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Sample records for care management model

  1. Developing a Total Quality Management Model for Health Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Mosadegh Rad

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total quality management (TQM is a managerial practice to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, flexibility, and competitiveness of a business as a whole. However, in practice, these TQM benefits are not easy to achieve. Despite its theoretical promise and the enthusiastic response to TQM, recent evidence suggests that attempts to implement it are often unsuccessful. Many of these TQM programmes have been cancelled, or are in the process of being cancelled, as a result of the negative impact on profits. Therefore, there is a pressing need for a clinical approach to establishing TQM. Method: The aim of this article is therefore: “To identify the strengths and weakness of TQM, the logical steps towards TQM, and to develop a model so that health care organizations aiming at using TQM to achieve excellence can follow through easily”. Based on the research questions proposed in this study, the research strategies of a literature review, a questionnaire survey, semi-structured interviews, and a participatory action research were adopted in this study. For determining the success and barriers of TQM in health care organizations, a questionnaire survey has done in 90 health acre organizations in Isfahan Province, which implement TQM. The results of this survey were used for introducing a new model of TQM. This model will be developed via a semi-structured interview with at minimum 10 health care and quality managers. Then, through a participatory action research, this model will be implemented in 3 sites. At this time, the questionnaire survey has done and the model is introduced. Therefore, developing the model and its implementation will be done later. Results: In this survey, the mean score of TQM success was 3.48±0.68 (medium from 5 credits. Implementation of TQM was very low, low, medium, high and very high successful respectively in 3.6, 10.9, 21.8, 56.4 and 7.3 percent of health care organizations. TQM had the most effect on

  2. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Stellefson, Michael; Dipnarine, Krishna; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academi...

  3. A quality management model for integrated care : results of a Delphi and Concept Mapping study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkman, Mirella; Ahaus, Kees; Fabbricotti, Isabelle; Nabitz, Udo; Huijsman, Robbert

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the elements and clusters of a quality management model for integrated care. In order to develop the model a combination of three methods were applied. A literature study was conducted to identify elements of integrated care. In a Delphi study experts comme

  4. A quality management model for integrated care: results of a Delphi and Concept Mapping study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Minkman; K. Ahaus; I. Fabbricotti; U. Nabitz; R. Huijsman

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the elements and clusters of a quality management model for integrated care. In order to develop the model a combination of three methods were applied. A literature study was conducted to identify elements of integrated care. In a Delphi study experts comme

  5. Disease management projects and the Chronic CareModel in action: Baseline qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Hipple-Walters, Bethany; Adams, Samantha; Nieboer, Anna; Bal, Roland

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM),are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have beenwell-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. Theoverall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implementedwithin primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early developmentand implementation stages of fi...

  6. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Walters Bethany; Adams Samantha A; Nieboer Anna P; Bal Roland

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM), are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of f...

  7. Health care operations management

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, M W; Hans, E.W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully selected papers dealing with optimization and decision analysis problems in the field of health care operations management.

  8. Mediation and managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubler, N N

    1998-03-01

    Managed care has not only intensified existing conflicts between patient and provider, it has, by its very nature, changed the shape and scope of the healthcare enterprise and introduced an entirely new set of disputes. The decision-making dynamics have been altered, and the cast of players has expanded. Traditionally, the therapeutic interaction took place between the physician and the patient although it occasionally included the patient's family. Whatever obligations existed, such as fidelity, confidentiality, and standard of care, they bound only those parties. Now, as the managed care organization has interposed itself between the patient and the physician, the dyad has become a triad. The power balance has shifted, and a new set of rights and responsibilities now flows between and among the players, each of whom has interests that may or may not coincide. This article argues that, because of its cost containment origins and orientation, managed care increases the likelihood that misunderstandings, disagreements and disputes will develop into full-blown conflicts. If managed care is to succeed financially and operate with integrity, it must develop techniques for managing the increasing conflicts that arise inevitably between and among the organizations, physicians, and patients. It is clear that the voice of the patient needs to be strengthened within the new complex decision-making, review, and appeal procedures. Mediation is the most appropriate method of dispute resolution for the managed care setting because it balances the disparities in power endemic to the bureaucratization of medicine and refocuses the interests of the various parties. Using bioethics consultation as a model for dispute mediation provides a set of principles and guideline tasks that can be applied effectively to managed care. PMID:9514387

  9. Disease management projects and the Chronic CareModel in action: Baseline qualitative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Hipple-Walters (Bethany); S.A. Adams (Samantha); A.P. Nieboer (Anna); R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM),are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have beenwell-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. Theoverall aim

  10. Managing as blended care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, H

    1994-09-01

    As part of a research project on managerial work based on a new model of the roles, the head nurse of a hospital unit was observed during a working day. Her work is described, with reference especially to the roles of leading, linking, controlling, and doing. Conclusions are drawn about the advantages of a craft style of management as opposed to the more traditional "boss" or professional styles. The author also discusses what those in general management can learn from those in nursing management, which seems best practiced out in the open, on one's feet, as a kind of blended care. PMID:8089715

  11. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters Bethany

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM, are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of five disease management programs in the primary care setting, based on interviews with project leadership teams. Methods Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted at the five selected sites with sixteen professionals interviewed; all project directors and managers were interviewed. The interviews focused on each project’s chosen chronic illness (diabetes, eating disorders, COPD, multi-morbidity, CVRM and project plan, barriers to development and implementation, the project leaders’ action and reactions, as well as their roles and responsibilities, and disease management strategies. Analysis was inductive and interpretive, based on the content of the interviews. After analysis, the results of this research on disease management programs and the Chronic Care Model are viewed from a traveling technology framework. Results This analysis uncovered four themes that can be mapped to disease management and the Chronic Care Model: (1 changing the health care system, (2 patient-centered care, (3 technological systems and barriers, and (4 integrating projects into the larger system. Project leaders discussed the paths, both direct and indirect, for transforming the health care system to one that addresses chronic illness. Patient-centered care was highlighted as needed and a paradigm shift for many. Challenges with technological systems were pervasive. Project leaders managed the expenses of a traveling technology, including the social, financial, and

  12. Developing a Total Quality Management Model for Health Care Systems

    OpenAIRE

    AM Mosadegh Rad; M Ansarian

    2005-01-01

    Background: Total quality management (TQM) is a managerial practice to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, flexibility, and competitiveness of a business as a whole. However, in practice, these TQM benefits are not easy to achieve. Despite its theoretical promise and the enthusiastic response to TQM, recent evidence suggests that attempts to implement it are often unsuccessful. Many of these TQM programmes have been cancelled, or are in the process of being cancelled, as a result of the ne...

  13. Palliative care - managing pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... or if you have side effects from your pain treatments. ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and ... Medicine . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap ...

  14. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Peiro Meritxell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1 improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2 benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients. The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of

  15. Complementary therapy in chronic wound management: a holistic caring case study and praxis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Mercy Mammah

    2003-01-01

    Holistic caring consists of providing care to each aspect of a patient's life through the use of therapeutic caring and complementary or alternative healing modalities. Since nursing consists of caring for the whole person and not just the disease process, consideration of a patient's physical, emotional, social, economic, spiritual, and cultural needs is necessary in dealing with any chronic health problem such as chronic wounds. In this model case studies presentation, the purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of the holistic caring approach and the use of complementary and alternative medicine or therapeutic modalities in chronic wound management. The use or role of theory in practice will also be discussed to emphasize the holistic caring praxis model used in the holistic assessment and holistic plan of care for the cases presented. This article also presents a framework that will help wound care and holistic nurses move from simply the positivist-modernist philosophy to begin to embrace the postmodernist philosophy. PMID:12784899

  16. Barriers of access to care in a managed competition model: lessons from Colombia

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    Mogollón-Pérez Amparo Susana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health sector reform in Colombia, initiated by Law 100 (1993 that introduced a managed competition model, is generally presented as a successful experience of improving access to care through a health insurance regulated market. The study's objective is to improve our understanding of the factors influencing access to the continuum of care in the Colombian managed competition model, from the social actors' point of view. Methods An exploratory, descriptive-interpretative qualitative study was carried out, based on case studies of four healthcare networks in rural and urban areas. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted to a three stage theoretical sample: I cases, II providers and III informants: insured and uninsured users (35, health professionals (51, administrative personnel (20, and providers' (18 and insurers' (10 managers. Narrative content analysis was conducted; segmented by cases, informant's groups and themes. Results Access, particularly to secondary care, is perceived as complex due to four groups of obstacles with synergetic effects: segmented insurance design with insufficient services covered; insurers' managed care and purchasing mechanisms; providers' networks structural and organizational limitations; and, poor living conditions. Insurers' and providers' values based on economic profit permeate all factors. Variations became apparent between the two geographical areas and insurance schemes. In the urban areas barriers related to market functioning predominate, whereas in the rural areas structural deficiencies in health services are linked to insufficient public funding. While financial obstacles are dominant in the subsidized regime, in the contributory scheme supply shortage prevails, related to insufficient private investment. Conclusions The results show how in the Colombian healthcare system structural and organizational barriers to care access, that are common in developing countries

  17. Towards personalized integrated dementia care: a qualitative study into the implementation of different models of case management

    OpenAIRE

    Van Mierlo, Lisa D; Meiland, Franka JM; van Hout, Hein PJ; Dröes, Rose-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this process evaluation was to provide insight into facilitators and barriers to the delivery of community-based personalized dementia care of two different case management models, i.e. the linkage model and the combined intensive case management/joint agency model. These two emerging dementia care models differ considerably in the way they are organized and implemented. Insight into facilitators and barriers in the implementation of different models is needed to create ...

  18. Stepped care model for pain management and quality of pain care in long-term opioid therapy

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    Brent A. Moore, PhD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful organizational improvement processes depend on application of reliable metrics to establish targets and to monitor progress. This study examined the utility of the Pain Care Quality (PCQ extraction tool in evaluating implementation of the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management at one Veterans Health Administration (VHA healthcare system over 4 yr and in a non-VHA Federally qualified health center (FQHC over 2 yr. Two hundred progress notes per year from VHA and 150 notes per year from FQHC primary care prescribers of long-term opioid therapy (>90 consecutive days were randomly sampled. Each note was coded for the presence or absence of key dimensions of PCQ (i.e., pain assessment, treatment plans, pain reassessment/outcomes, patient education. General estimating equations controlling for provider and facility were used to examine changes in PCQ items over time. Improvements in the VHA were noted in pain reassessment and patient education, with trends in positive directions for all dimensions. Results suggest that the PCQ extraction tool is feasible and may be responsive to efforts to promote organizational improvements in pain care. Future research is indicated to improve the reliability of the PCQ extraction tool and enhance its usability.

  19. Beware the Managed Health-Care Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, John; Smith, Gary

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses implications of the movement toward managed health care models for long-term health care services for people with disabilities, especially people with developmental disabilities. It notes possible advantages of managed care but raises issues concerning consumer choice, management and financial capacity of managed care…

  20. Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management for nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    A. Aziz Alimul Hidayat; M. Kes

    2015-01-01

    Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management is an integration model in nursing care records, especially records nursing assessment and diagnosis in one format. This model can reduce the duration of the recording in nursing care, and make it easier for students to understand the nursing diagnosis, so that nursing interventions more effective. The purpose of this paper was to describes the form integration documentation of nursing assessmen...

  1. Health Care Waste Management

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    Health care waste management (HCWM) is a process to help ensure proper hospital hygiene and safety of health care workers and communities. It includes planning and procurement, construction, staff training and behavior, proper use of tools, machines and pharmaceuticals, proper disposal methods inside and outside the hospital, and evaluation. Its many dimensions require a broader focus than ...

  2. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Killu; Victor Coba; Michael Mendez; Subhash Reddy; Tanja Adrzejewski; Yung Huang; Jessica Ede; Mathilda Horst

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respec...

  3. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteo Ciccone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marco Matteo Ciccone1, Ambrogio Aquilino2, Francesca Cortese1, Pietro Scicchitano1, Marco Sassara1, Ernesto Mola3, Rodolfo Rollo4,Pasquale Caldarola5, Francesco Giorgino6, Vincenzo Pomo2, Francesco Bux21Section of Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, School of Medicine, University of Bari, Bari, Italy; 2Agenzia Regionale Sanitaria – Regione Puglia (ARES, Apulia, Italy; 3ASL, Lecce, Italy; 4ASL, Brindisi, Italy; 5Cardiologia, Ospedale “Sarcone”, Terlizzi, Italy; 6Section of Endocrinology, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, School of Medicine, University of Bari, Bari, ItalyPurpose: Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM model and of the introduction of “care manager” nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Patients and methods: Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative “team” consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization.Results: Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services

  4. Comparing Dutch Case management care models for people with dementia and their caregivers: The design of the COMPAS study

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    MacNeil Vroomen Janet

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dementia care in the Netherlands is shifting from fragmented, ad hoc care to more coordinated and personalised care. Case management contributes to this shift. The linkage model and a combination of intensive case management and joint agency care models were selected based on their emerging prominence in the Netherlands. It is unclear if these different forms of case management are more effective than usual care in improving or preserving the functioning and well-being at the patient and caregiver level and at the societal cost. The objective of this article is to describe the design of a study comparing these two case management care models against usual care. Clinical and cost outcomes are investigated while care processes and the facilitators and barriers for implementation of these models are considered. Design Mixed methods include a prospective, observational, controlled, cohort study among persons with dementia and their primary informal caregiver in regions of the Netherlands with and without case management including a qualitative process evaluation. Inclusion criteria for the cohort study are: community-dwelling individuals with a dementia diagnosis who are not terminally-ill or anticipate admission to a nursing home within 6 months and with an informal caregiver who speaks fluent Dutch. Person with dementia-informal caregiver dyads are followed for two years. The primary outcome measure is the Neuropsychiatric Inventory for the people with dementia and the General Health Questionnaire for their caregivers. Secondary outcomes include: quality of life and needs assessment in both persons with dementia and caregivers, activity of daily living, competence of care, and number of crises. Costs are measured from a societal perspective using cost diaries. Process indicators measure the quality of care from the participant’s perspective. The qualitative study uses purposive sampling methods to ensure a wide variation of

  5. Integrating Bipolar Disorder Management in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodrich, David E.; O’Donnell, Allison N.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care ma...

  6. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  7. NHF-McMaster Guideline on Care Models for Haemophilia Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, M; Key, N S; Skinner, M; Curtis, R; Feinstein, M; Kessler, C; Lane, S J; Makris, M; Riker, E; Santesso, N; Soucie, J M; Yeung, C H T; Iorio, A; Schünemann, H J

    2016-07-01

    This guideline was developed to identify evidence-based best practices in haemophilia care delivery, and discuss the range of care providers and services that are most important to optimize outcomes for persons with haemophilia (PWH) across the United States. The guideline was developed following specific methods described in detail in this supplement and based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach). Direct evidence from published literature and the haemophilia community, as well as indirect evidence from other chronic diseases, were reviewed, synthesized and applied to create evidence-based recommendations. The Guideline panel suggests that the integrated care model be used over non-integrated care models for PWH (conditional recommendation, moderate certainty in the evidence). For PWH with inhibitors and those at high risk for inhibitor development, the same recommendation was graded as strong, with moderate certainty in the evidence. The panel suggests that a haematologist, a specialized haemophilia nurse, a physical therapist, a social worker and round-the-clock access to a specialized coagulation laboratory be part of the integrated care team, over an integrated care team that does not include all of these components (conditional recommendation, very low certainty in the evidence). Based on available evidence, the integrated model of care in its current structure, is suggested for optimal care of PWH. There is a need for further appropriately designed studies that address unanswered questions about specific outcomes and the optimal structure of the integrated care delivery model in haemophilia. PMID:27348396

  8. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Lau Breda HF; Lafave Mark R; Mohtadi Nicholas G; Butterwick Dale J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The g...

  9. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    OpenAIRE

    DeJesus, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferenc...

  10. Behavioral Informatics and Computational Modeling in Support of Proactive Health Management and Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly B; Korhonen, Ilkka; Gordon, Christine M; Saranummi, Niilo

    2015-12-01

    Health-related behaviors are among the most significant determinants of health and quality of life. Improving health behavior is an effective way to enhance health outcomes and mitigate the escalating challenges arising from an increasingly aging population and the proliferation of chronic diseases. Although it has been difficult to obtain lasting improvements in health behaviors on a wide scale, advances at the intersection of technology and behavioral science may provide the tools to address this challenge. In this paper, we describe a vision and an approach to improve health behavior interventions using the tools of behavioral informatics, an emerging transdisciplinary research domain based on system-theoretic principles in combination with behavioral science and information technology. The field of behavioral informatics has the potential to optimize interventions through monitoring, assessing, and modeling behavior in support of providing tailored and timely interventions. We describe the components of a closed-loop system for health interventions. These components range from fine grain sensor characterizations to individual-based models of behavior change. We provide an example of a research health coaching platform that incorporates a closed-loop intervention based on these multiscale models. Using this early prototype, we illustrate how the optimized and personalized methodology and technology can support self-management and remote care. We note that despite the existing examples of research projects and our platform, significant future research is required to convert this vision to full-scale implementations. PMID:26441408

  11. Developing Integrated Care: Towards a development model for integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Minkman, Mirella M.N

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated care. Based on a systematic approach in which a literature study, a delphi study, a concept mapping study and questionnaire research are combined, a development model for integrated care is created....

  12. An Employee Assistance Model of Health Care Management for Employees with Alcohol-Related Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Kerry D.; Balkin, David B.

    1992-01-01

    Describes employee assistance model in which cost-effective, high-quality treatment can be offered for a complex range of alcohol-related problems. Notes that this system of care allows the employee to be treated in the least restrictive therapeutic environment, thus encouraging continued productivity at work. (Author/NB)

  13. Changes in primary care physician’s management of low back pain in a model of interprofessional collaborative care: an uncontrolled before-after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mior Silvano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracking how clinicians treat patients provides an opportunity to explore how the clinical management of common musculoskeletal disorders evolves over time. We present an uncontrolled before-after study of a primary care physician’s management of low back pain and describe how his involvement in an interprofessional collaborative practice was associated with a change in the management of patients with low back pain. Method Data from the electronic medical record of one primary care physician who participated in a study of a model of chiropractic-medical collaboration were retrospectively collected. Records of a sample of consecutive patients prior to the start (i.e. pre-study, n = 51 and at the end of the collaborative study (i.e. study, n = 49 were collected. Results Demographics were similar in both groups but median number of physician visits (2.5 and 1.0, average prescriptions per patients (1.24 and 0.47, and total number of narcotic prescriptions (14 and 6 differed between pre-study and study groups, respectively. Separate analysis of only the records of low back pain study patients revealed that 61% were referred for chiropractic care during the study period. Patients who were not referred had more neurological deficits and leg pain but back pain severity and average number of prescriptions was about the same. Referred patients in the study group had about 25% fewer physician visits and imaging requests. Conclusion Based on this study of a single primary care physician, we hypothesize that doctors may change their prescribing behaviours and consultation rate for patients with low back pain when engaged in interprofessional collaborative care. Further research is required to test this observation in the population.

  14. Developing Integrated Care: Towards a development model for integrated care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.N. Minkman (Mirella)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated c

  15. Distributed Knowledge Management in Health Care Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Holm Larsen, Michael; Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the electronic commerce application field of Health Care Administration. Models for knowledge distribution is a rare commodity in the Health Care Administration. Distributed Knowledge Management (DKM) is a concept that originated as an abstraction of a business model prepared for the mechanical and agricultural industry but holds promises for a more general use. The contribution of this paper is to suggest a new business model based on DKM and show ...

  16. Glossary of Managed Care Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative health care : products and services such as acupuncture, homeopathy, nutrition therapy, and massage, that can complement ... with a specific diagnosis, such as cancer or diabetes. The goals of disease management are to improve ...

  17. Medicaid Managed Care Enrollment Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This report is composed annually and profiles enrollment statistics on Medicaid managed care programs on a plan-specific level. This report also provides...

  18. A collaborative cardiologist-pharmacist care model to improve hypertension management in patients with or at high risk for cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Irons BK; Meyerrose G; Laguardia S; Hazel K; Seifert CF

    2012-01-01

    Physician led collaborative drug therapy management utilizing clinical pharmacists to aid in the medication management of patients with hypertension has been shown to improve blood pressure control. With recommendations for lower blood pressures in patients with coronary artery disease, a cardiologist-pharmacist collaborative care model may be a novel way to achieve these more rigorous goals of therapy. Objective: The purpose of this project was to evaluate this type of care model in a high c...

  19. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Breda HF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group. This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ. Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The

  20. Managed care opportunities for improving asthma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan D

    2011-04-01

    Uncontrolled asthma is an enormous burden in terms of the propensity to reach asthma control in the future, direct and indirect costs, and health-related quality of life. The complex pathophysiology, treatment, and triggers of asthma warrant a unified, yet targeted, approach to care. No single factor is fully responsible for poor control. Complicating the problem of asthma control is adherence to long-term controller medications. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) established several key points for asthma control, and developed classifications for asthma control and recommended actions for treatment. All parties involved in the management of asthma, including physicians, pharmacists, nurses, patients, family members, and insurance companies, need to be aware of the NAEPP guidelines. To determine if the goals of asthma therapy are being met, assessment of asthma outcomes is necessary. Unfortunately, some measures may get overlooked, and patient-reported outcomes (as assessed by the validated control instruments) are not often collected during routine examinations. The Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measure for asthma may be used to quantify asthma care, but there is evidence that it does not fully capture the goals of asthma management. Most well-designed, education-based interventions are considered good value for money, but it can be difficult to put into practice such policy interventions. An optimal managed care plan will adhere to known evidence-based guidelines, can measure outcomes, is targeted to the patient's risk and impairment, and can adapt to changes in our understanding of asthma and its treatment. PMID:21761959

  1. Participative management in health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muller

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The need and demand for the highest-quality management of all health care delivery activities requires a participative management approach. The purpose with this article is to explore the process of participative management, to generate and describe a model for such management, focusing mainly on the process of participative management, and to formulate guidelines for operationalisation of the procedure. An exploratory, descriptive and theory-generating research design is pursued. After a brief literature review, inductive reasoning is mainly employed to identify and define central concepts, followed by the formulation of a few applicable statements and guidelines. Participative management is viewed as a process of that constitutes the elements of dynamic interactive decision-making and problem-solving, shared governance, empowerment, organisational transformation, and dynamic communication within the health care organisation. The scientific method of assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation is utilised throughout the process of participative management.

  2. Managing future Gulf War Syndromes: international lessons and new models of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Charles C; Hyams, Kenneth C; Scott, Ken

    2006-04-29

    After the 1991 Gulf War, veterans of the conflict from the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other nations described chronic idiopathic symptoms that became popularly known as 'Gulf War Syndrome'. Nearly 15 years later, some 250 million dollars in United States medical research has failed to confirm a novel war-related syndrome and controversy over the existence and causes of idiopathic physical symptoms has persisted. Wartime exposures implicated as possible causes of subsequent symptoms include oil well fire smoke, infectious diseases, vaccines, chemical and biological warfare agents, depleted uranium munitions and post-traumatic stress disorder. Recent historical analyses have identified controversial idiopathic symptom syndromes associated with nearly every modern war, suggesting that war typically sets into motion interrelated physical, emotional and fiscal consequences for veterans and for society. We anticipate future controversial war syndromes and maintain that a population-based approach to care can mitigate their impact. This paper delineates essential features of the model, describes its public health and scientific underpinnings and details how several countries are trying to implement it. With troops returning from combat in Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, the model is already getting put to the test. PMID:16687273

  3. Effectiveness of a nurse-led case management home care model in Primary Health Care. A quasi-experimental, controlled, multi-centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morilla-Herrera JC

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demand for home care services has increased considerably, along with the growing complexity of cases and variability among resources and providers. Designing services that guarantee co-ordination and integration for providers and levels of care is of paramount importance. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a new case-management based, home care delivery model which has been implemented in Andalusia (Spain. Methods Quasi-experimental, controlled, non-randomised, multi-centre study on the population receiving home care services comparing the outcomes of the new model, which included nurse-led case management, versus the conventional one. Primary endpoints: functional status, satisfaction and use of healthcare resources. Secondary endpoints: recruitment and caregiver burden, mortality, institutionalisation, quality of life and family function. Analyses were performed at base-line, and at two, six and twelve months. A bivariate analysis was conducted with the Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney's U, and the chi squared test. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival and institutionalisation. A multivariate analysis was performed to pinpoint factors that impact on improvement of functional ability. Results Base-line differences in functional capacity – significantly lower in the intervention group (RR: 1.52 95%CI: 1.05–2.21; p = 0.0016 – disappeared at six months (RR: 1.31 95%CI: 0.87–1.98; p = 0.178. At six months, caregiver burden showed a slight reduction in the intervention group, whereas it increased notably in the control group (base-line Zarit Test: 57.06 95%CI: 54.77–59.34 vs. 60.50 95%CI: 53.63–67.37; p = 0.264, (Zarit Test at six months: 53.79 95%CI: 49.67–57.92 vs. 66.26 95%CI: 60.66–71.86 p = 0.002. Patients in the intervention group received more physiotherapy (7.92 CI95%: 5.22–10.62 vs. 3.24 95%CI: 1.37–5.310; p = 0.0001 and, on average, required fewer

  4. Effectiveness of a nurse-led case management home care model in Primary Health Care. A quasi-experimental, controlled, multi-centre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Asencio, JM; Gonzalo-Jiménez, E; Martin-Santos, FJ; Morilla-Herrera, JC; Celdráan-Mañas, M; Carrasco, A Millán; García-Arrabal, JJ; Toral-López, I

    2008-01-01

    Background Demand for home care services has increased considerably, along with the growing complexity of cases and variability among resources and providers. Designing services that guarantee co-ordination and integration for providers and levels of care is of paramount importance. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of a new case-management based, home care delivery model which has been implemented in Andalusia (Spain). Methods Quasi-experimental, controlled, non-randomised, multi-centre study on the population receiving home care services comparing the outcomes of the new model, which included nurse-led case management, versus the conventional one. Primary endpoints: functional status, satisfaction and use of healthcare resources. Secondary endpoints: recruitment and caregiver burden, mortality, institutionalisation, quality of life and family function. Analyses were performed at base-line, and at two, six and twelve months. A bivariate analysis was conducted with the Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney's U, and the chi squared test. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival and institutionalisation. A multivariate analysis was performed to pinpoint factors that impact on improvement of functional ability. Results Base-line differences in functional capacity – significantly lower in the intervention group (RR: 1.52 95%CI: 1.05–2.21; p = 0.0016) – disappeared at six months (RR: 1.31 95%CI: 0.87–1.98; p = 0.178). At six months, caregiver burden showed a slight reduction in the intervention group, whereas it increased notably in the control group (base-line Zarit Test: 57.06 95%CI: 54.77–59.34 vs. 60.50 95%CI: 53.63–67.37; p = 0.264), (Zarit Test at six months: 53.79 95%CI: 49.67–57.92 vs. 66.26 95%CI: 60.66–71.86 p = 0.002). Patients in the intervention group received more physiotherapy (7.92 CI95%: 5.22–10.62 vs. 3.24 95%CI: 1.37–5.310; p = 0.0001) and, on average, required fewer home care visits (9

  5. Reengineering health care materials management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, L R

    1998-01-01

    Health care executives across the country, faced with intense competition, are being forced to consider drastic cost cutting measures as a matter of survival. The entire health care industry is under siege from boards of directors, management and others who encourage health care systems to take actions ranging from strategic acquisitions and mergers to simple "downsizing" or "rightsizing," to improve their perceived competitive positions in terms of costs, revenues and market share. In some cases, management is poorly prepared to work within this new competitive paradigm and turns to consultants who promise that following their methodologies can result in competitive advantage. One favored methodology is reengineering. Frequently, cost cutting attention is focused on the materials management budget because it is relatively large and is viewed as being comprised mostly of controllable expenses. Also, materials management is seldom considered a core competency for the health care system and the organization performing these activities does not occupy a strongly defensible position. This paper focuses on the application of a reengineering methodology to healthcare materials management. PMID:9785300

  6. Oregon's experiment in health care delivery and payment reform: coordinated care organizations replacing managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven W; Bernell, Stephanie L; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff; Ranit, Claire M

    2015-02-01

    To control Medicaid costs, improve quality, and drive community engagement, the Oregon Health Authority introduced a new system of coordinated care organizations (CCOs). While CCOs resemble traditional Medicaid managed care, they have differences that have been deliberately designed to improve care coordination, increase accountability, and incorporate greater community governance. Reforms include global budgets integrating medical, behavioral, and oral health care and public health functions; risk-adjusted payments rewarding outcomes and evidence-based practice; increased transparency; and greater community engagement. The CCO model faces several implementation challenges. If successful, it will provide improved health care delivery, better health outcomes, and overall savings. PMID:25480844

  7. Leaders, managers, and employee care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Della W

    2012-01-01

    With the economic and market changes currently taking place, organizations cannot survive or prosper without quality employees. Key to employee loyalty, performance, and retention is the relationship between the leader, manager, and employee. Leaders are visionaries who make sure that the right things are done for the organization. Managers are in a position to make sure that things are done right within the organization. There are traits and qualities that good leaders and managers must possess to ensure organizational success. Displaying these characteristics will ensure that employees are taken care of, which will benefit both the employees and the organization. PMID:22282003

  8. The 7th IMA international conference on quantitative modelling in the management of health and social care: IMA health 2013 special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilakis, Christos; Chaussalet, Thierry; Pitt, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Health and social care systems are facing major challenges worldwide, due in part to changes in demography and advances in technology and in part to changes in the structure and organisation of care delivery. The IMA Health 2013 conference brought together health care managers, clinicians, management consultants, and mathematicians, operational and health service researchers, statisticians and health economists from across the world with a view to bridging the gap between the respective communities, to exploring recent developments and identifying opportunities for further research. The eight selected papers of this special issue have been grouped into two broad categories. First, there are five papers that report on studies conducted in or relevant to care provision within hospitals. The three remaining papers concern studies aimed at problems related to care provided outside the hospital including long-term care, community based care services and public health. A key learning point arising from these papers and the discussions that took place during the conference is that the systems modelling community need not only to focus their efforts in developing new and improving the performance of existing algorithms, but also in achieving better integration with qualitative research methods and with various relevant strands of the social sciences (ethnography, organisation behaviour etc.). In any case, collaborative projects which engage directly with those involved both in delivering and receiving health care is key if modelling is to make a difference in tackling the messy and complex problems of health and social care. PMID:25304877

  9. Professional advancement of women in health care management: a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, M K; Blide, L A

    1992-11-01

    Ragins and Sundstrom suggest three major conclusions based on power and gender differences within organizations. The first is that power develops or detracts as individuals progress along their career track. HIM professionals who accept the challenges that changing roles bring can also develop a new sensitivity to the value of power as a tool. They can use their negotiating skills to avoid being placed in work roles that result in a decrease in power. The second difference between men and women within organizations is that obstacles often impede women's career paths more than men's. Perceptions by women and men of a woman as homemaker and mother create serious conflicts when jobs are demanding and time intensive. Lastly, Ragins and Sundstrom suggest that career progression is influenced by both intrinsic factors (personal and professional) and extrinsic factors (organizational and interpersonal). The interaction between these factors is often driven by gender differences allowing men to progress and succeed, whereas women remain beneath the glass ceiling. HIM professionals, like other women health professionals, are graduating from advanced programs in health care and business administration at a greater rate than ever before in the history of this country. Not all these graduates will be able to acquire top-level administrative positions in the traditional health care institutions (e.g., hospitals). Therefore, if they wish to advance, they may have to move to nontraditional work settings. This is especially true for HIM professionals. The expanding computerized environment in traditional and nontraditional health care settings presents great potential for the development of new roles and responsibilities that have not been identified as male roles. HIM professionals and women in other health care professions who aspire to advance to upper administrative positions in traditional and nontraditional settings must be willing to take the risks inherent in assuming

  10. The CanPain SCI Clinical Practice Guideline for Rehabilitation Management of Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord: recommendations for model systems of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guy, S D; Mehta, S; Harvey, D;

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Clinical practice guidelines. OBJECTIVES: The project objectives were to develop the first Canadian recommendations on a model of care for the management of at- and below-level neuropathic pain in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: The guidelines are relevant for inpatient...... consensus process. RESULTS: The Working Group developed five recommendations for the organization of neuropathic pain rehabilitation care in people with SCI. CONCLUSIONS: The Working Group recommendations for a model of care for at- and below-level neuropathic pain after SCI should be used to inform...

  11. HIV/AIDS managed care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J G

    2000-01-01

    Approximately one-half of all patients with HIV infection who are under care have Medicaid as the third party payor. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid is a state-specific program that has huge variations in reimbursement strategies. Multiple studies have shown that care for persons with AIDS is about $20,000/year, but reimbursement through various state Medicaid programs varies about $100/m/m to $2800/m/m despite the fact that expectations for care are identical. Hopkins has a major commitment to persons with HIV infection with a program that now includes 30 faculty members and a support staff of 170. With the introduction of mandatory managed care for Medicaid recipients in July, 1997, we were confronted with the issue of substantial downsizing with abandonment of over half of our patients, or learning the transition to managed care. This has been a steep learning curve involving negotiations with the state Medicaid office, reorganization of our clinic, careful scrutiny of our database regarding resource utilization and cost, education of providers, and longitudinal collection of new information and integration of the rapid changes in the field. In the process of this transition, we learned that there are precious few resources to provide guidance and that there is a perceived need for assistance by HIV providers throughout the country. Consequently, we have now established the "HIV Managed Care Network" with substantial funding from diverse sources to support education, data collection, and public policy review. It is premature to evaluate performance since most of these activities have just begun, but we expect that this Network will serve as a demonstration model for methods to deal with chronic diseases under managed care. PMID:10881336

  12. Multivariate determinants of self-management in Health Care: assessing Health Empowerment Model by comparison between structural equation and graphical models approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Trentini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Backgroung. In public health one debated issue is related to consequences of improper self-management in health care.  Some theoretical models have been proposed in Health Communication theory which highlight how components such general literacy and specific knowledge of the disease might be very important for effective actions in healthcare system.  Methods. This  paper aims at investigating the consistency of Health Empowerment Model by means of both graphical models approach, which is a “data driven” method and a Structural Equation Modeling (SEM approach, which is instead “theory driven”, showing the different information pattern that can be revealed in a health care research context.The analyzed dataset provides data on the relationship between the Health Empowerment Model constructs and the behavioral and health status in 263 chronic low back pain (cLBP patients. We used the graphical models approach to evaluate the dependence structure in a “blind” way, thus learning the structure from the data.Results. From the estimation results dependence structure confirms links design assumed in SEM approach directly from researchers, thus validating the hypotheses which generated the Health Empowerment Model constructs.Conclusions. This models comparison helps in avoiding confirmation bias. In Structural Equation Modeling, we used SPSS AMOS 21 software. Graphical modeling algorithms were implemented in a R software environment.

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients' Experiences of an Enhanced Self-Management Model of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neil; Jones, Pauline; Adamson, Vikki; Spiteri, Monica; Kinmond, Kathryn

    2016-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is debilitating and costly. Self-management is championed to empower individuals to better manage their condition and also to efficiently utilize health resources. As a multi-disciplinary team, we conducted focus group research with individuals living with COPD who were participating in a longitudinal study to use an electronic "diary" to monitor, record, and transmit their own health status, plus receiving regular nurse visits. The main aims of the focus groups were to investigate how far individuals embraced the electronic diary and experienced it as an aid to the self-management of their condition. We also looked at the importance of the nurse visits to the process. Thematic analysis revealed that patients responded positively to the use of technology (the electronic diary), including psychological benefits of perceived support offered by the remote symptom surveillance. Findings also showed patients' increased awareness and monitoring of personal symptoms together with an improved understanding of disease self-management. Nurse support emerged as an important "human" factor in the process. In addition, a reduction in hospital admission was observed, thus reducing costs to the health service. PMID:25711841

  14. Managed Care Plans: Getting Good Care for Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Health Insurance > Managed Care Plans: Getting Good Care for Your Child Family ...

  15. Effect of Primary Health Care Orientation on Chronic Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Schmittdiel, Julie A.; Shortell, Stephen M.; Rundall, Thomas G; Bodenheimer, Thomas; SELBY, Joe V.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE It has been suggested that the best way to improve chronic illness care is through a redesign of primary care emphasizing comprehensive, coordinated care as espoused by the Chronic Care Model (CCM). This study examined the relationship between primary care orientation and the implementation of the CCM in physician organizations.

  16. 健康管理模式下药学服务的实践%Pharmaceutical care under health management model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅翔; 王博冉; 王福利; 陈盛新

    2014-01-01

    通过论述与比较药学服务和健康管理的理念,分析两者在提出背景、实施过程中的内在联系,探讨如何结合健康管理模式,拓宽药学服务的内容,加强药学服务的实践。%To compare the concepts of pharmaceutical care and health management , analyze their internal connections both in present background and implementation process .Further development and practice of pharmaceutical care under the new health manage -ment model were discussed .

  17. A collaborative cardiologist-pharmacist care model to improve hypertension management in patients with or at high risk for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irons BK

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Physician led collaborative drug therapy management utilizing clinical pharmacists to aid in the medication management of patients with hypertension has been shown to improve blood pressure control. With recommendations for lower blood pressures in patients with coronary artery disease, a cardiologist-pharmacist collaborative care model may be a novel way to achieve these more rigorous goals of therapy. Objective: The purpose of this project was to evaluate this type of care model in a high cardiac risk patient population. Methods: A retrospective cohort study determined the ability of a cardiologist-pharmacist care model (n=59 to lower blood pressure and achieve blood pressure goals (< 130/80 mmHg in patients with or at high risk for coronary artery disease compared to usual cardiologist care (n=58 in the same clinical setting. Results: The cardiologist-pharmacist care model showed a higher percentage of patients obtaining their goal blood pressure compared to cardiologist care alone, 49.2% versus 31.0% respectively, p=0.0456. Greater reductions in systolic blood pressure (-22 mmHg versus -12 mmHg, p=0.0077 and pulse pressure (-15 mmHg versus -7 mmHg, p=0.0153 were noted in the cardiologist-pharmacist care model. No differences in diastolic blood pressure were found. There was a shorter duration of clinic follow-up (7.0 versus 13.2 months, p=0.0013 but a higher frequency of clinic visits (10.7 versus 3.45, p<0.0001 in the cardiologist-pharmacist care model compared to usual care. The number of antihypertensive agents used did not change over the time period evaluated. Conclusion: This study suggests a team-based approach to hypertensive care using a collaborative cardiologist-pharmacist care model improves blood pressure from baseline in a high cardiac risk patient population and was more likely to obtain more stringent blood pressure goals than usual care.

  18. The role of palliative care in population management and accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grant; Bernacki, Rachelle; Block, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    By 2021, health care spending is projected to grow to 19.6% of the GDP, likely crowding out spending in other areas. The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) attempts to curb health care spending by incentivizing high-value care through the creation of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), which assume financial risk for patient outcomes. With this financial risk, health systems creating ACOs will be motivated to pursue innovative care models that maximize the value of care. Palliative care, as an emerging field with a growing evidence base, is positioned to improve value in ACOs by increasing high-quality care and decreasing costs for the sickest patients. ACO leaders may find palliative care input valuable in optimizing high-quality patient-centered care in the accountable care environment; however, palliative care clinicians will need to adopt new models that extrapolate their direct patient care skills to population management strategies. We propose that palliative care specialists take on responsibilities for working with ACO leaders to broaden their mission for systemwide palliative care for appropriate patients by prospectively identifying patients with a high risk of death, high symptom burden, and/or significant psychosocial dysfunction, and developing targeted, "triggered" interventions to enhance patient-centered, goal-consistent, coordinated care. Developing these new population management competencies is a critical role for palliative care teams in the ACO environment. PMID:25723619

  19. Structuring networks for maximum performance under managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T R

    1996-12-01

    Healthcare providers interested in forming delivery networks to secure managed care contracts must decide how to structure their networks. Two basic structural models are available: the noncorporate model and the corporate model. The noncorporate model delivery network typically has a single governing body and management infrastructure to oversee only managed care contracting and related business. The corporate model delivery system has a unified governance management infrastructure that handles all of the network's business. While either structure can work, corporate model networks usually are better able to enforce provider behavior that is in the best interest of a network as a whole. PMID:10163003

  20. The Gold Coast Integrated Care Model

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, Martin; Cooper, Helen; McMurray, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the development of the Australian Gold Coast Integrated Care Model based on the elements identified in contemporary research literature as essential for successful integration of care between primary care, and acute hospital services. The objectives of the model are to proactively manage high risk patients with complex and chronic conditions in collaboration with General Practitioners to ultimately reduce presentations to the health service emergency department, improve ...

  1. Best practice eye care models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar M Qureshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the launching of Global Initiative, VISION 2020 "the Right to Sight" many innovative, practical and unique comprehensive eye care services provision models have evolved targeting the underserved populations in different parts of the World. At places the rapid assessment of the burden of eye diseases in confined areas or utilizing the key informants for identification of eye diseases in the communities are promoted for better planning and evidence based advocacy for getting / allocation of resources for eye care. Similarly for detection and management of diabetes related blindness, retinopathy of prematurity and avoidable blindness at primary level, the major obstacles are confronted in reaching to them in a cost effective manner and then management of the identified patients accordingly. In this regard, the concept of tele-ophthalmology model sounds to be the best solution. Whereas other models on comprehensive eye care services provision have been emphasizing on surgical output through innovative scales of economy that generate income for the program and ensure its sustainability, while guaranteeing treatment of the poorest of the poor.

  2. A managed care cycle provides contract oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul B; Messinger, Stephen F; Welter, Terri

    2002-03-01

    In response to poor payment performance by health plans, providers are realizing that managed care contracts require systematic, ongoing management rather than a periodic focus. An effective managed care cycle that encompasses strategy development, implementation of the strategy through contracting and operations, and monitoring of contract performance can accomplish this needed oversight. Each phase requires specialized management tools, skills, and staff. Because of the importance of managed care to the provider's financial viability, a wide range of persons should be involved in the managed care cycle, including the board of directors, business office staff, senior management, and finance staff. As providers embrace a more structured approach to managed care, they will increase their chances of receiving accurate contracted payments. PMID:11899723

  3. Primary care quality management in Uzbekistan.

    OpenAIRE

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Baymirova, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Uzbek government has a central role in primary care quality management. On paper, many quality management structures and procedures exist. Now, primary care practice should follow, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – has shown. The results have been published in a WHO report. With donor support, quality improvement in primary care is a national priority. Many laws, decrees and orders deal with the improvement of (primary) health care service...

  4. Spirulina in health care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management. PMID:18855693

  5. Characteristics of effective health care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sherryl W

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of traditional and contemporary management theories. Concerns, characteristics, and skills of effective managers are also presented. Further, a self-assessment (survey) of 7 highly effective health care managers in a South Georgia community was conducted to determine their ratings on 6 management indices. The assessment or Scale of Transformational Leadership uses a Likert-type scale to allow for the evaluation of managers. The scale contains 6 management elements for assessment: attention, meaning, trust, self, vision, and feeling. Individual ratings and group summary skills rating are presented. Findings revealed the order of managerial importance of the elements as follows (from highest to lowest): Management of Trust, Management of Attention, Management of Self, Management of Feeling, Management of Meaning, and Management of Risk. As a second tier, the final ratings are corroborated by health care management interns. PMID:15923923

  6. Future developments in health care performance management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crema M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. Keywords: health care, lean management, clinical risk management, quality, health care processes

  7. [Managed care. Its impact on health care in the USA, especially on anesthesia and intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Bach, A

    1998-06-01

    Managed care, i.e., the integration of health insurance and delivery of care under the direction of one organization, is gaining importance in the USA health market. The initial effects consisted of a decrease in insurance premiums, a very attractive feature for employers. Managed care promises to contain expenditures for health care. Given the shrinking public resources in Germany, managed care seems attractive for the German health system, too. In this review the development of managed care, the principal elements, forms of organisation and practical tools are outlined. The regulation of the delivery of care by means of controlling and financial incentives threatens the autonomy of physicians: the physician must act as a "double agent", caring for the interest for the individual patient and being restricted by the contract with the managed care organisation. Cost containment by managed care was achieved by reducing the fees for physicians and hospitals (and partly by restricting care for patients). Only a fraction of this cost reduction was handed over to the enrollee or employer, and most of the money was returned with profit to the shareholders of the managed care organisations. The preeminent role of primary care physicians as gatekeepers of the health network led to a reduced demand for specialist services in general and for university hospitals and anesthesiologists in particular. The paradigm of managed care, i.e., to guide the patient and the care giver through the health care system in order to achieve cost-effective and high quality care, seems very attractive. The stress on cost minimization by any means in the daily practice of managed care makes it doubtful if managed care should be an option for the German health system, in particular because there are a number of restrictions on it in German law. PMID:9676303

  8. Intensive Care Management in Pediatric Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ebru Sakallıoğlu Abalı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. This article aimed to review the current principles of management from initial assessment to early management and intensive care for pediatric burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 62-9

  9. Physician-patient communication in managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, G H; Baker, L; Levinson, W

    1995-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication affects important health care outcomes. Managed care presents a number of challenges to physician-patient communication, including shorter visits, decreased continuity, and lower levels of trust. Good communication skills can help physicians create and maintain healthy relationships with patients in the face of these challenges. We describe 5 communication dilemmas that are common in managed care and review possible solutions suggested by recent ...

  10. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

  11. A life cycle model of public policy issues in health care: the importance of strategic issues management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakich, J S; Feit, M D

    2001-01-01

    Public policy affects health and social services organizations. Senior management has a responsibility to prevent inappropriate demands of stakeholders from predominating and to influence the outcome of public policy to the benefit of their organization through the strategic issues management process. This article presents a public policy issue life cycle model, life-cycle stages and suggested strategies, paths issues can take in the life cycle, and factors that affect issue paths. An understanding of these dynamics can aid senior managers in shaping and changing public policy issues and lessening external environment threats to their organization. PMID:11263098

  12. Identification and management of behavioral/mental health problems in primary care pediatrics: perceived strengths, challenges, and new delivery models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Deborah Winders; Honaker, Sarah M; Jones, V Faye; Williams, P Gail; Stocker, Frederick; Martin, Elaine

    2012-10-01

    This study describes the experiences of and barriers for pediatricians in Kentucky in providing behavioral/mental health (B-MH) services in primary care settings. These data will serve as a foundation for improving service delivery. An online survey was completed by 70 pediatricians. Descriptive data are presented. More than 90% of the respondents said that they saw at least one patient a month with 1 of 10 specific B-MH diagnoses. Physicians' comfort with diagnosing and treating disorders varied widely by diagnosis, age-group, and drug classification. Major barriers to providing optimal care were inaccessibility of mental health professionals for consultation and referral, lack of communication, and lack of knowledge. Respondents were more likely to favor consultation and co-location models over an integration model of care delivery. Overall, the authors found that pediatricians are dealing with patients with B-MH problems for which they may not have been adequately trained. Communication and collaboration needs were identified. PMID:22514194

  13. Medicaid Managed Care in an Integrated Health Care Delivery System: Lessons from Geisinger's Early Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Daniel D; Snyder, Susan R; Baumgart, Charles; Minnich, Amy L; Tomcavage, Janet F; Graf, Thomas R

    2016-08-01

    Many states in the United States, including Pennsylvania, have opted to rely on private managed care organizations to provide health insurance coverage for their Medicaid population in recent years. Geisinger Health System has been one such organization since 2013. Based on its existing care management model involving data-driven population management, advanced patient-centered medical homes, and targeted case management, Geisinger's Medicaid management efforts have been redesigned specifically to accommodate those with complex health care issues and social service needs to facilitate early intervention, effective and efficient care support, and ultimately, a positive impact on health care outcomes. An analysis of Geisinger's claims data suggests that during the first 19 months since beginning Medicaid member enrollment, Geisinger's Medicaid members, particularly those eligible for the supplemental security income benefits, have incurred lower inpatient, outpatient, and professional costs of care compared to expected levels. However, the total cost savings were partially offset by the higher prescription drug costs. These early data suggest that an integrated Medicaid care management effort may achieve significant cost of care savings. (Population Health Management 2016;19:257-263). PMID:26565693

  14. 优质护理管理模式在皮肤科护理中的应用%Quality Care Management Model Applied in Dermatology Nursing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英花

    2015-01-01

    目的 探索优质护理管理模式的具体实施过程,并探寻其在皮肤科护理治疗过程中取得的良好的效果.方法 对该院2015年6月份皮肤科收治的180例皮肤病患者平均分为两组,其中对照组采用传统的普通护理模式,实验组则采用优质护理管理模式. 两组人员中,男女数量大致相等,其中对照组的90例中,有38例女性患者;52例男性患者;实验组中,有40例女性患者,50例男性患者.患者年龄在15~58岁之间.一段时间后,对比两组皮肤病患者的的治疗满意度、治疗效果、住院环境满意度等.结果 通过对进行传统护理模式的对照组与进行优质护理的实验组进行对比.实验组的患者满意度明显高于对照组,且实验组皮肤病患者的治疗效果明显好于对照组患者的治疗效果.结论 优质护理管理模式在皮肤病的护理治疗过程中具有明显的优势,并且能够提升治疗的效果、增加患者的满意度、加快患者恢复的速度等优势. 是当前各大医院皮肤科护理管理中积极推崇的一种护理管理模式.%Objective To explore the quality of care management model specific implementation process, and to explore the good results achieved in its dermatology care treatment. Methods Dermatology hospital in June 2015 admitted 180 patients with skin diseases were divided into two groups, one control group using traditional ordinary care model, the experimental group is made of high quality care management. Two groups, the number of men and women roughly equal, in which 90 people in the control group, there were 38 female patients;52 cases of male patients;the experimental group, 40 female pa-tients and 50 male patients. Patients aged between 15 years old to 58 years old. After some time, compared two groups of patients with skin diseases treatment satisfaction, treatment, hospital environment satisfaction. Results By performing the traditional models of care control group and the

  15. A cluster randomised controlled trial of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a 'whole systems' model of self-management support for the management of long- term conditions in primary care: trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bower Peter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with long-term conditions are increasingly the focus of quality improvement activities in health services to reduce the impact of these conditions on quality of life and to reduce the burden on care utilisation. There is significant interest in the potential for self-management support to improve health and reduce utilisation in these patient populations, but little consensus concerning the optimal model that would best provide such support. We describe the implementation and evaluation of self-management support through an evidence-based 'whole systems' model involving patient support, training for primary care teams, and service re-organisation, all integrated into routine delivery within primary care. Methods The evaluation involves a large-scale, multi-site study of the implementation, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of this model of self-management support using a cluster randomised controlled trial in patients with three long-term conditions of diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The outcome measures include healthcare utilisation and quality of life. We describe the methods of the cluster randomised trial. Discussion If the 'whole systems' model proves effective and cost-effective, it will provide decision-makers with a model for the delivery of self-management support for populations with long-term conditions that can be implemented widely to maximise 'reach' across the wider patient population. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN90940049

  16. Embracing case management for computerization of care pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jing; Li, Jing; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Xiang; Liu, Haifeng; Xie, Guotong

    2014-01-01

    The computerization of care pathways (CPs) has drawn considerable attention, for improving quality of health care and reducing costs. A well-known big challenge of implementing CPs is their flexibility and ad hoc variations in execution of clinical tasks. We observe that case management suits well to address this problem, and this paper proposes a CMMN-based CP model, where CMMN (Case Management Model and Notation) is becoming an industry standard. Via an experimental experience on modelling CHF (congestive heart failure) ambulatory CP, we illustrate that the usage of case management paves the way to popularize CPs, particularly for its quick deployment and execution in industrial products. PMID:25160134

  17. Future developments in health care performance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

  18. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  19. Advanced technologies in trauma critical care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Chung, Kevin K; King, David R

    2012-08-01

    Care of critically injured patients has evolved over the 50 years since Shoemaker established one of the first trauma units at Cook County Hospital in 1962. Modern trauma intensive care units offer a high nurse-to-patient ratio, physicians and midlevel providers who manage the patients, and technologically advanced monitors and therapeutic devices designed to optimize the care of patients. This article describes advances that have transformed trauma critical care, including bedside ultrasonography, novel patient monitoring techniques, extracorporeal support, and negative pressure dressings. It also discusses how to evaluate the safety and efficacy of future advances in trauma critical care. PMID:22850154

  20. Evidence-based models of care for people with epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzsimons, Mary

    2012-02-01

    Advances in medical science and technology, together with improved medical and nursing care, are continuously improving health outcomes in chronic illness, including epilepsy. The consequent increasing diagnostic and therapeutic complexity is placing a burgeoning strain on health care systems. In response, an international move to transform chronic disease management (CDM) aims to optimize the quality and safety of care while containing health care costs. CDM models recommend: integration of care across organizational boundaries that is supported with information and communication technology; patient self-management; and guideline implementation to promote standardized care. Evidence of the effectiveness of CDM models in epilepsy care is presented in this review article.

  1. Integrated, automated revenue management for managed care contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhart, Kent

    2002-04-01

    Faced with increasing managed care penetration and declining net revenue in recent years, healthcare providers increasingly are emphasizing revenue management. To streamline processes and reduce costs in this area, many healthcare providers have implemented or are considering automated contract management systems. When selecting such a system, healthcare financial managers should make certain that the system can interface with both patient-accounting and decision-support systems of the organization. This integration enhances a healthcare provider's financial viability by providing integrated revenue-management capabilities to analyze projected performance of proposed managed care contracts and actual performance of existing contracts. PMID:11963597

  2. Perspective from a hotbed of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, N

    1996-01-01

    An environmental assessment of the current healthcare market in the United States shows four stages of evolution: (1) the unstructured stage, (2) the loose framework, (3) consolidation, and (4) managed competition. Recognition of these stages should help in the development of strategies for the future. After determining the existing stage of the health-care market in a particular geographic area, clinical endocrinologists can compose a vision statement, develop goals and objectives, and formulate strategies to achieve the established goals. For example, one strategy is to join a managed-care plan. Some practical business advice about assuming risk (responsibility) for various health-care services is provided, and the concept of disease-specific capitation is discussed. Health-care reform is likely to proceed regardless of what the federal government does. In the managed-care environment, the most successful physician participants will be those who are thoroughly informed. PMID:15251504

  3. Managed care in four managed competition OECD health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli, Amir; Stam, Piet; Wasem, Jürgen; Trottmann, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Managed care emerged in the American health system in the 1980s as a way to manage suppliers' induced demand and to contain insurers' costs. While in Israel the health insurers have always been managed care organizations, owning health care facilities, employing medical personnel or contracting selectively with independent providers, European insurers have been much more passive, submitting themselves to collective agreements between insurers' and providers' associations, accompanied by extensive government regulation of prices, quantities, and budgets. With the 1990s reforms, and the introduction of risk-adjusted "managed competition", a growing pressure to allow the European insurers to manage their own care - including selective contracting with providers - has emerged, with varying speed of the introduction of policy changes across the individual countries. This paper compares experiences with managed care in Israel, The Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland since the 1990s. After a brief description of the health insurance markets in the four countries, we focus comparatively on the emergence of managed care in the markets for ambulatory care and inpatient market care. We conclude with an evaluation of the current situation and a discussion of selected health policy issues. PMID:25776034

  4. Medicare Managed Care: Numbers and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Zarabozo, Carlos; Taylor, Charles(8 Cherryl House, Seymour Gardens, Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands, B74 4ST, U.K.); Hicks, Jarret

    1996-01-01

    This article captures some key trends in Medicare managed care. The figures which accompany this article explore, among other issues: enrollment; numbers of participating plans; demographic characteristics such as geographic location, age, and income; and premium and benefit comparisons.

  5. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Medicare Managed Care Spillovers and Treatment Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests that the share of Medicare managed care enrollees in a region affects the costs of treating traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries; however, little is known about the mechanisms through which these 'spillover effects' operate. This paper examines the relationship between Medicare managed care penetration and treatment intensity for FFS enrollees hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AMI. I find that increased Medicare managed care penetration is associated with a reduction in both the costs and the treatment intensity of FFS AMI patients. Specifically, as Medicare managed care penetration increases, FFS AMI patients are less likely to receive surgical reperfusion and mechanical ventilation and to experience an overall reduction in the number of inpatient procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25960418

  7. Medicare Managed Care plan Performance, A Comparison...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The study evaluates the performance of Medicare managed care, Medicare Advantage, Plans in comparison to Medicare fee-for-service Plans in three states with...

  8. Primary care quality management in Slovenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Bulc, M.

    2008-01-01

    Of all GPs in Slovenia 86% are not interested in activities to systematically improve care. A clear national quality policy, further education for care managers and financial incentives for GPs could change the picture, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO

  9. Financial management in leading health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    To understand better the financial management practices and strategies of modern health care organizations, we conducted interviews with chief financial officers (CFOs) of several leading health care systems. In this introduction, we present an overview of the project and summary responses on corporate financial structures and strategic challenges facing CFOs. PMID:10845383

  10. Future management opportunities for minorities in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J N

    1994-01-01

    Current proposals for health care reform emphasize managed care in an effort to achieve universal coverage and access to health care for all Americans. One of the many strategies to achieve this goal is to create a new health care workforce by supporting the recruitment and education of health professionals from population groups underrepresented in health care. To help insure that the managed care industry will be adequately prepared to face the challenges of reform, the Group Health Foundation of the Group Health Association of America, Inc., has crafted an innovative Minority Training Program--a management training program in the field of managed care. The program involves resident fellows who will train in select health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the Washington, DC/Baltimore metropolitan area. To augment training, the fellows will simultaneously participate in a comprehensive didactic program especially designed to prepare each fellow for a first or middle-management position in an HMO or a similar managed care organization. Following successful completion of the first years in Washington, DC, the program will be broadened to other geographical areas. PMID:7918893

  11. Participatory management in today's health care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the health care revolution progresses, so must the management styles of today's leaders. The authors must ask ourselves if we are managing tomorrow's work force or the work force of the past. Participatory management may better meet the needs of today's work force. This paper identifies the reasons participatory management is a more effective management style, the methods used to implement a participatory management program, its benefits (such as higher productivity and more efficient, effective implementation and acceptance of change), and the difficulties experienced

  12. Can Managed Health Care Help Manage Health Care-Associated Infections?

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, Richard; Caldwell, Blake

    2001-01-01

    Managed-care organizations have a unique opportunity, still largely unrealized, to collaborate with health-care providers and epidemiologists to prevent health care-associated infections. Several attributes make these organizations logical collaborators for infection control programs: they have responsibility for defined populations of enrollees and for their overall health, including preventive care; they possess unique data resources about their members and their care; and they are able to ...

  13. Concussion management by primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleacher, M D; Dexter, W W

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess current concussion management practices of primary care providers. Methods An 11 item questionnaire was mailed to primary care providers in the state of Maine, with serial mailings to non‐respondents. Results Over 50% of the questionnaires were completed, with nearly 70% of primary care providers indicating that they routinely use published guidelines as a tool in managing patients with concussion. Nearly two thirds of providers were aware that neuropsychological tests could be used, but only 16% had access to such tests within a week of injury. Conclusions Primary care providers are using published concussion management guidelines with high frequency, but many are unable to access neuropsychological testing when it is required. PMID:16371479

  14. Job redesign and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Elizabeth J

    2007-01-01

    Health care supervisors and managers are often asked to redesign jobs in their departments. Frequently, little information accompanies the directive. This article lists sources of change in work and defines key terms. Also reviewed are factors that supervisors and managers can weigh in their redesigns. The article suggests actions aligned to common problems in the work environment. Finally, guidelines for a practical, step-by-step approach are provided. For health care supervisors and managers, the key to a successful job redesign is to achieve the unique balance of factors that matches the situation. PMID:17464222

  15. Nutrition services in managed care: new paradigms for dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramee, S H

    1996-04-01

    Managed care systems are transforming the health care system in the United States. Dietitians will need to review practice opportunities in new and different settings, and develop additional skills to make a successful transition to the transformed health care environment. The shift in health care financing from a fee-for-service model to a capitated system will have the most dramatic impact on the profession. Not all the answers are available, but the focus for the future is clear--customer satisfaction, outcomes research, and cost-effective nutrition services. PMID:8598432

  16. Models of care and delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good...... outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP), or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining...... this diversity include differences in health policy, health insurance structures, case load and the prevalence of HIV-related morbidity. In clinical stable populations, the current trend is to gradually extend intervals between HIV-specific visits in a shared care model with GPs. A similar shared-model approach...

  17. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  18. Dyspepsia management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, JC; Arents, NLA; van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2003-01-01

    Background: Dyspepsia is common in western society. Prompt endoscopy is imperative in all patients with sinister symptoms or if symptoms first appear after the age of 50-55 years, but the optimal management of younger patients with uncomplicated dyspepsia is still open to debate. Methods: The litera

  19. [Major Burn Trauma Management and Nursing Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shu-Fen

    2015-08-01

    Major burn injury is one of the most serious and often life-threatening forms of trauma. Burn patients not only suffer from the physical, psychological, social and spiritual impacts of their injury but also experience considerable changes in health-related quality of life. This paper presents a review of the literature on the implications of previous research and clinical care guidelines related to major burn injuries in order to help clinical practice nurses use evidence-based care guidelines to respond to initial injury assessments, better manage the complex systemic response to these injuries, and provide specialist wound care, emotional support, and rehabilitation services. PMID:26242439

  20. Models of care and delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Lundgren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP, or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining this diversity include differences in health policy, health insurance structures, case load and the prevalence of HIV-related morbidity. In clinical stable populations, the current trend is to gradually extend intervals between HIV-specific visits in a shared care model with GPs. A similar shared-model approach with community clinics for injecting drug-dependent persons is also being implemented. Shared care models require oversight to ensure that primary responsibility is defined for the persons overall health situation, for screening of co-morbidities, defining indication to treat comorbidities, prescription of non-HIV medicines, etc. Intelligent bioinformatics platforms (i.e. generation of alerts if course of care deviates from a prior defined normality are being developed to assist in providing this oversight and to provide measure of quality. Although consensus exists to assess basic quality indicators of care, a comprehensive set of harmonized indicators are urgently needed to define best practise standards via benchmarking. Such a tool will be central to guide ongoing discussions on restructuring of models, as quality of care should not be compromised in this process.

  1. Managing the myths of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Myths impede the effective management of health care, for example that the system is failing (indeed, that is a system), and can be fixed by detached social engineering and heroic leadership, or treating it more like a business. This field needs to reframe its management, as distributed beyond the "top"; its strategy as venturing, not planning; its organizing as collaboration beyond control, and especially itself, as a system beyond its parts. PMID:23342753

  2. Cost accounting, management control, and planning in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, R B; Blish, C S

    1988-02-01

    Advantages and pharmacy applications of computerized hospital management-control and planning systems are described. Hospitals must define their product lines; patient cases, not tests or procedures, are the end product. Management involves operational control, management control, and strategic planning. Operational control deals with day-to-day management on the task level. Management control involves ensuring that managers use resources effectively and efficiently to accomplish the organization's objectives. Management control includes both control of unit costs of intermediate products, which are procedures and services used to treat patients and are managed by hospital department heads, and control of intermediate product use per case (managed by the clinician). Information from the operation and management levels feeds into the strategic plan; conversely, the management level controls the plan and the operational level carries it out. In the system developed at New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, the intermediate product-management system enables managers to identify intermediate products, develop standard costs, simulate changes in departmental costs, and perform variance analysis. The end-product management system creates a patient-level data-base, identifies end products (patient-care groupings), develops standard resource protocols, models alternative assumptions, performs variance analysis, and provides concurrent reporting. Examples are given of pharmacy managers' use of such systems to answer questions in the areas of product costing, product pricing, variance analysis, productivity monitoring, flexible budgeting, modeling and planning, and comparative analysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3284338

  3. Depression In Primary Care Part 2: Management

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The management of depression in the primary care setting should ideally take a biological, psychological, and sociological approach. Antidepressants are the most commonly used biological agents in the treatment of depression. Psychological therapies and psychosocial interventions improve the outcome of treatment when combined with pharmacotherapy. Clinical depression is treatable and thus efforts should be made to alleviate the suffering of patients with depression.

  4. The association between care co-ordination and emergency department use in older managed care enrollees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Coleman

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association between care co-ordination and use of the Emergency Department (ED in older managed care enrollees. Design: Nested case-control with 103 cases (used the ED and 194 controls (did not use the ED. Patients and methods: Older patients with multiple chronic illnesses enrolled in a care management programme of a large group-model health maintenance organisation with more than 50,000 members over the age of 64. Better care co-ordination was defined as timely follow-up after a change in treatment; fewer decision-makers involved with the care plan; and a higher patient-perceived rating of overall care co-ordination. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between ED use (the outcome variable and measures of care co-ordination (the predictor variables. Results: Self-reported care co-ordination was not significantly different between cases and controls for any of the four classifications of inappropriate ED use. Similarly, no differences were found in the number of different physicians or medication prescribers involved in the patients' care. Four-week follow-up after potentially high-risk events for subsequent ED use, including changes in chronic disease medications, missed encounters, and same day encounters, did not differ between subjects with inappropriate ED use and controls. Conclusion: Existing measures of care co-ordination were not associated with inappropriate ED use in this study of older adults with complex care needs. The absence of an association may, in part, be attributable to the paucity of validated measures to assess care co-ordination, as well as the methodological complexity inherent in studying this topic. Future research should focus on the development of new measures and on approaches that better isolate the role of care co-ordination from other potential variables that influence utilisation.

  5. Anxiety and diabetes: Innovative approaches to management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Allison; Tapp, Hazel

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chief concern for patients, healthcare providers, and health care systems in America, and around the globe. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit clinical and subclinical symptoms of anxiety more frequently than people without diabetes. Anxiety is traditionally associated with poor metabolic outcomes and increased medical complications among those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Collaborative care models have been utilized in the multidisciplinary treatment of mental health problems and chronic disease, and have demonstrated success in managing the pathology of depression which often accompanies diabetes. However, no specific treatment model has been published that links the treatment of anxiety to the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the success of collaborative care models in treating depression associated with diabetes, and anxiety unrelated to chronic disease, it is possible that the collaborative care treatment of primary care patients who suffer from both anxiety and diabetes could be met with the same success. The key issue is determining how to implement and sustain these models in practice. This review summarizes the proposed link between anxiety and diabetes, and offers an innovative and evidence-based collaborative care model for anxiety and diabetes in primary care. PMID:27390262

  6. Exploration of the financing and management model of a children's critical disease security system in China based on the implementation of Shanghai Children Hospital Care Aid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-ruo; WEN Zhao-jun; CHEN Sai-juan; CHEN Zhu

    2011-01-01

    This study is designed to serve as a reference for the establishment of health security systems for children's critical diseases. Through analysis of the operation of Shanghai Children Hospital Care Aid (SCHCA), this study explored the financing model and management of a children's critical disease healthcare system and analyzed the possibility of expanding this system to other areas. It is found that a premium as Iow as RMB 7 per capita per year under SCHCA can provide high-level security for children's critical diseases. With the good experience in Shanghai and based on the current basic medical insurance system for urban residents and the new rural cooperative medical scheme (NRCMS), it is necessary and feasible to build a health security system for children's critical diseases at the national level.

  7. Neonatal bilirubin management as an implementation example of interdisciplinary continuum of care tools

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, Sidney N.; Thompson, Bryce S.; Millar, Jean A.; Eggert, Larry D.; Wilcox, Adam B

    2007-01-01

    Management of newborn bilirubin spans the inpatient and outpatient continuum of care. Intermountain Healthcare has developed and implemented a web-based tool for managing bilirubin that follows newborn patients across care settings and providers with a consistent plan of care. The underlying model for the tool is derived from published guidelines. The model divides the time-sensitive data into risk zones and associates each zone with the appropriate order set for follow-up care. The tool inte...

  8. Managed care, deficit financing, and aggregate health care expenditure in the United States: a cointegration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, N R; Okunade, A A

    2000-09-01

    We applied a battery of cointegration tests comprising those of Johansen and Juselius [19], Phillips and Hansen [35], and Engle and Granger [6], to model aggregate health care expenditure using 1960-96 US data. The existence of a stable long-run economic relationship or cointegration is confirmed, in the United States, between aggregate health care expenditure and real GDP, population age distribution, managed care enrollment, number of practicing physicians, and government deficits. The evidence of cointegration among these variables, chosen on the theoretical basis of prior studies, implies that while they are individually non-stationary in levels, together they are highly correlated and move, in the long run to form an economic equilibrium relationship of US aggregate health care expenditure. More specifically, and for the first time in this line of inquiry, (i) managed care enrollment is found to be negatively associated with the level of health care spending, (ii) supply disinduced demand effects of physicians tend to moderate health expenditure, and (iii) government deficit financing is positively related to health care spending. The observed sign and magnitude of the income coefficient are consistent with health care being a luxury good. PMID:11105414

  9. Creating A Sustainable Model of Spine Care in Underserved Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldeman, Scott; Nordin, Margareta; Outerbridge, Geoff;

    2015-01-01

    The world lacks sustainable models of care to manage spinal disorders in poor and underserved communities. The purpose of this article is to: (1) review the rationale and importance of developing a sustainable evidence-based model of care at low cost for people with spinal disorders in underserved...... with sound leadership, research and a model of care, there is an opportunity to help reduce the burden of the leading cause of disability in the world....

  10. Intercultural caring-an abductive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikberg, Anita; Eriksson, Katie

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of caring from a transcultural perspective and to develop the first outline of a theory. The theoretical perspective includes Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. Texts on caring by the transcultural theorists, including Campinha-Bacote, Kim-Godwin, Leininger and Ray, are analysed using content analysis. The overall theme that resulted from this analysis was that caring is a complex whole. Three main categories of caring emerged: inner caring, outer caring and the goal of caring. Inner caring consists of caring is a relationship, and caring and culture are seen in different dimensions. Outer caring refers to caring affected by educational, administrative and social and other structures. The goal of caring consists of caring leading to change towards health and well-being. The main categories include categories and subcategories that are compared with Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. A model for intercultural caring is generated abductively. Caring and culture appear in three dimensions: caring as ontology independent of context; caring as a phenomenon emphasised differently in different cultures; caring as nursing care activities is unique. Caring alleviates suffering and leads to health and well-being. This model describes caring from an intercultural perspective as a mutual but asymmetric relationship between the nurse and the patient, including the patient's family and community. The patient's cultural background and acculturation influence caring. The cultural background, cultural competence and organisation of the nurse also influence caring. Caring is seen as a complex whole. This study integrates Campinha-Bacote's, Kim-Godwin's, Leininger's and Ray's views of caring with Eriksson's caritative caring and presents caring from a transcultural perspective in a new way as a model for intercultural caring, which can benefit nursing care, education, research and administration. PMID:18840233

  11. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Johanson da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management.METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed.RESULTS: four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (demotivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method.CONCLUSIONS: the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (discontinuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model.

  12. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability. PMID:25217142

  13. Preparing Psychotherapy Students for the New Demands of Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Catherine

    The wildly varying utilization and quality control practices that make up "managed care" make it difficult to generalize new rules and requirements. Information that can aid counselor trainees in understanding the demands of managed health care is presented. The text explores the following questions: (1) "What do managed care companies want?" and…

  14. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Martha L; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care.

  15. Health-Care Waste Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to give A view of the hospital waste management and environmental problem in india. The objective of this study is to analyze the health care waste management system, including practices and compliances. Most countries of the world, especially the developing countries, are facing the grim situation arising out of environmental pollution due to pathological waste arising from increasing populations and the consequent rapid growth in the number of hospital units. In india, there are about 6 lakhs hospital beds, over 23,000 primary health centers, more than 15,000 small and private hospitals. In india, the biomedical waste (management and handling rules 1998 make it mandatory for hospitals, clinics, and other medical and veterinary institutes to dispose of bio medical wastes strictly according to the rules.

  16. Surviving managed care: the effect on job satisfaction in hospital-based nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiser, M

    2000-06-01

    Major changes brought about by managed care have redefined the nursing profession. Current trends such as case management, downsizing, restructuring of the workforce, and changes in the patient profile have had numerous effects, particularly on job satisfaction among hospital-based nurses. Strategies to improve job satisfaction during this era of increased managed care penetration include enhanced communication mechanisms, support from hospital administration, implementation of care models that promote professional nursing practice, adequate staffing, and competitive salaries and benefits. PMID:11033702

  17. The value of Medicare managed care plans and their prescription drug benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Anne E. Hall

    2007-01-01

    I estimate the welfare, both gross and net, provided by the Medicare managed care program in 1999 through 2002. First, I estimate a model of demand for the benefits offered by managed care plans to Medicare beneficiaries. I then use the demand estimates to form estimates of welfare provided by the program. Medicare beneficiaries derived $14.9 billion of gross welfare per year from the Medicare HMO program. Depending on the amount of selection in the program, the Medicare managed care program ...

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel M. Bassily-Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases.

  19. Collaborative Depression Care Among Latino Patients in Diabetes Disease Management, Los Angeles, 2011–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Brian; Jin, Haomiao; Vidyanti, Irene; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Ell, Kathleen; Wu, Shinyi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of comorbid diabetes and depression is high, especially in low-income Hispanic or Latino patients. The complex mix of factors in safety-net care systems impedes the adoption of evidence-based collaborative depression care and results in persistent disparities in depression outcomes. The Diabetes–Depression Care-Management Adoption Trial examined whether the collaborative depression care model is an effective approach in safety-net clinics to improve clinical care o...

  20. Innovation Health Care Management Application Personnel Training Model%卫生事业管理专业应用型人才培养模式的创新研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱怡

    2015-01-01

    近年来,国家相继推出医疗改革的重要文件,可见国家对卫生医疗改革的决心,而面对这种新医改的不断深化,新形势对卫生管理专业人才的培养模式提出了新的要求,卫生事业管理需要的是医学、管理学、自然科学等相关学科的综合性人才. 该研究就传统卫生事业管理专业人才的培养模式中存在的问题进行分析的基础上,提出了适应时代发展的人才培养模式.%In recent years, countries have launched important documents of health care reform, visible national commitment to health care reform, but the face of this new health care reform deepening, the new situation of the training model of health management professionals put forward new demands, health Care Management need is medicine, management, natural sciences and other related disciplines integrated talent. This paper analyzed on the basis of traditional health management training model of the existing problems on the proposed training model adapted to the times.

  1. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  2. The metamorphosis of managed care: implications for health reform internationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2010-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that managed care's brief life is over and we are now in a post-managed care era. In fact, managed care has a long history and continues to thrive. Writers also often assume that managed care is a fixed thing. They overlook that managed care has evolved and neglect to examine the role that it plays in the health system. Furthermore, private actors and the state have used managed care tools to promote diverse goals. These include the following: increasing access to medical care; restricting physician entrepreneurialism; challenging professional control over the medical economy; curbing medical spending; managing medical practice and markets; furthering the growth of medical markets and private insurance; promoting for-profit medical facilities and insurers; earning bounties for reducing medical expenditures: and reducing governmental responsibility for, and oversight of, medical care. Struggles over these competing goals spurred the metamorphosis of managed care. This article explores how managed care transformed physicians' conflicts of interests and responses to them. It also examines how managed care altered the opportunities for patients/medical consumers to use exit and voice to spur change. PMID:20579232

  3. Estimating the Clinical Outcomes and Cost Differences Between Standard Care With and Without Cadexomer Iodine in the Management of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers Using a Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nherera, Leo M; Woodmansey, Emma; Trueman, Paul; Gibbons, Garry W

    2016-06-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLUs) affect up to 1% of the adult population in the developed world and present a significant financial and resource burden to health care systems. Cadexomer iodine (CI) is an antimicrobial dressing indicated for use in chronic exuding wounds. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost utility of using CI + standard care (SC) - ie, high compression multicomponent bandaging including debridement - compared with SC alone in the management of chronic (>6 months' duration) VLUs from a payer's perspective. A Markov model was constructed to evaluate the cost and clinical benefits (healing and decreased infection rates) of the 2 treatment modalities over a 1-year period using data from 4 randomized, controlled clinical studies (RCTs) included in a recent Cochrane review and cost data from a recently published economic evaluation of VLUs. Costs were calculated using 2014 United States dollars; wound outcomes in- cluded complete healing in 212 patients reported in the Cochrane meta-analysis and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), with utility values obtained from 200 patients with VLUs calculated using standard gamble. Treatment with CI over 1 year was $7,259 compared to $7,901 for SC. This resulted in a cost savings of $643/patient in favor of CI compared with SC. More patients treated with CI (61%) had their wounds healed compared to 54% treated with SC. Furthermore, patients treated with CI+SC experienced 6 additional ulcer-free weeks compared to persons treated with SC alone (ie, 25 ulcer- free weeks compared to 19 ulcer-free weeks, respectively). Overall, CI resulted in 0.03 more QALYs (ie, 0.86 QALYs compared to 0.83 for SC). The use of CI in addition to SC compared to SC alone over 52 weeks resulted in more wounds healed and more QALYs along with a decrease of overall costs The results of this study suggest CI is cost effective com- pared to SC alone in the management of patients with chronic VLUs. Prospective, controlled clinical

  4. Understanding effective care management implementation in primary care: a macrocognition perspective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status. Primary care practices, however, are often challenged with its implementation. Incorporating care management involves more than a simple physical process redesign to existing clinical care routines. It involves changes to who is working with patients, and consequently such things as who is making decisions, who is sharing patient information, and how. Studying the ...

  5. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with better outcomes in diabetes care. Quality management was measured with newly developed questionnaires about organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, q...

  6. Roles and responsibilities in the secondary level eye care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibaba Saravanan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In any secondary level eye care clinic, a number of tasks must be completed. In different countries and different settings, different people will carry out these tasks. The manager is responsible for ensuring that all the tasks are covered, that people are carefully selected to perform them, and that staff are supported and managed. The International Centre for Advancement of Rural Eye Care (ICARE, within the L.V. Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI in India, has evolved an eye care team to provide secondary level eye care services to a population of 0.5 to 1 million. The ICARE model emphasises that all cadres of clinical and non-clinical personnel are equally important. Below is a description of the range of jobs at secondary level centres. The tertiary centre at LVPEI manages leadership and training for this model.

  7. Managed care: a view from Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Y; Wilson, R

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes recent developments in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the new Baltic states that reflect the influence of US managed care concepts and practices. We emphasize (a) developments in restructuring traditional health insurance mechanisms by shifting premium and out-of-pocket burdens to consumers so as to constrain demand and costs and (b) reliance on prospective hospital budgets and case management by primary physicians. Social insurance mechanisms and universal coverage remain national tasks as well as basic components of the social structure of most European countries. Full open-market competition between traditional sick funds and private insurance companies and the introduction of for-profit MCOs beholden to their shareholders appears unlikely on other than an experimental basis. Increased competition between providers may well result from the new right of insurers and payers to contract with medical care providers of their choice. It remains to be shown how far these experiments, which differ substantially between the countries examined, will succeed in their objectives and become permanent features of their national systems. PMID:11274522

  8. OEC management model used in the performance appraisal of quality care ward%OEC管理模式应用于优质护理病房绩效考核

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童莉

    2012-01-01

    目的:将OEC管理模式应用于优质护理病房绩效考核,进一步提高护理服务质量.方法:在护理管理过程中明确优质护理责任组工作目标,制定合理科学的护理工作流程及各班职责,细化护理工作的每日检查体系,量化基础护理工作项目,有效落实护理工作的激励机制,完善护士绩考核.结果:运用OEC管理模式将工作质量标准量化到每个岗,每个人,护士意识到工作中每一天所做的每一件事所应承担的义务和职责,并使患者得到持续护理,提高了护理质量及病人满意度.结论:OEC管理模式是践行现代护理管理观,提升护理工作效率和效果的有效手.%Objective The OEC management model used in performance evaluation of high-quality care ward, to further improve the quality of care. Methods In the care management process in clear high -quality care and responsibility group objectives, developing reasonable scientific nursing workflow and responsibilities of each class, refinement of the daily checks of the care system, quantify the basic nursing care project, the effective implementation of the nursing work incentives , and improve nursing performance appraisal. Results The use of OEC management model to quantify the quality of work standards to each Gang, everyone, nurses aware of the obligations and responsibilities of every thing should be made to work every day, and patients receive continuity of care, improve quality of care and patient satisfaction. Conclusion The OEC management model is the practice of nursing management concept, an effective means to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of care.

  9. A collaborative quality improvement model and electronic community of practice to support sepsis management in emergency departments: investigating care harmonization for provincial knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kendall; Marsden, Julian; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Novak Lauscher, Helen; Kamal, Noreen; Stenstrom, Rob; Sweet, David; Goldman, Ran D; Innes, Grant

    2012-01-01

    national level to establish a template for policy makers from other jurisdictions to translate knowledge into action for EDs. This research study will employ the IHI model for improvement, incorporate the principles of participatory action research, and use the E2E online CoP to engage ED practitioners (eg, physicians, nurses, and administrators, exchanging ideas, engaging in discussions, sharing resources, and amalgamating knowledge) from across BC to (1) share the evidence of early intervention in sepsis, (2) adapt the evidence to their patterns of practice, (3) develop a common set of orders for implementing the sepsis pathway, and (4) agree on common indicators to measure clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis is that combining the social networking ability of an electronic CoP and its inherent knowledge translation capacity with the structured project management of the IHI model will result in widespread and sustained improvement in the emergency and overall care of patients with severe sepsis presenting to EDs throughout BC. PMID:23611816

  10. Conflicts between managed care organizations and emergency departments in California.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, L. A.; Derlet, R W

    1996-01-01

    To control costs, managed care organizations have begun to restrict the use of hospital emergency departments by their enrollees. They are doing this by educating enrollees, providing better access to 24-hour urgent care, denying preauthorizations for care for some patients who do present to emergency departments, and retrospectively denying payment for certain patients who use emergency services. Changing traditional use of emergency departments has resulted in conflicts between managed care...

  11. System Change: Quality Assessment and Improvement for Medicaid Managed Care

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Wally R.; Cotter, J. James; Louis F Rossiter

    1996-01-01

    Rising Medicaid health expenditures have hastened the development of State managed care programs. Methods to monitor and improve health care under Medicaid are changing. Under fee-for-service (FFS), the primary concern was to avoid overutilization. Under managed care, it is to avoid underutilization. Quality enhancement thus moves from addressing inefficiency to addressing insufficiency of care. This article presents a case study of Virginia's redesign of Quality Assessment and Improvement (Q...

  12. Case management for long-term and acute medical care

    OpenAIRE

    Capitman, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Case management has developed as an administrative service for controlling costs and improving the quality of health and social service delivery. Long-term care case management combined with service expansion has been examined in some detail with varied results. Less research has focused on case management for users of high-cost medical care. This overview highlights five programs and patient groups where integrated delivery and/or financing of medical and long-term care services are being de...

  13. Effectiveness of the Smart Care Service for Diabetes Management

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Young-Soon; Kim, Yongsuk; Lee, Chang Hee

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Smart Care service for the diabetes management. Methods Fifty-six patients with diabetes mellitus were recruited in Daegu, Korea. All participants completed a diabetes management education course (diet, exercise, and complications) for their self-care and received access to a care management website through a netbook and smartphone. The website accepts uploads of glucose level, body weight, HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein ...

  14. Palliative Care Doula: an innovative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Judy C

    2014-01-01

    Walking the journey of serious illness is very difficult and stressful for patients and families. A universal principle of palliative care is caring for the patient/ family unit. This article introduces a model for the Palliative Care Doula for experienced and advanced practice palliative care nurses to support patients and families during the traumatic and vulnerable period of end-of-life care. PMID:25296488

  15. Glycemia management in critical care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bilotta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the approach to clinical management of blood glucose concentration (BGC in critical care patients has dramatically changed. In this editorial, the risks related to hypo, hyperglycemia and high BGC variability, optimal BGC target range and BGC monitoring devices for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU will be discussed. Hypoglycemia has an increased risk of death, even after the occurrence of a single episode of mild hypoglycemia (BGC < 80 mg/dL, and it is also associated with an increase in the ICU length of stay, the major determinant of ICU costs. Hyperglycemia (with a threshold value of 180 mg/dL is associated with an increased risk of death, longer length of stay and higher infective morbidity in ICU patients. In ICU patients, insulin infusion aimed at maintaining BGC within a 140-180 mg/dL target range (NICE-SUGAR protocol is considered to be the state-of-the-art. Recent evidence suggests that a lower BGC target range (129-145 mg/dL is safe and associated with lower mortality. In trauma patients without traumatic brain injury, tight BGC (target < 110 mg/dL might be associated with lower mortality. Safe BGC targeting and estimation of optimal insulin dose titration should include an adequate nutrition protocol, the length of insulin infusion and the change in insulin sensitivity over time. Continuous glucose monitoring devices that provide accurate measurement can contribute to minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia and improve insulin titration. In conclusion, in ICU patients, safe and effective glycemia management is based on accurate glycemia monitoring and achievement of the optimal BGC target range by using insulin titration, along with an adequate nutritional protocol.

  16. Holistic approach to management of innovation : a home care case study

    OpenAIRE

    Borgiel, Katarzyna; Latortue, Xavier; Minel, Stéphanie; Merlo, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of information and communication technologies (ICT) in home care organizations is seen as a way of improving work efficiency and care quality. In recent years many research project have been undertaken in order to create models of existing processes and to design appropriate technological tools. This paper argues for the need of global and systemic approach for innovation management in home care in relation to the implementation of ICT devices. After describing the home care acti...

  17. Care management actions in the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Costa Fernandes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify, from nurses’ speeches, the actions that enable care management in the Family Health Strategy.Methods: descriptive study with a qualitative approach conducted with 32 nurses of primary care. It was used a semistructuredinterview as the data collection technique. The methodological process of the collective subject discourse wasused to organize the data Results: from the nurses’ speeches one identified the categories: complementary relationshipbetween care and management; meeting with community health agents, a care management strategy in nurses’ work;health education activities such as a care management action and a health information system as an essential tool forcare Conclusion: it was possible to observe that nurses understood the importance of coordination and complementaritybetween the activities of the working process of care and management.

  18. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. Method: descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. Results: 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. Conclusion: the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. PMID:27508902

  19. Adapting chronic care models for diabetes care delivery inlow-and-middle-income countries: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    A contextual review of models for chronic care was doneto develop a context-adapted chronic care model-basedservice delivery model for chronic conditions includingdiabetes. The Philippines was used as the setting ofa low-to-middle-income country. A context-basednarrative review of existing models for chronic carewas conducted. A situational analysis was done at thegrassroots level, involving the leaders and members ofthe community, the patients, the local health system andthe healthcare providers. A second analysis making useof certain organizational theories was done to explore onimproving feasibility and acceptability of organizing carefor chronic conditions. The analyses indicated that carefor chronic conditions may be introduced, consideringthe needs of people with diabetes in particular andthe community in general as recipients of care, andthe issues and factors that may affect the healthcareworkers and the health system as providers of thiscare. The context-adapted chronic care model-basedservice delivery model was constructed accordingly.Key features are incorporation of chronic care in thehealth system's services; assimilation of chronic caredelivery with the other responsibilities of the healthcareworkers but with redistribution of certain tasks; andensuring that the recipients of care experience thewhole spectrum of basic chronic care that includes educationand promotion in the general population, riskidentification, screening, counseling including self-caredevelopment, and clinical management of the chroniccondition and any co-morbidities, regardless of level ofcontrol of the condition. This way, low-to-middle incomecountries can introduce and improve care for chronicconditions without entailing much additional demand ontheir limited resources.

  20. The effect of managed care on hospitals' provision of uncompensated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Niccie L; Meng, Xiaoxian

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effect of managed care on hospitals' provision of uncompensated care, using a new measure of managed care that is hospital-specific, rather than measured for the area as a whole, and which includes payment by preferred provider organizations (PPOs) as well as by health maintenance organizations (HMOs). Based on data for Florida hospitals in the period 1998-2002, the results indicate that a higher percentage of private managed care patient-days was associated with a decrease in uncompensated care as a percentage of total operating expenses, holding net profit margin and other factors constant. The results suggest that spillover effects on uncompensated care should be taken into account when considering increases in managed care payment. PMID:17583265

  1. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients...... with type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action...

  2. 护士分层管理模式在优质护理管理中的应用%Exploration of nurse hierarchical management model in quality care management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓虹; 齐忠勤

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application of hierarchical management approach in nursing management and application of the results. Methods To compare the quality of care before and after implementing hierarchical management, training of nurses and patient satisfaction. Results After the implementation of nurse hierarchical management, quality of care, the rate of training and patient satisfaction has significantly improved. Conclusion The implementation of the hierarchical management nurses, can achieve a reasonable allocation of human resources and scientific management, and promote the steady improvement in the quality of care and continuous improvement, improve patient’s satisfaction.%目的:探讨和分析分层管理在护理管理中的应用方法及应用效果。方法比较实施分层管理前后护理质量、护士培训、患者满意度情况。结果实施护士分层管理后,护理质量、护士培训通过率和患者满意度均较实施前有明显提升。结论实施护士分层管理,实现了护士人力资源合理调配与科学管理,促进了护理质量的稳步提升与持续改进,提高了患者满意度。

  3. A systematic review on comparing 2 common models for management of warfarin therapy; pharmacist-led service versus usual medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari-Maleki, Taher; Dousti, Samaneh; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2016-01-01

    Despite a growing body of literature supporting the potential benefit of pharmacist-managed warfarin therapy (PMWT), comprehensive reviews regarding this topic are still lacking. A systematic search of literature was done in Pubmed/Medline, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library from database inception to January 2014. Studies comparing PMWT with usual medical care (UMC) regarding the control of anticoagulation, bleeding and thromboembolic events, mortality, hospitalization, emergency department visit, cost, patients' satisfaction, and quality of life were included. Of 758 potential articles identified, 24 studies (4 randomized controlled trials [RCT] and 20 non-RCT studies) with a population of 11,607 were included. Among non-RCT studies, the percentage of time in the therapeutic range (72.1% vs 56.7%; P = .013), major bleeding events (0.6% vs 1.7%, P managing warfarin therapy based on observational studies. As well, it is comparable to UMC based on RCT studies. PMID:26100092

  4. MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. G. Totskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews topical issues of organization and management of innovative activity in the regional health care system.Objective. Development and scientific substantiation of a conceptual model of managing innovation in the regional health care system, introduction of institutional mechanisms for its implementation, and evaluation of their efficacy in using diagnosis and treatment technologies. Objectives of the study included reviewing the organization status and problems hampering the development, identification of prospects, and justification for appropriate changes in innovation in healthcare system and medical science at the regional level.Material and methods. To conduct a comprehensive assessment of the status and meet challenges of innovation promotion, a methodology for social-hygienic research was worked out including bibliographic and analytical methods, situational analysis, sociological and economic methods, expert assessment, methods for quality management system audit in accordance with ISO 19011:2002, IDEFO function modeling (RD IDEF0-2000, and organizational modeling. The study was based on the analysis of foreign and domestic literature, statistics, methods for managerial modeling, as well as management experience (including innovative methodological approaches gained by Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics named after Ya.L. Tsivyan which meets the requirements for a platform for research and innovative product reproduction, including research, clinical, organizational, and managerial aspects. Other facilities were considered in conjunction with the leading innovative platform.Results. The paper presents a scientifically based model of innovative medical environment with its elements as subjects, each with a set of functions. Conceptual model for management includes structuring (resource, processes, and quality management; application of international standards and strategic management mechanisms

  5. The match between institutional elderly care management research and management challenges - a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokkonen Kaija

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elderly care practice and its management together with policy and research play a crucial role in responding to increasing challenges in institutional care for elderly people. Successful dialogue between these is necessary. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to compare how institutional elderly care management research meets the care challenges currently emphasized in international long-term care policy documents. Methods This paper was based on a systematic literature review. After screening 1971 abstracts using inclusion/exclusion criteria, 58 refereed articles published between 2000 and 2010 remained for analysis. The articles were analyzed using theory-based content analysis by comparing the results to the framework based on analysis of international long-term care management policy documents. Results The current challenges of long-term care management identified from policy documents were Integrated Care Management, Productivity Management, Quality Management, Workforce Management and ICT Management. The research on institutional elderly care management responded somewhat to the challenges mentioned in policy documents. However, some of the challenges were studied broadly and some were paid only minor attention. Further, only few studies focused on the core items of challenges addressed in policy documents. Conclusions Institutional care management research needs to focus more on challenges in integrated care, productivity, ICT and division of labor. Managers, researchers and policy-makers should assume more active collaborative roles in processes of research, policymaking and policy implementation. In addition managers’ and policymakers’ scientific literacy needs to be enhanced.

  6. Marketing quality and value to the managed care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmirski, G

    1998-11-01

    Quantifying quality and marketing care delivery have been long-term challenges in the health care market. Insurers, employers, other purchasers of care, and providers face a constant challenge in positioning their organizations in a proactive, competitive niche. Tools that measure patient's self-reported perception of health care needs and expectations have increased the ability to quantify quality of care delivery. When integrated with case management and disease management strategies, outcomes reporting and variance analysis tracking can be packaged to position a provider in a competitive niche. PMID:10338715

  7. An innovative national health care waste management system in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktobaev, Nurjan; Emmanuel, Jorge; Djumalieva, Gulmira; Kravtsov, Alexei; Schüth, Tobias

    2015-02-01

    A novel low-cost health care waste management system was implemented in all rural hospitals in Kyrgyzstan. The components of the Kyrgyz model include mechanical needle removers, segregation using autoclavable containers, safe transport and storage, autoclave treatment, documentation, recycling of sterilized plastic and metal parts, cement pits for anatomical waste, composting of garden wastes, training, equipment maintenance, and management by safety and quality committees. The gravity-displacement autoclaves were fitted with filters to remove pathogens from the air exhaust. Operating parameters for the autoclaves were determined by thermal and biological tests. A hospital survey showed an average 33% annual cost savings compared to previous costs for waste management. All general hospitals with >25 beds except in the capital Bishkek use the new system, corresponding to 67.3% of all hospital beds. The investment amounted to US$0.61 per capita covered. Acceptance of the new system by the staff, cost savings, revenues from recycled materials, documented improvements in occupational safety, capacity building, and institutionalization enhance the sustainability of the Kyrgyz health care waste management system. PMID:25649402

  8. Needs Assessment for Health Care Management Education in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekhter, Natalia; Togunov, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: For more than 70 years, health care management in the Soviet Union reflected a centralized directive style familiar to the Soviet political system. Market-oriented reform in post-Soviet Russia is pushing practicing physicians and physician-executives to acquire new information and skills regarding health care management. To assist…

  9. A Survey of Managed Care Education at Optometry Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Mort; Reis, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    Studied the courses and topics offered at schools of optometry and the total hours devoted to managed care. Responses from the 17 schools of optometry reveal significant variations in curricular coverage of managed care, although a core set of materials was found to exist that could be the basis for more standard curriculum. (SLD)

  10. Managed care and the scale efficiency of US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H Shelton; Pagán, José A

    2006-12-01

    Managed care penetration has been partly responsible for slowing down increases in health care costs in recent years. This study uses a 1992-1996 Health Care Utilization Project sample of hospitals to analyze the relationship between managed care penetration in local insurance markets and hospital scale efficiency. After controlling for hospital and market area variables, we find that managed care insurance, particularly the preferred provider type, is associated with increases in hospital scale efficiency in tertiary cases. The results presented here are consistent with the view that managed care can lead to reductions in health cost inflation by controlling the diffusion of technology via improvements in the scale efficiency of hospitals. PMID:17111213

  11. The Impact of Comprehensive Pre-visit Preparation on Patient Engagement and Quality of Care in a Population of Underserved Patients with Diabetes: Evidence from the Care Management Medical Home Center Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivo, Julie; Page, Timothy F; Arrieta, Alejandro; Amofah, St Anthony; McCann, Shelia; Kassaye, Hirut; Rodriguez, Alfonso; Williams, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the impact of pre-visit preparation, a key component of Patient-Centered Medical Home guidelines, on compliance with recommended tests and screenings in a diabetic patient population receiving care in Federally Qualified Health Centers in Miami-Dade County. The pre-visit preparation consisted of a pre-visit phone call to review patient compliance with recommended tests and screenings, provide encouragement for self-care goal setting, answer patient questions, assure referrals and tests were scheduled, and notify an in-center patient care team about which services are required at the upcoming visit. Aggregated data from 7 health centers and a cohort analysis of 7491 patients showed significantly higher compliance among those who were successfully contacted prior to the visit compared to those who were not successfully contacted at 24 months for all compliance measures included in the study. These results included a 28.8 percentage point difference in compliance with HbA1c testing, a 14.6 percentage point difference in influenza immunization, a 27.7 percentage point difference in diabetic foot exam compliance, and a 33.2 percentage point difference in compliance with annual low-density lipoprotein testing. After 24 months, the patient no-show rate decreased by 6.8 percentage points (from 20.7% to 14.0%) among contacted patients and by 5.5 percentage points (from 20.7% to 15.2%) among patients who were not contacted. Study results suggest that proactive pre-visit preparation may be a key strategy for primary care practices to improve areas critical for chronic disease management, such as patient engagement, appointments kept, and compliance with recommended screenings, tests, and services. (Population Health Management 2016;19:171-177). PMID:26440513

  12. Application of chronic disease health management model in community home-based care services%慢性病健康管理模式在社区居家养老服务中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海燕; 汤晓峰; 周丽华; 乔学斌; 刘洋; 俞黎黎

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide reference for exploring the senile chronic disease health management new model by apply‐ing the chronic disease health management model into the practice of home‐based care service center in community .Methods The chronic disease health management team was established and the management platform of home‐based care service centers in com‐munity was applied to implement the chronic disease health management service .The senile chronic disease management and service situation were compared between before and after implementing chronic disease health management ,and the difference of service be‐tween the home‐based care service center and community health service center after implementing the chronic disease health man‐agement was compared as well .Results The service content implementation in the home‐based care service center was significantly improved after senile chronic disease health management (P<0 .01) ,and the chronic disease management satisfaction was increased by 39 .66% .Meanwhile ,the management rate and control rate of chronic diseases in the community home‐based care service center were superior to those in the community health service center (P<0 .01) .Conclusion Applying the chronic disease health manage‐ment model into the platform of the home‐based care service center can provide more comprehensive ,specific and efficient chronic disease health management service ,w hich provides a new model of senile chronic disease management application .%目的:通过把慢性病健康管理模式应用于社区居家养老服务中心的养老服务实践中,为探索一条老年慢性病健康管理的新模式提供参考。方法建立慢性病健康管理小组,利用社区居家养老服务中心的管理平台实施慢性病健康管理服务。对比慢性病健康管理实施前、后社区老年人慢性病管理和服务情况,以及慢性病健康管理实施后与社区卫生服务中心在服务

  13. Management practices and the quality of care in cardiac units

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, K. John; Lindrooth, Richard C; Wholey, Douglas R; Maddox, Thomas M.; Bloom, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Importance:- To improve the quality of health care, many researchers have suggested that health care institutions adopt management approaches that have been successful in the manufacturing and technology sectors. However, relatively little information exists about how these practices are disseminated in hospitals and whether they are associated with better performance. Objectives:- To describe the variation in management practices among a large sample of hospital cardiac care units; asses...

  14. The match between institutional elderly care management research and management challenges - a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkonen Kaija; Rissanen Sari; Hujala Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Elderly care practice and its management together with policy and research play a crucial role in responding to increasing challenges in institutional care for elderly people. Successful dialogue between these is necessary. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to compare how institutional elderly care management research meets the care challenges currently emphasized in international long-term care policy documents. Methods This paper was based on a systemat...

  15. Data Management for Evaluating Complications of Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Streed, Stephen A.; Massanari, R. Michael

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the design and operating characteristics of a microcomputer-based data management system for assessing complications associated with the delivery of health care. The system was developed in response to the need to promote “risk management” as an essential component of the Quality Assurance effort within the health care delivery environment. The system herein described allows the epidemiological evaluation of complications of health care in a tertiary care referral center....

  16. Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles

  17. [Nursing management of wound care pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yen-Fan

    2007-06-01

    Wound care is an important step in promoting wound healing, but it may cause wound care pain. This article aims to explore factors influencing wound care pain and the effectiveness of various interventions to alleviate it. Five major factors that influence wound care pain include inappropriate dressing change techniques, inflammation response, emotion, cognition, and social-cultural factors. Nurses should apply appropriate dressings and dressing change techniques to relieve wound care pain. Music therapy and aromatherapy can alleviate wound pain after dressing change. But distraction techniques should be used in conjunction with consideration of the needs of the individual subject. PMID:17554674

  18. Pilot Program to Improve Self-Management of Patients with Heart Failure by Redesigning Care Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica D. Shaw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We tested both an educational and a care coordination element of health care to examine if better disease-specific knowledge leads to successful self-management of heart failure (HF. Background. The high utilization of health care resources and poor patient outcomes associated with HF justify tests of change to improve self-management of HF. Methods. This prospective study tested two components of the Chronic Care Model (clinical information systems and self-management support to improve outcomes in the self-management of HF among patients who received intensive education and care coordination during their acute care stay. A postdischarge follow-up phone call assessed their knowledge of HF self-management compared to usual care patients. Results. There were 20 patients each in the intervention and usual care groups. Intervention patients were more likely to have a scale at home, write down their weight, and practice new or different health behaviors. Conclusion. Patients receiving more intensive education knew more about their disease and were better able to self-manage their weight compared to patients receiving standard care.

  19. Racial and ethnic differences in parents' assessments of pediatric care in Medicaid managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Weech-Maldonado, R; Morales, L. S.; Spritzer, K; Elliott, M.; Hays, R D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines whether parents' reports and ratings of pediatric health care vary by race/ethnicity and language in Medicaid managed care. DATA SOURCES: The data analyzed are from the National Consumer Assessment of Health Plans (CAHPS) Benchmarking Database 1.0 and consist of 9,540 children enrolled in Medicaid managed care plans in Arkansas, Kansas, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Vermont, and Washington state from 1997 to 1998. DATA COLLECTION: The data were collected by telephone and...

  20. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective. PMID:27453745

  1. Time based management in health care system: The chosen aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Kobza; Magdalena Syrkiewicz-Świtała

    2014-01-01

    Time-based management (TBM) is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms). Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990) and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001–2011) have be...

  2. Physicians in health care management: 1. Physicians as managers: roles and future challenges.

    OpenAIRE

    Leatt, P

    1994-01-01

    Physicians are increasingly expected to assume responsibility for the management of human and financial resources in health care, particularly in hospitals. Juggling their new management responsibilities with clinical care, teaching and research can lead to conflicting roles. However, their presence in management is crucial to shaping the future health care system. They bring to management positions important skills and values such as observation, problem-solving, analysis and ethical judgeme...

  3. A multi-organisation aged care emergency service for acute care management of older residents in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jane; Dilworth, Sophie; Hullick, Carolyn; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Turner, Catherine; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    This case study describes a multi-organisation aged care emergency (ACE) service. The service was designed to enable point-of-care assessment and management for older people in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Design of the ACE service involved consultation and engagement of multiple key stakeholders. The ACE service was implemented in a large geographical region of a single Medicare Local (ML) in New South Wales, Australia. The service was developed over several phases. A case control pilot evaluation of one emergency department (ED) and four RACFs revealed a 16% reduction in presentations to the ED as well as reductions in admission to the hospital following ED presentation. Following initial pilot work, the ACE service transitioned across another five EDs and 85 RACFs in the local health district. The service has now been implemented in a further 10 sites (six metropolitan and four rural EDs) across New South Wales. Ongoing evaluation of the implementation continues to show positive outcomes. The ACE service offers a model shown to reduce ED presentations and admissions from RACFs, and provide quality care with a focus on the needs of the older person. PMID:25981903

  4. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodner, Dennis L

    2015-01-01

    The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP) was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries-primarily older persons-with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each). It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO). The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a "whole systems" approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program includes the staffing structure

  5. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  6. Critical care issues in cervical cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, R; Janicek, M F; Schoell, W M

    1999-01-01

    Radical pelvic surgery in gynecologic oncology patients poses a challenge to the surgeon and the ancillary team in charge of the peri-operative care. The high frequency of medical problems observed in this patient population, in conjunction with the stresses of radical surgery, necessitates careful monitoring of patients' medical status. A comprehensive team approach in the perioperative period is critical to patient care. Early intervention and anticipation of potential problems for the patient at risk in the postoperative period minimizes morbidity and mortality. This article will review the essentials of critical care as it relates to patients undergoing radical pelvic operations. PMID:10225307

  7. Managing Tensions Between New and Existing Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Bogers, Marcel; Villarroel, J. Andrei;

    2016-01-01

    The search for new business models forces established companies to experiment with organizational designs — and leads to tensions that should be anticipated and carefully managed.......The search for new business models forces established companies to experiment with organizational designs — and leads to tensions that should be anticipated and carefully managed....

  8. Improving Chronic Care: Developing and testing disease-management interventions applied in COPD care

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmens, Karin

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDisease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control health care costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. The purpose of this thesis was to determine the core elements of disease management and to understand how they operate and interact in order to effectively evaluate disease-management programmes, particularly for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease....

  9. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model - a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  10. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior. PMID:21045586

  11. Responding to financial pressures. The effect of managed care on hospitals' provision of charity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Núria

    2013-06-01

    Healthcare financing and insurance is changing everywhere. We want to understand the impact that financial pressures can have for the uninsured in advanced economies. To do so we focus on analyzing the effect of the introduction in the US of managed care and the big rise in financial pressures that it implied. Traditionally, in the US safety net hospitals have financed their provision of unfunded care through a complex system of cross-subsidies. Our hypothesis is that financial pressures undermine the ability of a hospital to cross-subsidize and challenges their survival. We focus on the impact of price pressures and cost-controlling mechanisms imposed by managed care. We find that financial pressures imposed by managed care disproportionately affect the closure of safety net hospitals. Moreover, amongst those hospitals that remain open, in areas where managed care penetration increases the most, they react by closing the health services most commonly used by the uninsured. PMID:23389814

  12. What doctors think about the impact of managed care tools on quality of care, costs, autonomy, and relations with patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bovier Patrick A; Agoritsas Thomas; Deom Marie; Perneger Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background How doctors perceive managed care tools and incentives is not well known. We assessed doctors' opinions about the expected impact of eight managed care tools on quality of care, control of health care costs, professional autonomy and relations with patients. Methods Mail survey of doctors (N = 1546) in Geneva, Switzerland. Respondents were asked to rate the impact of 8 managed care tools on 4 aspects of care on a 5-level scale (1 very negative, 2 rather negative, 3 neutral...

  13. Practice nurse involvement in primary care depression management: an observational cost-effectiveness analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Jodi; Haji Ali Afzali, Hossein; Beilby, Justin; Holton, Christine; Banham, David; Karnon, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background Most evidence on the effect of collaborative care for depression is derived in the selective environment of randomised controlled trials. In collaborative care, practice nurses may act as case managers. The Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP) aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative models of practice nurse involvement in a real world Australian setting. Previous analyses have demonstrated the value of high level practice nurse involvement in the manageme...

  14. Seamless health care for chronic diseases in a dual health care system: managed care and the role of family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A

    1998-01-01

    Neither private nor state run health care systems are perfect. Although there is increasing evidence that Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) provide comparable care at lower cost, HMOs tend to select healthy patients. The dual health care system in Hong Kong spends about 3.9 per cent of GDP, with health indices among the best in the world. Hong Kong still faces the problem of escalating health care expenditure. One should take advantage of the dual health care system to evolve a new paradigm for a primary-led seamless health care service. The Diabetes Centre of a university teaching hospital together with the University of Community and Family Medicine has started a structured shared care programme in diabetes mellitus, involving general practitioners in both the private and public sectors integrating the primary and secondary care, and the private and public sectors. This programme starts to develop an infrastructure for providing quality care at an affordable cost for a large pool of patients with chronic disease. Unlike other "managed care schemes", this one is not run by profit-oriented companies, but by health professionals with an interest in providing best possible care at an affordable cost. The "disease management" approach needs a care delivery system without traditional boundaries; and a continuous improvement process which develops and refines the knowledge base, guidelines and delivery system. PMID:10351265

  15. Multidisciplinary care planning in the primary care management of completed stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erikssen Lars

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease management requires input from multiple health professionals, both specialist and primary care providers. This study sought to assess the impact of co-ordinated multidisciplinary care in primary care, represented by the delivery of formal care planning by primary care teams or shared across primary-secondary teams, on outcomes in stroke, relative to usual care. Methods A Systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL (all 1990–2006, Cochrane Library (Issue 1 2006, and grey literature from web based searching of web sites listed in the CCOHA Health Technology Assessment List Analysis used narrative analysis of findings of randomised and non-randomised trials, and observational and qualitative studies of patients with completed stroke in the primary care setting where care planning was undertaken by 1 a multi-disciplinary primary care team or 2 through shared care by primary and secondary providers. Results One thousand and forty-five citations were retrieved. Eighteen papers were included for analysis. Most care planning took part in the context of multidisciplinary team care based in hospitals with outreach to community patients. Mortality rates are not impacted by multidisciplinary care planning. Functional outcomes of the studies were inconsistent. It is uncertain whether the active engagement of GPs and other primary care professionals in the multidisciplinary care planning contributed to the outcomes in the studies showing a positive effect. There may be process benefits from multidisciplinary care planning that includes primary care professionals and GPs. Few studies actually described the tasks and roles GPs fulfilled and whether this matched what was presumed to be provided. Conclusion While multidisciplinary care planning may not unequivocally improve the care of patients with completed stroke, there may be process benefits such as improved task allocation between providers. Further study on the impact

  16. Challenging the Cost Effectiveness of Medi-Cal Managed Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riner, R. Myles

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Some researchers and consulting groups have promoted managed care as a way to provide cost-effective quality care to Medicaid patients, based on assertions that are often poorly substantiated. Unfortunately, politicians and policy makers in California and other states have adopted the presumption of the cost-effectiveness of Medicaid Managed Care as a rationale for expanding the use of managed care programs to include a larger share of more Medicaid eligible enrollees, and expand coverage and services to the currently uninsured. This paper challenges the assertion that Medi-Cal Managed Care is cost effective, by demonstrating that the unique and idiosyncratic manner in which Medi-Cal managed care has been implemented in California (and other states creates perverse incentives leading to cost-shifting and selective enrollment and dis-enrollment of costly beneficiaries. This places an unfair burden on fee-for-service Medi-Cal providers, who are expected to provide more services for less reimbursement. Administrators of Medicaid Managed Care programs need to consider risk adjusted rates for beneficiaries enrolled in plans in order to align incentives with program objectives. [WestJEM. 2009;10:124-129.

  17. Managing the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Specialty Care Centers, Coordinated Care, and Patient Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakinala, Murali M; Duncan, Maribeth; Wirth, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension remains a challenging condition to diagnose and manage. Decentralized care for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has led to shortcomings in the diagnosis and management of PAH. The Pulmonary Hypertension Association-sponsored Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center program is designed to recognize specialty centers capable of providing multidisciplinary and comprehensive care of PAH. Ideally, Pulmonary Hypertension Care Centers will comanage PAH patients with community-based practitioners and address the growing needs of this emerging population of long-term PAH patients. PMID:27443143

  18. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    OpenAIRE

    Kaptein AA; Fischer MJ; Scharloo M

    2014-01-01

    Ad A Kaptein, Maarten J Fischer, Margreet Scharloo Medical Psychology Section, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden, the Netherlands Abstract: In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the em...

  19. A “best practices” strategy to improve quality in Medicaid managed care plans

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Karen L.; Baron, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Medicaid managed care is delivered through organizations operating in very heterogeneous environments that confront similar barriers to success. Because Medicaid managed care is implemented differently in each state, health plans have been isolated from each other and have not had an opportunity to learn how others may have surmounted commonly encountered barriers. After interviewing Medicaid health plan medical directors, we developed a learning collaborative model based on shared categories...

  20. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians is...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...... are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and...

  1. Consumerism in the financial services industry: lessons for managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyser, N; Wong, A

    2000-01-01

    Managed care today is being shaped by the emergence of a savvier, better informed health care consumer. Facing a strikingly similar consumer movement over the past two decades, the banking industry experienced a market transformation that holds important lessons for managed care. Nontraditional entrants in the financial services industry, offering focused "monoline" products and services closely analogous to "carve-out" providers in health care, targeted rising consumer demands and stronger preferences. Banks in time answered these formidable new competitive forces with innovative consolidation and globalization strategies. The most successful initiatives in healthcare, as in banking, will focus on satisfying the consumer's hunger for information, improved levels of service, and enhanced outcomes. Managed care plans may play a lead role in accelerating the impact of consumerism by bridging the disconnect between patients and their purchasing decisions. PMID:11010386

  2. New health care law may spell opportunity for quality managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    New health care law emphasizes quality, safety, and efficiency. Pay-for-performance emphasis requires attention of quality managers. Many quality provisions will not kick in for several years. PMID:20491197

  3. Medicaid Managed Care Penetration Rates and Expansion Enr...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid managed care penetration rates and expansion enrollment by state charts are composed annually by the Data and System Group (DSG) of the Centers for...

  4. Stakeholder theory and care management: An inquiry into social enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Marcon; Lorenzo Dorigo

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to introduce care management from the moral viewpoint of stakeholder theory. It considers stakeholder theory a useful methodology for managerial descriptions, narratives and theorising of business ethics, and the feminist thought, especially the moral grounding of care, a valuable normative core to earn productive remarks and insights into stakeholder research in modern capitalism. Care leads researchers to meaningful conceptualizations of the firm as a relational entity, both ...

  5. Managed competition in health care and the unfinished agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Enthoven, Alain C

    1986-01-01

    A market made up of health care financing and delivery plans and individual consumers, without a carefully drawn set of rules to mitigate market failures, and without mediation by collective action on the demand side, cannot produce efficiency and equity. The concept of competition that can achieve these goals, at least to a satisfactory approximation, is managed competition, with intelligent active agents on the demand side, called sponsors, that contract with the competing health care plans...

  6. Medicine management in municipal home care : delegating, administrating and receiving

    OpenAIRE

    Gransjön Craftman, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to investigate how delegation of medication is handled in municipal home care. Specific aims were to 1) explore the prevalence of medication use in older adults over time; 2) describe district nurses’ experiences of the delegation of medication management to municipal home care personnel; 3) explore and describe how home care assistants experience receiving the actual delegation of the responsibility of medication administration; and 4) to describe how older...

  7. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    OpenAIRE

    Kodner, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP) was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each). It started during the first phase at Massachusett...

  8. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  9. Training primary care physicians improves the management of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, TWDP; Ormel, J; van den Brink, RHS; Jenner, JA; Van der Meer, K; Tiemens, BG; van der Doorn, W; Smit, A; van den Brink, W

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this pretest-posttest study was to evaluate effects of a training program designed to improve primary care physicians' (PCPs) ability to recognize mental health problems (MHP) and Co diagnose and manage depression according to clinical guidelines. The primary care settings were in the

  10. Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis;

    2010-01-01

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices...... suggests that factors contributing to high performance may be highly context-dependent or that the factors involved may be too numerous or their implementation too nuanced to be reliably identified in observational studies....

  11. Implications of managed care for health systems, clinicians, and patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Fairfield, G.; Hunter, D.J.; Mechanic, D.; Rosleff, F.

    1997-01-01

    The rhetoric and realities of managed care are easily confused. The rapid growth of managed care in the United States has had many implications for patients, doctors, employers, state and federal programmes, the health insurance industry, major medical institutions, medical research, and vulnerable patient populations. It has restricted patients' choice of doctors and limited access to specialists, reduced the professional autonomy and earnings of doctors, shifted power from the non-profit to...

  12. Methadone Maintenance and State Medicaid Managed Care Programs

    OpenAIRE

    McCarty, Dennis; Frank, Richard G.; Denmead, Gabrielle C.

    1999-01-01

    Coverage for methadone services in state Medicaid plans may facilitate access to the most effective therapy for heroin dependence. State Medicaid plans were reviewed to assess coverage for methadone services, methadone benefits in managed care, and limitations on methadone treatment. Medicaid does not cover methadone maintenance medication in 25 states (59 percent). Only 12 states (24percent) include methadone services in Medicaid managed care plans. Moreover, two of the 12 states limit cover...

  13. (Dis) connections between management and care in a surgical intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Maria Cristina Leite Araujo; Silva, Lucilane Maria Sales da

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to understand the perception of the nursing team on the (dis)connections between management actions and care performed by nurses in a surgical intensive care unit. Method: Exploratory research with qualitative approach carried out in a surgical intensive care unit of a hospital in the public net of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Data was collected between March and July 2011, through semi-structured interviews and systematic observations, with 20 nursing ...

  14. Impact of care management processes and integration of care on blood pressure control in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Ken; Boulanger, Luke; Smalarz, Amy; Wu, Ning; Fraser, Kimberly; Wogen, Jenifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Fragmentation within health care systems may negatively impact the quality of chronic disease patient care. We sought to evaluate the relationship between care management processes (CMP), integration of services, and blood pressure (BP) control among diabetic patients. Methods Retrospective chart reviews were performed for a random sample of adult diabetic hypertensive patients (n = 2,162) from 28 physician organizations in the United States (US). A modified version of the Physicia...

  15. Study of the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School on the nurses' caring ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao He; De-Ying Hu; Yi-Lan Liu; Li-Fen Wu; Lian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To understand the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School (CCWS) on the nurses' caring ability. Methods: Questionnaire 25 nurses of humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS using the Nkongho Caring Ability Inventory (CAI) before and after implement the humanistic nursing care model, including reform the systems of nursing care, introduce humanistic care model, implement the humanistic care, to measure the nurses' caring ability. Results: The nurses' caring ability had significantly developed on total, cognition dimension, courage dimension and patience dimension after all measures considered (p Conclusions: The humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS has a positive effect on the nurses' caring ability, not only to help build great relationships between nurses and patients but also to enhance the patients' satisfaction.

  16. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  17. Evaluating pain management delivered by direct care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, Jane; Kropp, Denise

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult to assess the effectiveness of the delivery of pain management care because pain management is a complex process. This article describes a quality assurance study that was conducted on a surgical unit at a community teaching hospital, which is a member of a 1200 licensed inpatient beds multihospital system, to determine the effectiveness of pain management at the unit level. For the study, a Chart Audit Analysis Tool was developed and used to review second postoperative day charts of patients who had undergone a major abdominal surgery. The Chart Audit Analysis Tool quantifies by weighted indicators 2 outcomes measures, nurses' care delivery and pharmacologic management. The Chart Audit Analysis Tool, along with the results of a test of the nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain management, provides nurse managers a quick and easy method to identify strengths and weaknesses of pain management at the unit level. PMID:15839297

  18. A model plan for the uninsured: delivering quality and affordability in a limited benefit managed care safety net program in Flint, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Constance J; Kornblau, Barbara; Strugar-Fritsch, Donna

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the background and multiyear outcome data for a limited benefit safety-net care program in Michigan. It is a possible solution for policymakers and hospital/clinic administrators to consider when evaluating plans to provide primary care for the 30 million uninsured Americans who will be affected by the Affordable Care Act. PMID:22643481

  19. Integration and continuity of Care in health care network models for frail older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Renato Peixoto; Caldas, Célia Pereira; da Motta, Luciana Branco; de Lima, Kenio Costa; Siqueira, Ricardo Carreño; Rodrigues, Renata Teixeira da Silva Vendas; Santos, Luciana Maria Alves Martins; Guerra, Ana Carolina Lima Cavaletti

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review was conducted of the literature on models evaluating the effectiveness of integrated and coordinated care networks for the older population. The search made use of the following bibliographic databases: Pubmed, The Cochrane Library, LILACS, Web of Science, Scopus and SciELO. Twelve articles on five different models were included for discussion. Analysis of the literature showed that the services provided were based on primary care, including services within the home. Service users relied on the integration of primary and hospital care, day centers and in-home and social services. Care plans and case management were key elements in care continuity. This approach was shown to be effective in the studies, reducing the need for hospital care, which resulted in savings for the system. There was reduced prevalence of functional loss and improved satisfaction and quality of life on the part of service users and their families. The analysis reinforced the need for change in the approach to health care for older adults and the integration and coordination of services is an efficient way of initiating this change. PMID:24897058

  20. Emotion management in children′s palliative care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryl Zac Maunder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the emotional labor involved for nurses providing palliative care for children/young people living with life-limiting illnesses/conditions, and their families. It highlights the challenges nurses face in managing their emotion when caring for children/young people and their families, and explores strategies to enable nurses to cope with this aspect of their role without compromising their personal wellbeing. It suggests that emotional labor within nursing goes largely unrecorded, and remains undervalued by managers and health care services.

  1. Becoming nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Marcellino de Melo Lanzoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to understand the experience of managing medical-surgical inpatient units in a general hospital, highlighting the meaning of being a nursing manager, with the intention to qualify and instrument nurses for caring management practice in this scenario. This is a Grounded Theory research, conducted from August 2010 to August 2012, through interviews with 19 participants from the nursing team, distributed in 3 sampling groups. From the analysis emerged the phenomenon “Becoming a nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimension”. To exercise caring management, nurses use management instruments as essential tools, they become capable theoretically and enhances, based on his experience, professional skills and personal characteristics.  We conclude that competency mobilization beyond the clinical aspect is needed; allowing the use of management instruments to make caring viable and to improve relational and interactive processes.

  2. Early Efforts By Medicare Accountable Care Organizations Have Limited Effect On Mental Illness Care And Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Alisa B; Huskamp, Haiden A; McWilliams, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    People with mental illness use more health care and have worse outcomes than those without such illnesses. In response to incentives to reduce spending, accountable care organizations (ACOs) may therefore attempt to improve their management of mental illness. We examined changes in mental health spending, utilization, and quality measures associated with ACO contracts in the Medicare Shared Savings Program and Pioneer model for beneficiaries with mental illness, using Medicare claims for the period 2008-13 and difference-in-differences comparisons with local non-ACO providers. Pioneer contracts were associated with lower spending on mental health admissions in the first year of the contract, an effect that was attenuated in the second year. Otherwise, ACO contracts were associated with no changes in mental health spending or readmissions, outpatient follow-up after mental health admissions, rates of depression diagnosis, or mental health status. These results suggest that ACOs have not yet focused on mental illness or have been largely unsuccessful in early efforts to improve their management of it. PMID:27385241

  3. Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff members and 24 cleaning personnel were interviewed. Generated medical waste totaled 1.22, 0.77, and 1.17 kg/bed/day in tertiary, secondary, and primary HCF, respectively. The amount of medical waste generated in primary health care centers was much higher than that in secondary hospitals, which may be attributed to general waste being mixed with medical waste. This study found that the level of the HCF, responsibility for medical waste management in departments and wards, educational background and training experience can be factors that determine medical staff members' knowledge of health care waste management policy. Regular training programs and sufficient provision of protective measures are urgently needed to improve occupational safety for cleaning personnel. Financing and administrative monitoring by local authorities is needed to improve handling practices and the implementation of off-site centralized disposal in primary health care centers.

  4. Using risk management to promote person-centred dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Charlotte; Mantle, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Risk management for people with dementia has traditionally focused on preventing physical harm. However, research has demonstrated that focusing on the physical safety of people with dementia may result in their social and psychological wellbeing being overlooked - the very aspects that are necessary to achieve person-centred care. This article discusses the main challenges for practitioners caring for people with dementia in various settings, and encourages a care approach which enables appropriate risk taking as a way of promoting person-centred care. PMID:26959471

  5. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David;

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe....... The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a...... feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed...

  6. Local wound care and topical management of hidradenitis suppurativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Kirsner, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, recurrent, debilitating disease predominantly involving apocrine gland-bearing skin. The folliculoinfundibular dysfunction and an aberrant cutaneous immune response to commensal bacteria are recognized as potential contributors. Topical antibiotics, such as clindamycin, and keratolytic agents have been used in the management of early stages of HS. Proper wound care is a key part of management, particularly in patients with advanced HS. The evidence for the optimal topical therapy or optimal local wound care is limited. As such, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary to address all aspects of HS, including topical therapy, systemic therapy, and proper wound care. The focus of this paper is to review the evidence for the topical management and local wound care strategies in patients with HS. PMID:26470618

  7. Training managers for primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekki, P

    1994-01-01

    The University of Helsinki has devised a powerful in-service training course for managers of health centres. By working together at the University and their own centres on setting objectives, analysing data and solving problems, the participants greatly enhance their management and teamwork skills. PMID:7945761

  8. Diabetes Management at School: Application of the Healthy Learner Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Kaup, Tara; McCarty, Patricia; Carlson, Jessie Parker

    2011-01-01

    Every child with diabetes deserves a school nurse with the capacity to effectively manage the disease at school. The school nurse needs knowledge and skills to confidently provide care and communicate with health care providers and families. The Healthy Learner Model for Chronic Condition Management provided a framework to eliminate the disjointed…

  9. Self-care and postoperative dressing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn Hunt, Sharon

    2016-08-11

    As the increasing burden on healthcare costs continues to rise, posing clinical and financial challenges for all healthcare providers attempting to provide optimal, evidence-based wound care, the situation appears to be reaching the tipping point with regard to reduced resources, increasing patient groups with complex wounds and financial restraints. It is clearly time for action and new ways of working that include empowering patients and carers to take appropriate ownership within their personal wound-care journey. This observational evaluation explores 10 community-based patients presenting with postoperative acute surgical wounds; it examines and evaluates the patients' experience with regard to self-care satisfaction, Leukomed Control product satisfaction and actual traditional/personal costs incurred up to a 4-week period. The evaluation highlights not only an overall positive improvement within patient satisfaction and experience, alongside optimised wound progression and related cost savings, but also offers a valuable insight into the promotion and success of patients taking ownership of their wound-care journey. PMID:27523771

  10. Understanding Business Models in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-05-01

    The increasing focus on the costs of care is forcing health care organizations to critically look at their basic set of processes and activities, to determine what type of value they can deliver. A business model describes the resources, processes, and cost assumptions that an organization makes that will lead to the delivery of a unique value proposition to a customer. As health care organizations are beginning to transform their structure in preparation for a value-based delivery system, understanding business model theory can help in the redesign process. PMID:27018909

  11. [Compassionate care and management in the medical-social sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert Barraquier, Arièle

    2016-05-01

    Compassionate care can appear ambiguous when subject to critical examination. The spotlight falls on the responsibility and activity of management with regard to policy guidance and the management of activities in the medical-social field. Discussion around this subject enables an assessment of current standards and ethical progress to be carried out. PMID:27157562

  12. Hypertension management in primary care in Belarus and The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Rusovich, V.; Egorov, K.N.; Podpalov, V.P.; Boerma, W.G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Both in Belarus and in the Netherlands, guidelines on the management of hypertension in primary care have been developed, including recommendations about detection, treatment and follow-up. These guidelines are meant to harmonize actual practice management of hypertension of improve the quality of c

  13. The impact of managed care on patients' trust in medical care and their physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, D; Schlesinger, M

    1996-06-01

    Social trust in health care organizations and interpersonal trust in physicians may be mutually supportive, but they also diverge in important ways. The success of medical care depends most importantly on patients' trust that their physicians are competent, take appropriate responsibility and control, and give their patients' welfare the highest priority. Utilization review and structural arrangements in managed care potentially challenge trust in physicians by restricting choice, contradicting medical decisions and control, and restricting open communication with patients. Gatekeeping and incentives to limit care also raise serious trust issues. We argue that managed care plans rather than physicians should be required to disclose financial arrangements, that limits be placed on incentives that put physicians at financial risk, and that professional norms and public policies should encourage clear separation of interests of physicians from health plan organization and finance. PMID:8637148

  14. Managed care: future good news or bad news for vascular surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, J W

    1998-08-01

    Recently, William W. McGuire, Chief Executive Officer of United Health-Care, emphasized that the key from the patient's viewpoint is access. He stated, "We use the term gateway rather than gatekeeper." He emphasizes the importance of direct access of the patient to the right physician, whether it be a specialist or a generalist. Although some health care strategists believe that patients should initially see a generalist before receiving specialty care, this approach may not save dollars in the long run. Managed care is likely to have a major impact on vascular surgeons. Currently, business purchasing cooperatives are one model for containing costs of expensive invasive procedures among the working population. Such cooperatives are likely to achieve a stronger penetration in the health care market and to negotiate aggressively for packaged fee contracts for specialized cardiovascular care and procedures. Because the vast majority of vascular patients are more than 65 years of age, the movement of Medicare toward managed care may also affect vascular surgery in a major way. If vascular surgeons are to survive financially in the managed care environment, they must continue to provide evidence-based solutions to clinical problems at a reasonable cost and with good outcomes. They must also understand that involvement in the administrative and political leadership of health care is essential to maintaining some influence on the future reimbursement for our services. PMID:9719337

  15. Managing malaria in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, M; Gupta-Wright, A.; Doherty, JF; Singer, M; Walker, D.

    2014-01-01

    The number of people travelling to malaria-endemic countries continues to increase, and malaria remains the commonest cause of serious imported infection in non-endemic areas. Severe malaria, mostly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, often requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and can be complicated by cerebral malaria, respiratory distress, acute kidney injury, bleeding complications, and co-infection. The mortality from imported malaria remains significant. This article reviews the man...

  16. Hierarchical storage management strategy in health care

    OpenAIRE

    Oblak, Miha

    2016-01-01

    High availability of data in healthcare is essential, since the introduction of e-Health project patient key information should be available to all health institutions. These data are condition to fast and efficient patient care in any healthcare institution. Awareness of the importance of high data availability and reliability is fast developing in Slovenia. With aging population and increasing number of treatments with modern technologies, amount of each patient data is rapidly increasing. ...

  17. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting. PMID:27025116

  18. A Model for Implementing Integrative Practice in Health Care Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Patterson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been increased awareness and use of complementary/alternative therapies (CAM in many countries without the health care infrastructure to support it. The National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine referred to the combining of mainstream medical therapies and CAM as integrative medicine. The creation of integrative health care teams will definitely result in redefining roles, but more importantly in a change in how services are delivered. The purpose of this paper is to describe a model of the necessary health care agency resources to support an integrative practice model. A logic model is used to depict the findings of a review of current evidence. Logic models are designed to show relationships between the goals of a program or initiative, the resources to achieve desired outputs and the activities that lead to outcomes. The four major resource categories necessary for implementing integrative care are within the domains of a professional and research development, b health human resource planning, c regulation and legislation and d practice and management in clinical areas. It was concluded that the system outcomes from activities within these resource categories should lead to freedom of choice in health care; a culturally sensitive health care system and a broader spectrum of services for achieving public health goals.

  19. Shared care management of patients with type 2 diabetes across the primary and secundary Health care sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Lene; Bennich, Birgitte Bøcher; Arreskov, Anne B;

    2016-01-01

    of this study is to test if T2D patients (who are at intermediate risk of or are already having incipient diabetic complications) jointly managed by a hospital-based outpatient clinic and general practitioners (shared care programme) have a non-inferior outcome compared to an established programme...... in a specialised (hospital based) outpatient diabetes clinic. Methods The study is designed as a randomised controlled trial. The shared care model will be tested during a period of 3 years, with data collection at baseline and at 12, 24 and 36 months. All patients will be offered four medical visits a year......Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is growing globally and hospital-based outpatient clinics are burdened with increasing numbers of patients. To ensure high quality treatment and care, it is necessary to structurally reorganise the management of patients with T2D. The objective...

  20. Towards a model for integrative medicine in Swedish primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkenberg Torkel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between providers of conventional care and complementary therapies (CTs has gained in popularity but there is a lack of conceptualised models for delivering such care, i.e. integrative medicine (IM. The aim of this paper is to describe some key findings relevant to the development and implementation of a proposed model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care. Methods Investigative procedures involved research group and key informant meetings with multiple stakeholders including general practitioners, CT providers, medical specialists, primary care administrators and county council representatives. Data collection included meeting notes which were fed back within the research group and used as ongoing working documents. Data analysis was made by immersion/crystallisation and research group consensus. Results were categorised within a public health systems framework of structures, processes and outcomes. Results The outcome was an IM model that aimed for a patient-centered, interdisciplinary, non-hierarchical mix of conventional and complementary medical solutions to individual case management of patients with pain in the lower back and/or neck. The IM model case management adhered to standard clinical practice including active partnership between a gate-keeping general practitioner, collaborating with a team of CT providers in a consensus case conference model of care. CTs with an emerging evidence base included Swedish massage therapy, manual therapy/naprapathy, shiatsu, acupuncture and qigong. Conclusion Despite identified barriers such as no formal recognition of CT professions in Sweden, it was possible to develop a model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care. The IM model calls for testing and refinement in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to explore its clinical effectiveness.

  1. Managed care and medical education: hard cases and hard choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E

    1997-05-01

    As managed care becomes more and more dominant in U.S. health care, it is coming into conflict with medical education. There are historical reasons for this: medical education traditionally excluded physicians who chose to work in health plans, and for profit managed care has tended to avoid subsidizing medical education. In order to improve the climate, three changes are necessary: medical education must understand the tense history of discord between the two; distinctions must be made between responsible and irresponsible managed care plans; and medical educators should not assume they own the moral high ground. Arrogance, a gross oversupply of physicians and especially specialists, scandals and fraud, an often callous attitude toward the poor, and other sins can be laid at medical education's door. The worse threat for both sides is that the public and payers could simply abandon both, leading to underfunding for health professions education, a society that does not trust its health care system, and the loss of superb teaching organizations. To prevent this, managed care and medical education should work together to solve several difficult problems: how to shrink the medical education infrastructure; how to report honestly the uses to which medical education funds are put; and how to identify and end irresponsible behavior on the part of health plans and medical education entities alike. If the two sides can exercise leadership in these areas, they will be able to protect and enhance the singular place of honor that medical education holds in this society. PMID:9159575

  2. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p managed care processes coordinated with the formal marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers. PMID:11570344

  3. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY... guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities... been studying unused pharmaceutical disposal practices at health care facilities, prompted by...

  4. Time based management in health care system: The chosen aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kobza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-based management (TBM is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms. Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990 and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001–2011 have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary

  5. Exporting the Buyers Health Care Action Group Purchasing Model: Lessons from Other Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Christianson, Jon B; Feldman, Roger

    2005-01-01

    When first implemented in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, the Buyers Health Care Action Group's (BHCAG) purchasing approach received considerable attention as an employer-managed, consumer-driven health care model embodying many of the principles of managed competition. First BHCAG and, later, a for-profit management company attempted to export this model to other communities. Their efforts were met with resistance from local hospitals and, in many cases, apathy by employers who were exp...

  6. Improving Obesity Prevention and Management in Primary Care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sharma, Arya Mitra

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases with significant morbidity, mortality and health care cost. There is concern due to the dramatic increase in overweight and obesity in Canada in the last 20 years. The causes of obesity are multifactorial, with underestimation by patients and healthcare providers of the long-term nature of the condition, and its complexity. Solutions related to prevention and management will require multifaceted strategies involving education, health policy, public health and health systems across the care continuum. We believe that to support such strategies we need to have a strong primary care workforce equipped with appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes to support persons at risk for, or with, obesity. To achieve this end, significant skills building is required to improve primary care obesity prevention and management efforts. This review will first examine the current state, and then will outline how we can improve. PMID:27342445

  7. The Mediterranean Forests: Problems and management models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Xavier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The following paper presents a detailed insight about the situation of the forest management in the diversity within the Mediterranean Forests, and their response to different problems, in order to allow the development and application of a forest management model. Therefore, a survey was carried out in several partners’ areas of the PROTECT project (An Integrated European Model to Protect MEDiterranean Forests from Fire. The results provided a comparative analysis between different areas located in the Mediterranean Basin, and the analysis shows that there are several management systems that may be improved with experiences from other countries. Also, there are some common problems which need solutions in the different areas, namely forest fires. This general information also provided a good background for carefully applying and adapting different forests’ management models, both ecological and economically sustainable, in the PROTECT partners, where the problems and agents to be considered are different, giving conditions for the adaptation and development of a common model.

  8. Toward a 21st Century Quality-Measurement System for Managed-Care Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Armstead, Rodney C.; Elstein, Paul; Gorman, John

    1995-01-01

    As the Nation's largest managed-care purchaser, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is working to develop a uniform data and performance-measurement system for all enrollees in managed-care plans. This effort will ultimately hold managed-care plans accountable for continuous improvement in the quality of care they provide and will provide information to consumers and purchasers to make responsible managed-care choices. The effort entails overhauling peer review organization (PRO) ...

  9. Co-Leadership – A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Klinga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers – each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services – was explored. Aim: To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assignment, its operationalization and impact on provision of sustainable integration of health and social care. Method: Interviews with eight managers exercising co-leadership were analysed using directed content analysis. Respondent validation was conducted through additional interviews with the same managers. Results: Key contextual preconditions were an organization-wide model supporting co-leadership and co-location of services. Perception of the management role as a collective activity, continuous communication and lack of prestige were essential personal and interpersonal preconditions. In daily practice, office sharing, being able to give and take and support each other contributed to provision of sustainable integration of health and social care.  Conclusion and discussion: Co-leadership promoted robust management by providing broader competence, continuous learning and joint responsibility for services. Integrated health and social care services should consider employing co-leadership as a managerial solution to achieve sustainability.

  10. Implementing Outcome Measures Within an Enhanced Palliative Care Day Care Model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilonzo, Isae

    2015-04-23

    Specialist palliative care day care (SPDC) units provide an array of services to patients and their families and can increase continuity of care between inpatient and homecare settings. A multidisciplinary teamwork approach is emphasized, and different models of day care exist. Depending on the emphasis of care, the models can be social, medical, therapeutic, or mixed. We describe our experience of introducing an enhanced therapeutic specialist day care model and using both patient- and carer-rated tools to monitor patient outcomes.

  11. Managing dengue fever in primary care: A practical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lum, LCS; Ng, CJ; Khoo, EM

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a common cause of illness seen in primary care in the tropical and subtropical countries. An understanding of the course of disease progression, risk factors, recognition of the warning signs and look out for clinical problems during the different phases of the disease will enable primary care physicians to manage dengue fever in an appropriate and timely manner to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  12. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10105044

  13. Atrial fibrillation in a primary care practice: prevalence and management

    OpenAIRE

    Upshur Ross E; Ceresne Lance

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation is a common serious cardiac arrhythmia. Knowing the prevalence of atrial fibrillation and documentation of medical management are important in the provision of primary care. This study sought to determine the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in a primary care population and to identify and quantify the treatments being used for stroke prevention in this group of patients. Methods A prevalence study through chart audit was conducted in the family medici...

  14. Application of hierarchical management model in nursing in emergency care%分层级护理管理模式在急诊护理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰倩

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hierarchical model in nursing management application results in emergency care situa-tions. Method Emergency care work was divided into two phases,the first phase of the year 2007~2008,the year 2008~2013 for the second stage,the Court began in early 2008 stratified care management model,related care for the two-stage review of the comparative analysis of the situation. Results The rate of emergency room nurses qualified primary care area of the second stage,special care pass rate,pass rate of imple-mentation of the relevant documents,qualified care operations were significantly higher than the first stage,and had a significant difference( P﹤0. 05);the patient of the emergency physician satisfaction in the second phase were significantly higher than the first stage,and had a sig-nificant difference(P﹤0. 05);the passing rate of the second phase of professional behavior was significantly higher than the first phase,with significant difference(P﹤0. 05). Conclusion Stratified care model is implemented in the emergency zone,district hospital emergency nurses aspects of professional skills,professional behavior has been significantly improved,significantly increased personnel satisfaction,worthy of clinical implementation.%目的:探讨分层级护理管理模式在急诊护理中的应用效果情况。方法:将急诊护理工作分为两个阶段,2007年~2008年度为第一阶段,2008年~2013年度为第二阶段,在2008年初开始实施分层护理管理模式,对两个阶段相关护理情况进行比较。结果:第二阶段急诊区护士基础护理合格率、特殊护理合格率、相关文件执行合格率、护理操作合格率均显著高于第一阶段,差异有统计学意义(P﹤0.05);第二阶段急诊区患者、医生满意程度均显著高于第一阶段,差异有统计学意义(P﹤0.05);第二阶段职业行为合格率显著高于第一阶段,差异有统计学意义( P﹤0

  15. Continuity in health care: lessons from supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijboom, Bert R; Bakx, Saskia J W G C; Westert, Gert P

    2010-01-01

    In health care, multidisciplinary collaboration is both indispensable and complicated. We discuss organizational problems that occur in situations where multiple health care providers are required to cooperate for patients with complex needs. Four problem categories, labelled as communication, patient safety, waiting times and integration are distinguished. Then we develop a supply chain perspective on these problems in the sense of discussing remedies according to supply chain management (SCM) literature. This perspective implies a business focus on inter-organizational conditions and requirements necessary for delivering health care and cure across organizational borders. We conclude by presenting some strategic and policy recommendations. PMID:21069770

  16. Primary Care Management of Plantar Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Thomas J; Tankersley, Zach J; Qazi, Zain N; Jasko, John J; Odono, Russell; Shuler, Franklin D

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is present in 10% of the population and is the most common cause of plantar heel pain. PF is painful, can alter daily activities and presents as a sharp pain localized to the plantar foot and medial heel. The underlying etiology involves microtrauma to the plantar fascia, specifically at its insertion point on the calcaneus. Successful management of plantar fasciitis is typically achieved with the conservative therapy approaches discussed. PMID:26665894

  17. Case managers optimize patient safety by facilitating effective care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Dana Deravin

    2007-01-01

    In this new era of patient safety, the case manager, as an advocate and facilitator of care, has a pivotal role on the front line of healthcare delivery. Effective communication and collaboration between disciplines is key to the promotion of patient safety, and ultimately the avoidance of life-threatening medical errors. Across the healthcare continuum and within hospitals in particular, patients are routinely transferred from one service to another, from one level of care to another, or from one provider to another. As patients are stabilized and transitioned through the hospital system, there are multiple hand-offs of care or care transitions that can often expose the patient to fragmented service and increase the risk of communication breakdown. Ineffective hand-offs can result in a disruption of continuity between one level of care and the next. In a culture that places a strong emphasis on patient safety, case managers can facilitate opportunities that ease care transitions whereby a change in venue is no longer perceived as a disruption in the flow of care but rather is viewed as a coordinated changeover where cautious and comprehensive communication sets the tone for the continued delivery of safe and effective healthcare. PMID:17413671

  18. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.

  19. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  20. Model-based decision support in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzsieder, E; Vogt, L; Kohnert, K-D; Heinke, P; Augstein, P

    2011-05-01

    The model-based Karlsburg Diabetes Management System (KADIS®) has been developed as a patient-focused decision-support tool to provide evidence-based advice for physicians in their daily efforts to optimize metabolic control in diabetes care of their patients on an individualized basis. For this purpose, KADIS® was established in terms of a personalized, interactive in silico simulation procedure, implemented into a problem-related diabetes health care network and evaluated under different conditions by conducting open-label mono- and polycentric trials, and a case-control study, and last but not least, by application in routine diabetes outpatient care. The trial outcomes clearly show that the recommendations provided to the physicians by KADIS® lead to significant improvement of metabolic control. This model-based decision-support system provides an excellent tool to effectively guide physicians in personalized decision-making to achieve optimal metabolic control for their patients. PMID:20621384

  1. Market Model of Care and Transnational Care Practices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhde, Zuzana

    Berlin: Fridrich Ebert Stiftung, 2015 - (Magbunduku, E.), s. 7-15 [Global Care Chains: Why should we care?. Berlin (DE), 22.10.2014-23.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : care * migration * gender Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography http://www.fes.de/GPol/pdf/Global_Care_Chains_Conference_Reader2015.pdf

  2. Influences on the career commitment of health-care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrtle, Robert C; Chen, Duan-Rung; Liu, Caroline; Fahey, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    The health-care field is undergoing rapid and significant transformation. This transformation has led to the breakdown of traditional career paths for managers in the patient care segment of the industry. To our knowledge, there has not been a systematic examination of how these changes have impacted on the career commitment of managers in this segment of the industry. Building on previous research, we examine the effects of employment-related conditions and career experiences on the career commitment of these managers while controlling for the influence of individual characteristics. Specifically we assess the relationship between employment-related conditions, such as job security, position tenure, industry segment, management level and the extent to which their current position meets their career expectations, and their career experiences, including moving from a non-health-care management position, moving from a different health-care sector, their career stage, career patterns and their satisfaction with their career progression. We found that measures associated with the different employment-related experiences had a more significant influence on career commitment than those measures associated with different career experiences. PMID:18957403

  3. Management of nurse shortage and its impact on pathogen dissemination in the intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Jordi Ferrer; Pierre-Yves Boelle; Jérôme Salomon; Katiuska Miliani; François L’Hériteau; Pascal Astagneau; Laura Temime

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies provide evidence that reduced nurse staffing resources are associated to an increase in health care-associated infections in intensive care units, but tools to assess the contribution of the mechanisms driving these relations are still lacking. We present an agent-based model of pathogen spread that can be used to evaluate the impact on nosocomial risk of alternative management decisions adopted to deal with transitory nurse shortage. Materials and methods: We constru...

  4. The Island Hospice model of palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumalo, Thembelihle; Maasdorp, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in cancer detections in Africa over years, and it has also been noted that higher number of individuals are affected by the later stages of cancer that lead to death. When it comes to cancer care, Zimbabwe is no exception with its ongoing palliative care related research, though still in its infancy. The need for advanced and more accessible palliative care to assist the vulnerable has been intensified by this increase in cancer prevalence. Island Hospice, which is a centre of excellence in palliative care has varying elements of the models that it employs to engage those most in need of palliative assistance, especially children and financially-challenged individuals.

  5. Pembangunan Model Restaurant Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Fredy Jingga; Natalia Limantara

    2014-01-01

    Model design for Restaurant Management System aims to help in restaurant business process, where Restaurant Management System (RMS) help the waitress and chef could interact each other without paper limitation. This Restaurant Management System Model develop using Agile Methodology and developed based on PHP Programming Langguage. The database management system is using MySQL. This web-based application model will enable the waitress and the chef to interact in realtime, from the time they a...

  6. Models for Designing Long-Term Care Service Plans and Care Programs for Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Shogo Kato; Satoko Tsuru; Yoshinori Iizuka

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a system for providing appropriate long-term care services for older people is a national issue in Japan, and it will likely become a worldwide issue in the years to come. Under Japanese Long-term Care Insurance System, long-term care is provided based on long-term care programs, which were designed by care providers on the basis of long-term care service plans, which were designed by care managers. However, defined methodology for designing long-term care service plans a...

  7. Human resource management in the health-care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conant, G; Kleiner, B H

    1998-01-01

    It has been said that managing change is a synonym for managing people through change. No other industry has experienced more change in the past ten years than the health-care industry. In order to regulate all this change, managers in health-care organizations must identify new ways to deal with the changes. The issues are as old as time: job satisfaction, cultural conflict, and compensation. This paper addresses each of these key issues with the following examples. A new nursing paradigm that was implemented at a hospital has significantly increased job satisfaction. This paper also takes a look at ways to manage cultural conflict in a diversified workforce. Finally, the results of a team approach to compensation are studied. PMID:10346306

  8. Will Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Be the Predominant Setting for Oral Health Care by 2025? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be the Setting in Which the Majority of Oral Health Care Is Delivered by 2025 and Viewpoint 2: Increases in DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be Offset by Models Allowing Dentists to Retain the Independence and Freedom of a Traditional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James R; Dodge, William W; Findley, John S; Young, Stephen K; Horn, Bruce D; Kalkwarf, Kenneth L; Martin, Max M; Winder, Ronald L

    2015-05-01

    This Point/Counterpoint article discusses the transformation of dental practice from the traditional solo/small-group (partnership) model of the 1900s to large Dental Support Organizations (DSO) that support affiliated dental practices by providing nonclinical functions such as, but not limited to, accounting, human resources, marketing, and legal and practice management. Many feel that DSO-managed group practices (DMGPs) with employed providers will become the setting in which the majority of oral health care will be delivered in the future. Viewpoint 1 asserts that the traditional dental practice patterns of the past are shifting as many younger dentists gravitate toward employed positions in large group practices or the public sector. Although educational debt is relevant in predicting graduates' practice choices, other variables such as gender, race, and work-life balance play critical roles as well. Societal characteristics demonstrated by aging Gen Xers and those in the Millennial generation blend seamlessly with the opportunities DMGPs offer their employees. Viewpoint 2 contends the traditional model of dental care delivery-allowing entrepreneurial practitioners to make decisions in an autonomous setting-is changing but not to the degree nor as rapidly as Viewpoint 1 professes. Millennials entering the dental profession, with characteristics universally attributed to their generation, see value in the independence and flexibility that a traditional practice allows. Although DMGPs provide dentists one option for practice, several alternative delivery models offer current dentists and future dental school graduates many of the advantages of DMGPs while allowing them to maintain the independence and freedom a traditional practice provides. PMID:25941139

  9. Adoption of Self-management Interventions for Prevention and Care

    OpenAIRE

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Ingram, Barbara L.; Swendeman, Dallas; Lee, Adabel

    2012-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of spiraling healthcare costs can be attributed to chronic diseases, making prevention and management of chronic conditions one of our highest healthcare priorities, especially as we organize for patient-centered medical homes. Collaborative patient self-management in primary care has been repeatedly demonstrated to be efficacious in reducing both symptoms and increasing quality of life, yet there is no consensus on what, how, when, and by whom self-mana...

  10. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaenglein, Andrea L; Pathy, Arun L; Schlosser, Bethanee J; Alikhan, Ali; Baldwin, Hilary E; Berson, Diane S; Bowe, Whitney P; Graber, Emmy M; Harper, Julie C; Kang, Sewon; Keri, Jonette E; Leyden, James J; Reynolds, Rachel V; Silverberg, Nanette B; Stein Gold, Linda F; Tollefson, Megha M; Weiss, Jonathan S; Dolan, Nancy C; Sagan, Andrew A; Stern, Mackenzie; Boyer, Kevin M; Bhushan, Reva

    2016-05-01

    Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults and can also be seen in children. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. Issues from grading of acne to the topical and systemic management of the disease are reviewed. Suggestions on use are provided based on available evidence. PMID:26897386

  11. A proposed 'health literate care model' would constitute a systems approach to improving patients' engagement in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Howard K; Brach, Cindy; Harris, Linda M; Parchman, Michael L

    2013-02-01

    Improving health outcomes relies on patients' full engagement in prevention, decision-making, and self-management activities. Health literacy, or people's ability to obtain, process, communicate, and understand basic health information and services, is essential to those actions. Yet relatively few Americans are proficient in understanding and acting on available health information. We propose a Health Literate Care Model that would weave health literacy strategies into the widely adopted Care Model (formerly known as the Chronic Care Model). Our model calls for first approaching all patients with the assumption that they are at risk of not understanding their health conditions or how to deal with them, and then subsequently confirming and ensuring patients' understanding. For health care organizations adopting our model, health literacy would then become an organizational value infused into all aspects of planning and operations, including self-management support, delivery system design, shared decision-making support, clinical information systems to track and plan patient care, and helping patients access community resources. We also propose a measurement framework to track the impact of the new Health Literate Care Model on patient outcomes and quality of care. PMID:23381529

  12. Safe management of waste from health-care activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The waste produced in the course of health-care activities, from contaminated needles to radioactive isotopes, carries a greater potential for causing infection and injury than any other type of waste, and inadequate or inappropriate management is likely to have serious public health consequences and deleterious effects on the environment. This handbook - the result of extensive international consultation and collaboration - provides comprehensive guidance on safe, efficient, and environmentally sound methods for the handling and disposal of health-care wastes. The various categories of waste are clearly defined and the particular hazards that each poses are described. Considerable prominence is given to the careful planning that is essential for the success of waste management; workable means of minimizing waste production are outlined and the role of reuse and recycling of waste is discussed. Most of the text, however, is devoted to the collection, segregation, storage, transport, and disposal of wastes. Details of containers for each category of waste, labelling of waste packages, and storage conditions are provided, and the various technologies for treatment of waste and disposal of final residues are discussed at length. Advice is given on occupational safety for all personnel involved with waste handling, and a separate chapter is devoted to the closely related topic of hospital hygiene and infection control. The handbook pays particular attention to basic processes and technologies that are not only safe but also affordable, sustainable, and culturally appropriate. For health-care settings in which resources are severely limited there is a separate chapter on minimal programmes; this summarizes all the simplest and least costly techniques that can be employed for the safe management of health-care wastes. The guide is aimed at public health managers and policy-makers, hospital managers, environmental health professionals, and all administrators with an

  13. Characteristics of evolving models of care for arthritis: A key informant study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veinot Paula

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of arthritis is increasing in the face of diminishing health human resources to deliver care. In response, innovative models of care delivery are developing to facilitate access to quality care. Most models have developed in response to local needs with limited evaluation. The primary objective of this study is to a examine the range of models of care that deliver specialist services using a medical/surgical specialist and at least one other health care provider and b document the strengths and challenges of the identified models. A secondary objective is to identify key elements of best practice models of care for arthritis. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of key informants with expertise in arthritis from jurisdictions with primarily publicly-funded health care systems. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach to identify common types of models of care, strengths and challenges of models, and key components of arthritis care. Results Seventy-four key informants were interviewed from six countries. Five main types of models of care emerged. 1 Specialized arthritis programs deliver comprehensive, multidisciplinary team care for arthritis. Two models were identified using health care providers (e.g. nurses or physiotherapists in expanded clinical roles: 2 triage of patients with musculoskeletal conditions to the appropriate services including specialists; and 3 ongoing management in collaboration with a specialist. Two models promoting rural access were 4 rural consultation support and 5 telemedicine. Key informants described important components of models of care including knowledgeable health professionals and patients. Conclusion A range of models of care for arthritis have been developed. This classification can be used as a framework for discussing care delivery. Areas for development include integration of care across the continuum, including primary

  14. The transfer of a health insurance/managed care business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, John N; Goodman, George; Goroff, David B

    2007-01-01

    The owners of a health insurance/managed care business may want to sell that business for a variety of reasons. Health care provider systems may want to exit that business due to operating losses, difficulty in complying with regulations, the inherent conflict in operating that business as part of a provider system, or the desire to focus on being a health care provider. Health insurers/HMOs may want to sell all or a portion of their business due to operating losses, difficulty in servicing a particular market, or a desire to focus on other markets. No matter what reason prompts a seller to undertake a sale, a sale of health insurance/managed care business can be a complicated transaction involving a multitude of issues. This article will focus first on the ways in which such a sale may be structured. The article will then discuss some transactional issues that may arise in the negotiations for the sale of a health insurance/managed care business. The article will then focus on some particular legal issues that arise in each sale-e.g., antitrust, HIPAA, regulatory approvals, and charitable issues. Finally, this article will provide an overview of tax structuring considerations. PMID:18972991

  15. Management of Chronic Diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: Cross-Fertilisation between HIV/AIDS and Diabetes Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefien van Olmen

    2012-01-01

    is useful to think about management of both in tandem, comparing care delivery platforms and self-management strategies. A literature review on care delivery models for diabetes and HIV/AIDS in SSA revealed potential elements for cross-fertilisation: rapid scale-up approaches through the public health approach by simplification and decentralisation; community involvement, peer support, and self-management strategies; and strengthening health services.

  16. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early care and…

  17. The Impact of Management on Knowledge and Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Hans Petter

    2011-01-01

    How do approaches to management affect knowledge and patient care? In this paper, the establishment and dismantling of an organisational unit for research and development (R&D) in a mental health department of a Norwegian health enterprise are analysed. The characteristics of two adverse treatment ideologies and their coherence with approaches to…

  18. Snapshots of health care managers: a measure of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Janice

    2007-01-01

    Based on a global survey of leaders, this article examines the challenges facing health care managers today and uncovers best practices to develop and select leaders, especially those on the frontline. Highlights include hiring processes that identify motivated, potential leaders who have the knowledge, experience, competencies, and attributes to get the job done. PMID:17314629

  19. TQ What?: Applying Total Quality Management to Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Dorothy

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM), developed by W. Edward Deming and Joseph Juran in 1940s, and its applications for child care centers. Discusses how TQM focuses on customer satisfaction, measuring performance, benchmarking, employee empowerment, and continuous training. Includes a list of suggested readings on TQM. (MDM)

  20. Cardiovascular risk management in diabetes in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-08-01

    This communication describes simple targets and interventions, aimed at cardiovascular risk reduction in diabetes mellitus, which are feasible at primary care level. It summarizes therapeutic goals and strategies for management of high blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, and anti-platelet therapy. PMID:26228345

  1. Primary Care Evaluation and Management of Gastroenterologic Issues in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vijaya L; Micic, Dejan; Kim, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders often present to the primary care setting where initial preventive, diagnostic, and treatment strategies are implemented. This article reviews the presentation and diagnosis of common gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, peptic ulcer disease, gallbladder disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and Barrett's esophagus. We focus on the evaluation and management of these diseases in women. PMID:27212096

  2. The Nurturing Teacher: Managing the Stress of Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    This book tackles the concerns of stressed teachers. Whether from nurturance suffering (stress related to caring for students) or from the piles of paperwork yet to be tackled, this text helps the reader sort through the causes of stress, the emotional, physical and social reactions to stress and how one can begin to plan a stress management plan.…

  3. Care plans and care planning in long term conditions: a conceptual model

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, J.; J. Rick; Blakeman, T; Protheroe, J; Roland, M; Bower, P.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of long term conditions continues to rise. Care planning for people with long term conditions has been a policy priority for chronic disease management in a number of health care systems. However, patients and providers appear unclear about the formulation and implementation of care planning. Further work in this area is therefore required to inform the development, implementation and evaluation of future care planning initiatives. We distinguish between ‘care planni...

  4. Exposure management systems in emergencies as comprehensive medical care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emergency management of nuclear hazards relies on a comprehensive medical care system that includes accident prevention administration, environmental monitoring, a health physics organization, and a medical institution. In this paper, the care organization involved in the criticality accident at Tokai-mura is described, and the problems that need to be examined are pointed out. In that incident, even the expert was initially utterly confused and was unable to take appropriate measures. The author concluded that the members of the care organization were all untrained for dealing with nuclear hazards and radiation accidents. The education and training of personnel at the job site are important, and they are even more so for the leaders. Revisions of the regional disaster prevention plans and care manual are needed. (K.H.)

  5. Income statement management in a turbulent health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaleski, M A

    2001-03-01

    This article considers the role of accounting information embedded in the income statement of health care providers in their increasingly difficult economic environment. This turbulent economic environment has resulted from the dramatic shift in power from the seller to the buyer of health care services, with a consequential shift of risks that will mandate that health care providers obtain access to better cost and utilization information. This article looks at the 2 critical components of the income statement--the revenue function and the cost structure-in terms of their importance in the management of enhanced economic performance in both the fee-for-service and the prepaid provision of health care services. PMID:11239384

  6. Knowledge Model: Project Knowledge Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter; Grolin, Daniel;

    2009-01-01

    The Knowledge model for project management serves several goals:Introducing relevant concepts of project management area for software development (Section 1). Reviewing and understanding the real case requirements from the industrial perspective. (Section 2). Giving some preliminary suggestions...

  7. Worker's comp meets managed care. In the quest for lower costs, a new niche emerges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckman, P V

    1998-01-01

    Niche markets such as Medicare, Medicaid and behavioral healthcare are looking to managed care to control costs and increase the quality of care provided. Now workers' compensation officials are looking to managed care with the same goals in mind. As managed care organizations begin marketing to these special populations, the information glut is growing. Information technology can aid managed care officials in the collection, organization and dissemination of the data. PMID:10177514

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hospital-based Case Management in Cancer Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Christian N; Vedsted, Peter; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case management (CM) models based on experienced nurses are increasingly used to improve coordination and continuity of care for patients with complex health care needs. Anyway, little is known about the effects of hospital-based CM in cancer care.Aim.To analyse the effects of hospital......-based CM on (i) GPs' evaluation of information from the hospital and collaboration with the hospital staff and (ii) patients' contacts with GPs during daytime and out of hours. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial allocated 280 colorectal cancer patients 1:1 to either a control group or CM intervention...

  9. Stroke disease management--a framework for comprehensive stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venketasubramanian, N; Chan, B P L; Lim, E; Hafizah, Noor; Goh, K T; Lew, Y J; Loo, L; Yin, A; Widjaja, L; Loke, W C; Kuick, G; Lee, N L; Ong, B S; Koh, S F; Heng, B H; Cheah, J

    2002-07-01

    Disease management is an approach to patient care that coordinates medical resources for the patient across the entire healthcare delivery system throughout the lifetime of the patient with the disease. Stroke is suitable for disease management as it is a well-known disease with a high prevalence, high cost, variable practice pattern, poor clinical outcome, and managed by a non-integrated healthcare system. It has measurable and actionable outcomes, with available local expertise and support of the Ministry of Health. Developing the programme requires a multidisciplinary team, baseline data on target populations and healthcare services, identification of core components, collaboration with key stakeholders, development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and carepaths, institution of care coordinators, use of information technology and continuous quality improvement to produce an effective plan. Core components include public education, risk factor screening and management, primary care and specialist clinics, acute stroke units, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation facilities, and supportive community services including medical, nursing, therapy, home help and support groups for patients and carers. The family physician plays a key role. Coordination of services is best done by a network of hospital and community-based care managers, and is enhanced by a coordinating call centre. Continuous quality improvement is required, with audit of processes and outcomes, facilitated by a disease registry. Pitfalls include inappropriate exclusion of deserving patients, misuse, loss of physician and patient independence, over-estimation of benefits, and care fragmentation. Collaboration and cooperative among all parties will help ensure a successful and sustainable programme. PMID:12161880

  10. The effect of managed care on hospital marketing orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubeau, P R; Jantzen, R

    1998-01-01

    Marketing is a central activity of modern organizations. To survive and succeed, organizations must know their markets, attract sufficient resources, convert these resources into appropriate services, and communicate them to various consuming publics. In the hospital industry, a marketing orientation is currently recognized as a necessary management function in a highly competitive and resource-constrained environment. Further, the literature supports a marketing orientation as superior to other orientation types, namely production, product and sales. In this article, the results of the first national cross-sectional study of the marketing orientation of U.S. hospitals in a managed care environment are reported. Several key lessons for hospital executives have emerged. First, to varying degrees, U.S. hospitals have adopted a marketing orientation. Second, hospitals that are larger, or that have developed strong affiliations with other providers that involve some level of financial interdependence, have the greatest marketing orientation. Third, as managed care organizations have increased their presence in a state, hospitals have become less marketing oriented. Finally, contrary to prior findings, for-profit institutions are not intrinsically more marketing oriented than their not-for-profit counterparts. This finding is surprising because of the traditional role of marketing in non-health for-profit enterprises and management's greater emphasis on profitability. An area of concern for hospital executives arises from the finding that as managed care pressure increases, hospital marketing orientation decreases. Although a marketing orientation is posited to lead to greater customer satisfaction and improved business results, a managed care environment seems to force hospitals to focus more on cost control than on customer satisfaction. Hospital executives are cautioned that cost-cutting, the primary focus in intense managed care environments, may lead to short

  11. The health-care manager's guide to managing change in challenging times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, D N

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Bill Gates was a college dropout working for a four-member, fledgling company in New Mexico. Today, he is the richest man in America and the head of perhaps the most powerful company in recent corporate history. Ten years ago, managed health care was merely a concept discussed in academic and industry observer circles. Now it is a norm in almost every health-care organization nationally. Five years ago, health-care professionals in every discipline believed the maxim that, ¿as long as people get sick, health-care professionals will have jobs.¿ In 1995, health-care executives have alternately referred to the widescale process of laying off employees as reengineering, rightsizing, downsizing, or RIF (reduction in force). With this massive amount of change, both societally and professionally, health-care managers have been contending with the change management process. Although a breadth of concepts borrowed from other industries and a plethora of conceptual practicums have entered the health-care educational realm, a straightforward, immediately useful approach to managing change is probably more beneficial, as the need to manage change quickly and effectively becomes the paramount criterion for health-care management success in the second half of this decade of change. In this article we will explore the four areas where mistakes are made most frequently by leaders in the change process, and we will provide specific strategies to not only avoid these mistakes but moreover reduce resistance to change, activate positive action, and ultimately improve performance through optimum staff contribution. The four critical areas we will explore are the reasons for resistance to change, the management of the proactive phase of change, creating staff interdependence, and key leadership roles for change management. PMID:10154378

  12. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain. PMID:23329083

  13. Disabling health care? Medicaid managed care and people with disabilities in America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    . Although the lived realities of accessing managed care services that surfaced in this study can be viewed as reasonably representative of the experiences of disabled Medicaid beneficiaries given the cross-disability nature of the sample, the study does not claim generalizability across the country. States...

  14. Disabling health care? Medicaid managed care and people with disabilities in America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid, America's largest government-funded health insurance program, plays a pivotal role in providing health services to eight million adults with disabilities. Since the mid-1990s, many Medicaid programs have aggressively introduced managed care, which reconfigures service delivery using bus...

  15. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m3 (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  16. [An Experience Promoting the Interdisciplinary Care Model for Dengue Fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Fu; Ke, Ya-Ting

    2016-08-01

    Emergency departments represent the first line in facing major healthcare events. During major epidemic outbreaks, patients crowding into the emergency departments increase the wait time for patients and overload the staffs that are on duty. The dengue fever outbreak in southern Taiwan during the summer 2015 presented a huge management challenge for physicians and nurses in local hospitals. We responded to this challenge by integrating resources from different hospital departments. This strategy successfully increased group cohesiveness among the medical team, ensuring that they could not only ultimately cope with the outbreak together but also effectively provide patient-centered care. This interdisciplinary care model may serve as a reference for medical professionals for the management of future epidemics and similar events. PMID:27492305

  17. Evaluation of the integrated community based home care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Uys

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1999-2000 the Integrated Community-Based Home Care model for the care of people with AIDS in communities were implemented in seven sites across the country. The post-implementation evaluation showed that most respondents felt that the model could be replicated if a functioning and informed network including all partners, and a strong management team were in place. The effects of the project were mainly positive for all stakeholders (hospice, clinic, hospital, PWA and their carers, professionals and other community members. Hospitals and community- based services became more aware of and involved in the needs of PWA and felt that the model enabled them to address these needs. PWA and their carers felt supported and respected.

  18. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites. PMID:15671788

  19. Technologies of birth and models of midwifery care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine McCourt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a study of a reform in the organisation of maternity services in the United Kingdom, which aimed towards developing a more woman-centred model of care. After decades of fragmentation and depersonalisation of care, associated with the shift of birth to a hospital setting, pressure by midwives and mothers prompted government review and a relatively radical turnaround in policy. However, the emergent model of care has been profoundly influenced by concepts and technologies of monitoring. The use of such technologies as ultrasound scans, electronic foetal monitoring and oxytocic augmentation of labour, generally supported by epidural anaesthesia for pain relief, have accompanied the development of a particular ecological model of birth – often called active management –, which is oriented towards the idea of an obstetric norm. Drawing on analysis of women’s narrative accounts of labour and birth, this article discusses the impact on women’s embodiment in birth, and the sources of information they use about the status of their own bodies, their labour and that of the child. It also illustrates how the impact on women’s experiences of birth may be mediated by a relational model of support, through the provision of caseload midwifery care.

  20. Emphasis: an active management model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Nuclear Materials Management was founded and has grown on the basis of promoting professionalism in the nuclear industry. This paper is concerned with professional management of nuclear material. The paper introduces the reader to Emphasis, an active management model. The management model provides the framework to assist a manager in directing his available resources. Emphasis provides for establishing goals, identifying and selecting objectives, matching objectives to specific personnel, preparing and monitoring action plans, and evaluating results. The model stresses crisis prevention by systematically administering and controlling resources. A critical requirement for implementation of the model is the desire to manage, to be in charge of the situation. The nuclear industry does need managers - people who realize the sensitive nature of the industry, professionals who insist on improved performance

  1. Managing health care system in small island countries: Palau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuartei, Stevenson

    2006-09-01

    Managing health systems in small island countries carry with it challenges that are common with other small communities around the world but also articulates for unique challenges that are intrinsically that of small island countries. Sustainability of economies and the small population in small island countries in the Pacific dictates how health care services align and organize to meet the needs of their population. This paper is an attempt to outline possible strategies that could be implemented in view of the ever decreasing meager resources. It will outline a step approach toward realignment and reengineering a viable health care system that is hopefully both cost effective and outcome oriented. PMID:18181405

  2. Collaborative Decision Support Systems for Primary Health care Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Pahuja

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a collaborative DSS Model for health care systems and results obtained are described. The proposed framework [1] embeds expert knowledge within DSS to provide intelligent decision support, and implements the intelligent DSS using collaboration technologies. The problem space contains several Hub and Spoke networks. Information about such networks is dynamically captured and represented in a Meta-data table. This master table enables collaboration between any two networks in the problem space, through load transfer, between them. In order to show the collaboration the sample database of 15 health care centers is taken assuming that there are 5 health care centers in one network.

  3. Confronting the barriers to chronic care management in Medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Robert A; Horvath, Jane

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of the current Medicare program--both traditional fee-for-service and risk-based contracting--to address the needs of beneficiaries with chronic conditions, who represent almost 80 percent of program enrollment. Grounded in indemnity insurance principles, including concerns about "moral hazard," the traditional Medicare program faces difficulty evolving to support of a chronic care model of health care practice. Although capitation may be the most desirable platform to support provision of care to beneficiaries with chronic conditions, the current structural limitations and problems faced in the Medicare+Choice program limit capitation's use at this time. PMID:14527234

  4. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  5. A SUSTAINABLE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM REQUIRES MANAGEMENT TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos Dimitros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to be the health care system sustainable , management transformations must be based on very precise diagnostic analysis that includes complete and current information. It is necessary to implement an information system that collects information in real time, that watches the parameters that significantly influence the sustainability of the system. Such an information system should point out a radiography(a scan of the system at some time under following aspects:: 1. An overview of system; 2 An overview of the economic situation; 3 A technical presentation ;4. A legal overview; 5. A social overview ; 6. A management overview .Based on these Xrays of the health system, it outlines a series of conclusions and recommendations together with a SWOT analysis that highlights the potential internal (strengths and weaknesses and external potential (opportunities and threats. Based on this analysis and recommendations, the management is going to redesign the system in order to be adapted to the changing environmental requirements. Management transformation is recommended to be by following steps. :1. The development of a new management system that would make a positive change in the health care system 2. Implementation of the new management system 3. Assessment of the changes

  6. Targeted temperature management in neurocritical care: Boon or bust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Bindra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature management in neurocritical care is important and has gained due importance in recent years. Targeted temperature management (TTM includes deliberate reduction of core body temperature to a range of 32–34°C in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest after return of spontaneous circulation and also therapeutic hypothermia (33–35°C in normothermic patients or controlled normothermia (cooling patients to 37°C in hyperthermic patients. This review focuses on the practical aspects of cooling and temperature management in neurocritical care. An electronic search of Google Scholar, MEDLINE (OVID, EMBASE and the Cochrane library was performed. The physiological changes, potential side effects along with significant research and clinical applications in the field of temperature management are main highlights. Currently, the research evidence is available for TTM in adults following cardiac arrest, neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy and raised intracranial pressure. Controlled normothermia in neurocritical care population is rapidly gaining popularity. However, data on disease specific therapeutic markers, therapeutic depth and duration and prognostication of this modality are limited. Overall in experienced hands, the technique is safe to execute without the major morbidity and a potential to improve the outcome. Though over the years, clinical applications are unable to consistently demonstrate its benefits, but TTM in neurological insult has become an established and promising concept.

  7. The Norrtaelje model: a unique model for integrated health and social care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Monica Andersson; Calltorp, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Many countries organise and fund health and social care separately. The Norrtaelje model is a Swedish initiative that transformed the funding and organisation of health and social care in order to better integrate care for older people with complex needs. In Norrtaelje model, this transformation made it possible to bringing the team together, to transfer responsibility to different providers, to use care coordinators, and to develop integrated pathways and plans around transitions in and out of hospital and from nursing homes to hospital. The Norrtaelje model operates in the context of the Swedish commitment to universal coverage and public programmes based on tax-funded resources that are pooled and redistributed to citizens on the basis of need. The experience of Norrtaelje model suggests that one way to promote integration of health and social care is to start with a transformation that aligns these two sectors in terms of high level organisation and funding. This transformation then enables the changes in operations and management that can be translated into changes in care delivery. This "top-down" approach must be in-line with national priorities and policies but ultimately is successful only if the culture, resource allocation and management are changed throughout the local system. PMID:26528093

  8. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaptein AA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ad A Kaptein, Maarten J Fischer, Margreet Scharloo Medical Psychology Section, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC, Leiden, the Netherlands Abstract: In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients’ functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, self-management, psychology, quality of life, biopsychosocial model, medical humanities

  9. Game Maturity Model for Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan C; Adriani, Paul; van Houwelingen, Jan Willem; Geerts, A

    2016-04-01

    This article introduces the Game Maturity Model for the healthcare industry as an extension to the general Game Maturity Model and describes the usage by two case studies of applied health games. The Game Maturity Model for healthcare provides a practical and value-adding method to assess existing games and to determine strategic considerations for application of applied health games. Our forecast is that within 5 years the use and development of applied games will have a role in our daily lives and the way we organize health care that will be similar to the role social media has today. PMID:26859720

  10. Development of a primary care-based complex care management intervention for chronically ill patients at high risk for hospitalization: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyer Martin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex care management is seen as an approach to face the challenges of an ageing society with increasing numbers of patients with complex care needs. The Medical Research Council in the United Kingdom has proposed a framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions that will be used to develop and evaluate a primary care-based complex care management program for chronically ill patients at high risk for future hospitalization in Germany. Methods and design We present a multi-method procedure to develop a complex care management program to implement interventions aimed at reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for primary care patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a high likelihood of hospitalization. The procedure will start with reflection about underlying precipitating factors of hospitalizations and how they may be targeted by the planned intervention (pre-clinical phase. An intervention model will then be developed (phase I based on theory, literature, and exploratory studies (phase II. Exploratory studies are planned that entail the recruitment of 200 patients from 10 general practices. Eligible patients will be identified using two ways of 'case finding': software based predictive modelling and physicians' proposal of patients based on clinical experience. The resulting subpopulations will be compared regarding healthcare utilization, care needs and resources using insurance claims data, a patient survey, and chart review. Qualitative studies with healthcare professionals and patients will be undertaken to identify potential barriers and enablers for optimal performance of the complex care management program. Discussion This multi-method procedure will support the development of a primary care-based care management program enabling the implementation of interventions that will potentially reduce avoidable

  11. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saiful Ridhwan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of managing medical information has become very critical in the healthcare delivery system. Medical information nowadays are optimized towards serving different areas such as; diagnosing of diseases, planning and administration, treatment and monitoring of patient outcomes, services and costs. This article provides a review into various Health and Social Care systems which encompasses the Knowledge Management value. For analysis, more than 30 systems that are related to Health and Social Care were gathered via Internet research, only 20 of these systems were finally selected based on recent system development and popularity of the system.Keywords: Health Care, Knowledge, Knowledge Management, Social Care, systemdoi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4 How to cite this article:Ridhwan, M.S., and Oyefolahan, I.O. (2013. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management. The Asian Journal of Technology Management 6 (2: 92-101. Print ISSN: 1978-6956; Online ISSN: 2089-791X. doi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4

  12. The management of family conflict in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Kissane, David W

    2008-02-01

    We review the literature on family conflict in palliative care. The prevalence and common sources of conflict are discussed, including historical issues of tension, differing coping styles, the division of labour, and the presence of acute or chronic mental illness within the family. Assessment and intervention strategies used in Family Focused Grief Therapy (FFGT), a family-centred preventive intervention that begins during palliative care and continues during bereavement, are presented, with special consideration given to research on treatment decision-making, cultural issues, special-needs populations, and the management of crises within the family. We conclude with a discussion of challenges that frequently impede conflict resolution and with suggestions for addressing these difficulties in the palliative care setting. PMID:24027358

  13. Difficult airway management from Emergency Department till Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of "can ventilate but can′t intubate" situation which was successfully managed in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit by the use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and Frova Intubating Introducer as bridging rescue devices. Use of appropriate technique while strictly following the difficult airway algorithm is the mainstay of airway management in unanticipated difficult airway situations. Although the multiple airway devices were used but each step took not more than 2 min and "don′t struggle, skip to the next step principle" was followed. With the availability of many advanced airway management tools, the intensivists should have a training and experience along with preparedness in order to perform such lifesaving airway managements.

  14. Factors associated with antibiotic prescribing in a managed care setting: an exploratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, B L; Salmon, J W; Stubbings, J; Gilomen-Study, G; Valuck, R J; Kezlarian, K

    1997-12-01

    This multi-site, cross-sectional, observational study sought to identify attitudinal and social normative factors associated with the prescribing of oral antibiotics to ambulatory patients in a managed care setting. Participants were 25 physicians specializing in internal medicine, family practice or pediatrics from five ambulatory care clinics within a large, fully integrated health care system in a major midwestern U.S. city. The main outcome measure was number of prescriptions per physician written in the fourth quarter of 1994 for each of seven selected antibiotics. Correlational and multiple regression analyses revealed that behavioral intentions were significantly associated (P antibiotic prescribing behavior. Prescribing behavior may have been a function of patient-specific rather than general beliefs about antibiotics. Methodological limitations related to the sample size and the sparseness of the utilization data may also have prevented a significant effect of intentions on behavior from being detected. Alternatively, in managed care settings, it is hypothesized that prescribing behavior may have been influenced more by non-psychological factors, such as management systems, formularies and therapeutic substitution programs, than they were by internal, psychological factors such as attitudes, subjective norms and intentions. Managed care is altering the role of the physician as an autonomous decision-maker. In response, models of prescribing must either incorporate variables such as perceived behavioral control to aid in the prediction of non-volitional behavior, model the decision-making of non-physician managers, or forego psychological models in favor of structural or system-level models of drug utilization. PMID:9447627

  15. Systems modelling for improving health care

    OpenAIRE

    Pitt, Martin; Monks, Thomas; Allen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The growing complexity of health care coupled with the ever-increasing pressures to ensure efficient and effective use of limited resources have encouraged policy makers to turn to system modelling solutions. Such techniques have been available for decades, but despite ample research which demonstrates potential, their application in health services to date is limited. This presentation surveys the breadth of approaches available to support delivery and design across many areas and levels of ...

  16. Managing the transition to integrated health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J R

    1996-01-01

    Today's successful community hospitals should and will evolve into integrated health care organizations (IHCOs) that will share several common characteristics. IHCOs will have a community--not a membership--orientation, and this will be a distinguishing characteristic and a source of market appeal. The transition to IHCO will be a slow one, and to prosper, the IHCO will have to accommodate both price-oriented markets and traditional ones. Successful IHCOs will expand technical skills and capabilities to control costs and quality. New strategic competencies will have to be developed, and to do this, emerging IHCOs will improve the ability of managers to support decisions and sell them both to the buyers and the public at large. Excellent patient care will rest upon better trained, advised, and informed management teams. Making the change to an IHCO will take time and money, but organizations that make steady progress are likely to succeed. PMID:10156172

  17. Can managed care reduce employers' retiree medical liability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R S; Newton, B

    1991-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has forced U.S. companies to look squarely at their current retiree health obligations and their future commitments. Accounting Statement No. 106 (FAS 106) requires employers to accrue liabilities for retiree health benefits during employees' active service, rather than record the costs as benefits are paid. Employers are scrambling to find ways to reduce the statement's effect on corporate balance sheets. While managed health care has been increasingly employed to control benefit costs in active employee health plans, it has not been as popular in retiree plans. This article reviews important demographic and health trends in the retiree population and summarizes employers' early responses to FAS 106. It explores why managed health care has thus far played a limited role in reducing employers' postretirement medical liability, and offers insight into how that role could be increased in the future. PMID:10116958

  18. Coordinated Care Management For Dementia In A Large, Academic Health System

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, ZS; Jennings, L; Reuben, D

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and other dementias are chronic, incurable diseases that require coordinated care that addresses the medical, behavioral, and social aspects of the disease. With funding from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, we launched a dementia care program in which a nurse practitioner acting as a dementia care manager worked with primary care physicians to develop and implement a dementia care plan that offers training and support to caregivers, manages care transition...

  19. Clinical outcomes of HIV care delivery models in the US: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, April D; Martin, Erika G; Galadima, Hadiza; Bono, Rose S; Tehrani, Ali Bonakdar; Cyrus, John W; Henderson, Margaret; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Krist, Alexander H

    2016-10-01

    With over 1 million people living with HIV, the US faces national challenges in HIV care delivery due to an inadequate HIV specialist workforce and the increasing role of non-communicable chronic diseases in driving morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. Alternative HIV care delivery models, which include substantial roles for advanced practitioners and/or coordination between specialty and primary care settings in managing HIV-infected patients, may address these needs. We aimed to systematically review the evidence on patient-level HIV-specific and primary care health outcomes for HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient care across HIV care delivery models. We identified randomized trials and observational studies from bibliographic and other databases through March 2016. Eligible studies met pre-specified eligibility criteria including on care delivery models and patient-level health outcomes. We considered all available evidence, including non-experimental studies, and evaluated studies for risk of bias. We identified 3605 studies, of which 13 met eligibility criteria. Of the 13 eligible studies, the majority evaluated specialty-based care (9 studies). Across all studies and care delivery models, eligible studies primarily reported mortality and antiretroviral use, with specialty-based care associated with mortality reductions at the clinician and practice levels and with increased antiretroviral initiation or use at the clinician level but not the practice level. Limited and heterogeneous outcomes were reported for other patient-level HIV-specific outcomes (e.g., viral suppression) as well as for primary care health outcomes across all care delivery models. No studies addressed chronic care outcomes related to aging. Limited evidence was available across geographic settings and key populations. As re-design of care delivery in the US continues to evolve, better understanding of patient-level HIV-related and primary care health outcomes, especially

  20. [Case management. The nursing business of care or cost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, B K; Duquette, A; Kérouac, S; Rouillier, L

    1992-01-01

    Less money spent on health services, cost-effectiveness, better productivity and more efficiency are some of the driving forces of contemporary "neo-liberalism" and political trends. How can nursing services and the profession's human values adapt in this difficult context? The authors describe the newest modality of patient care delivery system: nursing case management. They examine the factors and assumptions that led up to its development and point out the validity of asking some serious questions before embarking on the euphoria of case management. PMID:1291932

  1. RATA to take care of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Law of the Republic of Lithuania was passed on Radioactive Waste (RW) Management on 20 May 1999, much more attention has been given to the disposal of this kind of waste in our country and especially to the Ignalina NPP, the facility that produces most of it. The Ministry of Economy set up the Radioactive Waste Management Agency (RATA) on 20 July 2001. Its task is to take care of the final disposal of RW in the Republic of Lithuania. Structure, description of the activities and plans for future of RATA is presented

  2. Management models for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær; Jonker, Jan; van Pijkeren, Michel

    2009-01-01

    In light of a growing number of management models used in organisations questions regarding their nature, validity and applicability are becoming more and more important. We therefore provide in this introduction a concise overview of their background. We define a management model as: a "stable...

  3. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients

  4. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through “Embrace,” an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach. Results Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1) Experiences with aging, with the themes “Struggling with health,” “Increasing dependency,” “Decreasing social interaction,” “Loss of control,” and “Fears;” and 2) Experiences with Embrace, with the themes “Relationship with the case manager,” “Interactions,” and “Feeling in control, safe, and secure”. The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants’ ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system. Conclusion The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging. PMID:26489096

  5. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie L W Spoorenberg

    Full Text Available Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through "Embrace," an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach.Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1 Experiences with aging, with the themes "Struggling with health," "Increasing dependency," "Decreasing social interaction," "Loss of control," and "Fears;" and 2 Experiences with Embrace, with the themes "Relationship with the case manager," "Interactions," and "Feeling in control, safe, and secure". The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants' ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system.The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging.

  6. The effect of nursing management development program on clinical competency in coronary care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Vaezi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are the main members in nursing cares and nursing managers can improve their clinical competency by applying better leadership skills. This study carried out to determine the effect of nursing management program on clinical competency of nurses in a coronary care unit (CCU.Methods: A quasi-experimental study was carried out in two educational hospitals in Yazd- Iran. These hospitals were allocated randomly in case and control hospitals. 25 matched nurses were selected by convenience sampling from both case and control hospitals. The clinical competency of nurses was measured by related questioners consisted of two dimensions caring and care management behaviors by self-evaluation and head nurse evaluation in case and control groups. Then, the intervention was implemented in four stages including nurse's development, managers' development, adaptation and supervision period during four months in the case group. After intervention, clinical competency of nurses was measured in both groups.Results: The results showed that before intervention more than 80% of nurses in two groups was in the moderate clinical competency level and they were proficient based on Benner's skill acquisition model. After intervention, nurses' clinical competency improved to higher level in case group but it didn't change in control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Creating necessary modifications in nursing environments through the management development program by head nurses may improve nurses' clinical competency.

  7. A fragmented patient safety concept: the structure and culture of safety management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Gerald R

    2004-01-01

    The uniform and visible commitment to safety management is a cultural and structural change that health care organizations have not typically attempted. Committee structures are just one example of how culture drives structure in managing health care safety. The question is: "Are we interested in making nonpatient safety programs as well understood and as culturally significant as patient safety programs?" Models exist to institutionalize safety management in health care. We need only look to the JCAHO or OSHA and other high-hazard industry models for examples of safety management. Change requires a focus on safety, not occupational safety or patient safety, but just safety. In health care, safety would be a key characteristic of organizational culture. The organizational expectation is then that all employees will work safely and practice safety. Employees will apply safe practices when handling chemicals, in lifting, and when giving medications. Only when safety imbues the work and decisions of each employee in this way will the highest level of safety be attained. PMID:15000050

  8. Enterprise Risk Management Models

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, David L

    2010-01-01

    Enterprise risk management has always been important. However, the events of the 21st Century have made it even more critical. The top level of business management became suspect after scandals at ENRON, WorldCom, and other business entities. Financially, many firms experienced difficulties from bubbles. The problems of interacting cultures demonstrated risk from terrorism as well, with numerous terrorist attacks, to include 9/11 in the U.S. Risks can arise in many facets of business. Businesses in fact exist to cope with risk in their area of specialization. Financial risk management has focu

  9. Interprofessional team management in pediatric critical care: some challenges and possible solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stocker M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Martin Stocker,1 Sina B Pilgrim,2 Margarita Burmester,3 Meredith L Allen,4 Wim H Gijselaers5 1Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital Lucerne, Lucerne, 2Pediatric Intensive Care, University Children's Hospital Berne, Berne, Switzerland; 3Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK; 4Department of Pediatrics, The Royal Children's Hospital, Victoria, Australia; 5Educational Research and Development, School of Business and Economics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: Aiming for and ensuring effective patient safety is a major priority in the management and culture of every health care organization. The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU has become a workplace with a high diversity of multidisciplinary physicians and professionals. Therefore, delivery of high-quality care with optimal patient safety in a PICU is dependent on effective interprofessional team management. Nevertheless, ineffective interprofessional teamwork remains ubiquitous.Methods: We based our review on the framework for interprofessional teamwork recently published in association with the UK Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education. Articles were selected to achieve better understanding and to include and translate new ideas and concepts.Findings: The barrier between autonomous nurses and doctors in the PICU within their silos of specialization, the failure of shared mental models, a culture of disrespect, and the lack of empowering parents as team members preclude interprofessional team management and patient safety. A mindset of individual responsibility and accountability embedded in a network of equivalent partners, including the patient and their family members, is required to achieve optimal interprofessional care. Second, working competently as an interprofessional team is a learning process. Working declared as a learning process, psychological safety, and speaking up are pivotal

  10. Model Management in Virtual Reality Research

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jungang; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Wenyao

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a Bi-angle Model Management method (BiMM) is proposed to manage models in virtual reality research. One angle is based on the model itself, which includes the model, model scheme, and texture; another angle is based on the model sort - each sort has its child sorts except leaf nodes. Based on this method, we have developed a model management application that has the following major functions: model management, model sort management, model query, model statistics, model registra...

  11. Opening the Black Box of Clinical Collaboration in Integrated Care Models for Frail, Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Stampa, Matthieu; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard; Novella, Jean-Luc; Lechowski, Laurent; Ankri, Joel; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to understand better the clinical collaboration process among primary care physicians (PCPs), case managers (CMs), and geriatricians in integrated models of care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of 35 PCPs, 7 CMs, and 4 geriatricians was selected in…

  12. Issues in Business and Medical Education: Brief Literature Review on Strategic Management of Health Care Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D.

    The literature on the use of strategic management principles by health care organizations is reviewed. After considering basic concepts of strategic management and managerial problems in nonprofit organizations, strategic planning and management of health care organizations are covered. Attention is directed to the health care environment,…

  13. Experiences of Emotion Management in Medical Care (Case Study: Toronto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Kianpour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   This study lies at the intersection of the sociology of emotions and medical sociology, investigating emotion management among a rather unknown category of medical personnel –Hospital Chaplains. Sociologists of emotions seek to understand how emotions can be socially influenced in terms of both experience and expression. They believe emotions can be influenced by such institutions as culture and religion. As a result, not only do societies and subcultures have different patterns of expressing emotions according to their own norms and characteristics, but there are also different ways of managing emotions in social institutions. For example, in North American healthcare system, hospital chaplaincy is institutionalized, like other members of the medical team, to provide spiritual and religious care, which is often accompanied with emotional support, requiring therefore emotion management. In order to explore emotional experiences that chaplains undergo as a result of working in hospital and dealing with people who are emotionally overwhelmed, the author utilized insights from interactional and symbolic interactionist, phenomenological, and ethnomethodological approaches within the sociology of emotions and spoke with different chaplains from five faith traditions. The aim was to understand how chaplains perform interpersonal emotion management, what techniques, strategies and skills are involved in dealing with people’s emotions, and how performing emotion management in healthcare institutions brings religion and spirituality at the forefront of a secular society.       Material and Methods   This is a qualitative study based on in-depth interviewing with hospital chaplains working in different hospitals in the Toronto area. Toronto has a large number of hospitals and medical/healthcare institutions, most of which have a spiritual care department in which a number of full-time and part-time chaplains work to provide

  14. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model. Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation. Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes. Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  15. Case management for at-risk elderly patients in the English integrated care pilots: observational study of staff and patient experience and secondary care utilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2009, the English Department of Health appointed 16 integrated care pilots which aimed to provide better integrated care. We report the quantitative results from a multi-method evaluation of six of the demonstration projects which used risk profiling tools to identify older people at risk of emergency hospital admission, combined with intensive case management for people identified as at risk. The interventions focused mainly on delivery system redesign and improved clinical information systems, two key elements of Wagner's Chronic Care Model.Methods: Questionnaires to staff and patients. Difference-in-differences analysis of secondary care utilisation using data on 3,646 patients and 17,311 matched controls, and changes in overall secondary care utilisation.Results: Most staff thought that care for their patients had improved. More patients reported having a care plan but they found it significantly harder to see a doctor or nurse of their choice and felt less involved in decisions about their care. Case management interventions were associated with a 9% increase in emergency admissions. We found some evidence of imbalance between cases and controls which could have biased this estimate, but simulations of the possible effect of unobserved confounders showed that it was very unlikely that the sites achieved their goal of reducing emergency admissions. However, we found significant reductions of 21% and 22% in elective admissions and outpatient attendance in the six months following an intervention, and overall inpatient and outpatient costs were significantly reduced by 9% during this period. Area level analyses of whole practice populations suggested that overall outpatient attendances were significantly reduced by 5% two years after the start of the case management schemes.Conclusion: Case management may result in improvements in some aspects of care and has the potential to reduce secondary care costs. However, to improve

  16. The effect of normative social forces on managed care organizations: implications for strategic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, E G; Sebastian, J G

    1998-01-01

    Drawing on institutional theory, this study examines how adherence to a number of "institutional" and "technical" environmental forces can influence the business success of managed care organizations (MCOs). The standards studied include: (1) institutional forces: socially accepted procedures for delivering care (access to quality care, availability of information, and delivery of care in a personal manner); and (2) technical forces: industry standards for cost control and efficient use of financial and medical resources. The most significant finding is that successful MCOs must conform to both institutional and technical forces to be successful. MCOs that conform to either one or the other type of standard were no more successful than those that conformed to neither. These findings have several important implications for MCO strategy. First, to be successful, MCO executives must understand the external environment in which they operate. They must anticipate and respond to shifts in that environment. Second, this understanding of the external environment must place equal emphasis on societal demands (e.g., for accessible care and information) and on technical demands (e.g., for cost-efficient care). These findings may well reflect that once managed care penetration reaches relatively high levels, marketshare can no longer be gained through cost-efficiency alone; rather, enrollee satisfaction based on societal demands becomes a key factor in maintaining and gaining marketshare. Institutional theory provides' some strategies for accomplishing these goals. Cost-containment strategies include implementing policies for cutting costs in areas that do not affect the quality of care, such as using generic drugs and reducing administrative excesses and redundancies. At the same time, MCOs must implement strategies aimed at improving conformity to prevailing societal perceptions of appropriate care, including providing patients more freedom to choose their physicians and

  17. Facilitators and barriers of implementing the chronic care model in primary care: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kadu, Mudathira K; Stolee, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is a framework developed to redesign care delivery for individuals living with chronic diseases in primary care. The CCM and its various components have been widely adopted and evaluated, however, little is known about different primary care experiences with its implementation, and the factors that influence its successful uptake. The purpose of this review is to synthesize findings of studies that implemented the CCM in primary care, in order to identi...

  18. Care production for tuberculosis cases:analysis according to the elements of the Chronic Care Model

    OpenAIRE

    Daiane Medeiros da Silva; Hérika Brito Gomes de Farias; Tereza Cristina Scatena Villa; Lenilde Duarte de Sá; Maria Eugênia Firmino Brunello; Jordana Almeida Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To analyze the care provided to tuberculosis cases in primary health care services according to the elements of the Chronic Care Model. METHOD: Cross-sectional study conducted in a capital city of the northeastern region of Brazil involving 83 Family Health Strategy professionals.A structured tool adapted to tuberculosis-related care in Brazil was applied.Analysis was based on the development of indicators with capacity to produce care varying between limited and optimum...

  19. Practical suicide-risk management for the busy primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Anna K; Lineberry, Timothy W; Bostwick, J Michael

    2011-08-01

    Suicide is a public health problem and a leading cause of death. The number of people thinking seriously about suicide, making plans, and attempting suicide is surprisingly high. In total, primary care clinicians write more prescriptions for antidepressants than mental health clinicians and see patients more often in the month before their death by suicide. Treatment of depression by primary care physicians is improving, but opportunities remain in addressing suicide-related treatment variables. Collaborative care models for treating depression have the potential both to improve depression outcomes and decrease suicide risk. Alcohol use disorders and anxiety symptoms are important comorbid conditions to identify and treat. Management of suicide risk includes understanding the difference between risk factors and warning signs, developing a suicide risk assessment, and practically managing suicidal crises. PMID:21709131

  20. Using Mobile Health to Support the Chronic Care Model: Developing an Institutional Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Shantanu Nundy; Jonathan J. Dick; Goddu, Anna P.; Patrick Hogan; Lu, Chen-Yuan E.; Solomon, Marla C; Arnell Bussie; Chin, Marshall H; Peek, Monica E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of successful health system implementation. Program Development. An iterative process of program design was built upon a pilot study and engaged multiple institutional stakeholders. Patients identified having a “human face” to the pilot...

  1. Interprofessional team management in pediatric critical care: some challenges and possible solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Martin; Pilgrim, Sina B; Burmester, Margarita; Allen, Meredith L; Gijselaers, Wim H

    2016-01-01

    Background Aiming for and ensuring effective patient safety is a major priority in the management and culture of every health care organization. The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) has become a workplace with a high diversity of multidisciplinary physicians and professionals. Therefore, delivery of high-quality care with optimal patient safety in a PICU is dependent on effective interprofessional team management. Nevertheless, ineffective interprofessional teamwork remains ubiquitous. Methods We based our review on the framework for interprofessional teamwork recently published in association with the UK Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education. Articles were selected to achieve better understanding and to include and translate new ideas and concepts. Findings The barrier between autonomous nurses and doctors in the PICU within their silos of specialization, the failure of shared mental models, a culture of disrespect, and the lack of empowering parents as team members preclude interprofessional team management and patient safety. A mindset of individual responsibility and accountability embedded in a network of equivalent partners, including the patient and their family members, is required to achieve optimal interprofessional care. Second, working competently as an interprofessional team is a learning process. Working declared as a learning process, psychological safety, and speaking up are pivotal factors to learning in daily practice. Finally, changes in small steps at the level of the microlevel unit are the bases to improve interprofessional team management and patient safety. Once small things with potential impact can be changed in one’s own unit, engagement of health care professionals occurs and projects become accepted. Conclusion Bottom–up patient safety initiatives encouraging participation of every single care provider by learning effective interprofessional team management within daily practice may be an effective way of

  2. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves. PMID:20200865

  3. A framework for the management of intellectual capital in the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, C E; Nichols, L D; Schonberner, M

    1997-01-01

    This article proposes a new theoretical model for the effective management of intellectual capital in the health care industry. The evolution of knowledge-based resources as a value-adding characteristic of service industries coupled with mounting environmental pressures on health care necessitates the extension of current models of intellectual capital. Our theoretical model contains an expanded context linking its development to organizational learning theory and extends current theory by proposing a six-term archetype of organizational functioning built on flows of information. Further, our proposal offers a hierarchical dimension to intellectual capital and a method of scientific visualization for the measurement of intellectual capital. In conclusion, we offer some practical suggestions for future development, both for researchers and managers. PMID:9089446

  4. An analysis of the usage of antibiotics in the private health care sector : a managed health care approach / Renier Coetzee

    OpenAIRE

    Coetzee, Renier

    2004-01-01

    The most frequent intervention performed by physicians is the writing of a prescription. Modern medicine has been remarkably effective in managing diseases. Medicines play a fundamental role in the effectiveness, efficiency and responsiveness of health care systems. However, health care expenditure is a great cause for concern and many nations around the world struggle to contain rising health care costs. Pharmaceutical benefit management programmes such as pharmacoeconomics, drug...

  5. Leadership models in health care - a case for servant leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastek, Victor F; Hamilton, Neil W; Niles, Emily E

    2014-03-01

    Our current health care system is broken and unsustainable. Patients desire the highest quality care, and it needs to cost less. To regain public trust, the health care system must change and adapt to the current needs of patients. The diverse group of stakeholders in the health care system creates challenges for improving the value of care. Health care providers are in the best position to determine effective ways of improving the value of care. To create change, health care providers must learn how to effectively lead patients, those within health care organizations, and other stakeholders. This article presents servant leadership as the best model for health care organizations because it focuses on the strength of the team, developing trust and serving the needs of patients. As servant leaders, health care providers may be best equipped to make changes in the organization and in the provider-patient relationship to improve the value of care for patients. PMID:24486078

  6. Care Utilization Patterns and Diabetes Self-Management Education Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tammie M; Richards, Jennifer; Churilla, James R

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Previous studies have shown that receiving diabetes self-management education (DSME) is associated with increased care utilization. However, the relationship between DSME duration and care utilization patterns remains largely unexamined. Our purpose is to characterize DSME duration and examine the relationship between DSME duration and clinical- and self-care utilization patterns. Methods. The study sample included 1,446 adults who were ≥18 years of age, had diabetes, and had participated in the 2008 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Clinical- and self-care outcomes were derived using responses to the survey's diabetes module and were based on minimum standards of care established by the American Diabetes Association. The outcomes examined included self-monitoring of blood glucose at least once per day; receiving at least one eye exam, one foot exam, A1C tests, and an influenza vaccination in the past year; and ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccination. DSME duration was categorized as no DSME, >0 to 10 hours. Results. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, compared to those who did not receive DSME, those who had 4-10 or 10+ hours of DSME were more likely to receive two A1C tests (odds ratio [95% CI] 2.69 [1.30-5.58] and 2.63 [1.10-6.31], respectively) and have a pneumococcal vaccination (1.98 [1.03-3.80] and 1.92 [1.01-3.64], respectively). Those receiving 10+ hours of DSME were 2.2 times (95% CI 1.18-4.09) as likely to have an influenza vaccination. Conclusion. These data reveal a positive relationship between DSME duration and utilization of some diabetes clinical care services. PMID:26300613

  7. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  8. Variation in the use of alternative levels of hospital care for newborns in a managed care organization.

    OpenAIRE

    Roblin, D. W.; Richardson, D K; Thomas, E; Fitzgerald, F; Veintimilla, R.; Hulac, P.; Bemis, G.; Leon, L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE(S): To assess the extent to which variation in the use of neonatal intensive care resources in a managed care organization is a consequence of variation in neonatal health risks and/or variation in the organization and delivery of medical care to newborns. STUDY DESIGN: Data were collected on a cohort of all births from four sites in Kaiser Permanente by retrospective medical chart abstraction of the birth admission. Likelihood of admission into a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)...

  9. Clinical research of a newer model of systematic management of child health care%儿童保健系统管理更新模式的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱华; 彭珉娟; 杨涛毅; 李桦; 陈先辉; 程建; 张希玲; 陈敏; 周霞

    2012-01-01

    [目的]探讨神经行为发育监测和早期教育及干预在儿童保健系统管理中的重要作用,为建立儿保更新模式提供依据. [方法]分别将同期出生的46名正常新生儿和46名高危儿随机分为新模式组和对照组,新模式组的正常儿和高危儿除常规模式儿保外,定期进行神经行为发育监测和早期教育及干预.对照组只做常规模式儿保.各组均在3、6月和1岁时用Gesell婴幼儿发育量表进行发育商(developmental quotient,DQ)的测评. [结果]1)3月、6月和1岁时,高危新模式组5个能区的DQ逐步提高,到1岁时明显高于高危对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);并已达到正常对照组水平.2)生后3月时,正常新模式组的DQ与正常对照组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);到6月和1岁,正常新模式组5个能区的DQ明显高于正常对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01). [结论]将神经行为发育监测和早期教育及干预纳入常规儿保中的更新模式,可以促进婴幼儿智能发育,利于儿童早期发展.%[Objectives] To investigate the important function of neurobehavioral developmental monitoring and early education and intervention within the systematic management of child health care, and to provide a basis for the establishment of a newer model of child health care. [Methods] Forty-six normal newborns and forty-six high-risk newborns, who were born in the same period, were randomly divided into a new model group and a control group. For the normal and high-risk newborns within the new model group, beside the conventional model of child health care, regular monitoring of neurobehavioral development and early education and intervention were also carried out. For the control group only the conventional model of child health care was carried out. For each group (equally) at 3,6 months,and 1 year,a development quotient (DQ) assessment was carried out using the Gesell's Infant Development Schedule. [Results] 1) At

  10. A personalized framework for medication treatment management in chronic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis G; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Malousi, Andigoni; Giaglis, Georgios D; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-03-01

    The ongoing efforts toward continuity of care and the recent advances in information and communication technologies have led to a number of successful personal health systems for the management of chronic care. These systems are mostly focused on monitoring efficiently the patient's medical status at home. This paper aims at extending home care services delivery by introducing a novel framework for monitoring the patient's condition and safety with respect to the medication treatment administered. For this purpose, considering a body area network (BAN) with advanced sensors and a mobile base unit as the central communication hub from the one side, and the clinical environment from the other side, an architecture was developed, offering monitoring patterns definition for the detection of possible adverse drug events and the assessment of medication response, supported by mechanisms enabling bidirectional communication between the BAN and the clinical site. Particular emphasis was given on communication and information flow aspects that have been addressed by defining/adopting appropriate formal information structures as well as the service-oriented architecture paradigm. The proposed framework is illustrated via an application scenario concerning hypertension management. PMID:20007042

  11. Charting the demand for pharmacists in the managed care era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, K K

    1999-07-01

    The demand for pharmacists in the changing health care market is discussed. The Pharmacy Manpower Project (PMP) evolved out of concerns raised in the late 1980s, when the demand for pharmacists exceeded the supply. PMP collects, analyzes, and disseminates data on pharmacy work force variables. PMP's Subcommittee to Study Demand Issues was formed after the publication in 1995 of the Pew Health Professions Commission report projecting dramatic surpluses of pharmacists. In 1996-97, the PMP subcommittee held a series of sessions to discuss the future demand for pharmacists and their services. The panel identified a wide range of work force projections, but it concluded that medication management problems in the context of increasing prescription numbers and the emergence of data-driven health care support a scenario of a steadily increasing demand for pharmacists and pharmaceutical services. The data did not show that higher penetration by managed care is associated with smaller pharmacy staffs or job loss in institutions. There is little reason to expect the dramatic downsizing of the pharmacy work force predicted by the third report of the Pew Commission. However, retaining pharmacy roles that are useful to the system and satisfying to pharmacists will require a continuation of current proactive measures by the profession. PMID:10683127

  12. Potential benefits of integrated COPD management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, A L; Chavannes, N H

    2010-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a major and progressive cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, resulting in an important financial and health burden in coming decades. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been proven to be the most effective treatment in all patients in whom respiratory symptoms are associated with diminished functional capacity or reduced quality of life. Nevertheless, despite wide recommendation and proven efficacy, the use of PR is limited in daily practice. Reasons for these include low accessibility and availability, high costs, and lack of motivation to continue a healthy life style after treatment. By contrast, it has been demonstrated that primary care patients can be reactivated by formulating personal targets and designing individualized treatment plans in collaboration with their general practitioner or practice nurse. Based on these personal plans and targets, specific education must be provided and development of self management skills should be actively encouraged. Ideally, elements of pulmonary rehabilitation are tailored into a comprehensive primary care integrated disease management program. In that way, the benefits of PR can be extended to a substantially larger part of the COPD population, to reach even those with milder stages of disease. Favorable long-term effects on exercise tolerance and quality of life in a number of studies have been demonstrated in recent years, but broad introduction in the primary care setting still needs further justification in the form of a proper cost effectiveness analysis. PMID:21214043

  13. Software Development Risk Management Model

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Shareeful

    2011-01-01

    Risk management is an effective tool to control risks in software projects and increases the likelihood of project success. Risk management needs to be integrated as early as possible in the project. This dissertation proposes a Goal-driven Software Development Risk Management Model (GSRM) and explicitly integrates it into requirements engineering phase. This integration provides an early warning of potential problems so that both preventive and corrective actions can be undertaken to avoid t...

  14. Management of health-care waste in Izmir, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Soysal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate health-care waste in the 18 districts of metropolitan municipality of the third biggest city in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 825 health institutions established in the 18 districts of Izmir metropolitan municipality, in 2007. The total amount of health-care waste collected was 4841 tons and 621 kilograms per patient's bed in 2007. Most of the medical wastes were collected from Konak, Karsiyaka and Bornova districts and were 2308, 272 and 1020 tons, respectively. Regarding to overpopulation, the number of health institutions in these districts are more than the number of health institutions in the other administrative districts. There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between the amount of health-care waste collected and population of the 18 districts (r = 0.79, p < 0.001, and number of beds/patients (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. To provide a safe health-care waste management metropolitan municipality must provide hazardous waste separation in health institutions, establish sterilization units for infectious waste, and provide the last storage of medical waste in completely different, safe and special areas apart from the municipal waste storage areas.

  15. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  16. Revenue cycle optimization in health care institutions. A conceptual framework for change management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugdh, Mrinal; Pilla, Satya

    2012-01-01

    Health care providers in the United States are constantly faced with the enormous challenge of optimizing their revenue cycle to improve their overall financial performance. These challenges keep evolving in both scope and complexity owing to a host of internal and external factors. Furthermore, given the lack of control that health care providers have over external factors, any attempt to successfully optimize the revenue cycle hinges on several critical improvements aimed at realigning the internal factors. This study provides an integrated change management model that aims to reengineer and realign the people-process-technology framework by using the principles of lean and Six Sigma for revenue cycle optimization. PMID:22282001

  17. Opinions of disease management programs among medical directors of managed care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algozzine, T; Pannone, R; Kozma, C M

    1998-05-15

    Medical directors of managed care organizations (MCOs) were surveyed about their views on disease management programs in their facilities. A survey was mailed to 600 MCO medical directors. The survey consisted of 14 Likert-type items related to disease management programs, 4 demographic items, and 1 item related to satisfaction. Seventy-nine usable surveys were received, for a net response rate of 14%. There were 48 medical directors (61%) with disease management programs at their MCO; 25 (52%) were working independently. A majority (71%) of programs were targeted at asthma. Seventy percent of the 48 medical directors were completely to somewhat satisfied and 13% dissatisfied to some extent with their disease management programs. Satisfaction was significantly related to the MCO's partnerships for these programs. A majority of medical directors agreed or strongly agreed that disease management programs could improve outcomes and decrease health care costs at their MCO, that an independent consultant could help analyze their MCO's prescription and medical data, and that they would be willing to accept grants or funds from pharmaceutical companies to initiate and support an independent disease management program at their MCO. MCO medical directors who responded to a national survey indicated that their organization could benefit from disease management programs, that internal resources might be insufficient to manage these programs, and that their MCO might be willing to contract with external organizations for support. PMID:9606454

  18. Part 2, Conflict management. Managing low-to-mid intensity conflict in the health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrener, C A; Siders, C T

    1999-01-01

    Physician executives face low to mid-level intensity conflicts, day-to-day issues and problems associated with pressures and changes in the health care environment. Such conflicts can be sorted on the basis of relationship, duration, and intensity. The authors apply the five major modes of conflict management--competition, avoidance, compromise, accommodation, and collaboration--to specific scenarios taken from their work in health care and suggest guidelines for managing conflicts with peers, supervisees, and authority figures. Thorough preparation and a portfolio of skills build flexibility through the conflict management process. In part 1 of this article series, the authors presented the conflict management checklist, a diagnostic tool for assessing conflict in organizations. PMID:10558283

  19. Overcoming barriers in care for the dying: Theoretical analysis of an innovative program model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cara L

    2016-08-01

    This article explores barriers to end-of-life (EOL) care (including development of a death denying culture, ongoing perceptions about EOL care, poor communication, delayed access, and benefit restrictions) through the theoretical lens of symbolic interactionism (SI), and applies general systems theory (GST) to a promising practice model appropriate for addressing these barriers. The Compassionate Care program is a practice model designed to bridge gaps in care for the dying and is one example of a program offering concurrent care, a recent focus of evaluation though the Affordable Care Act. Concurrent care involves offering curative care alongside palliative or hospice care. Additionally, the program offers comprehensive case management and online resources to enrollees in a national health plan (Spettell et al., 2009).SI and GST are compatible and interrelated theories that provide a relevant picture of barriers to end-of-life care and a practice model that might evoke change among multiple levels of systems. These theories promote insight into current challenges in EOL care, as well as point to areas of needed research and interventions to address them. The article concludes with implications for policy and practice, and discusses the important role of social work in impacting change within EOL care. PMID:27332743

  20. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Saiful Ridhwan; Ishaq Oyebisi Oyefolahan

    2014-01-01

    The importance of managing medical information has become very critical in the healthcare delivery system. Medical information nowadays are optimized towards serving different areas such as; diagnosing of diseases, planning and administration, treatment and monitoring of patient outcomes, services and costs. This article provides a review into various Health and Social Care systems which encompasses the Knowledge Management value. For analysis, more than 30 systems that are related to Health ...

  1. Physicians in health care management: 2. Managing performance: who, what, how and when?

    OpenAIRE

    Lemieux-Charles, L

    1994-01-01

    Physicians are becoming more involved in performance management as hospitals restructure to increase effectiveness. Although physicians are not hospital employees, they are subject to performance appraisals because the hospitals are accountable to patients and the community for the quality of hospital services. The performance of a health care professional may be appraised by the appropriate departmental manager, by other professionals in a team or program or by peers, based on prior agreemen...

  2. Using Mobile Health to Support the Chronic Care Model: Developing an Institutional Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Nundy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of successful health system implementation. Program Development. An iterative process of program design was built upon a pilot study and engaged multiple institutional stakeholders. Patients identified having a “human face” to the pilot program as essential. Stakeholders recognized the need to integrate the program with primary and specialty care but voiced concerns about competing demands on clinician time. Program Description. Nurse administrators at a university-affiliated health plan use automated text messaging to provide personalized self-management support for member patients with diabetes and facilitate care coordination with the primary care team. For example, when a patient texts a request to meet with a dietitian, a nurse-administrator coordinates with the primary care team to provide a referral. Conclusion. Our innovative program enables the existing health system to support a de novo care management program by leveraging mobile technology. The program supports self-management and team-based care in a way that we believe engages patients yet meets the limited availability of providers and needs of health plan administrators.

  3. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. PMID:26979353

  4. Economic credentialing moves from the hospital to managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J D

    1995-01-01

    This article deals with the application of economic measures to the appointment, reappointment, and delineation of medical staff privileges, the so-called practice of economic credentialing. The concept of economic credentialing is first explored in the hospital context with a focus on legal and political issues. The second part of the article examines how economic credentialing will evolve in new managed care practice settings. Emphasis is placed on how the law and legislation will be utilized by organized medicine to protect physician interests in the process of selective contracting. Specific discussion focuses on the American Medical Association's Patient Protection Act and the implications of "any willing provider" provisions. PMID:8528826

  5. Explanatory model for nursing and care 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Jedid-Jah Jonker; Klarita Sadiraj; Isolde Woittiez; Michiel Ras; Meike Morren

    2007-01-01

    Original title: Verklaringsmodel verpleging en verzorging 2007. Population ageing means the demand for and take-up of care is likely to increase sharply in the coming years. Older people make particularly heavy use of home care, nursing homes and care homes, collectively referred to as 'nursing and care'. The Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport is therefore interested in the likely trend in nursing and care in the coming decades. This study presents forecasts of the demand for and tak...

  6. Trying to understand management models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonker, Jan; van Pijkeren, Michel; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    2009-01-01

    In the previous chapters a number of management models have been presented. What ties them together is the fact that companies have created them in order to address present and future organisational challenges. We have chosen to show them as they are, with as much as possible respect to differences...... models have in common but also how they can be distinguished from each other. Our aim of this exploration is to grasp the more fundamental, conceptual and theoretical aspects of management models. This exploration is guided by a number of questions. How can management models be classified and categorised...... in cultural, contextual and linguistic backgrounds. Now that this volume comes to a close, this final chapter will be used to shed some light on the nature of the models presented previously. We therefore set out to explore their character and functionality, thus enabling to identify what these...

  7. Pembangunan Model Restaurant Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy Jingga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Model design for Restaurant Management System aims to help in restaurant business process, where Restaurant Management System (RMS help the waitress and chef could interact each other without paper limitation. This Restaurant Management System Model develop using Agile Methodology and developed based on PHP Programming Langguage. The database management system is using MySQL. This web-based application model will enable the waitress and the chef to interact in realtime, from the time they accept the customer order until the chef could know what to cook and checklist for the waitress wheter the order is fullfill or not, until the cahsier that will calculate the bill and the payment that they accep from the customer.

  8. Models for Primary Eye Care Services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhra Misra

    2015-01-01

    In the current situation, an integrated health care system with primary eye care promoted by government of India is apparently the best answer. This model is both cost effective and practical for the prevention and control of blindness among the underprivileged population. Other models functioning with the newer technology of tele-ophthalmology or mobile clinics also add to the positive outcome in providing primary eye care services. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various models presently functioning in the country with the idea of providing useful inputs for eye care providers and enabling them to identify and adopt an appropriate model for primary eye care services.

  9. Model of Independency Mother in Caring for Preterm Infant Based on Experiential Learning Care (ELC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudah, Noer; Nursalam; Meriana; Sulistyono, Agus

    2015-01-01

    The role of parents has done less during the preterm infant care in hospitals caused dependence in caring for the baby. The objective of the research was to development a model of independence of the mother in the care of preterm infants with experiential learning approach based theory of goal attainment. Research's design used analytic…

  10. [Role of the community pharmacist in the management of drug related problems in home care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Putte, M; Appels, S; Boone, T; Collienne, S; Daems, T; De Lepeleire, J; Foulon, V

    2012-09-01

    Medication management in home care is an error prone process. In a small pilot project in Flanders, community pharmacists collaborated with physicians and home care nurses through a shared electronic care plan, to optimize the medication management of their home care patients. The pilot project shows that GPs and nurses are positive about the possible contribution of the pharmacist in medication management of home care patients. A larger follow up study is necessary to further identify possible roles of pharmacists in home care and to show related health benefits. PMID:23697093

  11. A mobile phone-based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: the care assessment platform (CAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer effective means to prevent recurrence of a cardiac event, but poor uptake of current programs have been reported globally. Home based models are considered as a feasible alternative to avoid various barriers related to care centre based programs. This paper sets out the study design for a clinical trial seeking to test the hypothesis that these programs can be better and more efficiently supported with novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Methods/Design We have integrated mobile phones and web services into a comprehensive home- based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Mobile phones with a built-in accelerometer sensor are used to measure physical exercise and WellnessDiary software is used to collect information on patients' physiological risk factors and other health information. Video and teleconferencing are used for mentoring sessions aiming at behavioural modifications through goal setting. The mentors use web-portal to facilitate personal goal setting and to assess the progress of each patient in the program. Educational multimedia content are stored or transferred via messaging systems to the patients phone to be viewed on demand. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to compare the health outcomes and cost efficiency of the proposed model with a traditional community based rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure is adherence to physical exercise guidelines. Discussion The study will provide evidence on using mobile phones and web services for mentoring and self management in a home-based care model targeting sustainable behavioural modifications in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR with number ACTRN12609000251224.

  12. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Allison

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Results Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1 organisational influence – strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2 community linkages – facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week", but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3 self management – promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4 decision support – facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5 delivery system

  13. A better model for care — virtual care coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, Chris; Medd, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Telehealth is a proven tool for reducing costs, improving quality of life, reducing hospital visits/length of stay and enhancing relationships between patients and community nurses. There have been many trials demonstrating these benefits, and findings have always demonstrated return on investment. However, uptake has been slow—68% of providers have no plans to roll out a telehealth solution in the next 24 months. Through a decade of ethnographic research, Care Innovations has visited 20 coun...

  14. The implementation of integrated care: the empirical validation of the Development Model for Integrated Care

    OpenAIRE

    Ahaus Kees TB; Vermeulen Robbert P; Minkman Mirella MN; Huijsman Robbert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Integrated care is considered as a strategy to improve the delivery, efficiency, client outcomes and satisfaction rates of health care. To integrate the care from multiple providers into a coherent client-focused service, a large number of activities and agreements have to be implemented like streamlining information flows and patient transfers. The Development Model for Integrated care (DMIC) describes nine clusters containing in total 89 elements that contribute to the i...

  15. Models for managing wildlife disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCALLUM, Hamish

    2016-06-01

    Modelling wildlife disease poses some unique challenges. Wildlife disease systems are data poor in comparison with human or livestock disease systems, and the impact of disease on population size is often the key question of interest. This review concentrates specifically on the application of dynamic models to evaluate and guide management strategies. Models have proved useful particularly in two areas. They have been widely used to evaluate vaccination strategies, both for protecting endangered species and for preventing spillover from wildlife to humans or livestock. They have also been extensively used to evaluate culling strategies, again both for diseases in species of conservation interest and to prevent spillover. In addition, models are important to evaluate the potential of parasites and pathogens as biological control agents. The review concludes by identifying some key research gaps, which are further development of models of macroparasites, deciding on appropriate levels of complexity, modelling genetic management and connecting models to data. PMID:26283059

  16. A comparative study of total quality management of health care system in India and Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari Gorji Ali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total quality management (TQM has a great potential to address quality problems in a wide range of industries and improve the organizational performance. The growing need to take initiatives by hospitals in countries like India and Iran to improve the service quality and reduce wastage of resources has inspired the authors to develop a survey instrument to measure health care quality and performance in the two countries. Methods Based on the Baldrige health care criteria for performance excellence 2009-2010 and the guidelines proposed by the American Hospitals Association for hospitals in pursuit of excellence, compared health care services in three countries. The data are collected from the capital cities and their nearby places in India and Iran. Using ANOVAs, three groups in quality planning and performance have been compared. Result Results showed there is significantly difference between groups and in no case the hospitals from India and Iran are found scoring close to the benchmarks. The average scores of Indian and Iranian hospitals on different constructs of the IHCQPM model are compared with the major results achieved by the recipients of the MBNQ award. Conclusion In no case the hospitals from India and Iran are found scoring close to the benchmarks (Baldrige health care criteria for performance excellence 2009-2010 and the guidelines proposed by the American Hospitals Association for hospitals. These results suggested to health care services more attempt to achieve high quality in management and performance.

  17. Efficiency and functionality of an internal purchaser-provider model in public specialized health care services

    OpenAIRE

    Iso-Mustajärvi, Anni

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand to find solutions for improving cost-efficiency in health care. The demand for services continues to increase and there is a need to control the increasing resource requirements. Market-oriented organization models and management methods have been seen as one way to address the challenge and as an alternative to traditional hierarchical organization models in health care. Researchers highlight the importance of investigating how different kinds of changes actuall...

  18. Implementation of a Diabetes Educator Care Model to Reduce Paediatric Admission for Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Asma Deeb; Hana Yousef; Layla Abdelrahman; Mary Tomy; Shaker Suliman; Salima Attia; Hana Al Suwaidi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication that can be life-threatening. Management of DKA needs admission in a specialized center and imposes major constraints on hospital resources. Aim. We plan to study the impact of adapting a diabetes-educator care model on reducing the frequency of hospital admission of children and adolescents presenting with DKA. Method. We have proposed a model of care led by diabetes educators for children and adolescents with diabetes. The ...

  19. Using key performance indicators as knowledge-management tools at a regional health-care authority level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berler, Alexander; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2005-06-01

    The advantages of the introduction of information and communication technologies in the complex health-care sector are already well-known and well-stated in the past. It is, nevertheless, paradoxical that although the medical community has embraced with satisfaction most of the technological discoveries allowing the improvement in patient care, this has not happened when talking about health-care informatics. Taking the above issue of concern, our work proposes an information model for knowledge management (KM) based upon the use of key performance indicators (KPIs) in health-care systems. Based upon the use of the balanced scorecard (BSC) framework (Kaplan/Norton) and quality assurance techniques in health care (Donabedian), this paper is proposing a patient journey centered approach that drives information flow at all levels of the day-to-day process of delivering effective and managed care, toward information assessment and knowledge discovery. In order to persuade health-care decision-makers to assess the added value of KM tools, those should be used to propose new performance measurement and performance management techniques at all levels of a health-care system. The proposed KPIs are forming a complete set of metrics that enable the performance management of a regional health-care system. In addition, the performance framework established is technically applied by the use of state-of-the-art KM tools such as data warehouses and business intelligence information systems. In that sense, the proposed infrastructure is, technologically speaking, an important KM tool that enables knowledge sharing amongst various health-care stakeholders and between different health-care groups. The use of BSC is an enabling framework toward a KM strategy in health care. PMID:16138535

  20. A systematic review of different models of home and community care services for older persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodaty Henry

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Costs and consumer preference have led to a shift from the long-term institutional care of aged older people to home and community based care. The aim of this review is to evaluate the outcomes of case managed, integrated or consumer directed home and community care services for older persons, including those with dementia. Methods A systematic review was conducted of non-medical home and community care services for frail older persons. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AgeLine, Scopus and PubMed were searched from 1994 to May 2009. Two researchers independently reviewed search results. Results Thirty five papers were included in this review. Evidence from randomized controlled trials showed that case management improves function and appropriate use of medications, increases use of community services and reduces nursing home admission. Evidence, mostly from non-randomized trials, showed that integrated care increases service use; randomized trials reported that integrated care does not improve clinical outcomes. The lowest quality evidence was for consumer directed care which appears to increase satisfaction with care and community service use but has little effect on clinical outcomes. Studies were heterogeneous in methodology and results were not consistent. Conclusions The outcomes of each model of care differ and correspond to the model's focus. Combining key elements of all three models may maximize outcomes.

  1. Architecture for a Federated Drug Reference in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchell, D S; Ibrahim, K N; Murri, N A; Wareham, P S; Bell, D M; Jankowski, T A

    1996-01-01

    We describe a model of drug information query management that supports the integration of various types of pharmaceutical information and the delivery of that information through a common interface. Our prototype drug reference system makes use of the World Wide Web client/server architecture as a front-end to federate this data. Although originally intended as an electronic Hospital Formulary, the system has been redefined as a result of input from physicians to include formularies of multiple managed care plans. The underlying database is designed for integration with an electronic medical record as well as education and research resources for faculty and students in an academic medical center environment. PMID:8947699

  2. Caring as Career: An Alternative Model for Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Catherine; And Others

    This paper identifies four models of educational administration--the rational, mechanistic, organic, and bargaining models--and argues that a fifth model of leadership--a caring model--is needed. The ethic of caring (Nodding, 1986) is reciprocal, natural, and ethical and emphasizes connection, responsibilities, and relationships. Creating a model…

  3. Marketing depression care management to employers: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Donna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized trials demonstrate that depression care management can improve clinical and work outcomes sufficiently for selected employers to realize a return on investment. Employers can now purchase depression products that provide depression care management, defined as employee screening, education, monitoring, and clinician feedback for all depressed employees. We developed an intervention to encourage employers to purchase a depression product that offers the type, intensity, and duration of care management shown to improve clinical and work outcomes. Methods In a randomized controlled trial conducted with 360 employers of 30 regional business coalitions, the research team proposes to compare the impact of a value-based marketing intervention to usual-care marketing on employer purchase of depression products. The study will also identify mediators and organizational-level moderators of intervention impact. Employers randomized to the value-based condition receive a presentation encouraging them to purchase depression products scientifically shown to benefit the employee and the employer. Employers randomized to the usual-care condition receive a presentation encouraging them to monitor and improve quality indicators for outpatient depression treatment. Because previous research demonstrates that the usual-care intervention will have little to no impact on employer purchasing, depression product purchasing rates in the usual-care condition capture vendor efforts to market depression products to employers in both conditions while the value-based intervention is being conducted. Employers in both conditions are also provided free technical assistance to undertake the actions each presentation encourages. The research team will use intent-to-treat models of all available data to evaluate intervention impact on the purchase of depression products using a cumulative incidence analysis of 12- and 24-month data. Discussion By

  4. Assessment of quality of care in acute postoperative pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutinović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Managing of acute postoperative pain should be of great interest for all hospital institutions, as one of the key components of patients satisfaction, which indicates quality, as well as the outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of nursing care in managing acute postoperative pain and to establish factors which influence patients assessment of the same. Method. The investigation was conducted on the sample of 135 patients hospitalized in surgical clinics of the Clinical Centre of Vojvodina in Novi Sad in the form of cross-sectional study, by interviewing patients during the second postoperative day and collecting sociodemographic variables, type of surgical procedure and applied analgesic therapy which were taken from their medical documentation. The modified questionnaire of the Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP was used as the instrument of the investigation. The data were processed with suitable mathematical statistics methods such as multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA, discriminative and other parametric procedures and methods. Roy's test, Pearson's coefficient contingency (χ, multiple correlation coefficient (R were conducted amongst other invariant procedures. Results. The mean score for the individual items of SCQIPP questionnaire was between 2.0 and 4.7 (scale range 1-5 and the percentage of patients answers 'strongly agree' ranged from 4.4 to 77%. The smallest number of positive answers were given by the patients for the item 'In order to assess pain intensity, some of the staff asked me at least once in the morning, in the afternoon and in the evening to show the number from 0-10'. Most of the patients (57% evaluated severe pain during the previous 24 hours, as moderate pain, which represents significantly greater number of patients which complain of severe pain and mild pain (p < 0.001. The analysis of patients evaluation (MANOVA p

  5. Management models for the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonker, Jan; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    2007-01-01

    In the last decades a growing number of generic management models (e.g. EFQM, INK, ISO 9000:2000) has emerged. All these models are based on the ambition to stipulate the road to conventional and contemporary forms of organizational excellence. Some of the models aim to do so with regard to one...... aspect of the company's operations such as processes; others are based on a holistic view of the organisation. This paper is based on a book project (2006-2007) entitled "Management Models for the Future" (Springer Verlag, Heidelberg - Germany) aiming to harvest twelve new company-based models from...... around the globe. Each of these models is described in a structured company-based story thus creating the backbone for the book at hand. The aim is to analyse these different kinds of institutional frameworks of excellence and discuss their nature, content and enactability. The result is a rich and...

  6. Physician anger: Leggo dem managed care blues--leadership beyond the era of managed cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirz, H L

    1999-01-01

    While managed care has caused great disruption, it has also provided physician executives with a natural leadership raison d'être. Managed care, with all its pros and cons, is largely a response to certain unrelenting trends. The core functions of leaders comprise the stewardship of organizations and colleagues in response to these trends. Four trends are explored: (1) The demise of open-ended funding of American health care; (2) continued competition for health care resources; (3) thriving pluralism; and (4) patients continually adjusting to assure themselves of appropriate health care access, quality, and service. In the 21st century, the industry will need a new brand of leader, one capable of balancing the needs of the professionals with the business and accountability requirements of a permanently competitive and resource-constrained service industry. The keys to successful leadership in the future include: (1) Clear service differentiation and a compelling vision to match it; (2) recruiting and retaining top clinical talent, including the required return to physician self-direction and governance; (3) successful partnerships with others outside your organization; and (4) a steady focus on performance in all its dimensions. PMID:10351726

  7. Effectiveness of Case Management for 'At Risk' Patients in Primary Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Stokes

    Full Text Available An ageing population with multimorbidity is putting pressure on health systems. A popular method of managing this pressure is identification of patients in primary care 'at-risk' of hospitalisation, and delivering case management to improve outcomes and avoid admissions. However, the effectiveness of this model has not been subjected to rigorous quantitative synthesis.We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of case management for 'at-risk' patients in primary care. Six bibliographic databases were searched using terms for 'case management', 'primary care', and a methodology filter (Cochrane EPOC group. Effectiveness compared to usual care was measured across a number of relevant outcomes: Health--self-assessed health status, mortality; Cost--total cost of care, healthcare utilisation (primary and non-specialist care and secondary care separately, and; Satisfaction--patient satisfaction. We conducted secondary subgroup analyses to assess whether effectiveness was moderated by the particular model of case management, context, and study design. A total of 15,327 titles and abstracts were screened, 36 unique studies were included. Meta-analyses showed no significant differences in total cost, mortality, utilisation of primary or secondary care. A very small significant effect favouring case management was found for self-reported health status in the short-term (0.07, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.14. A small significant effect favouring case management was found for patient satisfaction in the short- (0.26, 0.16 to 0.36 and long-term (0.35, 0.04 to 0.66. Secondary subgroup analyses suggested the effectiveness of case management may be increased when delivered by a multidisciplinary team, when a social worker was involved, and when delivered in a setting rated as low in initial 'strength' of primary care.This was the first meta-analytic review which examined the effects of case management on a wide range of outcomes and

  8. Patients in a depression collaborative care model of care: comparison of 6-month cost utilization data with usual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstman, Kurt B; Williams, Mark D

    2010-04-01

    A collaborative care model (CCM) has been implemented for management of depression. This paper studies the impact that the CCM had on cost measures for the period of six months after initial diagnosis of depression compared to patients receiving usual care (UC). There was a significant increase in the CPT costs for the six months following diagnosis in the CCM group ($451.35 vs. $323.50, P < 0.001). The average CPT cost rank and CPT cost differential were also significantly increased in the CCM group. The adjusted means of the CPT costs were (when controlling for prior utilization) $452.11 for the CCM group and $322.09 for UC (P < 0.001). In the CCM group; there were 161 patients (73.5%) that achieved a clinical response for their depression compared to the UC group, which had a 15.1% (18/119) response rate (P < 0.001). There also was a significant difference between the groups in those who were symptoms free of their depression (PHQ-9 score < 5), with the CCM having 59.4% of the patients symptom-free compared to 10.9% of the UC group (P < 0.001). In this group of patients, CCM is associated with markedly improved clinical outcomes for depression, however with a modest short-term increase in CPT costs. PMID:23804062

  9. Diabetes management patterns in a palliative care unit in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ayed Alshammary

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Diabetes management varied among PCU patients. There is a real need for evidence-based guidelines for diabetes management among patients at the end of life. These guidelines should be tailored to patients' individual preferences in goals of care. Advance care planning should include discussion about patient preferences for management of diabetes at the end of life.

  10. Causal Models for Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neysis Hernández Díaz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work a study about the process of risk management in major schools in the world. The project management tools worldwide highlights the need to redefine risk management processes. From the information obtained it is proposed the use of causal models for risk analysis based on information from the project or company, say risks and the influence thereof on the costs, human capital and project requirements and detect the damages of a number of tasks without tribute to the development of the project. A study on the use of causal models as knowledge representation techniques causal, among which are the Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (DCM and Bayesian networks, with the most favorable MCD technique to use because it allows modeling the risk information witho ut having a knowledge base either itemize.

  11. A New Vision Of Management: Full Potential Management Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yuka Fujimoto; Charmine E.J. Hartel

    2010-01-01

    This paper establishes the Full Potential Management (FPM) Model based upon the social model of disabilities coupled with principles of diversity management and disability-oriented human resource management. Despite the fact that the concept of management was once envisioned as having ‘value to society’ by improving the quality of life through efficient practices (Rimler, 1976), management literature has narrowly defined management as a means to gain increased productivity and ach...

  12. Surveying Consumer Satisfaction to Assess Managed-Care Quality: Current Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Marsha; Wooldridge, Judith

    1995-01-01

    Growing interest in using consumer satisfaction information to enhance quality of care and promote informed consumer choice has accompanied recent expansions in managed care. This article synthesizes information about consumer satisfaction surveys conducted by managed-care plans, government and other agencies, community groups, and purchasers of care. We discuss survey content, methods, and use of consumer survey information. Differences in the use of consumer surveys preclude one instrument ...

  13. Product Knowledge Modelling and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.; MacCallum, K. J.; Duffy, Alex

    1996-01-01

    function-oriented design. Both Specific Product Knowledge and Product Domain Knowledge are modelled at two levels, a meta-model and an information-level.Following that, a computer-based scheme to manage the proposed product lknowledge models within a dynamically changing environment is presented.......The term, Product Knowledge is used to refer to two related but distinct concepts; the knowledge of a specific product (Specific Product Knowledge) and the knowledge of a product domain (Product Domain Knowledge). Modelling and managing Product Knowlege is an essential part of carrying out design.......A scheme is presented in this paper to model, i.e. classify, structure and formalise the product knowledge for the purpose of supporting function-oriented design. The product design specification and four types of required attributes of a specific product have been identified to form the Specific Product...

  14. Ecological model of disaster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Randal; Bridges, Elizabeth; Salazar, Mary K; Oberle, Mark W; Stergachis, Andy; Thompson, Jack; Butterfield, Patricia

    2008-11-01

    The ecological model of disaster management provides a framework to guide occupational health nurses who are developing disaster management programs.This ecological model assumes that disaster planning, preparedness, response, and recovery occur at various levels of the organization. These nested, increasingly complex organizational levels include individual and family, workplace, community, state, tribal, federal, and global levels. The ecological model hypothesizes that these levels interact and these dynamic interactions determine disaster planning, preparedness, response, and recovery outcomes. In addition to the features of the hazard or disaster, it is also assumed that parallel disaster planning, preparedness, and response elements, logistical challenges, and flexibility, sustainability, and rehabilitation elements occur at each level of the ecological model. Finally, the model assumes that evaluation of response and recovery efforts should inform future planning and preparedness efforts. PMID:19051571

  15. Accelerating a Network Model of Care: Taking a Social Innovation to Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Byrne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Government-funded systems of health and social care are facing enormous fiscal and human-resource challenges. The space for innovation in care is wide open and new disruptive patterns are emerging. These include self-management and personal budgets, participatory and integrated care, supported decision making and a renewed focus on prevention. Taking these disruptive patterns to scale can be accelerated by a technologically enabled shift to a network model of care to co-create the best outcomes for individuals, family caregivers, and health and social care organizations. The connections, relationships, and activities within an individual’s personal network lay the foundation for care that health and social care systems/policy must simultaneously support and draw on for positive outcomes. Practical tools, adequate information, and tangible resources are required to coordinate and sustain care. Tyze Personal Networks is a social venture that uses technology to engage and inform the individual, their personal networks, and their care providers to co-create the best outcomes. In this article, we demonstrate how Tyze contributes to a shift to a network model of care by strengthening our networks and enhancing partnerships between care providers, individuals, and family and friends.

  16. mHealth self-care interventions: managing symptoms following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Rampertaap, Kavita; El-Shammaa, Nardin; Hiotis, Karen; Scagliola, Joan; Yu, Gary; Wang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background Many women suffer from daily distressing symptoms related to lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Lymphedema, an abnormal accumulation of lymph fluid in the ipsilateral body area or upper limb, remains an ongoing major health problem affecting more than 40% of 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Patient-centered care related to lymphedema symptom management is often inadequately addressed in clinical research and practice. mHealth plays a significant role in improving self-care, patient-clinician communication, and access to health information. The-Optimal-Lymph-Flow health IT system (TOLF) is a patient-centered, web-and-mobile-based educational and behavioral mHealth interventions focusing on safe, innovative, and pragmatic electronic assessment and self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and test of TOLF system. Methods The development of TOLF was guided by the Model of Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management and designed based on principles fostering accessibility, convenience, and efficiency of mHealth system to enhance training and motivating assessment of and self-care for lymphedema symptoms. Test of TOLF was accomplished by conducting a psychometric study to evaluate reliability, validity, and efficiency of the electronic version of Breast Cancer and Lymphedema Symptom Experience Index (BCLE-SEI), a usability testing and a pilot feasibility testing of mHealth self-care interventions. Results Findings from the psychometric study with 355 breast cancer survivors demonstrated high internal consistency of the electronic version of the instrument: a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.959 for the total scale, 0.919 for symptom occurrence, and 0.946 for symptom distress. Discriminant validity of the instrument was supported by a significant difference in symptom occurrence (z=−6.938, Psignificantly positive effects on less pain (P=0.031), less

  17. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context

    OpenAIRE

    Soriano Mark A; Howard John M; Orchard Carole; Kabene Stefane M; Leduc Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. Methods We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. Results Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management. This paper will reveal how human resources management is esse...

  18. The 5As team intervention: bridging the knowledge gap in obesity management among primary care practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunleye, Ayodele; Osunlana, Adedayo; Asselin, Jodie; Cave, Andrew; Sharma, Arya Mitra; Campbell-Scherer, Denise Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite opportunities for didactic education on obesity management, we still observe low rates of weight management visits in our primary care setting. This paper describes the co-creation by front-line interdisciplinary health care providers and researchers of the 5As Team intervention to improve obesity prevention and management in primary care. Methods We describe the theoretical foundations, design, and core elements of the 5AsT intervention, and the process of eliciting practi...

  19. Development of the competency scale for primary care managers in Thailand: Scale development

    OpenAIRE

    Kitreerawutiwong, Keerati; Sriruecha, Chanaphol; Laohasiriwong, Wongsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of the primary care system requires a competent manager to achieve high-quality healthcare. The existing literature in the field yields little evidence of the tools to assess the competency of primary care administrators. This study aimed to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the competency scale for primary care managers in Thailand. Methods The scale was developed using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions among policy makers, managers, p...

  20. First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Seiger-Cronfalk, Berit; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Sandberg, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers' views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sw...

  1. Lessons from the business sector for successful knowledge management in health care: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sibbald Shannon; Hastie Robyn; Hovanec Nina; Kothari Anita

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The concept of knowledge management has been prevalent in the business sector for decades. Only recently has knowledge management been receiving attention by the health care sector, in part due to the ever growing amount of information that health care practitioners must handle. It has become essential to develop a way to manage the information coming in to and going out of a health care organization. The purpose of this paper was to summarize previous studies from the bus...

  2. Getting better at chronic care in remote communities: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled of community based management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Barbara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence and incidence of diabetes and other common comorbid conditions (hypertension, coronary heart disease, renal disease and chronic lung disease are extremely high among Indigenous Australians. Recent measures to improve quality of preventive care in Indigenous community settings, while apparently successful at increasing screening and routine check-up rates, have shown only modest or little improvements in appropriate care such as the introduction of insulin and other scaled-up drug regimens in line with evidence-based guidelines, together with support for risk factor reduction. A new strategy is required to ensure high quality integrated family-centred care is available locally, with continuity and cultural safety, by community-based care coordinators with appropriate system supports. Methods/design The trial design is open parallel cluster randomised controlled trial. The objective of this pragmatic trial is to test the effectiveness of a model of health service delivery that facilitates integrated community-based, intensive chronic condition management, compared with usual care, in rural and remote Indigenous primary health care services in north Queensland. Participants are Indigenous adults (aged 18–65 years with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c>=8.5 and at least one other chronic condition. The intervention is to employ an Indigenous Health Worker to case manage the care of a maximum caseload of 30 participants. The Indigenous Health Workers receive intensive clinical training initially, and throughout the study, to ensure they are competent to coordinate care for people with chronic conditions. The Indigenous Health Workers, supported by the local primary health care (PHC team and an Indigenous Clinical Support Team, will manage care, including coordinating access to multidisciplinary team care based on best practice standards. Allocation by cluster to the intervention and control groups is by simple

  3. ANALYSIS MODEL FOR INVENTORY MANAGEMENT

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    CAMELIA BURJA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The inventory represents an essential component for the assets of the enterprise and the economic analysis gives them special importance because their accurate management determines the achievement of the activity object and the financial results. The efficient management of inventory requires ensuring an optimum level for them, which will guarantee the normal functioning of the activity with minimum inventory expenses and funds which are immobilised. The paper presents an analysis model for inventory management based on their rotation speed and the correlation with the sales volume illustrated in an adequate study. The highlighting of the influence factors on the efficient inventory management ensures the useful information needed to justify managerial decisions, which will lead to a balancedfinancial position and to increased company performance.

  4. [Risk management in anesthesia and critical care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisold, C; Heller, A R

    2016-06-01

    Throughout its history, anesthesia and critical care medicine has experienced vast improvements to increase patient safety. Consequently, anesthesia has never been performed on such a high level as it is being performed today. As a result, we do not always fully perceive the risks involved in our daily activity. A survey performed in Swiss hospitals identified a total of 169 hot spots which endanger patient safety. It turned out that there is a complex variety of possible errors that can only be tackled through consistent implementation of a safety culture. The key elements to reduce complications are continuing staff education, algorithms and standard operating procedures (SOP), working according to the principles of crisis resource management (CRM) and last but not least the continuous work-up of mistakes identified by critical incident reporting systems. PMID:27273109

  5. Primary Care Providers’ experiences with Pharmaceutical Care-based Medication Therapy Management Services

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    Heather L. Maracle, Pharm.D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored primary care providers’ (PCPs experiences with the practice of pharmaceutical care-based medication therapy management (MTM. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six PCPs who have experiences working with MTM pharmacists for at least three years. The first author conducted the interviews that were audio-taped, transcribed, and coded independently. The codes were then harmonized via discussion and consensus with the other authors. Data were analyzed for themes using the hermeneutic-phenomenological method as proposed by Max van Manen. Three men and three women were interviewed. On average, the interviewees have worked with MTM pharmacists for seven years. The six (6 themes uncovered from the interviews included: (1 “MTM is just part of our team approach to the practice of medicine”: MTM as an integral part of PCPs’ practices; (2 “Frankly it’s education for the patient but it’s also education for me”: MTM services as a source of education; (3 “It’s not exactly just the pharmacist that passes out the medicines at the pharmacy”: The MTM practitioner is different from the dispensing pharmacist; (4 “So, less reactive, cleaning up the mess, and more proactive and catching things before they become so involved”: MTM services as preventative health care efforts; (5“I think that time is the big thing”: MTM pharmacists spend more time with patients; (6 “There’s an access piece, there’s an availability piece, there’s a finance piece”: MTM services are underutilized at the clinics. In conclusion, PCPs value having MTM pharmacists as part of their team in ambulatory clinics. MTM pharmacists are considered an important source of education to patients as well as to providers as they are seen as having a unique body of knowledge –medication expertise. All PCPs highly treasure the time and education provided by the MTM pharmacists, their ability to manage and adjust patients

  6. Gold standards for primary care of burn management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Zor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, about 2.5 million people are affected from burns in the world. In our country there is no reliable database related to this subject. There are ongoing studies about the epidemiology of burns in Turkey. After burn injury had represent many various complications, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac deficiency, acute hypertension, endocarditis, thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, respiratuar failure, renal failure, gastric ulcus, ileus, sepsis, coagulopathy and anemia. Such complications can preventable or treatable. In this respect, preventive management in the first step burn treatment had very importantly in burn cases. Skin is a barrier which protects evaporative heat loss. In cases of acute burn, hypothermia occurs related to skin loss. For these cases, care must be taken to keep the patient warm. In addition fluid resuscitation is very important in these cases. Furthermore, the damaged tissues are highly susceptible to infection in burned patients. Burn care and rehabilitation includes challenging and complex procedures. Briefly, treatments of burn cases require a multidisciplinary and meticulous approach.

  7. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  8. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  9. Exploring valid and reliable assessment methods for care management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennissen, Lokke; Stammen, Lorette; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Jolien; Wieringa, Sietse; Busari, Jamiu

    2016-07-01

    Purpose It is assumed that the use of valid and reliable assessment methods can facilitate the development of medical residents' management and leadership competencies. To justify this assertion, the perceptions of an expert panel of health care leaders were explored on assessment methods used for evaluating care management (CM) development in Dutch residency programs. This paper aims to investigate how assessors and trainees value these methods and examine for any inherent benefits or shortcomings when they are applied in practice. Design/methodology/approach A Delphi survey was conducted among members of the platform for medical leadership in The Netherlands. This panel of experts was made up of clinical educators, practitioners and residents interested in CM education. Findings Of the respondents, 40 (55.6 per cent) and 31 (43 per cent) participated in the first and second rounds of the Delphi survey, respectively. The respondents agreed that assessment methods currently being used to measure residents' CM competencies were weak, though feasible for use in many residency programs. Multi-source feedback (MSF, 92.1 per cent), portfolio/e-portfolio (86.8 per cent) and knowledge testing (76.3 per cent) were identified as the most commonly known assessment methods with familiarity rates exceeding 75 per cent. Practical implications The findings suggested that an "assessment framework" comprising MSF, portfolios, individual process improvement projects or self-reflections and observations in clinical practice should be used to measure CM competencies in residents. Originality/value This study reaffirms the need for objective methods to assess CM skills in post-graduate medical education, as there was not a single assessment method that stood out as the best instrument. PMID:27397747

  10. Management of nursing care quality with ethical principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabarcas-Ortega Nirva del Socorro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality is a guiding principle of nursing care, law 266 defines it as an efficient helpin terms of opportunity and proper use of resources. Nursing care is based oncomprehensive care on the basis of individual dignity, rights and needs, not just thedisease. Changes and trends in care have imposed new roles in professional practiceof nursing, often presenting ethical dilemmas and conflicts that require you to haveknowledge of principles and values to better analyze situations and exercise properorientation; the nurse must use their knowledge in ethics and bioethics to meet theneeds of patients for their welfare.The management of nursing care quality involves planning, organization, directionand control of financial, human and material resources with the intent to effectivelyimplement the quality policy of the institution, bearing in mind the ethical principlesestablished by law 266 of 1996. In conclusion, the quality is the result of the entire healthcare process; to reach it, it is necessary to implement a system of quality managementthat tends to achieve a balance between user needs, available infrastructure for care,objectives of the institution and satisfaction of customer and care providers.RESUMEN:La calidad es un principio rector del cuidado de enfermería, la ley 266 define la calidadcomo una ayuda eficiente, en términos de oportunidad y uso adecuado de los recursos.La atención de enfermería se basa en el cuidado integral del individuo teniendo comobase la dignidad, necesidades derechos y no simplemente la enfermedad. Los cambiosy tendencias del cuidado han impuesto nuevos roles en la práctica profesional de laenfermera, presentándose con frecuencia dilemas y conflictos éticos que le exigentener conocimientos de principios y valores para un mejor análisis de las situaciones yorientación adecuada del ejercicio, debiendo la enfermera hacer uso de sus conocimientosen ética y bioética para la satisfacción de las necesidades del

  11. Comparison of primary care models in the prevention of cardiovascular disease - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg William

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care providers play an important role in preventing and managing cardiovascular disease. This study compared the quality of preventive cardiovascular care delivery amongst different primary care models. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a larger randomized control trial, known as the Improved Delivery of Cardiovascular Care (IDOCC through Outreach Facilitation. Using baseline data collected through IDOCC, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 82 primary care practices from three delivery models in Eastern Ontario, Canada: 43 fee-for-service, 27 blended-capitation and 12 community health centres with salary-based physicians. Medical chart audits from 4,808 patients with or at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease were used to examine each practice's adherence to ten evidence-based processes of care for diabetes, chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia, hypertension, weight management, and smoking cessation care. Generalized estimating equation models adjusting for age, sex, rurality, number of cardiovascular-related comorbidities, and year of data collection were used to compare guideline adherence amongst the three models. Results The percentage of patients with diabetes that received two hemoglobin A1c tests during the study year was significantly higher in community health centres (69% than in fee-for-service (45% practices (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR = 2.4 [95% CI 1.4-4.2], p = 0.001. Blended capitation practices had a significantly higher percentage of patients who had their waistlines monitored than in fee-for-service practices (19% vs. 5%, AOR = 3.7 [1.8-7.8], p = 0.0006, and who were recommended a smoking cessation drug when compared to community health centres (33% vs. 16%, AOR = 2.4 [1.3-4.6], p = 0.007. Overall, quality of diabetes care was higher in community health centres, while smoking cessation care and weight management was higher in the blended-capitation models. Fee-for-service practices

  12. Delivering quality of care while managing the interests of all stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopper, Andrea; Raddatz, Agnieszka; Grassmann, Aileen; Stuard, Stefano; Menzer, Marcus; Possnien, Gernot; Scatizzi, Laura; Marcelli, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    National healthcare systems worldwide face growing challenges to reconcile interests of patients for high-quality medical care and of payers for sustainable and affordable funding. Advances in the provision of renal replacement therapy can only be made by developing and implementing appropriate sophisticated and state-of-the-art business models that include reimbursement schemes for comprehensive care packages. Such business models must succeed in integrating and reconciling the interests of all stakeholders. NephroCare as dialysis provider has adopted and tailored recognized management techniques, i.e. Balanced Scorecard and Kaizen, to achieve these goals. Success of the complete business model package is tangible - strategies initiated to improve treatment quality even at the cost of providers have been translated into win-win scenarios for the complete stakeholder community. Room for improvement exists: the possibility to extend the portfolio of service offerings within the comprehensive care frame, as well as the challenge for achieving a balance between the stability of targets while keeping these up to date concerning new insights. PMID:22057008

  13. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon Carla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC to usual physician care (UC in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a family medicine clinic which included a clinical pharmacist. In 2006, the pharmacist assumed anticoagulation management. For a 17-month period, the PC group (n = 112 of patients on warfarin were compared to the UC patients (n = 81 for a similar period prior to 2006. The primary outcome was the percentage of time patients' INR was in the therapeutic range (TTR. Secondary outcomes were the percentage of time in therapeutic range within ± 0.3 units of the recommended range (expanded TTR and percentage of time the INR was >5.0 or Results The baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Fifty-five percent of the PC group was male with a mean age of 67 years; 51% of the UC group was male with a mean age of 71 years. The most common indications for warfarin in both groups were atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves and deep vein thrombosis. The TTR was 73% for PC and 65% for UC (p 5 were 0.3% for PC patients and 0.1% for UC (p Conclusion The pharmacist-managed anticoagulation program within a family practice clinic compared to usual care by the physicians achieved significantly better INR control as measured by the percentage of time patients' INR values were kept in both the therapeutic and expanded range. Based on the results of this study, a collaborative family practice clinic using pharmacists and physicians may be an effective model for anticoagulation management with these results verified in future

  14. The management of diabetes in indigenous Australians from primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Merlin C

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians have high rates of diabetes and its complications. This study examines ethnic differences in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes in Australian primary care. Methods Diabetes management and outcomes in Indigenous patients enrolled in the NEFRON study (n = 144 was systematically compared with that in non-Indigenous patients presenting consecutively to the same practitioner (n = 449, and the NEFRON cohort as a whole (n = 3893. Results Indigenous Australians with diabetes had high rates of micro- and macrovascular disease. 60% of Indigenous patients had an abnormal albumin to creatinine ratio compared to 33% of non-Indigenous patients (p 1c ≥ 8.0%, observed in 55% of all Indigenous patients, despite the similar frequency use of oral antidiabetic agents and insulin. Smoking was also more common in Indigenous patients (38%vs 10%, p Conclusion Although seeing the same doctors and receiving the same medications, glycaemic and smoking cessation targets remain unfulfilled in Indigenous patients. This cross-sectional study confirms Aboriginal ethnicity as a powerful risk factor for microvascular and macrovascular disease, which practitioners should use to identify candidates for intensive multifactorial intervention.

  15. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Norouzpour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality.Objectives: To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers.Patients and Methods: This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome.Results: There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40; 59% of cases (n = 39 were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01, but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47. However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01 in multivariate analysis.Conclusions: GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  16. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Symptom Management in Cancer Palliative Care: Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Vincent C H; Wu, Xinyin; Lu, Ping; Hui, Edwin P; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Anthony L; Lau, Alexander Y L; Zhao, Junkai; Fan, Min; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2016-02-01

    Use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in symptom management for cancer palliative care is very common in Chinese populations but clinical evidence on their effectiveness is yet to be synthesized.To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to summarize results from CHM randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on symptoms that are undertreated in conventional cancer palliative care.Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. RCTs evaluating CHM, either in combination with conventional treatments or used alone, in managing cancer-related symptoms were considered eligible. Effectiveness was quantified by using weighted mean difference (WMD) using random effect model meta-analysis.Fourteen RCTs were included. Compared with conventional intervention alone, meta-analysis showed that combined CHM and conventional treatment significantly reduced pain (3 studies, pooled WMD: -0.90, 95% CI: -1.69 to -0.11). Six trials comparing CHM with conventional medications demonstrated similar effect in reducing constipation. One RCT showed significant positive effect of CHM plus chemotherapy for managing fatigue, but not in the remaining 3 RCTs. The additional use of CHM to chemotherapy does not improve anorexia when compared to chemotherapy alone, but the result was concluded from 2 small trials only. Adverse events were infrequent and mild.CHM may be considered as an add-on to conventional care in the management of pain in cancer patients. CHM could also be considered as an alternative to conventional care for reducing constipation. Evidence on the use of CHM for treating anorexia and fatigue in cancer patients is uncertain, warranting further research. PMID:26886628

  17. THE SPORT MARKETING MANAGEMENT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Lucian MIHAI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport marketing involves marketing fundamentals applied in one industry, the sport business industry. The development of sport marketing fundamentals is therefore based on basic marketing principles. The practice and activities of sport marketing are also based on basic marketing activities, but are modified and adapted to the sport business industry. Therefore, sport marketing is based on its primary and parent discipline - marketing. Sport marketing is one of the most important functions of a sport business. This is because the sport marketing activities will define the business. The growth of the sport industry is phenomenal and shows no signs of slowing. Also, sport marketing is a process. A process is a continuous cycle. Therefore, marketing is a function that never ends. The sport marketing management model is an illustration of the elements and process of sport marketing. It should serve as a guide for managing the company’s marketing functions. The model illustrates the elements of marketing, the succession of elements and functions, the process of managing, and the interdependence of the elements This paper presents an overview of the model, sport marketing management, each element and the process.

  18. Developing a medication communication framework across continuums of care using the Circle of Care Modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kitson, Nicole A; Price, Morgan; Lau, Francis Y; Showler, Grey

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication errors are a common type of preventable errors in health care causing unnecessary patient harm, hospitalization, and even fatality. Improving communication between providers and between providers and patients is a key aspect of decreasing medication errors and improving patient safety. Medication management requires extensive collaboration and communication across roles and care settings, which can reduce (or contribute to) medication-related errors. Medication managemen...

  19. Searching for the Holy Grail of Care Delivery Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensik, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Too often health care executives state the need for more research, knowledge, and information in staffing. Perhaps what we really need is education and support for innovation in operations. In looking for the holy grail of staffing solutions, focused attention will need to be placed on creating innovative care delivery models. Leaders who are tasked with developing innovative care delivery models must have a supportive environment and given time to be successful. PMID:27265951

  20. Determinants of access to pediatric hospice care: A conceptual model

    OpenAIRE

    Lindley, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    One of the many difficult moments for families of children with life-limiting illnesses is to make the decision to access pediatric hospice care. Although determinants that influence families’ decisions to access pediatric hospice care have been recently identified, the relationship between these determinants and access to pediatric hospice care have not been explicated or grounded in accepted healthcare theories or models. Using the Andersen Behavioral Healthcare Utilization Model, this arti...

  1. Towards a model for integrative medicine in Swedish primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Falkenberg Torkel; Warenmark Anders; Halpin Jeremy; Sundberg Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Collaboration between providers of conventional care and complementary therapies (CTs) has gained in popularity but there is a lack of conceptualised models for delivering such care, i.e. integrative medicine (IM). The aim of this paper is to describe some key findings relevant to the development and implementation of a proposed model for IM adapted to Swedish primary care. Methods Investigative procedures involved research group and key informant meetings with multiple st...

  2. Effect Observation of the Management Model of Walking in the Quality Control of Nursing Care%走动式管理模式在护理质量控制中的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔彩霞; 杨芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To summarize the application of specific methods about management in nursing management,implementation of management by walking around mode played in nursing quality control effect.Method:Under the leadership of the head nurse of the tasks assigned to nurses at all levels daily and irregular inspections ward to implement management by walking around,and on-site management,timely detection of problems and to solve the problems in moving around the process,in strict accordance with the standards of quality of care evaluate the effect of the control of the quality of care,quality control,to implementation the MBWA mode 1 years.Result:MBWA mode implementation,the quality of care control in basic nursing care instruments writing and patient care work satisfaction were significantly higher than before the increase,the difference between the two was significantly(P<0.05).Conclusion:The implementation of walking type management mode can promote the nursing problems and hidden dangers timely detection and correction in the nursing work,significantly improve the quality of nursing,and is worthy of wide application and promotion in clinical practice.%  目的:总结应用走动式管理于护理管理的具体方法,探讨实施走动式管理模式在护理质量控制中的效果。方法:在护士长的带领下,对工作任务进行分配,各级护士每天不定时巡查病房以实行走动式管理及现场管理,在走动过程中及时发现问题并解决问题,严格按照护理质量标准进行质量控制,实施走动式管理模式1年后,对护理质量控制的效果进行评价。结果:实施走动式管理模式后,护理质量控制中基础护理、护理文书书写及患者对护理工作的满意度等较之前均显著提高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:在护理工作中实施走动式管理模式可促使护理工作中的问题和隐患及时发现并改正,显著提高护理质量,值

  3. Determinants of Heart Failure Self-Care Maintenance and Management in Patients and Caregivers: A Dyadic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Julie T; Vellone, Ercole; Lyons, Karen S; D'Agostino, Fabio; Riegel, Barbara; Juárez-Vela, Raúl; Hiatt, Shirin O; Alvaro, Rosaria; Lee, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    Disease self-management is a critical component of maintaining clinical stability for patients with chronic illness. This is particularly evident in the context of heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization for older adults. HF self-management, commonly known as HF self-care, is often performed with the support of informal caregivers. However, little is known about how a HF dyad manages the patient's care together. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of patient and caregiver contributions to HF self-care maintenance (daily adherence and symptom monitoring) and management (appropriate recognition and response to symptoms), utilizing an approach that controls for dyadic interdependence. This was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from 364 dyads of Italian HF patients and caregivers. Multilevel modeling was used to identify determinants of HF self-care within patient-caregiver dyads. Patients averaged 76.2 (SD = 10.7) years old, and a slight majority (56.9%) was male, whereas caregivers averaged 57.4 (SD = 14.6) years old, and about half (48.1%) were male. Most caregivers were adult children (48.4%) or spouses (32.7%) of patients. Both patients and caregivers reported low levels of HF maintenance and management behaviors. Significant individual and dyadic determinants of self-care maintenance and self-care management included gender, quality of life, comorbid burden, impaired ADLs, cognition, hospitalizations, HF duration, relationship type, relationship quality, and social support. These comprehensive dyadic models assist in elucidating the complex nature of patient-caregiver relationships and their influence on HF self-care, leading to more effective ways to intervene and optimize outcomes. PMID:26355702

  4. Home-based Self-care: Understanding and Designing Pervasive Technology to Support Care Management Work at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    -clinical settings. As such, sustaining daily care activities in the home (or other non-clinical settings) is challenging as they are becoming more and more intertwined into people’s everyday life. Thus, this dissertation is concerned about one major challenge in Pervasive Healthcare: the design of technology that......Demographic changes are challenging healthcare systems as well as societies around the world due to an increasing aging population and rapid propagation of chronic diseases. To deal with the consequences of these changes, more and more long-term care services are being implemented including home...... self-care management work at home. People need to know which care activities to perform, when to perform them, how to proceed and why these are important. While at home, an active lifestyle and comorbidity not only challenge self-care activities but also the use of self-care technologies in non...

  5. Lay and health care professional understandings of self-management:A systematic review and narrative synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sadler, Euan; Wolfe, Charles DA; McKevitt, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Self-management is widely promoted but evidence of effectiveness is limited. Policy encourages health care professionals to support people with long-term conditions to learn self-management skills, yet little is known about the extent to which both parties share a common understanding of self-management. Thus, we compared health care professional and lay understandings of self-management of long-term conditions.Methods: Systematic review and narrative synthesis of qualitative stud...

  6. An HMO-Sponsored Primary Care-Based Disease Management and Case Management Initiative: Economic and Selected Clinical Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Jaan Sidorov; Franz Joseph Fisher; Sabrina Girolami; Otto Wolke

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the cost savings achieved in a health maintenance organization (HMO)-sponsored primary care-based case management and disease management programs. Methods: The HMO-sponsored programs recruited patients in the primary care setting and relied on clinical guidelines and HMO-employed patient education nurses and case management nurses. Total per member per month (PMPM) charges for medical services and changes in selected clinical outcomes before and after entry into HMO-spo...

  7. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedel Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Although collaborative team models (CTM improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs. The objectives of this study are to understand: (1 how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2 the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Theory. First, diffusion curves were developed for all 175 PCPs and 59 nurses practicing in one borough of Paris. Second, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 40 PCPs and 15 nurses to better understand the implementation dynamics. Results Diffusion curves showed that 3.5 years after the start of the implementation, 100% of nurses and over 80% of PCPs had adopted the CTM. The dynamics of the CTM's diffusion were different between the PCPs and the nurses. The slopes of the two curves are also distinctly different. Among the nurses, the critical mass of adopters was attained faster, since they adopted the CTM earlier and more quickly than the PCPs. Results of the semi-structured interviews showed that these differences in diffusion dynamics were mostly founded in differences between the PCPs' and the nurses' perceptions of the CTM's compatibility with norms, values and practices and its relative advantage (impact on patient management and work practices. Opinion leaders played a key role in the diffusion of the CTM among PCPs. Conclusion CTM diffusion is a social phenomenon that requires a major commitment by clinicians and a willingness to take risks; the role of opinion leaders is key. Paying attention to the notion of a critical mass of adopters is essential to developing implementation strategies that will accelerate the adoption process by clinicians.

  8. Randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care intervention to manage cancer-related symptoms: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jennifer; Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan; Marsh, J Wallis; Dew, Mary Amanda; Spring, Michael; Grady, Jonathan; Likumahuwa, Sonja; Dunlavy, Andrea; Youssef, Michael; Antoni, Michael; Butterfield, Lisa H; Schulz, Richard; Day, Richard; Helgeson, Vicki; Kim, Kevin H; Gamblin, T Clark

    2012-01-01

    Background Collaborative care interventions to treat depression have begun to be tested in settings outside of primary care. However, few studies have expanded the collaborative care model to other settings and targeted comorbid physical symptoms of depression. Purpose The aims of this report were to: (1) describe the design and methods of a trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention designed to manage cancer-related symptoms and improve overall quality of life in patients diagnosed with hepatobiliary carcinoma; and (2) share the lessons learned during the design, implementation, and evaluation of the trial. Methods The trial was a phase III randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention to reduce depression, pain, and fatigue in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The intervention was compared to an enhanced usual care arm. The primary outcomes included the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Fatigue, and the FACT-Hepatobiliary. Sociodemographic and disease-specific characteristics were recorded from the medical record; Natural Killer cells and cytokines that are associated with these symptoms and with disease progression were assayed from serum. Results and Discussion The issues addressed include: (1) development of collaborative care in the context of oncology (e.g., timing of the intervention, tailoring of the intervention, ethical issues regarding randomization of patients, and changes in medical treatment over the course of the study); (2) use of a website by chronically ill populations (e.g., design and access to the website, development of the website and intervention, ethical issues associated with website development, website usage, and unanticipated costs associated with website development); (3) evaluation of the efficacy of intervention (e.g., patient preferences, proxy raters

  9. Translational models of workplace violence in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Michael Russell; Bowen, Bob; Bowie, Vaughan

    2015-01-01

    Decision makers have little time to study literature on the prevention and management of workplace violence (WPV). In a health care workplace setting, identifying the person, stimulus, and environmental interactions that can lead to violence is a complicated process. Those in positions of leadership make decisions that affect many individuals, agencies, and communities. Often, they come from different professional backgrounds yet need ways of rapidly understanding concepts of violence that transcend their profession, training, or experience. Translational models (TMs) in WPV visually summarize and interprofessionally facilitate this understanding of concepts, enhancing the chances of more effective collaborative solutions to WPV. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how TM can be used in interprofessional settings to find effective solutions to reduce WPV. PMID:25929143

  10. Diffusion of a collaborative care model in primary care: a longitudinal qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Vedel Isabelle; Ghadi Veronique; De Stampa Matthieu; Routelous Christelle; Bergman Howard; Ankri Joel; Lapointe Liette

    2013-01-01

    Background Although collaborative team models (CTM) improve care processes and health outcomes, their diffusion poses challenges related to difficulties in securing their adoption by primary care clinicians (PCPs). The objectives of this study are to understand: (1) how the perceived characteristics of a CTM influenced clinicians' decision to adopt -or not- the model; and (2) the model's diffusion process. Methods We conducted a longitudinal case study based on the Diffusion of Innovations Th...

  11. Outcomes for patients with dementia from the Cleveland Alzheimer's Managed Care Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P A; Bass, D M; Looman, W J; McCarthy, C A; Eckert, S

    2004-01-01

    This investigation evaluates effects of care consultation delivered within a partnership between a managed health care system and Alzheimer's Association chapter. Care consultation is a multi-component telephone intervention in which Association staff work with patients and caregivers to identify personal strengths and resources within the family, health plan, and community. The primary hypothesis is that care consultation will decrease utilization of managed care services and improve psychosocial outcomes. A secondary modifying-effects hypothesis posits benefits will be greater for patients with more severe memory impairment. The sample is composed of managed care patients whose medical records indicate a diagnosis of dementia or memory loss. Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group, which was offered care consultation in addition to usual managed care services, or to a control group, which was offered only usual managed care services. Data come from two in-person interviews with patients, and medical and administrative records. Results supporting the primary hypothesis show intervention group patients feel less embarrassed and isolated because of their memory problems and report less difficulty coping. Findings consistent with the modifying-effects hypothesis show intervention group patients with more severe impairment have fewer physician visits, are less likely to have an emergency department visit or hospital admission, are more satisfied with managed care services, and have decreased depression and strain. PMID:14690867

  12. Co-ordination and management of chronic conditions in Europe : the role of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gress, S.; Baan, C.A.; Calnan, M.; Dedeu, T.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Howson, H.

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare systems in Europe struggle with inadequate co-ordination of care for people with chronic conditions. Moreover, there is a considerable evidence gap in the treatment of chronic conditions, lack of self-management, variation in quality of care, lack of preventive care, increasing costs for

  13. Barriers and Facilitators in Pain Management in Long-Term Care Institutions: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patricia; Solomon, Patricia; Raina, Parminder; Jadad, Alejandro R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to the management of pain in long-term care institutions. Formal caregivers practising in four long-term care institutions in Hamilton, Ontario participated in eight focus groups. Participants included 6 physicians, 19 registered nurses, 8 registered practical nurses, 13 health care aides and 8…

  14. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina O. Odusola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective: We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11 and health insurance managers (n=4. Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results: Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions: By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA.

  15. Management Models for the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    companies are not. New functional requirements often seem to be in conflict, such as transparency, stock market performance, sustainability, innovation, responsibility, time to market, stakeholders, business rationalisation and many others. These requirements force business to revise its management model......It is evident that many organisations are in need of renovation, innovation and reinvigoration. Longstanding business paradigms and underpinning practices require critical reflection in the light of fundamental societal and business developments. Some companies are addressing these challenges, many....... The time is right to demonstrate how the business enterprise can be re-conceptualised, and what the challenges are of fundamental strategic choices in organising a sustainable business proposition. This book presents ten cases of organisations which have developed  a management model that leads the...

  16. A Moral Hazard Model of Parental Care

    OpenAIRE

    Baomin Dong; Tianpeng Zhou

    2013-01-01

    One perplexing observation is that although men and women have different comparative advantages, cooperation is often only seen during child-bearing and rearing periods. One interpretation is that the juvenile offspring serves as an indivisible public goods to facilitate cooperation between opposite sexes of adults. We show that moral hazard in maternal parental care will either force the father to pay the mother a rent in order to induce optimal care (when the child is of intrinsic high qual...

  17. Marketing the dental hygienist as a manager in oral health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, E M

    1989-09-01

    In 1985, the ADHA, in response to the changing health care environment, identified six roles for the future of dental hygiene. The administrator/manager role, one of the six, is an expansion of dental hygiene skills to facilitate the provision of quality oral health care. Oral health care settings require personnel trained in management to accomplish practice-related goals and objectives. Dental hygiene is preparing individuals to assume managerial roles to fill this health care need. This paper discusses the skills and knowledge level required to assume managerial roles and strategies for marketing the dental hygienist as a manager. PMID:2637342

  18. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  19. Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Child Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Kalmar, Evie; Leonard, Victoria; Flint, Mary Louise; Kuo, Devina; Davidson, Nita; Bradman, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Young children and early care and education (ECE) staff are exposed to pesticides used to manage pests in ECE facilities in the United States and elsewhere. The objective of this pilot study was to encourage child care programs to reduce pesticide use and child exposures by developing and evaluating an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Toolkit for…

  20. Modelling catchment areas for secondary care providers: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Simon; Wardlaw, Jessica; Crouch, Susan; Carolan, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    Hospitals need to understand patient flows in an increasingly competitive health economy. New initiatives like Patient Choice and the Darzi Review further increase this demand. Essential to understanding patient flows are demographic and geographic profiles of health care service providers, known as 'catchment areas' and 'catchment populations'. This information helps Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to review how their populations are accessing services, measure inequalities and commission services; likewise it assists Secondary Care Providers (SCPs) to measure and assess potential gains in market share, redesign services, evaluate admission thresholds and plan financial budgets. Unlike PCTs, SCPs do not operate within fixed geographic boundaries. Traditionally, SCPs have used administrative boundaries or arbitrary drive times to model catchment areas. Neither approach satisfactorily represents current patient flows. Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming and can be challenging for healthcare managers to exploit. This paper presents three different approaches to define catchment areas, each more detailed than the previous method. The first approach 'First Past the Post' defines catchment areas by allocating a dominant SCP to each Census Output Area (OA). The SCP with the highest proportion of activity within each OA is considered the dominant SCP. The second approach 'Proportional Flow' allocates activity proportionally to each OA. This approach allows for cross-boundary flows to be captured in a catchment area. The third and final approach uses a gravity model to define a catchment area, which incorporates drive or travel time into the analysis. Comparing approaches helps healthcare providers to understand whether using more traditional and simplistic approaches to define catchment areas and populations achieves the same or similar results as complex mathematical modelling. This paper has demonstrated, using a case study of Manchester, that when estimating

  1. Children's health care assistance according to their families: a comparison between models of Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bertoglio Comassetto Antunes de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To compare the health assistance models of Basic Traditional Units (UBS with the Family Health Strategy (ESF units for presence and extent of attributes of Primary Health Care (APS, specifically in the care of children. METHOD A cross-sectional study of a quantitative approach with families of children attended by the Public Health Service of Colombo, Paraná. The Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCA-Tool was applied to parents of 482 children, 235 ESF units and 247 UBS units covering all primary care units of the municipality, between June and July 2012. The results were analyzed according to the PCA-Tool manual. RESULTS ESF units reached a borderline overall score for primary health care standards. However, they fared better in their attributes of Affiliation, Integration of care coordination, Comprehensiveness, Family Centeredness and Accessibility of use, while the attributes of Community Guidance/Orientation, Coordination of Information Systems, Longitudinality and Access attributes were rated as insufficient for APS. UBS units had low scores on all attributes. CONCLUSION The ESF units are closer to the principles of APS (Primary Health Care, but there is need to review actions of child care aimed at the attributes of APS in both care models, corroborating similar studies from other regions of Brazil.

  2. Can the Accountable Care Organization model facilitate integrated care in England?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Faheem; Mays, Nicholas; Ahmed, Naeem; Bisognano, Maureen; Gottlieb, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Following the global economic recession, health care systems have experienced intense political pressure to contain costs without compromising quality. One response is to focus on improving the continuity and coordination of care, which is seen as beneficial for both patients and providers. However, cultural and structural barriers have proved difficult to overcome in the quest to provide integrated care for entire populations. By holding groups of providers responsible for the health outcomes of a designated population, in the United States, Accountable Care Organizations are regarded as having the potential to foster collaboration across the continuum of care. They could have a similar role in England's National Health Service. However, it is important to consider the difference in context before implementing a similar model, adapted to suit the system's strengths. Working together, general practice federations and the Academic Health Science Networks could form the basis of accountable care in England. PMID:26079144

  3. STUDY OF A RISK MANAGEMENT MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Marn-Ling Shing; Chen-chi Shing; Kuo Lane Chen; Huei Lee

    2011-01-01

    Risk management has become an important issue in the information security area. This study proposes a Semi-Markov chain model to manage the information security risk. When the state information is not recognized as a normal state, the model can send a warning signal to the manager. A simulated model was used to validate the semi-Markov chain model.

  4. STUDY OF A RISK MANAGEMENT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marn-Ling Shing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Risk management has become an important issue in the information security area. This study proposes a Semi-Markov chain model to manage the information security risk. When the state information is not recognized as a normal state, the model can send a warning signal to the manager. A simulated model was used to validate the semi-Markov chain model.

  5. Data management system performance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Larry M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical techniques that have been used to gain a better understanding of the Space Station Freedom's (SSF's) Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is a complex, distributed, real-time computer system that has been redesigned numerous times. The implications of these redesigns have not been fully analyzed. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages for static analytical techniques such as Rate Monotonic Analysis (RMA) and also provides a rationale for dynamic modeling. Factors such as system architecture, processor utilization, bus architecture, queuing, etc. are well suited for analysis with a dynamic model. The significance of performance measures for a real-time system are discussed.

  6. Patient costs in anticoagulation management: a comparison of primary and secondary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, D; Bryan, S; Gee, K; Murray, E.; Fitzmaurice, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for anticoagulation management is increasing. This has led to care being provided in non-hospital settings. While clinical studies have similarly demonstrated good clinical care in these settings, it is still unclear as to which alternative is the most efficient. AIM: To determine the costs borne by patients when attending an anticoagulation management clinic in either primary or secondary care and to use this information to consider the cost-effectiveness of anticoagul...

  7. Reconciling Practice and Theory: Challenges in Monitoring Medicaid Managed-Care Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Marsha; Felt, Suzanne

    1995-01-01

    The massive shift to managed care in many State Medicaid programs heightens the importance of identifying effective approaches to promote and oversee quality in plans serving Medicaid enrollees. This article reviews operational issues and lessons from the ongoing evaluation of a three-State demonstration of the Health Care Financing Administration's (HCFA) Quality Assurance Reform Initiative (QARI) for Medicaid managed care. The QARI experience to date shows the potential utility of the syste...

  8. Integrating GDM management in primary care: Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Qudsia; Mumtaz, Shadma

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes is prevailing universally and Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) is no exception. Pregnancies associated with gestational diabetes place women at high risk of natal complications. Statistics from GCC gives variable figures for GDM. Family Physicians are the first level health care providers and their role in management of GDM can be promising. This has been evident from a focused group study where patients prefer screening for GDM in primary care settings. Strengthening of primary care is important universally. Government should have mandatory primary care registration to be referred to secondary level for obstetric follow up and management. An important issue needing attention is presence of multiple criteria for diagnosing and screening GDM. There is need for a single guideline globally to avoid confusion for primary care providers.10 Primary care centers can better be utilized to screen for GDM at early stages. This will decrease the load on secondary and tertiary care centers and can also maintain continuity of care. PMID:27582140

  9. A Model for Risk Assessment in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prijatelj, Vesna; Rajkovič, Vladislav; Šušteršič, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to reduce risks and hence prevent errors in the health care process. The aim is to design an organizational information model using error prevention methods for risk assessment in a clinical setting. The model is based on selected indicators of quality nursing care, resulting from the world-known theoretical and practical models combined with experience in the Slovenian health care. The proposed organizational information model and software solution has a significant impact on the professional attention, communication and information, critical thinking, experience and knowledge. PMID:27332383

  10. Exploring limits to market-based reform: managed competition and rehabilitation home care services in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Glen E; Williams, A Paul

    2006-04-01

    The rise of neo-liberalism, which suggests that only markets can deliver maximum economic efficiency, has been a driving force behind the trend towards using market-based solutions to correct health care problems. However, the broad application of market-based reforms has tended to assume the presence of fully functioning markets. When there are barriers to markets functioning effectively, such as the absence of adequate competition, recourse to market-based solutions can be expected to produce less than satisfactory, if not paradoxical results. One such case is rehabilitation homecare in Ontario, Canada. In 1996, a "managed competition" model was introduced as part of a province-wide reform of home care in an attempt to encourage high quality at competitive prices. However, in the case of rehabilitation home care services, significant obstacles to achieving effective competition existed. Notably, there were few private provider agencies to bid on contracts due to the low volume and specialized nature of services. There were also structural barriers such as the presence of unionized employees and obstacles to the entry of new providers. This paper evaluates the impact of Ontario's managed competition reform on community-based rehabilitation services. It draws on data obtained through 49 in-depth key informant interviews and a telephone survey of home care coordinating agencies and private rehabilitation provider agencies. Instead of reducing costs and improving quality, as the political rhetoric promised, the analysis suggests that providing rehabilitation homecare services under managed competition resulted in higher per-visit costs and reduced access to services. These findings support the contention that there are limits to market-based reforms. PMID:16198035

  11. Memphis Business Group on Health: a model for health care reform and cost containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D

    1994-01-01

    A market-driven, community-based, competitive health care model has effectively assisted Memphis employers to achieve their cost containment and health care reform objectives. Members of the Memphis Business Group on Health joined forces and successfully implemented a variety of programs and services that resulted in dramatic cost savings and reform of health care delivery systems. Programs included development of a purchasing alliance for negotiating contracts for hospital, medical, workers' compensation, psychiatric, and substance abuse care and other service and product options. Utilization management programs focused on appropriate consumption of resources and intensive management of critical cases. While increases in per employee costs averaged 14.7 percent per year for five years nationally, members of the Memphis Business Group on Health held their increases to an average of 6 percent per year. PMID:10132786

  12. Sustaining complex interventions in long-term care: a qualitative study of direct care staff and managers

    OpenAIRE

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Toles, Mark; Cary, Michael P; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa; Yap, Tracey; Song, Yuting; Hall, Rasheeda; Anderson, Amber; Burd, Andrew; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the sustainability of behavioral change interventions in long-term care (LTC). Following a cluster randomized trial of an intervention to improve staff communication (CONNECT), we conducted focus groups of direct care staff and managers to elicit their perceptions of factors that enhance or reduce sustainability in the LTC setting. The overall aim was to generate hypotheses about how to sustain complex interventions in LTC. Methods In eight facilities, we cond...

  13. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions. PMID:25797113

  14. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Rodney A.

    2012-01-01

    Routine general practice (GP) care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP) study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD) patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts). Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental ...

  15. Using activity-based costing and theory of constraints to guide continuous improvement in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, H; Baxendale, S J; Gupta, M

    1999-01-01

    Activity-based costing and the theory of constraints have been applied successfully in many manufacturing organizations. Recently, those concepts have been applied in service organizations. This article describes the application of activity-based costing and the theory of constraints in a managed care mental health and substance abuse organization. One of the unique aspects of this particular application was the integration of activity-based costing and the theory of constraints to guide process improvement efforts. This article describes the activity-based costing model and the application of the theory of constraint's focusing steps with an emphasis on unused capacities of activities in the organization. PMID:10350791

  16. Transfer of risk: "right to sue" legislation and managed care organization stock performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, W B; Nells, T; Wallace, A E

    2001-01-01

    We examined whether Congress's consideration of legislation that gave consumers the right to sue managed care organizations impacted the performance of these companies' stocks relative to that of the market. For each company examined, the total return related to such legislation was negative and substantially lower than that expected from the market model; losses in market value were from 17 percent to 48 percent for individual companies and 22 percent for a capitalization-weighted portfolio. The study suggests that equity markets responded to the proposed legislation quickly and that the impact of proposed legislation is felt through loss of market value and increased corporate risk. PMID:11669290

  17. On robust methodologies for managing public health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmagadda, Shastri L; Dreher, Heinz V

    2014-01-01

    Authors focus on ontology-based multidimensional data warehousing and mining methodologies, addressing various issues on organizing, reporting and documenting diabetic cases and their associated ailments, including causalities. Map and other diagnostic data views, depicting similarity and comparison of attributes, extracted from warehouses, are used for understanding the ailments, based on gender, age, geography, food-habits and other hereditary event attributes. In addition to rigor on data mining and visualization, an added focus is on values of interpretation of data views, from processed full-bodied diagnosis, subsequent prescription and appropriate medications. The proposed methodology, is a robust back-end application, for web-based patient-doctor consultations and e-Health care management systems through which, billions of dollars spent on medical services, can be saved, in addition to improving quality of life and average life span of a person. Government health departments and agencies, private and government medical practitioners including social welfare organizations are typical users of these systems. PMID:24445953

  18. On Robust Methodologies for Managing Public Health Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shastri L. Nimmagadda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors focus on ontology-based multidimensional data warehousing and mining methodologies, addressing various issues on organizing, reporting and documenting diabetic cases and their associated ailments, including causalities. Map and other diagnostic data views, depicting similarity and comparison of attributes, extracted from warehouses, are used for understanding the ailments, based on gender, age, geography, food-habits and other hereditary event attributes. In addition to rigor on data mining and visualization, an added focus is on values of interpretation of data views, from processed full-bodied diagnosis, subsequent prescription and appropriate medications. The proposed methodology, is a robust back-end application, for web-based patient-doctor consultations and e-Health care management systems through which, billions of dollars spent on medical services, can be saved, in addition to improving quality of life and average life span of a person. Government health departments and agencies, private and government medical practitioners including social welfare organizations are typical users of these systems.

  19. Management of Acute Pancreatitis in Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güniz Meyancı Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is characterized by an inflammation occuring due to digestion of pancreatic self tissues and other organs after activation of digestive enzymes which are stable under normal conditions . For all the pancreatitis cases, the mortality rate is <%15. In the acute pancreatitis cases, the monitorization of the inspiration system, cardiovascular system and the metabolic status are needed. There is no primary therapy for the pancreatitis. All the therapy protocols are support therapy. The basic support therapy methods are: Liquid replacement, respiration support, pain management, pancreas secretion inhibition, metabolic support, intra-abdominal monitoring and decompression, nutrition, antibiotherapy, immunomodulation, coagulation mechanism monitoring. In the acute pancreatitis, the causes of early deaths are pancreatic shock and acute pulmonary thrombohemorrhage, within the first 7 days the causes of the 75% deaths are pulmonary shock and congestion and after 7 days the causes of the 77% are pancreas abscess, MOF (multiple organ failure, purulent peritonitis and erosive hemorrhage. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 85-9

  20. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) management in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Anil

    2012-10-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) occurs in up to 50% of men by age 50, and the incidence increases with age. This common clinical problem is diagnosed by history, including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire, and physical examination by digital rectal examination (DRE). Initial management for BPH includes lifestyle modification, and smooth muscle relaxant alpha blocker therapy. Alpha blockers usually take effect quickly within 3-5 days, and have minimal side effects. Current commonly used alpha blockers include the selective alpha blockers tamsulosin (Flomax), alfusosin (Xatral), and silodosin (Rapaflo). For patients with larger prostates, the 5-alpha reductase inhibitor class (finasteride (Proscar) and dutasteride (Avodart)) work effectively to shrink prostate stroma resulting in improved voiding. The 5-ARI class of drugs, in addition to reducing prostate size, also reduce the need for future BPH-related surgery, and reduce the risk of future urinary retention. Drugs from the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor class may now be considered for treating BPH. Once daily 5 mg tadalafil has been shown to improve BPH-related symptoms and is currently approved to treat patients with BPH. Referral to a urologist can be considered for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA), especially while on 5-ARI, failure of urinary symptom control despite maximal medical therapy, suspicion of prostate cancer, hematuria, recurrent urinary infections, urinary retention, or renal failure. Currently the primary care physician is armed with multiple treatment options to effectively treat men with symptomatic BPH. PMID:23089343

  1. Primary Health Care Models: A Review of the International Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Abelson; Brian Hutchison

    1994-01-01

    A common element in many countries’ health system reform agenda is an emphasis on changes to the organization, financing and delivery of primary health care. Numerous objectives for primary health care reform have been cited in jurisdictions around the world with different approaches being taken toward achieving stated objectives. This paper reviews the literature which has described and evaluated experiences with different primary health care delivery models in Canadian and other jurisdictio...

  2. A model for supply of informal care to elderly parents

    OpenAIRE

    Fevang, Elisabeth; Kverndokk, Snorre; Røed, Knut

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model of informal care to parents. We assume that the child participates in the labour market and gains in utility from consumption and leisure. In addition it has altruistic motivation to give informal care to its elderly parent. We show how the labour income, labour supply and informal caregiving are affected by exogenous factors such as the education level, wage rate, other supply of care, travel distance and inheritance.

  3. Research of organization of integrated primary care: a conceptual model

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Bruijnzeels

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Primary health care in The Netherlands evolves from small general practices to multidisciplinary teams. Research on the effects on outcomes of organization of primary care is hardly available. Aims Develop a conceptual model to be able to systematically arrange empirical evidence on the effects of different types of organizations of integrated (primary) care. Methods During an expert meeting of directors of health centres we identified essential elements which they consider impor...

  4. Meeting the challenge of managed care - Part I: Radiation oncology as an important part of multi-modal care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Oncology is an important component in multi-modality cancer care. Managed care has defined a number of different ways that radiation oncologists can interact with the other members of the cancer team. This course will review those options. The change in health care delivery is forcing radiation oncologists to examine every aspect of how they organize themselves, deliver care, evaluate that care, and how they are reimbursed for this process. This course will attempt to examine how the pressures of the new paradigms of health care delivery; managed care and outcomes research are impacting upon radiation therapy practice, and what radiation oncologists can do to maintain patient care standards. I. Introduction: A. Managed Care: What it is and where it is going 1. PPO's 2. HMO's 3. POS plans 4. Carve-outs B. Outcomes Research: What it can and cannot do 1. Patterns of care and SEER 2. Rand 3. ''Surrogate outcomes:'' patient satisfaction, quality of life indicators II. Moving from QA and CQI and Benchmarking A. Radiation Oncologists cannot take anything for granted B. Using analytical tools to evaluate all aspects of the radiation oncology practice. 1. Capital Purchases 2. Operational Aspects III Evaluating Staffing Needs A. What traditional jobs in the department should stay? B. Is the cross-training seen in the rest of the hospital appropriate in radiation oncology C. Outsourcing and multi-department organization as ways to improve efficiency D. What about physician extenders? E. What residents, newly trained radiation oncologists, and physician-practice managers must acknowledge to each other IV. Evaluating Technology A. See second and third talks in this series B. Improving efficiency: how does this help when one is not at capacity C. Increasing throughput D. Decreasing cost V. Informatics A. See second and third talks in this series B. What should one expect the computer to do for you C. Some personal observations VI. Gains from Share Services A. Should

  5. Perfect storm: organizational management of patient care under natural disaster conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughrin, William Cass; Mattammal, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Managing uncertainty is an essential attribute of organizational leadership and effectiveness. Uncertainty threatens optimal decision making by managers and, by extension, reduces the quality of patient care. Variation in the work flows of everyday patient caregiving reflects management's steps to control uncertainty, which include strategies for contending with potential disaster scenarios. Little exists in the literature that reveals how management's strategic response to controlling uncertainty in a real disaster event differs from strategies practiced in disaster simulations, with the goal of protecting patient care. Using organization theory, this article presents the application of uncertainty management to the catastrophic flooding of a major teaching hospital. A detailed description of management's strategies for patient rescue and evacuation is provided. Unique aspects of managing uncertainty stemming from a natural disaster are highlighted. Recommendations on organization responses to disasters that optimize patient care, safety, and continuity are offered to managers. PMID:14552099

  6. Implementation of a collaborative care model for the treatment of depression and anxiety in a community health center: results from a qualitative case study

    OpenAIRE

    Eghaneyan BH; Sanchez K; Mitschke DB

    2014-01-01

    Brittany H Eghaneyan,1 Katherine Sanchez,2 Diane B Mitschke2 1Department of Psychiatry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, USA Background: The collaborative care model is a systematic approach to the treatment of depression and anxiety in primary care settings that involves the integration of care managers and consultant psychiatrists, with primary care physician oversight, to more proactively manage m...

  7. Coping strategies, care manager support and mental health outcome among Japanese family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Miho; Hagihara, Akihito; Nobutomo, Koichi

    2008-07-01

    Coping and social support are regarded as major modifiers of the caregiving stress and negative mental health effects experienced by caregivers. Under Japan's Long-term Care Insurance (LTCI) system, care managers have played a major role in providing psychosocial support for family caregivers while coordinating formal and informal care resources for elderly people. However, since the launch of the LTCI system in 2000, no evaluation has examined the role care managers play in buffering the negative effects of the caregiver burden among family caregivers in Japan. This study examined the direct and buffering effects of stress-coping strategies and care manager support on caregiver burden and depression among Japanese family caregivers (n = 371) caring for community-dwelling persons aged 65 or over who were having difficulties with the activities of daily living. A self-administrated questionnaire survey was conducted between February and March 2005 in a rural suburb in south-western Japan. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed the following. (i) Coping strategies and 'social talk' by care managers had direct effects on caregiver burden and depression. (ii) 'Avoidant' coping and 'social talk' by care managers had buffering effects on the care needs-depression relationship. (iii) 'Information giving' by care managers had no significant direct effect, but it had a negative effect on the care needs-depression relationship. Overall, results concerning 'approaching' coping were in line with those of previous studies, while findings concerning 'avoidant' coping were not consistent with findings in Western countries. The type of care manager support appeared to have a variable influence on caregiver burden and depression. PMID:18221487

  8. Organizing principles and management climate in high-performing municipal elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajonius, Petri; Kazemi, Ali; Tengblad, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - Previous research has shown that user-oriented care predicts older persons' satisfaction with care. What is yet to be researched is how senior management facilitates the implementation of user-oriented care. The purpose of this study is to investigate the organizing principles and management climate characterizing successful elderly care. Design/methodology/approach - The department in one highly ranked municipality was selected and compared with a more average municipality. On-site in-depth semi-structured interviews with department managers and participatory observations at managers' meetings were conducted in both municipalities. Findings - Results revealed three key principles for successful elderly care: organizing care from the viewpoint of the older person; recruiting and training competent and autonomous employees; instilling a vision for the mission that guides operations at all levels in the organization. Furthermore, using climate theory to interpret the empirical material, in the highly successful municipality the management climate was characterized by affective support and cognitive autonomy, in contrast to a more instrumental work climate primarily focusing on organizational structure and doing the right things characterizing the more average municipality. Originality/value - The authors suggest that guiding organizing principles are intertwined with management climate and that there are multiple perspectives that must be considered by the management, that is, the views of the older persons, the co-workers and the mission. These results can guide future care quality developments, and increase the understanding of the importance of organizational climate at the senior management level. PMID:26764962

  9. The asset management business model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes the 4 transformation stages of the electric power industry as being vertical unbundling as seen in Europe and Asia, horizontal unbundling as seen in Canada and the United States, industry convergence as seen in Australia and New Zealand, and strategic consolidation as seen in the United Kingdom. The rationale for horizontal unbundling is described with reference to the asset owner, the asset manager and the utility service provider. The presentation includes several viewgraphs depicting the following: the asset management model; the path to success which was built upon a decade of experience; number of stock items from 1991 to 2001; substation capacity utilization from 1997 to 2001; O and M costs per customer from 1990 to 2000; reliability improvements from 1994 to 2000; the design, operation and maintenance of 13 investment pools; transition strategies for total transformation; and, regionally adjusted wage rates. 11 figs

  10. A total safety management model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear organizations, quality and safety are inextricably linked. Therefore, the search for excellence means reaching excellence in nuclear safety. The International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, developed, after the Chernobyl accident, the organizational approach for improving nuclear safety based on the safety culture, which requires a framework necessary to provide modifications in personnel attitudes and behaviors in situations related to safety. This work presents a Total Safety Management Model, based on the Model of Excellence of the Brazilian Quality Award and on the safety culture approach, which represents an alternative to this framework. The Model is currently under validation at the Nuclear Engineering Institute, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the results of its initial safety culture self assessment are also presented and discussed. (author)

  11. Co-Leadership – A Management Solution for Integrated Health and Social Care

    OpenAIRE

    Klinga, Charlotte; Hansson, Johan; Hasson, Henna; Andreen Sachs, Magna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Co-leadership has been identified as one approach to meet the managerial challenges of integrated services, but research on the topic is limited. In the present study, co-leadership, practised by pairs of managers – each manager representing one of the two principal organizations in integrated health and social care services – was explored.Aim: To investigate co-leadership in integrated health and social care, identify essential preconditions in fulfilling the management assignm...

  12. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon Carla; Twells Laurie; Bishop Lisa; Young Stephanie; Hawboldt John; O'Shea Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC) to usual physician care (UC) in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retros...

  13. Ethical perspectives on managed care as it relates to child and adolescent psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraty, R D; Hendren, R L; Flaa, C J

    1992-05-01

    Managed health care is providing an increasing influence in the way child and adolescent psychiatry is practiced. The goals of managed care have been to manage price, service, and quality. As external forces are brought to bear on child and adolescent psychiatry, ethical and legal dilemmas are faced. Underlying principles and the impact of society force physicians to reexamine their values and reeducate themselves about legal developments. PMID:1592769

  14. Personality Model in Human Resources Management

    OpenAIRE

    Jovan Zubovic

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the new „Personality model” of managing human resources in an organisation. The model analyses administrative personnel (usually called management) in an organisation and divides them into three core categories: managers, executives and advisors. Unlike traditional models which do not recognise advisors as part of an organisation, this model gives to advisors the same ranking as managers and executives. Model traces 11 categories of personality traits for every employee, r...

  15. Consulting Psychiatry within an Integrated Primary Care Model

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiter, Elizabeth A. Zeidler; Pandhi, Nancy; Fondow, Meghan D. M.; Thomas, Chantelle; Vonk, Jantina; Reardon, Claudia L; Serrano, Neftali

    2013-01-01

    After implementation of an integrated consulting psychiatry model and psychology services within primary care at a federally qualified health center, patients have increased access to needed mental health services, and primary care clinicians receive the support and collaboration needed to meet the psychiatric needs of the population.

  16. Strategic positioning. Part 1: The sources of value under managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauer, R T; Berkowitz, E

    1997-01-01

    Part 1 of this series organizes and discusses the sources of value against a background of an evolving managed care market. Part 2 will present, in more detail, the marketing and financial challenges to organizational positioning and performance across the four stages of managed care. What are the basic principles or tenets of value and how do they apply to the health care industry? Why is strategic positioning so important to health care organizations struggling in a managed care environment and what are the sources of value? Service motivated employees and the systems that educate them represent a stronger competitive advantage than having assets and technology that are available to anyone. As the health care marketplace evolves, organizations must develop a strategic position that will provide such value and for which the customer will be willing to pay. PMID:10169353

  17. Management of Port-a-Cath devices in long-term acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonczek, Rita; Nurse, Brenda A

    2012-01-01

    A reliable means of maintaining an intravascular access device (IVAD) is an important aspect of care for a patient in a long-term acute care (LTAC) setting. Overall, various authors have confirmed that complication rates are lower with use of an IVAD. The key to this success in low complication rates appears to be a team approach to catheter care and management. In our unique practice setting, LTAC, we have over 20 years of experience with IVAD care and management. In an extensive 15-year retrospective review of the IVAD care, we found very low rates of complications, including infections. This is directly related to a team approach to catheter care, protocol development, employee education, and postoperative management. PMID:23212956

  18. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris;

    2007-01-01

    the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions of...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  19. A discrete choice model for labor supply and child care

    OpenAIRE

    Kornstad, Tom; Thoresen, Thor Olav

    2002-01-01

    Abstract: A discrete choice model for labor supply and child care for mothers of preschoolers is presented. The mothers are assumed to make choices from a finite set of job possibilities and from a finite set of child care options. The options in the markets for child care are characterized by opening hours, fees and a number of quality attributes, such as mode of care. Similarly, jobs are characterized by a (fixed) wage rate, working hours and a number of variables related to job satisfac...

  20. First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Sandberg, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers' views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes. The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested. PMID:25628769

  1. Integrated care and optimal management of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Strange

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Geoff Strange1, Robin Fowler2, Corina Jary2, Brad Dalton3, Simon Stewart4, Eli Gabbay51Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, Monash University, VIC, Australia; 2Royal Perth Hospital and Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 3University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia; 4Baker Heart Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 5Royal Perth Hospital and University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, AustraliaAbstract: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH may occur as an idiopathic process or as a component of a variety of diseases, including connective tissue diseases, congenital heart disease, and exposure to appetite suppressants or infectious agents such as HIV. Untreated, it is a potentially devastating disease; however, diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific nature of symptoms during the early stages, and the fact that patients often present to a range of different medical specialties. The past decade has seen remarkable improvements in our understanding of the pathology associated with the condition and the development of PAH-specific therapies with the ability to alter the natural history of the disease. This article reviews the evidence for screening and diagnosis of susceptible patient groups and discusses treatment selection and recommendations based on data available from randomized controlled trials. In addition, due to the complexity of the diagnostic evaluation required and the treatment options available, this review mandates for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of PAH. We discuss the roles and organizational structure of a specialized PAH center in Perth, Western Australia to highlight these issues. Keywords: pulmonary hypertension, multidisciplinary care, systemic sclerosis, diagnostic protocol

  2. Adapting a strategic management model to hospital operating strategies. A model development and justification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinehart, K; Zimmerer, T W; Oswald, S

    1995-01-01

    Industrial organizations have employed the process of strategic management in their attempts to cope effectively with global competitive pressures, while attempting to build and maintain competitive advantage. With health-care organizations presently trying to cope with an increasingly turbulent environment created by the uncertainty as to pending legislation and anticipated reform, the need for such organizational strategic planning is apparent. Presents and discusses a methodology for adapting a business-oriented model of strategic planning to health care. PMID:10166203

  3. Musings on management. Ten ideas designed to rile everyone who cares about management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, H

    1996-01-01

    Henry Mintzberg, a professor of management at McGill University in Canada and at INSEAD in France, takes aim at the hype surrounding management fads and gurus and dares to suggest that the emperor has no clothes. In order to rile all who care about management and get them thinking creatively, he presents ten contrarian observations on such topics as the meanness of leanness, the folly of CEOs who fancy themselves strategists, the disempowering that so-called empowerment creates, the myopia of purely financial measures, and the inadequacy of M.B.A. programs. Mintzberg maintains, for example, that it is time to delayer the delayerers. He argues that delayering has created more problems than it has solved be cause it is, in essence, a process by which people who barely know what's going on get rid of those who do--a process ensuring that the real database of the organization, the key to what was its future, lines up at the unemployment office. Too many managers, he says, dream of becoming the next turnaround doctor. They fail to understand that great organizations, once created, don't need great leaders: if a company can't function on its own, a hero won't help. A leader who draws out the knowledge embedded in all parts of an organization is a leader who can help a company function alone--without heroes. Such leaders often practice what Mintzberg calls the craft style of management (as opposed to the professional style or the boss style). It is about inspiring, not empowering. It is based on mutual respect rooted in common experience and offers hope for improving what is now wrong with management. PMID:10158474

  4. Validation of an information–motivation–behavioral skills model of self-care among Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Junling; Wang, Jingli; Zhu, Yaocheng; Yu, Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-care is a crucial component of diabetes management. But comprehensive behavior change frameworks are needed to provide guidance for the design, implementation, and evaluation of diabetes self-care programs in diverse populations. We tested the Information–Motivation–Behavioral Skills (IMB) model in a sample of Chinese adults with Type 2 diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional study of 222 Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes was conducted in a primary care center. We collected info...

  5. A New Model of Delirium Care in the Acute Geriatric Setting: Geriatric Monitoring Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Mei

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium is a common and serious condition, which affects many of our older hospitalised patients. It is an indicator of severe underlying illness and requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment, associated with poor survival, functional outcomes with increased risk of institutionalisation following the delirium episode in the acute care setting. We describe a new model of delirium care in the acute care setting, titled Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU where the important concepts of delirium prevention and management are integrated. We hypothesize that patients with delirium admitted to the GMU would have better clinical outcomes with less need for physical and psychotropic restraints compared to usual care. Methods/Design GMU models after the Delirium Room with adoption of core interventions from Hospital Elder Life Program and use of evening bright light therapy to consolidate circadian rhythm and improve sleep in the elderly patients. The novelty of this approach lies in the amalgamation of these interventions in a multi-faceted approach in acute delirium management. GMU development thus consists of key considerations for room design and resource planning, program specific interventions and daily core interventions. Assessments undertaken include baseline demographics, comorbidity scoring, duration and severity of delirium, cognitive, functional measures at baseline, 6 months and 12 months later. Additionally we also analysed the pre and post-GMU implementation knowledge and attitude on delirium care among staff members in the geriatric wards (nurses, doctors and undertook satisfaction surveys for caregivers of patients treated in GMU. Discussion This study protocol describes the conceptualization and implementation of a specialized unit for delirium management. We hypothesize that such a model of care will not only result in better clinical outcomes for the elderly patient with delirium compared to usual geriatric care

  6. Cancer pain: A critical review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of pain is essential to effectively manage painful symptoms in patients attending palliative care. The objective of this review is to provide a detailed review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of patients with cancer pain. Cancer pain can be classified based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Classification based upon mechanisms not only addresses the underlying pathophysiology but also provides us with an understanding behind patient′s symptoms and treatment responses. Existing evidence suggests that the five mechanisms - central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, sympathetically maintained pain, nociceptive and cognitive-affective - operate in patients with cancer pain. Summary of studies showing evidence for physical therapy treatment methods for cancer pain follows with suggested therapeutic implications. Effective palliative physical therapy care using a mechanism-based classification model should be tailored to suit each patient′s findings, using a biopsychosocial model of pain.

  7. Differences in Hospital Managers', Unit Managers', and Health Care Workers' Perceptions of the Safety Climate for Respiratory Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kristina; Rogers, Bonnie M E; Brosseau, Lisa M; Payne, Julianne; Cooney, Jennifer; Joe, Lauren; Novak, Debra

    2016-07-01

    This article compares hospital managers' (HM), unit managers' (UM), and health care workers' (HCW) perceptions of respiratory protection safety climate in acute care hospitals. The article is based on survey responses from 215 HMs, 245 UMs, and 1,105 HCWs employed by 98 acute care hospitals in six states. Ten survey questions assessed five of the key dimensions of safety climate commonly identified in the literature: managerial commitment to safety, management feedback on safety procedures, coworkers' safety norms, worker involvement, and worker safety training. Clinically and statistically significant differences were found across the three respondent types. HCWs had less positive perceptions of management commitment, worker involvement, and safety training aspects of safety climate than HMs and UMs. UMs had more positive perceptions of management's supervision of HCWs' respiratory protection practices. Implications for practice improvements indicate the need for frontline HCWs' inclusion in efforts to reduce safety climate barriers and better support effective respiratory protection programs and daily health protection practices. PMID:27056750

  8. Dyspnea management in Palliative home care: A case series in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojanasak Thongkhamcharoen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing dyspnea at home is a challenging task. Although a competent palliative home care team can assist a patient to live at home with better pain control, dyspnea is usually not as well managed. In the Asian context, there are few research studies in dyspnea management in palliative home care. This paper aims to illustrate the cultural context that has an impact on dyspnea management at home and the assessment and management of dyspnea in a community palliative care setting in Malaysia. This paper reports on a study of 5 dyspneic patients suffering from both cancer-related and non-cancer-related dyspnea. Its focus is on a unique Asian cultural belief system that affects communication about prognosis and the role of family in palliative home care. In addition, this paper also describes dyspnea assessment, the barriers to morphine use, benzodiazepine prescription, oxygen therapy, and nonpharmacologic intervention in this center.

  9. Investigating factor structure of an instrument to measure social work students' preparedness for managed care environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael N; Houston-Vega, Mary Kay; Tan, Philip P; Hawkins, Wesley E

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the factor structure of an instrument to measure social work students' perceptions of preparedness to enter managed care environments. Exploratory statistical procedures to reduce data through principle component analysis identified nine factors with eigenvalues greater than 1.0. These factors include: perceived understanding of agency financial agendas, managing personal risk and liability, perceived understanding of agency documentation requirements, awareness of ethical and value conflicts in documentation, classroom preparation for documentation, understanding the fit between client advocacy and managed care agendas, worrying about law suits in employment settings, perceived understanding of managed care gatekeeping and service authorization, and perceptions of field preparation for documentation. Recommendations are made for utilizing this brief self-report instrument in training students for managed care settings. PMID:12425449

  10. A New Vision Of Management: Full Potential Management Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Fujimoto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes the Full Potential Management (FPM Model based upon the social model of disabilities coupled with principles of diversity management and disability-oriented human resource management. Despite the fact that the concept of management was once envisioned as having ‘value to society’ by improving the quality of life through efficient practices (Rimler, 1976, management literature has narrowly defined management as a means to gain increased productivity and achieve organizational goals, thus overlooking the social formation and implementation design for a better life (Diener & Seligman, 2004; Small, 2004; Whitley 1989. Based upon the diversity literature, we propose that social-oriented diversity management principles and practices are the key to transforming management concepts from achieving organizational potential to achieving social aims that maximize the potential and quality of life of each person.

  11. PERSONAL MANAGEMENT IN SOCIAL CARE IN THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Mackinova; Peter Slovak; Jana Keketiova; Thorsten Eidenmuller

    2015-01-01

    The concept of management should portray that it´s not only the implementation of higher orders and to oversee the regulations, but that the criterion is a relatively free management of activities with higher order. Management of human resources is the most important part of the whole management, because human resources determine and put into motion all other sources.

  12. Implications for multiple sclerosis in the era of the Affordable Care Act: the shifting managed care landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, A Scott; Owens, Gary M

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder of the central nervous system that is associated with disability, reduced quality of life, extensive medical and nonmedical costs, and lost productivity. Specialty medications that are crucial to effective disease management, helping to prevent debilitating episodes of relapse, account for a substantial portion of the medical expenditures associated with MS. Although these therapies are not considered cost-effective by conventional definitions, they are comparable to one another in cost-effectiveness estimates, leaving the complex task of designing cost-efficient formulary management strategies to managed care professionals. Current epidemiologic data suggest that most patients with MS are covered by some form of healthcare insurance, but plan designs and formulary restrictions may still create access barriers for some patients. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is recent federal legislation that seeks to provide new consumer protections, improve healthcare quality and accessibility while mitigating expenditures, and increase accountability of healthcare insurance companies. The impact of the ACA on specialty pharmaceuticals is unclear at this time, but it does appear to have already begun improving healthcare coverage across the population. Managed care professionals must work within the confines of the ACA to provide better and more affordable care that targets overall cost reductions rather than just pharmacy expenses. PMID:25734889

  13. Challenges and opportunities of health care supply chain management in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmuti, Dean; Khoury, Grace; Omran, Omar; Abou-Zaid, Ahmed S

    2013-01-01

    This article explores current supply chain management challenges and initiatives and identifies problems that affect supply chain management success in the U.S. health-care industry. In addition, it investigates the impact of health care supply chain management (SCM) initiatives on the overall organizational effectiveness. The attitudinal results, as well as the performance results presented in this study support the claim of health care proponents that the SCM allows organizations to reduce cost, improve quality, and reduce cycle time, and leads to high performance. PMID:23697853

  14. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This model describes the primary quality management methods which may be used to assess an organization's present strengths and weaknesses with regard to its use of quality management methods. This model ...

  15. Managing Health Care After Cancer Treatment: A Wellness Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Moye, Jennifer; Langdon, Maura; Jones, Janice M.; Haggstrom, David; Naik, Aanand D.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients and health care providers lack awareness of both the existence of, and treatments for, lingering distress and disability after treatment. A cancer survivorship wellness plan can help ensure that any referral needs for psychosocial and other restorative care after cancer treatment are identified.

  16. Aspects of family-managed care at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik

    . However, this formalization requires new support systems for collaboration and communication. Also, when informal care turns formal there is a risk that a caring family-member might have to give up professional goals such as a career, or suffer economically as one may not be able to work fulltime while...

  17. Latent class models for utilisation of health care

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Bago d’Uva

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores different approaches to econometric modelling of count measures of health care utilisation, with an emphasis on latent class models. A new model is proposed that combines the features of the two most common approaches- the hurdle model and the finite mixture Negative Binomial. Additionally, the panel structure of the data is taken into account. The proposed model is shown to perform better than the existing models for a particular application with data from the RAND Health...

  18. Application of a theoretical model to evaluate COPD disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asin Javier D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programmes are heterogeneous in nature and often lack a theoretical basis. An evaluation model has been developed in which theoretically driven inquiries link disease management interventions to outcomes. The aim of this study is to methodically evaluate the impact of a disease management programme for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD on process, intermediate and final outcomes of care in a general practice setting. Methods A quasi-experimental research was performed with 12-months follow-up of 189 COPD patients in primary care in the Netherlands. The programme included patient education, protocolised assessment and treatment of COPD, structural follow-up and coordination by practice nurses at 3, 6 and 12 months. Data on intermediate outcomes (knowledge, psychosocial mediators, self-efficacy and behaviour and final outcomes (dyspnoea, quality of life, measured by the CRQ and CCQ, and patient experiences were obtained from questionnaires and electronic registries. Results Implementation of the programme was associated with significant improvements in dyspnoea (p Conclusions The application of a theory-driven model enhances the design and evaluation of disease management programmes aimed at improving health outcomes. This study supports the notion that a theoretical approach strengthens the evaluation designs of complex interventions. Moreover, it provides prudent evidence that the implementation of COPD disease management programmes can positively influence outcomes of care.

  19. Practicing radiation oncology today - Part I: Meeting the challenge of managed care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The change in health care delivery is forcing radiation oncologists to examine every aspect of how they organize themselves, deliver care, evaluate the quality of that care, and how they are reimbursed for this process. While managed care has been implicated as the new paradigm that will change the way that health care is delivered, the authors maintain that outcomes research may be just as important a stimulus for change. This course will attempt to examine how managed care and outcomes research are impacting upon radiation oncology practice, and what radiation oncologists can do to maintain patient care standards. This course will introduce certain concepts that will be discussed in subsequent courses on Informatics and Evaluating New Technology. Topics Covered: 1. The Managed Care Nomenclature Explained: HMO's, PPO's, POS's, Carve-Outs 2. Outcomes Research: What it can and cannot do 3. Moving from QA to CQI to Benchmarking 4. Using Analytical Tools to Evaluate Capital Purchases and Operational Requirements 5. Evaluating Staffing Needs: Traditional jobs, Cross-training, Outsourcing, Physician extenders 6. Introduction to Evaluation of Technology 7. Introduction to Evaluation of Informatics 8. Potential gains from Shared Services 9. Networking vs. Mergers vs. Oncology IPA's vs. MSO's 10. Evaluating Managed Care Strategies and Contracts

  20. Year in review 2006: Critical Care--Resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Marcus J; Kuiper, Michael; Spronk, Peter E; Vroom, Margreeth B; Gajic, Ognjen

    2007-01-01

    As health care resources become increasingly constrained, it is imperative that intensive care unit resources be optimized. In the years to come, a number of challenges to intensive care medicine will need to be addressed as society changes. Last year's Critical Care papers provided us with a number of interesting and highly accessed original papers dealing with health care resources. The information yielded by these studies can help us to deal with issues such as prognostication, early detection and treatment of delirium, prevention of medical errors and use of radiology resources in critically ill patients. Finally, several aspects of scientific research in critically ill patients were investigated, focusing on the possibility of obtaining informed consent and recall of having given informed consent. PMID:17764592

  1. Year in review 2006: Critical Care – resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Marcus J; Kuiper, Michael; Spronk, Peter E; Vroom, Margreeth B; Gajic, Ognjen

    2007-01-01

    As health care resources become increasingly constrained, it is imperative that intensive care unit resources be optimized. In the years to come, a number of challenges to intensive care medicine will need to be addressed as society changes. Last year's Critical Care papers provided us with a number of interesting and highly accessed original papers dealing with health care resources. The information yielded by these studies can help us to deal with issues such as prognostication, early detection and treatment of delirium, prevention of medical errors and use of radiology resources in critically ill patients. Finally, several aspects of scientific research in critically ill patients were investigated, focusing on the possibility of obtaining informed consent and recall of having given informed consent. PMID:17764592

  2. [The development of strategic management of high-tech surgical medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, V S; Krasnov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The high-tech surgical medical care is one of the most effective types of medical care in Russia. However high-tech surgical treatment very often is inaccessible for patients. The development of basics of strategic management of high-tech surgical care makes it possible to enhance availability of this type of care and to shorten the gap between volumes of rendered care and population needs. This approach can be resulted in decrease of disability and mortality of the most prevalent diseases of cardio-vascular diseases, malignant neoplasms, etc. The prerequisites can be developed to enhance life quality and increase longevity of population. PMID:24175384

  3. Women as Care Managers: The Effect of Gender and Partnership Status on Grandparent Care for Grandchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Hasmanová Marhánková, Jaroslava; Štípková, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Grandparental care of grandchildren is a highly gendered institution, with women being more likely to participate in it than men. This article studies whether and why care by grandmothers and grandfathers is influenced by their family arrangement. Following previous research, the authors focus on the mediating role of grandmothers in the involvement of men in caring for their grandchildren. We use a combination of quantitative and qualitative data about grandparents with small grandchildren (...

  4. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-01

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m(3) (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures. PMID:19398317

  5. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Chenoweth, Lynn; Cunich, Michelle; Kendig, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Background A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care − CLiAC) was developed to improve managers’ leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australi...

  6. Nurse-managed care for health care workers in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamba, P; Dlamini, M; Mallinson, R K; Williams, V

    2013-10-01

    In Swaziland, the health care system is experiencing severe scarcity of health care workers (HCWs) due to difficult working conditions, migration and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic. Nurses and other HCWs in Swaziland are personally as affected by communicable diseases as the general population. High levels of HIV and TB co-infection bring added complexity to care. The loss of skilled staff in key positions has had a particularly negative impact on the quality of care and service delivery. The Swaziland Nurses Association (SNA) has established a Centre for Comprehensive Wellness for HCWs in the public and private sector and their immediate families to support the health workforce. PMID:24020598

  7. Case management for patients with chronic systolic heart failure in primary care: The HICMan exploratory randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunz Cornelia U

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic (systolic heart failure (CHF represents a clinical syndrome with high individual and societal burden of disease. Multifaceted interventions like case management are seen as promising ways of improving patient outcomes, but lack a robust evidence base, especially for primary care. The aim of the study was to explore the effectiveness of a new model of CHF case management conducted by doctors' assistants (DAs, equivalent to a nursing role and supported by general practitioners (GPs. Methods This patient-randomised controlled trial (phase II included 31 DAs and employing GPs from 29 small office-based practices in Germany. Patients with CHF received either case management (n = 99 consisting of telephone monitoring and home visits or usual care (n = 100 for 12 months. We obtained clinical data, health care utilisation data, and patient-reported data on generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL, SF-36 and KCCQ, CHF self-care (EHFScBS and on quality of care (PACIC-5A. To compare between groups at follow-up, we performed analyses of covariance and logistic regression models. Results Baseline measurement showed high guideline adherence to evidence-based pharmacotherapy and good patient self-care: Patients received angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (or angiotensin-2 receptor antagonists in 93.8% and 95%, and betablockers in 72.2% and 84%, and received both in combination in 68% and 80% of cases respectively. EHFScBS scores (SD were 25.4 (8.4 and 25.0 (7.1. KCCQ overall summary scores (SD were 65.4 (22.6 and 64.7 (22.7. We found low hospital admission and mortality rates. EHFScBS scores (-3.6 [-5.7;-1.6] and PACIC and 5A scores (both 0.5, [0.3;0.7/0.8] improved in favour of CM but QoL scores showed no significant group differences (Physical/Mental SF-36 summary scores/KCCQ-os [95%CI]: -0.3 [-3.0;2.5]/-0.1 [-3.4;3.1]/1.7 [-3.0;6.4]. Conclusions In this sample, with little room for improvement regarding evidence

  8. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM): A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large sta...

  9. Intervening at the Setting Level to Prevent Behavioral Incidents in Residential Child Care: Efficacy of the CARE Program Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Charles V; Smith, Elliott G; Holden, Martha J; Norton, Catherine I; Nunno, Michael A; Sellers, Deborah E

    2016-07-01

    The current study examined the impact of a setting-level intervention on the prevention of aggressive or dangerous behavioral incidents involving youth living in group care environments. Eleven group care agencies implemented Children and Residential Experiences (CARE), a principle-based program that helps agencies use a set of evidence-informed principles to guide programming and enrich the relational dynamics throughout the agency. All agencies served mostly youth referred from child welfare. The 3-year implementation of CARE involved intensive agency-wide training and on-site consultation to agency leaders and managers around supporting and facilitating day-to-day application of the principles in both childcare and staff management arenas. Agencies provided data over 48 months on the monthly frequency of behavioral incidents most related to program objectives. Using multiple baseline interrupted time series analysis to assess program effects, we tested whether trends during the program implementation period declined significantly compared to the 12 months before implementation. Results showed significant program effects on incidents involving youth aggression toward adult staff, property destruction, and running away. Effects on aggression toward peers and self-harm were also found but were less consistent. Staff ratings of positive organizational social context (OSC) predicted fewer incidents, but there was no clear relationship between OSC and observed program effects. Findings support the potential efficacy of the CARE model and illustrate that intervening "upstream" at the setting level may help to prevent coercive caregiving patterns and increase opportunities for healthy social interactions. PMID:27138932

  10. The pediatric intensive care unit business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, Charles L

    2013-06-01

    All pediatric intensivists need a primer on ICU finance. The author describes potential alternate revenue sources for the division. Differentiating units by size or academic affiliation, the author describes drivers of expense. Strategies to manage the bottom line including negotiations for hospital services are covered. Some of the current trends in physician productivity and its described metrics, with particular focus on clinical FTE management is detailed. Methods of using this data to enhance revenue are discussed. Some of the other current trends in the ICU business related to changes at the federal and state level as well as in the insurance sector, moving away from fee-for-service are covered. PMID:23639657

  11. The Influence of Adult Attachment on Patient Self-Management in Primary Care - The Need for a Personalized Approach and Patient-Centred Care

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Brenk-Franz; Bernhard Strauss; Fabian Tiesler; Christian Fleischhauer; Paul Ciechanowski; Nico Schneider; Jochen Gensichen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-management strategies are essential elements of evidence-based treatment in patients with chronic conditions in primary care. Our objective was to analyse different self-management skills and behaviours and their association to adult attachment in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions. Methods In the apricare study (Adult Attachment in Primary Care) we used a prospective longitudinal design to examine the association between adult attachment and self-management...

  12. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. METHODS AND RESULTS: 115 adults aged 18-75 years with acute...... information session aimed at encouraging self-management as complementary to usual care (n=56). Data on resource use were obtained from Danish national registries and valued from a societal perspective. Patient cost and health-related quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; based on EuroQol five...... QALYs between the groups were negligible. CONCLUSIONS: Chiropractic care was more cost-effective than self-management. Therefore, chiropractic care can be seen as a good example of a targeted primary care approach for a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT...

  13. Chiropractic as spine care: a model for the profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metz R Douglas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 100 years after its inception the chiropractic profession has failed to define itself in a way that is understandable, credible and scientifically coherent. This failure has prevented the profession from establishing its cultural authority over any specific domain of health care. Objective To present a model for the chiropractic profession to establish cultural authority and increase market share of the public seeking chiropractic care. Discussion The continued failure by the chiropractic profession to remedy this state of affairs will pose a distinct threat to the future viability of the profession. Three specific characteristics of the profession are identified as impediments to the creation of a credible definition of chiropractic: Departures from accepted standards of professional ethics; reliance upon obsolete principles of chiropractic philosophy; and the promotion of chiropractors as primary care providers. A chiropractic professional identity should be based on spinal care as the defining clinical purpose of chiropractic, chiropractic as an integrated part of the healthcare mainstream, the rigorous implementation of accepted standards of professional ethics, chiropractors as portal-of-entry providers, the acceptance and promotion of evidence-based health care, and a conservative clinical approach. Conclusion This paper presents the spine care model as a means of developing chiropractic cultural authority and relevancy. The model is based on principles that would help integrate chiropractic care into the mainstream delivery system while still retaining self-identity for the profession.

  14. Managing diverse occupational therapy resources in a creative, corporate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, S

    1993-10-01

    Two occupational therapy departments were amalgamated into a corporate whole and charged with the development of a workable, corporate structure. The departmental model which was developed served to enhance the concepts of quality of working life, employee autonomy, management team and quality circle theory. This paper provides a background from business and organizational literature, and outlines the development of the departmental model, in concert with the adoption of the client-centred model of occupational performance as a department basis for practice. This development was taking place concurrently with larger, institutional changes into a decentralized clinical programme management model. Discussion highlights the level of staff satisfaction with the changes, areas of concern during the development of the system and plans for the future growth. During this period of massive and critical change in the delivery of health care services, there has been a trend in restructuring health care institutions towards decentralized models. This paper will describe the experience of one occupational therapy department in developing an innovative departmental structure involving participatory management amalgamation. It is believed that the experience of the past occupational therapy work units with one viable option for a renewed management model. Staff skill sets can be maximized and optimal potential realized while faced with inevitable resource shrinkage and service reorganization. PMID:10129023

  15. Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care: Results of the 2002 Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol McPhillips-Tangum

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In the United States, tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death and disease. The health and cost consequences of tobacco dependence have made treatment and prevention of tobacco use a key priority among multiple stakeholders, including health plans, insurers, providers, employers, and policymakers. In 2002, the third survey of tobacco control practices and policies in health plans was conducted by America’s Health Insurance Plans’ technical assistance office as part of the Addressing Tobacco in Managed Care (ATMC program. Methods The ATMC survey was conducted in the spring of 2002 via mail, e-mail, and fax. A 19-item survey instrument was developed and pilot-tested. Of the 19 items, 12 were the same as in previous years, four were modified to collect more detailed data on areas of key interest, and three were added to gain information about strategies to promote smoking cessation. The sample for the survey was drawn from the 687 plans listed in the national directory of member and nonmember health plans in America's Health Insurance Plans. Results Of the 246 plans in the sample, 152 plans (62% representing more than 43.5 million health maintenance organization members completed the survey. Results show that health plans are using evidence-based programs and clinical guidelines to address tobacco use. Compared to ATMC survey data collected in 1997 and 2000, the 2002 ATMC survey results indicate that more health plans are providing full coverage for first-line pharmacotherapies and telephone counseling for smoking cessation. Plans have also shown improvement in their ability to identify at least some members who smoke. Similarly, a greater percentage of plans are employing strategies to address smoking cessation during the postpartum period to prevent smoking relapse and during pediatric visits to reduce or eliminate children’s exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Conclusion The results of the 2002 ATMC survey

  16. Workflow: a new modeling concept in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, F; Beuscart, R; Geib, J M

    1995-01-01

    The term Groupware concerns computer-based systems that support groups of people engaged in a common task (goal) and that provide an interface to a shared environment [1]. The absence of a common tool for exchanges between physicians and nurses causes a multiplication of paper supports for the recording of information. Our objective is to study software architectures in particular medical units that allow task coordination and managing conflicts between participants within a distributed environment. The final goal of this research is to propose a computer solution that could answer the user requirements in Critical Care Units (CCUs). This paper describes the Workflow management approach [5] for supporting group work in health care field. The emphasis is especially on asynchronous cooperation. This approach was applied to CCUs through the analysis and the proposal of a new architecture [6]. We shall limit ourselves to explaining control board and analyzing the message management we support. PMID:8591248

  17. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntinga Maaike E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling frail older adults. Methods/design In a 2-year stepped-wedge cluster randomised clinical trial with 6-monthly measurements, the chronic care model will be compared with usual care. The trial will be carried out among 35 primary care practices in two regions in the Netherlands. Per region, practices will be randomly allocated to four allocation arms designating the starting point of the intervention. Participants: 1200 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 or over and their primary informal caregivers. Primary care physicians will identify frail individuals based on a composite definition of frailty and a polypharmacy criterion. Final inclusion criterion: scoring 3 or more on a disability case-finding tool. Intervention: Every 6 months patients will receive a geriatric in-home assessment by a practice nurse, followed by a tailored care plan. Expert teams will manage and train practice nurses. Patients with complex care needs will be reviewed in interdisciplinary consultations. Evaluation: We will perform an effect evaluation, an economic evaluation, and a process evaluation. Primary outcome is quality of life as measured with the Short Form-12 questionnaire. Effect analyses will be based on the “intention-to-treat” principle, using multilevel regression analysis. Cost measurements will be administered continually during the study period. A cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis will be conducted comparing mean total costs to functional

  18. Transmural care in the rehabilitation sector: implementation experiences with a transmural care model for people with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J.H.A.; de Witte, L.P.; Engels, J.P.G.M.; Van den Heuvel, W.J.A.; Post, M.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Purposes The purpose of this article is first to describe the development and content of a transmural care model in the rehabilitation sector, which aims to reduce the number and severity of health problems of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and improve the continuity of care. Second, the purpose is to describe the applicability and implementation experiences of a transmural care model in the rehabilitation sector. Methods The transmural care model was developed in cooperation w...

  19. Intermediate care: for better or worse? Process evaluation of an intermediate care model between a university hospital and a residential home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmaat Tonnie ACM

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermediate care was developed in order to bridge acute, primary and social care, primarily for elderly persons with complex care needs. Such bridging initiatives are intended to reduce hospital stays and improve continuity of care. Although many models assume positive effects, it is often ambiguous what the benefits are and whether they can be transferred to other settings. This is due to the heterogeneity of intermediate care models and the variety of collaborating partners that set up such models. Quantitative evaluation captures only a limited series of generic structure, process and outcome parameters. More detailed information is needed to assess the dynamics of intermediate care delivery, and to find ways to improve the quality of care. Against this background, the functioning of a low intensity early discharge model of intermediate care set up in a residential home for patients released from an Amsterdam university hospital has been evaluated. The aim of this study was to produce knowledge for management to improve quality of care, and to provide more generalisable insights into the accumulated impact of such a model. Methods A process evaluation was carried out using quantitative and qualitative methods. Registration forms and patient questionnaires were used to quantify the patient population in the model. Statistical analysis encompassed T-tests and chi-squared test to assess significance. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 staff members representing all disciplines working with the model. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using both 'open' and 'framework' approaches. Results Despite high expectations, there were significant problems. A heterogeneous patient population, a relatively unqualified staff and cultural differences between both collaborating partners impeded implementation and had an impact on the functioning of the model. Conclusion We concluded that setting up a low intensity

  20. The Care Manager's Dilemma: Balancing Human Rights with Risk Management under the Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebble, Kate; Diesfeld, Kate; Frey, Rosemary; Sutton, Daniel; Honey, Michelle; Vickery, Russell; McKenna, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In New Zealand, the Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003 provides diversion for persons with an intellectual disability who have been charged with, or convicted of, a criminal offence. This unique Act moves the responsibility for such "care recipients" from the criminal justice system to a disability sector that…