the regional epidemiology. Training that incorporates best practice guidelines can be tailored to the most prevalent wound types. Clinical pathways that encompass the Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers can be introduced and the clinical and economical outcomes can be quantitatively measured. The MWC allows healing times (days) to be benchmarked both regionally and against established literature, for example, venous leg ulcers.

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M.; Carol Yuan; John Oropello; Anthony Manasia; Roopa Kohli-Seth; Ernest Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Im...

  11. Better Kid Care Program Improves the Quality of Child Care: Results from an Interview Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergren, Carol S.; Riley, David A.; Wehmeier, Jenny M.

    2011-01-01

    More high quality child care is needed in the United States. This article evaluates the Better Kid Care (BKC) program produced by Pennsylvania State University Extension. Child care staff in Wisconsin were interviewed about changes they had made in their early childhood programs following participation in the BKC program. Findings show that 2…

  12. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  13. Social justice considerations in neonatal care for nurse managers and executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Linda; Walden, Marlene; Verklan, M Terese

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the struggle between social justice and market justice within the current health care system, specifically issues affecting neonatal care. Community benefit is described and discussed as an aspect of social justice demonstrated by hospitals. The federal and state Children's Health Insurance Program also is discussed in relation to social justice and health care costs. Implications for managers and executives overseeing neonatal care are presented in relation to the economic and social issues.

  14. Assessing the effect of increased managed care on hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowll, C A

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new relative risk methodology developed by the author to assess and compare certain performance indicators to determine a hospital's relative degree of financial vulnerability, based on its location, to the effects of increased managed care market penetration. The study also compares nine financial measures to determine whether hospital in states with a high degree of managed-care market penetration experience lower levels of profitability, liquidity, debt service, and overall viability than hospitals in low managed care states. A Managed Care Relative Financial Risk Assessment methodology composed of nine measures of hospital financial and utilization performance is used to develop a high managed care state Composite Index and to determine the Relative Financial Risk and the Overall Risk Ratio for hospitals in a particular state. Additionally, financial performance of hospitals in the five highest managed care states is compared to hospitals in the five lowest states. While data from Colorado and Massachusetts indicates that hospital profitability diminishes as the level of managed care market penetration increases, the overall study results indicate that hospitals in high managed care states demonstrate a better cash position and higher profitability than hospitals in low managed care states. Hospitals in high managed care states are, however, more heavily indebted in relation to equity and have a weaker debt service coverage capacity. Moreover, the overall financial health and viability of hospitals in high managed care states is superior to that of hospitals in low managed care states.

  15. Intervening at the Setting Level to Prevent Behavioral Incidents in Residential Child Care: Efficacy of the CARE Program Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Charles V; Smith, Elliott G; Holden, Martha J; Norton, Catherine I; Nunno, Michael A; Sellers, Deborah E

    2016-07-01

    The current study examined the impact of a setting-level intervention on the prevention of aggressive or dangerous behavioral incidents involving youth living in group care environments. Eleven group care agencies implemented Children and Residential Experiences (CARE), a principle-based program that helps agencies use a set of evidence-informed principles to guide programming and enrich the relational dynamics throughout the agency. All agencies served mostly youth referred from child welfare. The 3-year implementation of CARE involved intensive agency-wide training and on-site consultation to agency leaders and managers around supporting and facilitating day-to-day application of the principles in both childcare and staff management arenas. Agencies provided data over 48 months on the monthly frequency of behavioral incidents most related to program objectives. Using multiple baseline interrupted time series analysis to assess program effects, we tested whether trends during the program implementation period declined significantly compared to the 12 months before implementation. Results showed significant program effects on incidents involving youth aggression toward adult staff, property destruction, and running away. Effects on aggression toward peers and self-harm were also found but were less consistent. Staff ratings of positive organizational social context (OSC) predicted fewer incidents, but there was no clear relationship between OSC and observed program effects. Findings support the potential efficacy of the CARE model and illustrate that intervening "upstream" at the setting level may help to prevent coercive caregiving patterns and increase opportunities for healthy social interactions.

  16. Total quality management program planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, P.T.; Spence, K.

    1994-05-01

    As government funding grows scarce, competition between the national laboratories is increasing dramatically. In this era of tougher competition, there is no for resistance to change. There must instead be a uniform commitment to improving the overall quality of our products (research and technology) and an increased focus on our customers` needs. There has been an ongoing effort to bring the principles of total quality management (TQM) to all Energy Systems employees to help them better prepare for future changes while responding to the pressures on federal budgets. The need exists for instituting a vigorous program of education and training to an understanding of the techniques needed to improve and initiate a change in organizational culture. The TQM facilitator is responsible for educating the work force on the benefits of self-managed work teams, designing a program of instruction for implementation, and thus getting TQM off the ground at the worker and first-line supervisory levels so that the benefits can flow back up. This program plan presents a conceptual model for TQM in the form of a hot air balloon. In this model, there are numerous factors which can individually and collectively impede the progress of TQM within the division and the Laboratory. When these factors are addressed and corrected, the benefits of TQM become more visible. As this occurs, it is hoped that workers and management alike will grasp the ``total quality`` concept as an acceptable agent for change and continual improvement. TQM can then rise to the occasion and take its rightful place as an integral and valid step in the Laboratory`s formula for survival.

  17. University Program Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  18. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization.

  19. Identifying potentially cost effective chronic care programs for people with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L M G Steuten

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available L M G Steuten1, K M M Lemmens2, A P Nieboer2, H JM Vrijhoef31Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Health, Organisation, Policy and Economics, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 2Erasmus University Medical Centre, Institute of Health Policy and Management, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Care and Public Health Research, Department of Integrated Care, Maastricht, The NetherlandsObjective: To review published evidence regarding the cost effectiveness of multi-component COPD programs and to illustrate how potentially cost effective programs can be identified.Methods: Systematic search of Medline and Cochrane databases for evaluations of multi-component disease management or chronic care programs for adults with COPD, describing process, intermediate, and end results of care. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers and descriptively summarized.Results: Twenty articles describing 17 unique COPD programs were included. There is little evidence for significant improvements in process and intermediate outcomes, except for increased provision of patient self-management education and improved disease-specific knowledge. Overall, the COPD programs generate end results equivalent to usual care, but programs containing ≥3 components show lower relative risks for hospitalization. There is limited scope for programs to break-even or save money.Conclusion: Identifying cost effective multi-component COPD programs remains a challenge due to scarce methodologically sound studies that demonstrate significant improvements on process, intermediate and end results of care. Estimations of potential cost effectiveness of specific programs illustrated in this paper can, in the absence of ‘perfect data’, support timely decision-making regarding these programs. Nevertheless, well-designed health economic studies are needed to decrease the current decision

  20. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  1. Problems identified by dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care when using a self-management program: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, Sytse; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Dees, Marianne; Hermsen, Pieter; Kempen, Gertrudis; Graff, Maud

    2017-01-01

    Objective To gain insights into the problems of dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care. Insights into these problems are essential for developing adequate policies which address the needs of the increasing population of dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in parallel with a cluster randomized controlled trial. Dual sensory impaired older adults in the intervention group (n = 47, age range 82–98) were invited by a familiar nurse to identify the problems they wanted to address. Data were taken from the semi-structured intervention diaries in which nurses noted the older adults’ verbal responses during a five-month intervention period in 17 long-term care homes across the Netherlands. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis based on the Grounded Theory. Findings The 47 dual sensory impaired older adults identified a total of 122 problems. Qualitative content analysis showed that the older adults encountered participation problems and problems controlling what happens in their personal environment. Three categories of participation problems emerged: (1) existential concerns of not belonging or not being able to connect with other people, (2) lack of access to communication, information and mobility, and (3) the desire to be actively involved in care delivery. Two categories of control-in-personal-space problems emerged: (1) lack of control of their own physical belongings, and (2) lack of control regarding the behavior of nurses providing daily care in their personal environment. Conclusions The invasive problems identified indicate that dual sensory impaired older adults experience great existential pressures on their lives. Long-term care providers need to develop and implement policies that identify and address these problems, and be aware of adverse consequences of usual care, in order to improve dual sensory impaired residents’ autonomy and

  2. Environmental Restoration Information Resource Management Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Restoration Information Resources Management (ER IRM) Program Plan defines program requirements, organizational structures and responsibilities, and work breakdown structure and to establish an approved baseline against which overall progress of the program as well as the effectiveness of its management will be measured. This plan will guide ER IRM Program execution and define the program`s essential elements. This plan will be routinely updated to incorporate key decisions and programmatic changes and will serve as the project baseline document. Environmental Restoration Waste Management Program intersite procedures and work instructions will be developed to facilitate the implementation of this plan.

  3. A need for managed care in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufti, M H

    2000-04-01

    Is the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia getting value for money invested in health? Quality care is being provided throughout health facilities in the Kingdom, however there is minimal control of utilization in all health sectors, consequently leading to abuse and over utilization, particularly in the public sector. Managed care programs have proven effective in reducing unnecessary inpatient and ancillary service utilization by reducing use of expensive procedures and unnecessary, highly specialized services, and shifting to less expensive care options. Health maintenance organizations are the best example of a managed health care model; tracking good performance and cost savings averaging between 20-40% compared to more traditional health plans. Key features of health maintenance organizations include serving a defined population voluntarily enrolled in the health plan; assumption of contractual responsibility and financial risk by plan to provide a range of services, and payment of a fixed periodic payment by the enrollee, independent of the actual use of services. The key characteristic that distinguishes health maintenance organizations from other delivery systems is prepayment for the care that is provided. Preferred Provider Organizations offer discounts for services received from a selected set of physicians and hospitals. Services received by enrollees are not fully reimbursed from this selected list of providers. Preferred Provider Organizations use health maintenance organizations administrative processes for controlling costs but do not include some of the intrinsic cost and quality controls of health maintenance organizations. Review of several studies indicate that patients enrolled in prepaid group practices (managed care organizations) were hospitalized 15-40% less often than those enrolled in fee-for-service health plans.

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel M. Bassily-Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases.

  5. Crafting the group: Care in research management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah R; Horst, Maja

    2015-06-01

    This article reports findings from an interview study with group leaders and principal investigators in Denmark, the United Kingdom and the United States. Taking as our starting point current interest in the need to enhance 'responsible research and innovation', we suggest that these debates can be developed through attention to the talk and practices of scientists. Specifically, we chart the ways in which interview talk represented research management and leadership as processes of caring craftwork. Interviewees framed the group as the primary focus of their attention (and responsibilities), and as something to be tended and crafted; further, this process required a set of affective skills deployed flexibly in response to the needs of individuals. Through exploring the presence of notions of care in the talk of principal investigators and group leaders, we discuss the relation between care and craft, reflect on the potential implications of the promotion of a culture of care and suggest how mundane scientific understandings of responsibility might relate to a wider discussion of responsible research and innovation.

  6. Successful healthcare programs and projects: organization portfolio management essentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Scott; Solak, Jamie

    2005-01-01

    Many healthcare organization projects take more time and resources than planned and fail to deliver desired business outcomes. Healthcare IT is a major component of many projects and often undeservedly receives the blame for failure. Poor results are often not a result of faulty healthcare IT or poor project management or poor project execution alone. Many projects fail because of poor portfolio management--poor planning and management of the portfolio of initiatives designed to meet an organization's strategic goals. Because resources are limited, portfolio management enables organizations to more strategically allocate and manage their resources so care delivery, service delivery, and initiatives that advance organizations toward their strategic goals, including healthcare IT initiatives, can be accomplished at the levels of quality and service desired by an organization. Proper portfolio management is the essential foundation for program and project success and supports overall organization success. Without portfolio management, even programs and projects that execute flawlessly may not meet desired objectives. This article discusses the essential requirements for porfolio management. These include opportunity identification, return on investment (ROI) forecast, project prioritization, capacity planning (inclusive of human, financial, capital, and facilities resources), work scheduling, program and project management and execution, and project performance and value assessment. Portfolio management is essential to successful healthcare project execution. Theories are drawn from the Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3) work of the Project Management Institute and other leading strategy, planning, and organization change management research institutes.

  7. End-of-life care in the United States: policy issues and model programs of integrated care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Wiener

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: End-of-life care financing and delivery in the United States is fragmented and uncoordinated, with little integration of acute and long-term care services. Objective: To assess policy issues involving end-of-life care, especially involving the hospice benefit, and to analyse model programs of integrated care for people who are dying. Methods: The study conducted structured interviews with stakeholders and experts in end-of-life care and with administrators of model programs in the United States, which were nominated by the experts. Results: The two major public insurance programs—Medicare and Medicaid—finance the vast majority of end-of-life care. Both programs offer a hospice benefit, which has several shortcomings, including requiring physicians to make a prognosis of a six month life expectancy and insisting that patients give up curative treatment—two steps which are difficult for doctors and patients to make—and payment levels that may be too low. In addition, quality of care initiatives for nursing homes and hospice sometimes conflict. Four innovative health systems have overcome these barriers to provide palliative services to beneficiaries in their last year of life. Three of these health systems are managed care plans which receive capitated payments. These providers integrate health, long-term and palliative care using an interdisciplinary team approach to management of services. The fourth provider is a hospice that provides palliative services to beneficiaries of all ages, including those who have not elected hospice care. Conclusions: End-of-life care is deficient in the United States. Public payers could use their market power to improve care through a number of strategies.

  8. Repository-Based Software Engineering Program: Working Program Management Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Repository-Based Software Engineering Program (RBSE) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored program dedicated to introducing and supporting common, effective approaches to software engineering practices. The process of conceiving, designing, building, and maintaining software systems by using existing software assets that are stored in a specialized operational reuse library or repository, accessible to system designers, is the foundation of the program. In addition to operating a software repository, RBSE promotes (1) software engineering technology transfer, (2) academic and instructional support of reuse programs, (3) the use of common software engineering standards and practices, (4) software reuse technology research, and (5) interoperability between reuse libraries. This Program Management Plan (PMP) is intended to communicate program goals and objectives, describe major work areas, and define a management report and control process. This process will assist the Program Manager, University of Houston at Clear Lake (UHCL) in tracking work progress and describing major program activities to NASA management. The goal of this PMP is to make managing the RBSE program a relatively easy process that improves the work of all team members. The PMP describes work areas addressed and work efforts being accomplished by the program; however, it is not intended as a complete description of the program. Its focus is on providing management tools and management processes for monitoring, evaluating, and administering the program; and it includes schedules for charting milestones and deliveries of program products. The PMP was developed by soliciting and obtaining guidance from appropriate program participants, analyzing program management guidance, and reviewing related program management documents.

  9. Vouchers for Day Care of Children: Evaluating a Program Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Examined effects of a pilot voucher program on the price, supply, and quality of day care. Findings offered no conclusive evidence concerning expected benefits. Discusses vouchers' potential for easing the day care crisis. (RJC)

  10. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  11. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  12. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  13. Implementation of a Tailored Kiosk-Based Injury Prevention Program in Pediatric Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This study identified behavioral and organizational barriers and facilitators related to the implementation of a clinic-based pediatric injury prevention program. Safe N′ Sound (SNS), an evidence-based tailored injury prevention program designed for pediatric primary care, was implemented in five pediatric clinics in North Carolina. Office managers participated in structured interviews; health care providers participated in focus groups. Waiting room observations were conducted in participati...

  14. The management of lipohypertrophy in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambridge, Kevin

    Lipohypertrophy has been a recognized complication of insulin therapy for many years, yet research shows that its prevalence in insulin-injecting patients with diabetes remains high. The problem for the patient is that the injection of insulin into a site of lipohypertrophy, although painless, may lead to erratic absorption of the insulin, with the potential for poor glycaemic control and unpredictable hypoglycaemia. Despite the important implications of this for diabetes control in insulin-injecting patients, there is a dearth of information and completed research into the condition. This article raises awareness of lipohypertrophy by reviewing the available literature on the prevention, identification and management of the condition from a nursing perspective. Recommendations for medical and nursing practice in diabetes care to improve prevention and management of lipohypertrophy are made.

  15. Integrated obesity care management system -implementation and research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Cyr-Tribble Denise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly 50% of Canadians are overweight and their number is increasing rapidly. The majority of obese subjects are treated by primary care physicians (PCPs who often feel uncomfortable with the management of obesity. The current research proposal is aimed at the development and implementation of an innovative, integrated, interdisciplinary obesity care management system involving both primary and secondary care professionals. Methods We will use both action and evaluative research in order to achieve the following specific objectives. The first one is to develop and implement a preceptorship-based continuing medical education (CME program complemented by a web site for physicians and nurses working in Family Medicine Groups (FMGs. This CME will be based on needs assessment and will be validated by one FMG using questionnaires and semi structured interviews. Also, references and teaching tools will be available for participants on the web site. Our second objective is to establish a collaborative intra and inter-regional interdisciplinary network to enable on-going expertise update and networking for FMG teams. This tool consists of a discussion forum and monthly virtual meetings of all participants. Our third objective is to evaluate the implementation of our program for its ability to train 8 FMGs per year, the access and utilization of electronic tools and the participants' satisfaction. This will be measured with questionnaires, web logging tools and group interviews. Our fourth objective is to determine the impact for the participants regarding knowledge and expertise, attitudes and perceptions, self-efficacy for the management of obesity, and changes in FMG organization for obesity management. Questionnaires and interviews will be used for this purpose. Our fifth objective is to deliver transferable knowledge for health professionals and decision-makers. Strategies and pitfalls of setting up this program will also be

  16. Mingo NWR 1994 Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 1994 Mingo NWR Water Management Program documents 1993 use and proposes management for 1994 for three major impoundments, two green tree reservoirs, and 19 moist...

  17. Horse Training and Management: Program of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Marvin

    This report on Lamar Community College's Horse Training and Management (HTM) program assesses the quality of the educational experience provided by the program, the quality of the faculty and students, institutional financial commitment to the program, contribution of the HTM program to state and local economic development, and external funding…

  18. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians' 2016 Veterinary Medical Care Guidelines for Spay-Neuter Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brenda; Bushby, Philip A; McCobb, Emily; White, Sara C; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Appel, Leslie D; Makolinski, Kathleen V; Wilford, Christine L; Bohling, Mark W; Eddlestone, Susan M; Farrell, Kelly A; Ferguson, Nancy; Harrison, Kelly; Howe, Lisa M; Isaza, Natalie M; Levy, Julie K; Looney, Andrea; Moyer, Michael R; Robertson, Sheilah Ann; Tyson, Kathy

    2016-07-15

    As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs.

  19. Standardising the lay: Logics of change in programs of disease self-management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Annegrete; Grøn, Lone

    2012-01-01

    The health political discourse on self-care is dominated by the view that the selfmanaging patient represents a more democratic and patient-centric perspective, as he or she is believed to renegotiate the terms on which patient participation in health care has hitherto taken place. The self-manag...... questions these assumptions through an ethnographic exploration of a patient-led self-management program called the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program....

  20. Patient care management as a global nursing concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kathleen A

    2004-01-01

    Effective and efficient patient management is important in all health care environments because it influences clinical and financial outcomes as well as capacity. Design of care management processes is guided by specific principles. Roles (e.g., case management) and tools (e.g., clinical paths) provide essential foundations while attention to outcomes anchors the process.

  1. Survival strategies in the era of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudomin, M L; Spirakes, A S

    1996-02-01

    The era of managed care has forced an unprecedented restructuring of the health care environment. As hospitals downsize in response, materiel managers should consider adopting strategies that may help ensure their survival, including innovative approaches to supply management and the development of individual responses that will best position them to succeed in this new reality.

  2. Managed care contracting issues in integrated delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E E

    1996-01-01

    This article is a checklist for use by health care providers in reviewing proposed managed care contracting agreements. This checklist is not an exhaustive list, but is intended to be used as a framework for review.

  3. Retaining customers in a managed care market. Hospitals must understand the connection between patient satisfaction, loyalty, retention, and revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemme, E M

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, health care patients have been treated by health care professionals as people with needs rather than as customers with options. Although managed care has restricted patient choice, choice has not been eliminated. The premise of this article is that patients are primary health care consumers. Adopting such a premise and developing an active customer retention program can help health care organizations change their culture for the better, which may lead to higher customer retention levels and increased revenues. Customer retention programs based on service excellence that empower employees to provide excellent care can eventually lead to a larger market share for health care organizations trying to survive this era of intense competition.

  4. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety.

  5. Certificate Program in Self-Care for Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jerome W.; Popovich, Nicholas G.

    The Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences initiated a Certificate Program in Self-Care for Pharmacy Practice. The program aimed to enable pharmacists to develop their practice to better serve the self-care needs of customers. In a pilot group 26 participating pharmacists took a sequence of home study modules and workshops…

  6. Wellness Programs: Preventive Medicine to Reduce Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Gilbert R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A wellness program is a formalized approach to preventive health care that can positively affect employee lifestyle and reduce future health-care costs. Describes programs for health education, smoking cessation, early detection, employee assistance, and fitness, citing industry success figures. (eight references) (MLF)

  7. 78 FR 25591 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... MANAGEMENT 45 CFR Part 800 RIN 3206-AM47 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the Affordable Insurance Exchanges; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Office of... Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of the Multi-State Plan Program for the...

  8. Managing care in an integrated delivery system via an Intranet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamka, J D; Hughes, M; Mack, J; Hurwitz, M; Davis, F; Wood, D; Borten, K; Saal, A K

    1998-01-01

    The CareGroup Provider Service Network is a managed care contracting organization which provides central administrative services for over 1800 physicians and 200,000 managed care lives. Services include utilization management, disease management and credentialing for the entire network. The management model of the Provider Service Network empowers local physician groups with information and education. To meet the managed care information needs of the network, we implemented an intranet-based executive information system, PSNWeb, which retrieves data from a managed care data warehouse. The project required the integration of diverse technologies and development of a complex security/confidentiality infrastructure to deliver information to 8 major clinician groups, each with different information needs.

  9. Program Evaluation: Two Management-Oriented Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Kenneth Ray

    2010-01-01

    Two Management-Oriented Samples details two examples of the management-oriented approach to program evaluation. Kenneth Alford, a doctorate candidate at the University of the Cumberlands, details two separate program evaluations conducted in his school district and seeks to compare and contrast the two evaluations based upon the characteristics of…

  10. Program and Curriculum Trends in Sport Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Bob; And Others

    A study assessed the present status of professional preparation programs in sport management at 134 four-year colleges and universities throughout the United States. The study survey attempted to find answers to four questions: (1) Has the number of professional preparation programs in sport management increased during the past three years? (2) Is…

  11. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  12. How managed care growth affects where physicians locate their practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, D; Escarce, J J

    2000-11-01

    Managed care has had a profound effect on physician practice. It has altered patterns in the use of physician services, and consequently, the practice and employment options available to physicians. But managed care growth has not been uniform across the United States, and has spawned wide geographic disparities in earning opportunities for generalists and specialists. This Issue Brief summarizes new information on how managed care has affected physicians' labor market decisions and the impact of managed care on the number and distribution of physicians across the country.

  13. Palliative care case management in primary care settings: A nationwide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, A.G. van der; Deliens, L.; Watering, M. van de; Jansen, W.J.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In case management an individual or small team is responsible for navigating the patient through complex care. Characteristics of case management within and throughout different target groups and settings vary widely. Case management is relatively new in palliative care. Insight into the

  14. Comparing mandated health care reforms: the Affordable Care Act, accountable care organizations, and the Medicare ESRD program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watnick, Suzanne; Weiner, Daniel E; Shaffer, Rachel; Inrig, Jula; Moe, Sharon; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2012-09-01

    In addition to extending health insurance coverage, the Affordable Care Act of 2010 aims to improve quality of care and contain costs. To this end, the act allowed introduction of bundled payments for a range of services, proposed the creation of accountable care organizations (ACOs), and established the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to test new care delivery and payment models. The ACO program began April 1, 2012, along with demonstration projects for bundled payments for episodes of care in Medicaid. Yet even before many components of the Affordable Care Act are fully in place, the Medicare ESRD Program has instituted legislatively mandated changes for dialysis services that resemble many of these care delivery reform proposals. The ESRD program now operates under a fully bundled, case-mix adjusted prospective payment system and has implemented Medicare's first-ever mandatory pay-for-performance program: the ESRD Quality Incentive Program. As ACOs are developed, they may benefit from the nephrology community's experience with these relatively novel models of health care payment and delivery reform. Nephrologists are in a position to assure that the ACO development will benefit from the ESRD experience. This article reviews the new ESRD payment system and the Quality Incentive Program, comparing and contrasting them with ACOs. Better understanding of similarities and differences between the ESRD program and the ACO program will allow the nephrology community to have a more influential voice in shaping the future of health care delivery in the United States.

  15. Monitoring of health care personnel employee and occupational health immunization program practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Ruth M; Sorrells, Nikka; Westhusing, Kelly; Wiemken, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have identified concerns with various elements of health care personnel immunization programs, including the handling and management of the vaccine. The purpose of this study was to assess monitoring processes that support evaluation of the care of vaccines in health care settings. An 11-question survey instrument was developed for use in scripted telephone surveys. State health departments in all 50 states in the United States and the District of Columbia were the target audience for the surveys. Data from a total of 47 states were obtained and analyzed. No states reported an existing monitoring process for evaluation of health care personnel immunization programs in their states. Our assessment indicates that vaccine evaluation processes for health care facilities are rare to nonexistent in the United States. Identifying existing practice gaps and resultant opportunities for improvements may be an important safety initiative that protects patients and health care personnel.

  16. NETWORKS OF HEALTH CARE: A CHALLENGE TO SUS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dubow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a critical reflection, based on national law, scholarly, scientific, on the current development of Networks of Health Care, as a strategy for strengthening the Single Health System (SUS. Are weighted inefficiency of traditional ways of organizing care and management, the challenge of Network Health Care for comprehensive care and management mechanisms used in this process. The work provides subsidies for the care practices and health management are reflected, pointing strategies that result in disruptions of paradigms through a refocusing of attention in existing models. For networks of health care can be consolidated, is fundamental to political sensitivity of health managers with a commitment to build a new model of care, through the struggle to consolidate the SUS and the realization of the principles of universality, comprehensiveness and equity.

  17. Does managed care make a difference? Physicians' length of stay decisions under managed and non-managed care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we examined the influence of type of insurance and the influence of managed care in particular, on the length of stay decisions physicians make and on variation in medical practice. Methods We studied lengths of stay for comparable patients who are insured under managed or non-managed care plans. Seven Diagnosis Related Groups were chosen, two medical (COPD and CHF, one surgical (hip replacement and four obstetrical (hysterectomy with and without complications and Cesarean section with and without complications. The 1999, 2000 and 2001 – data from hospitals in New York State were used and analyzed with multilevel analysis. Results Average length of stay does not differ between managed and non-managed care patients. Less variation was found for managed care patients. In both groups, the variation was smaller for DRGs that are easy to standardize than for other DRGs. Conclusion Type of insurance does not affect length of stay. An explanation might be that hospitals have a general policy concerning length of stay, independent of the type of insurance of the patient.

  18. Care management actions in the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Costa Fernandes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify, from nurses’ speeches, the actions that enable care management in the Family Health Strategy.Methods: descriptive study with a qualitative approach conducted with 32 nurses of primary care. It was used a semistructuredinterview as the data collection technique. The methodological process of the collective subject discourse wasused to organize the data Results: from the nurses’ speeches one identified the categories: complementary relationshipbetween care and management; meeting with community health agents, a care management strategy in nurses’ work;health education activities such as a care management action and a health information system as an essential tool forcare Conclusion: it was possible to observe that nurses understood the importance of coordination and complementaritybetween the activities of the working process of care and management.

  19. Enhancing the primary care team to provide redesigned care: the roles of practice facilitators and care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin Fries; Machta, Rachel M; Meyers, David S; Genevro, Janice; Peikes, Deborah N

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care require multiple supports. Two potential members of the primary care team-practice facilitator and care manager-can play important but distinct roles in redesigning and improving care delivery. Facilitators, also known as quality improvement coaches, assist practices with coordinating their quality improvement activities and help build capacity for those activities-reflecting a systems-level approach to improving quality, safety, and implementation of evidence-based practices. Care managers provide direct patient care by coordinating care and helping patients navigate the system, improving access for patients, and communicating across the care team. These complementary roles aim to help primary care practices deliver coordinated, accessible, comprehensive, and patient-centered care.

  20. Federal Nursing Service Award. Impact of TriCare/managed care on total force readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, M A; Turkel, M C

    2001-04-01

    Mission readiness is dependent on a healthy total force and the response of military medical and nursing services. Managed care has become the norm in U.S. health care, including the Department of Defense Military Health System. Cost management, health maintenance organizations, and other health plans are defined as "managed care," an aggressive cost-control effort by health care purchasers and insurers to limit health care spending and services and advance a market-oriented, profit-driven system. The impact of managed care on mission readiness and retention of active and reserve personnel is and will continue to be profound. The purpose of this research was to conduct a qualitative, phenomenological study (life experiences) of TriCare/managed care to explore the impact and the meaning of the experience on total force mission readiness of the U.S. Air Force and how managed care has changed nursing practice. The results reveal the significance of the impact of TriCare/managed care on total force readiness by identifying, through themes, meta-themes, and a representative model, the negative effect that economics is having on active duty and reserve force health and well-being.

  1. Framework for energy management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomar, H.I. III; Hirsch, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    Energy cost-avoidance programs can involve the entire campus in a positively directed effort if organizing the program is looked upon as an opportunity and not just a continuing problem. An effective program will deal with the technical and nontechnical aspects of increasing energy efficiency, and will view the campus as a decentralized community. A comprehensive program will consider the three basic components (energy generation, distribution systems, and end use) of the total energy system and the various external and internal factors affecting the system. A comprehensive framework should include an information base, energy activity calendar, total utility system analysis and control program, building utility system analysis and control program, community awareness and communication program, and policy development and analysis program. The University of Pennsylvania provides a case study. 5 references.

  2. Nevada Experiments and Operations Program (N Program) Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nattrass, L.; Anastasio, M.R.

    2000-02-01

    This plan briefly describes the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) institutional structure and how Nevada Experiments and Operations Program (N Program's) organization fits within this structure, roles and responsibilities, and management processes that govern N Program activities. This plan also serves as the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Implementation Plan for N Program work. This plan applies to all work performed by and for LLNL that falls under the oversight of DOE/NV except LLNL activities in support of the Yucca Mountain Project Office (YMPO).

  3. Characteristics of patients with diabetes who accept referrals for care management services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bree Holtz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with chronic conditions can improve their health through participation in self-care programs. However, awareness of and enrollment in these programs are generally low. Objective: We sought to identify factors influencing patients’ receptiveness to a referral for programs and services supporting chronic disease management. Methods: We analyzed data from 541 high-risk diabetic patients who completed an assessment between 2010 and 2013 from a computer-based, nurse-led Navigator referral program within a large primary care clinic. We compared patients who accepted a referral to those who declined. Results: A total of 318 patients (75% accepted 583 referrals, of which 52% were for self-care programs. Patients who accepted a referral had more primary care visits in the previous year, were more likely to be enrolled in another program, expressed more interest in using the phone and family or friends for support, and were more likely to report recent pain than those who declined a referral. Discussion: Understanding what factors influence patients’ decisions to consider and participate in self-care programs has important implications for program design and development of strategies to connect patients to programs. This work informs outreach efforts to identify and engage patients who are likely to benefit from self-care activities.

  4. Understanding Panel Management: A Comparative Study of an Emerging Approach to Population Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Esther (Estee) B; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Tallman, Karen; Bellows, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Context: Panel management is an innovative approach for population care that is tightly linked with primary care. This approach, which is spreading rapidly across Kaiser Permanente, represents an important shift in population-care structure and emphasis, but its potential and implications have not been previously studied. Objective: To inform the ongoing spread of panel management by providing an early understanding of its impact on patients, physicians, and staff and to identify barriers and facilitators. Design: Qualitative studies at four sites, including patient focus groups, physician and staff interviews, and direct observation. Findings: Panel management allows primary care physicians to use dedicated time to direct proactive care for their patients, uses staff support to conduct outreach, and leverages new panel-based information technology tools. Patients reported appreciating the panel management outreach, although some also reported coordination issues. Two of four study sites seemed to provide a more coordinated patient experience of care; factors common to these sites included longer maturation of their panel management programs and a more circumscribed role for outreach staff. Some physicians reported tension in the approach's implementation: All believed that panel management improved care for their patients but many also expressed feeling that the approach added more tasks to their already busy days. Challenges yet to be fully addressed include providing program oversight to monitor for safe and reliable coordination of care and incorporation of self-management support. Conclusion: Subsequent spread of panel management should be informed by these lessons and findings from early adopters and should include continued monitoring of the impact of this rapidly developing approach on quality, patient satisfaction, primary care sustainability, and cost. PMID:21461107

  5. Measuring the savings from managed care: experience at Citibank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, M G; Sperling, K L

    1995-01-01

    In a leap of faith, Citibank in 1989 designed a point-of-service plan aimed at containing health care costs in the long term without sacrificing quality of care. In 1994 a study was undertaken to empirically evaluate whether these goals had been achieved. The study supported Citibank's overall managed care strategy, providing objective, quantifiable data that can lead to greater efficiencies.

  6. Ethical Issues in Managed Care: Perspectives in Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belar, Cynthia D.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a reaction to Cooper and Gottlieb's (this issue) article titled, "Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology." Challenges that many issues addressed by Cooper and Gottlieb have been longstanding in the profession. Argues against the belief that the managed care environment is fraught with more ethical…

  7. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Ad A; Fischer, Maarten J; Scharloo, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients' functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD.

  8. COPD self-management supportive care: chaos and complexity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornforth, Amber

    This paper uses the emergent theories of chaos and complexity to explore the self-management supportive care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients within the evolving primary care setting. It discusses the concept of self-management support, the complexity of the primary care context and consultations, smoking cessation, and the impact of acute exacerbations and action planning. The author hopes that this paper will enable the acquisition of new insight and better understanding in this clinical area, as well as support meaningful learning and facilitate more thoughtful, effective and high quality patient-centred care within the context of primary care.

  9. A multilingual population health management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Edison W; Wang, Grace; Zahler, Abbie; Simoyan, Olapeju M; White, Mark V; Mckee, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many small- and medium-sized physician practices have developed specific programs and models toward becoming a successful patient-centered medical home. This article reports on a case-control quality improvement study of a multilingual population health management program for chronic disease management at International Community Health Services. In its first 2.5 years of operation, the International Community Health Services Population Health Management program for patients with hypertension and diabetes is associated with significant improvements in key health outcome measures for blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c control. This has significant implications for similar practices.

  10. An evaluation of a computer based education program for the diagnosis and management of dementia in primary care. An international study of the transcultural adaptations necessary for European dissemination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, J.; Lepeleire, J. De; Southgate, L.; Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Gay, B.; Heyrman, J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to make an inventory of the changes that are needed to make an interactive computer based training program (ICBT) with a specific educational content, acceptable to professional communities with different linguistic,cultural and health care backgrounds in differe

  11. A Model for Community-Based Pediatric Oral Heath: Implementation of an Infant Oral Care Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Ramos-Gomez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act (ACA mandates risk assessments, preventive care, and evaluations based on outcomes. ACA compliance will require easily accessible, cost-effective care models that are flexible and simple to establish. UCLA has developed an Infant Oral Care Program (IOCP in partnership with community-based organizations that is an intervention model providing culturally competent perinatal and infant oral care for underserved, low-income, and/or minority children aged 0–5 and their caregivers. In collaboration with the Venice Family Clinic's Simms/Mann Health and Wellness Center, UCLA Pediatrics, Women, Infants, and Children (WIC, and Early Head Start and Head Start programs, the IOCP increases family-centered care access and promotes early utilization of dental services in nontraditional, primary care settings. Emphasizing disease prevention, management, and care that is sensitive to cultural, language, and oral health literacy challenges, IOCP patients achieve better oral health maintenance “in health” not in “disease modality”. IOCP uses interprofessional education to promote pediatric oral health across multiple disciplines and highlights the necessity for the “age-one visit”. This innovative clinical model facilitates early intervention and disease management. It sets a new standard of minimally invasive dental care that is widely available and prevention focused, with high retention rates due to strong collaborations with the community-based organizations serving these vulnerable, high-risk children.

  12. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campmans-Kuijpers MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjo JE Campmans-Kuijpers,1 Lidwien C Lemmens,2 Caroline A Baan,2 Guy EHM Rutten1 1Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, 2Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Utrecht, the Netherlands Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention.Methods: This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100% was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non parametric tests.Results: Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002, and on its subdomains “access to

  13. Managing conscientious objection in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicclair, Mark R

    2014-09-01

    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's/surrogate's timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's timely access to health care services offered within the institution. (3) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if the accommodation will not impose excessive burdens on colleagues, supervisors, department heads, other administrators, or the institution. (4) Whenever feasible, health professionals should provide advance notification to department heads or supervisors. Formal review may not be required in all cases, but when it is appropriate, several recommendations are offered about standards and the review process. A key recommendation is that when reviewing an objector's reasons, contrary to what some have proposed, it is not appropriate to adopt an adversarial approach modelled on military review boards' assessments of requests for conscientious objector status. According to the approach recommended, the primary function of reviews of objectors' reasons is to engage them in a process of reflecting on the nature and depth of their objections, with the objective of facilitating moral clarity on the part of objectors rather than enabling department heads, supervisors, or ethics committees to determine whether conscientious objections are sufficiently genuine.

  14. Pain management: lessons from palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, John P

    2013-01-01

    Reducing suffering and helping patients to control their symptoms are key components of palliative care. This commentary will offer a comprehensive definition of palliative care and will present a case history to illustrate how palliative care can benefit patients with chronic pain.

  15. The impact of a disease management program (COACH on the attainment of better cardiovascular risk control in dyslipidaemic patients at primary care centres (The DISSEMINATE Study: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Francis Jude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the efficacy of Counselling and Advisory Care for Health (COACH programme in managing dyslipidaemia among primary care practices in Malaysia. This open-label, parallel, randomised controlled trial compared the COACH programme delivered by primary care physicians alone (PCP arm and primary care physicians assisted by nurse educators (PCP-NE arm. Methods This was a multi-centre, open label, randomised trial of a disease management programme (COACH among dyslipidaemic patients in 21 Malaysia primary care practices. The participating centres enrolled 297 treatment naïve subjects who had the primary diagnosis of dyslipidaemia; 149 were randomised to the COACH programme delivered by primary care physicians assisted by nurse educators (PCP-NE and 148 to care provided by primary care physicians (PCP alone. The primary efficacy endpoint was the mean percentage change from baseline LDL-C at week 24 between the 2 study arms. Secondary endpoints included mean percentage change from baseline of lipid profile (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, TG, TC: HDL ratio, Framingham Cardiovascular Health Risk Score and absolute risk change from baseline in blood pressure parameters at week 24. The study also assessed the sustainability of programme efficacy at week 36. Results Both study arms demonstrated improvement in LDL-C from baseline. The least squares (LS mean change from baseline LDL-C were −30.09% and −27.54% for PCP-NE and PCP respectively. The difference in mean change between groups was 2.55% (p=0.288, with a greater change seen in the PCP-NE arm. Similar observations were made between the study groups in relation to total cholesterol change at week 24. Significant difference in percentage change from baseline of HDL-C were observed between the PCP-NE and PCP groups, 3.01%, 95% CI 0.12-5.90, p=0.041, at week 24. There was no significant difference in lipid outcomes between 2 study groups at week 36 (12 weeks after the programme had

  16. Managed care and its impact on American urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1998-05-01

    America's health care is undergoing a revolution. A previous private, fee-for-service, delivery system chiefly centered around hospital specialty care is rapidly being replaced by a commercialized system of managed care, controlled by businessmen whose prime motive is profit. Increasing emphasis of these managed care organizations is upon primary physicians who function as gatekeepers. While this new commercialized method of health care has been attended with reductions in the previous omnipresent health care inflation our country has experienced for the past several decades, its impact on quality of care and patient choice of physician remain a great concern. Especially vulnerable in this new system are our nation's academic centers, which, burdened with responsibility for education and research, are at a disadvantage in the competitive cost-based bidding for managed care contracts. Urology work force issues and the number of urologists in our nation remain another concern for urologists as they compete for access to patients in this new highly competitive environment. In a 1995 survey of a cohort of urologists in seven states, the respondents reported 35.8% of gross income came from managed care contracts, 86% reported the need for preservice approval for many diagnostic and therapeutic undertakings, 87% reported an inability to refer complex cases outside the Managed Care Organization (MCO) network, and 23% reported they were required to retain patients for treatment who they would have otherwise referred to a more qualified urologist. The majority of American urologists are reporting dropping gross revenues and increasing overhead in their dealings with managed care contracts. The advent of managed care is being attended with dropping gross revenues, increasing overhead costs and interference with the practice patterns of American urologists.

  17. Is managed care restraining the adoption of technology by hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Núria; Seinfeld, Janice

    2008-07-01

    As health care costs increase, cost-control mechanisms become more widespread and it is crucial to understand their implications for the health care market. This paper examines the effect that managed care activity (based on the aim to control health care expenditure) has on the adoption of technologies by hospitals. We use a hazard rate model to investigate whether higher levels of managed care market share are associated with a decrease on medical technology adoption during the period 1982-1995. We analyze annual data on 5390 US hospitals regarding the adoption of 13 different technologies. Our results are threefold: first, we find that managed care has a negative effect on hospitals' technology acquisition for each of the 13 medical technologies in our study, and its effect is stronger for those technologies diffusing in the 1990s, when the managed care sector is at its largest. If managed care enrollment had remained at its 1984 level, there would be 5.3%, 7.3% and 4.1% more hospitals with diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy and cardiac technologies, respectively. Second, we find that the rise in managed care leads to long-term reductions in medical cost growth. Finally, we take into account that profitability analysis is one of the main dimensions considered by hospitals when deciding about the adoption of new technologies. In order to determine whether managed care affects technologies differently if they have a different cost-reimbursement ratio (CRR), we have created a unique data set with information on the cost-reimbursement for each of the 13 technologies and we find that managed care enrollment has a considerably larger negative effect on the adoption of less profitable technologies.

  18. Enhancing knowledge and attitudes in pain management: a pain management education program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Ho, Suki S K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of a pain management program (PMP) in enhancing the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers in pain management. Many nursing home residents suffer from pain, and treatment of pain is often inadequate. Failure of health care workers to assess pain and their insufficient knowledge of pain management are barriers to adequate treatment. It was a quasiexperimental pretest and posttest study. Four nursing homes were approached, and 88 staff joined the 8-week PMP. Demographics and the knowledge and attitudes regarding pain were collected with the use of the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Chinese version (NKASRP-C) before and after the PMP. A deficit in knowledge and attitudes related to pain management was prominent before the PMP, and there was a significant increase in pain knowledge and attitudes from 7.9 ± SD 3.52 to 19.2 ± SD4.4 (p knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff and enable them to provide adequate and appropriate care to older persons in pain. PMPs for nurses and all health care professionals are important in enhancing care for older adults and to inform policy on the provision of pain management.

  19. One System for Blood Program Information Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gero, Michael G.; Klickstein, Judith S.; Hurst, Timm M.

    1980-01-01

    A system which integrates the diverse functions of a Blood Program within one structure is being assembled at the American National Red Cross Blood Services, Northeast Region. When finished, it will provide technical support for collection scheduling, donor recruitment, recordkeeping, laboratory processing, inventory management, HLA typing and matching, distribution, and administration within the Program. By linking these applications, a reporting structure useful to top management will be pr...

  20. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. The proposed amendments to title... counseling. (2) Professional counseling, including counseling on self care skills, adaptive coping skills and, as appropriate, vocational rehabilitation counseling, in collaboration with VA programs and...

  1. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-07-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), in partnership with the Office of Energy Research (ER), designed, developed, and implemented the Environmental Management Science Program as a basic research effort to fund the scientific and engineering understanding required to solve the most challenging technical problems facing the government's largest, most complex environmental cleanup program. The intent of the Environmental Management Science Program is to: (1) Provide scientific knowledge that will revolutionize technologies and cleanup approaches to significantly reduce future costs, schedules, and risks. (2) Bridge the gap between broad fundamental research that has wide-ranging applications such as that performed in the Department's Office of Energy Research and needs-driven applied technology development that is conducted in Environmental Management's Office of Science and Technology. (3) Focus the nation's science infrastructure on critical Department of Energy environmental problems. In an effort to share information regarding basic research efforts being funded by the Environmental Management Science Program and the Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program), this CD includes summaries for each project. These project summaries, available in portable document format (PDF), were prepared in the spring of 1998 by the principal investigators and provide information about their most recent project activities and accomplishments.

  2. 45 CFR 1306.35 - Family child care program option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... condition that poses a threat to children's health. Family child care providers must ensure that pets are... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Family child care program option. 1306.35 Section... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES,...

  3. Collaboration and Subsidized Early Care and Education Programs in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Julie; Zanoni, Wladimir; Barisik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As a result of policy changes following welfare reform in 1996 and the costs associated with providing high-quality early care and education for children of low-income working families, agency collaboration in the state of Illinois has become an increasingly salient feature of subsidized early care and education programs (SECE). The authors…

  4. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective.......77) and general health scores (EQ-5D +0.03, CI 0.00 to 0.05) improved significantly at 24 months of intervention. Intervention costs summed up to 10 United States dollars per patient per month. Limitations: Limitations included a small number of primary care practices and a low intensity of intervention......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2...

  5. Fashion Production and Management Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide presents the standard fashion production and management curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. It is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed to become a qualified alterationist, clothing design assistant, home textiles assistant, fashion management assistant, or tailoring assistant. A…

  6. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  7. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  8. Final program evaluation methods and results of a National Lymphedema Management Program in Togo, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziperstein, Josh; Dorkenoo, Monique; Datagni, Michel; Drexler, Naomi; Murphy, Monica; Sodahlon, Yao; Mathieu, Els

    2014-06-01

    In order to eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) as a public health problem, the World Health Assembly recommends an approach which includes interruption of transmission of infection and the alleviation of morbidity. In 2000, the Togolese National Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (PNELF) started the annual mass drug administrations and in 2007, the program added a morbidity component for the management of lymphedema. This manuscript describes the methods of an evaluation aimed at assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the Togolese National Lymphedema Morbidity Program. The evaluation was conducted through in-depth interviews with stakeholders at each programmatic level. Interviews focused on message dissemination, health provider training, patient self-care practices, social dynamics, and program impact. The evaluation demonstrated that the program strengths include the standardization and in-depth training of health staff, dissemination of the program's treatment message, a positive change in the community's perception of lymphedema, and successful patient recruitment and training in care techniques. The lessons learned from this evaluation helped to improve Togo's program, but may also provide guidance and strategies for other countries desiring to develop a morbidity program. The methods of program evaluation described in this paper can serve as a model for monitoring components of other decentralized national health programs in low resource settings.

  9. Act In case of Depression: the evaluation of a care program to improve the detection and treatment of depression in nursing homes. Study Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.L.; Smalbrugge, M.; Teerenstra, S.; Leontjevas, R.; Adang, E.M.M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Derksen, E.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is evaluating the (cost-) effectiveness of a multidisciplinary, evidence based care program to improve the management of depression in nursing home residents of somatic and dementia special care units. The care program is an evidence based standardization of the man

  10. Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management at John F. Kennedy Space Center. The contents include: 1) Corrosion at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC); 2) Requirements and Objectives; 3) Program Description, Background and History; 4) Approach and Implementation; 5) Challenges; 6) Lessons Learned; 7) Successes and Benefits; and 8) Summary and Conclusions.

  11. The "Battle" of Managing Language Barriers in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Emma M; Valenzuela-Araujo, Doris; Zickafoose, Joseph S; Kieffer, Edith; DeCamp, Lisa Ross

    2016-02-18

    Providing safe and high-quality health care for children whose parents have limited English proficiency (LEP) remains challenging. Reports of parent perspectives on navigating language discordance in health care are limited. We analyzed portions of 48 interviews focused on language barriers from 2 qualitative interview studies of the pediatric health care experiences of LEP Latina mothers in 2 urban US cities. We found mothers experienced frustration with health care and reported suboptimal accommodation for language barriers. Six themes emerged relevant to health care across settings: the "battle" of managing language barriers, preference for bilingual providers, negative bias toward interpreted encounters, "getting by" with limited language skills, fear of being a burden, and stigma and discrimination experienced by LEP families. Parents' insights highlight reasons why effective language accommodation in health care remains challenging. Partnering with families to address the management of language barriers is needed to improve health care quality and safety for LEP patients and families.

  12. Exploring valid and reliable assessment methods for care management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennissen, Lokke; Stammen, Lorette; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Jolien; Wieringa, Sietse; Busari, Jamiu

    2016-07-04

    Purpose It is assumed that the use of valid and reliable assessment methods can facilitate the development of medical residents' management and leadership competencies. To justify this assertion, the perceptions of an expert panel of health care leaders were explored on assessment methods used for evaluating care management (CM) development in Dutch residency programs. This paper aims to investigate how assessors and trainees value these methods and examine for any inherent benefits or shortcomings when they are applied in practice. Design/methodology/approach A Delphi survey was conducted among members of the platform for medical leadership in The Netherlands. This panel of experts was made up of clinical educators, practitioners and residents interested in CM education. Findings Of the respondents, 40 (55.6 per cent) and 31 (43 per cent) participated in the first and second rounds of the Delphi survey, respectively. The respondents agreed that assessment methods currently being used to measure residents' CM competencies were weak, though feasible for use in many residency programs. Multi-source feedback (MSF, 92.1 per cent), portfolio/e-portfolio (86.8 per cent) and knowledge testing (76.3 per cent) were identified as the most commonly known assessment methods with familiarity rates exceeding 75 per cent. Practical implications The findings suggested that an "assessment framework" comprising MSF, portfolios, individual process improvement projects or self-reflections and observations in clinical practice should be used to measure CM competencies in residents. Originality/value This study reaffirms the need for objective methods to assess CM skills in post-graduate medical education, as there was not a single assessment method that stood out as the best instrument.

  13. Monitoring managers through corporate compliance programs

    OpenAIRE

    Angelucci, C.; Han, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Compliance programs entail monitoring of employees' behavior with the claimed objective of fighting corporate crime. (Competition) Authorities promote such intra-firm monitoring. In a three-tier hierarchy model, authority-shareholder-manager, we study the impact of monitoring through a compliance program on contracting within the firm and the authority's optimal sanctions and leniency policy. We find that compliance programs are beneficial in the fight against corporate crime if and only if t...

  14. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with bette

  15. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior.

  16. Fetal programming of adult disease: implications for prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christopher; Rogers, John M; Desai, Mina; Ross, Michael G

    2011-04-01

    The obesity epidemic, including a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity among pregnant women, represents a critical public health problem in the United States and throughout the world. Over the past two decades, it has been increasingly recognized that the risk of adult health disorders, particularly metabolic syndrome, can be markedly influenced by prenatal and infant environmental exposures (ie, developmental programming). Low birth weight, together with infant catch-up growth, is associated with a significant risk of adult obesity and cardiovascular disease, as well as adverse effects on pulmonary, renal, and cerebral function. Conversely, exposure to maternal obesity or high birth weight also represents an increased risk for childhood and adult obesity. In addition, fetal exposure to select chemicals (eg, phytoestrogens) or environmental pollutants (eg, tobacco smoke) may affect the predisposition to adult disease. Animal models have confirmed human epidemiologic findings and provided insight into putative programming mechanisms, including altered organ development, cellular signaling responses, and epigenetic modifications (ie, control of gene expression without modification of DNA sequence). Prenatal care is transitioning to incorporate goals of optimizing maternal, fetal, and neonatal health to prevent or reduce adult-onset diseases. Guidelines regarding optimal pregnancy nutrition and weight gain, management of low- and high-fetal-weight pregnancies, use of maternal glucocorticoids, and newborn feeding strategies, among others, have yet to fully integrate long-term consequences on adult health.

  17. Managed care, consumerism, preventive medicine: does a causal connection exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Xie, Yang

    2006-07-01

    Managed care plans, and HMOs in particular, have long touted that their emphasis is on preventive care, to avoid expensive illness later in life. However, few articles in the contemporary literature adequately address this claim. The available evidence seems to support that HMOs do, in fact, provide greater access to preventive services, but the limitations of this research are substantial. This article discusses the scientific evidence on the relationships between managed care arrangements and the implications for preventive care in the current era, emphasizing consumer choices and less-restrictive plan structures.

  18. Development of an interprofessional program for cardiovascular prevention in primary care: A participatory research approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyne Lalonde

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The chronic care model provides a framework for improving the management of chronic diseases. Participatory research could be useful in developing a chronic care model–based program of interventions, but no one has as yet offered a description of precisely how to apply the approach. Objectives: An innovative, structured, multi-step participatory process was applied to select and develop (1 chronic care model–based interventions program to improve cardiovascular disease prevention that can be adapted to a particular regional context and (2 a set of indicators to monitor its implementation. Methods: Primary care clinicians (n = 16, administrative staff (n = 2, patients and family members (n = 4, decision makers (n = 5, researchers, and a research coordinator (n = 7 took part in the process. Additional primary care actors (n = 26 validated the program. Results: The program targets multimorbid patients at high or moderate risk of cardiovascular disease with uncontrolled hypertension, dyslipidemia or diabetes. It comprises interprofessional follow-up coordinated by case-management nurses, in which motivated patients are referred in a timely fashion to appropriate clinical and community resources. The program is supported by clinical tools and includes training in motivational interviewing. A set of 89 process and clinical indicators were defined. Conclusion: Through a participatory process, a contextualized interventions program to optimize cardiovascular disease prevention and a set of quality indicators to monitor its implementation were developed. Similar approach might be used to develop other health programs in primary care if program developers are open to building on community strengths and priorities.

  19. NASA management of the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, F.

    1975-01-01

    The management system and management technology described have been developed to meet stringent cost and schedule constraints of the Space Shuttle Program. Management of resources available to this program requires control and motivation of a large number of efficient creative personnel trained in various technical specialties. This must be done while keeping track of numerous parallel, yet interdependent activities involving different functions, organizations, and products all moving together in accordance with intricate plans for budgets, schedules, performance, and interaction. Some techniques developed to identify problems at an early stage and seek immediate solutions are examined.

  20. Environmental Restoration Program Control Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, R.T.

    1992-08-13

    Environmental Restoration managers need to demonstrate that their programs are under control. Unlike most industrial programs, the public is heavily involved in Environmental Restoration activities. The public is demanding that the country prove that real progress is being made towards cleaning up the environment. A Program Control Management System can fill this need. It provides a structure for planning, work authorization, data accumulation, data analysis and change control. But it takes time to implement a control system and the public is losing its patience. This paper describes critical items essential to the quick development and implementation of a successful control system.

  1. Identifying management competencies for health care executives: review of a series of Delphi studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, R P; Brooke, P P; Finstuen, K

    2000-01-01

    This analysis reviews a selected body of research that identifies the essential areas of management expertise required of future health care executives. To ensure consistency, six studies are analyzed, utilizing the Delphi technique, to query a broad spectrum of experts in different fields and sites of health care management. The analysis identifies a number of management competencies, i.e., managerial capabilities, which current and aspiring health care executives, in various settings and with differing educational backgrounds, should possess to enhance the probability of their success in current and future positions of responsibility. In addition, this review identifies the skills (technical expertise), knowledge (facts and principles) and abilities (physical, mental or legal power) required to support achievement of these competencies. Leadership and resource management, including cost and finance dimensions, are the highest-rated requisite management competencies. The dominant skills, knowledge and abilities (SKAs) are related to interpersonal skills. The lowest-rated SKAs are related to job-specific, technical skills. Recommendations include the review of this research by formal and continuing education programs to determine the content of their courses and areas for future research. Similarly, current health care executives should assess this research to assist in identifying competency gaps. Lastly, this analysis recommends that the Delphi technique, as a valid and replicable methodology, be applied toward the study of non-executive health care managers, e.g., students, clinicians, mid-level managers and integrated systems administrators, to determine their requisite management competencies and SKAs.

  2. Health promotion and disease prevention: a look at demand management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, P

    1996-09-01

    This Issue Brief describes employers' efforts to contain health expenditures through demand management programs. These programs are designed to reduce utilization by focusing on disease prevention and health promotion. Demand management includes work site health promotion, wellness programs, and access management. Work site health promotion is a comprehensive approach to improving health and includes awareness, health education, behavioral change, and organizational health initiatives. Wellness programs usually include stress management, smoking cessation, weight management, back care, health screenings, nutrition education, work place safety, prenatal and well baby care, CPR and first aid classes, and employee assistance programs (EAPs). These programs are often viewed positively by workers and can have long-term benefits for employers above and beyond health care cost containment. Demand management can benefit employers by increasing productivity, employee retention, and employee morale and by reducing turnover, absenteeism, future medical claims, and ultimately expenditures on health care. Even though a growing number of employers are offering wellness programs, only 37 percent of full-time workers employed in medium and large private establishments were eligible for wellness programs by 1993. However, a recent survey found that 88 percent of major employers have introduced some form of health promotion, disease prevention, or early intervention initiative to encourage healthy lifestyles among their salaried employees. Distinctions must be drawn between short- and long-term strategies. Demand management can be thought of as a short-term strategy when the focus of the program is on creating more appropriate and efficient health care utilization. Disease prevention is characterized by longer-term health improvement objectives. Whether the purpose is to reduce utilization in the short term or in the long term, the ultimate goal remains the same: to reduce health

  3. Adapting a tertiary-care pediatric weight management clinic to better reach Spanish-speaking families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Angelica; Irby, Megan B; Pulgar, Camila; Skelton, Joseph A

    2012-06-01

    Pediatric obesity continues to be an epidemic, affecting Hispanic children disproportionately. Recent recommendations outline a step-wise approach to the treatment of overweight and obese children, culminating in tertiary-care, multidisciplinary programs. We detail here how our tertiary-care, family-based, pediatric weight management clinic addressed the problem of few Spanish-speaking families enrolling in treatment after referral by adding a Bilingual Case Manager. Utilizing a family-centered, high-contact, personal approach, our program increased the number of Hispanic families enrolling over ten-fold. Further, outcomes in Hispanic families were equal to or better than other racial/ethnic groups. Lessons learned from this experience may benefit other obesity treatment programs trying to improve care of Spanish-speaking families.

  4. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Andrea L; Bohling, Mark W; Bushby, Philip A; Howe, Lisa M; Griffin, Brenda; Levy, Julie K; Eddlestone, Susan M; Weedon, James R; Appel, Leslie D; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Ferguson, Nancy J; Sweeney, David J; Tyson, Kathy A; Voors, Adriana H; White, Sara C; Wilford, Christine L; Farrell, Kelly A; Jefferson, Ellen P; Moyer, Michael R; Newbury, Sandra P; Saxton, Melissa A; Scarlett, Janet M

    2008-07-01

    As efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned dogs and cats have increased, greater attention has been focused on spay-neuter programs throughout the United States. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of programs have been developed to increase delivery of spay-neuter services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, feral cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to ensure a consistent level of care, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. The guidelines consist of recommendations for preoperative care (eg, patient transport and housing, patient selection, client communication, record keeping, and medical considerations), anesthetic management (eg, equipment, monitoring, perioperative considerations, anesthetic protocols, and emergency preparedness), surgical care (eg, operating-area environment; surgical-pack preparation; patient preparation; surgeon preparation; surgical procedures for pediatric, juvenile, and adult patients; and identification of neutered animals), and postoperative care (eg, analgesia, recovery, and release). These guidelines are based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, microbiology, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs.

  5. The value of data collection within a palliative care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Arif H; Currow, David C; Ritchie, Christine; Bull, Janet; Wheeler, Jane L; Abernethy, Amy P

    2011-08-01

    Collecting reliable and valid data is an increasing expectation within palliative care. Data remain the crux for demonstrating value and quality of care, which are the critical steps to program sustainability. Parallel goals of conducting research and performing quality assessment and improvement can also ensure program growth, financial health, and viability in an increasingly competitive environment. Mounting expectations by patients, hospitals, and payers and inevitable pay-for-performance paradigms have transitioned data collection procedures from novel projects to expected standard operation within usual palliative care delivery. We present types of data to collect, published guides for data collection, and how data can inform quality, value, and research within a palliative care organization. Our experiences with the Quality Data Collection Tool (QDACT) in the Carolinas Palliative Care Consortium to collect data on quality have led to valuable lessons learned in creating a data collection system. Suggested steps in forming data-sharing collaborations and building data collection procedures are shared.

  6. A Care Coordination Program for Substance-Exposed Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Jean E.; Caldwell, Donna; Soave, Rosemary; Fontaine, Lynne Andreozzi; Lester, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI) was established as a care coordination program to promote permanency for substance-exposed newborns in the child welfare system. Goals of VIP-RI were to optimize parents' opportunities for reunification and increase the efficacy of social service systems involved with families affected by…

  7. Military Child Care Programs: Progress Made, More Needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    program areas such as nutri- tion, health, child growth and development, educational guidance, and remedial techniques. None of the existing service...activities weakens their programs. The child care staff should know about such things as nutri- tion, health, child growth and development

  8. People deliver eye care: managing human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Odusote

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available People deliver health. Effective health care needs an efficient and motivated health workforce, which is the totality of individuals who directly or indirectly contribute to the promotion, protection and improvement of the health of the population.Community eye health is about providing eye health care to the people as close as possible to where they live and as much as possible at a price they can afford. It promotes people-centred care rather than the traditional disease-centred eye care services. In order to provide effective and efficient eye care services, we need an adequate number of well-qualified, well-motivated and equitably distributed eye health workers (EHWs.

  9. Program Manager Assessments: Professionalism Personified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Assessments Professionalism Personified Frank Kendall A few months ago, I decided to ask all of our Acquisition Cat-egory I and Major Automated Information ...transition of DoD traditional information assurance approaches to the recently implemented Risk Management Framework. What this means on the...institutional fear of the consequences of an honest assessment should not be appeased; it should be confronted . There was also a concern, which I took more

  10. Confronting trade-offs in health care: Harvard Pilgrim Health Care's organizational ethics program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, James E; Cochran, David

    2007-01-01

    Patients, providers, and policy leaders need a new moral compass to guide them in the turbulent U.S. health care system. Task forces have proposed excellent ethical codes, but these have been seen as too abstract to provide guidance at the front lines. Harvard Pilgrim Health Care's ten-year experience with an organizational ethics program suggests ways in which health care organizations can strengthen transparency, consumer focus, and overall ethical performance and contribute to the national health policy dialogue.

  11. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  12. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated......Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...

  13. Public dental health care program for persons with disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Hede, Børge; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    ) payment of service, (4) providers of oral health care, (5) special training of staff, 6) dental services delivered, (7) ethical issues, and (8) patient rights. Less than one-third of persons estimated by the health authorities were enrolled in the program. On average, 0.4% of the municipal population...... attended the program, ranging from 0.03% to 1.53%. In large municipalities, and where internal providers delivered oral health care, relatively more persons were enrolled in the program (p ...The objectives of the study were (1) to describe the organization and content of the Danish public oral health care program for persons with disability, and (2) to analyse possible variations in relation to the goals and requirements set by the health authorities. Data were collected by means...

  14. Managing palliative care for adults with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Strachan, Patricia H; Brazil, Kevin; Marshall, Denise; Willison, Kathleen; Dolovich, Lisa; Taniguchi, Alan; Demers, Catherine

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the care processes experienced by community-dwelling adults dying from advanced heart failure, their family caregivers, and their health-care providers. A descriptive qualitative design was used to guide data collection, analysis, and interpretation. The sample comprised 8 patients, 10 informal caregivers, 11 nurses, 3 physicians, and 3 pharmacists. Data analysis revealed that palliative care was influenced by unique contextual factors (i.e., cancer model of palliative care, limited access to resources, prognostication challenges). Patients described choosing interventions and living with fatigue, pain, shortness of breath, and functional decline. Family caregivers described surviving caregiver burden and drawing on their faith. Health professionals described their role as trying to coordinate care, building expertise, managing medications, and optimizing interprofessional collaboration. Participants strove towards 3 outcomes: effective symptom management, satisfaction with care, and a peaceful death.

  15. Staged diabetes management. Toward an integrated model of diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, R S; Etzwiler, D D; Strock, E; Peterson, K; McClave, C R; Meszaros, J F; Leigh, C; Owens, L W; Deeb, L C; Peterson, A

    1994-06-01

    This paper introduces a new and innovative approach to diabetes management in the primary-care setting. Staged diabetes management (SDM) represents a four-year effort to develop and test a data-based approach to diabetes management that could be easily adapted to a variety of health-care settings in which diabetes management is principally under the direction of primary-care physicians was limited access to specialists. After testing under controlled circumstances at the International Diabetes Center (Minneapolis, MN), SDM was subjected to substantial field trials under conditions that represent the scope and variety of primary-care practices in diabetes. The following represents the work of several investigators who independently undertook a review of SDM.

  16. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  17. Medicaid Managed Care Penetration Rates and Expansion Enr...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid managed care penetration rates and expansion enrollment by state charts are composed annually by the Data and System Group (DSG) of the Centers for...

  18. Effects of managed care contracting on physician labor supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, A M; Thurston, N K

    2001-06-01

    We examine the effect of managed care contracting on physician labor supply for office-based medical practices. We extend the standard labor supply model to incorporate choices regarding the patient base. Empirical tests use data from the 1985 and 1988 national HCFA Physician Practice Costs and Income Surveys and InterStudy Managed Care Surveys. We use physician-level information on participation in managed care contracting to estimate changes in work hours. Managed care contracting is generally associated with lower physician work hours. However, accounting for motivations to participate in contracts and the extent of contracting, the effect on hours is reduced in magnitude and significance. We conclude that relying on broad aggregate measures for policy analysis will likely be misleading as underlying motivations and contracting incentives change over time.

  19. Multidisciplinary care planning in the primary care management of completed stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erikssen Lars

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease management requires input from multiple health professionals, both specialist and primary care providers. This study sought to assess the impact of co-ordinated multidisciplinary care in primary care, represented by the delivery of formal care planning by primary care teams or shared across primary-secondary teams, on outcomes in stroke, relative to usual care. Methods A Systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL (all 1990–2006, Cochrane Library (Issue 1 2006, and grey literature from web based searching of web sites listed in the CCOHA Health Technology Assessment List Analysis used narrative analysis of findings of randomised and non-randomised trials, and observational and qualitative studies of patients with completed stroke in the primary care setting where care planning was undertaken by 1 a multi-disciplinary primary care team or 2 through shared care by primary and secondary providers. Results One thousand and forty-five citations were retrieved. Eighteen papers were included for analysis. Most care planning took part in the context of multidisciplinary team care based in hospitals with outreach to community patients. Mortality rates are not impacted by multidisciplinary care planning. Functional outcomes of the studies were inconsistent. It is uncertain whether the active engagement of GPs and other primary care professionals in the multidisciplinary care planning contributed to the outcomes in the studies showing a positive effect. There may be process benefits from multidisciplinary care planning that includes primary care professionals and GPs. Few studies actually described the tasks and roles GPs fulfilled and whether this matched what was presumed to be provided. Conclusion While multidisciplinary care planning may not unequivocally improve the care of patients with completed stroke, there may be process benefits such as improved task allocation between providers. Further study on the impact

  20. Quality of Care in Family Planning Program in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-ming XIE; Hong-yan LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To sum up the theory of quality care according to the experience of F.P. program in China.Methods The author summarized the QOC theory and draw on its experiences and strength in family planning program in China.Results The theory facilitated the earnest program of the population and family planning program during the tenth five-year plan period, benefited the realization of the innovation of system and mechanism in population and family planning work, and the creation of a nice population environment for the healthy social and economic development in China.Conclusion The development of QOC has displayed a conspicuous theory in China's family planning program.

  1. The assessment and management of skin tears in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen-Haynes, Jackie; Callaghan, Rosie; Bethell, Elaine; Greenwood, Michelle

    This article discusses a project conducted in Worcestershire nursing homes to review current practices in the management of skin tears and the subsequent development and implementation of guidelines resulting in a standardised client care package. An initial audit in five care homes was followed by an in-depth audit in 52 homes over a 12-week period. This led to the development of resources and the 'STAR box' to assist with implementation of timely and appropriate care delivery.

  2. Headache in primary care: how important is diagnosis to management?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Flynn, Norma; Ridsdale, Leone

    2002-01-01

    Headache is a common presentation in primary care. The classification of headache was overhauled by the International Headache Society (IHS) in 1988, and the past decade has seen rapid growth in the understanding of headache disorders. The IHS places particular importance on precise headache diagnosis. This paper discusses the relevance of such an approach to primary care. A review of the literature revealed a dearth of evidence regarding headache management in primary care settings. The evid...

  3. Selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs in health care systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Hayden B Bosworth1–4 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3School of Nursing, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Practitioners and researchers often design behavioral programs that are effective for a specific population or problem. Despite their success in a controlled setting, relatively few programs are scaled up and implemented in health care systems. Planning for scale-up is a critical, yet often overlooked, element in the process of program design. Equally as important is understanding how to select a program that has already been developed, and adapt and implement the program to meet specific organizational goals. This adaptation and implementation requires attention to organizational goals, available resources, and program cost. We assert that translational behavioral medicine necessitates expanding successful programs beyond a stand-alone research study. This paper describes key factors to consider when selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs for scale-up in large health care systems and applies the Knowledge to Action (KTA Framework to a case study, illustrating knowledge creation and an action cycle of implementation and evaluation activities. Keywords: program sustainability, diffusion of innovation, information dissemination, health services research, intervention studies 

  4. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  5. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  6. Evaluation of an Urban Phase of the Specialized Care Program for Diabetes in Iran: Providers′ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ravaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To develop and implement more effective programs of health care delivery to prevent and control diabetes, Iran has developed and implemented the urban phase of the specialized care program for diabetic′s patients. Deeply understanding the views and experiences of various stakeholders in this program can assist policy makers to identify the program′s strengths and weaknesses and enable them to develop action plans. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the planning and establishing of this program from the perspective of providers. Methods: A qualitative study was applied using documents review and face-to-face semi-structured interviews with the program leads and relevant executive managers of the local medical universities. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Three main themes and nine subthemes were explored, including program planning (the content and the strengths, weaknesses, and corrective measures, implementation (executive mechanisms at the university level, establishment of referral system, collaboration between deputies of health and treatment, information dissemination mechanisms, satisfaction measurement and strengths, weaknesses and corrective measures, and result (implementation results. Conclusions: The urban phase of the specialized care program for diabetic′s patients has been a good base to improve continuity of care, which emphasizes on controlling and prevention of occurrence or progression of chronic complications of diabetes. This model can also be used for better management of other chronic disease. However, there are still issues that should be considered and improved such as allocation of guaranteed resources, more trained health professionals, and more evidence based guidelines and protocols, better collaboration among medical universities′ deputies, clearer payment system for program evaluation and better information management system.

  7. Development of a primary care-based complex care management intervention for chronically ill patients at high risk for hospitalization: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyer Martin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex care management is seen as an approach to face the challenges of an ageing society with increasing numbers of patients with complex care needs. The Medical Research Council in the United Kingdom has proposed a framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions that will be used to develop and evaluate a primary care-based complex care management program for chronically ill patients at high risk for future hospitalization in Germany. Methods and design We present a multi-method procedure to develop a complex care management program to implement interventions aimed at reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a high likelihood of hospitalization. The procedure will start with reflection about underlying precipitating factors of hospitalizations and how they may be targeted by the planned intervention (pre-clinical phase. An intervention model will then be developed (phase I based on theory, literature, and exploratory studies (phase II. Exploratory studies are planned that entail the recruitment of 200 patients from 10 general practices. Eligible patients will be identified using two ways of 'case finding': software based predictive modelling and physicians' proposal of patients based on clinical experience. The resulting subpopulations will be compared regarding healthcare utilization, care needs and resources using insurance claims data, a patient survey, and chart review. Qualitative studies with healthcare professionals and patients will be undertaken to identify potential barriers and enablers for optimal performance of the complex care management program. Discussion This multi-method procedure will support the development of a primary care-based care management program enabling the implementation of interventions that will potentially reduce avoidable

  8. Becoming nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Marcellino de Melo Lanzoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to understand the experience of managing medical-surgical inpatient units in a general hospital, highlighting the meaning of being a nursing manager, with the intention to qualify and instrument nurses for caring management practice in this scenario. This is a Grounded Theory research, conducted from August 2010 to August 2012, through interviews with 19 participants from the nursing team, distributed in 3 sampling groups. From the analysis emerged the phenomenon “Becoming a nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimension”. To exercise caring management, nurses use management instruments as essential tools, they become capable theoretically and enhances, based on his experience, professional skills and personal characteristics.  We conclude that competency mobilization beyond the clinical aspect is needed; allowing the use of management instruments to make caring viable and to improve relational and interactive processes.

  9. Postpartum Depression: Screening, Diagnosis, and Management Programs 2000 through 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Yawn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The value and appropriateness of universal postpartum depression (PPD screening remains controversial in the United States. To date, several PPD screening programs have been introduced and a few have been evaluated. Among those programs that have been evaluated, most report screening rates, diagnosis rates, or treatment initiation rates. Only four studies included patient outcomes such as the level of depressive symptoms at 6 to 12 months postpartum, and only two reported success in improving outcomes. Program characteristics that appear to result in low rates of diagnosis and followup after PPD screening include requirements for a formal psychiatric evaluation, the need to refer women to another site for therapy, and failure to integrate the PPD screening into the care provided at the woman’s or her child’s medical home. The two programs that reported improved outcomes were both self-contained within primary care and included specific followup, management, and therapy procedures. Both resulted in the need for outside referrals in less than 10% of women diagnosed with postpartum depression. Future studies should be based on the successful programs and their identified facilitators while avoiding identified barriers. To affect policies, the future program must report maternal outcomes going beyond the often reported process outcomes of screening, referral, and therapy initiation rates.

  10. Stokes examines NASA program management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leath, Audrey T.

    As NASA gears up for another attempt at redesigning Space Station Freedom, some in Congress are wondering whether the space agency has learned any lessons from a number of costly past mistakes. Louis Stokes (D-Ohio), the new chairman of the House Appropriations Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Subcommittee, held a hearing on March 17 to examine unanticipated cost growth in a variety of projects, including the space toilet, the advanced turbo pump for the shuttle, and the Mars Observer, as well as the space station. Stokes seemed well-suited to this oversight role, asking well-informed and probing questions rather than accusatory ones. The witnesses, NASA head Daniel Goldin and many of his top managers (most of whom were not in their present positions when the projects were initiated), analyzed past errors and offered useful measures for avoiding similar problems in the future.

  11. Organization and management of space grant programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Sallie; Nichols, Steve

    1990-01-01

    The 21 Space Grant Programs represent a broad range of organizational structures which operate programs ranging in size from single university organizations to organizations including up to 41 members involving a composite of industrial organizations such as state agencies, and universities. Some of the space grant awards were made to organizations already in existence with on-going programs while other awards were made to consortia newly formed for the purpose of applying to the Space Grant Program. The workshop on organization and management of Space Grant Programs provided an opportunity for directors and program representatives to discuss and compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various models being used. This paper offers examples of the diversity of organizations, summarizes the common concerns to be met by each organizational model, and provides a case study of the Texas Space Grant Consortium organization.

  12. The Patient Care Connect Program: Transforming Health Care Through Lay Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocque, Gabrielle B; Partridge, Edward E; Pisu, Maria; Martin, Michelle Y; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Acemgil, Aras; Kenzik, Kelly; Kvale, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Karen; Li, Xuelin; Li, Yufeng; Halilova, Karina I; Jackson, Bradford E; Chambless, Carol; Lisovicz, Nedra; Fouad, Mona; Taylor, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    The Patient Care Connect Program (PCCP) is a lay patient navigation program, implemented by the University of Alabama at Birmingham Health System Cancer Community Network. The PCCP's goal is to provide better health and health care, as well as to lower overall expenditures. The program focuses on enhancing the health of patients, with emphasis on patient empowerment and promoting proactive participation in health care. Navigator training emphasizes palliative care principles and includes development of skills to facilitate advance care planning conversations. Lay navigators are integrated into the health care team, with the support of a nurse supervisor, physician medical director, and administrative champion. The intervention focuses on patients with high needs to reach those with the greatest potential for benefit from supportive services. Navigator activities are guided by frequent distress assessments, which help to identify patient concerns across multiple domains, triage patients to appropriate resources, and ultimately overcome barriers to health care. In this article, we describe the PCCP's development, infrastructure, selection and training of lay navigators, and program operations.

  13. Developing a Comprehensive Animal Care Occupational Health and Safety Program at a Land-Grant Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodly, Lyndon J; Jarrell, Vickie L; Miller, Monica A; Banks, Maureen C; Anderson, Thomas J; Branson, Katherine A; Woodward, Robert T; Peper, Randall L; Myers, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    The Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and sound ethical practices require institutions to provide safe working environments for personnel working with animals; this mandate is achieved in part by establishing an effective animal care Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP). Land-grant institutions often face unique organizational challenges in fulfilling this requirement. For example, responsibilities for providing health and safety programs often have historically been dispersed among many different divisions scattered around the campus. Here we describe how our institutional management personnel overcame organizational structure and cultural obstacles during the formation of a comprehensive campus-wide animal care OHSP. Steps toward establishing the animal care OHSP included assigning overall responsibility, identifying all stakeholders, creating a leadership group, and hiring a fulltime Animal Care OHSP Specialist. A web-based portal was developed, implemented, and refined over the past 7 y and reflected the unique organizational structures of the university and the needs of our research community. Through this web-based portal, hazards are identified, risks are assessed, and training is provided. The animal care OHSP now provides easy mandatory enrollment, supports timely feedback regarding hazards, and affords enrollees the opportunity to participate in voluntary medical surveillance. The future direction and development of the animal care OHSP will be based on the research trends of campus, identification of emerging health and safety hazards, and ongoing evaluation and refinement of the program.

  14. [The list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program and the Brazilian National Pharmaceutical Care Policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauti, Sueli Miyuki; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; Lopes, Luciane Cruz

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program in Brazil (PFPB) in relation to the country's pharmaceutical care policy. The list of drugs in the PFPB was compared to the Brazilian and international reference lists of essential medicines, the components of pharmaceutical care in Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), and drug production by the country's government pharmaceutical laboratories. The PFPB list includes 119 drugs, of which 19.3% and 47.1% were not selected on the Brazilian and international reference lists, respectively; 16.8% are not used in primary care, and 40.3% are not produced by the country's government laboratories. A revision of the PFPB list based on the essential medicines concept (World Health Organization), alignment of pharmaceutical care policies, and production by government laboratories are essential to improve quality of health care, management, training of prescribers, and information for the population.

  15. Implementing a Pharmacist-Led Medication Management Pilot to Improve Care Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Root, PharmD, MS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this project was to design and pilot a pharmacist-led process to address medication management across the continuum of care within a large integrated health-system.Summary: A care transitions pilot took place within a health-system which included a 150-bed community hospital. The pilot process expanded the pharmacist’s medication management responsibilities to include providing discharge medication reconciliation, a patient-friendly discharge medication list, discharge medication education, and medication therapy management (MTM follow-up.Adult patients with a predicted diagnosis-related group (DRG of congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical-surgical and intensive care units who utilized a primary care provider within the health-system were included in the pilot. Forty patients met the inclusion criteria and thirty-four (85% received an intervention from an inpatient or MTM pharmacist. Within this group of patients, 88 drug therapy problems (2.6 per patient were identified and 75% of the drug therapy recommendations made by the pharmacist were accepted by the care provider. The 30-day all-cause readmission rates for the intervention and comparison groups were 30.5% and 35.9%, respectively. The number of patients receiving follow-up care varied with 10 (25% receiving MTM follow-up, 26 (65% completing a primary care visit after their first hospital discharge, and 23 (58% receiving a home care visit.Conclusion: Implementation of a pharmacist-led medication management pilot across the continuum of care resulted in an improvement in the quality of care transitions within the health-system through increased identification and resolution of drug therapy problems and MTM follow-up. The lessons learned from the implementation of this pilot will be used to further refine pharmacy care transitions programs across the health-system.

  16. Treatment effects model for assessing disease management: measuring outcomes and strengthening program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Jeanne; Dumitras, Diana

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes an analytical methodology for obtaining statistically unbiased outcomes estimates for programs in which participation decisions may be correlated with variables that impact outcomes. This methodology is particularly useful for intraorganizational program evaluations conducted for business purposes. In this situation, data is likely to be available for a population of managed care members who are eligible to participate in a disease management (DM) program, with some electing to participate while others eschew the opportunity. The most pragmatic analytical strategy for in-house evaluation of such programs is likely to be the pre-intervention/post-intervention design in which the control group consists of people who were invited to participate in the DM program, but declined the invitation. Regression estimates of program impacts may be statistically biased if factors that impact participation decisions are correlated with outcomes measures. This paper describes an econometric procedure, the Treatment Effects model, developed to produce statistically unbiased estimates of program impacts in this type of situation. Two equations are estimated to (a) estimate the impacts of patient characteristics on decisions to participate in the program, and then (b) use this information to produce a statistically unbiased estimate of the impact of program participation on outcomes. This methodology is well-established in economics and econometrics, but has not been widely applied in the DM outcomes measurement literature; hence, this paper focuses on one illustrative application.

  17. 78 FR 7477 - Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program AGENCY: Federal... system management and operations. This notice seeks applications for available fiscal year (FY) 2012... Operations and Management (MCOM) programs and projects. The purpose of these investments is to...

  18. 76 FR 65561 - Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ... Federal Highway Administration Multistate Corridor Operations and Management Program AGENCY: Federal... Operations and Management (MCOM) Program authorized by the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient... transportation challenges facing the efficient and effective operation and management of...

  19. Emotion management in children′s palliative care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryl Zac Maunder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the emotional labor involved for nurses providing palliative care for children/young people living with life-limiting illnesses/conditions, and their families. It highlights the challenges nurses face in managing their emotion when caring for children/young people and their families, and explores strategies to enable nurses to cope with this aspect of their role without compromising their personal wellbeing. It suggests that emotional labor within nursing goes largely unrecorded, and remains undervalued by managers and health care services.

  20. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David B.; Chan, Frandics P.; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Molvin, Lior Z. [Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA (United States); Wang, Jia [Stanford University, Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve. (orig.)

  1. 75 FR 30106 - Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Terrorism Risk Insurance Program; Litigation Management Submissions AGENCY: Departmental Offices. ACTION..., the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Office is seeking comments regarding Litigation Management..., preferably an original and two copies) to: Terrorism Risk Insurance Program, Public Comment Record,...

  2. The process of implementing a rural VA wound care program for diabetic foot ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiber, Gayle E; Raugi, Gregory J; Rowberg, Donald

    2007-10-01

    Delivering and documenting evidence-based treatment to all Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) foot ulcer patients has wide appeal. However, primary and secondary care medical centers where 52% of these patients receive care are at a disadvantage given the frequent absence of trained specialists to manage diabetic foot ulcers. A retrospective review of diabetic foot ulcer patient records and a provider survey were conducted to document the foot ulcer problem and to assess practitioner needs. Results showed of the 125 persons with foot ulcers identified through administrative data, only, 21% of diabetic foot patients were correctly coded. Chronic Care and Microsystem models were used to prepare a tailored intervention in a VA primary care medical center. The site Principal Investigators, a multidisciplinary site wound care team, and study investigators jointly implemented a diabetic foot ulcer program. Intervention components include wound care team education and training, standardized good wound care practices based on strong scientific evidence, and a wound care template embedded in the electronic medical record to facilitate data collection, clinical decision making, patient ordering, and coding. A strategy for delivering offloading pressure devices, regular case management support, and 24/7 emergency assistance also was developed. It took 9 months to implement the model. Patients were enrolled and followed for 1 year. Process and outcome evaluations are on-going.

  3. How to manage burns in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Waitzman, A. A.; Neligan, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    Burns are common injuries; more than 200,000 occur in Canada annually. Nearly all burn injuries can be managed on on outpatient basis. Appropriate treatment depends on burn depth, extent, and location. Special types of burns, such as chemical, tar, and electrical injuries, need specific management strategies. Prevention through education is important to reduce the incidence of burns.

  4. Improving Chronic Care: Developing and testing disease-management interventions applied in COPD care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M.M. Lemmens (Karin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDisease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control health care costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. The purpose of this thesis was to determine the core elements of dis

  5. Formative evaluation of practice changes for managing depression within a Shared Care model in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulac, Julie; Edwards, Jeanette; Steele, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To investigate the implementation and initial impact of the Physician Integrated Network (PIN) mental health indicators, which are specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression, in three primary care practices with Shared Mental Health Care in Manitoba.

  6. Defense Manufacturing Management Guide for Program Managers, Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    producibillty acquisition proce3s. This chapter builds on a programs are Imperative as a management definition of proaticibility and Its relationship to...Identification (ACI), 13-7 functional configuration Identification (FCI), 13-7 item (CI), 13-5 management : definition , 13-5 policies and objectives, 13-7...3-10 human element In, 14-6 management : definition , 1-1, 6-2 documents, 1-7 DOD organizational structure, 1-2 objectives of DOD, 1-1 overview of DOD

  7. Anticoagulated patient management in primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Out-patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment are attended by nursing staff, working with doctors.To be able to provide adequate medical care, nurses must have the minimum knowledge and skills needed to work with the programme described in this article. These include basic and specific knowledge of anticoagulation. The correct functioning of the service will help provide an optimum control of the INR (International Normalized Ratio and reduce the complications of bleeding, both of which are the main objectives of the nursing care of these patients.

  8. The Breathmobile Program: structure, implementation, and evolution of a large-scale, urban, pediatric asthma disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Craig A; Clement, Loran T; Hanley-Lopez, Jean; Morphew, Tricia; Kwong, Kenny Yat Choi; Lifson, Francene; Opas, Lawrence; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    Despite more than a decade of education and research-oriented intervention programs, inner city children with asthma continue to engage in episodic "rescue" patterns of healthcare and experience a disproportionate level of morbidity. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a sustainable community-wide pediatric asthma disease management program designed to shift inner city children in Los Angeles from acute episodic care to regular preventive care in accordance with national standards. In 1995 the Southern California Chapter of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS), and the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) established an agreement to initiate and sustain the Breathmobile Program. This program includes automated case identification, mobile school-based clinics, and highly structured clinical encounters supported by an advanced information technology solution. Interdisciplinary teams of asthma care specialists provide regular and ongoing care to children at school and county clinic sites over a wide geographic area of urban Los Angeles. Each team operates in a specially equipped mobile clinic (Breathmobile), efficiently moving a structured healthcare process to school and county clinic sites with large numbers of children. Demographic, clinical, and participation data is tracked carefully in an electronic medical record system. Program operations, clinical oversight, and patient tracking are centralized at a care coordination center. Clinical operations and methods have been replicated in fixed specialty clinic sites at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center. Clinical and process measures are regularly evaluated to assure quality, plan iterative improvement, and support evidence-based care. Four Breathmobiles deliver ongoing care at more than 90 school sites. The program has engaged over five thousand patients and their families in a

  9. Audit Trail Management System in Community Health Care Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nakaya, Jun; Tominaga, Teiji; Suganuma, Takuo; Shiratori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake we constructed a community health care information network system. Focusing on the authentication server and portal server capable of SAML&ID-WSF, we proposed an audit trail management system to look over audit events in a comprehensive manner. Through implementation and experimentation, we verified the effectiveness of our proposed audit trail management system.

  10. Hypertension management in primary care in Belarus and The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Rusovich, V.; Egorov, K.N.; Podpalov, V.P.; Boerma, W.G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Both in Belarus and in the Netherlands, guidelines on the management of hypertension in primary care have been developed, including recommendations about detection, treatment and follow-up. These guidelines are meant to harmonize actual practice management of hypertension of improve the quality of c

  11. Optimizing cardiothoracic surgery information for a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, T A; Matloff, J M

    1995-11-01

    The rapid change occurring in American healthcare is a direct response to rising costs. Managed care is the fastest growing model that attempts to control escalating costs through limitations in patient choice, the active use of guidelines, and placing providers at risk. Managed care is an information intensive system, and those providers who use information effectively will be at an advantage in the competitive healthcare marketplace. There are five classes of information that providers must collect to be competitive in a managed care environment: patient satisfaction, medical outcomes, continuous quality improvement, quality of the decision, and financial data. Each of these should be actively used in marketing, assuring the quality of patient care, and maintaining financial stability. Although changes in our healthcare system are occurring rapidly, we need to respond to the marketplace to maintain our viability, but as physicians, we have the singular obligation to maintain the supremacy of the individual patient and the physician-patient relationship.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  14. Management knowledge and skills required in the health care system of the Federation bosnia and herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipicevic, Osman; Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Extremely complex health care organizations, by their structure and organization, operate in a constantly changing business environment, and such situation implies and requires complex and demanding health management. Therefore, in order to manage health organizations in a competent manner, health managers must possess various managerial skills and be familiar with problems in health care. Research, identification, analysis, and assessment of health management education and training needs are basic preconditions for the development and implementation of adequate programs to meet those needs. Along with other specific activities, this research helped to determine the nature, profile, and level of top-priority needs for education. The need for knowledge of certain areas in health management, as well as the need for mastering concrete managerial competencies has been recognized as top-priorities requiring additional improvement and upgrading.

  15. Propuesta de un formulario abierto para un programa de atención médica dirigida en México Open formulary propossal for a managed care program in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-01-01

    sell in Mexico, as part of a Pharmacy Benefit Management & Manage Care program implemented in our country. Each drug was classified according to its active ingredient under one of the following categories: 1 essentials, 2 excluded, and 3 not essentials - not excluded. The decision in each case was based on pure scientific grounds and using an Evidence-Based Medicine analysis. Results. The proposed formulary contains a total of 1106 active ingredients -either unique or in combination-, from which 429 (38.8% were classified as essentials. About one-out-of-ten drugs (8.7% currently in use within the private medical practice in Mexico, some of them highly prescribed, were regarded by the committee as excluded due to concerns about their efficacy and/or or safety. Conclusions. On this report a detailed description of the process followed to conform the committee, its objectives an its performing criteria is presented, as well as the bases under which the final list of drugs of the formulary were set.

  16. 75 FR 32480 - Funding Opportunity: Affordable Care Act Medicare Beneficiary Outreach and Assistance Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration on Aging Funding Opportunity: Affordable Care Act Medicare Beneficiary...: Availability of funding opportunity announcement. Funding Opportunity Title/Program Name: Affordable Care Act... Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Affordable Care Act). Catalog of Federal Domestic......

  17. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  18. Monitoring managers through corporate compliance programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Angelucci; M.A. Han

    2010-01-01

    Compliance programs entail monitoring of employees’ behavior with the claimed objective of fighting corporate crime. (Competition) Authorities promote such intra-firm monitoring. In a three-tier hierarchy model, authority-shareholder-manager, we study the impact of monitoring on contracting within t

  19. Configuration Management for eXtreme Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asklund, U.; Bendix, Lars Gotfred; Ekman, T.

    2003-01-01

    Extreme programming (XP) is a software development method that prescribes the use of 12 different practices. Four of these practices (collective code ownership, continuous integration, small releases and refactoring) can indeed be given good support by the use of simple configuration management (CM...

  20. Abstracts: NRC Waste Management Program reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.; Minichino, C.

    1979-11-01

    This document consists of abstracts of all reports published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). It will be updated at regular intervals. Reports are arranged in numerical order, within each category. Unless otherwise specified, authors are LLL scientists and engineers.

  1. Monitoring managers through corporate compliance programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelucci, C.; Han, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Compliance programs entail monitoring of employees' behavior with the claimed objective of fighting corporate crime. (Competition) Authorities promote such intra-firm monitoring. In a three-tier hierarchy model, authority-shareholder-manager, we study the impact of monitoring through a compliance pr

  2. DoD Pest Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-29

    Medicine shall provide program administration and data support services, including permanent archiving for all Military Services, in accordance with...minor nuisance pest problems. Quarters and housing occupants are responsible for controlling pests, such as cockroaches , household infesting ants... cockroach and ant baits and/or traps, mouse traps, glue boards, and ready-to-use aerosol pesticides. The office designated to manage the

  3. Parents are Teachers: A Child Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Wesley C.

    This manual is designed to help parents apply reinforcement theory in managing their children. The program explains how parents can systematically use consequences to teach children in positive ways. Units include: When to Reinforce; How to Reinforce; Reinforcement and Punishment in Everyday Life; and Why Parents (and Teachers) Goof; the Criticism…

  4. Effect of a Comprehensive Health Care Program by Korean Medicine Doctors on Medical Care Utilization for Common Infectious Diseases in Child-Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the role of traditional medicine in community health improvement increases, a comprehensive health care program for infectious diseases management in child-care centers by Korean medicine doctors was developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the program intervention on infection-related medical care utilization among children. The study used a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group, comparing pre- and post-intervention data of the same children. The program implemented interventions in terms of management, education, and medical examination for the teachers, parents, and children in 12-week period. The frequency of utilization, cost, and prescription days of drugs and antibiotics due to infectious diseases prior to the intervention were compared with those during the 3-month intervention, using health insurance claim data. A panel analysis was also conducted to support the findings. A significant reduction (12% in infection-related visit days of hospitals was observed with the intervention (incident rate ratio = 0.88, P=0.01. And medical cost, drug prescription days, and antibiotics prescription days were decreased, although not statistically significant. A further cost-effectiveness analysis in terms of social perspectives, considering the opportunity costs for guardians to take children to medical institutions, would be needed.

  5. Conflict across organizational boundaries: managed care organizations versus health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, R R; Wall, J A

    2001-08-01

    This research examined conflicts that occur across organizational boundaries, specifically between managed care organizations and health care providers. Using boundary spanning theory as a framework, the authors identified 3 factors in the 1st study (30 interviews) that influence this conflict: (a) organizational power, (b) personal status differences of the individuals handling the conflict, and (c) their previous interactions. These factors affected the individuals' behavioral responses or emotions, specifically anger. After developing hypotheses, the authors tested them in a 2nd study using 109 conflict incidents drawn from 9 different managed care organizations. The results revealed that organizational power affects behavioral responses, whereas status differences and previous negative interactions affect emotions.

  6. Prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Bracco, Mário M; Florindo, Alex Antonio; Mielke, Gregore Iven; Parra, Diana C; Lobelo, Felipe; Simoes, Eduardo J; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units within Brazil’s health system. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study based on telephone interviews with managers of primary care units. Of a total 42,486 primary health care units listed in the Brazilian Unified Health System directory, 1,600 were randomly selected. Care units from all five Brazilian macroregions were selected proportionally to the number of units in each region. We examined whether any of the following five different types of health promotion programs was available: physical activity; smoking cessation; cessation of alcohol and illicit drug use; healthy eating; and healthy environment. Information was collected on the kinds of activities offered and the status of implementation of the Family Health Strategy at the units. RESULTS Most units (62.0%) reported having in place three health promotion programs or more and only 3.0% reported having none. Healthy environment (77.0%) and healthy eating (72.0%) programs were the most widely available; smoking and alcohol use cessation were reported in 54.0% and 42.0% of the units. Physical activity programs were offered in less than 40.0% of the units and their availability varied greatly nationwide, from 51.0% in the Southeast to as low as 21.0% in the North. The Family Health Strategy was implemented in most units (61.0%); however, they did not offer more health promotion programs than others did. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed that most primary care units have in place health promotion programs. Public policies are needed to strengthen primary care services and improve training of health providers to meet the goals of the agenda for health promotion in Brazil. PMID:25372175

  7. What health care managers do: applying Mintzberg's structured observation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Rebecka; Dellve, Lotta; Wikström, Ewa; Törnström, Linda

    2009-09-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to explore and describe what characterizes first- and second-line health care managers' use of time. Background Many Swedish health care managers experience difficulties managing their time. Methods Structured and unstructured observations were used. Ten first- and second-line managers in different health care settings were studied in detail from 3.5 and 4 days each. Duration and frequency of different types of work activities were analysed. Results The individual variation was considerable. The managers' days consisted to a large degree of short activities (<9 minutes). On average, nearly half of the managers' time was spent in meetings. Most of the managers' time was spent with subordinates and <1% was spent alone with their superiors. Sixteen per cent of their time was spent on administration and only a small fraction on explicit strategic work. Conclusions The individual variations in time use patterns suggest the possibility of interventions to support changes in time use patterns. Implications for nursing management A reliable description of what managers do paves the way for analyses of what they should do to be effective.

  8. 78 FR 79619 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium Stabilization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ...-9957-CN; 9964-CN] RIN 0938-AR82; RIN 0938-AR74 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program... Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium Stabilization Programs, and Market Standards... and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium Stabilization Programs, and...

  9. Total energy management for nursing homes and other long-term care institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide the basic instruction needed to implement the most effective form of energy conservation--Total Energy Management, or TEM--in your long-term care facility. The effort required is worthwhile for many different reasons: TEM is self-paying; TEM promotes energy conservation without negative impact on health care services; and energy costs will continue to escalate. Following the introductory chapter, chapters are titled: Understanding Energy Consumption; Initiating a Total Energy Management Program; Developing Energy Consumption Data; Conducting the Facility Survey; Developing and Implementing the Basic Plan; Communication and Motivation; Monitoring Your Program and Keeping It Effective; and Guidelines for Energy Conservation. Two appendices furnish information on building information for TEM and sources of information for energy management. (MCW)

  10. Planning for a smooth transition: evaluation of a succession planning program for prospective nurse unit managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Vicki; Jones, Alan; Jones, Pamela; Fernandez, Ritin S

    2015-01-01

    The current and projected nurse workforce shortage has created significant pressure on health care organizations to examine their approach to managing talent. This includes the need for strategic development of new formal leaders. This article reports on a succession planning program for prospective nursing unit managers. Eight prospective management candidates participated in a Future Nursing Unit Managers program. The effectiveness of the program was measured through a comparison of pre- and postprogram surveys relating to participants' perception of personal managerial and leadership skills. Significant differences in scores from baseline to 6-month follow-up surveys were observed in the participants' confidence in undertaking the nursing unit manager role and in their management skills. Investment in structured programs to prepare nurses for leadership roles is strongly recommended as a management workforce strategy.

  11. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  12. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting.

  13. Management considerations in the care of elderly heart failure patients in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, George A; Boscart, Veronique M; McKelvie, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    Heart failure, a condition that affects up to 20% of older persons residing in long-term care facilities, is an important cause of morbidity, health service utilization and death. Effective and interprofessional heart failure care processes could potentially improve care, outcomes and quality of life and delay decline or hospital admission. This article reviews the clinical aspects of heart failure, and the challenges to the diagnosis and management of this condition in long-term care residents who are frail and are affected by multiple comorbidities.

  14. Aeronautical Systems Division (AFSC) Program Management Resource Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-30

    MANAGEMENT Definition . Program management consists of the actions involved in developing and producing deliverable end items on time, within the...CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT Definition . Configuration management is the formal process of identifying the functional and physical characteristics of

  15. "Because somebody cared about me. That's how it changed things": homeless, chronically ill patients' perspectives on case management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Case management programs for chronically ill, homeless people improve health and resource utilization by linking patients with case managers focused on improving management of medical and psychosocial problems. Little is known about participants' perspectives on case management interventions. METHODS: This qualitative study used in-depth, one-on-one interviews to understand the impact of a case management program from the perspective of participants. A standardized interview guide with open-ended questions explored experiences with the case management program and feelings about readiness to leave the program. RESULTS: FOUR RECURRENT THEMES EMERGED: (1 Participants described profound social isolation prior to case management program enrollment; (2 Participants perceived that caring personal relationships with case managers were key to the program; (3 Participants valued assistance with navigating medical and social systems; and (4 Participants perceived that their health improved through both the interpersonal and the practical aspects of case management. CONCLUSIONS: Chronically ill, homeless people enrolled in a case management program perceived that social support from case managers resulted in improved health. Programs for this population should consider explicitly including comprehensive social support interventions. Further research on case management should explore the impact of different types of social support on outcomes for homeless chronically ill patients.

  16. Introducing managed care to the medical school curriculum: effect on student attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, T S; Baldor, R A; Casey, L M; Chuman, A; Lasser, D; Ehrlich, A; Gurwitz, J H

    1998-07-01

    In order to assess the effect of clinical training and didactic instruction on medical student attitudes toward managed care, we conducted a survey of all medical students at the midpoint of their third year clerkships at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The students were exposed to clinical training in managed care settings and a 2-day required course on the principles underlying managed care. The main outcome measures were student attitudes toward the concepts of managed care, managed care organizations, and future careers in managed care. Students also assessed the attitudes of medical faculty toward managed care. Attitudes of students with previous clinical training in managed care settings did not differ from those of students without such exposure toward the concepts underlying managed care or managed care organizations and were less positive about careers in managed care. Student responses before and after the 2-day course on managed care demonstrated that attitudes moved in a significantly positive direction. Seventy-one percent of students reported that the opinions they had heard from medical faculty about managed care were negative. Preparing medical students to practice medicine effectively in managed care settings will require focused attention on managed care issues in the medical school curriculum and the combined efforts of academic health centers and managed care organizations.

  17. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p managed care processes coordinated with the formal marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers.

  18. Psycotherapy, managed care, and the economy of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzl, J M

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the disclosure over the value of long-term psychotherapy in a managed-care system. Many managed-care companies define extended psychotherapy as superfluous. Those who defend psychotherapy respond that the restrictions imposed by managed care are misguided and potentially harmful. After briefly discussing the relevant literature, the points of contention between psychotherapy and managed care are examined from the perspective of narrative literary theory. The analysis highlights the contrasting narrative assumptions implied about the importance of the clinical interaction. Pointing out each side's use of point-of-view, narrative structure, and informational exchange, it is posited that beneath arguments that often focus on the commodities of time and money lie larger, conceptual differences. These stealthily serve to undermine the possibility of a rational debate. The paper concludes by asserting that psychotherapy and managed care assume incommensurate narratives of interaction when discussing the value of therapy. The terms of discourse must be expanded in order to account for the philosophical differences described. Several ways this might be accomplished are proposed.

  19. [Management of technology and its influence on nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo

    2007-01-01

    Currently, much nursing care adheres to a specific biomedical paradigm within the positivist framework. However, sometimes nursing care cannot be adapted to numerous human or vital conditions affecting our patients, their families or the environment in which nurses work. An specific example of these nursing interventions are those applied in intensive care units (ICU) where there is a large amount of technology and nursing care is specialized. Several questions that arise are whether the above-mentioned specialization is inherent to nurse care, whether technology management forms part of nursing care, whether this care has a non-nursing origin, and what is the source of nursing knowledge. The present article aims to provide basic knowledge to distinguish the nursing care performed in the ICU within the 2 predominant paradigms in current nursing: the biomedical and the holistic paradigms. The characteristics of nursing care in both paradigms are described and an integrated vision of these 2 paradigms and of nursing care with and without the use of technology is provided.

  20. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  1. 49 CFR 237.33 - Content of bridge management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of bridge management programs. 237.33... Content of bridge management programs. Each bridge management program adopted in compliance with this part... spans, span lengths, and all other information necessary to provide for the management of bridge...

  2. 18 CFR 740.4 - State water management planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State water management... STATE WATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM § 740.4 State water management planning program. (a) A State... major elements of the State water management program, which should address but not be limited to:...

  3. Time based management in health care system: The chosen aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kobza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-based management (TBM is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms. Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990 and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001–2011 have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary

  4. Administration to innovation: the evolving management challenge in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, A; Marnoch, G; McKee, L; Joshi, R; Reid, J

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the primary health-care team involving an increasingly diverse range of health care professionals is widely recognized as central to the pursuit of a primary care-led health service in the UK. Although GPs are formally recognized as the team leaders, there is little by way of policy prescription as to how team roles and relationships should be developed, or evidence as to how their roles have in fact evolved. Thus the notion of the primary health-care team while commonly employed, is in reality lacking definition with the current contribution of practice managers to the operation of this team being poorly understood. Focusing on the career backgrounds of practice managers, their range of responsibilities, and their involvement in innovation in general practice, presents a preliminary account of a chief scientist office-funded project examining the role being played by practice managers in primary health-care innovation. More specifically, utilizing data gained from the ongoing study, contextualizes the role played by practice managers in the primary health-care team. By exploring the business environment surrounding the NHS general practice, the research seeks to understand the evolving world of the practice manager. Drawing on questionnaire data, reinforced by qualitative data from the current interview phase, describes the role played by practice managers in differing practice contexts. This facilitates a discussion of a set of ideal type general practice organizational and managerial structures. Discusses the relationships and skills required by practice managers in each of these organizational types with reference to data gathered to date in the research.

  5. [Time based management in health care system: the chosen aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Joanna; Syrkiewicz-Świtała, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Time-based management (TBM) is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms). Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990) and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001-2011) have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary.

  6. [Management of pain in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Tarja; Hamunen, Katri; Hirvonen, Outi

    2013-01-01

    Palliative pain management is usually successful, if the medication is strengthened in a stepwise manner in accordance with pain intensity, and initiation of a strong opioid is not delayed. Finding of a sufficiently effective dose of the opioid drug with simultaneous management of adverse effects requires continuous pain assessment and patient monitoring. In many cases it is possible to enhance analgesia by supplementing the medication with an antidepressant or an antiepileptic along with the opioid and paracetamol or the analgesic. Palliative radiotherapy will relieve tissue injury pain caused by bone metastases and soft tissue tumors as well as pain due to the possible nerve entrapments caused by them.

  7. The design, implementation, and operational management of a comprehensive quality management program to support national telehealth networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkins, Adam; Foster, Linda; Anderson, Carla; Goldschmidt, Leonard; Selvin, Gerald

    2013-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is a large integrated healthcare system with a mission to care for over 5.6 million Veteran patients annually. VHA, like other healthcare organizations, is challenged with providing access to care to those it serves when they live at a distance from a physical site of care. VHA has embraced telehealth as a way of delivering care at a distance and increase access to specialty care services. Since 2003 VHA has developed large national telehealth networks that provided care to 497,342 patients in fiscal year 2012, who received 1,429,424 episodes of care, and is recognized as a national leader in this field. To ensure the safety and effectiveness of its telehealth networks in their delivery of care VHA has implemented a dedicated quality management (QM) program for telehealth. QM data for telehealth are reviewed at 3-month intervals, and the procedures and processes in place to support telehealth in VHA are assessed biannually in an internal accreditation process called "Telehealth Conditions of Participation." This collegial, nonadversarial process has ensured that all designated telehealth programs meet minimal standards and disseminate best practice. As a result of VHA's QM program, telehealth services in VHA meet consistently high clinical outcomes and have received no adverse Joint Commission citations. The Joint Commission regularly assesses patients managed via telehealth under its tracer methodology reviews.

  8. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  9. Can object technology meet health care's programming needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, J

    1997-02-01

    Although object technology is just starting to make inroads in programming for health care applications, some observers predict it will drive information systems into the next century and beyond. Objects technology could play a major role in quicker development of the computer-based patient record and in easing the creation of links between systems.

  10. 78 FR 29441 - Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... systems for child care quality improvement. This proposed rule is driven by the same priorities and vision... into better alignment with the current knowledge in the field, result in a more comprehensive vision of... administration of the program. These proposed changes represent minimum, common-sense standards for the...

  11. Wills Eye Hospital and surgical network: successful pre-positioning strategies for payment reduction and managed care pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D M

    2001-01-01

    Through strategic clinical diversification, political activism, and bold expansion, Wills Eye Hospital, a teaching specialty surgical hospital, survives ravages of sudden onslaughts of managed care payment reductions while maintaining autonomy. Slack inpatient resources were re-utilized to create unique programs attractive to regional managed care organizations. Advocacy and lobbying for short-term favorable treatment from Medicare bought the Hospital valuable time and positioning. Building out a regional network of ambulatory surgical centers assures the growth and access to market required for Wills to maintain its autonomy in a managed care contracting environment.

  12. Hypertension management: the primary care nursing role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ehsan Ullah

    2005-03-01

    Hypertension is a prevalent chronic illness that is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Practice nurses and the district nursing team have a major role to play in its management. In this article, current British Hypertension Society guidelines are presented and discussed with regards to their evidence base. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.

  13. Musings on management. Ten ideas designed to rile everyone who cares about management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, H

    1996-01-01

    Henry Mintzberg, a professor of management at McGill University in Canada and at INSEAD in France, takes aim at the hype surrounding management fads and gurus and dares to suggest that the emperor has no clothes. In order to rile all who care about management and get them thinking creatively, he presents ten contrarian observations on such topics as the meanness of leanness, the folly of CEOs who fancy themselves strategists, the disempowering that so-called empowerment creates, the myopia of purely financial measures, and the inadequacy of M.B.A. programs. Mintzberg maintains, for example, that it is time to delayer the delayerers. He argues that delayering has created more problems than it has solved be cause it is, in essence, a process by which people who barely know what's going on get rid of those who do--a process ensuring that the real database of the organization, the key to what was its future, lines up at the unemployment office. Too many managers, he says, dream of becoming the next turnaround doctor. They fail to understand that great organizations, once created, don't need great leaders: if a company can't function on its own, a hero won't help. A leader who draws out the knowledge embedded in all parts of an organization is a leader who can help a company function alone--without heroes. Such leaders often practice what Mintzberg calls the craft style of management (as opposed to the professional style or the boss style). It is about inspiring, not empowering. It is based on mutual respect rooted in common experience and offers hope for improving what is now wrong with management.

  14. Depression Care Management: Can Employers Purchase Improved Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Rost

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen vendors are currently selling depression care management products to US employers after randomized trials demonstrate improved work outcomes. The research team interviewed 10 (71.4% of these vendors to compare their products to four key components of interventions demonstrated to improve work outcomes. Five of 10 depression products incorporate all four key components, three of which are sold by health maintenance organizations (HMOs; however, HMOs did not deliver these components at the recommended intensity and/or duration. Only one product delivered by a disease management company delivered all four components of care at the recommended intensity and duration. This “voltage drop,” which we anticipate will increase with product implementation, suggests that every delivery system should carefully evaluate the design of its depression product before implementation for its capacity to deliver evidence-based care, repeating these evaluations as new evidence emerges.

  15. Physician directed networks: the new generation of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, T; O'Sullivan, D

    1996-07-01

    The external pressure to reduce cost while maintaining quality and services is moving the whole industry into a rapid mode of integration. Hospitals, vendors, MCOs, and now, physicians, are faced with the difficult decisions concerning how their operations will be integrated into the larger health care delivery system. These pressures have forced physicians to consolidate, build leverage, and create efficiencies to become more productive; thereby better positioning themselves to respond to the challenges and the opportunities that lie before them. This initial phase of consolidation has given many physicians the momentum to begin to wrestle back the control of health care and the courage to design the next generation of managed care: Physician Directed Managed Care. What will be the next phase? Perhaps, the next step will be fully-integrated specialty and multi-specialty groups leading to alternate delivery sites. "Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." - Leo Tolstoy

  16. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  17. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  18. Managed care or managed inequality? A call for critiques of market-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylko-Bauer, Barbara; Farmer, Paul

    2002-12-01

    This review article critiques the growing dominance of market-based medicine in the United States against the background of existing problems with quality of care, rising costs, devaluation of doctor-patient relationships, and, especially, persistent inequalities of access and outcomes. It summarizes the present state of health care delivery by focusing on the concurrent trends of growth in managed care, expanding profits, increasing proportion of those uninsured, and widening racial, ethnic, and class disparities in access to care. Allowing market forces to dictate the shape of health care delivery in this country ensures that inequalities will continue to grow and modern medicine will become increasingly adept at managing inequality rather than managing (providing) care. The article challenges anthropology to become more involved in critiquing these developments and suggests how anthropologists can expand on and contextualize debates surrounding the market's role in medicine, here and abroad.

  19. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  20. Multidisciplinary care and management selection in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Ayal A; Paly, Jonathan J; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-07-01

    The management of prostate cancer is complicated by the multitude of treatment options, the lack of proven superiority of one modality of management, and the presence of physician bias. Care at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic offers patients the relative convenience of consultation with physicians of multiple specialties within the confines of a single visit and appears to serve as a venue in which patients can be counseled regarding the risks and benefits of available therapies in an open and interactive environment. Physician bias may be minimized in such an environment, and patient satisfaction rates are high. Available data suggest that low-risk patients who are seen at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic appear to select active surveillance in greater proportion. However, relatively few studies have investigated the other added value that multidisciplinary clinics provide to the patient or health care system, and therefore, additional studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary care in the management of patients with prostate cancer are needed.

  1. Improved cardiac management with a disease management program incorporating comprehensive lipid profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAna, John F; Goldfarb, Neil I; Couto, Joseph; Henry, Michelle A; Piefer, Gary; Rapier, George M

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the improved effectiveness of a disease management treatment protocol incorporating comprehensive lipid profiling and targeted lipid care based on lipid profile findings in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) or congestive heart failure (CHF) enrolled in a managed care plan. This retrospective cohort study, conducted over a 2-year period, compared outcomes between patients with a standard lipid profile to those evaluated with a comprehensive lipid profile. All adult members of the WellMed Medical Management, Inc. managed care health plan diagnosed with IHD or CHF, and continuously enrolled between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2008, were included in the study. Cases were defined as those who had at least 1 comprehensive lipid test (the VAP [vertical auto profile] ultracentrifuge test) during this period (n=1767); they were compared to those who had no lipid testing or traditional standard lipid testing only (controls, n=289). Univariate statistics were analyzed to describe the groups, and bivariate t tests or chi-squares examined differences between the 2 cohorts. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to control for potential confounders. The results show that the case group had lower total costs ($4852.62 vs. $7413.18; P=0.0255), fewer inpatient stays (13.1% vs. 18.3% of controls; P=0.0175) and emergency department visits (11.9% vs. 15.6% of controls; P=0.0832). Prescription use and frequency of lipid measurement suggested improved control resulting from a targeted approach to managing specific dyslipidemias. A treatment protocol incorporating a comprehensive lipid profile appears to improve care and reduce utilization and costs in a disease management program for cardiac patients.

  2. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Symptom Management in Cancer Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in symptom management for cancer palliative care is very common in Chinese populations but clinical evidence on their effectiveness is yet to be synthesized. To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to summarize results from CHM randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on symptoms that are undertreated in conventional cancer palliative care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. RCTs evaluating CHM, either in comb...

  3. Marketing a managed care plan: achieving product differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, N C

    1996-01-01

    The health care marketplace is changing dramatically, even without federal reform measures. This is a volatile, yet promising, time to market a managed care plan. Before marketing the product, it is critical that the competition is thoroughly evaluated and consumer and employer needs are researched. The final product should be distinguishable from the competition and address market needs. Promotion can then begin, utilizing a proactive public relations and advertising campaign in addition to traditional methods of marketing.

  4. Myasthenic crisis patients who require intensive care unit management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Uchino, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to investigate predictive factors that necessitate intensive care in myasthenic crisis (MC). We retrospectively reviewed MC patients at our institution and compared ICU and ward management groups. Higher MG-ADL scale scores, non-ocular initial symptoms, infection-triggered findings, and higher MGFA classification were observed more frequently in the ICU group. In patients with these prognostic factors, better outcomes may be obtained with early institution of intensive care.

  5. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  6. Dialogues on depression management: the primary care and specialist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Richard L; Escobar, Javier I

    2006-10-01

    Depression is a major public health problem in the United States and is responsible for an enormous economic burden and loss of productivity and quality of life. In many cases, PCPs are well situated to identify and treat unrecognized depression, but an optimal treatment program often comprises both medical and psychotherapeutic interventions. Many collaborative models that integrate the efforts of PCPs, psychiatrists, behavioral health organizations, and workplace assistance programs are being tested and may prove to be the best direction for improving care for patients with depression. Looking ahead, improvement in treatment of depression will depend on numerous factors, including educating health care practitioners to recognize silent depression, expanding current collaborative models to cover more of the population, involving MCOs and payers in the development of effective treatment systems, and improving workplace-support programs to encourage more patients to seek appropriate care.

  7. Facilities Management and Health Care at Home

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the new requirements that will be put upon the facilities management when the elderly are living longer in their own homes, in spite of illness, impairment and old age. For many reasons, especially demographic ones, this issue has come to the fore and since it has substantial political impact and considerably affects our living conditions, it will most certainly appear on the agenda of most Swedish housing companies in the near future. The growing number of inhabit...

  8. Quality assurance and risk management: a survey of dental schools and recommendations for integrated program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredekind, Richard E; Cuny, Eve J; Nadershahi, Nader A

    2002-04-01

    Quality assurance (QA) and risk management (RM) programs are intended to improve patient care, meet accreditation standards, and ensure compliance with liability insurance policies. The purpose of this project was to obtain and disseminate information on whether dental schools integrate QA and RM and what mechanisms have been most effective in measuring accomplishments in these programs. All sixty-five U.S. and Canadian dental schools were sent a twenty-nine-item survey, and forty-six (71 percent) schools responded. The main findings are as follows: 66 percent had a written QA program combined with a QA committee; 95 percent received administrative support; there was wide variation in the makeup of the QA committee; many institutions reported significant changes resulting from the QA program; and over half of the respondents merged QA and RM in some fashion. To develop or maintain an effective QA/RM program, the authors propose the following: obtain active support from the dean; develop goals and mission/vision statements; include trained personnel on the committee; establish wide levels of involvement in the QA program; develop QA measurements to ensure compliance with institutionally developed standards of patient care; and establish continuous cycles of improvement.

  9. [Organization of health services and tuberculosis care management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrêto, Anne Jaquelyne Roque; de Sá, Lenilde Duarte; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Pinheiro, Patrícia Geórgia de Oliveira Diniz; de Farias, Nilma Maria Porto; Rodrigues, Débora Cezar de Souza; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2012-07-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the discourse of managers regarding the relationship between the organization of the health services and tuberculosis care management in a city in the metropolitan region of João Pessoa, State of Pernambuco. Using qualitative research in the analytical field of the French line of Discourse Analysis, 16 health workers who worked as members of the management teams took part in the study. The transcribed testimonials were organized using Atlas.ti version 6.0 software. After detailed reading of the empirical material, an attempt was made to identify the paraphrasic, polyssemic and metaphoric processes in the discourses, which enabled identification of the following discourse formation: Organization of the health services and the relation with TB care management: theory and practice. In the discourse of the managers the fragmentation of the actions of control of tuberculosis, the lack of articulation between the services and sectors, the compliance of the specific activities for TB, as well as the lack of strategic planning for management of care of the disease are clearly revealed. In this respect, for the organization of the health services to be effective, it is necessary that tuberculosis be considered a priority and acknowledged as a social problem in the management agenda.

  10. Continuity in health care: lessons from supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijboom, Bert R; Bakx, Saskia J W G C; Westert, Gert P

    2010-01-01

    In health care, multidisciplinary collaboration is both indispensable and complicated. We discuss organizational problems that occur in situations where multiple health care providers are required to cooperate for patients with complex needs. Four problem categories, labelled as communication, patient safety, waiting times and integration are distinguished. Then we develop a supply chain perspective on these problems in the sense of discussing remedies according to supply chain management (SCM) literature. This perspective implies a business focus on inter-organizational conditions and requirements necessary for delivering health care and cure across organizational borders. We conclude by presenting some strategic and policy recommendations.

  11. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.

  12. American Organization of Nurse Executives Care Innovation and Transformation program: improving care and practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlies, Amanda Stefancyk

    2014-09-01

    The American Organization of Nurse Executives conducted an evaluation of the hospitals participating in the Care Innovation and Transformation (CIT) program. A total of 24 hospitals participated in the 2-year CIT program from 2012 to 2013. Reported outcomes include increased patient satisfaction, decreased falls, and reductions in nurse turnover and overtime. Nurses reported statistically significant improvements in 4 domains of the principles and elements of a healthful practice environment developed by the Nursing Organizations Alliance.

  13. Managed care, deficit financing, and aggregate health care expenditure in the United States: a cointegration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, N R; Okunade, A A

    2000-09-01

    We applied a battery of cointegration tests comprising those of Johansen and Juselius [19], Phillips and Hansen [35], and Engle and Granger [6], to model aggregate health care expenditure using 1960-96 US data. The existence of a stable long-run economic relationship or cointegration is confirmed, in the United States, between aggregate health care expenditure and real GDP, population age distribution, managed care enrollment, number of practicing physicians, and government deficits. The evidence of cointegration among these variables, chosen on the theoretical basis of prior studies, implies that while they are individually non-stationary in levels, together they are highly correlated and move, in the long run to form an economic equilibrium relationship of US aggregate health care expenditure. More specifically, and for the first time in this line of inquiry, (i) managed care enrollment is found to be negatively associated with the level of health care spending, (ii) supply disinduced demand effects of physicians tend to moderate health expenditure, and (iii) government deficit financing is positively related to health care spending. The observed sign and magnitude of the income coefficient are consistent with health care being a luxury good.

  14. Transitional care programs: who is left behind? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Piraino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Older adults are at risk of rehospitalization if their care transitions from hospital-to-home are not properly managed. The objective of this review was to determine if older patient populations recruited for randomized controlled trials of transitional care interventions represented those at greatest risk of rehospitalization following discharge.  Relevant risk factors examined were cognitive impairment, depression, polypharmacy, comorbidity, length of stay, advanced non-malignant diseases, and available social support.DESIGN: Systematic Review.SETTING: Hospital to home.PARTICIPANTS: Older hospitalized adults.MEASUREMENTS: For inclusion, articles were required to focus on hospital-to-home transitions with a self-care component, have components occurring both before and after discharge, and a randomized controlled trial design. Articles were excluded if participants had a mean age under 55 years, or if interventions focused on developmental disabilities, youth, addictions, or case management, or were solely primary-care based.RESULTS:  Following title, abstract, and full review by two authors, 17 articles met inclusion criteria.  Risk factors for rehospitalization were often listed either as exclusion criteria or were not reported at baseline by the studies. One study included patients with all identified risk factors for rehospitalization.CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that published studies of transitional care interventions do not often include older adults at highest risk of rehospitalization, raising concerns about the generalizability of their results. Studies are needed that evaluate interventions that explicitly address the needs and characteristics of these patients.

  15. Transitional care programs: who is left behind? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Piraino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Older adults are at risk of rehospitalization if their care transitions from hospital-to-home are not properly managed. The objective of this review was to determine if older patient populations recruited for randomized controlled trials of transitional care interventions represented those at greatest risk of rehospitalization following discharge.  Relevant risk factors examined were cognitive impairment, depression, polypharmacy, comorbidity, length of stay, advanced non-malignant diseases, and available social support. DESIGN: Systematic Review. SETTING: Hospital to home. PARTICIPANTS: Older hospitalized adults. MEASUREMENTS: For inclusion, articles were required to focus on hospital-to-home transitions with a self-care component, have components occurring both before and after discharge, and a randomized controlled trial design. Articles were excluded if participants had a mean age under 55 years, or if interventions focused on developmental disabilities, youth, addictions, or case management, or were solely primary-care based. RESULTS:  Following title, abstract, and full review by two authors, 17 articles met inclusion criteria.  Risk factors for rehospitalization were often listed either as exclusion criteria or were not reported at baseline by the studies. One study included patients with all identified risk factors for rehospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that published studies of transitional care interventions do not often include older adults at highest risk of rehospitalization, raising concerns about the generalizability of their results. Studies are needed that evaluate interventions that explicitly address the needs and characteristics of these patients.

  16. Influences on the career commitment of health-care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrtle, Robert C; Chen, Duan-Rung; Liu, Caroline; Fahey, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    The health-care field is undergoing rapid and significant transformation. This transformation has led to the breakdown of traditional career paths for managers in the patient care segment of the industry. To our knowledge, there has not been a systematic examination of how these changes have impacted on the career commitment of managers in this segment of the industry. Building on previous research, we examine the effects of employment-related conditions and career experiences on the career commitment of these managers while controlling for the influence of individual characteristics. Specifically we assess the relationship between employment-related conditions, such as job security, position tenure, industry segment, management level and the extent to which their current position meets their career expectations, and their career experiences, including moving from a non-health-care management position, moving from a different health-care sector, their career stage, career patterns and their satisfaction with their career progression. We found that measures associated with the different employment-related experiences had a more significant influence on career commitment than those measures associated with different career experiences.

  17. 76 FR 67801 - Medicare Program; Medicare Shared Savings Program: Accountable Care Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Participating in ACOs c. Antitrust Policy Statement d. Coordinating the Shared Savings Program Application With...) Identification of Primary Care Services Rendered in FQHCs and RHCs (2) Identification of the Type of Practitioner... Insurance Program CMP Civil Monetary Penalties CMS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services CNM...

  18. 1998 Environmental Management Science Program Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-03-01

    The Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is a collaborative partnership between the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science (DOE-SC), and the Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to sponsor basic environmental and waste management related research. Results are expected to lead to reduction of the costs, schedule, and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. The EMSP research portfolio addresses the most challenging technical problems of the EM program related to high level waste, spent nuclear fuel, mixed waste, nuclear materials, remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and health, ecology, or risk. The EMSP was established in response to a mandate from Congress in the fiscal year 1996 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. Congress directed the Department to ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs, develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective''. This mandate followed similar recommendations from the Galvin Commission to the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. The EMSP also responds to needs identified by National Academy of Sciences experts, regulators, citizen advisory groups, and other stakeholders.

  19. [Geertz' Interpretive Theory and care management: visualizing nurses' social practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Adelina Giacomelli; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical reflection on hospital nursing care management and Geertz' Interpretive Theory of Culture. We discuss some significant elements of culture in management, based on the theoretical reference frameworks of nursing, administration and anthropology. In these, the importance of cultural diversity is highlighted as an innovative resource to expand the vision of human integrity, valuing divergences, respect and sharing, which are important for nurses in the construction of their social practice.

  20. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaenglein, Andrea L; Pathy, Arun L; Schlosser, Bethanee J; Alikhan, Ali; Baldwin, Hilary E; Berson, Diane S; Bowe, Whitney P; Graber, Emmy M; Harper, Julie C; Kang, Sewon; Keri, Jonette E; Leyden, James J; Reynolds, Rachel V; Silverberg, Nanette B; Stein Gold, Linda F; Tollefson, Megha M; Weiss, Jonathan S; Dolan, Nancy C; Sagan, Andrew A; Stern, Mackenzie; Boyer, Kevin M; Bhushan, Reva

    2016-05-01

    Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults and can also be seen in children. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. Issues from grading of acne to the topical and systemic management of the disease are reviewed. Suggestions on use are provided based on available evidence.

  1. Critical care management of severe traumatic brain injury in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad Samir H; Arabi Yaseen M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical and socio-economic problem, and is the leading cause of death in children and young adults. The critical care management of severe TBI is largely derived from the "Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury" that have been published by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The main objectives are prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension and secondary brain insults, preservation of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP...

  2. Independent practice associations and physician-hospital organizations can improve care management for smaller practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Wu, Frances M; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance, public reporting, and accountable care organization programs place pressures on physicians to use health information technology and organized care management processes to improve the care they provide. But physician practices that are not large may lack the resources and size to implement such processes. We used data from a unique national survey of 1,164 practices with fewer than twenty physicians to provide the first information available on the extent to which independent practice associations (IPAs) and physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) might make it possible for these smaller practices to share resources to improve care. Nearly a quarter of the practices participated in an IPA or a PHO that accounted for a significant proportion of their patients. On average, practices participating in these organizations provided nearly three times as many care management processes for patients with chronic conditions as nonparticipating practices did (10.4 versus 3.8). Half of these processes were provided only by IPAs or PHOs. These organizations may provide a way for small and medium-size practices to systematically improve care and participate in accountable care organizations.

  3. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandourh, Wsam A

    2016-12-01

    Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between patients' and physicians' expectations by investigating three primary issues: (1) the factors associated with patients developing unrealistic expectations; (2) the implications of having unrealistic hopes and the effects of raising patients' awareness about prognosis; and (3) patients' and caregivers' perspective on disclosure and their preferences for communication styles. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases including Pubmed, EMBASE and ScienceDirect using multiple combinations of keywords, which yielded a total of 65 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The discrepancy between patients' and doctors' expectations was associated with many factors including doctors' reluctance to disclose terminal prognoses and patients' ability to understand or accept such information. The majority of patients and caregivers expressed a desire for detailed prognostic information; however, varied responses have been reported on the preferred style of conveying such information. Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.

  4. Development of an allergy management support system in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flokstra - de Blok, Bertine MJ; van der Molen, Thys; Christoffers, Wianda A; Kocks, Janwillem WH; Oei, Richard L; Oude Elberink, Joanne NG; Roerdink, Emmy M; Schuttelaar, Marie Louise; van der Velde, Jantina L; Brakel, Thecla M; Dubois, Anthony EJ

    2017-01-01

    Background Management of allergic patients in the population is becoming more difficult because of increases in both complexity and prevalence. Although general practitioners (GPs) are expected to play an important role in the care of allergic patients, they often feel ill-equipped for this task. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an allergy management support system (AMSS) for primary care. Methods Through literature review, interviewing and testing in secondary and primary care patients, an allergy history questionnaire was constructed by allergists, dermatologists, GPs and researchers based on primary care and specialists’ allergy guidelines and their clinical knowledge. Patterns of AMSS questionnaire responses and specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE)-test outcomes were used to identify diagnostic categories and develop corresponding management recommendations. Validity of the AMSS was investigated by comparing specialist (gold standard) and AMSS diagnostic categories. Results The two-page patient-completed AMSS questionnaire consists of 12 (mainly) multiple choice questions on symptoms, triggers, severity and medication. Based on the AMSS questionnaires and sIgE-test outcome of 118 patients, approximately 150 diagnostic categories of allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, anaphylaxis, food allergy, hymenoptera allergy and other allergies were identified, and the corresponding management recommendations were formulated. The agreement between the allergy specialists’ assessments and the AMSS was 69.2% (CI 67.2–71.2). Conclusion Using a systematic approach, it was possible to develop an AMSS that allows for the formulation of diagnostic and management recommendations for GPs managing allergic patients. The AMSS thus holds promise for the improvement of the quality of primary care for this increasing group of patients. PMID:28352197

  5. Tennessee Star-Quality Child Care Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Tennessee's Star-Quality Child Care Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  6. Integrative care for the management of low back pain: use of a clinical care pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legendre Claire G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the treatment of chronic back pain, it has been theorized that integrative care plans can lead to better outcomes than those achieved by monodisciplinary care alone, especially when using a collaborative, interdisciplinary, and non-hierarchical team approach. This paper describes the use of a care pathway designed to guide treatment by an integrative group of providers within a randomized controlled trial. Methods A clinical care pathway was used by a multidisciplinary group of providers, which included acupuncturists, chiropractors, cognitive behavioral therapists, exercise therapists, massage therapists and primary care physicians. Treatment recommendations were based on an evidence-informed practice model, and reached by group consensus. Research study participants were empowered to select one of the treatment recommendations proposed by the integrative group. Common principles and benchmarks were established to guide treatment management throughout the study. Results Thirteen providers representing 5 healthcare professions collaborated to provide integrative care to study participants. On average, 3 to 4 treatment plans, each consisting of 2 to 3 modalities, were recommended to study participants. Exercise, massage, and acupuncture were both most commonly recommended by the team and selected by study participants. Changes to care commonly incorporated cognitive behavioral therapy into treatment plans. Conclusion This clinical care pathway was a useful tool for the consistent application of evidence-based care for low back pain in the context of an integrative setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00567333

  7. Quality of management in the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgenhammar, E

    1990-01-01

    Quality of management is a necessary, yet not sufficient, prerequisite in quality of care. There are two main approaches to improved quality. One is the individualist approach, where the role of the manager is emphasized. The other is the contextual approach. Focus is on managerial prerequisites such as organizational structure, culture, participation in decision making, and use of management time. Individualist as well as contextualist approaches are presented. Each decade during the 20th century has had its own "pet theory" regarding what problems the manager should allocate time on. A study of 41 Nordic public health researchers illustrates that cost-benefit analysis is the best known of ten theories. Management ethics, with the manager as ideologist, is seen as particularly demanding on managerial creativity.

  8. A new "loyalty rewards" program in health care customer relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macstravic, Scott

    2006-01-01

    "Loyalty rewards" in sponsored DM and HRM programs can apply to both providers and consumers. Physicians and hospitals can be paid to "loyally" adhere to payers' guidelines for managing diseases and risks. Many payer and their outsourced vendor programs include significant efforts to create collaborations between payer and provider, rather than relying on unilateral efforts. And growing numbers are rewarding providers for their efforts and results achieved.

  9. National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, B

    2002-04-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has the mission of supporting Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science research in high-energy-density plasmas. To execute those missions, the facility must provide diagnostic instrumentation capable of observing and resolving in time events and radiation emissions characteristic of the plasmas of interest. The diagnostic instrumentation must conform to high standards of operability and reliability within the NIF environment. These exacting standards, together with the facility mission of supporting a diverse user base, has led to the need for a central organization charged with delivering diagnostic capability to the NIF. The National NIF Diagnostics Program (NNDP) has been set up under the aegis of the NIF Director to provide that organization authority and accountability to the wide user community for NIF. The funds necessary to perform the work of developing diagnostics for NIF will be allocated from the National NIF Diagnostics Program to the participating laboratories and organizations. The participating laboratories and organizations will design, build, and commission the diagnostics for NIF. Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize NIF Core Diagnostics Systems and Cryogenic Target Handing Systems, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems has been initiated and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National NIF Diagnostics Program Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope

  10. The transfer of a health insurance/managed care business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, John N; Goodman, George; Goroff, David B

    2007-01-01

    The owners of a health insurance/managed care business may want to sell that business for a variety of reasons. Health care provider systems may want to exit that business due to operating losses, difficulty in complying with regulations, the inherent conflict in operating that business as part of a provider system, or the desire to focus on being a health care provider. Health insurers/HMOs may want to sell all or a portion of their business due to operating losses, difficulty in servicing a particular market, or a desire to focus on other markets. No matter what reason prompts a seller to undertake a sale, a sale of health insurance/managed care business can be a complicated transaction involving a multitude of issues. This article will focus first on the ways in which such a sale may be structured. The article will then discuss some transactional issues that may arise in the negotiations for the sale of a health insurance/managed care business. The article will then focus on some particular legal issues that arise in each sale-e.g., antitrust, HIPAA, regulatory approvals, and charitable issues. Finally, this article will provide an overview of tax structuring considerations.

  11. Awareness and Practice of Biomedical Waste Management Among Different Health Care Personnel at Tertiary Care Centre, Rajkot, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh K Chudasama

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bio medical waste collection and proper disposal has become a significant concern for both the medical and general community. Objective: To know the awareness and practice of biomedical waste management (BMW among health care personnel working at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The study was conducted from January 2013 to June 2013. It was a descriptive observational hospital based cross sectional study. Study participants included the resident and intern doctors, nursing staff, laboratory technicians, sanitary staff (ward boys, aaya and sweepers working in the P D U Government Medical College and Civil Hospital, Rajkot who are dealing with BMW. The study was conducted by using pretested, semi-structured pro forma. Results: Total 282 health care personnel participated, including 123 resident and intern doctors, 92 nursing personnel, 13 laboratory technicians and 54 sanitary staff. Only 44.3% study participants received training for bio medical waste management. Except for doctors (98.4%, awareness regarding identification and use of color coded bags as per BMW act, was very poor among health care personnel. Record keeping for injuries related to biomedical waste was very poor for all health care personnel. Significant number of paramedics maintained record of BMW at work place, practiced disinfection and segregation of BMW at work place, used personal protective measures while handling BMW. Significant number of resident and intern doctors practiced correct method for collecting sharps and needles than paramedical staff. Conclusion: Intensive training program at regular time interval and a system of monitoring and surveillance about practice of day to day BMW management should be evolved.

  12. An evaluation of a managed care project from the patients perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, J.J.; Delnoij, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The American concept of managed care has found its way into European health care since the late nineties. The ultimate goal of managed care is to improve the efficiency of health care through promoting the quality of care and controlling the costs. A large Dutch health insurer initiated

  13. Medicaid Managed Care and Individuals with Disabilities: Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Richard; Braddock, David

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes information presented in the American Association on Mental Retardation's 1998 publication, "State of the States in Developmental Disabilities" (Braddock, Hemp, Parish, and Westrich), which reports data on the implementation of managed care for persons with developmental disabilities. A table summarizes information about enrollment of…

  14. Update on the critical care management of severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Kevin R; Makley, Amy T; Kagan, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Care of the severely injured patient with burn requires correct diagnosis, appropriately tailored resuscitation, and definitive surgical management to reduce morbidity and mortality. Currently, mortality rates related to severe burn injuries continue to steadily decline due to the standardization of a multidisciplinary approach instituted at tertiary health care centers. Prompt and accurate diagnoses of burn wounds utilizing Lund-Browder diagrams allow for appropriate operative and nonoperative management. Coupled with diagnostic improvements, advances in resuscitation strategies involving rates, volumes, and fluid types have yielded demonstrable benefits related to all aspects of burn care. More recently, identification of comorbid conditions such as inhalation injury and malnutrition have produced appropriate protocols that aid the healing process in severely injured patients with burn. As more patients survive larger burn injuries, the early diagnosis and successful treatment of secondary and tertiary complications are becoming commonplace. While advances in this area are exciting, much work to elucidate immune pathways, diagnostic tests, and effective treatment regimens still remain. This review will provide an update on the critical care management of severe burns, touching on accurate diagnosis, resuscitation, and acute management of this difficult patient population.

  15. The Nurturing Teacher: Managing the Stress of Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    This book tackles the concerns of stressed teachers. Whether from nurturance suffering (stress related to caring for students) or from the piles of paperwork yet to be tackled, this text helps the reader sort through the causes of stress, the emotional, physical and social reactions to stress and how one can begin to plan a stress management plan.…

  16. The VA Maryland Health Care System's telemental health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Edward F

    2012-05-01

    The VA Maryland Health Care System introduced videoconferencing technology to provide psychiatry, evidenced-based psychotherapy, case management, and patient education at rural clinics where it was difficult to recruit providers. Telemental health services enable rural clinics to offer additional services, such as case management and patient education. Services have been expanded to urban outpatient clinics where a limited number of mental health clinic hours are available. This technology expands the availability of mental health providers and services, allowing patients to receive services from providers located at distant medical centers.

  17. Managing information technology human resources in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Sathiadev; Crow, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    The health care sector has seen a major increase in the use of information technology (IT). The increasing permeation of IT into the enterprise has resulted in many non-IT employees acquiring IT-related skills and becoming an essential part of the IT-enabled enterprise. Health care IT employees work in a continually changing environment dealing with new specializations that are often unfamiliar to other personnel. The widespread use of outsourcing and offshoring in IT has introduced a third layer of complexity in the traditional hierarchy and its approach to managing human resources. This article studies 3 major issues in managing these human resources in an IT-enabled health care enterprise and recommends solutions to the problem.

  18. 7 CFR 225.4 - Program management and administration plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program management and administration plan. 225.4... Provisions § 225.4 Program management and administration plan. (a) Not later than February 15 of each year, each State agency shall submit to FNSRO a Program management and administration plan for that...

  19. An Analysis of the Radio Program Manager Occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Jerry; Stella, Phillip.

    This occupational analysis data was assembled to help broadcasting arts teachers develop a course of study in program management for junior and senior high school students. Following a job description for a program manager, the remainder of the content in standard task analysis format presents an analysis of nine program management duties (tasks).…

  20. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  1. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  2. University Program Management Information System: NASA's University Program Active Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Office of Education/N.

  3. Primary care management of opioid use disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anita; Kahan, Meldon; Nader, Maya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To advise physicians on which treatment options to recommend for specific patient populations: abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance, or methadone maintenance. Sources of information PubMed was searched and literature was reviewed on the effectiveness, safety, and side effect profiles of abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, and methadone treatment. Both observational and interventional studies were included. Main message Both methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone are substantially more effective than abstinence-based treatment. Methadone has higher treatment retention rates than buprenorphine-naloxone does, while buprenorphine-naloxone has a lower risk of overdose. For all patient groups, physicians should recommend methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone treatment over abstinence-based treatment (level I evidence). Methadone is preferred over buprenorphine-naloxone for patients at higher risk of treatment dropout, such as injection opioid users (level I evidence). Youth and pregnant women who inject opioids should also receive methadone first (level III evidence). If buprenorphine-naloxone is prescribed first, the patient should be promptly switched to methadone if withdrawal symptoms, cravings, or opioid use persist despite an optimal buprenorphine-naloxone dose (level II evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is recommended for socially stable prescription oral opioid users, particularly if their work or family commitments make it difficult for them to attend the pharmacy daily, if they have a medical or psychiatric condition requiring regular primary care (level IV evidence), or if their jobs require higher levels of cognitive functioning or psychomotor performance (level III evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is also recommended for patients at high risk of methadone toxicity, such as the elderly, those taking high doses of benzodiazepines or other sedating drugs, heavy drinkers, those with a lower

  4. House Calls: California Program For Homebound Patients Reduces Monthly Spending, Delivers Meaningful Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Glenn A; Green, Lois; Rich, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In 2009 HealthCare Partners Affiliates Medical Group, based in Southern California, launched House Calls, an in-home program that provides, coordinates, and manages care primarily for recently discharged high-risk, frail, and psychosocially compromised patients. Its purpose is to reduce preventable emergency department visits and hospital readmissions. We present data over time from this well-established program to provide an example for other new programs that are being established across the United States to serve this population with complex needs. The findings show that the initial House Calls structure, staffing patterns, and processes differed across the geographic areas that it served, and that they also evolved over time in different ways. In the same time period, all areas experienced a reduction in operating costs per patient and showed substantial reductions in monthly per patient health care spending and hospital utilization after enrollment in the House Calls program, compared to the period before enrollment. Despite more than five years of experience, the program structure continues to evolve and adjust staffing and other features to accommodate the dynamic nature of this complex patient population.

  5. Acute stroke: postprocedural care and management of complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Flávio Augusto; de Figueiredo, Marcelo Marinho; Silva, Gisele Sampaio

    2012-03-01

    Endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke is an important alternative to thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for patients who present beyond the thrombolysis time window, those who are ineligible for rt-PA, or those who do not improve after intravenous rt-PA. These patients generally require special attention in the postprocedural period because, although not frequent, complications of endovascular procedures in acute ischemic stroke have the potential to be devastating. Neurocritical care is essential to reduce and appropriately treat complications after endovascular procedures. Neurointensivists and neurocritical care nurses are experts in both critical care and neurologic disorders and have special training to recognize early physiological derangements in patients presenting with acute stroke. Close attention to the serial neurological examination, blood pressure control, adequate management of glucose, temperature, and immediate identification of complications such as reocclusion and hemorrhagic transformation are key elements that exemplify the importance of postprocedural neurocritical care in acute ischemic stroke.

  6. NASA University Program Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA:s objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. NASA field codes and certain Headquarters program offices provide funds for those activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. Although NASA has no predetermined amount of money to devote to university activities, the effort funded each year is substantial. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA:s Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.* This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education, using a management information system which was modernized during FY 1993.

  7. 20 CFR 632.76 - Program management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program management systems. 632.76 Section... management systems. (a) All Native American grantees shall establish management information systems to... for the overall management of all programs including: (1) Eligibility verification systems...

  8. Diagnosing and managing psychosis in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kate; Brain, Susannah; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2011-05-01

    Psychosis is broadly defined as the presence of delusions and hallucinations. It can be organic or functional. The former is secondary to an underlying medical condition, such as delirium or dementia, the latter to a psychiatric disorder, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The identification and treatment of psychosis is vital as it is associated with a 10% lifetime risk of suicide and significant social exclusion. Psychosis can be recognised by taking a thorough history, examining the patient's mental state and obtaining a collateral history. The history usually enables a distinction to be made between bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other causes. Early symptoms often include low mood, declining educational or occupational functioning, poor motivation, changes in sleep, perceptual changes, suspiciousness and mistrust. The patient's appearance, e.g. unkempt or inappropriately attired, may reflect their predominant mental state. There may be signs of agitation, hostility or distractibility. Speech may be disorganised and difficult to follow or there may be evidence of decreased speech. Mood may be depressed or elated or change rapidly. Patients may describe abnormal thoughts and enquiry into thoughts of suicide should be routine. Disturbances of thought such as insertion or withdrawal may be present along with perceptual abnormalities i.e. illusions, hallucinations. Insight varies during the course of a psychotic illness but should be explored as it has implications for management. All patients presenting with first episode psychosis for which no organic cause can be found should be referred to the local early intervention service. In patients with a known diagnosis consider referral if there is: poor response or nonadherence to treatment; intolerable side effects; comorbid substance misuse; risk to self or others.

  9. Prematurity and programming: contribution of neonatal Intensive Care Unit interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, S C; Wilson-Costello, D

    2013-04-01

    Contemporary clinical practice for the care of the prematurely born babies has markedly improved their rates of survival so that most of these babies are expected to grow up to live a healthy functional life. Since the clinical follow-up is of short duration (years), only limited data are available to relate non-communicable diseases in adult life to events and interventions in the neonatal period. The major events that could have a programming effect include: (1) intrauterine growth restriction; (2) interruption of pregnancy with change in redox and reactive oxygen species (ROS) injury; (3) nutritional and pharmacological protocols for clinical care; and (4) nutritional care in the first 2 years resulting in accelerated weight gain. The available data are discussed in the context of perturbations in one carbon (methyl transfer) metabolism and its possible programming effects. Although direct evidence for genomic methylation is not available, clinical and experimental data on impact of redox and ROS, of low protein intake, excess methionine load and vitamin A, on methyl transfers are reviewed. The consequences of antenatal and postnatal administration of glucocorticoids are presented. Analysis of the correlates of insulin sensitivity at older age, suggests that premature birth is the major contributor, and is compounded by gain in weight during infancy. We speculate that premature interruption of pregnancy and neonatal interventions by affecting one carbon metabolism may cause programming effects on the immature baby. These can be additive to the effects of intrauterine environment (growth restriction) and are compounded by accelerated growth in early infancy.

  10. Fact Sheet: Risk Management Plan (RMP) Audit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk management programs, which consist of a hazard assessment, a prevention program, and an emergency response program; must be periodically audited to assess whether the plans are adequate or need to be revised to comply with the regulation.

  11. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  12. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  13. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability.

  14. Program evaluation of Sea Mar’s Chronic Care Program for Latino and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes: providers and staff perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bond GE

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gail E Bond,1 Laurie Rechholtz,1 Christina Bosa,1 Celine Impert,1,2 Sara Barker21College of Nursing, Seattle University, Seattle WA, USA; 2Sea Mar Community Health Center, Seattle, WA, USAProblem statement: Unprecedented consumption of health care resources in the USA coupled with increasing rates of chronic disease has fueled pursuit of improved models of health care delivery. The Chronic Care Model provides an organizational framework for chronic care management and practice improvement. Sea Mar, a community health care organization in Washington state, implemented the Chronic Care Model, but has not evaluated the outcomes related to provider and staff satisfaction. The specific aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Chronic Care Model with the addition of the Chronic Care Coordinator role.Approach: A descriptive method was used, which incorporated quantitative, and qualitative data from providers and clinic staff collected through a Web-based survey consisting of Likert-type questions sent via an electronic link.Results: This evaluation identified the strengths of and barriers to the chronic care model with a focus on provider and staff satisfaction regarding patient care since the addition of the Chronic Care Coordinator role. We found a high appreciation (94% and acceptance of the role; 80% agreed that the Chronic Care Coordinator was well-integrated into clinic operations. Major strengths of the program included more patient education, better follow-up, and improved team communications. Barriers to success included limited provider access, confusion regarding role expectations of the Chronic Care Coordinator, inconsistent communications, and Chronic Care Coordinator turnover.Conclusions/recommendations: Our findings help to validate the importance of community health organizations such as Sea Mar, the utility of the chronic care model, and the potential value for specific roles such as the Chronic Care Coordinator to

  15. The Impact of a Telephone-Based Chronic Disease Management Program on Medical Expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, George; Cook, David; Talens, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    The impact of a payer-provided telephone-based chronic disease management program on medical expenditures was evaluated using claims data from 126,245 members in employer self-ensured health plans (16,224 with a chronic disease in a group enrolled in the self-management program, 13,509 with a chronic disease in a group not participating in the program). A random effects regression model controlling for retrospective risk, age, sex, and diagnosis with a chronic disease was used to determine the impact of program participation on market-adjusted health care expenditures. Further confirmation of results was obtained by an ordinary least squares model comparing market- and risk-adjusted costs to the length of participation in the program. Participation in the program is associated with an average annual savings of $1157.91 per enrolled member in health care expenditures. Savings increase with the length of participation in the program. The results support the use of telephone-based patient self-management of chronic disease as a cost-effective means to reduce health care expenditures in the working-age population. (Population Health Management 2016;19:156-162).

  16. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Johanson da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management.METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed.RESULTS: four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (demotivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method.CONCLUSIONS: the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (discontinuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model.

  17. Defense Health Care: Acquisition Process for TRICARE’s Third Generation of Managed Care Support Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Selection Team Roles and Responsibilities for TRICARE’s Contract Award Process 11 Figure 3: Timeline of Bid Protest Events for TRICARE’s North Region...14-195 TRICARE Managed Care Support Contracts Figure 2: Source Selection Team Roles and Responsibilities for TRICARE’s Contract Award Process

  18. Uncertain Programming for Network Revenue Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyi Mou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model for airline network seat inventory control problem is usually investigated to maximize the total revenue under some constraints such as capacities and demands. This paper presents a chance-constrained programming model based on the uncertainty theory for network revenue management, in which the fares and the demands are both uncertain variables rather than random variables. The uncertain programming model can be transformed into a deterministic form by taking expected value on objective function and confidence level on the constraint functions. Based on the strategy of nested booking limits, a solution method of booking control is developed to solve the problem. Finally, this paper gives a numerical example to show that the method is practical and efficient.

  19. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Al-WahbiDepartment of Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City and King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyahd, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Diabetic foot complications are a leading cause of lower extremity amputation. With the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the Arab world, specifically in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the rate of amputation will rise significantly. A diabetic foot care program was implemented at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2002. The program was directed at health care staff and patients to increase their awareness about diabetic foot care and prevention of complications. The purpose of this study was to perform a primary evaluation of the program’s impact on the rate of lower extremity amputation due to diabetic foot complications.Method: This pilot study was the first analysis of the diabetic foot care program and examined two groups of participants for comparison, ie, a “before” group having had diabetic foot ulcers managed between 1983, when the hospital was first established, and 2002 when the program began and an “after group” having had foot ulcers managed between 2002 and 2004, in the program’s initial phase. A total of 41 charts were randomly chosen retrospectively. A data sheet containing age, gender, medical data, and the presentation, management, and outcome of diabetic foot cases was used for the analysis.Results: The before group contained 20 patients (17 males and the after group contained 21 patients (16 males. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to age and comorbidities. The rate of amputation was 70% in the before group and 61.9% in the after group. There was a decrease in the percentage of toe amputation in the after group and an increase in the percentage of below-knee amputation in the before group. However, these changes were not significant.Conclusion: The program, although evaluated at an early

  20. Management of liver cirrhosis between primary care and specialists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignazio Grattagliano; Enzo Ubaldi; Leonilde Bonfrate; Piero Portincasa

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses a practical, evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and management of liver cirrhosis by focusing on etiology, severity, presence of complications, and potential home-managed treatments. Relevant literature from 1985 to 2010 (PubMed) was reviewed. The search criteria were peer-reviewed full papers published in English using the following MESH headings alone or in combination: "ascites", "liver fibrosis","cirrhosis", "chronic hepatitis", "chronic liver disease","decompensated cirrhosis", "hepatic encephalopathy","hypertransaminasemia", "liver transplantation" and "portal hypertension". Forty-nine papers were selected based on the highest quality of evidence for each section and type (original, randomized controlled trial, guideline, and review article), with respect to specialist setting (Gastroenterology,Hepatology, and Internal Medicine) and primary care. Liver cirrhosis from any cause represents an emerging health issue due to the increasing prevalence of the disease and its complications worldwide. Primary care physicians play a key role in early identification of risk factors, in the management of patients for improving quality and length of life, and for preventing complications.Specialists, by contrast, should guide specific treatments, especially in the case of complications and for selecting patient candidates for liver transplantation. An integrated approach between specialists and primary care physicians is essential for providing better outcomes and appropriate home care for patients with liver cirrhosis.

  1. Nurses in abortion care: identifying and managing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Allyson; Fothergill, Anne

    2009-02-01

    The psychological impact of abortion on the women undergoing the procedure is well researched, but little is known about the potential psychological impact on nurses working in abortion care. The proportion of medical abortions in the UK is rising compared to surgical abortions. A recent research study found that being more directly involved in the procedure places more emotional demands on the nurses. This emotional labour required by nurses working in abortion care may increase their stress levels. This paper examines the potential increase in stress in nurses caused by medical abortions. A model of stress comprising stressors, moderators and stress outcomes was used as a framework for this examination. Research on abortion and mental health nursing was applied to managing stress in abortion care; this included coping mechanisms, prevention and intervention strategies. This showed that stress, burnout and coping are important issues in abortion care. On this basis, recommendations for practice have been formulated to inform practice for nurses and managers in abortion care.

  2. Nurse case managers: patient care implications at a Pakistani university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walani, Laila

    The role of the nurse in hospital is varied and some are choosing to incorporate more managerial and administrative skills into their clinical role. One such role is that of the nurse case manager (NCM). This particular role concentrates on involving the family and the patient in his or her own care, facilitation of the care plan, and open discussions between the patient, medics and nursing staff. NCMs in the author's hospital have made a remarkable contribution to patient care. It is a challenging and exceedingly demanding role in both developing and developed countries, but one that is increasingly important. The NCMs are involved in coordination, facilitation of core process and mobilization of resources, not only in hospital but at the patient's home. In this short introductory article the role of NCM is highlighted and the author discusses how this diverse role is concerned with patient care. NCMs work with multidisciplinary teams to enhance the patient's care process. Their attention is also given to cost reduction and clinical pathway management.

  3. Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

  4. The Business Case for Palliative Care: Translating Research Into Program Development in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, J Brian; Kerr, Kathleen M; Kalman, Noah S; Smith, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Specialist palliative care (PC) often embraces a "less is more" philosophy that runs counter to the revenue-centric nature of most health care financing in the U.S. A special business case is needed in which the financial benefits for organizations such as hospitals and payers are aligned with the demonstrable clinical benefits for patients. Based on published studies and our work with PC programs over the past 15 years, we identified 10 principles that together form a business model for specialist PC. These principles are relatively well established for inpatient PC but are only now emerging for community-based PC. Three developments that are key for the latter are the increasing penalties from payers for overutilization of hospital stays, the variety of alternative payment models such as accountable care organizations, which foster a population health management perspective, and payer-provider partnerships that allow for greater access to and funding of community-based PC.

  5. A SUSTAINABLE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM REQUIRES MANAGEMENT TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos Dimitros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to be the health care system sustainable , management transformations must be based on very precise diagnostic analysis that includes complete and current information. It is necessary to implement an information system that collects information in real time, that watches the parameters that significantly influence the sustainability of the system. Such an information system should point out a radiography(a scan of the system at some time under following aspects:: 1. An overview of system; 2 An overview of the economic situation; 3 A technical presentation ;4. A legal overview; 5. A social overview ; 6. A management overview .Based on these Xrays of the health system, it outlines a series of conclusions and recommendations together with a SWOT analysis that highlights the potential internal (strengths and weaknesses and external potential (opportunities and threats. Based on this analysis and recommendations, the management is going to redesign the system in order to be adapted to the changing environmental requirements. Management transformation is recommended to be by following steps. :1. The development of a new management system that would make a positive change in the health care system 2. Implementation of the new management system 3. Assessment of the changes

  6. [Management of onychocryptosis in primary care: A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala Aguilar, K; Gutiérrez Pineda, F; Bozalongo de Aragón, E

    2013-09-01

    Onychocryptosis (ingrown toenail) is a condition commonly seen in Primary Care clinics. It is uncomfortable and restrictive for patients and has a high incidence in males between second and third decades of life. It is of unknown origin, with a number of predisposing triggering factors being involved. Treatment depends on the stage of the ingrown nail and the procedures may range from conservative to minor surgery that can be performed by the Primary Care physician in the health centre. We report the case of a 25-year onychocryptosis that did not respond to conservative management, and was extracted with partial matricectomy of the nail.

  7. Expanded managed care liability: what impact on employer coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, D M; Sage, W M; Gresenz, C R; Hensler, D R

    1999-01-01

    Policymakers are considering legislative changes that would increase managed care organizations' exposure to civil liability for withholding coverage or failing to deliver needed care. Using a combination of empirical information and theoretical analysis, we assess the likely responses of health plans and Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) plan sponsors to an expansion of liability, and we evaluate the policy impact of those moves. We conclude that the direct costs of liability are uncertain but that the prospect of litigation may have other important effects on coverage decision making, information exchange, risk contracting, and the extent of employers' involvement in health coverage.

  8. Management of health care expenditure by soft computing methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimović, Goran; Jović, Srđan; Jovanović, Radomir; Aničić, Obrad

    2017-01-01

    In this study was managed the health care expenditure by soft computing methodology. The main goal was to predict the gross domestic product (GDP) according to several factors of health care expenditure. Soft computing methodologies were applied since GDP prediction is very complex task. The performances of the proposed predictors were confirmed with the simulation results. According to the results, support vector regression (SVR) has better prediction accuracy compared to other soft computing methodologies. The soft computing methods benefit from the soft computing capabilities of global optimization in order to avoid local minimum issues.

  9. Total quality management and the Army health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffer, E K

    1991-10-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is the newest in a long line of magic formulas which have been touted as saviors for American industry and medicine. The author discusses the basic concepts of TQM and notes that much of it resembles philosophical beliefs long held by the medical community. TQM does offer many opportunities to refine old concepts and further those goals of quality care to which health care providers have always aspired. If, however, it becomes simply another codified bureaucracy, then a great deal of time and money will be invested for very little gain.

  10. Targeted temperature management in neurocritical care: Boon or bust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Bindra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature management in neurocritical care is important and has gained due importance in recent years. Targeted temperature management (TTM includes deliberate reduction of core body temperature to a range of 32–34°C in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest after return of spontaneous circulation and also therapeutic hypothermia (33–35°C in normothermic patients or controlled normothermia (cooling patients to 37°C in hyperthermic patients. This review focuses on the practical aspects of cooling and temperature management in neurocritical care. An electronic search of Google Scholar, MEDLINE (OVID, EMBASE and the Cochrane library was performed. The physiological changes, potential side effects along with significant research and clinical applications in the field of temperature management are main highlights. Currently, the research evidence is available for TTM in adults following cardiac arrest, neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy and raised intracranial pressure. Controlled normothermia in neurocritical care population is rapidly gaining popularity. However, data on disease specific therapeutic markers, therapeutic depth and duration and prognostication of this modality are limited. Overall in experienced hands, the technique is safe to execute without the major morbidity and a potential to improve the outcome. Though over the years, clinical applications are unable to consistently demonstrate its benefits, but TTM in neurological insult has become an established and promising concept.

  11. Obesity, weight management, and health care costs: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Keith H

    2007-06-01

    Rational decision-making regarding health care spending for weight management requires an understanding of the cost of care provided to obese patients and the potential cost-effectiveness or cost savings of interventions. The purpose of this review is to assist health plans and disease management leaders in making informed decisions for weight management services. Among the review's findings, obesity and severe obesity are strongly and consistently associated with increased health care costs. The cost-effectiveness of obesity-related interventions is highly dependent on the risk status of the treated population, as well as the length, cost, and effectiveness of the intervention. Bariatric surgery offers high initial costs and uncertain long-term cost savings. From the perspective of a payor, obesity management services are as cost-effective as other commonly offered health services, though not likely to offer cost savings. Behavioral health promotion interventions in the worksite setting provide cost savings from the employer's perspective, if decreased rates of absenteeism are included in the analysis.

  12. Chronic disease management: improving care for people with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Tropea, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Chronic disease management (CDM) service models are being developed for many conditions; however, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness in osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review was undertaken to examine effectiveness, cost effectiveness and barriers to the use of osteoarthritis-chronic disease management (OA-CDM) service models. Thirteen eligible studies (eight randomised controlled trial (RCTs)) were identified. The majority focussed on delivery system design (n = 9) and/or providing self-management support (SMS) (n = 8). Overall, reported model effectiveness varied, and where positive impacts on process or health outcomes were observed, they were of small to moderate effect. There was no information about cost effectiveness. There is some evidence to support the use of collaborative care/multidisciplinary case management models in primary and community care and evidence-based pathways/standardisation of care in hospital settings. Multiple barriers were identified. Future research should focus on identifying the effective components of multi-faceted interventions and evaluating cost-effectiveness to support clinical and policy decision-making.

  13. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  14. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs.

  15. Corporate compliance programs: risk management for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, L S; Lewis, E A

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Justice has estimated that the government loses $100 billion annually in health care fraud. Consequently, the government's health care fraud enforcement activities with respect to all health care providers and suppliers continue to grow. Last year alone, the government collected more than $8 billion in settlements, fines, and penalties involving health care fraud. Recent settlements with the government have begun to include corporate compliance programs that require continued government oversight of the health care organization as an essential part of the settlement. The first section of this article describes the legal significance of health care companies' having corporate compliance programs. The second section provides a sample list of topics that should be included in any corporate compliance program. Finally, we describe various issues related to the creation and implementation of corporate compliance programs.

  16. Generalist care managers for the treatment of depressed medicaid patients in North Carolina: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Alan R

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most states, mental illness costs are an increasing share of Medicaid expenditures. Specialized depression care managers (CM have consistently demonstrated improvements in patient outcomes relative to usual primary care (UC, but are costly and may not be fully utilized in smaller practices. A generalist care manager (GCM could manage multiple chronic conditions and be more accepted and cost-effective than the specialist depression CM. We designed a pilot program to demonstrate the feasibility of training/deploying GCMs into primary care settings. Methods We randomized depressed adult Medicaid patients in 2 primary care practices in Western North Carolina to a GCM intervention or to UC. GCMs, already providing services in diabetes and asthma in both study arms, were further trained to provide depression services including self-management, decision support, use of information systems, and care management. The following data were analyzed: baseline, 3- and 6-month Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9 scores; baseline and 6-month Short Form (SF 12 scores; Medicaid claims data; questionnaire on patients' perceptions of treatment; GCM case notes; physician and office staff time study; and physician and office staff focus group discussions. Results Forty-five patients were enrolled, the majority with preexisting depression. Both groups improved; the GCM group did not demonstrate better clinical and functional outcomes than the UC group. Patients in the GCM group were more likely to have prescriptions of correct dosing by chart data. GCMs most often addressed comorbid conditions (36%, then social issues (27% and appointment reminders (14%. GCMs recorded an average of 46 interactions per patient in the GCM arm. Focus group data demonstrated that physicians valued using GCMs. A time study documented that staff required no more time interacting with GCMs, whereas physicians spent an average of 4 minutes more per week. Conclusion GCMs

  17. Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care: Results of the 2002 Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol McPhillips-Tangum

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In the United States, tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and disease. The health and cost consequences of tobacco dependence have made treatment and prevention of tobacco use a key priority among multiple stakeholders, including health plans, insurers, providers, employers, and policymakers. In 2002, the third survey of tobacco control practices and policies in health plans was conducted by America’s Health Insurance Plans’ technical assistance office as part of the Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (ATMC program. Methods The ATMC survey was conducted in the spring of 2002 via mail, e-mail, and fax. A 19-item survey instrument was developed and pilot-tested. Of the 19 items, 12 were the same as in previous years, four were modified to collect more detailed data on areas of key interest, and three were added to gain information about strategies to promote smoking cessation. The sample for the survey was drawn from the 687 plans listed in the national directory of member and nonmember health plans in America's Health Insurance Plans. Results Of the 246 plans in the sample, 152 plans (62% representing more than 43.5 million health maintenance organization members completed the survey. Results show that health plans are using evidence-based programs and clinical guidelines to address tobacco use. Compared to ATMC survey data collected in 1997 and 2000, the 2002 ATMC survey results indicate that more health plans are providing full coverage for first-line pharmacotherapies and telephone counseling for smoking cessation. Plans have also shown improvement in their ability to identify at least some members who smoke. Similarly, a greater percentage of plans are employing strategies to address smoking cessation during the postpartum period to prevent smoking relapse and during pediatric visits to reduce or eliminate children’s exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Conclusion The results of the 2002 ATMC survey

  18. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE): an innovative long-term care model in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mui, A C

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the long-term care service system in the United States, its problems, and an improved long-term care model. Problematic quality of care in institutional settings and fragmentation of service coordination in community-based settings are two major issues in the traditional long-term care system. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) has been emerging since the 1970s to address these issues, particularly because most frail elders prefer community-based to institutional care. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 made PACE a permanent provider type under Medicare and granted states the option of paying a capitation rate for PACE services under Medicaid. The PACE model is a managed long-term care system that provides frail elders alternatives to nursing home life. The PACE program's primary goals are to maximize each frail elderly participant's autonomy and continued community residence, and to provide quality care at a lower cost than Medicare, Medicaid, and private-pay participants, who pay in the traditional fee-for-service system. In exchange for Medicare and Medicaid fixed monthly payments for each participating frail elder, PACE service systems provide a continuum of long-term care services, including hospital and nursing home care, and bear full financial risk. Integration of acute and long-term care services in the PACE model allows care of frail elders with multiple problems by a single service organization that can provide a full range of services. PACE's range of services and organizational features are discussed.

  19. Act In case of Depression: The evaluation of a care program to improve the detection and treatment of depression in nursing homes. Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernooij-Dassen Myrra JFJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is evaluating the (cost- effectiveness of a multidisciplinary, evidence based care program to improve the management of depression in nursing home residents of somatic and dementia special care units. The care program is an evidence based standardization of the management of depression, including standardized use of measurement instruments and diagnostical methods, and protocolized psychosocial, psychological and pharmacological treatment. Methods/Design In a 19-month longitudinal controlled study using a stepped wedge design, 14 somatic and 14 dementia special care units will implement the care program. All residents who give informed consent on the participating units will be included. Primary outcomes are the frequency of depression on the units and quality of life of residents on the units. The effect of the care program will be estimated using multilevel regression analysis. Secondary outcomes include accuracy of depression-detection in usual care, prevalence of depression-diagnosis in the intervention group, and response to treatment of depressed residents. An economic evaluation from a health care perspective will also be carried out. Discussion The care program is expected to be effective in reducing the frequency of depression and in increasing the quality of life of residents. The study will further provide insight in the cost-effectiveness of the care program. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR1477

  20. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty: perspectives on nursing care and collaborative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, M W

    1995-01-01

    Historically, heart transplantation has served as the definitive treatment of choice for patients with end-stage heart failure. Unfortunately, heart transplantation is not available to all patients because of the scarcity of donor allografts and strict patient selection criteria. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is an experimental alternative to heart transplantation for the treatment of severe congestive heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. The procedure involves the use of an autologous latissimus dorsi muscle graft that is wrapped around the ventricles by pericardial attachment. The muscle graft is then stimulated by specialized synchronous train impulses from a cardiomyostimulator; the resultant muscle graft contractions provide support for ventricular function. This article describes collaborative, preoperative, immediate postoperative, and long-term management of patients receiving dynamic cardiomyoplasty. As members of the health care team, nurses are in a unique position to develop care standards and facilitate multidisciplinary collaboration for the care of this complex patient population.

  1. [Management and organization of ambulatory medical care in a district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Keune, H G; Miethe, D; Ringel, M; Szkibik, B

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is given of the management and organization of out-patient medical care in 15 districts and of the District Physician's responsibilities as well as the profile of a District Health Department. Compared to the situation of a decade ago, substantial changes in the territorial health organization have occurred (decentralization, formation of care areas, affiliation of small health facilities to bigger ones). The District Physician's scope of responsibility is increasingly determined by activities within the framework of the District Council, the proportion of organizational work has increased. In order to be able to fulfill his tasks the District Physician needs the support of a special Health Department. Skeleton regulations for out-patient medical care are necessary.

  2. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ..., 2010, at 75 FR 41793. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) [Per meal rates in whole or fractions... 48 FR 29114, June 24, 1983.) This notice has been determined to be not significant and was reviewed... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day...

  3. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ..., 2009, at 74 FR 34295. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Lunch and Centers Breakfast supper \\1... related notice published at 48 FR 29114, June 24, 1983.) This notice has been determined to be not... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day...

  4. [Case management. The nursing business of care or cost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, B K; Duquette, A; Kérouac, S; Rouillier, L

    1992-01-01

    Less money spent on health services, cost-effectiveness, better productivity and more efficiency are some of the driving forces of contemporary "neo-liberalism" and political trends. How can nursing services and the profession's human values adapt in this difficult context? The authors describe the newest modality of patient care delivery system: nursing case management. They examine the factors and assumptions that led up to its development and point out the validity of asking some serious questions before embarking on the euphoria of case management.

  5. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient.

  6. Utilizing patient satisfaction surveys to prepare for Medicaid managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, T T; Gomez, P S

    2001-02-01

    To prepare for Medicaid managed care, a community health center incorporated the business principle of continuous quality improvement, often used in the private sector to improve customer service, into its planning process. The initial endeavor was to create a patient satisfaction survey that was appropriate for the uniqueness of the community. The survey, taken monthly, resulted in both staff and patients making active improvements in the clinic environment. Staff showed more enthusiasm, and patients were more assertive in their attitudes toward the clinic. The empowerment of the patient to take ownership in the clinic will be coupled with the next step of the formalized plan, that of educating patients on the steps necessary to ensure that their Medicaid managed care facility will be the local community health center.

  7. Policy options to improve leadership of middle managers in the Australian residential aged care setting: a narrative synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlyn Teri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of both chronic diseases and multi-morbidity increases with longer life spans. As Australia's population ages, the aged care sector is under increasing pressure to ensure that quality aged care is available. Key to responding to this pressure is leadership and management capability within the aged care workforce. A systematic literature review was conducted to inform the policy development necessary for the enhancement of clinical and managerial leadership skills of middle managers within residential aged care. Methods Using scientific journal databases, hand searching of specialist journals, Google, snowballing and suggestions from experts, 4,484 papers were found. After a seven-tiered culling process, we conducted a detailed review (narrative synthesis of 153 papers relevant to leadership and management development in aged care, incorporating expert and key stakeholder consultations. Results • Positive staff experiences of a manager's leadership are critical to ensure job satisfaction and workforce retention, the provision of quality care and the well-being of care recipients, and potentially a reduction of associated costs. • The essential attributes of good leadership for aged care middle management are a hands-on accessibility and professional expertise in nurturing respect, recognition and team building, along with effective communication and flexibility. However, successful leadership and management outcomes depend on coherent and good organisational leadership (structural and psychological empowerment. • There is inadequate preparation for middle management leadership roles in the aged care sector and a lack of clear guidelines and key performance indicators to assess leadership and management skills. • Theory development in aged care leadership and management research is limited. A few effective generic clinical leadership programs targeting both clinical and managerial leaders exist. However

  8. Do-it-yourself managed care. Case study I: Randall's Medical Network. Case study II: Hershey's Managed Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Employers, who pay for much of the healthcare in this country, are not waiting for government to restructure the healthcare system. In this cover story, PROFILES examines how two firms formed their own managed care networks to control healthcare cost and quality, and what hospitals did to become players. By understanding the employer' point of view, hospital marketers can better anticipate their needs and develop a marketing strategy to form closer relationships with employers, provide quality care at a lower cost, and increase their market share.

  9. Implementation and evaluation of Stanford Health Care direct-care teledermatology program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh S Pathipati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teledermatology has proven to be an effective means of providing dermatologic care. The existing research has primarily evaluated its usefulness in a consultative model. Few academic centers have evaluated a patient-initiated model, and direct-to-consumer services remain the subject of controversy. Stanford Health Care recently launched a direct-care, patient-initiated teledermatology pilot program. This article evaluates the viability and patient satisfaction with this service. Materials and Methods: During the pilot period, patients were able to seek remote dermatologic care using an eVisit tool in their MyHealth account. Patients initiated the consultation, answered questions regarding their complaint, and uploaded a picture if relevant. A Stanford dermatologist reviewed each eVisit and responded with an assessment and plan. The dermatologist noted whether they were able to make a diagnosis and their level of confidence in it. After the study, 10 patients participated in a focus group to provide feedback on the service. Results: In all, 38 patients sought care during the pilot period. A dermatologist was able to make a diagnosis in 36 of 38 (95% cases, with an average confidence level of 7.9 of 10. The average time to consultation was 0.8 days. Patients indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service although they had suggestions for improvement. Discussion: Patients provided clinically useful images and information in a direct-care teledermatology model. Such services allow dermatology providers to increase access while maintaining high-quality care in an academic medical center. Further research is needed on standalone services that cannot integrate encounters with the patient’s existing medical record.

  10. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  11. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiro Meritxell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1 improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2 benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients. The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of

  12. New Public Management, Care and Struggles about Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2009-01-01

    New Public Management (NPM) is usually perceived as a homogeneous discourse. However, when we examine it by looking at micro-politics in municipalities and understand its consequences drawing on the voices of home helpers, the picture is more complex and ambiguous. NPM is seen as disciplining pai...... of resistance. The analysis applies feminist theories of recognition and care, and its findings are based on focus group interviews and feminist discourse analysis...

  13. Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

    2008-12-15

    In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

  14. Neonatal Information System Using an Interactive Microcomputer Data Base Management Program

    OpenAIRE

    Engelke, Stephen C.; Paulette, Ed W.; Kopelman, Arthur E.

    1981-01-01

    A low cost, interactive microcomputer data base management system is presented which is being used in a neonatal follow-up program at the East Carolina University School of Medicine. The features and flexibility of the system could be applied to a variety of medical care settings.

  15. 77 FR 54615 - Strategic Management Program; Fiscal Year 2013-2016 Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Doc No: 2012-21820] NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Strategic Management Program; Fiscal Year..., Strategic Management Program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Agency contact, Shamicka Fulson, Program Manager, Strategic Management Program; National Transportation Safety Board, 490 L'Enfant Plaza SW.,...

  16. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services exploration of positive patient care synergies fueled by consumer demand: care coordination, advanced clinic access, and patient self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Yerardi, Ruth; Drake, Audrey C; Parlier, Renee

    2006-01-01

    The consumers who utilize the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system are older, and most are learning to live with chronic diseases. Their desires and needs have driven changes within the Veterans Health Administration. Through patient satisfaction initiatives and other feedback sources, consumers have made it clear that they do not want to wait for their care, they want a say in what care is provided to them, and they want to remain as independent as possible. Two interdisciplinary processes/models of healthcare are being implemented on the national level to address these issues: advanced clinic access and care coordination. These programs have a synergistic relationship and are integrated with patient self-management initiatives. Positive outcomes of these programs also meet the needs of our staff. As these new processes and programs are implemented nationwide, skills of both patients and nursing staff who provide their care need to be enhanced to meet the challenges of providing nursing care now and into the 21st century. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services Strategic Planning Work Group is defining and implementing processes/programs to ensure nurses have the knowledge, information, and skills to meet these patient care demands at all levels within the organization.

  17. 76 FR 42536 - Real-Time System Management Information Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... Federal Highway Administration 23 CFR Part 511 RIN 2125-AF19 Real-Time System Management Information... additional comments relating to the costs and benefits of the Real-Time System Management Information Program... System Management Information Program on November 8, 2010, at 75 FR 68418. The final rule document...

  18. 75 FR 68418 - Real-Time System Management Information Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... Federal Highway Administration 23 CFR Part 511 RIN 2125-AF19 Real-Time System Management Information... System Management Information Program that provides, in all States, the capability to monitor, in real... traveler information. The purposes of the Real-Time System Management Information Program are to:...

  19. Using management action plans to integrate program improvement efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meador, S.W.; Kidwell, R.J.; Shangraw, W.R.; Cardamone, E.N. [Project Performance Corporation, Sterling, VA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental Management Program is the country`s largest and most sophisticated environmental program to date. The rapid expansion of the DOE`s environmental restoration efforts has led to increased scrutiny of its management processes and systems. As the program continues to grow and mature, maintaining adequate accountability for resources and clearly communicating progress will be essential to sustaining public confidence. The Office of Environmental Management must ensure that adequate processes and systems are in place at Headquarters, Operation Offices, and contractor organizations. These systems must provide the basis for sound management, cost control, and reporting. To meet this challenge, the Office of Environmental Restoration introduced the Management Action Plan process. This process was designed to serve three primary functions: (1) define the program`s management capabilities at Headquarters and Operations Offices; (2) describe how management initiatives address identified program deficiencies; and (3) identify any duplication of efforts or program deficiencies. The Environmental Restoration Management Action Plan is a tracking, reporting, and statusing tool, used primarily at the Headquarters level, for assessing performance in key areas of project management and control. BY DOE to communicate to oversight agencies and stakeholders a clearer picture of the current status of the environmental restoration project management system. This paper will discuss how Management Action Plans are used to provide a program-wide assessment of management capabilities.

  20. SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2005-09-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program was developed in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1 and incorporates the elements of the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2014-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  2. A Cognitive Stress Reduction Program for Recently Unemployed Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saam, Robert H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of a structured cognitive stress reduction program for unemployed managers (n=42) involved in an outplacement program. Using a control group design, managers who were assigned to cognitively based stress reduction program found reemployment significantly sooner and showed reductions in levels of state anxiety and anger that…

  3. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2013-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  4. Space maintenance in a child dental care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C J; Sorenson, H W; Mink, J R

    1975-04-01

    Five types of space maintainers were placed in 196 children participating in an extensive dental care program during a four-year study. Children with space maintainers were examined at six-month intervals. During the study, some sort of difficulty was encountered with 43% of the appliances inserted. The most common problem encountered was lost or missing appliances. Sixteen appliances had broken arch wires or loop wires; only ten broken bands were noted. Anther problem was distortion of arch wires. Suggestions are made for possible modifications in the space maintainers to reduce the incidence of problems.

  5. The Nordic Maintenance Care Program - Time intervals between treatments of patients with low back pain: how close and who decides?

    OpenAIRE

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte; Bjørnstad Charlotte; Sandnes Kjerstin F; Hestbaek Lise

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The management of chiropractic patients with acute and chronic/persistent conditions probably differs. However, little is known on this subject. There is, for example, a dearth of information on maintenance care (MC). Thus it is not known if patients on MC are coerced to partake in a program of frequent treatments over a long period of time, or if they are actively involved in designing their own individualized treatment program. Objectives It was the purpose of this study...

  6. Issues in Business and Medical Education: Brief Literature Review on Strategic Management of Health Care Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D.

    The literature on the use of strategic management principles by health care organizations is reviewed. After considering basic concepts of strategic management and managerial problems in nonprofit organizations, strategic planning and management of health care organizations are covered. Attention is directed to the health care environment,…

  7. Effects of Medicaid disease management programs on medical expenditures: Evidence from a natural experiment in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranker, Keith

    2016-03-01

    In recent decades, most states' Medicaid programs have introduced disease management programs for chronically ill beneficiaries. Interventions assist beneficiaries and their health care providers to appropriately manage chronic health condition(s) according to established clinical guidelines. Cost containment has been a key justification for the creation of these programs despite mixed evidence they actually save money. This study evaluates the effects of a disease management program in Georgia by exploiting a natural experiment that delayed the introduction of high-intensity services for several thousand beneficiaries. Expenditures for medical claims decreased an average of $89 per person per month for the high- and moderate-risk groups, but those savings were not large enough to offset the total costs of the program. Impacts varied by the intensity of interventions, over time, and across disease groups. Heterogeneous treatment effect analysis indicates that decreases in medical expenditures were largest at the most expensive tail of the distribution.

  8. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.

  9. Acquisition Program Risk Management: Does the Department of Defense Risk Management Practices Guide Provide an Effective Risk Tool for Program Managers in Today’s Acquisition Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Management Definition ........................................................................................... 32 Table 16. Risk Management Tracking...Other (please specify) 5 Table 15. Risk Management Definition Question 7: Does your Program Office or Risk Management IPT track risks for cost...aligned to collect information on program risk definition. Question 6 was designed to collect information on risk management definition . Participants

  10. Pathologists' roles in clinical utilization management. A financing model for managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J J; Liberman, A

    2000-03-01

    In ancillary or laboratory utilization management, the roles of pathologists have not been explored fully in managed care systems. Two possible reasons may account for this: pathologists' potential contributions have not been defined clearly, and effective measurement of and reasonable compensation for the pathologist's contribution remains vague. The responsibilities of pathologists in clinical practice may include clinical pathology and laboratory services (which have long been well-defined and are compensated according to a resource-based relative value system-based coding system), laboratory administration, clinical utilization management, and clinical research. Although laboratory administration services have been compensated with mechanisms such as percentage of total service revenue or fixed salary, the involvement of pathologists seems less today than in the past, owing to increased clinical workload and time constraints in an expanding managed care environment, especially in community hospital settings. The lack of financial incentives or appropriate compensation mechanisms for the services likely accounts for the current situation. Furthermore, the importance of pathologist-driven utilization management in laboratory services lacks recognition among hospital administrators, managed care executives, and pathologists themselves, despite its potential benefits for reducing cost and enhancing quality of care. We propose a financial compensation model for such services and summarize its advantages.

  11. Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles

  12. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.

  13. Chronic care management of globesity: promoting healthier lifestyles in traditional and mHealth based settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and being overweight could be real chronic conditions above all if there are other complications such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, cancer and various psychosocial and psychopathological disorders,. Due to the multifactorial etiology of obesity, evidence-based interventions to improve weight loss, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce related comorbidities combine different treatment approaches: dietetic, nutritional, physical, behavioral, psychological, and, in some situations, pharmacological and surgical. There are significant limitations in this multidisciplinary chronic care management of obesity, most notably those regarding costs and long-term adherence and efficacy. Programs including eHealth platforms and new technologies could overcome limitations connected to the traditional in-patient chronic care management of obesity, thus providing promising opportunities in enhancing weight reduction and reducing complications in terms of long-term efficacy and effectiveness across clinical, organizational, and economic perspectives.

  14. Kidney Disease Population Health Management in the Era of Accountable Care: A Conceptual Framework for Optimizing Care Across the CKD Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendu, Mallika L; Waikar, Sushrut S; Rao, Sandhya K

    2017-01-23

    Since its passage in 2010, the Affordable Care Act has led to the creation of numerous accountable care organizations that face the challenge of transforming the traditional care delivery model to provide more patient-centered, high-quality, and low-cost care. Complex patients, including those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), present the most challenges and opportunities. CKD is a condition with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost and thought to be partly secondary to known gaps in care delivery. Successful population management for CKD requires consideration of the needs of patients at all phases of the disease. In this article, we offer a comprehensive framework for a population-based approach to CKD and examples of programs we are implementing in each area. These initiatives include the development and implementation of an electronic nephrology consult (e-consult) platform, CKD quality metrics, CKD registry, CKD collaborative care agreement, multidisciplinary care clinic for advanced CKD, end-stage renal disease care coordinator program, shared decision-making tools for renal replacement, CKD education videos, and a tablet-based CKD patient-reported outcome measures tool.

  15. Risk Management for Point-of-Care Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is growing in popularity, and with this growth comes an increased chance of errors. Risk management is a way to reduce errors. Originally developed for the manufacturing industry, risk management principles have application for improving the quality of test results in the clinical laboratory. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), EP23-A Laboratory Quality Control based on Risk Management guideline, introduces risk management to the clinical laboratory and describes how to build and implement a quality control plan for a laboratory test. A simple, unit-use blood gas analyzer is utilized as an example for developing a laboratory quality control plan. The US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has revised the Clinical and Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) interpretive guidelines to provide a new quality control option, individualized quality control plans (IQCP), for decreasing the frequency of analyzing liquid controls from two levels each day of testing to manufacturer recommended frequencies in conjunction with a device’s built-in internal control processes and the risk of error when testing with that device. IQCPs have the advantage of allowing laboratories the flexibility to adopt alternative control processes in concert with traditional liquid controls to improve efficiency and cost effectiveness while providing optimal quality POCT results for patient care. PMID:27683462

  16. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical oncologist. The report further suggested that a lead clinician with a well established interest in cancer care should be appointed to organise and coordinate the whole range of cancer services provided within the Cancer Unit. Many people have argued that the multidisciplinary team management of patients has resulted in better care and improved survival. However, there are barriers to the optimal effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team. This paper aims to review various studies on the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team in the management of cancer patients and also discuss some of the barriers to the multidisciplinary team.

  17. Managing PBL difficulties in an industrial engineering and management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Alves

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project-Based Learning (PBL is considered to be an active learning methodology which can be used to develop both technical and transversal competences in engineering programs. This methodology demands a great deal of work effort from the students and also from the teachers and it requires a meticulous plan and a well-managed project as well. These activities go far beyond the normal activities in traditional lectures, enabling to outpace the difficulties that spur along the way that may be both complex and demotivating. This methodology has been implemented in the Integrated Master Degree on Industrial Engineering and Management (IEM, at one public university in Portugal, since the 2004/2005 academic year. The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss the main difficulties of the implementation of PBL, mainly from the teachers’ perspectives. Additionally, some effective strategies will be recommended to overcome such difficulties. Design/methodology/approach: The perceptions of the teachers were collected through a survey based on six main themes. The participants in the study include eight teachers from the five courses of the first semester of the first year of the IEM program involved in the 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 editions. Findings: Integration of courses in the project; student assessment; growing number of students in each team and the need of physical spaces for them; and compartmentalized knowledge has emerged as the main difficulties. To overcome these difficulties some key strategies were recommended. Originality/value: A new perspective based on course teachers' views and experiences will deepen the understanding of the problems and provide inputs for the development of strategies that may improve the effectiveness of PBL and introduce changes for its successful implementation. These strategies are intended to be transferable to other contexts, as most of the problems and constraints are common to other active learning

  18. Integration of data and management tools into the new york state medicaid managed care encounter data system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohan, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    The New York State Department of Health has created a data warehouse to analyze and evaluate the Medicaid managed care program. Online query tools and reports, grouping tools such as Diagnostic Related Groups, and measurement tools such as Health Plan Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures have been incorporated into the data warehouse. Other public health data sets including birth certificate data have also been integrated. The result is a powerful data set that can analyze information quickly and efficiently, with built-in data intelligence. Developed over time, this system can provide states, health insurance companies, and health data consortiums a roadmap on how to implement an integrated data warehouse solution.

  19. Care pathways in thrombosis management: the INNOVATE peer-to-peer educational initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj K

    2017-01-01

    Context Anticoagulant options for the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) now include the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The safe and effective integration of these agents into routine clinical practice within different health care settings presents common challenges. Bayer AG created the INternational Network fOr Venous and Arterial Thrombosis Excellence in practice (INNOVATE) program as a professional education network to foster best practice in thrombosis management in the NOAC era. Concept and format Since 2013, INNOVATE has been run as a series of educational 1.5-day global meetings at VTE centers of excellence. The format is based on expert-led discussion rather than lectures; all participants are encouraged to share their own expertise and experience. Through peer-to-peer exchange, less experienced professionals from an array of specialties learn from others in a small-group interactive setting. This format encourages positive engagement and discussion, and the establishment of relationships between health care professionals from different countries. Expansion and localization INNOVATE has successfully expanded to cover a broad spectrum of thromboembolic disorders in which anticoagulation with NOACs plays an important role; now including specific meetings focusing on the management of patients in the community. Local meetings are run in many countries in the local language, facilitating discussion and ensuring applicability to local or regional issues. Implementing learnings INNOVATE delegates have provided consistently positive feedback and have used their attendance to create and improve thrombosis management pathways in their own institutions. Overseen by a Steering Committee, the program responds to feedback, evolving to meet the needs of participants. Conclusion By showcasing best practice in the care of patients requiring anticoagulation, INNOVATE provides a model for the non-promotional support of medical education by

  20. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves.

  1. How technology in care at home affects patient self-care and self-management: a scoping review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.M.; Wiegers, T.A.; Friele, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology in care at home has potential benefits such as improved quality of care. This includes greater focus on the patients’ role in managing their health and increased patient involvement in the care process. The objective of this scoping review is to analyse the existing evidence fo

  2. Managing managed care: habitus, hysteresis and the end(s) of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, S R; Lachicotte, W S

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we examine how clinicians at a community mental health center are responding to the beginnings of changes in the health care delivery system, changes that are designated under the rubric of "managed care." We describe how clinicians' attitudes about good mental health care are embodied in what sociologist Pierre Bourdieu calls their habitus, i.e., their professional habits and sense of good practice. Viewed in this light, their moral outrage and sense of threat, as well as their strategic attempts to resist or subvert the dictates of managed care agencies, become a function of what Bourdieu terms the hysteresis effect. The paper is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted by a team of researchers at the mental health and substance abuse service of a hospital-affiliated, storefront clinic which serves residents of several neighborhoods in a large northeastern city. Data consist primarily of observations of meetings and interviews with staff members. We describe four aspects of the clinicians' professional habitus: a focus on cases as narratives of character and relationship, an imperative of authenticity, a distinctive orientation towards time, and an ethic of ambiguity. We then chronicle practices that have emerged in response to the limits on care imposed by managed care protocols, which are experienced by clinicians as violating the integrity of their work. These are discussed in relation to the concept of hysteresis.

  3. End-of-life care in a children's hospice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Rose; Davies, Betty; Collins, John B; Cook, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A project was completed in 1999 to evaluate the Canuck Place children's hospice program. This article reports only on the end-of-life care component. Results are provided from mail-out surveys with families who required end-of-life care and are supplemented by qualitative data which were collected from interviews with individuals prior to the survey. Eighteen families completed face-to-face interviews and another 70 families completed the mail-out questionnaire developed from the initial interviews. A total of 39 parents responded to the survey section about end-of-life care services. Results indicated that parents were reasonably comfortable discussing death with staff; they generally felt well prepared for their child's death because of the staff; the death of another child had a significant effect on families; parents' wishes at the time of their child's death were very supported by staff; and families were well supported by staff at the time of a child's death. Implications for practice and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  4. The effect of managed care on use of health care services: results from two contemporaneous household surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Partha; Li, Chenghui; Trivedi, Pravin K; Zimmer, David M

    2006-07-01

    This paper estimates treatment effects of managed care plans on the utilization of health care services using data from two contemporaneous, nationally representative household surveys from the USA. The paper exploits recent advances in simulation-based econometrics to take the endogeneity of enrollment into managed care plans into account and identify the causal relationship between managed care enrollment and utilization. Overall, results from the two surveys are remarkably similar, lending credibility to their external validity and to the econometric model and estimation methods. There is significant evidence of self-selection into managed care plans. After accounting for selection, an individual enrolled in an health maintenance organization (HMO) plan has 2 more visits to a doctor and has 0.1 more visits to the emergency room per year than would the same individual enrolled in a nonmanaged care plan.

  5. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann Paquette-Warren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design: Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants: The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method: Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings: Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion: Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting.

  6. Infectious disease management in primary care: perceptions of GPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röing Marta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important to keep the level of antibiotic prescribing low to contain the development of resistant bacteria. This study was conducted to reveal new knowledge about how GPs think in relation to the prescribing of antibiotics - knowledge that could be used in efforts toward rational treatment of infectious diseases in primary care. The aim was to explore and describe the variations in GPs' perceptions of infectious disease management, with special reference to antibiotic prescribing. Methods Twenty GPs working at primary care centres in a county in south-west Sweden were purposively selected based on the strategy of including GPs with different kinds of experience. The GPs were interviewed and perceptions among GPs were analysed by a phenomenographic approach. Results Five qualitatively different perceptions of infectious disease management were identified. They were: (A the GP must help the patient to achieve health and well-being; (B the management must meet the GP's perceived personal, professional and organisational demands; (C restrictive antibiotic prescribing is time-consuming; (D restrictive antibiotic prescribing can protect the effectiveness of antibiotics; and (E patients benefit personally from restrictive antibiotic prescribing. Conclusions Restrictive antibiotic prescribing was considered important in two perceptions, was not an issue as such in two others, and was considered in one perception although the actual prescribing was greatly influenced by the interaction between patient and GP. Accordingly, to encourage restrictive antibiotic prescribing several aspects must be addressed. Furthermore, different GPs need various kinds of support. Infectious disease management in primary care is complex and time-consuming, which must be acknowledged in healthcare organisation and planning.

  7. Northeast Fisheries Observer Program Internal Management System (NEFOP_IMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northeast Fisheries Observer Program Internal Management System contains data and information that are used internally by FSB staff to administer and manage...

  8. Annual Water Management Program - 1991 : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The proposed water management program for 1991 focuses on managing unit water levels to maintain habitat on Big Stone NWR. During the winter of 1990/91, cattails...

  9. The role of self-management in designing care for people with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A

    2008-11-17

    Osteoarthritis of the hip and knee is an increasingly common condition that is managed principally with lifestyle behaviour changes. Osteoarthritis management can be complex, as it typically affects older patients with multiple comorbidities. There is evidence that opportunities exist to improve uptake of evidence-based recommendations for care, especially for non-pharmacological interventions. The National Chronic Disease Strategy (NCDS) defines key components of programs designed to meet the needs of people with chronic conditions; one component is patient self-management. NCDS principles have been effectively integrated into chronic disease management programs for other conditions, but there is limited evidence of effectiveness for osteoarthritis programs. A comprehensive osteoarthritis management model that reflects NCDS policy is needed. Barriers to implementing such a model include poor integration of decision support, a lack of national infrastructure, workforce constraints and limited funding.

  10. Prediction Markets as a Way to Manage Acquisition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    volume helps management set production levels, but if management increases advertising it will undermine the market . This becomes critical for the DoD...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT Prediction Markets as a Way to Manage Acquisition...TYPE AND DATES COVERED MBA Professional Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prediction Markets as a Way to Manage Acquisition Programs 5. FUNDING NUMBERS

  11. Trigeminal neuralgia – a coherent cross-specialty management program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Tone; Maarbjerg, Stine; Rochat, Per Bjørnstad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal management of patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) requires specific treatment programs and close collaboration between medical, radiological and surgical specialties. Organization of such treatment programs has never been described before. With this paper we aim...

  12. Water Management Program Report 1981 Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual program describes the results of the 1980 water management program at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge and outlines the water regimen plan for 1981....

  13. Water Management Program Report 1979 Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual program describes the results of the 1978 water management program at Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge and outlines the water regimen plan for 1979....

  14. Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Comprehensive Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EDSP Comprehensive Management Plan describes the technical review processes that will be used in implementing this program and how the agency intends to factor technology advancements into the program.

  15. Management Information Control Systems for Educational Facility Construction Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Walter S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a computerized management information control system for an educational facility construction program that allows access to more than 50 major system applications, using over 5,000 programs. (MLF)

  16. Technical elements, demonstration projects, and fiscal models in Medicaid managed care for people with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, T A; Walsh, K K; Criscione, T

    1997-08-01

    We presented a general model of the structure and functioning of managed care and described elements (provider networks, fiscal elements, risk estimation, case-mix, management information systems, practice parameters, and quality improvement) critical to service delivery for people with developmental disabilities. A number of technical elements of managed care systems were delineated and reviewed in relation to the inclusion of people with developmental disabilities. Several managed care demonstration projects were described and, finally, a multi-year hypothetical budget model, including long-term care, was presented as a framework for considering how managed care affects specific service structures. Implications for people with developmental disabilities were discussed.

  17. Managing evidence-based health care: a diagnostic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, K; Pyne, T; Cowling, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a diagnostic framework useful to Trust managers who are faced with the task of devising and implementing strategies for improvements in clinical effectiveness, and is based on a recent study incorporating clinicians, managers, and professional staff in four NHS Trusts in the North Thames Region. The gap framework is inspired by the gap model developed by Zeithaml, Parasuraman and Berry from their research into service quality and incorporates Dave Sackett's schema as well as a personal competency profile needed for the practice of evidence based health-care (EBHC). The paper highlights the four organisational and personal failures (gaps) which contribute to the fifth gap, namely the discrepancy between clinically relevant research evidence and its implementation in health care. To close the gaps, Trusts need to set the goal and tackle the cultural, organisational, attitudinal and more material aspects such as investment in the information infrastructure, education and training of doctors. Doctors need to go through a process from awareness to action facilitated through a combination of personal and organisational incentives and rewards as well as training in the requisite skills. Researchers should take steps to improve the quality of the evidence and its accessibility and purchasers should reinforce the use of EBHC by withdrawing funding for care which has proved to be ineffective, inappropriate or inferior.

  18. Instrumentation Technical Program Management Team: FY-1987 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, M.L.; Englert, G.L.; Grametbauer, G.L.

    1988-04-14

    This report contains evaluations of process, environmental, health, and safety instrumentation of gaseous diffusion plants. The study was conducted by the instrumentation technical program management team. (LSP)

  19. Challenges to Providing End-of-Life Care to Low-Income Elders with Advanced Chronic Disease: Lessons Learned from a Model Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Betty J.; Auer, Casey

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the challenges in providing end-of-life care to low-income elders with multiple comorbid chronic conditions in a fully "integrated" managed care program, and it highlighted essential recommendations. Design and Methods: A case-study design was used that involved an extensive analysis of qualitative data from five focus…

  20. Medical Education About the Care of Addicted Incarcerated Persons: A National Survey of Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Mark L.; Isaacson, J. Harry; Kahn, Ruth; Mundt, Marlon P.; Manwell, Linda Baier

    2001-06-01

    In June 1998, there were 1.8 million inmates in correctional facilities for adults; 1.2 million in state and federal prisons and 600,000 in municipal/county jails (668 persons per 100,000 U.S. population). Rates of TB, AIDS, mental illness, and substance abuse are 2-13 times higher in persons living in jails and prisons. This study was designed to assess the level of training offered to residents in seven medical specialties in the care of addicted incarcerated persons. The study design involved two stages. The first entailed a mailed survey to 1,831 residency directors in family medicine, internal medicine, osteopathic medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and emergency medicine. The second stage was a telephone interview, about substance use disorders, of faculty listed by the residency directors as teaching residents. The mailed survey was completed by 1,205 residency directors (66%). The 769 faculty from those identified programs, who participated in the telephone interview, reported that only 14% of their residency programs offered lectures or conferences on the care of incarcerated persons, yet 44% of the programs had residents caring for incarcerated persons with substance abuse problems, in a clinical setting. Only 22% offered clinical experiences for residents in a correctional facility.We recognize that our survey of correctional health and substance abuse training is limited, but as such, a greater number of respondents to our survey do not teach residents addiction medicine topics pertaining to prevention, evaluation, intervention, and management of the addicted criminal offender/patient in a correctional setting or give adequate clinical exposure to this special population. The data suggests a need to develop and implement educational programs on medical care for this high-risk and expanding population.