WorldWideScience

Sample records for care facilities helps

  1. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS: background, aims and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marginean Roxana

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet country-specific needs, and (iii at identifying best practice across Europe. Criteria for best practice will include evidence on the efficacy of physical health interventions and of their effectiveness in routine care, cost implications and feasibility for adaptation and implementation of interventions across different settings in Europe. HELPS will develop and implement a "physical health promotion toolkit". The toolkit will provide information to empower residents and staff to identify the most relevant risk factors in their specific context and to select the most appropriate action out of a range of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a stakeholder analysis, (b international literature reviews, (c Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities. Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. Discussion A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental

  2. Helping small babies survive: an evaluation of facility-based Kangaroo Mother Care implementation progress in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Aliganyira, Patrick; Kerber, Kate; Davy, Karen; Gamache, Nathalie; Sengendo, Namaala Hanifah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prematurity is the leading cause of newborn death in Uganda, accounting for 38% of the nation's 39,000 annual newborn deaths. Kangaroo mother care is a high-impact; cost-effective intervention that has been prioritized in policy in Uganda but implementation has been limited. Methods A standardised, cross-sectional, mixed-method evaluation design was used, employing semi-structured key-informant interviews and observations in 11 health care facilities implementing kangaroo mother ...

  3. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS): background, aims and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Marginean Roxana; Lucas Ramona; Lech Katarzyna; Larsen Jens; Lai Taavi; Hjorth Peter; Henderson John; Halis Ulaş; Germanavicius Arunas; Genova Aneta; Friedrich Fabian; Freidl Marion; Dragomirecka Eva; Dernovsek Mojca; Burton Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical il...

  4. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS): background, aims and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Weiser, P.; Becker, T; Losert, C.; Altpekin, K.; Berti, L.; Burti, L.; Burton, A

    2009-01-01

    Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical ...

  5. Health care in correctional facilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Thorburn, K M

    1995-01-01

    More than 1.3 million adults are in correctional facilities, including jails and federal and state prisons, in the United States. Health care of the inmates is an integral component of correctional management. Health services in correctional facilities underwent dramatic improvements during the 1970s. Public policy trends beginning in the early 1980s substantially affected the demographics and health status of jail and prison populations and threatened earlier gains in the health care of inma...

  6. Helping You Choose Quality Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health Care Behavioral Health Care Critical Access Hospitals Home Care (+ Pharmacy) Hospital Laboratory Nursing Care Center International Accreditation Accreditation Top Spots What ...

  7. Self Help Access in Routine Primary Care - the SHARP project

    OpenAIRE

    Lucock, Mike; Lawson, Mike; Khan, W.(National Centre for Physics, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan)

    2011-01-01

    NICE guidance recommends guided self-help approaches for anxiety and depression, provided in a stepped care service model. These interventions are provided within IAPT services and to compliment this, the SHARP (Self-help Access in Routine Primary Care) project was designed to enable primary care practitioners to support patients with mild to moderate anxiety and/or depression to access CBT based self-help information. The project consists of a training course, website and brief self-help lea...

  8. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in making health care safe. That includes doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. Health care organizations ... embarrassed if you don't understand what your doctor, nurse or other health care professional tells you. • Don’ ...

  9. Assisted Living Facilities, care facilities, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Assisted Living Facilities dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'care facilities'. Data...

  10. Helping Behavior, Dispositional Empathic Concern, and the Principle of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Mark Ottoni; Bekkers, Rene

    2010-01-01

    This research investigates the relative strength of two correlates of helping behavior: dispositional empathic concern and a moral principle to care about others. The empathy-helping and care-helping relationships are investigated using data from the General Social Survey, a nationally representative random sample of the U.S. adult population. Ten…

  11. Elderly care recipients’ perceptions of treatment helpfulness for depression and the relationship with help-seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Joanna; Naismith, Sharon L; Luscombe, Georgina M.; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to examine perceptions of the helpfulness of treatments/interventions for depression held by elderly care recipients, to examine whether these beliefs are related to help-seeking and whether the experience of depression affects beliefs about treatment seeking, and to identify the characteristics of help-seekers. Method One hundred eighteen aged care recipients were surveyed on their beliefs about the helpfulness of a variety of treatments/interventions for depression...

  12. Health Care Facilities Resilient to Climate Change Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn Paterson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events and create risks that will impact health care facilities. Health care facilities will need to assess climate change risks and adopt adaptive management strategies to be resilient, but guidance tools are lacking. In this study, a toolkit was developed for health care facility officials to assess the resiliency of their facility to climate change impacts. A mixed methods approach was used to develop climate change resiliency indicators to inform the development of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist for officials who work in areas of emergency management, facilities management and health care services and supply chain management, a facilitator’s guide for administering the checklist, and a resource guidebook to inform adaptation. Six health care facilities representing three provinces in Canada piloted the checklist. Senior level officials with expertise in the aforementioned areas were invited to review the checklist, provide feedback during qualitative interviews and review the final toolkit at a stakeholder workshop. The toolkit helps health care facility officials identify gaps in climate change preparedness, direct allocation of adaptation resources and inform strategic planning to increase resiliency to climate change.

  13. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... member of your health care team. The “Speak Up” program is sponsored by The Joint Commission. They ... health care mistakes, patients are urged to “Speak Up.” S peak up if you have questions or concerns. ...

  14. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  15. The meaning of receiving help from home nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Aud; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of receiving help from home nursing care for the chronically ill, elderly persons living in their homes. The study was carried out in Norway. Data were collected by narrative interviews and analysed by phenomenological hermeneutic interpretations. Receiving help from home nursing care sometimes meant 'Being ill and dependent on help'. Other times it meant 'Being at the mercy of help'. It could also mean 'Feeling inferior as a human being'. Sometimes help was given by nurses who were respectful and proficient at caring for an elderly person, while at other times nurses seemed to be incompetent and worked with a paternalistic attitude without respect for privacy. Receiving help also meant elderly persons wanted to be regarded and approached as equal human beings, supported in the courage to meet challenges in life. PMID:23625732

  16. Assisted Living Facilities - MO 2010 Long Term Care Facilities (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Long Term Care facilities (nursing homes) in Missouri - Data will not be made available for download via MSDIS. Interested parties should send an email inquiry to...

  17. Integration of animals in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Bunderšek, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical part of the thesis provides insight into the role animals play in different periods of a person’s life. The usefulness of human-animal interaction is demonstrated with a description of the ways of working with animals and the presentation of different animal species. The emphasis is put on children and minors placed in residential care facilities. While the advantages of introducing animals into residential care facilities are provided, the weaknesses and risks are also pointe...

  18. Health care help seeking behaviour among prisoners in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesset Merete

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prisoners are associated with high health care needs compared with the general population. This study aims to investigate prisoners' use of health service. Methods A cross-sectional study of 29 prisons in central and southern parts of Norway. A questionnaire was distributed to 1, 454 prisoners (90% response rate. Multilevel analyses were employed to analyse help seeking behaviour among the prisoners. Results Help seeking was substantially associated with sleep problems and drug problems. There was also a tendency for closed prisons as well as high staffing levels of healthcare professionals to be associated with elevated health care use. Conclusions This study suggests that sleep problems and drug use are most frequently associated with health service use. The differences in health care use between prisons suggest that the implementation of prison health care standards should be addressed.

  19. Elderly care recipients’ perceptions of treatment helpfulness for depression and the relationship with help-seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Joanna Atkins,1 Sharon L Naismith,1 Georgina M Luscombe,2 Ian B Hickie1 1Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2School of Rural Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Orange, NSW, Australia Objective: This study aims to examine perceptions of the helpfulness of treatments/interventions for depression held by elderly care recipients, to examine whether these beliefs are related to help-seeking and whether the experience of dep...

  20. Elderly care recipients’ perceptions of treatment helpfulness for depression and the relationship with help-seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins J; Naismith SL; Luscombe GM; Hickie IB

    2015-01-01

    Joanna Atkins,1 Sharon L Naismith,1 Georgina M Luscombe,2 Ian B Hickie1 1Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2School of Rural Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Orange, NSW, Australia Objective: This study aims to examine perceptions of the helpfulness of treatments/interventions for depression held by elderly care recipients, to examine whether these beliefs are related to help-seeking and whether the experience of depress...

  1. Elderly care recipients’ perceptions of treatment helpfulness for depression and the relationship with help-seeking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Atkins,1 Sharon L Naismith,1 Georgina M Luscombe,2 Ian B Hickie1 1Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2School of Rural Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Orange, NSW, Australia Objective: This study aims to examine perceptions of the helpfulness of treatments/interventions for depression held by elderly care recipients, to examine whether these beliefs are related to help-seeking and whether the experience of depression affects beliefs about treatment seeking, and to identify the characteristics of help-seekers. Method: One hundred eighteen aged care recipients were surveyed on their beliefs about the helpfulness of a variety of treatments/interventions for depression, on their actual help-seeking behaviors, and on their experience of depression (current and past. Results: From the sample, 32.4% of the participants screened positive for depression on the Geriatric Depression Scale, and of these, 24.2% reported receiving treatment. Respondents believed the most helpful treatments for depression were increasing physical activity, counseling, and antidepressant medication. Help-seeking from both professional and informal sources appeared to be related to belief in the helpfulness of counseling and antidepressants; in addition, help-seeking from informal sources was also related to belief in the helpfulness of sleeping tablets and reading self-help books. In univariate analyses, lower levels of cognitive impairment and being in the two lower age tertiles predicted a greater likelihood of help-seeking from professional sources, and female sex and being in the lower two age tertiles predicted greater likelihood of help-seeking from informal sources. In multivariate analyses, only lower levels of cognitive impairment remained a significant predictor of help-seeking from professional sources, whereas both lower age and female sex continued to predict a greater likelihood of help

  2. Health care help seeking behaviour among prisoners in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Nesset Merete; Rustad Åse-Bente; Kjelsberg Ellen; Almvik Roger; Bjørngaard Johan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Prisoners are associated with high health care needs compared with the general population. This study aims to investigate prisoners' use of health service. Methods A cross-sectional study of 29 prisons in central and southern parts of Norway. A questionnaire was distributed to 1, 454 prisoners (90% response rate). Multilevel analyses were employed to analyse help seeking behaviour among the prisoners. Results Help seeking was substantially associated with sleep problems an...

  3. Assisted Living Facilities - CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN: Residential Care Facilities, Nursing Homes, and Hospices in Indiana in 2007 (Indiana State Department of Health, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 86 residential care facilities, 525 long-term care facilities (nursing homes), and...

  4. Using social networks to help patients self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anne

    Social networks are creating new ways for people with long-term conditions to seek support and offering new ways for health professionals to communicate with patients who have long-term conditions. There is evidence this may be helpful but nurses need to be skilled at operating in these new digital spaces to support patients effectively. This article discusses the growing use of social networks in long-term conditions, focusing on their use in diabetes care. PMID:23560343

  5. Agency for quality and accreditation of the health care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Zisovska, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    The Agency ensures quality and safety in health care through the process of accreditation and re-accreditation of the health care facilities. The Agency develops, revise and improves the standards of the health care in HC facilities, monitors the implementation of the standards and facilitates the preparedness of the HC facility for successful external assessment.

  6. 40 CFR 160.43 - Test system care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Facilities § 160.43 Test system care facilities. (a) A testing... testing facility shall have a number of animal rooms or other test system areas separate from those... sanitary storage of waste before removal from the testing facility. Disposal facilities shall be...

  7. Planning for Maintaining School Facilities? Help Is on the Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Thomas; Young, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Describes cooperative effort between Association of School Business Officials, International and National Forum on Education Statistics to develop a guide to facilities maintenance planning, to be completed in 2 years, for use by local school districts. (PKP)

  8. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Laboratory Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in making health care safe. That includes doctors, nurses, laboratory technologists, phlebotomists (health care staff who take ... if you don't understand something that your doctor, nurse, or other health care professional tells you. • Don’ ...

  9. 40 CFR 792.43 - Test system care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Facilities § 792.43 Test system care facilities. (a) A testing facility shall have a sufficient number of animal rooms or other test system areas, as... different tests. (b) A testing facility shall have a number of animal rooms or other test system...

  10. Child Care Assistance: Helping Parents Work and Children Succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Hannah; Walker, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Quality child care enables parents to work or go to school while also providing young children with the early childhood education experiences needed for healthy development. The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary federal program that provides funding for child care assistance for low-income working parents. Child care…

  11. 42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section 476.76 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities. Before implementation of review, a QIO must make...

  12. Transitional care in skilled nursing facilities: a multiple case study

    OpenAIRE

    Toles, Mark; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Naylor, Mary D; Barroso, Julie; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Among hospitalized older adults who transfer to skilled nursing facilities (SNF) for short stays and subsequently transfer to home, twenty two percent require additional emergency department or hospital care within 30 days. Transitional care services, that provide continuity and coordination of care as older adults transition between settings of care, decrease complications during transitions in care, however, they have not been examined in SNFs. Thus, this study described how exis...

  13. Facility Service Environments, Staffing, and Psychosocial Care in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Gammonley, Denise; Paek, Seung Chun; Frahm, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Using 2003 Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data for Medicare and Medicaid certified facilities (N=14, 184) and multinomial logistic regression this study investigated if (1) psychosocial care quality was better in facilities where State requirements for qualified social services staffing exceeded Federal minimum regulations and (2) facility service environments are associated with psychosocial care quality. For-profit status and higher percentage of Medicaid residents are as...

  14. Urinary incontinence in extended care facilities: a literature review and proposal for continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavner, K

    1998-12-01

    Despite inconsistencies in the literature regarding research design, definitions, outcomes measures, and maintenance programs, the majority of continence experts have accepted prompted voiding as a successful method for decreasing urinary incontinence in extended care facilities. Research findings to date lack a consistent definition of urinary incontinence, and no objective outcomes measures are available to evaluate the success of an intervention. Furthermore, maintenance of an intervention is often not included in the research design. The findings to date suggest that prompted voiding programs in extended care facilities can help decrease cost of care and dependence, increase self esteem, increase dignity, maintain skin health, and increase satisfaction with care among significant others. Implications for research include developing more structured approaches to maintaining continence, comprehensive training programs for extended care facility staff at all levels, and realistic maintenance protocols for interventions used to maintain continence. PMID:10026548

  15. 21 CFR 58.43 - Animal care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... testing facility shall have a sufficient number of animal rooms or areas, as needed, to assure proper: (1... (4) routine or specialized housing of animals. (b) A testing facility shall have a number of animal... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Animal care facilities. 58.43 Section 58.43...

  16. Helping People Make Better Long-Term-Care Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L.; Boston, Krista; Chilvers, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative online system to support long-term-care decision making. Design and Methods: The Long-Term Care Choices tool is a web-based system that uses expert opinion and structures decision making. Results: The system has been well accepted, and most users find it easy to use. Implications:…

  17. Coexisting principles and logics of elder care : Help to self-help and consumer-oriented service?

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene; Eskelinen, Leena; Boll Hansen, Eigil

    2015-01-01

    Healthy and active ageing has become an ideal in Western societies. In the Nordic countries, this ideal has been supported through a policy of help to self-help in elder care since the 1980s. However, reforms inspired by New Public Management (NPM) have introduced a new policy principle of consumer-oriented service that stresses the wishes and priorities of older people. We have studied how these two principles are applied by care workers in Denmark. Is one principle or logic replacing the ot...

  18. Does Early Child Care Help or Hurt Children's Development?

    OpenAIRE

    Felfe, Christina; Lalive, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    More children than ever attend center-based care early in life. We study whether children who attend center-based care before age 3 have better or worse language and motor skills, socio-emotional maturity, and school readiness just before entering primary school. In data covering about 36,000 children in one West German state, we use a marginal treatment effects framework to show how causal effects vary with observed characteristics of children, parents, and care centers and with unobserved p...

  19. Does early child care help or hurt childrens's development?

    OpenAIRE

    Felfe, Christina; Lalive, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    More children than ever attend center-based care early in life. We study whether children who attend center-based care before age 3 have better or worse language and motor skills, socio-emotional maturity, and school readiness just before entering primary school. In data covering about 36,000 children in one West German state, we use a marginal treatment effects framework to show how causal effects vary with observed characteristics of children, parents, and care centers and with unobserved p...

  20. Finding More Help (Long Distance Care-Giving)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caregiver: Hoarding Failure to take essential medications or refusal to seek medical treatment for serious illness Leaving ... either by the caregiver or the person receiving care. If your parent is in a long-term ...

  1. Improving the Help-desk Service of the Facility Superintendents at Laurea Leppävaara

    OpenAIRE

    Thieu, Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    The subject of the thesis project is the facility management help-desk service of the Facility Superintendents at Laurea University of Applied Sciences, Leppävaara campus. The main purpose of the thesis is to develop the help-desk service by examining the experiences of customers. The strategy of the research included three stages. Initially, information about the current situation of the service was investigated and then problems were identified. After that, based on literature and the resul...

  2. Care Perceptions among Residents of LTC Facilities Purporting to Offer Person-Centred Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Leeann; MacEntee, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    This study explored qualitatively how residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities feel about and adapt to the care they receive. We interviewed and observed a purposeful selection of elderly residents in seven facilities purporting to provide person-centred care. Interpretative descriptions from 43 personal interviews with 23 participants answered the question: How do residents perceive the care rendered in LTC facilities purporting to offer person-centred care? Three themes emerged: (1) the caring environment; (2) preservation of dignity; and (3) maintenance of personal autonomy. Participants were sympathetic to the nursing staff's workload, but felt distant from the staff. Participants gave examples of poor care and lack of empathy, human indignities, and violations of personal autonomy caused by institutional policies they felt inhibited their ability to receive care based on their preferences. Overall, they challenged the claims of person-centred care, but adapted to cope with an environment that threatened their dignity and autonomy. PMID:27063137

  3. 75 FR 54627 - Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities AGENCY... guidance document entitled, Best Management Practices for Unused Pharmaceuticals at Health Care Facilities... been studying unused pharmaceutical disposal practices at health care facilities, prompted by...

  4. Challenging Our Assumptions: Helping a Baby Adjust to Center Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Enid

    2003-01-01

    Contends that assumptions concerning infants' adjustment to child center care need to be tempered with attention to observation, thought, and commitment to each individual baby. Describes the Options Daycare program for pregnant teens and young mothers. Presents a case study illustrating the need for openness in strategy and planning for…

  5. Hospitals, care facility attribute, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hospitals dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'care facility attribute'. Data by this...

  6. EMS Stations, care facility attribute, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This EMS Stations dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'care facility attribute'. Data by...

  7. Financial Analysis of a Health-Care Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Bezděková, Pavla

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is carried out using selected methods the financial analysis of a Health-Care facility of the nature a hospital, an assessment of its financial health, its operation and financing.

  8. Access to public dental care facilities in Chandigarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himbala Verma

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Dental health care access and only limited dental facilities were available in most of the dental clinics in Chandigarh. Self-reported dental problem was low, and people ignored their dental problems.

  9. Challenges in Diabetes Care: Can Digital Health Help Address Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Varun; Wolf, Alexander; Brown, Adam; Close, Kelly

    2016-07-01

    In Brief There is great enthusiasm for the potential of digital health solutions in medicine and diabetes to address key care challenges: patient and provider burden, lack of data to inform therapeutic decision-making, poor access to care, and costs. However, the field is still in its nascent days; many patients and providers do not currently engage with digital health tools, and for those who do, the burden is still often high. Over time, digital health has excellent potential to collect data more seamlessly, make collected data more useful, and drive better outcomes at lower costs in less time. But there is still much to prove. This review offers key background information on the current state of digital health in diabetes, six of the most promising digital health technologies and services, and the challenges that remain. PMID:27621530

  10. Hospitals - MEDICAL_CARE_FACILITIES_MHMP_IN: Medical Care Facilities in Indiana, derived from Essential Facilities Data of the Multi-Hazard Mitigation Planning Data (The Polis Center, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — MEDICAL_CARE_FACILITIES_MHMP_IN.SHP is a point shapefile that shows medical care facilities in Indiana. MEDICAL_CARE_FACILITIES_MHMP_IN.SHP was derived from the...

  11. Standards for Psychological Services in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Smith, Michael; Frazer, Deborah; Molinari, Victor; Rosowsky, Erlene; Crose, Royda; Stillwell, Nick; Kramer, Nanette; Hartman-Stein, Paula; Qualls, Sara; Salamon, Michael; Duffy, Michael; Parr, Joyce; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of standards for psychological practice in long-term care facilities. The standards, which were developed by Psychologists in Long-Term Care, address provider characteristics, methods of referral, assessment practices, treatment, and ethical issues. Offers suggestions for use of the standards. (MKA)

  12. 7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health care facilities. 15b.38 Section 15b.38... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care... material concerning waivers of rights or consent to treatment shall take such steps as are necessary...

  13. Why caretakers bypass Primary Health Care facilities for child care - a case from rural Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Kahabuka Catherine; Kvåle Gunnar; Moland Karen; Hinderaker Sven

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Research on health care utilization in low income countries suggests that patients frequently bypass PHC facilities in favour of higher-level hospitals - despite substantial additional time and financial costs. There are limited number of studies focusing on user's experiences at such facilities and reasons for bypassing them. This study aimed to identify factors associated with bypassing PHC facilities among caretakers seeking care for their underfive children and to expl...

  14. Influenza in long-term care facilities: preventable, detectable, treatable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2009-09-01

    Influenza in long-term care facilities is an ever more challenging problem. Vaccination of residents and health care workers is the most important preventive measure. Although vaccine efficacy has been questioned, the preponderance of data favors vaccination. Antiviral resistance complicates postexposure chemoprophylaxis and treatment. Factors that limit the choice of antiviral agents in this patient population include limited vaccine supplies and impaired dexterity and confusion in long-term care residents. PMID:19726556

  15. Measuring the diffusion of palliative care in long-term care facilities – a death census

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Eggimann Brigitte; Paroz Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The dissemination of palliative care for patients presenting complex chronic diseases at various stages has become an important matter of public health. A death census in Swiss long-term care facilities (LTC) was set up with the aim of monitoring the frequency of selected indicators of palliative care. Methods The survey covered 150 LTC facilities (105 nursing homes and 45 home health services), each of which was asked to complete a questionnaire for every non-accidental d...

  16. Winning market positioning strategies for long term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, L F; Weinstein, K; Arndt, K

    1997-01-01

    The decision to develop an aggressive marketing strategy for its long term care facility has become a priority for the management of a one-hundred bed facility in the Rocky Mountain West. Financial success and lasting competitiveness require that the facility in question (Deer Haven) establish itself as the preferred provider of long term care for its target market. By performing a marketing communications audit, Deer Haven evaluated its present market position and created a strategy for solidifying and dramatizing this position. After an overview of present conditions in the industry, we offer a seven step process that provides practical guidance for positioning a long term care facility. We conclude by providing an example application. PMID:10179063

  17. Virtual Dementia Tour helps sensitize health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beville, P K

    2002-01-01

    A review of the literature on sensitivity training among caregivers for the elderly revealed that no programs focused specifically on the cognitive changes that occur due to aging. Second Wind Dreams, a national nonprofit organization committed to improving society's perception of aging, conducted a study in which degenerative physical symptoms common for this population, such as impaired vision and motor skills, were simulated in a group of 146 subjects who worked in the field of elder care to give them a broader sense of the patient's perspective. Overwhelmingly, participants in the study came away with heightened awareness of the plight of confused elders and a strong sense that the high behavioral expectations caregivers have for dementia patients are unrealistic and need to change. PMID:12083349

  18. Sound & Vibration 20 Design Guidelines for Health Care Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Tocci, Gregory; Cavanaugh, William

    2013-01-01

    Sound, vibration, noise and privacy have significant impacts on health and performance. As a result, they are recognized as essential components of effective health care environments. However, acoustics has only recently become a prominent consideration in the design, construction, and operation of healthcare facilities owing to the absence, prior to 2010, of clear and objective guidance based on research and best practices. Sound & Vibration 2.0 is the first publication to comprehensively address this need. Sound & Vibration 2.0 is the sole reference standard for acoustics in health care facilities and is recognized by: the 2010 FGI Guidelines for the Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities (used in 60 countries); the US Green Building Council’s LEED for Health Care (used in 87 countries); The Green Guide for Health Care V2.2; and the International Code Council (2011). Sound & Vibration 2.0 was commissioned by the Facility Guidelines Institute in 2005, written by the Health Care Acous...

  19. Strategic Facilities Planning: A Focus On Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen D. Hoadley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent market conditions have forced the health care sector to re-examine its business and operational practices.  Health care has become increasingly complex as decisions and planning are reframed in light of the current lagging economy, an increased demand for services, new global competition, and impending legislation reform.  The stress is felt most keenly within the nation’s hospitals and consortia of health care facilitiesFacility planning decisions are no exception.  Hospital administrators are abandoning the once commonplace rules governing aging infrastructure renovations.  Instead, administrators are basing decisions within their respective strategic context and are attempting to align buildings, services, personnel, and technology to an overall plan that looks at markets, operations, and finances as resources for competitive advantage.  This paper reviews the strategic facilities planning literature and applies those best practices which support this organizational alignment for health care.  An application in the mid-Atlantic demonstrates that hospital facilities, by design, need to support the current and future needs of health care delivery systems, while dated structures impede industry advances.  Health care infrastructure improvements must proactively address technological, regulatory, and financial changes facing the sector.

  20. Why caretakers bypass Primary Health Care facilities for child care - a case from rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahabuka Catherine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on health care utilization in low income countries suggests that patients frequently bypass PHC facilities in favour of higher-level hospitals - despite substantial additional time and financial costs. There are limited number of studies focusing on user's experiences at such facilities and reasons for bypassing them. This study aimed to identify factors associated with bypassing PHC facilities among caretakers seeking care for their underfive children and to explore experiences at such facilities among those who utilize them. Methods The study employed a mixed-method approach consisting of an interviewer administered questionnaires and in-depth interviews among selected care-takers seeking care for their underfive children at Korogwe and Muheza district hospitals in north-eastern Tanzania. Results The questionnaire survey included 560 caretakers. Of these 30 in-depth interviews were conducted. Fifty nine percent (206/348 of caretakers had not utilized their nearer PHC facilities during the index child's sickness episode. The reasons given for bypassing PHC facilities were lack of possibilities for diagnostic facilities (42.2%, lack of drugs (15.5%, closed health facility (10.2%, poor services (9.7% and lack of skilled health workers (3.4%. In a regression model, the frequency of bypassing a PHC facility for child care increased significantly with decreasing travel time to the district hospital, shorter duration of symptoms and low disease severity. Findings from the in-depth interviews revealed how the lack of quality services at PHC facilities caused delays in accessing appropriate care and how the experiences of inadequate care caused users to lose trust in them. Conclusion The observation that people are willing to travel long distances to get better quality services calls for health policies that prioritize quality of care before quantity. In a situation with limited resources, utilizing available resources to

  1. Can Managed Health Care Help Manage Health Care-Associated Infections?

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, Richard; Caldwell, Blake

    2001-01-01

    Managed-care organizations have a unique opportunity, still largely unrealized, to collaborate with health-care providers and epidemiologists to prevent health care-associated infections. Several attributes make these organizations logical collaborators for infection control programs: they have responsibility for defined populations of enrollees and for their overall health, including preventive care; they possess unique data resources about their members and their care; and they are able to ...

  2. Urgent Care Facilities, Trauma Care Facilities - name, address, certification level, contact info, email address, Published in 2007, Iowa Dept. of Public Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Urgent Care Facilities dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It is described as 'Trauma Care Facilities -...

  3. Managing facility risk: external threats and health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Daniel J; Reid, William H

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and clinical administrators should have a basic understanding of physical and financial risk to mental health facilities related to external physical threat, including actions usually viewed as "terrorism" and much more common sources of violence. This article refers to threats from mentally ill persons and those acting out of bizarre or misguided "revenge," extortionists and other outright criminals, and perpetrators usually identified as domestic or international terrorists. The principles apply both to relatively small and contained acts (such as a patient or ex-patient attacking a staff member) and to much larger events (such as bombings and armed attack), and are relevant to facilities both within and outside the U.S. Patient care and accessibility to mental health services rest not only on clinical skills, but also on a place to practice them and an organized system supported by staff, physical facilities, and funding. Clinicians who have some familiarity with the non-clinical requirements for care are in a position to support non-clinical staff in preventing care from being interrupted by external threats or events such as terrorist activity, and/or to serve at the interface of facility operations and direct clinical care. Readers should note that this article is an introduction to the topic and cannot address all local, state and national standards for hospital safety, or insurance providers' individual facility requirements. PMID:24733720

  4. Frameworks of Caring and Helping in Adolescence: Are Empathy, Religiosity, and Spirituality Related Constructs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstrom, Carol A.; Huey, Erron; Stiles, Bethanie Morris; Krause, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    Caring and helping are suggested as mechanisms that link empathy to religiosity and spirituality. To test this assertion, 428 adolescents completed self-report measures of religious attendance, importance of spiritual or religious beliefs, care, volunteerism, and affective and cognitive subscales of empathy. Sex differences also were examined.…

  5. Together but apart: Caring for a spouse with dementia resident in a care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Dawn; MacCourt, Penny; Pierce, Joanna; Strudsholm, Tina

    2016-07-01

    This longitudinal, exploratory study was designed to better understand the lived experience of spousal caregivers age 60 and older providing care to partners with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias resident in a care facility. Twenty eight spousal caregivers were interviewed up to three times over a period of 2 years, and long-term care facility staff from four locations across British Columbia (BC), Canada participated in four focus groups. Thematic analysis of interview and focus group transcripts revealed a central, unifying theme 'together but apart'. The results identify key targets for policy makers and service providers to support positive health and well-being outcomes for spousal caregivers providing care to their partners diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia and living in care facilities. PMID:25027632

  6. Housekeeper in Health Care Facilities. Student Manual [and] Instructor Key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jane

    This packet contains a student manual and instructor key for a course in housekeeping for health care facilities in secondary health occupations programs. The student manual is divided into six units: (1) introduction to housekeeping; (2) interpersonal relations; (3) infection control and safety; (4) general cleaning procedures; (5) cleaning areas…

  7. Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Alam Khurshid; Ahmed Shakil

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC), a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Give...

  8. Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone Past ... healthy people to help," says Melanie Modlin about clinical trials. "We have a role to play in helping ...

  9. Household health care facility utilization in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, G; Herrin, A N; Pons, M C

    This paper presents probit estimates of household utilization of health care facilities in the Philippines. Using household data from the 1987 National Health Survey and supply data from the Department of Health, separate probit equations are estimated for each of the four major types of facilities in the Philippines: Public hospitals, private hospitals, major rural health units and barangay (village) health stations. The probability that a household will utilize services from these facilities is estimated as a function of socioeconomic, demographic and supply variables. The results indicate substantial differences in utilization patterns by income class. Households in the highest income quartile are approximately twice as likely (0.451 versus 0.236) to utilize private hospital services vis-à-vis households in the lowest income quartile, ceteris paribus. The results also indicate substantial substitution between public and private services. An increase in the availability of private hospital beds significantly reduces the probability that a household will utilize government facilities. PMID:10050192

  10. Social Determinants of Health and Beyond: Information to Help Family Physicians Improve Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    Social determinants of health (SDOHs) are a theme in this issue. In addition, we include a series of clinical articles to inform family medicine. One helps to demystify the process of obtaining hearing care. Another provides a case report of how a vanishing twin can confuse a newly available test. We also share articles on the early symptoms and signs of femoral insufficiency fractures and a simple test to help diagnose basal cell carcinomas. Family physicians provide their views on point-of-care tests. Positive outcomes are reported for behavioral health integration into family medicine offices and for diabetes education among patients cared for within patient-centered medical homes. A questionnaire can help family physicians identify and facilitate conversations with their patients about adverse childhood experiences. PMID:27170784

  11. How Palliative Care Helped Me Make an Important Decision in My Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    The author writes about her father's illness and how her knowledge of palliative care and "dying with dignity" helped her make important decisions for her father in his last days. She and her family members were able to give him the kind of care he needed and desired. He could enjoy the time he had left, and the family had the satisfaction of serving him when he needed them. PMID:26654415

  12. KSC volunteers help Meals on Wheels as part of Days of Caring '99

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers at Miracle City Mall, Titusville, help unload containers for Meals on Wheels delivery as part of their '99 Days of Caring participation. The volunteers will also help deliver the meals. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  13. Preparedness of elderly long-term care facilities in HSE East for influenza outbreaks.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, L

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We assessed preparedness of HSE East elderly long-term care facilities for an influenza outbreak, and identified Public Health Department support needs. We surveyed 166 facilities based on the HSE checklist document for influenza outbreaks, with 58% response rate. Client flu vaccination rates were > 75%; leading barriers were client anxiety and consent issues. Target flu vaccine uptake of 40% in staff occurred in 43% of facilities and was associated with staff vaccine administration by afacility-attached GP (p = 0.035), having a facility outbreak plan (p = 0.013) and being anon-HSE run facility (p = 0.013). Leading barriers were staff personal anxiety (94%) and lack of awareness of the protective effect on clients (21%). Eighty-nine percent found Public Health helpful, and requested further educational support and advocacy. Staff vaccine uptake focus, organisational leadership, optimal vaccine provision models, outbreak plans and Public Health support are central to the influenza campaign in elderly long-term care facilities.

  14. Does collaborative care help in the treatment of anxiety in primary health care?

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Moscovici; João Mazzoncini de Azevedo Marques; Antonio Waldo Zuardi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Anxiety disorders represent an important part of mental health problems in primary care. This literature review seeks to find out whether collaborative care (called “matrix support” in Brazil) assists the treatment of anxiety disorders and/or anxiety symptoms. Methods: We performed a literature search with no time period restriction using PubMed, ISI, and LILACS PSYCINFO databases. The descriptors sought were “collaborative care”, “shared care”, “primary care”, “anxiety”, “generali...

  15. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Behavioral Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... working to make safety a priority. The “Speak Up” program is sponsored by The Joint Commission. They ... in your care, you are urged to “Speak Up.” S peak up if you have questions or concerns. ...

  16. Helping You Take Care of Yourself Men of Color Prostate Health Workshops

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Ruttner; Irina Cheban; So O'Neil

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the knowledge gain among participants of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Helping You Take Care of Yourself prostate health workshops. Using scores on pre- and post-tests administered immediately before and after the workshops, findings indicated that knowledge increased among workshop participants on average and that they were generally satisfied with the workshops.

  17. Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program: WAsP 11 Help Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) is a PC-program for horizontal and vertical extrapolation of wind climates. The program contains a complete set of models to calculate the effects on the wind of sheltering obstacles, surface roughness changes and terrain height variations. The...... specific wind turbines and wind farms. The WAsP Help Facility includes a Quick Start Tutorial, a User's Guide and a Technical Reference. It further includes descriptions of the Observed Wind Climate Wizard, the WAsP Climate Analyst, the WAsP Map Editor tool, the WAsP Turbine Editor tool, the Air Density...

  18. 42 CFR 409.85 - Skilled nursing facility (SNF) care coinsurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Skilled nursing facility (SNF) care coinsurance... Coinsurance § 409.85 Skilled nursing facility (SNF) care coinsurance. (a) General provisions. (1) SNF care coinsurance is the amount chargeable to a beneficiary after the first 20 days of SNF care in a benefit...

  19. Measuring the diffusion of palliative care in long-term care facilities – a death census

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos-Eggimann Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dissemination of palliative care for patients presenting complex chronic diseases at various stages has become an important matter of public health. A death census in Swiss long-term care facilities (LTC was set up with the aim of monitoring the frequency of selected indicators of palliative care. Methods The survey covered 150 LTC facilities (105 nursing homes and 45 home health services, each of which was asked to complete a questionnaire for every non-accidental death over a period of six months. The frequency of 4 selected indicators of palliative care (resort to a specialized palliative care service, the administration of opiates, use of any pain measurement scale or other symptom measurement scale was monitored in respect of the stages of care and analysed based on gender, age, medical condition and place of residence. Results Overall, 1200 deaths were reported, 29.1% of which were related to cancer. The frequencies of each indicator varied according to the type of LTC, mostly regarding the administration of opiate. It appeared that the access to palliative care remained associated with cancer, terminal care and partly with age, whereas gender and the presence of mental disorders had no effect on the indicators. In addition, the use of drugs was much more frequent than the other indicators. Conclusion The profile of patients with access to palliative care must become more diversified. Among other recommendations, equal access to opiates in nursing homes and in home health services, palliative care at an earlier stage and the systematic use of symptom management scales when resorting to opiates have to become of prime concern.

  20. Students experienced help from preservative care. A reflective case study of two nursing students caring from a nursing framework on good care for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S. Jukema

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practice of nursing is shaped partly by nurses’ professional perspective of good care, guided by a nursing framework. An example is the framework of preservative care, which defines good nursing care for vulnerable older people in nursing homes. Currently we lack an understanding of how this framework could help nurses in training; it may be a useful developmental aid for undergraduate nursing students but so far there are no empirical data to support this. Aim: The purpose of this study is to explore how helpful a particular framework can be in the learning journey of two undergraduate nursing students. The study draws on narrative and reflective accounts, guided by the question: ‘How does preservative care as a framework of good care help two undergraduate nursing students develop their caring for older people?’ Methods: This was a reflective case study, in which two students – experienced registered nurses (non-graduates following a part-time education programme – reflected on their practices, using preservative care as a framework for taking care of older people. They kept reflective journals and received constructive feedback from the author of the preservative care framework (the first author. Their data were analysed in three steps. Findings: Both students reported gaining profound help from the framework in their evaluations of daily practices, although they rated the help differently in terms of demanding and rewarding experiences. The framework was particularly helpful in developing qualities in three domains: person-centredness, professional role and specific nursing competencies. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate how using a particular nursing framework made a difference to the practice of two undergraduate nursing students. Exploring the meaning and place of particular nursing frameworks in nursing education is necessary to establish their potential benefits for students. Implications for

  1. Factors influencing oral health in long term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEntee, M I; Weiss, R; Waxler-Morrison, N E; Morrison, B J

    1987-12-01

    In a stratified random sample of 41 long term care (LTC) facilities in Vancouver, 653 residents were chosen to investigate oral health needs and demands for treatment. All of the 603 dentists in the same area were questioned to assess their interest in attending the residents of the institutions. The information from each source was reviewed to identify factors influencing the oral health services to this predominantly elderly and medically compromised population. The majority (60%) of the residents were edentulous and they made infrequent demands on dentists. Two-thirds of those interviewed said that there was nothing wrong with their mouths, but most of those who were aware of a problem wanted it treated, preferably within the institution. They complained about loose or uncomfortable dentures most frequently, and many were dissatisfied with previous dental treatment. The oral mucosal lesions seen on examination were usually symptomless and associated with poor hygiene, while structurally defective dentures and deep carious lesions were not uncommon. The responding 334 dentists indicated that they enjoyed treating elderly patients, 19% had attended an LTC facility, usually to provide an emergency service, and 37% were willing to provide this service if asked. Interest, however, in the service was curtailed by pressures from private practice, concerns about inadequate training and the small demand and poor conditions in the facilities. Although the demand for treatment was not extensive from the residents, they did have problems that were not receiving care. PMID:3121247

  2. A comparative cost analysis of polytrauma and neurosurgery Intensive Care Units at an apex trauma care facility in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, V.; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although Intensive Care Units (ICUs) only account for 10% of the hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of the hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multispecialty and neurosurgery ICUs at an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203-bedded Level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India, from May 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in the study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's two tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multispecialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU, it was Rs. 14,306.7/-, workforce constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist health-care decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multispecialty ICUs are more cost-effective, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that needs to be designed.

  3. How gender is born in a diagnostic child-care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Benešová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is a summary of the main findings concerning (reconstruction of the gender identities of children placed in a contemporary diagnostic child-care facility in the Czech Republic. The research setting has the fictitious name DDÚ Archa. The author of the arcticle is summarizing the interim results from her Ph.D. dissertation project. The goal is to catch processes which have been neglected so far by the Czech professional community, and which may become potential disciplinary tools in the hands of professionals in a wide range of helping professions, including social and special pedagogy.

  4. Help-seeking preferences for psychological distress in primary care:: effect of current mental state

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, K; Buszewicz, M.; Weich, S.; King, M

    2008-01-01

    Background There is much debate over when it is appropriate to intervene medically for psychological distress, and limited evidence on patients' perspectives about a broad range of possible treatment options. It is currently unclear whether preferences may differ for those patients with milder symptoms compared to those experiencing more severe distress.Aim To determine patient preferences for professional, informal, and alternative help for psychological distress in primary care, and the imp...

  5. Helping cancer patients across the care continuum: the navigation program at the Queen's Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Amanda L; Ishihara-Wong, Debra D M; Domingo, Jermy B; Nishioka, Jocelyn; Wilburn, Andrea; Tsark, JoAnn U; Braun, Kathryn L

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that cancer patient navigation improves care, but few reports describe the variety of patients managed by a hospital-based navigation program. Differences in navigated patients by the intensity (low, medium, or high) of navigation services they received were examined. The 835 clients seen by the navigators in a hospital-based cancer center were first stratified by quarter and by four ethnic groups. Randomized selection from each group assured there would be equal representation for analysis of Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Whites and even numbers over all time intervals. Five professionals extracted data from these case records on demographics, type/stage of cancer, diagnosis and treatment dates, barriers, and navigator actions. Clients had breast (30.0%), lung (15.8%), esophageal (6.7%), colon (5.8%), ovarian (4.2%), prostate (3.3%), and other cancers (34.2%). The median number of actions taken on behalf of a client was 4 (range 1-83), and the median number of days a case was open was 14 (range 1-216). High intensity cases (those receiving more assistance over longer periods of time) were more likely than low-intensity cases to need help with education and reassurance, transportation, care coordination, and covering costs. Although there were no demographic differences across intensity groups, Neighbor Island patients from Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i and Kaua'i were more likely to need help with arranging travel, care coordination, and costs associated with getting treatment (all at P=.05), and patients on public insurance were more likely to have stage 4 cancer (P=.001) and to need help with costs (P=.006). Findings suggest that this hospital-based navigation program is filling a real need of patients across the cancer care continuum. A triage protocol and an integrated data capture system could help improve the targeting and documentation of cancer patient navigation services. PMID:23795311

  6. The Perceived Needs and Availability of Eye Care Services for Older Adults in Long-term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kergoat, Hélène; Boisjoly, Hélène; Freeman, Ellen E.; Monette, Johanne; Roy, Sylvie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to evaluate the eye care services offered to older residents living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods A questionnaire targeting residents aged ≥65 years was sent to all LTCFs in Quebec. Questions related to the institution’s characteristics, demographic data related to residents, oculovisual health of residents and barriers to eye care, eye care services offered within and outside the institution, and degree of satisfaction regarding the eye care servi...

  7. 7 CFR 1956.143 - Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Debt restructuring-hospitals and health care... Settlement-Community and Business Programs § 1956.143 Debt restructuring—hospitals and health care facilities. This section pertains exclusively to delinquent Community Facility hospital and health care...

  8. Breaking down silos: engaging students to help fix the US health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy MA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathu A Kumarasamy,1 Fred P Sanfilippo1–3 1Emory–Georgia Tech Healthcare Innovation Program, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, 3Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Problem: The field of health care is becoming a team effort as patient care becomes increasingly complex and multifaceted. Despite the need for multidisciplinary education, there persists a lack of student engagement and collaboration among health care disciplines, which presents a growing concern as students join the workforce. Approach: In October 2013, the Emory–Georgia Tech Healthcare Innovation Program organized a student driven symposium entitled “US Healthcare: What's Broken and How to Fix It: The Student Perspective”. The symposium engaged students from multiple disciplines to work together in addressing problems associated with US health care delivery. The symposium was organized and carried out by a diverse group of student leaders from local institutions who adopted a multidisciplinary approach throughout the planning process. Outcomes: The innovative planning process leading up to the symposium revealed that many of the student-discipline groups lacked an understanding of one another's role in health care, and that students were interested in learning how to work together to leverage each other's profession. The symposium was widely attended and positively received by students and faculty from the Atlanta metropolitan area, and has since helped to promote interdepartmental collaboration and multidisciplinary education across institutions. Next steps: The student symposium will become an annual event and incorporate broader discipline representation, as well as a patient perspective. Proposals for additional institution-wide, multidisciplinary educational offerings are being addressed with the help of faculty and health care providers across the network

  9. A systematic method of accountability. Sound policies allow facilities to account for the level of charity care they provide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H H; Weiss, S J; Melichar, C

    1992-11-01

    Charity care policies can help hospitals accurately determine, define, and account for the level of charity care they provide. This information will help hospitals budget appropriately and measure trends that will ultimately affect the organization's viability. State governments, the federal government, and the Internal Revenue Service are more closely scrutinizing not-for-profit hospitals' tax-exempt status. As a result, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) has revised its requirement to report on charity care. To meet the AICPA's requirement, healthcare providers must develop their own definition of charity and determine criteria for providing care free or at a reduced rate. Setting policies to support the organization's definition of charity is necessary for the development of internal systems that promote the early identification of individuals seeking healthcare who will be unable to pay for services. Several policy implications may result from the facility's charity care determination process. For example, patients exhibiting extreme hardship might still be eligible to receive charity care even though their income and assets exceed the hospital's income guidelines. An organization planning to develop a charity care policy must first thoroughly assess its current charity care practices and cost accounting capabilities. Obtaining input from all the departments involved in the development of the charity care policy is necessary to make the transition as smooth as possible. PMID:10122079

  10. Should the provision of home help services be contained?: Validation of the new preventive care policy in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi Tomoaki; Ikegami Naoki

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To maintain the sustainability of public long-term care insurance (LTCI) in Japan, a preventive care policy was introduced in 2006 that seeks to promote active improvement in functional status of elderly people who need only light care. This policy promotes the use of day care services to facilitate functional improvement, and contains the use of home help services that provide instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) support. However, the validity of this approach rem...

  11. The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership: helping to establish multidisciplinary cancer care in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E; Gorman, D; Knowles, G; Taylor, F; Jere, Y; Bates, J; Masamba, L

    2016-12-01

    In response to the growing incidence of cancer in Malawi, a new oncology unit was established at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre. The unit opened in 2010, the first in the country, and is led by a single consultant oncologist. In 2012, a healthcare partnership was formed between the oncology and palliative care unit at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital and the Edinburgh Cancer Centre, UK. The principal objective of the partnership is to help develop high quality multidisciplinary cancer care in Malawi. Methods A needs assessment identified three priority areas for further improvement of cancer services: nurse-led treatment delivery; management of clinical data; and multidisciplinary working. The partnership received grant funding from the Scottish Government Malawi Development Programme in 2013 and a three year project plan was implemented. This has been conducted through a series of reciprocal training visits. Results Key achievements have been completion of a programme of oncology nursing education attended by 32 oncology nurses and other healthcare professionals, which has resulted in increased experience in cancer practice and standardisation of chemotherapy delivery procedures; development of a clinical database that enables prospective collection of data of all new patients with cancer and which links to the Malawi Cancer Registry; development of weekly multidisciplinary meetings involving oncology, gynaecology and surgery that has enabled a cross-specialty approach to patient care. Conclusion The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership is supporting nursing education, data use and cross-specialty collaboration that we are confident will improve cancer care in Malawi. Future work will focus on the further development of multidisciplinary breast cancer care and the development of a radiotherapy service for patients in Malawi. PMID:27092363

  12. Nasazení SW podpory HelpDesk do procesu Facility managementu

    OpenAIRE

    Běhounková, Jitka

    2008-01-01

    Práce se zabývá významem nástroje HelpDesk pro prostředí Facility managementu zabývající se souborem služeb v oblasti správy nemovitostí. Práce analyzuje dopady do provozu (eventuální nároky na pracovní síly, zrychlení vyřizování požadavků, zkvalitnění služeb) po nasazení systému s ohledem na požadavky vyššího managementu (např. nevynutit navýšení lidských zdrojů, možnost sledování průběhu řešení incidentů, poskytování datových podkladů pro jednání s dodavateli apod.) Součástí řešení je návrh...

  13. Urgent Care Facilities, Urgent Care Facilities in Iredell County, NC, Published in 2007, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Urgent Care Facilities dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is described as...

  14. Care Facilities Licensed by LDHH, Geographic NAD83, LDHH (2006) [LDHH_care_facilities_06_07_full_LDHH_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — A portion of the facilities licensed by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, Health Standards Section. This database includes Adult Day Cares, Adult...

  15. Exploring the gap between rhetoric and reality in dementia care in Australia: could practice documents help bridge the great divide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturato, Lorraine; Moyle, Wendy; Steel, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Quality of care, and indeed, quality of life, for people living with dementia in long-term care is often underpinned by philosophies of care, such as person-centred care and relationship-centred care. The translation of these philosophies into practice is influenced by a range of individual and organizational features, including the context in which such care occurs. Within modern care organizations, the context of care is evidenced through organizational documents. This study sought to identify the key documents guiding dementia care within one large Australian long-term care organization and to explore points of consistency and tension within the documented system of care. Results highlight a lack of consistency and clarity in the philosophy of dementia care and a disconnection between the key documents guiding practice. This disconnection creates tension for clinicians and carers, and may contribute to the gap between rhetoric and reality in dementia care. This study suggests that a congruent documented dementia system can help bridge the gap between espoused philosophies of care and everyday care practices. PMID:24336772

  16. Help-Seeking Behavior and Health Care Navigation by Bhutanese Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Katherine; Paul, Papia; Subedi, Parangkush; Kuikel, Leela; Nguyen, Giang T; Barg, Frances K

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to document barriers to care, help-seeking behaviors, and the impact of a community-based patient navigation intervention on patient activation levels among Bhutanese refugees in the U.S. Data sources comprised 35 intake and 34 post-intervention interviews with program participants, 14 intake and 14 post-intervention interviews with patient navigators, and 164 case notes. Textual data were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Patient activation level was assessed at both time points. Participants had limited English proficiency (97 %), limited literacy (69 %), and the lowest level of patient activation (69 %). Participants routinely experienced complex insurance access, coverage, and payment problems and had limited healthcare-related life skills. Help-seeking began within social networks, with high reliance on bilingual, literate family members perceived to have experience with "the system." Help-seeking was not stigmatized and was instead consistent with societal norms valuing mutual assistance. Participants preferred helpers to act as proxies and required repeated social modeling by peers to gain confidence applying healthcare-related life skills. Following the intervention, only one-third reported the lowest level of patient activation (35 %) and one-third were highly activated (32 %). Bhutanese refugees overcome healthcare access barriers by seeking help from a network of support that begins within the community. Community health workers serving as patient navigators are readily sought out, and this approach is concordant with cultural expectations for mutual assistance. Community health workers serving immigrant groups should model healthcare-related life skills in addition to providing direct assistance. PMID:26659398

  17. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care...

  18. 42 CFR 476.90 - Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner. 476.90 Section 476.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...) Qio Review Functions § 476.90 Lack of cooperation by a health care facility or practitioner. (a) If...

  19. Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Results of an Obesity Prevention Initiative in Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby; Camejo, Stephanie; Sanders, Lee M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant public health issue affecting even our youngest children. Given that a significant amount of young children are enrolled in child care, the goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a child care facility-based obesity prevention program. Over 1,000 facilities participated in the study. The intervention…

  20. Differences in essential newborn care at birth between private and public health facilities in eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Waiswa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Uganda and elsewhere, the private sector provides an increasing and significant proportion of maternal and child health services. However, little is known whether private care results in better quality services and improved outcomes compared to the public sector, especially regarding care at the time of birth. Objective: To describe the characteristics of care-seekers and assess newborn care practices and services received at public and private facilities in rural eastern Uganda. Design: Within a community-based maternal and newborn care intervention with health systems strengthening, we collected data from mothers with infants at baseline and endline using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate data analysis comparing nine newborn care practices and three composite newborn care indicators among private and public health facilities was conducted. Results: The proportion of women giving birth at private facilities decreased from 25% at baseline to 17% at endline, whereas overall facility births increased. Private health facilities did not perform significantly better than public health facilities in terms of coverage of any essential newborn care interventions, and babies were more likely to receive thermal care practices in public facilities compared to private (68% compared to 60%, p=0.007. Babies born at public health facilities received an average of 7.0 essential newborn care interventions compared to 6.2 at private facilities (p<0.001. Women delivering in private facilities were more likely to have higher parity, lower socio-economic status, less education, to seek antenatal care later in pregnancy, and to have a normal delivery compared to women delivering in public facilities. Conclusions: In this setting, private health facilities serve a vulnerable population and provide access to service for those who might not otherwise have it. However, provision of essential newborn care practices was

  1. A multi-organisation aged care emergency service for acute care management of older residents in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jane; Dilworth, Sophie; Hullick, Carolyn; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Turner, Catherine; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    This case study describes a multi-organisation aged care emergency (ACE) service. The service was designed to enable point-of-care assessment and management for older people in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Design of the ACE service involved consultation and engagement of multiple key stakeholders. The ACE service was implemented in a large geographical region of a single Medicare Local (ML) in New South Wales, Australia. The service was developed over several phases. A case control pilot evaluation of one emergency department (ED) and four RACFs revealed a 16% reduction in presentations to the ED as well as reductions in admission to the hospital following ED presentation. Following initial pilot work, the ACE service transitioned across another five EDs and 85 RACFs in the local health district. The service has now been implemented in a further 10 sites (six metropolitan and four rural EDs) across New South Wales. Ongoing evaluation of the implementation continues to show positive outcomes. The ACE service offers a model shown to reduce ED presentations and admissions from RACFs, and provide quality care with a focus on the needs of the older person. PMID:25981903

  2. Quality along the continuum: a health facility assessment of intrapartum and postnatal care in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin C Nesbitt

    Full Text Available To evaluate quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care using a health facility assessment, and to estimate "effective coverage" of skilled attendance in Brong Ahafo, Ghana.We conducted an assessment of all 86 health facilities in seven districts in Brong Ahafo. Using performance of key signal functions and the availability of relevant drugs, equipment and trained health professionals, we created composite quality categories in four dimensions: routine delivery care, emergency obstetric care (EmOC, emergency newborn care (EmNC and non-medical quality. Linking the health facility assessment to surveillance data we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance as the proportion of births in facilities of high quality.Delivery care was offered in 64/86 facilities; only 3-13% fulfilled our requirements for the highest quality category in any dimension. Quality was lowest in the emergency care dimensions, with 63% and 58% of facilities categorized as "low" or "substandard" for EmOC and EmNC, respectively. This implies performing less than four EmOC or three EmNC signal functions, and/or employing less than two skilled health professionals, and/or that no health professionals were present during our visit. Routine delivery care was "low" or "substandard" in 39% of facilities, meaning 25/64 facilities performed less than six routine signal functions and/or had less than two skilled health professionals and/or less than one midwife. While 68% of births were in health facilities, only 18% were in facilities with "high" or "highest" quality in all dimensions.Our comprehensive facility assessment showed that quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care was generally low in the study region. While coverage with facility delivery was 68%, we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance at 18%, thus revealing a large "quality gap." Effective coverage could be a meaningful indicator of progress towards

  3. Help or hindrance? The role of economics in rationing health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, A; Bloor, K

    1995-10-01

    The economic evaluation of alternative diagnostic and therapeutic interventions is not merely a help to the processes by which decision makers allocate scarce economic resources, it is an essential ingredient into those rationing processes. Clinicians and other decision makers who advocate the use of effectiveness data alone to determine who will be treated and who will be left in pain and discomfort may perpetuate the inefficient use of resources. Rationing, or resource allocation, in health care must be informed by knowledge of the costs and consequences (effects) or alternative interventions. To ignore the economic element in clinical choices, generates inefficiency, and therefore unethical practice. The great advantage of the economic approach to rationing is that it requires an explicit framework which identifies the costs and benefits of alternative actions in all domains of human action. The combination of explicitness and precision inherent in good economic evaluation can only help in the difficult task of producing further health benefits for patients from the limited resources of the NHS. PMID:8556294

  4. Optimizing pain care delivery in outpatient facilities: experience in NCI, Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Khaled Abdel

    2011-04-01

    As a result of increasing waiting lists of patients attending National Cancer Institute of Cairo, we are faced to provide high-quality pain care service through our outpatient pain clinic. The program description presented here shows the capacity of a 24 hours/7 days outpatient cancer pain management service to provide rapidly accessible, high-quality care to patients with complex pain and palliative care symptom burdens. In addition, this model avoids inpatient hospital admissions. Pain clinics of cancer are committed to helping patients and families identify and implement the treatments necessary to achieve optimum functional ability and the best possible quality of life. These clinics also help to communicate and work with the family physician, surgeon, and other physicians associated with patient treatment. Cancer pain is complex in its causes, and affects all parts of the body. It involves the tissues, body systems , and the mind. Being multidimensional, it is never adequately addressed with unidimensional treatment. Pain management must extend beyond physical approaches to include the psychological, social, and even spiritual aspects of the patient. Effective integrated treatment fosters self awareness and teaches appropriate and effective self care. With time, complex issues are managed, pain is reduced, and the patient moves toward peak physical and psychological functioning. These goals can be achieved by providing the highest quality pain management services. Patients attending the clinic get treated medically for their physical ailments. Their emotional and psychological problems also need to be attended with an atmosphere of love and care. The mission of the highest quality service is to obtain customer satisfaction with reduction of cost in a multidisciplinary (or better interdisciplinary) approach. This can be reached by proper identification of the customers either internal or external, assessing their needs, and implementing plans for their

  5. An Optometrist-Led Eye Care Program for Older Residents of Retirement Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Labreche, Tammy; Stolee, Paul; McLeod, Jordache

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visual impairment among older adults residing in long-term care (LTC) facilities and retirement homes is common and can have a significant adverse impact on their quality of life. Despite the burden of illness, they frequently receive inadequate eye care. We describe an optometrist-led eye care program serving this population, including a profile of participants and the program’s educational role for optometry students. Methods An optometrist assessed residents of LTC f...

  6. A rapid assessment of the availability and use of obstetric care in Nigerian healthcare facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Erim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As part of efforts to reduce maternal deaths in Nigeria, pregnant women are being encouraged to give birth in healthcare facilities. However, little is known about whether or not available healthcare facilities can cope with an increasing demand for obstetric care. We thus carried out this survey as a rapid and tactical assessment of facility quality. We visited 121 healthcare facilities, and used the opportunity to interview over 700 women seeking care at these facilities. FINDINGS: Most of the primary healthcare facilities we visited were unable to provide all basic Emergency Obstetric Care (bEmOC services. In general, they lack clinical staff needed to dispense maternal and neonatal care services, ambulances and uninterrupted electricity supply whenever there were obstetric emergencies. Secondary healthcare facilities fared better, but, like their primary counterparts, lack neonatal care infrastructure. Among patients, most lived within 30 minutes of the visited facilities and still reported some difficulty getting there. Of those who had had two or more childbirths, the conditional probability of a delivery occurring in a healthcare facility was 0.91 if the previous delivery occurred in a healthcare facility, and 0.24 if it occurred at home. The crude risk of an adverse neonatal outcome did not significantly vary by delivery site or birth attendant, and the occurrence of such an outcome during an in-facility delivery may influence the mother to have her next delivery outside. Such an outcome during a home delivery may not prompt a subsequent in-facility delivery. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, reducing maternal deaths in Nigeria will require attention to both increasing the number of facilities with high-quality EmOC capability and also assuring Nigerian women have access to these facilities regardless of where they live.

  7. HIV and Infectious Disease Care in Jails and Prisons: Breaking Down the Walls with the Help of Academic Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Flanigan, Timothy P.; Zaller, Nickolas; Taylor, Lynn; BECKWITH, CURT; Kuester, Landon; Rich, Josiah; Carpenter, Charles C. J.

    2009-01-01

    Health care within correctional facilities has traditionally been marginalized from excellence in academic medicine. The armamentarium of a medical school, which includes excellence in research, teaching and clinical care, can be successfully applied to the correctional setting both in the United States and internationally. At any one time, there are over 2 million people incarcerated in the US who are disproportionately poor and from communities of color. Rates of human immunodeficiency viru...

  8. Should the provision of home help services be contained?: Validation of the new preventive care policy in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishibashi Tomoaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To maintain the sustainability of public long-term care insurance (LTCI in Japan, a preventive care policy was introduced in 2006 that seeks to promote active improvement in functional status of elderly people who need only light care. This policy promotes the use of day care services to facilitate functional improvement, and contains the use of home help services that provide instrumental activity of daily living (IADL support. However, the validity of this approach remains to be demonstrated. Methods Subjects comprised 241 people aged 65 years and over who had recently been certified as being eligible for the lightest eligibility level and had began using either home help or day care services between April 2007 and October 2008 in a suburban city of Tokyo. A retrospective cohort study was conducted ending October 2009 to assess changes in the LTCI eligibility level of these subjects. Cox's proportional hazards model was used to calculate the relative risk of declining in function to eligibility Level 4 among users of the respective services. Results Multivariate analysis adjusted for factors related to service use demonstrated that the risk of decline in functional status was lower for users of home help services than for users of day care services (HR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31-0.98. The same result was obtained when stratified by whether the subject lived with family or not. Furthermore, those who used two or more hours of home help services did not show an increase in risk of decline when compared with those who used less than two hours. Conclusions No evidence was obtained to support the effectiveness of the policy of promoting day care services and containing home help services for those requiring light care.

  9. Helping Families Improve: An Evaluation of Two Primary Care Approaches to Parenting Support in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Ireen; Onrust, Simone; Haverman, Merel; Janssens, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated two primary care parenting interventions. First, we evaluated the most widely used Dutch practices for primary care parenting support. Second, we assessed the applicability of the Primary Care Triple P approach, which is now being utilized in a wide variety of primary care settings. Both interventions target parents of…

  10. Prevention by Design: Construction and Renovation of Health Care Facilities for Patient Safety and Infection Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Russell N

    2016-09-01

    The built environment supports the safe care of patients in health care facilities. Infection preventionists and health care epidemiologists have expertise in prevention and control of health care-associated infections (HAIs) and assist with designing and constructing facilities to prevent HAIs. However, design elements are often missing from initial concepts. In addition, there is a large body of evidence that implicates construction and renovation as being associated with clusters of HAIs, many of which are life threatening for select patient populations. This article summarizes known risks and prevention strategies within a framework for patient safety. PMID:27515144

  11. Predictors for Increasing Eligibility Level among Home Help Service Users in the Japanese Long-Term Care Insurance System

    OpenAIRE

    Kuniyasu Kamiya; Kenji Sasou; Makoto Fujita; Sumio Yamada

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This cross-sectional study described the prevalence of possible risk factors for increasing eligibility level of long-term care insurance in home help service users who were certified as support level 1-2 or care level 1-2 in Japan. Methods. Data were collected from October 2011 to November 2011. Variables included eligibility level, grip strength, calf circumference (CC), functional limitations, body mass index, memory impairment, depression, social support, and nutrition status....

  12. How a Beacon Community Program in New Orleans Helped Create a Better Health Care System By Building Relationships Before Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Khurshid, Anjum; Brown, Lisanne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, much of New Orleans’ healthcare infrastructure was destroyed. Initial federal funding after the storm expanded primary care services and helped set up medical homes for New Orleans’ large uninsured and underinsured population. Following that, the Beacon Community in New Orleans, charged with improving health care through the use of technology, decided the best way to accomplish those goals was to build community partnerships and introduce t...

  13. Threats to groundwater supplies from contamination in Sierra Leone, with special reference to Ebola care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lapworth, D.J.; Carter, R. C.; Pedley, S; MacDonald, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa in 2014 is the worst single outbreak recorded, and has resulted in more fatalities than all previous outbreaks combined. This outbreak has resulted in a large humanitarian effort to build new health care facilities, with associated water supplies. Although Ebola is not a water-borne disease, care facilities for Ebola patients may become sources of outbreaks of other, water-borne, diseases spread through shallow groundwater from hazard sources...

  14. Using Workflow Diagrams to Address Hand Hygiene in Pediatric Long-Term Care Facilities1

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Eileen J.; Cohen, Bevin; Murray, Meghan T.; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) in pediatric long-term care settings has been found to be sub-optimal. Multidisciplinary teams at three pediatric long-term care facilities developed step-by-step workflow diagrams of commonly performed tasks highlighting HH opportunities. Diagrams were validated through observation of tasks and concurrent diagram assessment. Facility teams developed six workflow diagrams that underwent 22 validation observations. Four main themes emerged: 1) diagram specificity, 2) wording ...

  15. Helping families improve: an evaluation of two primary care approaches to parenting support in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, I.M. de; Onrust, S.A.; Haverman, M.C.C.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated two primary care parenting interventions. First, we evaluated the most widely used Dutch practices for primary care parenting support. Second, we assessed the applicability of the Primary Care Triple P approach, which is now being utilized in a wide variety of primary car

  16. Building relationships with physicians. Internal marketing efforts help strengthen organizational bonds at a rural health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, J W; Boyt, T; Westfall, J E

    1997-01-01

    Physician turnover is costly for health care organizations, especially for rural organizations. One approach management can take to reduce turnover is to promote physician loyalty by treating them as an important customer segment. The authors develop an information--oriented framework for generating physician loyalty and illustrate how this framework has helped to eliminate physician turnover at a rural health care clinic. Rural health care organizations must develop a more internal marketing orientation in their approach to establishing strong relationship bonds with physicians. PMID:10173904

  17. The Perceived Needs and Availability of Eye Care Services for Older Adults in Long-term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergoat, Hélène; Boisjoly, Hélène; Freeman, Ellen E.; Monette, Johanne; Roy, Sylvie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to evaluate the eye care services offered to older residents living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods A questionnaire targeting residents aged ≥65 years was sent to all LTCFs in Quebec. Questions related to the institution’s characteristics, demographic data related to residents, oculovisual health of residents and barriers to eye care, eye care services offered within and outside the institution, and degree of satisfaction regarding the eye care services offered to residents. Results 196/428 (45.8%) LTCFs completed the questionnaire. Participating LTCFs had an average of 97.0 ± 5.1 residents with a mean age of 82.8 ± 3.0 yrs and 69% women. Eye care services were mostly offered outside the institution, on a “per request” basis. The main barriers to eye care were the perception that residents could not cooperate and the lack of eye care professionals. Most LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to residents. Conclusions The fact that the LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to their residents, although it was neither provided on a regular basis nor to all residents, suggests that eye care professionals should take a proactive educational role for improving services to older institutionalized adults. PMID:25232370

  18. Examining the role of information exchange in residential aged care work practices-a survey of residential aged care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Gaskin Sarah; Georgiou Andrew; Barton Donna; Westbrook Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The provision of residential aged care is underpinned by information, and is reliant upon systems that adequately capture and effectively utilise and communicate this information. The aim of this study was to explicate and quantify the volume and method by which information is collected, exchanged within facilities and with external providers, and retrieved from facility information systems and hospitals. Methods A survey of staff (n = 119), including managers, health info...

  19. Effect of a Clostridium difficile Infection Prevention Initiative in Veterans Affairs Acute Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Rates of clinically confirmed hospital-onset healthcare facility-associated Clostridium difficile infections from July 1, 2012, through March 31, 2015, in 127 acute care Veterans Affairs facilities were evaluated. Quarterly pooled national standardized infection ratios decreased 15% from baseline by the final quarter of the analysis period (P=.01, linear regression). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:720-722. PMID:26864803

  20. 75 FR 37463 - Dispensing of Controlled Substances to Residents at Long Term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... practitioners, pharmacists, LTCFs, nurses, residents and family of residents in long term care facilities, State... professional staff (physicians, nurses, etc.) and facilities to provide a proper standard of hospital service... legitimate medical purpose by DEA-registered practitioners acting in the usual course of their...

  1. 45 CFR 234.130 - Assistance in the form of institutional services in intermediate care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... under the provisions of 42 CFR 449.33 as to a facility's eligibility to receive payments for... services in intermediate care facilities, available income will be applied, first for personal and... of safety and sanitation as are applicable to nursing homes under State law; and (iv)...

  2. Investigating Preterm Care at the Facility Level: Stakeholder Qualitative Study in Central and Southern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondwe, Austrida; Munthali, Alister; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Malawi is estimated to have one of the highest preterm birth rates in the world. However, care of preterm infants at facility level in Malawi has not been explored. We aimed to explore the views of health stakeholders about the care of preterm infants in health facilities and the existence of any policy protocol documents guiding the delivery of care to these infants. Methods We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with health stakeholders (11 service providers and 5 policy makers) using an interview guide and asked for any existing policy protocol documents guiding care for preterm infants in the health facilities in Malawi. The collected documents were reviewed and all the interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and translated. All data were analysed using content analysis approach. Results We identified four policy protocol documents and out of these, one had detailed information explaining the care of preterm infants. Policy makers reported that policy protocol documents to guide care for preterm infants were available in the health facilities but majority (63.6 %) of the service providers lacked knowledge about the existence of these documents. Health stakeholders reported several challenges in caring for preterm infants including lack of trained staff in preterm infant care, antibiotics, space, supervision and poor referral system. Conclusions Our study highlights that improving health care service provider knowledge of preterm infant care is an integral part in preterm child birth. Our findings suggests that policy makers and health decision makers should retain those trained in preterm new born care in the health facility's preterm unit. PMID:26976282

  3. A New Long-Term Care Facilities Model in Nova Scotia, Canada: Protocol for a Mixed Methods Study of Care by Design

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Emily Gard; Boudreau, Michelle Anne; Jensen, Jan L; Edgecombe, Nancy; Clarke, Barry; Burge, Frederick; Archibald, Greg; Taylor, Anthony; Andrew, Melissa K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior to the implementation of a new model of care in long-term care facilities in the Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, residents entering long-term care were responsible for finding their own family physician. As a result, care was provided by many family physicians responsible for a few residents leading to care coordination and continuity challenges. In 2009, Capital District Health Authority (CDHA) implemented a new model of long-term care called “Care b...

  4. Enhancement of clinical teaching for undergraduate students in primary health care facilities / Reginah Masakona

    OpenAIRE

    Masakona, Reginah

    2014-01-01

    The study comprises an investigation of the quality of the clinical teaching environment of undergraduate students in the accredited Primary health care ( PHC) facilities used by a provincial nursing college in Limpopo. The researcher, who is employed full time in one of the accredited PHC facilities to which undergraduate students are admitted for clinical practice, became aware of the tension between the undergraduate students and professional nurses working in the PHC facility during th...

  5. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... population with a high burden of functional and cognitive impairment. Residential care is an important component of ... RCF and the month and year of the interview. Medicaid beneficiary : A resident who, during the 30 ...

  6. A Model of Consumer Decision Making in the Selection of a Long-Term Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugroschel, William J.; Notzon, Linda R.

    Since nursing home placement is frequently the last choice for families of elderly people who need long-term care, little literature exists which delineates a model for consumer decision making in the selection of a specific long-term care facility. Critical issues include the following: (1) who actually makes the selection; (2) what other…

  7. 75 FR 65515 - NRC Corporation, USPS Help Desk of Customer Care Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Volt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration NRC Corporation, USPS Help Desk of Customer Care Center, Including On... September 3, 2010 (75 FR 54187). The workers supply information technology support services and are...

  8. The perceived stress and turnover intention of direct-care staff of community residential facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lightle, Kevin Eugene

    1990-01-01

    This study examines turnover among direct-care staff of community residential facilities. Turnover is of concern as the projected rate indicated by direct-care staff is 34%. A review of personnel records project an annual turnover rate of 40%. Stress is examined for its relationship to turnover. The Maslach Burnout Inventory is used to measure the perceived stress level of staff. Results indicate direct-care staff are not stressed to the point of burnout in two of ...

  9. Clostridium difficile Infections in Veterans Health Administration Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jeffrey S; Evans, Martin E; Simbartl, Loretta A; Kralovic, Stephen M; Kelly, Allison A; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A nationwide initiative was implemented in February 2014 to decrease Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in Veterans Affairs (VA) long-term care facilities. We report a baseline of national CDI data collected during the 2 years before the Initiative. METHODS Personnel at each of 122 reporting sites entered monthly retrospective CDI case data from February 2012 through January 2014 into a national database using case definitions similar to those used in the National Healthcare Safety Network Multidrug-Resistant Organism/CDI module. The data were evaluated using Poisson regression models to examine infection occurrences over time while accounting for admission prevalence and type of diagnostic test. RESULTS During the 24-month analysis period, there were 100,800 admissions, 6,976,121 resident days, and 1,558 CDI cases. The pooled CDI admission prevalence rate (including recurrent cases) was 0.38 per 100 admissions, and the pooled nonduplicate/nonrecurrent community-onset rate was 0.17 per 100 admissions. The pooled long-term care facility-onset rate and the clinically confirmed (ie, diarrhea or evidence of pseudomembranous colitis) long-term care facility-onset rate were 1.98 and 1.78 per 10,000 resident days, respectively. Accounting for diagnostic test type, the long-term care facility-onset rate declined significantly (P=.05), but the clinically confirmed long-term care facility-onset rate did not. CONCLUSIONS VA long-term care facility CDI rates were comparable to those in recent reports from other long-term care facilities. The significant decline in the long-term care facility-onset rate but not in the clinically confirmed long-term care facility-onset rate may have been due to less testing of asymptomatic patients. Efforts to decrease CDI rates in long-term care facilities are necessary as part of a coordinated approach to decrease healthcare-associated infections. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(3):295-300. PMID:26686361

  10. Effects of person-centered care on residents and staff in aged-care facilities: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancarrow S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sonya Brownie, Susan NancarrowSchool of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Several residential aged-care facilities have replaced the institutional model of care to one that accepts person-centered care as the guiding standard of practice. This culture change is impacting the provision of aged-care services around the world. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for an impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and nursing staff.Methods: We searched Medline, Cinahl, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Proquest, and Expanded Academic ASAP databases for studies published between January 1995 and October 2012, using subject headings and free-text search terms (in UK and US English spelling including person-centered care, patient-centered care, resident-oriented care, Eden Alternative, Green House model, Wellspring model, long-term care, and nursing homes.Results: The search identified 323 potentially relevant articles. Once duplicates were removed, 146 were screened for inclusion in this review; 21 were assessed for methodological quality, resulting in nine articles (seven studies that met our inclusion criteria. There was only one randomized, controlled trial. The majority of studies were quasi-experimental pre-post test designs, with a control group (n = 4. The studies in this review incorporated a range of different outcome measures (ie, dependent variables to evaluate the impact of person-centered interventions on aged-care residents and staff. One person-centered intervention, ie, the Eden Alternative, was associated with significant improvements in residents' levels of boredom and helplessness. In contrast, facility-specific person-centered interventions were found to impact nurses' sense of job satisfaction and their capacity to meet the individual needs of residents in a positive way. Two studies found that person-centered care was actually associated with an

  11. Assessing the skills of home care workers in helping older people take their prescribed medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Elizabeth E J

    2015-08-01

    The Southern Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland applied a modified version of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the skills of home care workers in assisting older people taking prescribed medications. In Northern Ireland, home care workers are care workers employed by health and social care trusts or private agencies. The application of the model has developed the skills of this staff group, improved the relationship between the commissioner and provider, significantly reduced the time spent by community nurses in individual training and assessment, and enhanced the patient experience for those taking medication. Overall, the application of this model has provided assurances to the Trust board, the executive director of nursing, and operational directors that home care workers are competent in assisting older people in this high-risk activity. PMID:26252238

  12. Elders' perceptions of formal and informal care: aspects of getting and receiving help for their activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, B; Whattam, M; Young, H; Dimond, M

    2001-05-01

    A purposive and convenience sample of 16 women and four men receiving informal and formal care for their activities of daily living either at home or institutions in Southeast Washington, USA was interviewed. Qualitative findings related to asking for help, getting and receiving help, interpersonal aspects of receiving help, and met and unmet needs are reported. Some seniors found it more difficult to ask for and accept help and there were gender differences, with men tending to adopt a more logical and pragmatic approach while women viewed receiving help as a loss of independence and an invasion of privacy. Intimacy and nudity were also threats for women. Three styles of adjustment and acceptance were identified within the data and related to positive acceptance, resigned acceptance and passive acceptance. There appeared to be a relationship between independence and control, with elders losing some independence but retaining control through choice, payment and involvement in decision making. Reciprocity was found to bring added value to relationships between care providers and elders, with a rhythm and symmetry developing in relationships where needs were known, anticipated and met. Seniors should be encouraged to plan for their future and to find out about local help and services available to them in advance of their requiring any assistance. PMID:11820550

  13. Guided Self-Help Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, C; Wilson, P; Morrison, J.; McMahon, A.; Walker, A.; Allan, L; McConnachie, A.; McNeill, Y.; Tansey, L

    2013-01-01

    Background: Access to Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for depression is limited. One solution is CBT self-help books. Trial Objectives: To assess the impact of a guided self-help CBT book (GSH-CBT) on mood, compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Hypotheses: 1. GSH-CBT will have improved mood and knowledge of the causes and treatment of depression compared to the control receiving TAU 2. Guided self-help will be acceptable to patients and staff. Methods and Findings ...

  14. Appointment standardization evaluation in a primary care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance on standardizing appointment slot length in a primary care clinic to understand the impact of providers' preferences and practice differences. Design/methodology/approach - The treatment time data were collected for each provider. There were six patient types: emergency/urgent care (ER/UC), follow-up patient (FU), new patient, office visit (OV), physical exam, and well-child care. Simulation model was developed to capture patient flow and measure patient wait time, provider idle time, cost, overtime, finish time, and the number of patients scheduled. Four scheduling scenarios were compared: scheduled all patients at 20 minutes; scheduled ER/UC, FU, OV at 20 minutes and others at 40 minutes; scheduled patient types on individual provider preference; and scheduled patient types on combined provider preference. Findings - Standardized scheduling among providers increase cost by 57 per cent, patient wait time by 83 per cent, provider idle time by five minutes per patient, overtime by 22 minutes, finish time by 30 minutes, and decrease patient access to care by approximately 11 per cent. An individualized scheduling approach could save as much as 14 per cent on cost and schedule 1.5 more patients. The combined preference method could save about 8 per cent while the number of patients scheduled remained the same. Research limitations/implications - The challenge is to actually disseminate the findings to medical providers and adjust scheduling systems accordingly. Originality/value - This paper concluded standardization of providers' clinic preference and practice negatively impact clinic service quality and access to care. PMID:27298064

  15. Older Residents' Perspectives of Long-Term Care Facilities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Junqiao; Cao, Yuling; Jia, Shoumei; Wu, Bei

    2016-08-01

    China's formal long-term care (LTC) system is in its developmental stage due to lack of standardized health assessments for resident admission, limited government funding, an acute shortage of qualified staff at all levels, and regional disparities in quality of care. Relocation to LTC facilities changes the lives of older adults because they have to leave behind their homes and previous social networks. The current study aimed to provide an in-depth exploration of 25 older adult residents' lives in four LTC facilities in China. A conventional content analysis approach was used to interpret participant interviews. Residents experienced losses and gains from residential life. Three themes emerged: (a) influences of cultural beliefs, (b) basic care needs fulfilled in LTC facilities, and (c) lack of quality care in LTC facilities. Findings show that residents' basic needs were met in Chinese LTC facilities, but there is room for improvement in delivering quality care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(8), 34-43.]. PMID:27319405

  16. Helping Children and Youth with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Systems of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a mental health care provider. Misperceptions and misunderstandings can lead to delayed diagnoses, misdiagnoses, or no ... Timothy copes with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD),depression, learning disabilities, and alcoholism. Timothy was diagnosed with ...

  17. Exploring implementation and sustainability of models of care: can theory help?

    OpenAIRE

    Forster Della A; Newton Michelle; McLachlan Helen L; Willis Karen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Research on new models of care in health service provision is complex, as is the introduction and embedding of such models, and positive research findings are only one factor in whether a new model of care will be implemented. In order to understand why this is the case, research design must not only take account of proposed changes in the clinical encounter, but the organisational context that must sustain and normalise any changed practices. We use two case studies where ...

  18. KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    KSC volunteers with Days of Caring '99 share tasks while getting ready to paint at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

  19. Student help seeking from pastoral care in UK high schools: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kendal, Sarah; Keeley, Philip; Callery, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about high school students' perceptions of school-based pastoral support. This study aimed to explore this in the context of a high school–based emotional support project. Methods Qualitative interviews explored perspectives on help seeking of students (N = 23) and staff (N = 27) in three UK high schools where a pastoral project was introduced. Data were analysed thematically. Results Student peer groups perceived help seeking as a sign of weakness....

  20. Informal and Formal Help Seeking Among Older Black Male Foster Care Youth and Alumni

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Lionel D.; McMillen, J. Curtis; Snowden, Lonnie R.

    2013-01-01

    Using the behavioral model for vulnerable populations as a framework, this study examined predisposing, enabling, and need factors related to seeking help from formal and informal sources among older Black male foster youth and alumni. Results of logistic regression analyses showed that emotional control, a predisposing variable, was related to help-seeking. Specifically, greater adherence to the norm of emotional control was related to lower likelihood of using informal or formal sources of ...

  1. Operationalising emergency care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa: consensus-based recommendations for healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Emilie J B; Tenner, Andrea G; Broccoli, Morgan C; Skog, Alexander P; Muck, Andrew E; Tupesis, Janis P; Brysiewicz, Petra; Teklu, Sisay; Wallis, Lee; Reynolds, Teri

    2016-08-01

    A major barrier to successful integration of acute care into health systems is the lack of consensus on the essential components of emergency care within resource-limited environments. The 2013 African Federation of Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference was convened to address the growing need for practical solutions to further implementation of emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa. Over 40 participants from 15 countries participated in the working group that focused on emergency care delivery at health facilities. Using the well-established approach developed in the WHO's Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care, the workgroup identified the essential services delivered-signal functions-associated with each emergency care sentinel condition. Levels of emergency care were assigned based on the expected capacity of the facility to perform signal functions, and the necessary human, equipment and infrastructure resources identified. These consensus-based recommendations provide the foundation for objective facility capacity assessment in developing emergency health systems that can bolster strategic planning as well as facilitate monitoring and evaluation of service delivery. PMID:26202673

  2. Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Khurshid

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC, a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Given the current maternal and child mortality in Bangladesh and the challenges to addressing health-related Millennium Development Goal (MDG targets the financial sustainability of such facilities is crucial. Methods The study was designed as a case study covering a single facility. The methodology was based on the 'ingredient approach' using the allocation techniques by inpatient and outpatient services. Cost recovery of the facility was estimated from the provider's perspective. The value of capital items was annualized using 5% discount rate and its market price of 2004 (replacement value. Sensitivity analysis was done using 3% discount rate. Results The cost recovery ratio of the BRAC primary care facility was 59%, and if excluding all capital costs, it increased to 72%. Of the total costs, 32% was for personnel while drugs absorbed 18%. Capital items were17% of total costs while operational cost absorbed 12%. Three-quarters of the total cost was variable costs. Inpatient services contributed 74% of total revenue in exchange of 10% of total utilization. An average cost per patient was US$ 10 while it was US$ 67 for inpatient and US$ 4 for outpatient. Conclusion The cost recovery of this NGO primary care facility is important for increasing its financial sustainability and decreasing donor dependency, and achieving universal health coverage in a developing country setting. However, for improving the cost recovery of the health facility, it needs to increase

  3. Can we help in changing the future of Italian health care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Di Napoli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available [The abstract of this article is not available. Here are the first sentences of the article. The full text is freely available upon registration]The retirement age of the baby boom generation is almost out-door. The proportion of ageing people will grow rapidly in the near future [1-3]. There will be fewer people to pay for the health and social care of the quickly aging population; furthermore, advancements in medical science will raise a new bar for quality in terms of the outcomes achieved in the treatment of illness [3]. An ageing population and the rising public expectations will produce an increase in costs and will impede timely access to care, thus jeopardising sustainability.The Italian National Health system is an example of a collapsing system: the ageing Italian workforce affects not only patient demographics but also the availability of clinicians. The upcoming wave of retiring health care professionals will occur in the exact moment when they will be more necessary. To overcome these challenges, our health care system will have to use its resources more effectively. Access and equity remain essential characteristics of our health care system, but are insufficient goals in terms of improving quality and achieving financial sustainability.

  4. Everybody matters. 1: How getting to know your patients helps to promote dignified care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Caroline; Flatley, Mary; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Meyer, Julienne; Dale, Patricia; Wessel, Lucinda

    The Dignity in Care Project aims to develop practical interventions to promote dignified care in hospitals, embedded in the project slogan: "Everybody matters: sustaining dignity in care." It is a nurse led research collaboration with Royal Free Hampstead and Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals Trusts and City University. Practical interventions devised by the project are presented around three main themes that emerged from the views of older people and their relatives (Bridges et al, 2010; 2009). The first theme of "maintaining identity--see who I am" focuses on knowing about people, while the second of "creating community--connect with me" recognises that in the act of caring, nurses receive as well as give. The last theme of "shared decision making--involve me" looks at how decisions about care are made. This first article in a three part series summarises the project and focuses on the first theme. It reports on practical initiatives to enhance dignity in hospitals by enabling nurses and patients/carers to know and value each other as people. PMID:20552858

  5. Australians with osteoarthritis: satisfaction with health care providers and the perceived helpfulness of treatments and information sources

    OpenAIRE

    Basedow, Martin; Hibbert,Peter; Hooper,Tamara; Runciman, William; Esterman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Martin Basedow,1 Peter Hibbert,1 Tamara Hooper,1 William Runciman,1 Adrian Esterman,2 1School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of Australian patients who suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) with their health care providers and the perceived helpfulness of treatments and information sources. Methods: A self-administered questionnair...

  6. Well-being, the Decision making process in residential care facilities and accommodation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann; Harder, Henrik

    process. 3. Alternatives to "the living environments”. In general a discussion about “the living environments” as the only and right solution for organising the residential care facilities and accommodation in Denmark is recommended. Maybe there should be a possibility given to create more private...... assisted living residential care facilities and accommodation for senior citizens selected from different parts of Denmark. The case study will provide important knowledge on municipal activities in the area of residential care facilities, as well as discuss the different actors’ roles in the decision...... making process. The research is commissioned and financed by the Danish National Board of Social Services conducted by CAST University of Southern Denmark in collaboration with the Institute for Architecture & Design at Aalborg University in Denmark. Granted with 1.07 million €. Results: 1. More research...

  7. Preventing airborne disease transmission: review of methods for ventilation design in health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, Amir A; Rogak, Steven N; Bartlett, Karen H; Green, Sheldon I

    2011-01-01

    Health care facility ventilation design greatly affects disease transmission by aerosols. The desire to control infection in hospitals and at the same time to reduce their carbon footprint motivates the use of unconventional solutions for building design and associated control measures. This paper considers indoor sources and types of infectious aerosols, and pathogen viability and infectivity behaviors in response to environmental conditions. Aerosol dispersion, heat and mass transfer, deposition in the respiratory tract, and infection mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on experimental and modeling approaches. Key building design parameters are described that include types of ventilation systems (mixing, displacement, natural and hybrid), air exchange rate, temperature and relative humidity, air flow distribution structure, occupancy, engineered disinfection of air (filtration and UV radiation), and architectural programming (source and activity management) for health care facilities. The paper describes major findings and suggests future research needs in methods for ventilation design of health care facilities to prevent airborne infection risk. PMID:22162813

  8. Falls, Depression, and Other Hospitalization Risk Factors for Adults in Residential Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimm, Gilbert W; Kitsantas, Panagiota

    2016-06-01

    Prior research has shown a relationship between falls, hospitalizations, and depression among older adults in nursing home settings, but few studies have explored these relationships for younger and older adults in residential care facilities. This study examined risk factors for hospitalizations among assisted living residents. Using the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities, the study found that 24% of residents had a hospital stay in the past year. Residents with falls were more than twice as likely to have a hospitalization. For younger residents, depression was a key risk factor (OR = 1.74, p depression and severe mental illness, who are at greater risk of hospitalization. Reducing avoidable hospitalizations can improve well-being for older and younger adults in residential care facilities. PMID:27147680

  9. Population Of US Practicing Psychiatrists Declined, 2003-13, Which May Help Explain Poor Access To Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tara F; Seirup, Joanna K; Pincus, Harold Alan; Ross, Joseph S

    2016-07-01

    A large proportion of the US population suffers from mental illness. Limited access to psychiatrists may be a contributor to the underuse of mental health services. We studied changes in the supply of psychiatrists from 2003 to 2013, compared to changes in the supply of primary care physicians and neurologists. During this period the number of practicing psychiatrists declined from 37,968 to 37,889, which represented a 10.2 percent reduction in the median number of psychiatrists per 100,000 residents in hospital referral regions. In contrast, the numbers of primary care physicians and neurologists grew during the study period. These findings may help explain why patients report poor access to mental health care. Future research should explore the impact of the declining psychiatrist supply on patients and investigate new models of care that seek to integrate mental health and primary care or use team-based care that combines the services of psychiatrists and nonphysician providers for individuals with severe mental illnesses. PMID:27385244

  10. Violence towards health care workers in a Public Health Care Facility in Italy: a repeated cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnavita Nicola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence at work is one of the major concerns in health care activities. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence in a general health care facility in Italy and to assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial factors, thereby providing a basis for appropriate intervention. Methods All health care workers from a public health care facility were invited to complete a questionnaire containing questions on workplace violence. Three questionnaire-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted. The response rate was 75 % in 2005, 71 % in 2007, and 94 % in 2009. The 2009 questionnaire contained the VIF (Violent Incident Form for reporting violent incidents, the DCS (demand/control/support model for job strain, the Colquitt 20 item questionnaire for perceived organizational justice, and the GHQ-12 General Health Questionnaire for the assessment of mental health. Results One out of ten workers reported physical assault, and one out of three exposure to non-physical violence in the workplace in the previous year. Nurses and physicians were the most exposed occupational categories, whereas the psychiatric and emergency departments were the services at greatest risk of violence. Workers exposed to non-physical violence were subject to high job strain, low support, low perceived organizational justice, and high psychological distress. Conclusion Our study shows that health care workers in an Italian local health care facility are exposed to violence. Workplace violence was associated with high demand and psychological disorders, while job control, social support and organizational justice were protective factors.

  11. Professional Distress and Meaning in Health Care: Why Professional Empathy Can Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Eve; Halpern, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    For human service care providers working in hospitals, balancing the motivation for interpersonal engagement with patients alongside self-protective emotional boundaries is a familiar struggle. Empathy is a critical, although not thoroughly understood, aspect of patient care as well as an important ingredient for feeling work satisfaction and meaning. However, empathy can lead to feelings of sympathetic emotional distress and even burnout. This article uses an illustrative case study from a medical social worker in the emergency room to explore these themes of empathy, burnout, and the search for meaning in work. The discussion examines areas for further empirical study and intervention to support care-provider empathy and avoid burnout. PMID:26317765

  12. Nursing staff's actions during older residents’ transition into long-term care facility in a nursing home in rural Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Eika

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Working in long-term care units poses particular staff challenges as these facilities are expected to provide services for seriously ill residents and give help in a homelike atmosphere. Licensed and unlicensed personnel work together in these surroundings, and their contributions may ease or inhibit a smooth transition for recently admitted residents. The aim of the study was to describe and explore different nursing staff's actions during the initial transition period for older people into a long-term care facility. Participant observation periods were undertaken following staff during 10 new residents’ admissions and their first week in the facility. In addition 16 interviews of different staff categories and reading of written documents were carried out. The findings show great variations of the staff's actions during the older residents’ initial transition period. Characteristics of their actions were (1 in the preparation period: “actions of sharing, sorting out, and ignoring information”; (2 on admission day: “actions of involvement and ignorance”; and (3 in the initial period: “targeted and random actions,” “actions influenced by embedded knowledge,” and “actions influenced by local transparency.”

  13. Prevalence of Respiratory Protective Devices in U.S. Health Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizner, Kerri; Stradtman, Lindsay; Novak, Debra; Shaffer, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    An online questionnaire was developed to explore respiratory protective device (RPD) prevalence in U.S. health care facilities. The survey was distributed to professional nursing society members in 2014 and again in 2015 receiving 322 and 232 participant responses, respectively. The purpose of this study was to explore if the emergency preparedness climate associated with Ebola virus disease changed the landscape of RPD use and awareness. Comparing response percentages from the two sampling time frames using bivariate analysis, no significant changes were found in types of RPDs used in health care settings. N95 filtering facepiece respirators continue to be the most prevalent RPD used in health care facilities, but powered air-purifying respirators are also popular, with regional use highest in the West and Midwest. Understanding RPD use prevalence could ensure that health care workers receive appropriate device trainings as well as improve supply matching for emergency RPD stockpiling. PMID:27462029

  14. Prevalence of Respiratory Protective Devices in U.S. Health Care Facilities: Implications for Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizner, Kerri; Stradtman, Lindsay; Novak, Debra; Shaffer, Ronald

    2016-08-01

    An online questionnaire was developed to explore respiratory protective device (RPD) prevalence in U.S. health care facilities. The survey was distributed to professional nursing society members in 2014 and again in 2015 receiving 322 and 232 participant responses, respectively. The purpose of this study was to explore if the emergency preparedness climate associated with Ebola virus disease changed the landscape of RPD use and awareness. Comparing response percentages from the two sampling time frames using bivariate analysis, no significant changes were found in types of RPDs used in health care settings. N95 filtering facepiece respirators continue to be the most prevalent RPD used in health care facilities, but powered air-purifying respirators are also popular, with regional use highest in the West and Midwest. Understanding RPD use prevalence could ensure that health care workers receive appropriate device trainings as well as improve supply matching for emergency RPD stockpiling. PMID:27462029

  15. DuPont/HFM Forum on carpet in health care facilities. Roundtable discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, J; Hemmes, M; Blyth, P L; Plappert, K K; Noell, E; VanStavern, V; Cama, R; Lynn, V; Pollitt, B S; Rainey, P M

    1993-11-01

    DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national experts to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--on May 13 to take part in DuPont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's C. Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, end-users, interior designers and mill representatives talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10183973

  16. DuPont/HFM forum on carpet in health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national experts to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--last year to take part in Dupont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's C. Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, ender-users, interior designers and carpet mill representatives talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10131499

  17. DuPont/HFM Forum on carpet in health care facilities. Third in a series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national experts to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--last year to take part in DuPont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's C. Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, end-users, interior designers and carpet mill representative talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10184014

  18. Child Care as a Setting for Helping to Prevent Child Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Nancy L.; Gillespie, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Effective relationships with parents are a cornerstone of high quality early childhood programs. When parents and professionals see each other as allies in caring for young children, everyone benefits. When parents are especially stressed or lacking in support, it can affect the way they relate to their children and, in some families, the risk for…

  19. Toward an Expansion of an Enactive Ethics with the Help of Care Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The paper argues that recent developments in the enactive approach to social phenomena call for further expansion of an enactive ethics beyond its initial focus on face-to- face dyadic interactions. The main aim is to draw attention to the so far under- appreciated kinship between an enactive ethics and the ethics of care.

  20. Evidence from facility level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Jai K; Kumar, Rohail; Salam, Rehana A; Lassi, Zohra S; Zulfiqar A Bhutta

    2014-01-01

    Most of the maternal and newborn deaths occur at birth or within 24 hours of birth. Therefore, essential lifesaving interventions need to be delivered at basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care facilities. Facilities provide complex interventions including advice on referrals, post discharge care, long-term management of chronic conditions along with staff training, managerial and administrative support to other facilities. This paper reviews the effectiveness of facility level inputs...

  1. Abuse of power against clients by professional staff in care facilities.

    OpenAIRE

    KUPSOVÁ, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    The objective of my dissertation work titled ``Abuse of power against clients by professional staff in care facilities{\\crqq} is to establish whether the ethical codes are observed in the social and health care institutions providing accommodation services to their clients. Another objective of the work is to find out whether the employers running these institutions take adequate measures to prevent the burnt-out syndrome in their employees. The theoretical part of the work deals with the phi...

  2. Social networks of nursing staff and organizational performance. A study in long-term care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Beek, A.P.A. van

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, there has been increasing attention for the role of social networks in explaining performance differences between organizations. Yet, research on social networks within healthcare organizations in general and long-term care facilities specifically has been rare, despite growing interest in explanations for differences in performance. In this thesis, we study informal social networks of nursing staff and organizational performance in different care settings for residents with d...

  3. Identification, Evaluation and Control of Physically Demanding Patient-Handling Tasks in an Acute Care Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Callison, Myrna

    2007-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are prevalent among health care workers worldwide and underreporting among nurses may mask the true impact of these injuries. Nursing staff are consistently among the top 10 occupations at risk for experiencing WMSDs and patient-handling tasks are the precipitating event in the majority of back injuries experienced among nursing staff. Existing research has focused on patient-handling issues within long-term care facilities, and identify...

  4. Reduction of Femoral Fractures in Long-Term Care Facilities: The Bavarian Fracture Prevention Study

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Clemens; Cameron, Ian D; Klenk, Jochen; Lindemann, Ulrich; Heinrich, Sven; König, Hans-Helmut; Rapp, Kilian

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a major public health burden. In industrialized countries about 20% of all femoral fractures occur in care dependent persons living in nursing care and assisted living facilities. Preventive strategies for these groups are needed as the access to medical services differs from independent home dwelling older persons at risk of osteoporotic fractures. It was the objective of the study to evaluate the effect of a fall and fracture prevention program on the incidence ...

  5. Development of a Daily Life Support System for Elderly Persons with Dementia in the Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kawai, Toshihiro; Komeda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Taking care for dementia persons with BPSD is burdening on caregivers. To reduce caregivers' burdens and improve dementia persons' quality of life, monitoring and communication intervention system has been proposed. A part of the system, wandering and falling down detection system has been developed. It is designed based on the requirement of the caregivers working in the care facility. Functional test was carried out and had positive impressions from the caregivers. PMID:26294607

  6. Hospice Utilization in Nursing Homes: Association With Facility End-of-Life Care Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.; Caprio, Thomas V.; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Hospice care provided to nursing home (NH) residents has been shown to improve the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care. However, hospice utilization in NHs is typically low. This study examined the relationship between facility self-reported EOL practices and residents’ hospice use and length of stay. Design: The study was based on a retrospective cohort of NH residents. Medicare hospice claims, Minimum Data Set, Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system and the Area Resour...

  7. Organizational factors influencing health information technology adoption in long-term-care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiankai; Wang, Yangmei; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Long-term care (LTC) is an important sector of the health care industry. However, the adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems in LTC facilities lags behind that in other sectors of health care. Previous literature has focused on the financial and technical barriers. This study examined the organizational factors associated with HIT adoption in LTC facilities. A survey of 500 LTC facilities in Texas enabled researchers to compile HIT indexes for further statistical analyses. A general linear model was used to study the associations between the clinical/administrative HIT indexes and organizational factors. The empirical outcomes show that the size of an LTC facility has a significant association with HIT adoption. Rural LTC facilities, especially freestanding ones, adopt less HIT than their urban counterparts, whereas freestanding LTC facilities have the lowest HIT adoption overall. There is not enough evidence to support ownership status as a significant factor in HIT adoption. Some implications are proposed, but further research is necessary. PMID:24463588

  8. 76 FR 9503 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Requirements for Long-Term Care (LTC) Facilities; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ..., written notification of an impending facility closure. For informational purposes, LTC ombudsmen are... the use of language translators in hospitals, health literacy and its impact on health care...

  9. Prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care facilities among adult Tanzanians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahabuka Febronia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral pain has been the major cause of the attendances in the dental clinics in Tanzania. Some patients postpone seeing the dentist for as long as two to five days. This study determines the prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care in Tanzania. Methods Questionnaire data were collected from 1,759 adult respondents aged 18 years and above. The study area covered six urban and eight rural study clusters, which had been selected using the WHO Pathfinder methodology. Chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations. Results Forty two percent of the respondents had utilized the oral health care facilities sometimes in their lifetime. About 59% of the respondents revealed that they had suffered from oral pain and/or discomfort within the twelve months that preceded the study, but only 26.5% of these had sought treatment from oral health care facilities. The reasons for not seeking emergency care were: lack of money to pay for treatment (27.9%; self medication (17.6%; respondents thinking that pain would disappear with time (15.7%; and lack of money to pay for transport to the dental clinic (15.0%. Older adults were more likely to report that they had experienced oral pain during the last 12 months than the younger adults (OR = 1.57, CI 1.07–1.57, P dental clinics far from home (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.09–13.54, P and being treated by traditional healer (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.25–12.49, P as reasons for not seeking emergency care from the oral health care facilities than their counterparts from urban areas. Conclusion Oral pain and discomfort were prevalent among adult Tanzanians. Only a quarter of those who experienced oral pain or discomfort sought emergency oral care from oral health care facilities. Self medication was used as an alternative to using oral care facilities mainly by rural residents. Establishing oral care facilities in rural areas is recommended.

  10. Dual indices for prioritizing investment in decentralized HIV services at Nigerian primary health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Nancy; Oyediran, Kola' A; Mullen, Stephanie; Kolapo, Usman M

    2016-04-01

    Decentralizing health services, including those for HIV prevention and treatment, is one strategy for maximizing the use of limited resources and expanding treatment options; yet few methods exist for systematically identifying where investments for service expansion might be most effective, in terms of meeting needs and rapid availability of improved services. The Nigerian Government, the United States Government under the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) program and other donors are expanding services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV to primary health care facilities in Nigeria. Nigerian primary care facilities vary greatly in their readiness to deliver HIV/AIDS services. In 2012, MEASURE Evaluation assessed 268 PEPFAR-supported primary health care facilities in Nigeria and developed a systematic method for prioritizing these facilities for expansion of PMTCT services. Each assessed facility was scored based on two indices with multiple, weighted variables: one measured facility readiness to provide PMTCT services, the other measured local need for the services and feasibility of expansion. These two scores were compiled and the summary score used as the basis for prioritizing facilities for PMTCT service expansion. The rationale was that using need and readiness to identify where to expand PMTCT services would result in more efficient allocation of resources. A review of the results showed that the indices achieved the desired effect-that is prioritizing facilities with high need even when readiness was problematic and also prioritizing facilities where rapid scale-up was feasible. This article describes the development of the two-part index and discusses advantages of using this approach when planning service expansion. The authors' objective is to contribute to development of methodologies for prioritizing investments in HIV, as well as other public health arenas, that should improve cost-effectiveness and

  11. Pathways to care : help-seeking for child and adolescent mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Although emotional and behavioural problems are relatively common in children and adolescents, they are rarely brought to the attention of general practitioners (GPs) or mental health professionals. The main aim of this study was to investigate the process of help-seeking for child and adolescent ps

  12. Unit managers' role in improving nursing teamwork in a mental health care facility / Mariska Elizabeth Oosthuizen–Van Tonder

    OpenAIRE

    Oosthuizen–Van Tonder, Mariska Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The nursing team in a mental health care facility is a known dynamic at every hospital, rehabilitation centre and out-patient unit which enables these units to be functional. Currently nursing teams function in a challenged environment in mental health care facilities. The National Department of Health in South Africa states that one of the priority areas in the core standards of health care is to improve values and attitudes of health care professionals. One of the ways to accomplish this is...

  13. The Role of the Primary Care Physician in Helping Adolescent and Adult Patients Improve Asthma Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yawn, Barbara P.

    2011-01-01

    Many adolescents and adults with asthma continue to have poorly controlled disease, often attributable to poor adherence to asthma therapy. Failure to adhere to recommended treatment may result from a desire to avoid regular reliance on medications, inappropriate high tolerance of asthma symptoms, failure to perceive the chronic nature of asthma, and poor inhaler technique. Primary care physicians need to find opportunities and methods to address these and other issues related to poor asthma ...

  14. Toward an Expansion of an Enactive Ethics with the Help of Care Ethics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1354 (2014), s. 1-3. ISSN 1664-1078 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP401/12/P544 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : enactivism * enactive ethics * feminist relational theory * the ethics of care * socially extended mind Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion Impact factor: 2.560, year: 2014 http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01354/full

  15. Delivery of surgical care in a district general hospital without high dependency unit facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Coggins, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Many hospitals lack the facilities for high dependency care, and patients requiring this level of care are nursed on the surgical ward. The aim of this study was to assess the extent of this problem in a district general hospital, looking at the impact of providing high dependency unit (HDU) care at ward level.
METHODS—A 28 bed surgical ward was studied for 39 consecutive days. Patients were assessed as being either appropriately placed (routine) or inappropriately placed (HDU). Nu...

  16. Management of diabetes mellitus and hypertension at UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef, J I

    2000-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at all UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon Field, to assess the quality of care of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The study reviewed 2202 records of diabetic and hypertensive patients. Both diseases were present at an early age (< 40 years), with family history, obesity and sedentary lifestyle being the main risk factors. The major complication was cardiovascular disease followed by retinopathy. Action-oriented measures to improve the organization and management of the health care services were identified. PMID:11556027

  17. Nursing staff ’s actions during older residents’ transition into long-term care facility in a nursing home in rural Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Eika, Marianne; Espnes, Geir Arild; Hvalvik, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Working in long-term care units poses particular staff challenges as these facilities are expected to provide services for seriously ill residents and give help in a homelike atmosphere. Licensed and unlicensed personnel work together in these surroundings, and their contributions may ease or inhibit a smooth transition for recently admitted residents. The aim of the study was to describe and explore different nursing staff’s actions during the initial transition period for older people into ...

  18. Challenges in Evaluating and Standardizing Medical Devices in Health Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ventola, C. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Advances in medical technologies have led to improved diagnoses and treatments, but medical devices do not always undergo the rigorous review process that is applied to drugs. To control costs, some health care facilities are becoming more selective in how they evaluate new devices.

  19. Insomnia, Sleepiness, and Depression in Adolescents Living in Residential Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Vincent; Belanger, Lynda; Begin, Gilles; Morin, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to document sleep patterns and disturbances reported by youths temporarily living in residential care facilities. A secondary objective was to examine the relationships between sleep disturbances and mood and daytime sleepiness. A self-reported questionnaire on sleep patterns and habits assessing duration,…

  20. Social networks of nursing staff and organizational performance. A study in long-term care facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, A.P.A van

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, there has been increasing attention for the role of social networks in explaining performance differences between organizations. Yet, research on social networks within healthcare organizations in general and long-term care facilities specifically has been rare, despite growing inter

  1. Minnesota's Nursing Facility Performance-Based Incentive Payment Program: An Innovative Model for Promoting Care Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Valerie; Arling, Greg; Lewis, Teresa; Abrahamson, Kathleen A.; Mueller, Christine; Edstrom, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Minnesota's Nursing Facility Performance-Based Incentive Payment Program (PIPP) supports provider-initiated projects aimed at improving care quality and efficiency. PIPP moves beyond conventional pay for performance. It seeks to promote implementation of evidence-based practices, encourage innovation and risk taking, foster collaboration…

  2. Evidence for perinatal and child health care guidelines in crisis settings: can Cochrane help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Hayley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important that healthcare provided in crisis settings is based on the best available research evidence. We reviewed guidelines for child and perinatal health care in crisis situations to determine whether they were based on research evidence, whether Cochrane systematic reviews were available in the clinical areas addressed by these guidelines and whether summaries of these reviews were provided in Evidence Aid. Methods Broad internet searches were undertaken to identify relevant guidelines. Guidelines were appraised using AGREE and the clinical areas that were relevant to perinatal or child health were extracted. We searched The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify potentially relevant reviews. For each review we determined how many trials were included, and how many were conducted in resource-limited settings. Results Six guidelines met selection criteria. None of the included guidelines were clearly based on research evidence. 198 Cochrane reviews were potentially relevant to the guidelines. These reviews predominantly addressed nutrient supplementation, breastfeeding, malaria, maternal hypertension, premature labour and prevention of HIV transmission. Most reviews included studies from developing settings. However for large portions of the guidelines, particularly health services delivery, there were no relevant reviews. Only 18 (9.1% reviews have summaries in Evidence Aid. Conclusions We did not identify any evidence-based guidelines for perinatal and child health care in disaster settings. We found many Cochrane reviews that could contribute to the evidence-base supporting future guidelines. However there are important issues to be addressed in terms of the relevance of the available reviews and increasing the number of reviews addressing health care delivery.

  3. Critical action research applied in clinical placement development in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily D; Kelton, Moira; Paterson, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quality clinical placements in residential aged care facilities for undergraduate nursing students undertaking their nursing practicum topics. The proportion of people aged over 65 years is expected to increase steadily from 13% in 2006 to 26% of the total population in Australia in 2051. However, when demand is increasing for a nursing workforce competent in the care of older people, studies have shown that nursing students generally lack interest in working with older people. The lack of exposure of nursing students to quality clinical placements is one of the key factors contributing to this situation. Critical action research built on a partnership between an Australian university and five aged care organisations was utilised. A theoretical framework informed by Habermas' communicative action theory was utilised to guide the action research. Multiple research activities were used to support collaborative critical reflection and inform actions throughout the action research. Clinical placements in eight residential aged care facilities were developed to support 179 nursing students across three year-levels to complete their practicum topics. Findings were presented in three categories described as structures developed to govern clinical placement, learning and teaching in residential aged care facilities. PMID:23134277

  4. High Burden of Palliative Needs among Older Intensive Care Unit Survivors Transferred to Post–Acute Care Facilities. A Single-Center Study

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, Matthew R.; Wunsch, Hannah; Reyfman, Paul A.; Narain, Wazim R.; Blinderman, Craig D.; Schluger, Neil W; Reid, M Cary; Maurer, Mathew S.; Goldstein, Nathan; Lederer, David J; Bach, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Adults with chronic critical illness (tracheostomy after ≥ 10 d of mechanical ventilation) have a high burden of palliative needs, but little is known about the actual use and potential need of palliative care services for the larger population of older intensive care unit (ICU) survivors discharged to post–acute care facilities.

  5. Examining the role of information exchange in residential aged care work practices-a survey of residential aged care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaskin Sarah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The provision of residential aged care is underpinned by information, and is reliant upon systems that adequately capture and effectively utilise and communicate this information. The aim of this study was to explicate and quantify the volume and method by which information is collected, exchanged within facilities and with external providers, and retrieved from facility information systems and hospitals. Methods A survey of staff (n = 119, including managers, health informatics officers (HIOs, quality improvement staff, registered nurses (RNs, enrolled nurses (ENs/endorsed enrolled nurses (EENs and assistants in nursing (AINs was carried out in four residential aged care facilities in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. Sites varied in size and displayed a range of information technology (IT capabilities. The survey investigated how and by whom information is collected, retrieved and exchanged, and the frequency and amount of time devoted to these tasks. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS, and open responses to questions were coded into key themes. Results Staff completed a median of six forms each, taking a median of 30 min per shift. 68.8% of staff reported transferring information from paper to a computer system, which took a median of 30 min per shift. Handover and face-to-face communication was the most frequently used form of information exchange within facilities. There was a large amount of faxing and telephone communication between facility staff and General Practitioners and community pharmacists, with staff reporting sending a median of 2 faxes to pharmacy and 1.5 faxes to General Practitioners, and initiating 2 telephone calls to pharmacies and 1.5 calls to General Practitioners per shift. Only 38.5% of respondents reported that they always had information available at the point-of-care and only 35.4% of respondents reported that they always had access to hospital stay information of residents

  6. Energy management in long-term care facilities: a hot or cold issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H L; Discenza, R

    1981-01-01

    Conservation of energy resources through total energy management programs is receiving considerable attention in the health services sector. Although the total energy management concept has been favorably implemented in hospitals, the record is not entirely clear for other health care institutions. Thirty-one Arizona and 37 Minnesota long-term care facilities were surveyed to examine the attitudes, knowledge and practice of energy management in the nursing home context. Specific questions were directed toward average monthly energy costs, energy consumption, energy conservation methods implemented, energy conservation methods planned for future implementation, and administrator attitudes on the energy management problem. The results of this study indicate that energy is not perceived to be a major problem in long-term care facilities. Administrators generally lack basic knowledge about energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of their facilities. Few long-range plans and programs have been established to address energy problems. These results suggest the need for new energy policies in the health care system, particularly for institutions other than hospitals. PMID:10253193

  7. Cost Effectiveness of Facility-Based Care, Home-Based Care and Mobile Clinics for Provision of Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Babigumira, Joseph B; Sethi, Ajay K.; Smyth, Kathleen A.; Singer, Mendel E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders in HIV/AIDS care currently use different programmes for provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. It is not known which of these represents the best value for money. Objective: To compare the cost effectiveness of home-based care (HBC), facility-based care (FBC) and mobile clinic care (MCC) for provision of ART in Uganda. Methods: Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using decision and Markov modeling of adult AIDS patients in WHO Clinical ...

  8. Romance and help-seeking among college women: "it hurts so much to care".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riessman, C K; Whalen, M H; Frost, R O; Morgenthau, J E

    1991-01-01

    Although previous research shows that adult women in intimate relations tend to enjoy better health than women without partners, this study finds the opposite tends to be true for late adolescent women. We followed a college entering class prospectively for 4 years and measured romantic involvement and various aspects of health and illness behavior in a questionnaire. Health service use was determined from the medical record, and disaggregated into distress and health maintenance visits, as well as visits expressly for psychological counseling. First year students who were romantically involved had more physical symptoms, more medical visits, but not more counseling visits, than non-involved women. At senior year, they continued to have more health maintenance, more counseling, but not more distress visits, and they tended to experience greater interference in social role performance due to illness when compared to non-involved women. When several mediators of the relationship between romantic involvement and health service use were controlled-number and intensity of physical symptoms, sexual activity, stress in the relationship, and social network characteristics--the differences persisted. Romance appears to motivate help-seeking among late adolescent women for reasons that are not easily explained empirically. Recent work on adolescent women's development offers theoretical leads that can guide future investigations. PMID:1807069

  9. Why Give Birth in Health Facility? Users' and Providers' Accounts of Poor Quality of Birth Care in Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, half of all pregnant women access a health facility for delivery. The proportion receiving skilled care at birth is even lower. In order to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, the government has set out to increase health facility deliveries by skilled care. The aim of this study was to describe the weaknesses in the provision of acceptable and adequate quality care through the accounts of women who have suffered obstetric fistula, nurse-midwives at both BEmOC and...

  10. Preparedness of health care professionals in preventing maternal mortality at a public health facility in Ghana: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Amu, Hubert; Nyarko, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preparedness of health care professionals for emergency situations is quite indispensable in quality health care; yet, information barely exists on the preparedness of health care professionals for emergency cases in health facilities in Ghana. This study sought to assess the preparedness of health professionals in preventing maternal mortality cases at a public health facility in Ghana. Methods This is a qualitative study that used purposive and convenient sampling techniques to r...

  11. Strengthening health facilities for maternal and newborn care: experiences from rural eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrude Namazzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Uganda maternal and neonatal mortality remains high due to a number of factors, including poor quality of care at health facilities. Objective: This paper describes the experience of building capacity for maternal and newborn care at a district hospital and lower-level health facilities in eastern Uganda within the existing system parameters and a robust community outreach programme. Design: This health system strengthening study, part of the Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST, aimed to increase frontline health worker capacity through district-led training, support supervision, and mentoring at one district hospital and 19 lower-level facilities. A once-off supply of essential medicines and equipment was provided to address immediate critical gaps. Health workers were empowered to requisition subsequent supplies through use of district resources. Minimal infrastructure adjustments were provided. Quantitative data collection was done within routine process monitoring and qualitative data were collected during support supervision visits. We use the World Health Organization Health System Building Blocks to describe the process of district-led health facility strengthening. Results: Seventy two per cent of eligible health workers were trained. The mean post-training knowledge score was 68% compared to 32% in the pre-training test, and 80% 1 year later. Health worker skills and competencies in care of high-risk babies improved following support supervision and mentoring. Health facility deliveries increased from 3,151 to 4,115 (a 30% increase in 2 years. Of 547 preterm babies admitted to the newly introduced kangaroo mother care (KMC unit, 85% were discharged alive to continue KMC at home. There was a non-significant declining trend for in-hospital neonatal deaths across the 2-year study period. While equipment levels remained high after initial improvement efforts, maintaining supply of even the most basic medications was a challenge, with

  12. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY ON CHOICE OF HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN RURAL AREAS OF KRISHNA DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Government is trying to deliver health services to as many numbers of people as possible. The extent to which these health services are utilized by the public is to be estimated. OBJECTIVES: 1. to study the extent of utilization of health services in rural areas of Krishna district. 2. To study the factors influencing the utilization of health services in Krishna district. SAMPLE SIZE: 600, calculated by the formula, 4pq/ L.2 STUDY DESIGN: Cross sectional, descriptive. METHODOLOGY: thirty rural clusters are randomly selected and 20 adults from each cluster are interviewed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: percentages. RESULTS: 1. Utilization of services from private health care facility is more. 2. People are utilizing services from private health care facility due to belief in doctor.

  13. The lived experiences of resilience in Iranian adolescents living in residential care facilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Nourian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resilience is one of the main factors affecting human health, and perceiving its meaning for high-risk adolescents is of particular importance in initiating preventive measures and providing resilience care. Objectives: This qualitative study was conducted to explain the meaning of resilience in the lived experiences of Iranian adolescents living in governmental residential care facilities. Materials and methods: This study was conducted using the hermeneutic phenomenological method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight adolescents aged 13–17 living in governmental residential care facilities of Tehran province affiliated to the Welfare Organization of Iran who articulated their experiences of resilience. Sampling lasted from May 2014 to July 2015 and continued until new themes were no longer emerging. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using Van Manen's six-step method of phenomenology. Results: The themes obtained in this study included “going through life's hardships,” “aspiring for achievement,” “self-protection,” “self-reliance,” and “spirituality.” Conclusion: Our study indicates that the meaning of resilience coexists with self-reliance in adolescents’ lived experiences. Adolescents look forward to a better future. They always trust God in the face of difficulties and experience resilience by keeping themselves physically and mentally away from difficulties. Adverse and bitter experiences of the past positively affected their positive view on life and its difficulties and also their resilience. The five themes that emerged from the findings describe the results in detail. The findings of this study enable nurses, health administrators, and healthcare providers working with adolescents to help this vulnerable group cope better with their stressful life conditions and improve their health through increasing their capacity for resilience.

  14. A comparative study of ADL at home and at care facilities : differences between system of elderly daycare administration

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsumura, Mika; Someya, Fujiko

    2011-01-01

    [Purpose] In elderly daycare facilities, services are provided according to independence support, which is the basic philosophy of Long-Term Care Insurance, to maintain and improve the user s activities of daily living (ADL). However, the efforts aimed at independence support and methods of service vary from facility to facility. In this study, we examined the relationship between the administrations system of the facilities and the user s independence of ADL, comparing two typ...

  15. Horizontal equity and efficiency at primary health care facilities in rural Afghanistan: a seemingly unrelated regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Benjamin; Steinhardt, Laura; Walker, Damian G; Peters, David H; Bishai, David

    2013-07-01

    Producing services efficiently and equitably are important goals for health systems. Many countries pursue horizontal equity - providing people with the same illnesses equal access to health services - by locating facilities in remote areas. Staff are often paid incentives to work at such facilities. However, there is little evidence on how many fewer people are treated at remote facilities than facilities in more densely settled areas. This research explores if there is an association between the efficiency of health centers in Afghanistan and the remoteness of their location. Survey teams collected data on facility level inputs and outputs at a stratified random sample of 579 health centers in 2005. Quality of care was measured by observing staff interact with patients and determining if staff completed a set of normative patient care tasks. We used seemingly unrelated regression to determine if facilities in remote areas have fewer outpatient visits than other rural facilities. In this analysis, one equation compares the number of outpatient visits to facility inputs, while another compares quality of care to determinants of quality. The results indicate remote facilities have about 13% fewer outpatient visits than non-remote facilities, holding inputs constant. Our analysis suggests that facilities in remote areas are realizing horizontal equity since their clients are receiving comparable quality of care to those at non-remote facilities. However, we find the average labor cost for a visit at a remote facility is $1.44, but only $0.97 at other rural facilities, indicating that a visit in a remote facility would have to be 'worth' 1.49 times a visit at a rural facility for there to be no equity - efficiency trade-off. In determining where to build or staff health centers, this loss of efficiency may be offset by progress toward a social policy objective of providing services to disadvantaged rural populations. PMID:23726212

  16. Diabetes management in Australian rural aged care facilities: A cross-sectional audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Khalil

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground There is gap in the literature regarding the current practice of diabetes management of the elderly in Australia and its compliance with available Australian diabetes practice guidelines. Aims The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacological management of elderly residents with diabetes living in aged care facilities and to identify areas for improvement in the current management as recommended by the current diabetes management guidelines in Australia. Method Residents with diabetes from three rural aged care facilities were identified by nursing staff. A cross-sectional medical record audit was carried out to obtain data of residents diagnosed with diabetes. Thirty-four medical records were audited from three aged care facilities. Data including demographics, medical histories and medications were collected and analysed Results This study had two key findings; Firstly, it showed that about a third of residents with type 2 diabetes are managed with diet only. Secondly, of the residents who are managed with medications, less than half of those audited (41% were managed according to the current diabetes guidelines in terms of pharmacological treatment which included anti- hypertensive, lipid lowering and anti- platelet therapies. Of those patients with a history of CVD, all were receiving an antihypertensive medication, 71% were not managed for their lipids and 20% were not on any prophylactic anti-platelet therapy. Conclusion Management of patients with diabetes living in rural aged care facilities is inconsistent with the current management guidelines. Educational interventions targeting health professionals and patients might be beneficial to increase compliance with the current diabetes guidelines.

  17. Barriers to obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa - a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Kyei-Nimakoh, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; McCann, Terence V

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the launch of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by the United Nations in 2000, the global community has intensified efforts to reduce adverse maternal health outcomes, especially, in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite these efforts, there is an increasing concern that the decline in maternal deaths has been less than optimal, even for women who receive birthing care in health facilities. High maternal deaths have been attributed to a variety of issues such as poor quality of c...

  18. Geographic accessibility around health care facilities for elderly residents in Hong Kong: a microscale walkability assessment

    OpenAIRE

    LOO, Becky P.Y.; Winnie Wing Yee Lam

    2012-01-01

    An ageing population poses various challenges to a society. Improvements in the medical system and the transportation network are both needed to maintain and to improve the quality of life of the elderly population. In this study we first analyze the travel patterns of elderly residents to health care facilities (HCFs) in Hong Kong. Then, we focus on elderly residents walking to and from major transit stops and on a major HCF for elderly residents as a case study. In particular, a microscale ...

  19. Long-term care facilities for the elderly: from legislation to needs

    OpenAIRE

    Ezequiel Vitório Lini; Marilene Rodrigues Portella; Marlene Doring; Maria Izabel Penha de Oliveira Santos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze existing federal legislation on public policies that deal with the elderly’s rights, with emphasis on the assistance provided in long-term care facilities for the elderly and the practical impact of these laws. Methods: this is a documentary analysis of descriptive character. Results: one identified, among nineteen laws, decrees and ordinances in the last 25 years, significant developments aimed at the elderly’s welfare, as well as structural proposals and the supervisio...

  20. Social and cultural dimensions of hygiene in Cambodian health care facilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Faurand-Tournaire Anne-Laure; Dumas Céline; Hancart-Petitet Pascale; Desclaux Alice; Vong Sirenda

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The frequency of bloodborne pathogen healthcare-associated infections is thought to be high in developing Southeast Asian Countries. The underlying social-cultural logics contributing to the risks of transmission are rarely studied. This report provides some insights on the social and cultural factors that shape hygiene practices in Cambodian health care settings. Methods We conducted qualitative surveys in various public and private health facilities in Phnom Penh, the ca...

  1. How gender is born in a diagnostic child-care facility

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Benešová

    2014-01-01

    The article is a summary of the main findings concerning (re)construction of the gender identities of children placed in a contemporary diagnostic child-care facility in the Czech Republic. The research setting has the fictitious name DDÚ Archa. The author of the arcticle is summarizing the interim results from her Ph.D. dissertation project. The goal is to catch processes which have been neglected so far by the Czech professional community, and which may become potential disciplinary tools i...

  2. Laboratory testing improves diagnosis and treatment outcomes in primary health care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Y. Carter; Orgenes E. Lema; Magdaline W. Wangai; Charles G. Munafu; Philip H. Rees; Jackson A. Nyamongo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine if use of basic laboratory tests improves diagnosis and treatment outcomes in outpatients attending rural primary health care facilities.Setting: Six rural health centres in Kenya.Design: Cross-sectional study to observe change in diagnosis and treatment made by clinical officers after laboratory testing in outpatients attending six rural health centres in Kenya.Subject: The diagnosis and treatment of 1134 patients attending outpatient services in six rural health cent...

  3. Antimicrobial use and infections in Finnish long-term care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Rummukainen, Maija-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. The rapidly growing ageing population results in a demand for new types of housing that may face the same challenges as nursing homes (NHs) do today. Elderly persons are at particular risk for healthcare-associated infections, since few long-term care facilities (LTCFs) have in-house expertise in infection control or in infectious diseases. This may lead to inappropriate prescription of antimicrobials and promote development of multidrug-resistant bacteria. The movement o...

  4. Nutritional status, body composition and physical activity among older people living in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Maine

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to study, whether drinkable yoghurt enriched with probiotic bacteria could have any effect on constipation and body weight (BW) among older people with dementia. Further, it concerns poor nutritional status among older people with physical and cognitive impairments and its relationship with factors commonly occur in older people living in residential care facilities. It also discusses how body composition changes with ageing and the associations between cha...

  5. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in elderly in a primary care facility: An ideal facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2011 census, 5.3% of the Indian population was > 65 years of age. This number has steadily grown over past few years and is steeply growing. Healthcare burden of elderly diabetics is immense and proper diagnosis and treatment alone can prevent further complications. According to the most recent surveillance data in U.S., the prevalence of diabetes among U.S. adults aged ≥65 years varies from 22 to 33%, depending on the diagnostic criteria used. In CSIR-NEERI, India, we have healthcare system wherein a fixed and limited number of patients are treated for their lifetime by qualified practitioners with negligible financial burden of the treatment costs. The patients have regular monthly follow up and hence we diagnose Diabetes and evaluate the control and diagnose micro vascular and macro vascular complications in all patients. We did retrospective analysis of all elderly patients following up in NEERI Hospital to find the exact prevalence of T2DM in elderly. It was observed that from total 585 elderly people, 178 had T2DM (30.42%- Prevalence.The sex ratio of Diabetic males to females was almost equal (1:0.97.Obesity was present in 114 people (64%.High prevalence of hypertension was found in Diabetic elderly population (80%. Comparing our prevalence rates with few other studies, it was found that our prevalence rates are quite high. The contributing factors may be urban living, with high prevalence of central obesity and Asian ethnicity, over and above, data of all patients undergoing treatment is available. We treated all diabetics with persistent values of Systolic BP > 130 mm of Hg and Diastolic values of BP > 80mm of Hg as Hypertensives, in order to achieve reduction in cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. This paper is for awareness of disease burden, in real primary care setup. It is not cross-sectional study but study with 100% inclusion of beneficiaries′. This is real world urban diabetes prevalence, also associated hypertension

  6. Comparing the knowledge, attitude and practices of health care workers in public and private primary care facilities in Lagos State on Ebola virus disease

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Bilqisu Jibril; Inem, Victor; Balogun, Mobolanle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The West African sub-region is currently witnessing an outbreak of EVD that began in December 2013. The first case in Nigeria was diagnosed in Lagos, at a private medical facility in July 2014. Health care workers are known amplifiers of the disease. The study aimed to determine and compare EVD knowledge, attitude and practices among HCWs in public and private primary care facilities in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods This was a comparative cross-sectional study. Seventeen public and pri...

  7. Drug usage review sample studies in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J E; Kabat, H F; Wertheimer, A I

    1976-02-01

    The usage of 10 drugs in five long-term care facilities was reviewed to evaluate the effectiveness of a five-step systematic method of drug usage review. Medical care evaluation sample studies are required under the Medicare and Medicaid programs, and drug usage review sample studies may satisfy this requirement. The five-step method involved selection of the health problem to be studied; development of criteria of care; measurement of specific performance data and comparison with the criteria; establishment of the audit committee evaluation process; and design and implementation of educational activities. In each facility, data were collected on abstract sheets designed to indicate when a patient's drug usage did not conform to criteria established by a committee of health professionals. Incidents of nonconformance were then examined. The largest number of exceptions to the criteria related to monitoring the effectiveness of drug therapy. Data by drug revealed higher nonconformance rates for digoxin, hydrochlorothiazide, methyldopa and thioridazine. A small number of exceptions was found in drug administration, indicating that the patients were receiving medications as ordered and that few errors were made in transcribing. This systematic approach to identifying drug usage patterns can be used by pharmacists to coordinate sample studies and to fulfill their consultant role in long-term facilities required by federal regulations. PMID:816197

  8. Financial risks of post-closure custodial care for the Barnwell radioactive waste disposal facility - 16155

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports evaluations of the adequacy of the Barnwell Extended Care Fund in light of identified risks, with the conclusion that the fund is sufficient to cover the costs and uncertainties associated with planned post-closure care of the Barnwell, South Carolina low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It reviews background information pertinent to the facility's post-closure monitoring and maintenance and describes financial responsibility for post-closure activities. It identifies and briefly characterizes the activities planned to be conducted following facility closure and presents the midrange estimate of planned post-closure costs. The paper identifies and quantifies sources of uncertainty in activities and costs planned for post-closure care and presents 50-, 80-, and 95-percent confidence levels of planned costs. The fund is currently sufficient to cover some but not all of the costs that might be incurred as a result of unplanned events. The paper identifies, characterizes, and quantifies unplanned events, possible consequences, and probabilities of occurrence. The paper presents costs that might be incurred in responding to the unplanned initiating events and identifies levels of confidence that the fund is adequate to cover such costs. (authors)

  9. EURO-CARES: European Roadmap for a Sample Return Curation Facility and Planetary Protection Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, John Robert

    2016-07-01

    A mature European planetary exploration program and evolving sample return mission plans gathers the interest of a wider scientific community. The interest is generated from studying extraterrestrial samples in the laborato-ry providing new opportunities to address fundamental issues on the origin and evolution of the Solar System, on the primordial cosmochemistry, and on the nature of the building blocks of terrestrial planets and on the origin of life. Major space agencies are currently planning for missions that will collect samples from a variety of Solar Sys-tem environments, from primitive (carbonaceous) small bodies, from the Moon, Mars and its moons and, final-ly, from icy moons of the outer planets. A dedicated sample return curation facility is seen as an essential re-quirement for the receiving, assessment, characterization and secure preservation of the collected extraterrestrial samples and potentially their safe distribution to the scientific community. EURO-CARES is a European Commission study funded under the Horizon-2020 program. The strategic objec-tive of EURO-CARES is to create a roadmap for the implementation of a European Extraterrestrial Sample Cu-ration Facility. The facility has to provide safe storage and handling of extraterrestrial samples and has to enable the preliminary characterization in order to achieve the required effectiveness and collaborative outcomes for the whole international scientific community. For example, samples returned from Mars could pose a threat on the Earth's biosphere if any living extraterrestrial organism are present in the samples. Thus planetary protection is an essential aspect of all Mars sample return missions that will affect the retrival and transport from the point of return, sample handling, infrastructure methodology and management of a future curation facility. Analysis of the state of the art of Planetary Protection technology shows there are considerable possibilities to define and develop

  10. Challenges Associated With Managing Suicide Risk in Long-Term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riley, Alisa; Nadorff, Michael R.; Conwell, Yeates; Edelstein, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Little information about suicidal ideation and behavior in long-term care (LTC) facilities is available. Nonetheless, the implementation of the Minimum Data Set 3.0 requires that LTC facilities screen their residents for suicide risk and have protocols in place to effectively manage residents’ responses. In this article, the authors briefly discuss the risk factors of suicide in the elderly and the problems that suicidal ideation and behavior pose in the LTC environment. The authors explain issues that arise when trying to manage suicide risk in the elderly LTC population with general, traditional approaches. These inherent issues make it difficult to develop an effective protocol for managing suicide risk in LTC facilities, leading the authors to propose their own framework for assessing and managing suicide risk in the LTC setting.

  11. Help Seeking and Access to Primary Care for People from “Hard-to-Reach” Groups with Common Mental Health Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bristow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the UK, most people with mental health problems are managed in primary care. However, many individuals in need of help are not able to access care, either because it is not available, or because the individual's interaction with care-givers deters or diverts help-seeking. Aims. To understand the experience of seeking care for distress from the perspective of potential patients from “hard-to-reach” groups. Methods. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, analysed using a thematic framework. Results. Access to primary care is problematic in four main areas: how distress is conceptualised by individuals, the decision to seek help, barriers to help-seeking, and navigating and negotiating services. Conclusion. There are complex reasons why people from “hard-to-reach” groups may not conceptualise their distress as a biomedical problem. In addition, there are particular barriers to accessing primary care when distress is recognised by the person and help-seeking is attempted. We suggest how primary care could be more accessible to people from “hard-to-reach” groups including the need to offer a flexible, non-biomedical response to distress.

  12. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carmel M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core

  13. Depression, Help-Seeking and Self-Recognition of Depression among Dominican, Ecuadorian and Colombian Immigrant Primary Care Patients in the Northeastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Caplan; Steven Buyske

    2015-01-01

    Latinos, the largest minority group in the United States, experience mental health disparities, which include decreased access to care, lower quality of care and diminished treatment engagement. The purpose of this cross-sectional study of 177 Latino immigrants in primary care is to identify demographic factors, attitudes and beliefs, such as stigma, perceived stress, and ethnic identity that are associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition of depression. Results indicated th...

  14. The Influence of Organizational Systems on Information Exchange in Long-Term Care Facilities: An Institutional Ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspar, Sienna; Ratner, Pamela A; Phinney, Alison; MacKinnon, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Person-centered care is heavily dependent on effective information exchange among health care team members. We explored the organizational systems that influence resident care attendants' (RCAs) access to care information in long-term care (LTC) settings. We conducted an institutional ethnography in three LTC facilities. Investigative methods included naturalistic observations, in-depth interviews, and textual analysis. Practical access to texts containing individualized care-related information (e.g., care plans) was dependent on job classification. Regulated health care professionals accessed these texts daily. RCAs lacked practical access to these texts and primarily received and shared information orally. Microsystems of care, based on information exchange formats, emerged. Organizational systems mandated written exchange of information and did not formally support an oral exchange. Thus, oral information exchanges were largely dependent on the quality of workplace relationships. Formal systems are needed to support structured oral information exchange within and between the microsystems of care found in LTC. PMID:26758177

  15. Behavioral and clinical characteristics of people receiving medical care for HIV infection in an outpatient facility in Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Carlo P

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Paola Di Carlo,1 Giuliana Guadagnino,1 Palmira Immordino,1 Giovanni Mazzola,2 Pietro Colletti,2 Ilenia Alongi,1 Lucia Adamoli,1 Francesco Vitale,1 Alessandra Casuccio1 1Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother-Child Care “G D’Alessandro”, University of Palermo, 2Department of Medicinal Clinics and Emerging Diseases, “Paolo Giaccone” Polyclinic University Hospital, Palermo, Italy Aim: The authors examined a cohort of HIV-positive outpatients at the AIDS Center of Palermo University in Italy in order to identify factors related to the frequency of their visits to the outpatient facility for health care services.Methods: Two hundred and twenty-four HIV-infected subjects were enrolled in the study. Demographic and HIV disease characteristics were recorded and assessed with the number of days accessed to our outpatients unit in univariate and multivariate analyses. The potential relationship with immunological status was also analyzed stratifying the patients into groups according to their CD4+ T-cell counts (≥500 vs <500/mm3, and ≥200 vs <200/mm3.Results: Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that duration of antiretroviral therapy <5 years and hypertension were significantly associated with a CD4+ T-cell count of <500/mm3, whereas geographic origin (Africa was associated with a CD4+ T-cell count of <200/mm3. Mean number of days the patients sought access to day-care services for laboratory tests was negatively associated with CD4+ T-cell count.Conclusion: Patients with low CD4+ T-cell counts showed higher use of health care services, demonstrating how early HIV diagnosis can help to reduce health care costs. The CD4+ T-cell cut-off of 200 cells emphasizes the importance of identifying and managing HIV infection among hard-to-reach groups like vulnerable migrants. In our sample, the illegal status of immigrants does not influence the management of their HIV/AIDS condition, but the lack of European health card

  16. Antimicrobial Stewardship in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Haley J; Caffrey, Aisling R; Jump, Robin L P; Dosa, David; LaPlante, Kerry L

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health crisis and a national security threat to the United States, as stated in an executive order signed by the president in September 2014. This crisis is a result of indiscriminant antimicrobial use, which promotes selection for resistant organisms, increases the risk of adverse drug events, and renders patients vulnerable to drug-resistant infections. Antimicrobial stewardship is a key measure to combat antimicrobial resistance and specifically seeks to do this by improving antimicrobial use. Antimicrobial stewardship compliments infection control practices and it is important to note that these 2 disciplines are distinct and cannot be discussed interchangeably. Antimicrobial stewardship promotes the appropriate diagnosis, drug, dose, and duration of treatment. The appropriate diagnosis falls into the hands of the prescriber and clinical staff. Optimal antimicrobial drug selection, dosing strategy, and duration of treatment, however, often require expertise in antimicrobial therapy, such as an infectious disease-trained physician or pharmacist. Therefore, successful antimicrobial stewardship programs must be comprehensive and interdisciplinary. Most antimicrobial stewardship programs focus on hospitals; yet, in long-term care, up to 75% of antimicrobial use is inappropriate or unnecessary. Thus, one of the most pressing areas in need for antimicrobial stewardship is in long-term care facilities. Unfortunately, there is little evidence that describes effective antimicrobial stewardship interventions in this setting. This review discusses the need for and barriers to antimicrobial stewardship in long-term care facilities. Additionally, this review describes prior interventions that have been implemented and tested to improve antimicrobial use in long-term care facilities. PMID:26778488

  17. Three Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei Associated with Colonization of a Health Care Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A.; Sheth, Mili; Frace, Michael; Lucas, Claressa E.; Loparev, Vladimir N.; Raphael, Brian H.; Winchell, Jonas M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei strains (including both serogroup 1 and 5 strains) that were found in the same health care facility in 1982 and 2012.

  18. Urgent Care Facilities, DPH, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Massachusetts Emergency Managment Agency.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Urgent Care Facilities dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is described...

  19. Three Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei Associated with Colonization of a Health Care Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A.; Sheth, Mili; Frace, Michael; Lucas, Claressa E.; Loparev, Vladimir N.; Raphael, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei strains (including both serogroup 1 and 5 strains) that were found in the same health care facility in 1982 and 2012. PMID:27151801

  20. Three Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei Associated with Colonization of a Health Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Morrison, Shatavia S; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A; Sheth, Mili; Frace, Michael; Lucas, Claressa E; Loparev, Vladimir N; Raphael, Brian H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei strains (including both serogroup 1 and 5 strains) that were found in the same health care facility in 1982 and 2012. PMID:27151801

  1. Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Transmission in Health Care Facilities - Wisconsin, February-May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Lina I; Borlaug, Gwen; Gundlach, Kristin M; Monson, Timothy; Warshauer, David; Walters, Maroya S; Kallen, Alexander; Gulvik, Christopher A; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli that can cause infections associated with high case fatality rates, and are emerging as epidemiologically important health care-associated pathogens in the United States (1). Prevention of CRE transmission in health care settings is dependent on recognition of cases, isolation of colonized and infected patients, effective use of infection control measures, and the correct use of antibiotics. The use of molecular technologies, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole genome sequencing (WGS), can lead to detection of transmission events and interruption of transmission. In Wisconsin, acute care and critical access hospitals report laboratory-identified CRE to the Wisconsin Division of Public Health (WDPH), and clinical laboratories submit CRE isolates to the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene (WSLH) for molecular testing. During February-May 2015, a total of 49 CRE isolates from 46 patients were submitted to WSLH. On June 8, WSLH informed WDPH of five carbapenemase-producing CRE isolates with closely related PFGE patterns identified among four inpatients at two hospitals in southeastern Wisconsin. An investigation revealed a high degree of genetic relatedness among the patients' isolates, but did not identify the mechanism of transmission between the two facilities. No breaches in recommended practices were identified; after reviewing respiratory care procedures, no further cases were identified. Routine hospital- and laboratory-based surveillance can detect and prevent health care transmission of CRE. PMID:27584864

  2. FYI:Supermarket Technology Helps Children Learn to Read...Booklets to Help At-Risk Youth...Home-Alone Kids: The Working Parent's Complete Guide to Providing the Best Care for Your Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children Today, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Topics include the use of light sensitive pens and codes to teach reading to slow readers, blind and learning-disabled children, and children with mental retardation; new booklets and audiovisual programs designed to help professionals, families, and communities cope with problems of today's youth; and a book that examines self-care for children…

  3. Social and cultural dimensions of hygiene in Cambodian health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faurand-Tournaire Anne-Laure

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of bloodborne pathogen healthcare-associated infections is thought to be high in developing Southeast Asian Countries. The underlying social-cultural logics contributing to the risks of transmission are rarely studied. This report provides some insights on the social and cultural factors that shape hygiene practices in Cambodian health care settings. Methods We conducted qualitative surveys in various public and private health facilities in Phnom Penh, the capital city and in provinces. We observed and interviewed 319 participants, health care workers and patients, regarding hygiene practices and social relationships amongst the health care staff and with patients. We also examined the local perceptions of hygiene, their impact on the relationships between the health care staff and patients, and perceptions of transmission risks. Data collection stem from face to face semi-structured and open-ended interviews and focus group discussions with various health care staffs (i.e. cleaners, nurses, midwives and medical doctors and with patients who attended the study health facilities. Results Overall responses and observations indicated that hygiene practices were burdened by the lack of adequate materials and equipements. In addition, many other factors were identified to influence and distort hygiene practices which include (1 informal and formal social rapports in hospitals, (2 major infection control roles played by the cleaners in absence of professional acknowledgment. Moreover, hygiene practices are commonly seen as an unessential matter to be devoted to low-ranking staff. Conclusion Our anthropological findings illustrate the importance of comprehensive understanding of hygiene practices; they need to be considered when designing interventions to improve infection control practices in a Cambodian medical setting.

  4. Respecting your rights : a guide to the rights of people living in British Columbia long term care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, Charmaine; Beck, Mary

    2003-01-01

    This booklet answers common questions about living in care facilities (including intermediate-, multi-level-, private-, and extended care facilities).Table of Contents: Introduction. 1. Your Right to Be Treated with Dignity and Respect: Your right to be treated as an adult; Your right to be treated with respect; Your right to be treated as a person capable of making your own decisions. 2. Your Right to Personal Choices: Your right to personal lifestyle choices; Your right to choices about you...

  5. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Saarland, Germany: The Long-Term Care Facility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nillius, Dorothea; von Müller, Lutz; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Klein, Renate; Herrmann, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiresistant organisms pose a threat for patients and care recipients. Control interventions need to be tailored to region, the type of institution considered, and risk factors. The German state of Saarland is ideally suited to study colonisation epidemiology throughout its various health and care institutions. After conclusion of a large admission prevalence study in acute care hospitals, we now performed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) point prevalence study in Saarland long term care facilities (LTCF), allowing for a direct comparison with respect of MRSA prevalence and associated risk factors between these two institutional types located within a confined region. Methodology and Principal Findings Of all LTCF of the region, 65/136 participated in the study performed between 09/2013 and 07/2014. Overall, complete microbiological specimen and questionnaires of 2,858 of 4,275 (66.8%) LTCF residents were obtained. 136/2,858 (4.8%) screened residents revealed MRSA carrier status. Multivariate risk factor analysis yielded ulcer/deep soft tissue infection, urinary tract catheter, and MRSA history with multiple MRSA decolonisation cycles to be independently associated with MRSA carrier status. Conclusion As already known from previous studies, colonisation with MRSA is common in LTCF residents even in an area with relatively low MRSA prevalence. This found prevalence can now be related to the acute care admission prevalence (2.2%) as well as to the admission prevalence in acute care geriatric departments (7.6%). The common clonal attribution (spa type) of MRSA isolates prevalent in the LTCF population as well as in the acute care admission population points towards a close relationship between both types of institutions. However, the ostensible absence of risk factors such as “previous hospitalisation” in conjunction with newly identified factors such as “multiple decolonisation cycles” refers to MRSA colonisation risks

  6. Relationship between professional antenatal care and facility delivery: an assessment of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Juan C; Carrillo, Bladimir; Iglesias, Wilman J

    2014-07-01

    The determinants of maternal and child health have been the recurrent topics of study in developing countries. Using the Demographic and Health Survey (2010) of Colombia, this study aimed to identify the determinants for professional antenatal care and institutional delivery, taking into account the interdependence of these two decisions, which we consider using a bivariate probit model. This study found that when certain factors affecting both the decision to seek prenatal care and giving birth in a hospital are neglected, the results of the estimates are inefficient. Estimates show that the effects of education, parity, regional location and economic status on institutional delivery tend to be underestimated in a univariate probit model. The results indicate that economic status, level of education, parity and medical-insurance affiliation influenced the joint likelihood of accessing professional antenatal care and delivering in a health facility. An important finding is that mothers with a higher level of education are 9 percentage points more likely to access these two health services compared with mothers who are illiterate. Another observed finding is the regional disparities. The evidence indicates that mothers in the Pacific Region, the poorest region of Colombia, are 6 percentage points less likely to access such services. Thus, the results indicate that the Colombian health policy should emphasize increasing the level of schooling of mothers and establish health facilities in the poorest regions of the country to ensure that women in need are provided with social health insurance. PMID:23735737

  7. Impact of resistance training on sarcopenia in nursing care facilities: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Bothaina H; Hewitt, Jennifer; Keogh, Justin W L; Bermeo, Sandra; Duque, Gustavo; Henwood, Tim R

    2016-01-01

    The impact of progressive resistance training on sarcopenia among very old institutionalized adults was investigated. Residents of Nursing Care Facilities were included in a controlled trial of twice weekly resistance and balance exercise program for six months (Age: 85.9 ± 7.5 years, Time in care: 707.1 ± 707.5 days, N = 21 per group). Sarcopenia was measured based on the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria. Of the recruited 42 participants, 35.7% had sarcopenia at baseline, with prevalence increasing in the control group post-intervention (42.9%-52.4%). Following training, the exercise group experienced a significant increase in grip strength when compared to controls (p = .02), and a within-group decrease in body mass index and increase in grip strength (p ≤ .007). Resistance and balance exercise has positive benefits for older adults residing in a nursing care facilities which may transfer to reduce disability and sarcopenia transition, but more work is needed to ensure improved program uptake among residents. PMID:26694694

  8. A retrospective audit of antibiotic prescriptions in primary health-care facilities in Eastern Region, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahiabu, Mary-Anne; Tersbøl, Britt Pinkowski; Biritwum, Richard;

    2016-01-01

    assured antibiotics and more optimal drugs and poor antibiotic use practices. The appropriate use of antibiotics to slow the pace of resistance development is crucial. The study retrospectively assessed antibiotic prescription practices in four public and private primary health-care facilities in Eastern...... national essential medicine list, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, health facility type (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42, 2.95), patient age (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.97, 0.98), number of medicines on a prescription (OR = 1.85; 95% CI: 1.63, 2.10) and ‘no malaria drug’ on......Resistance to antibiotics is increasing globally and is a threat to public health. Research has demonstrated a correlation between antibiotic use and resistance development. Developing countries are the most affected by resistance because of high infectious disease burden, limited access to quality...

  9. Applications of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation disinfection in health care facilities: effective adjunct, but not stand-alone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarzadeh, Farhad; Olmsted, Russell N; Bartley, Judene M

    2010-06-01

    This review evaluates the applicability and relative contribution of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) to disinfection of air in health care facilities. A section addressing the use of UVGI for environmental surfaces is also included. The germicidal susceptibility of biologic agents is addressed, but with emphasis on application in health care facilities. The balance of scientific evidence indicates that UVGI should be considered as a disinfection application in a health care setting only in conjunction with other well-established elements, such as appropriate heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems; dynamic removal of contaminants from the air; and preventive maintenance in combination with through cleaning of the care environment. We conclude that although UVGI is microbiocidal, it is not "ready for prime time" as a primary intervention to kill or inactivate infectious microorganisms; rather, it should be considered an adjunct. Other factors, such as careful design of the built environment, installation and effective operation of the HVAC system, and a high level of attention to traditional cleaning and disinfection, must be assessed before a health care facility can decide to rely solely on UVGI to meet indoor air quality requirements for health care facilities. More targeted and multiparameter studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and incremental benefit of UVGI for mitigating reservoirs of microorganisms and ultimately preventing cross-transmission of pathogens that lead to health care-associated infections. PMID:20569852

  10. [Drug supply and patient safety in long-term care facilities for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrhan, T; Schaefer, M

    2010-05-01

    Nursing home residents are a continuously growing population with a need for intense pharmacotherapy due to numerous comorbid conditions. Polypharmacy and the frequent use of psychotropic medication increase the risk of adverse drug events, which may result in risk of increased morbidity and mortality in frail, elderly patients. The requirement to solve individual therapeutic problems has to be supported by not only an adequate and need-based pharmaceutical supply but also by suitable organizational and logistic solutions. In the nursing home environment, ineffective communication between the various professional groups involved in medical treatment may lead to inappropriate or unintentional medication use. In the present survey, data and research results that are relevant to assess the medical treatment situation in long-term care facilities particularly with regard to the safety of pharmacotherapy are presented. The two problem areas of patient-customized therapy and the handling of pharmaceuticals in the context of institutional care are addressed separately. PMID:20376418

  11. Fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli Carriage in Long-Term Care Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Maslow, Joel N.; Lee, Betsy; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, colonization with fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli in residents in a long-term care facility. FQ-resistant E. coli were identified from rectal swabs for 25 (51%) of 49 participants at study entry. On multivariable analyses, prior FQ use was the only independent risk factor for FQ-resistant E. coli carriage and was consistent for FQ exposures in the previous 3, 6, 9, or 12 months. Pulsed-f...

  12. Assessment of medicines use pattern using World Health Organization’s Prescribing, Patient Care and Health facility indicators in selected health facilities in eastern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal, Arebu I.; Osman, Ebrahim D.; Mulugeta, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Background About one-third of the world’s population lack access to essential medicines and this is further compounded by inappropriate prescription, dispensing, sale and use of the available medicines. The objective of the study was to assess the patterns of medicine use among health facilities in eastern Ethiopia using World Health Organization’s Prescribing, Patient Care and Health facility indicators. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out in eight randomly selected health center...

  13. Breast cancer stories on the internet: improving search facilities to help patients find stories of similar others

    OpenAIRE

    Overberg, Regina Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this thesis is to gain insight into which search facilities for spontaneously published stories facilitate breast cancer patients in finding stories by other patients in a similar situation. According to the narrative approach, social comparison theory, and social cognitive theory, reading stories about similar others may have the most positive impact. The research followed a user-centred design: users of search facilities (i.e., patients who want to read stories written by...

  14. Guidance on The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza in Acute Care Facilities in Canada, 2014-2015

    OpenAIRE

    H Grant Stiver; Evans, Gerald A; Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; Michel Laverdière

    2015-01-01

    This article represents the second update to the AMMI Canada Guidelines document on the use of antiviral drugs for influenza. The article aims to inform health care professionals of the increased risk for influenza in long-term care facilities due to a documented mismatch between the components chosen for this season’s vaccine and currently circulating influenza strains. Adjusted recommendations for the use of antiviral drugs for influenza in the acute care setting for this season are provide...

  15. Successful aging as an oxymoron: older people – with and without home-help care – talk about what aging well means to them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Torres

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Notions of what it means to age well or successfully are central to social gerontological research and practice. As such, one would expect that there would be consensus as to what the construct of successful aging means and/or how aging well is achieved. This is not, however, the case which is why this study explores the meanings that a group of older people (i.e. some with home-help care and some without attach to this construct. The empirical material is constituted of 16 semi-structured interviews. The findings bring to fore the different resources (such as physical, mental, psycho-social, spiritual, and financial ones that are associated with successful aging and the kind of outlook on life that is regarded as useful if one wants to age well. Differences between home-help care recipients and those that do not receive this type of care were found. Those that are managing without the help offered by home-help care services listed more resources and offered more nuanced descriptions of what successful aging means than those that receive home-help care. This suggests that receiving home-help care and/or not being able to manage primarily on one’s own might shape the manner in which older people think about what constitutes a good old age. The in-depth analysis of the notions of successful aging that were brought to the fore suggests also the paradoxical fact that the title of this article attests to; namely that some associate aging well with not aging at all and deem, in fact, the term successful aging to be an oxymoron.

  16. Regulatory review of closure, post-closure and perpetual care funds at the energy solutions, LLC mixed waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EnergySolutions, LLC operates its Mixed Waste Facility at Clive, Utah under the provisions of its State-issued Part B Permit. The facility accepts waste that contains both hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Utah is an EPA Agreement State and therefore the Utah Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW) is authorized to regulate the hazardous waste operations at the facility. The radioactive portion of the waste is regulated by the Utah Division of Radiation Control. 40 CFR 264.142 outlines the facility requirements for Closure Costs. The owner or operator must have a detailed written estimate of the cost of closing the facility in accordance with the rules. For many years the State of Utah had relied on the facility's estimate of closure costs as the amount that needed to be funded. This amount is reviewed annually and adjusted for inflation and for changes at the facility. In 2004 the agency and the facility requested bids from independent contractors to provide their estimate for closure costs. Three engineering firms bid on the project. The facility funded the project and both the agency and the facility chose one of the firms to provide an independent estimate. The engineering firms met with both parties and toured the facility. They were also provided with the current closure cost line items. Each firm provided an estimated cost for closure of the facility at the point in the facility's active life that would make the closure most expensive. Included with the direct costs were indirect line items such as overhead, profit, mobilization, hazardous working conditions and regulatory oversight. The agency and the facility reviewed the independent estimates and negotiated a final Closure and Post-Closure Cost Estimate for the Mixed Waste Facility. There are several mechanisms allowed under the rules to fund the Closure and Post- Closure Care Funds. EnergySolutions has chosen to fund their costs through the use of an insurance policy. Changing mechanisms from

  17. Noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis in a children's day care facility in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallimore C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses are an important cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They are the most common cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the adult population and occur in nursing homes for the elderly, geriatric wards, medical wards, and in hotel and restaurant settings. Food-borne outbreaks have also occurred following consumption of contaminated oysters. This study describes the application of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay using random primers (PdN6 and specific Ni and E3 primers, directed at a small region of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-coding region of the norovirus genome, and DNA sequencing for the detection and preliminary characterisation of noroviruses in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in children in Brazil. The outbreak samples were collected from children <5 years of age at the Bertha Lutz children's day care facility at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, that occurred between 1996 and 1998, where no pathogen had been identified. At the Bertha Lutz day care center facility, only Fiocruz's employee children are provided for, and they come from different social, economic and cultural backgrounds. Three distinct genogroup II strains were detected in three outbreaks in 1997/98 and were most closely related to genotypes GII-3 (Mexico virus and GII-4 (Grimsby virus, both of which have been detected in paediatric and adult outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide.

  18. Learning from other countries: an on-call facility for health care policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Ellen; Ettelt, Stefanie; Thomson, Sarah; Mays, Nicholas

    2008-04-01

    Recognizing that robust information on health systems in other countries can provide valuable lessons for the English National Health Service, the Department of Health commissioned an academic team to provide an 'On-call Facility for International Healthcare Comparisons' in 2005. This paper describes the work of this novel approach to informing policy and reviews the experience of the first two years. It illustrates the well-documented challenges of comparative analysis of health systems. One important issue is understanding the health system context so as to interpret phenomena and draw appropriate policy conclusions. Other challenges include the potential tension between academic interest and rigour, and the need for timely analysis to inform the Department of Health's rapidly changing policy agenda. The diversity and nature of topics covered, as well as the rapid turn-around time have meant that the Facility has had to balance rigour and timeliness carefully to ensure the value and relevance of reports. A strong research base linked with an international network of country experts promotes the provision of high quality analyses at relatively low costs. However, such an arrangement can only be sustained if it provides scope for additional primary research. A formal evaluation of the influence on health care policy-making in England is not yet available. Such knowledge will be of crucial importance for the development of similar resources elsewhere. PMID:18416931

  19. Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes in Caring for Older Adults With Advanced Illness Among Staff Members of Long-Term Care and Assisted Living Facilities: An Educational Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Nina M; Lockman, Kashelle; Grant, Marian; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2016-05-01

    In long-term care and assisted living facilities, many groups of health care professionals contribute to the work of the health care team. These staff members perform essential, direct patient care activities. An educational needs assessment was conducted to determine the learning needs and preferences of staff members related to providing care for patients with life-limiting illnesses. Staff members placed importance on understanding topics such as principles of palliative care, pain assessment, pain management, and nonpain symptom management. The majority of survey respondents were also interested in learning more about these topics. The results of this educational needs analysis suggest staff members would benefit from a course tailored to these identified educational needs and designed to overcome previously identified educational barriers. PMID:25473091

  20. Caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Larsson, Lise-Lotte Franklin; Norberg, Astrid

    2014-06-01

    Caring for people with dementia and working in dementia care is described as having both rewarding and unpleasant aspects and has been studied to a minor extent. This study aims to explore care providers' narrated experiences of caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD. Nine care providers were interviewed about their experiences, the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed that participants were struggling to perform person-centred care, which meant trying to see the person behind the disease, dealing with troublesome situations in the daily care, a two-edged interaction with relatives, feelings of shortcomings and troubled conscience, and the need for improvements in dementia care. The analysis also revealed an ambiguous work situation, which meant a challenging value base, the differently judged work environment, feelings of job satisfaction and the need for a functional leadership and management. The results illuminate participants' positive as well as negative experiences and have identified areas requiring improvements. It seems of great importance to strive for a supportive and attendant leadership, a leadership which aims to empower care providers in their difficult work. Using conscience as a driving force together in the work group may benefit care providers' health. PMID:23834127

  1. Breast cancer stories on the internet : improving search facilities to help patients find stories of similar others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overberg, Regina Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this thesis is to gain insight into which search facilities for spontaneously published stories facilitate breast cancer patients in finding stories by other patients in a similar situation. According to the narrative approach, social comparison theory, and social cognitive theory

  2. When doctors come to prison – a pilot project for better HIV care in correctional facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Vaz Pinto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent rearrangements in national policies regarding follow-up of HIV-infected inmates have determined that hospitals closest to the prison facility be responsible for their care. Our HIV Unit and the two prison facilities in the area have established a clinical protocol whereby a clinical team goes to the prisons for blood collecting and visits instead of having the inmates transported to the hospital. The purpose of the protocol, from a clinical point of view, was to: (i promote adherence to blood tests and clinical visits; (ii promote adherence to antiretroviral (ARV therapy; (iii facilitate ARV administration by promoting once-daily-dosing. This retrospective review looks back at the first year of protocol implementation between the HIV Unit of HPP Cascais Hospital and the prisons of Tires and Linhó. The purpose of this study is to characterize the demographics of our inmate population; assess the number of inmates on ARV and describe the regimens as PI- or NNRTI-based and as once- or twice-daily dosed; evaluate ARV efficacy by HIV viral load undetectability; and assess opportunity for ARV switch from twice- to once-daily dosing. From April 2011 until June 2012 a total of 53 inmates were included in this protocol. The majority of patients were female (55% as one of the prisons is mainly for female inmates. The median age is 36 years (from 23–59. The average time of follow-up was 11 months (15 months maximum. From the total of 53 patients under study, 40 are currently under care, the other 13 having been released or transferred to other prison facilities. The majority of these patients are on ARV therapy (83%. By the end of follow-up time 88% of patients were on a once-daily dosed regimen; these are PI-based in 69% and NNRTI-based in 31%. At their last evaluation, 32/33 patients on therapy had undetectable HIV viremia (97%. As a conclusion, we assess that this protocol implementation has benefitted all parts: patients assure regular

  3. A record review of reported musculoskeletal pain in an Ontario long term care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphreys B Kim

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal (MSK pain is one of the leading causes of chronic health problems in people over 65 years of age. Studies suggest that a high prevalence of older adults suffer from MSK pain (65% to 80% and back pain (36% to 40%. The objectives of this study were: 1. To investigate the period prevalence of MSK pain and associated subgroups in residents of a long-term care (LTC facility. 2. To describe clinical features associated with back pain in this population. 3. To identify associations between variables such as age, gender, cognitive status, ambulatory status, analgesic use, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis with back pain in a long-term care facility. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted using a purposive sampling approach of residents' clinical charts from a LTC home in Toronto, Canada. All medical records for LTC residents from January 2003 until March 2005 were eligible for review. However, facility admissions of less than 6 months were excluded from the study to allow for an adequate time period for patient medical assessments and pain reporting/charting to have been completed. Clinical data was abstracted on a standardized form. Variables were chosen based on the literature and their suggested association with back pain and analyzed via multivariate logistic regression. Results 140 (56% charts were selected and reviewed. Sixty-nine percent of the selected residents were female with an average age of 83.7 years (51–101. Residents in the sample had a period pain prevalence of 64% (n = 89 with a 40% prevalence (n = 55 of MSK pain. Of those with a charted report of pain, 6% (n = 5 had head pain, 2% (n = 2 neck pain, 21% (n = 19 back pain, 33% (n = 29 extremity pain and 38% (n = 34 had non-descriptive/unidentified pain complaint. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that osteoporosis was the only significant association with back pain from the variables studied (P = 0.001. Conclusion

  4. Evaluation of a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system at a residential aged care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The aims of the study were to investigate discrepancies between general practitioners' paper medication orders and pharmacy-prepared electronic medication administration charts, back-up paper charts and dose-administration aids, as well as delays between prescribing, charting and administration, at a 90-bed residential aged care facility that used a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system. Methods A cross-sectional audit of medication orders, medication charts and dose-administration aids was performed to identify discrepancies. In addition, a retrospective audit was performed of delays between prescribing and availability of an updated electronic medication administration chart. Medication administration records were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether discrepancies and delays led to medication administration errors. Results Medication records for 88 residents (mean age 86 years) were audited. Residents were prescribed a median of eight regular medicines (interquartile range 5-12). One hundred and twenty-five discrepancies were identified. Forty-seven discrepancies, affecting 21 (24%) residents, led to a medication administration error. The most common discrepancies were medicine omission (44.0%) and extra medicine (19.2%). Delays from when medicines were prescribed to when they appeared on the electronic medication administration chart ranged from 18min to 98h. On nine occasions (for 10% of residents) the delay contributed to missed doses, usually antibiotics. Conclusion Medication discrepancies and delays were common. Improved systems for managing medication orders and charts are needed. What is known about the topic? Hybrid paper-electronic medication management systems, in which prescribers' orders are transcribed into an electronic system by pharmacy technicians and pharmacists to create medication administration charts, are increasingly replacing paper-based medication management systems in Australian residential aged care

  5. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances. PMID:25599637

  6. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkader A. Murad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances.

  7. The care of Filipino juvenile offenders in residential facilities evaluated using the risk-need-responsivity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, Anouk; Wissink, Inge B; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-01-01

    According to the risk-need-responsivity model of offender, assessment and rehabilitation treatment should target specific factors that are related to re-offending. This study evaluates the residential care of Filipino juvenile offenders using the risk-need-responsivity model. Risk analyses and criminogenic needs assessments (parenting style, aggression, relationships with peers, empathy, and moral reasoning) have been conducted using data of 55 juvenile offenders in four residential facilities. The psychological care has been assessed using a checklist. Statistical analyses showed that juvenile offenders had a high risk of re-offending, high aggression, difficulties in making pro-social friends, and a delayed socio-moral development. The psychological programs in the residential facilities were evaluated to be poor. The availability of the psychological care in the facilities fitted poorly with the characteristics of the juvenile offenders and did not comply with the risk-need-responsivity model. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:27137741

  8. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  9. Quality of care for under-fives in first-level health facilities in one district of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifeen, S. E.; Bryce, J.; Gouws, E.; Baqui, A. H.; Black, R. E.; Hoque, D. M. E.; Chowdhury, E. K.; Yunus, M.; Begum, N.; Akter, T.; Siddique, A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The multi-country evaluation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) effectiveness, cost and impact (MCE) is a global evaluation to determine the impact of IMCI on health outcomes and its cost-effectiveness. MCE studies are under way in Bangladesh, Brazil, Peru, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania. The objective of this analysis from the Bangladesh MCE study was to describe the quality of care delivered to sick children under 5 years old in first-level government health facilities, to inform government planning of child health programmes. METHODS: Generic MCE Health Facility Survey tools were adapted, translated and pre-tested. Medical doctors trained in IMCI and these tools conducted the survey in all 19 health facilities in the study areas. The data were collected using observations, exit interviews, inventories and interviews with facility providers. FINDINGS: Few of the sick children seeking care at these facilities were fully assessed or correctly treated, and almost none of their caregivers were advised on how to continue the care of the child at home. Over one-third of the sick children whose care was observed were managed by lower-level workers who were significantly more likely than higher-level workers to classify the sick child correctly and to provide correct information on home care to the caregiver. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate an urgent need for interventions to improve the quality of care provided for sick children in first-level facilities in Bangladesh, and suggest that including lower-level workers as targets for IMCI case-management training may be beneficial. The findings suggest that the IMCI strategy offers a promising set of interventions to address the child health service problems in Bangladesh. PMID:15868016

  10. Hepatitis B outbreak associated with a home health care agency serving multiple assisted living facilities in Texas, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheteyeva, Yenlik A; Tosh, Pritish; Patel, Priti R; Martinez, Diana; Kilborn, Cindy; Awosika-Olumo, Debo; Khuwaja, Salma; Ibrahim, Syed; Ryder, Anthony; Tohme, Rania A; Khudyakov, Yury; Thai, Hong; Drobeniuc, Jan; Heseltine, Gary; Guh, Alice Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a multifacility outbreak of acute hepatitis B virus infection involving 21 residents across 10 assisted living facilities in Texas during the period January 2008 through July 2010. Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggested that these infections belonged to a single outbreak. The only common exposure was receipt of assisted monitoring of blood glucose from the same home health care agency. Improved infection control oversight and training of assisted living facility and home health care agency personnel providing assisted monitoring of blood glucose is needed. PMID:24176604

  11. DuPont/HFM Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. Second in a series. Roundtable discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national expert to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--on May 13 to take part in DuPont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, end-users, interior designers and carpet mill representatives talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10183994

  12. The state of emergency obstetric care services in Nairobi informal settlements and environs: Results from a maternity health facility survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliku Teresa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa remains a challenge with estimates exceeding 1,000 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in some countries. Successful prevention of maternal deaths hinges on adequate and quality emergency obstetric care. In addition to skilled personnel, there is need for a supportive environment in terms of essential drugs and supplies, equipment, and a referral system. Many household surveys report a reasonably high proportion of women delivering in health facilities. However, the quality and adequacy of facilities and personnel are often not assessed. The three delay model; 1 delay in making the decision to seek care; 2 delay in reaching an appropriate obstetric facility; and 3 delay in receiving appropriate care once at the facility guided this project. This paper examines aspects of the third delay by assessing quality of emergency obstetric care in terms of staffing, skills equipment and supplies. Methods We used data from a survey of 25 maternity health facilities within or near two slums in Nairobi that were mentioned by women in a household survey as places that they delivered. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Permission was also sought from the Ministry of Health and the Medical Officer of Health. Data collection included interviews with the staff in-charge of maternity wards using structured questionnaires. We collected information on staffing levels, obstetric procedures performed, availability of equipment and supplies, referral system and health management information system. Results Out of the 25 health facilities, only two met the criteria for comprehensive emergency obstetric care (both located outside the two slums while the others provided less than basic emergency obstetric care. Lack of obstetric skills, equipment, and supplies hamper many facilities from providing lifesaving emergency obstetric procedures. Accurate estimation of burden

  13. Old-age Care Modes and Facility Planning Based on the Concept of “Continuum of Care”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Through the comparative analysis on the theories and practical experience of the development of old-age care (OAC) in both China and other countries,and based on the interview and questionnaire survey in Zhejiang Province and Hangzhou City,this paper proposes the research and analysis framework for the old-age service system,i.e.,"OAC mode-OAC service system-OAC facility system." The paper argues that,oriented by OAC mode of "taking community-and home-based care as the main body and institution-based care as supplement," China should build an OAC facility system and planning thoughts that take "continuum of care" as concept and long-term care system as core.Taking Zhejiang Province and Hangzhou City as examples,the paper conducts the optimization research on current OAC facilities planning in terms of hierarchical system,scale,and differentiation,so as to formulate more systematic and operable planning standards for OAC facilities.

  14. Is higher volume of post-acute care patients associated with a lower rehospitalization rate in skilled nursing facilities?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yue; Cai, Xueya; Yin, Jun; Glance, Laurent G; Mukamel, Dana B

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether higher patient volume of skilled nursing facility (SNF) care was associated with a lower hospital transfer rate. Using the nursing home Minimum Data Set and the On-line Survey, Certification, and Reporting file, we assembled a national cohort of Medicare SNF post-acute care admissions between January and September of 2008. Multivariable analyses based on Cox proportional hazards models found that patients admitted to high-volume SNFs (annual number of admissions ...

  15. Insights into the impact and use of research results in a residential long-term care facility: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Cranley Lisa A; Birdsell Judy M; Norton Peter G; Morgan Debra G; Estabrooks Carole A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Engaging end-users of research in the process of disseminating findings may increase the relevance of findings and their impact for users. We report findings from a case study that explored how involvement with the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC) study influenced management and staff at one of 36 TREC facilities. We conducted the study at ‘Restwood’ (pseudonym) nursing home because the Director of Care engaged actively in the study and TREC data showed that this ...

  16. The lived experiences of resilience in Iranian adolescents living in residential care facilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study

    OpenAIRE

    Nourian, Manijeh; Shahbolaghi, Farahnaz Mohammadi; Tabrizi, Kian Nourozi; Rassouli, Maryam; Biglarrian, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resilience is one of the main factors affecting human health, and perceiving its meaning for high-risk adolescents is of particular importance in initiating preventive measures and providing resilience care.Objectives: This qualitative study was conducted to explain the meaning of resilience in the lived experiences of Iranian adolescents living in governmental residential care facilities.Materials and methods: This study was conducted using the hermeneutic phenomenological method...

  17. Pathways to psychiatric care for children and adolescents at a tertiary facility in northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibril O. Abdulmalik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There is limited availability of mental health services in Nigeria, and indeed most of Africa. Available services are also often under-utilized because of widespread ignorance and supernatural beliefs about the etiology of mental illnesses. The consequence, therefore, is a long and tedious pathway to care for the mentally ill, especially children and adolescents. This was a study of all new patients, aged 18 years and below, presenting over a 6 month period in 2009 (January – June at the outpatient clinic of a tertiary psychiatric facility in northern Nigeria. A socio-demographic questionnaire was utilized, along with a record of the clinician’s assessment of diagnosis for 242 patients. Subjects who had been withdrawn from school, or any previously engaged-in activity for longer than 4 weeks on account of the illness, were recorded as having disability from the illness. The children were aged 1-18 years (mean=12.3; SD=5.2 with males accounting for 51.7% (125 while 14.5% of the females (n=117 were married. Two thirds (64.5% of the patients had been ill for longer than 6 months prior to presentation. One hundred and forty four subjects (59.5% had received no care at all, while 36.4% had received treatment from traditional/religious healers prior to presentation. The most disabling conditions were ADHD (80%, mental retardation (77.8%, epilepsy (64.1% and psychotic disorders (50%. There is urgent need for extending mental health services into the community in order to improve access to care and increase awareness about effective and affordable treatments.

  18. Laboratory testing improves diagnosis and treatment outcomes in primary health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Y. Carter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine if use of basic laboratory tests improves diagnosis and treatment outcomes in outpatients attending rural primary health care facilities.Setting: Six rural health centres in Kenya.Design: Cross-sectional study to observe change in diagnosis and treatment made by clinical officers after laboratory testing in outpatients attending six rural health centres in Kenya.Subject: The diagnosis and treatment of 1134 patients attending outpatient services in six rural health centres were compared before and after basic laboratory testing. Essential clinical diagnostic equipment and laboratory tests were established at each health centre. Clinical officers and laboratory technicians received on-site refresher training in good diagnostic practices and laboratory procedures before the study began.Results: Laboratory tests were ordered on 704 (62.1% patients. Diagnosis and treatment were changed in 45% of tested patients who returned with laboratory results (21% of all patients attending the clinics. 166 (23.5% patients did not return to the clinician for a final diagnosis and management decision after laboratory testing. Blood slide examination for malaria parasites, wet preparations, urine microscopy and stool microscopy resulted in most changes to diagnosis. There was no significant change in drug costs after laboratory testing. The greatest changes in numbers of recorded diseases following laboratory testing was for intestinal worms (53% and malaria (21%.Conclusion: Effective use of basic laboratory tests at primary health care level significantly improves diagnosis and patient treatment. Use of laboratory testing can be readily incorporated into routine clinical practice. On-site refresher training is an effective means of improving the quality of patient care and communication between clinical and laboratory staff.

  19. Medication incident reporting in residential aged care facilities: Limitations and risks to residents’ safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Amina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication incident reporting (MIR is a key safety critical care process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs. Retrospective studies of medication incident reports in aged care have identified the inability of existing MIR processes to generate information that can be used to enhance residents’ safety. However, there is little existing research that investigates the limitations of the existing information exchange process that underpins MIR, despite the considerable resources that RACFs’ devote to the MIR process. The aim of this study was to undertake an in-depth exploration of the information exchange process involved in MIR and identify factors that inhibit the collection of meaningful information in RACFs. Methods The study was undertaken in three RACFs (part of a large non-profit organisation in NSW, Australia. A total of 23 semi-structured interviews and 62 hours of observation sessions were conducted between May to July 2011. The qualitative data was iteratively analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results The findings highlight significant gaps in the design of the MIR artefacts as well as information exchange issues in MIR process execution. Study results emphasized the need to: a design MIR artefacts that facilitate identification of the root causes of medication incidents, b integrate the MIR process within existing information systems to overcome key gaps in information exchange execution, and c support exchange of information that can facilitate a multi-disciplinary approach to medication incident management in RACFs. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of viewing MIR process holistically rather than as segregated tasks, as a means to identify gaps in information exchange that need to be addressed in practice to improve safety critical processes.

  20. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation. PMID:27213839

  1. Use of job aids to improve facility-based postnatal counseling and care in rural Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, L; Yebadokpo, A; Affo, J; Agbogbe, M

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the effect of a job aids-focused intervention on quality of facility-based postnatal counseling, and whether increased communication improved in-hospital newborn care and maternal knowledge of home practices and danger signs requiring urgent care. Ensuring mothers and newborns receive essential postnatal services, including health counseling, is integral to their survival. Yet, quality of clinic-based postnatal services is often low, and evidence on effective improvement strategies is scarce. Using a pre-post randomized design, data were drawn from direct observations and interviews with 411 mother-newborn pairs. Multi-level regression models with difference-in-differences analyses estimated the intervention's relative effect, adjusting for changes in the comparison arm. The mean percent of recommended messages provided to recently-delivered women significantly improved in the intervention arm as compared to the control (difference-in-differences [∆i - ∆c] +30.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 19.3, 42.5), and the proportion of newborns thermally protected within the first hour (∆i - ∆c +33.7, 95 % CI 19.0, 48.4) and delayed for bathing (∆i - ∆c +23.9, 95 % CI 9.4, 38.4) significantly increased. No significant changes were observed in early breastfeeding (∆i - ∆c +6.8, 95 % CI -2.8, 16.4) which was nearly universal. Omitting traditional umbilical cord substances rose slightly, but was insignificant (∆i - ∆c +8.5, 95 % CI -2.8, 19.9). The proportion of mothers with correct knowledge of maternal (∆i - ∆c +27.8, 95 % CI 11.0, 44.6) and newborn (∆i - ∆c +40.3, 95 % CI 22.2, 58.4) danger signs grew substantially, as did awareness of several home-care practices (∆i - ∆c +26.0, 95 % CI 7.7, 44.3). Counseling job aids can improve the quality of postnatal services. However, achieving reduction goals in maternal and neonatal mortality will likely require more comprehensive approaches to link enhanced facility services with

  2. Depression, Help-Seeking and Self-Recognition of Depression among Dominican, Ecuadorian and Colombian Immigrant Primary Care Patients in the Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Susan; Buyske, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Latinos, the largest minority group in the United States, experience mental health disparities, which include decreased access to care, lower quality of care and diminished treatment engagement. The purpose of this cross-sectional study of 177 Latino immigrants in primary care is to identify demographic factors, attitudes and beliefs, such as stigma, perceived stress, and ethnic identity that are associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition of depression. Results indicated that 45 participants (25%) had depression by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) criteria. Factors most likely to be associated with depression were: poverty; difficulty in functioning; greater somatic symptoms, perceived stress and stigma; number of chronic illnesses; and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Fifty-four people endorsed help-seeking. Factors associated with help-seeking were: female gender, difficulty in functioning, greater somatic symptoms, severity of depression, having someone else tell you that you have an emotional problem, and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Factors most likely to be associated with self-recognition were the same, but also included greater perceived stress. This manuscript contributes to the literature by examining attitudinal factors that may be associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition among subethnic groups of Latinos that are underrepresented in research studies. PMID:26343691

  3. Depression, Help-Seeking and Self-Recognition of Depression among Dominican, Ecuadorian and Colombian Immigrant Primary Care Patients in the Northeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Caplan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Latinos, the largest minority group in the United States, experience mental health disparities, which include decreased access to care, lower quality of care and diminished treatment engagement. The purpose of this cross-sectional study of 177 Latino immigrants in primary care is to identify demographic factors, attitudes and beliefs, such as stigma, perceived stress, and ethnic identity that are associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition of depression. Results indicated that 45 participants (25% had depression by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 criteria. Factors most likely to be associated with depression were: poverty; difficulty in functioning; greater somatic symptoms, perceived stress and stigma; number of chronic illnesses; and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Fifty-four people endorsed help-seeking. Factors associated with help-seeking were: female gender, difficulty in functioning, greater somatic symptoms, severity of depression, having someone else tell you that you have an emotional problem, and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Factors most likely to be associated with self-recognition were the same, but also included greater perceived stress. This manuscript contributes to the literature by examining attitudinal factors that may be associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition among subethnic groups of Latinos that are underrepresented in research studies.

  4. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Ni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT. To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  5. The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members. PMID:24313819

  6. Cost-effectiveness of nurse-led self-help for recurrent depression in the primary care setting: design of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesheuvel-Leliefeld Karolien EM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major Depressive Disorder is a leading cause of disability, tends to run a recurrent course and is associated with substantial economic costs due to increased healthcare utilization and productivity losses. Interventions aimed at the prevention of recurrences may reduce patients' suffering and costs. Besides antidepressants, several psychological treatments such as preventive cognitive therapy (PCT are effective in the prevention of recurrences of depression. Yet, many patients find long-term use of antidepressants unattractive, do not want to engage in therapy sessions and in the primary care setting psychologists are often not available. Therefore, it is important to study whether PCT can be used in a nurse-led self-help format in primary care. This study sets out to test the hypothesis that usual care plus nurse-led self-help for recurrent depression in primary care is feasible, acceptable and cost-effective compared to usual care only. Design Patients are randomly assigned to ‘nurse-led self-help treatment plus usual care’ (134 participants or ‘usual care’ (134 participants. Randomisation is stratified according to the number of previous episodes (2 or 3 previous episodes versus 4 or more. The primary clinical outcome is the cumulative recurrence rate of depression meeting DSM-IV criteria as assessed by the Structured-Clinical-Interview-for-DSM-IV- disorders at one year after completion of the intervention. Secondary clinical outcomes are quality of life, severity of depressive symptoms, co-morbid psychopathology and self-efficacy. As putative effect-moderators, demographic characteristics, number of previous episodes, type of treatment during previous episodes, age of onset, self-efficacy and symptoms of pain and fatigue are assessed. Cumulative recurrence rate ratios are obtained under a Poisson regression model. Number-needed-to-be-treated is calculated as the inverse of the risk-difference. The economic

  7. Choice and control for older people using home care services:how far have council-managed personal budgets helped?

    OpenAIRE

    Rabiee, Parvaneh; Glendinning, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports the experiences of older people who use council-managed personal budgets (PBs) to fund home care services and their satisfaction with the level of choice and control they are able to exercise. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 18 older people from eight home care agencies across three councils in England. All interviews were semi-structured and face-to-face. Findings: Despite some optimism about improvements in choice and flexibility experienced...

  8. Predictors of Poor Pregnancy Outcomes Among Antenatal Care Attendees in Primary Health Care Facilities in Cross River State, Nigeria: A Multilevel Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Soter; Adeleye, Omokhoa A; Kabiru, Caroline W; Agan, Thomas; Duke, Roseline; Mkpanam, Nkese; Nwoha, Doris

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Pregnancy carries a high risk for millions of women and varies by urban-rural location in Nigeria, a country with the second highest maternal deaths in the world. Addressing multilevel predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes among antenatal care (ANC) attendees in primary health care (PHC) facilities could reduce the high maternal mortality rate in Nigeria. This study utilised the "Risk Approach" strategy to (1) compare the risks of poor pregnancy outcomes among ANC attendees by urban-rural location; and (2) determine predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes among ANC attendees in urban-rural PHC facilities in Cross River State, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 among 400 ANC attendees aged 15-49 years recruited through multistage sampling. Data on risk factors of poor pregnancy outcomes were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires and clinic records. Respondents were categorised into low, medium or high risk of poor pregnancy outcomes, based on their overall risk scores. Predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes were determined by multilevel ordinal logistic regression. Results A greater proportion of the women in the rural areas were below the middle socio-economic quintile (75 vs. 4 %, p education (12 vs. 2 %, p outcomes than those in the rural facilities (64 vs. 50 %, p = 0.034). Pregnant women in the urban areas had decreased odds of being at high risk of poor pregnancy outcomes versus the combined medium and low risks compared with those in the rural areas (OR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.09-0.65). Conclusions for Practice Pregnant women attending antenatal care in rural PHC facilities are more at risk of poor pregnancy outcomes than those receiving care in the urban facilities. Health programmes that promote safe pregnancy should target pregnant women in rural settings. PMID:27004795

  9. In connection with the aged who have need help to perform all daily chores on general care ward in Hiroshima Survivors Home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aged who are admitted to general care ward of Hiroshima Survivors Home and need help to perform all daily chores as of January 1978 are 3 of 18 aged 60 - 69 years old (16.7%), 18 of 69 ones 70 - 79 years old (26.1%), 21 of 52 ones 80 - 89 years old (40.4%), and 6 of 7 ones more than 90 years old (85.7%), which are 48 of total 146 (32.9%). This phenomenon is recognized more frequently in women than in men. Occurrence of this phenomenon was high in a short-distance group and a group who entered city after the explosion. It was also high in the aged who stayed at this home for more than 7 years. Most diseases from which they suffered are those of bone and joints (19%) and arteriosclerosis (18.7%). Eight of 13 aged with eye diseases suffered from cataract. As advancement of senility with aging and exacerbation lead to increase of care for them, it is necessary to change their general care to special one. The ability of such aged, who are admitted to general ward and need help to perform all daily chores, to act independently was the same as that of those admitted to Yokufukai special care ward. At the present when beds for special care are filled to capacity, treatment of the aged who need special care (30% of those who need general care), personnel management, and health management of staffs are important. (Tsunoda, M.)

  10. A Videotape-Based Training Method for Improving the Detection of Depression in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stacey; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Schnelle, Betha; Stephens, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the effectiveness of a new training program for improving nursing staffs' detection of depression within long-term care facilities. The course was designed to increase recognition of the Minimal Data Set (MDS) Mood Trigger items, to be brief, and to rely on images rather than didactics. Design and Methods: This study…

  11. Electronic Information Systems Use in Residential Care Facilities: The Differential Effect of Ownership Status and Chain Affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jullet A; Zakoscielna, Karolina; Jacobs, Lindsey

    2016-03-01

    The use of electronic information systems (EISs) including electronic health records continues to increase in all sectors of the health care industry. Research shows that EISs may be useful for improving care delivery and decreasing medical errors. The purpose of this project is twofold: First, we describe the prevalence of EIS use among residential care facilities (RCFs), and second, we explore utilization differences by ownership status and chain affiliation. We anticipate that RCFs that are non-profit and non-chain will use more EIS than other categories of RCFs. Data for this project come from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The sample consists of 2,300 facilities. Overall use of EIS was greatest among RCFs that are non-profit and chain-affiliated. Conversely, the use was lowest among for-profit RCFs that were also non-chain affiliated. This may suggest that these facilities lack the necessary resources or motivation to invest in information systems. PMID:25537650

  12. Laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection in immunized long-term care facility residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Anne-Luise; Peci, Adriana; Eshaghi, Alireza; Baird, Michelle; Memari, Nader; Kristjanson, Erik; Balogun, Elizabeth; Higgins, Rachel R; Li, Aimin; Farrell, David J; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2013-11-01

    We report on an influenza B outbreak in an Ontario long-term care facility in which 2 immunized residents receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis for at least 5 days developed laboratory-confirmed influenza B infection. All isolates were tested for the most common oseltamivir resistance, and none of them had resistance identified. PMID:24113612

  13. Risk factors for fecal colonization with multiple distinct strains of Escherichia coli among long-term care facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N

    2009-05-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with 2 or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest that future efforts to efficiently identify the diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging. PMID:19292660

  14. Risk Factors for Fecal Colonization with Multiple Distinct Strains of Escherichia coli Among Long-Term Care Facility Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Black, Nicole; Maslow, Joel N.

    2009-01-01

    Of 49 long-term care facility residents, 21 (43%) were colonized with two or more distinct strains of Escherichia coli. There were no significant risk factors for colonization with multiple strains of E. coli. These results suggest future efforts to efficiently identify diversity of colonizing strains will be challenging.

  15. 452 Asthma Control and Quality of Care of Adult Asthma Patients in Primary Health Care Facilities in Saint-Petersburg, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Emelyanov, Alexander; Tsukanova, Inessa; Fedoseev, Gleb; Sergeeva, Galina; Lisitsyna, Natalia; Bakanina, Lubov; Nikitina, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was performed to assess the control asthma and quality of care of asthmatic patient in primary health care facilities in Saint-Petersburg, the second largest city in Russia. Methods We conducted telephone interviews with 205 asthma outpatients (aged 24 to 90 years). Asthma control was assessed by using the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Results During the past 12 month spirometry were performed in 26.8%. Only 2% of outpatients were consulted by allergist and 26.8% - by respi...

  16. [Pandemic influenza: impact on health care facilities in Lazio, Italy, and the role of hospitals in pandemic management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Franceso Maria; Pittalis, Silvia; Puro, Vincenzo; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2007-09-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus H5N1 has so far caused more than 250 human cases. This virus is not transmitted efficaciously from person to person, but the capacity of human-to-human transmission could be acquired in the future. Consequently, the epidemiological and virological evolution of H5N1 is strictly monitored, insofar as the virus is a potential agent of an influenza pandemic. During such a pandemic, health care facilities would have to cope with many cases of severe respiratory illnesses, often requiring intensive care and mechanical pulmonary ventilation. In this article, the impact of the pandemic on health care facilities in Lazio, Italy, is evaluated using a statistical model, Flu-Surge. Moreover, some aspects of hospital preparedness for a pandemic, in particular in emergency departments, are discussed. PMID:17940401

  17. Integration of Chiropractic Services in Military and Veteran Health Care Facilities: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire D; Daniels, Clinton J; Napuli, Jason G; Gliedt, Jordan A; Paris, David J

    2016-04-01

    This literature review examined studies that described practice, utilization, and policy of chiropractic services within military and veteran health care environments. A systematic search of Medline, CINAHL, and Index to Chiropractic Literature was performed from inception through April 2015. Thirty articles met inclusion criteria. Studies reporting utilization and policy show that chiropractic services are successfully implemented in various military and veteran health care settings and that integration varies by facility. Doctors of chiropractic that are integrated within military and veteran health care facilities manage common neurological, musculoskeletal, and other conditions; severe injuries obtained in combat; complex cases; and cases that include psychosocial factors. Chiropractors collaboratively manage patients with other providers and focus on reducing morbidity for veterans and rehabilitating military service members to full duty status. Patient satisfaction with chiropractic services is high. Preliminary findings show that chiropractic management of common conditions shows significant improvement. PMID:26677851

  18. Hazardous medical waste generation rates of different categories of health-care facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We calculated hazardous medical waste generation rates (HMWGR) from 132 hospitals. ► Based on a 22-month study period, HMWGR were highly skewed to the right. ► The HMWGR varied from 0.00124 to 0.718 kg bed−1 d−1. ► A positive correlation existed between the HMWGR and the number of hospital beds. ► We used non-parametric statistics to compare rates among hospital categories. - Abstract: Goal of this work was to calculate the hazardous medical waste unit generation rates (HMWUGR), in kg bed−1 d−1, using data from 132 health-care facilities in Greece. The calculations were based on the weights of the hazardous medical wastes that were regularly transferred to the sole medical waste incinerator in Athens over a 22-month period during years 2009 and 2010. The 132 health-care facilities were grouped into public and private ones, and, also, into seven sub-categories, namely: birth, cancer treatment, general, military, pediatric, psychiatric and university hospitals. Results showed that there is a large variability in the HMWUGR, even among hospitals of the same category. Average total HMWUGR varied from 0.012 kg bed−1 d−1, for the public psychiatric hospitals, to up to 0.72 kg bed−1 d−1, for the public university hospitals. Within the private hospitals, average HMWUGR ranged from 0.0012 kg bed−1 d−1, for the psychiatric clinics, to up to 0.49 kg bed−1 d−1, for the birth clinics. Based on non-parametric statistics, HMWUGR were statistically similar for the birth and general hospitals, in both the public and private sector. The private birth and general hospitals generated statistically more wastes compared to the corresponding public hospitals. The infectious/toxic and toxic medical wastes appear to be 10% and 50% of the total hazardous medical wastes generated by the public cancer treatment and university hospitals, respectively.

  19. Current experiences and educational preferences of general practitioners and staff caring for people with dementia living in residential facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer Samuel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residential care is important for older adults, particularly for those with advanced dementia and their families. Education interventions that achieve sustainable improvement in the care of older adults are critical to quality care. There are few systematic data available regarding the educational needs of Residential Care Facility (RCF staff and General Practitioners (GPs relating to dementia, or the sustainability of educational interventions. We sought to determine participation in dementia education, perceived levels of current knowledge regarding dementia, perceived unmet educational needs, current barriers, facilitators and preferences for dementia education. Methods A mixed methods study design was utilised. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of general practitioners, and staff in 223 consecutive residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Responses were received from 102 RCF staff working in 10 facilities (out of 33 facilities who agreed to distribute the survey and 202 GPs (19% of metropolitan GPs. Quantitative survey data were summarised descriptively and chi squared statistics were used to analyse the distribution of categorical variables. Qualitative data were collected from general practitioners, staff in residential care facilities and family carers of people with dementia utilizing individual interviews, surveys and focus groups. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. Results Among RCF staff and GPs attending RCF, participation in dementia education was high, and knowledge levels generally perceived as good. The individual experiences and needs of people with dementia and their families were emphasised. Participants identified the need for a person centred philosophy to underpin educational interventions. Limited time was a frequently mentioned barrier, especially in relation to attending dementia care education. Perceived educational needs relating to behaviours of concern

  20. Evaluation of Antidiabetic Prescriptions from Medical Reimbursement Applications at Banaras Hindu University Health Care Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dev Priya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is on rapid increase in third world countries undergoing rapid transition in terms of development particularly in India, which is often being referred as Diabetic capital. It is a disease more prevalent at latter part of life of human beings when finances dwindle and social care gets neglected. The medication continues till the whole life on a regular basis. In present study, the objective has been to provide pharmacoeconomic medication to the diabetic pensioners in the backdrop as mentioned in above background.Methods: The data was collected at the medical reimbursement section of pensioners of the University. The data was examined to answer issues of therapeutic decisions in the light of the pharmacoeconomic considerations. In this paper essentially data on choice of prescriptions with the angle of pharmacoeconomic prudence were included. The dichotomy of specialist versus non specialist prescribers at the tertiary center (i.e. medical college hospital was compared. Effort was made to define merit of the prescription based on comprehensive considerations of patient profile, disease profile and therapeutic choice.Results: Total 72 prescriptions were analyzed for the study in which 475 drugs were prescribed to the patients.  Total antidiabetic drugs prescribed to the patients were 169. Out of 72 cases 39 were males and 33 were females with mean age 66.04 ± 5.80 (Mean ± SEM. The average number of drugs per prescription was 6.59 which was very high as per guidelines. Most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug was Metformin (63.89% followed by Glimepiride (31.95%.Conclusion: This study reflects that there is need to make available the standard therapeutic optionat University Health Care Facility based upon pharmacoeconomic considerations.

  1. Reduction of femoral fractures in long-term care facilities: the Bavarian fracture prevention study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Becker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hip fractures are a major public health burden. In industrialized countries about 20% of all femoral fractures occur in care dependent persons living in nursing care and assisted living facilities. Preventive strategies for these groups are needed as the access to medical services differs from independent home dwelling older persons at risk of osteoporotic fractures. It was the objective of the study to evaluate the effect of a fall and fracture prevention program on the incidence of femoral fracture in nursing homes in Bavaria, Germany. METHODS: In a translational intervention study a fall prevention program was introduced in 256 nursing homes with 13,653 residents. The control group consisted of 893 nursing homes with 31,668 residents. The intervention consisted of staff education on fall and fracture prevention strategies, progressive strength and balance training, and on institutional advice on environmental adaptations. Incident femoral fractures served as outcome measure. RESULTS: In the years before the intervention risk of a femoral fracture did not differ between the intervention group (IG and control group (CG. During the one-year intervention period femoral fracture rates were 33.6 (IG and 41.0/1000 person years (CG, respectively. The adjusted relative risk of a femoral fracture was 0.82 (95% CI 0.72-0.93 in residents exposed to the fall and fracture prevention program compared to residents from CG. CONCLUSIONS: The state-wide dissemination of a multi-factorial fall and fracture prevention program was able to reduce femoral fractures in residents of nursing homes.

  2. Motivational Factors that Help in Coping with Barriers to Provision of Psychiatric Nursing Care: Perspective of Psychiatric Nurses in a Hospital Setting in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimba, Solomon Musa; Duma, Sinegugu

    2015-07-01

    This qualitative case study explored barriers to provision of psychiatric nursing care in a hospital in Plateau State, Nigeria, and revealed motivational factors that helped the nurses to cope with these barriers. Data collection methods included grand tour and in-depth interviews and participant observation. Motivational factors were related to the psychiatric nurse's individual intrinsic belief system, as well as to their intrinsic belief system as influenced by the environment. These motivational factors highlight how psychiatric nurses continue to cope with the barriers they face in provision of care. The findings indicate the need for hospital management to create and sustain an environment to complement the existing intrinsic motivation of psychiatric nurses to provide psychiatric nursing care, and to provide prompt and appropriate emotional and psychological support to psychiatric nurses worldwide. PMID:26309173

  3. Brucellosis is not a major cause of febrile illness in patients at public health care facilities in Binh Thuan Province, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T.T. Nga; P.J. de Vries; T.H. Abdoel; H.L. Smits

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of brucellosis among patients with acute febrile illness at health care facilities in Binh Thuan province, Vietnam. Method: A retrospective seroepidemiological study on serum samples collected at 13 not adjacent health care facilities using the Rose Bengal test a

  4. Influence of a non-hospital medical care facility on antimicrobial resistance in wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Bäumlisberger

    Full Text Available The global widespread use of antimicrobials and accompanying increase in resistant bacterial strains is of major public health concern. Wastewater systems and wastewater treatment plants are considered a niche for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs, with diverse microbial communities facilitating ARG transfer via mobile genetic element (MGE. In contrast to hospital sewage, wastewater from other health care facilities is still poorly investigated. At the instance of a nursing home located in south-west Germany, in the present study, shotgun metagenomics was used to investigate the impact on wastewater of samples collected up- and down-stream in different seasons. Microbial composition, ARGs and MGEs were analyzed using different annotation approaches with various databases, including Antibiotic Resistance Ontologies (ARO, integrons and plasmids. Our analysis identified seasonal differences in microbial communities and abundance of ARG and MGE between samples from different seasons. However, no obvious differences were detected between up- and downstream samples. The results suggest that, in contrast to hospitals, sewage from the nursing home does not have a major impact on ARG or MGE in wastewater, presumably due to much less intense antimicrobial usage. Possible limitations of metagenomic studies using high-throughput sequencing for detection of genes that seemingly confer antibiotic resistance are discussed.

  5. Epidemiology and resistance patterns in urinary pathogens from long-term care facilities and GP populations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brabazon, E D

    2012-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a major source of antimicrobial prescribing in the clinical setting and a potential reservoir for the emergence of resistant organisms. Although studies have been published on resistance rates for urinary pathogens from both hospital and general practitioner (GP) settings, there is little information from Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCFs) in Ireland. This study aimed to document the epidemiology and resistance rates in urinary isolates, in the LTCF and GP setting, from samples submitted to a typical microbiology laboratory. In 2010, there were 963 urinary isolates from LTCFs and 1,169 urinary isolates from GPs, identified from patients 65 years and over, with cytology suggestive of infection. E. coil was the most common causative organism identified. There were significantly higher levels of resistance to ampicillin, co-amoxiclav, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim, and piperacillin\\/tazobactam in the LTCF population compared to the GP population (e.g. for E. coli, 86%-v-69%; 30%-v- 21%; 58%-v-26%, 10%-v-3%, 68%-v-48%, 10%-v- 4% respectively). Isolates with resistance mechanisms to beta-lactams, were identified in both populations. Results presented in this paper demonstrate significant differences between resistance rates in LTCF and GP populations which suggest that there are implications for empiric antimicrobial prescribing for UTIs in the LTCF setting.

  6. Assessment of HIV Knowledge in Correctional Facility Health Care Workers: A Pilot Study of an Educational Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Holly L; Khan, Muhammad Naeem; Berger, Sara; Moreau, Danusia; Nickel, Pamela; Woods, Dan; Jaipaul, Joy; Pyne, Diane; Moreland, Barbara; Singh, Ameeta; Ahmed, Rabia

    2016-07-01

    HIV rates are disproportionately higher in the incarcerated compared to the general population. Unfortunately, HIV sero-positive inmates report perceived discrimination and missed antiretroviral doses. Correctional facility nursing competency in HIV management may mitigate these concerns. Using validated knowledge instruments, the authors measured baseline HIV knowledge in correctional facility nurses from 3 correctional facilities in Alberta, Canada, and quantified changes after a targeted educational workshop. Basic HIV knowledge increased significantly, whereas perceived need for further HIV education significantly decreased postintervention. This study demonstrates that correctional facility nurses may not receive ideal HIV education during employment and that targeted HIV workshops can significantly increase knowledge and confidence when caring for affected individuals. PMID:26316522

  7. The effect of exercise intervention on frail elderly in need of care: half-day program in a senior day-care service facility specializing in functional training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Miura, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the long-term effect of a half-day exercise intervention program on health-related quality of life, life function, and physical function in frail elderly in need of care. The program was conducted at a senior day-care facility specializing in functional training. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 41 elderly in need of care who had visited the service facility for at least 1 year. Physical function and life function were evaluated at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Quality of life was evaluated with the Short Form-36 at baseline and 12 months. [Results] Improvements in balance, walking speed and endurance, complex performance abilities, self-efficacy during the activities, and the level and sphere of activity were observed at 6 months and maintained up to 12 months. Moreover, improvements in agility, activities of daily living, life function, and quality of life were also observed at 12 months. Improvements in muscle strength, walking ability, self-efficacy over an action, and activities of daily living were related to the improvement in quality of life. [Conclusion] The use of individualized exercise programs developed by physiotherapists led to improvements in activities of daily living and quality of life among elderly in need of care. PMID:27512243

  8. Strategies that help interaction between primary health care and public hospitals: a reflection of the portuguese health system.

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Ana; Monte, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    This work intends to evaluate the strategies that facilitate an interaction between Primary Health Care (PHC) and Public Hospitals (PH) in Portugal to maximize health benefits while rationalizing resources, taking into account that health units aim to achieve service efficiency and user satisfaction while reducing costs. The development of Communication and Information Technologies (CIT) for health sector is one of the fundamental strategies for the articulation of PHC and PH, ...

  9. Despite Resources From The ACA, Most States Do Little To Help Addiction Treatment Programs Implement Health Care Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, Christina; Abraham, Amanda; Grogan, Colleen M.; Pollock, Harold A.; Bersamira, Clifford; Humphreys, Keith; Friedmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) dramatically expands health insurance for addiction treatment and provides unprecedented opportunities for service growth and delivery model reform. Yet most addiction treatment programs lack the staffing and technological capabilities to respond successfully to ACA-driven system change. In light of these challenges, we conducted a national survey to examine how Single State Agencies for addiction treatment—the state governmental organizations charged with overse...

  10. Challenges for dialysis facility medical directors and impact on patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    My service within the RPA began with my need to be a part of the solution, to help navigate the direction of inevitable change, and to ensure we do not lose focus of our ultimate goal as nephrologists-the provision of excellent kidney care. I would encourage all of you to participate in this process as well. It is essential that we maintain our independence, ethics and principals, and excellence in our roles and responsibilities as nephrologists and dialysis unit medical directors, especially in challenging times such as these. Engaging with the RPA in advocating redress of the ESRD PPS proposed 9.4% cut and support for maintaining our critical role as independent dialysis unit medical directors is one way we can make a difference. Become involved in the process. Communicate your concerns to legislators and policy makers. Only with the support of our community and a firm commitment to our goals can we effect change and ensure nephrology patients continue to be well served in the years to come. PMID:24279209

  11. Association of antenatal care with facility delivery and perinatal survival – a population-based study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervin Jesmin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antenatal Care (ANC during pregnancy can play an important role in the uptake of evidence-based services vital to the health of women and their infants. Studies report positive effects of ANC on use of facility-based delivery and perinatal mortality. However, most existing studies are limited to cross-sectional surveys with long recall periods, and generally do not include population-based samples. Methods This study was conducted within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b in Matlab, Bangladesh. The HDSS area is divided into an icddr,b service area (SA where women and children receive care from icddr,b health facilities, and a government SA where people receive care from government facilities. In 2007, a new Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health (MNCH program was initiated in the icddr,b SA that strengthened the ongoing maternal and child health services including ANC. We estimated the association of ANC with facility delivery and perinatal mortality using prospectively collected data from 2005 to 2009. Using a before-after study design, we also determined the role of ANC services on reduction of perinatal mortality between the periods before (2005 – 2006 and after (2008–2009 implementation of the MNCH program. Results Antenatal care visits were associated with increased facility-based delivery in the icddr,b and government SAs. In the icddr,b SA, the adjusted odds of perinatal mortality was about 2-times higher (odds ratio (OR 1.91; 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.50, 2.42 among women who received ≤1 ANC compared to women who received ≥3 ANC visits. No such association was observed in the government SA. Controlling for ANC visits substantially reduced the observed effect of the intervention on perinatal mortality (OR 0.64; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.78 to non-significance (OR 0.81; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.01, when comparing cohorts before

  12. Staff Reactions Toward Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual (LGB) People Living in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) Who Actively Disclose Their Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo; Fabà, Josep; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-three staff members currently working in residential aged care facilities located in Barcelona, Spain, were asked about the way they would react if a resident told them that he or she felt sexually attracted and had maintained sexual relationships with another resident of the same gender. Acceptance of non-heterosexual sexual orientation was a frequent answer, and around one in four professionals stated that they would try helping the resident in question, by offering a private space or giving some emotional support. However, some reactions were not consistent with a respectful approach toward sexual diversity, as, for instance, informing the resident's family or advising the resident to keep his or her sexual orientation hidden. We highlight the importance of developing formal policies and offering formal training to staff in order to address the specific needs of older LGB people living in RACFs. PMID:25710604

  13. A survey of Dutch GPs’ attitudes towards help seeking and follow-up care for relatives bereaved by suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Groot, Marieke; Van der Meer, Klaas; Burger, Huibert

    2009-01-01

    Background. Relatives who are bereaved by suicide likely consult their GP when they feel the need for professional help. GPs may play a key role in establishing who is at risk for adverse consequences of the loss as they are familiar with relatives’ possible psychiatric vulnerabilities. The availability of evidence-based services for relatives of suicide victims is limited. Successful implementation of services needs analysis of key factors considered critical in the achievement of changes. W...

  14. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Carmel M; Peterson Chris; Robinson Rowena; Sturmberg Joachim P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in gener...

  15. Perceived quality of care for common childhood illnesses: facility versus community based providers in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Nanyonjo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare caretakers' perceived quality of care (PQC for under-fives treated for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea by community health workers (CHWs and primary health facility workers (PHFWs. METHODS: Caretaker rated PQC for children aged (2-59 months treated by either CHWs or PHFWs for a bought of malaria, pneumonia or diarrhoea was cross-sectionally compared in quality domains of accessibility, continuity, comprehensiveness, integration, clinical interaction, interpersonal treatment and trust. Child samples were randomly drawn from CHW (419 and clinic (399 records from eight Midwestern Uganda districts. An overall PQC score was predicted through factor analysis. PQC scores were compared for CHWs and PHFWs using Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to specify the association between categorized PQC and service providers for each quality domain. Finally, overall PQC was dichotomized into "high" and "low" based on median score and relative risks (RR for PQC-service provider association were modeled in a "modified" Poisson regression model. RESULTS: Mean (SD overall PQC was significantly higher for CHWs 0.58 (0 .66 compared to PHFWs -0.58 (0.94, p<0.0001. In "modified" Poisson regression, the proportion of caretakers reporting high PQC was higher for CHWS compared to PHFWs, RR=3.1, 95%CI(2.5-3.8. In multinomial models PQC was significantly higher for CHWs compared to PHFWs in all domains except for continuity. CONCLUSION: PQC was significantly higher for CHWs compared to PHFWs in this resource constrained setting. CHWs should be tapped human resources for universal health coverage while scaling up basic child intervention as PQC might improve intervention utilization.

  16. Exploring malaria case mangement of underfive children at households and public primary health care facilities in Kibaha district, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Nsimba, Stephen ED

    2003-01-01

    Background: Chloroquine (CQ) was the first line drug for treating malaria in Tanzania until 2001 when it was replaced with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP). The first four studies (I -IV) were conducted before the policy change, and the last one (V) after. Aim: To explore different aspects of malaria case management of underfives in households and at primary health care facilities in the Kibaha district. Materials and methods: Four cross-sectional studies (I, II, IV & V) we...

  17. Transmission Clusters of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Long-Term Care Facilities Based on Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, O Colin; Burrowes, Shana; David, Sophia; Johnson, J Kristie; Roghmann, Mary-Claire

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To define how often methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is spread from resident to resident in long-term care facilities using whole-genome sequencing DESIGN Prospective cohort study SETTING A long-term care facility PARTICIPANTS Elderly residents in a long-term care facility METHODS Cultures for MRSA were obtained weekly from multiple body sites from residents with known MRSA colonization over 12-week study periods. Simultaneously, cultures to detect MRSA acquisition were obtained weekly from 2 body sites in residents without known MRSA colonization. During the first 12-week cycle on a single unit, we sequenced 8 MRSA isolates per swab for 2 body sites from each of 6 residents. During the second 12-week cycle, we sequenced 30 MRSA isolates from 13 residents with known MRSA colonization and 3 residents who had acquired MRSA colonization. RESULTS MRSA isolates from the same swab showed little genetic variation between isolates with the exception of isolates from wounds. The genetic variation of isolates between body sites on an individual was greater than that within a single body site with the exception of 1 sample, which had 2 unrelated strains among the 8 isolates. In the second cycle, 10 of 16 residents colonized with MRSA (63%) shared 1 of 3 closely related strains. Of the 3 residents with newly acquired MRSA, 2 residents harbored isolates that were members of these clusters. CONCLUSIONS Point prevalence surveys with whole-genome sequencing of MRSA isolates may detect resident-to-resident transmission more accurately than routine surveillance cultures for MRSA in long-term care facilities. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:685-691. PMID:26941060

  18. The Emerging Threat of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Organisms in Long-Term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    O’Fallon, Erin; Pop-Vicas, Aurora; D’Agata, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Background Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCF) are among the main reservoirs of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Multidrug-resistant gram-negative organisms (MDRGN) are emerging as important pathogens among LTCF residents. Data on the clinical epidemiology of MDRGN, esp...

  19. Physical and Mental Factors Associated with Obesity in Individuals with Mental Disorders Attending Psychiatric Day-Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Saiga, Michiko; Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshioka, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with mental disorders have increased rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Here we evaluated factors influencing obesity in individuals with mental disorders who were attending psychiatric day-care facilities on an outpatient basis. Methods The subjects (n = 108) were outpatients attending hospital-based rehabilitation programs. We assessed body fat, weight, height, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS) scores...

  20. Physical exercise for older people : focusing on people living in residential care facilities and people with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Littbrand, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The main purposes of this thesis were to evaluate a high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise pro­gramme, regarding its applicability (attendance, achieved intensity, adverse events) as well as its effect on physical functions and activities of daily living (ADL) among older people living in residential care facilities, with a special focus on people with dementia. Furthermore, a main purpose was to systematically review the applicability and effects of physical exercise on physical f...

  1. Assessment of pharmacotherapeutic safety of medical prescriptions for elderly residents in a long-term care facility

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Rossi Varallo; Ingrid Stephanie Stein Ambiel; Luana Orlandelli Nanci; José Carlos Fernandes Galduróz; Patricia de Carvalho Mastroianni

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of elderly using potentially inappropriate medications (PIM) and with occurrence of potentially hazardous drug interactions (PHDI); to identify the risk factors for the prescription of PIM and to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical intervention (PI) for the prescription of safer therapeutic alternatives. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was performed in a long-term care facility in São Paulo State, between December/2010 and January/2011. ...

  2. ASSESSMENT OF COMPLIANCE TO TREATMENT AMONG AMBULATORY ASTHMATIC PATIENTS IN A SECONDARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    S. J. Showande et al.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the level of compliance using three different methods: pill count, self report and peak expiratory flow rate, in asthmatic patients attending a secondary health care facility. Self report (using a pre-tested structured questionnaire), peak expiratory flow rate and pill count were used to assess patient’s compliance and identify the factors which may be responsible for non compliance. Measurement of peak expiratory flow rate and the pill count were done at two different occ...

  3. [原著]Elder Abuse and Staff Awareness in Long-term Care Insurance Facilities in Okinawa

    OpenAIRE

    Kuniyoshi, Midori; Maeshiro, Chikako; Koja, Yasuko; Yokota, Takao; Departments of Coommunity Health Nursingschool of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus; Adult and Gerontotgical Nursing and Coommunity Health Nursingschool of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus

    2007-01-01

    Staff awareness of abusive actions to the elderly in long-term care insurance facilities was surveyed. A total of 702 responses (response rate, 65.6%) were obtained and then divided into abuse-experienced (n=432) and non-experienced group (n=270). Twentyseven abusive actions categorized by the Study Group for Treating the Elderly were evaluated by staff. Results were as follows:1) Men were more likely to commit abuse than women(p

  4. Quality of care for HIV infection provided by Ryan White Program-supported versus Non-Ryan White Program-supported facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S Sullivan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Care Act (now the Treatment Modernization Act; Ryan White Program, or RWP is a source of federal public funding for HIV care in the United States. The Health Services and Resources Administration requires that facilities or providers who receive RWP funds ensure that HIV health services are accessible and delivered according to established HIV-related treatment guidelines. We used data from population-based samples of persons in care for HIV infection in three states to compare the quality of HIV care in facilities supported by the RWP, with facilities not supported by the RWP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Within each area (King County in Washington State; southern Louisiana; and Michigan, a probability sample of patients receiving care for HIV infection in 1998 was drawn. Based on medical records abstraction, information was collected on prescription of antiretroviral therapy according to treatment recommendations, prescription of prophylactic therapy, and provision of recommended vaccinations and screening tests. We calculated population-level estimates of the extent to which HIV care was provided according to then-current treatment guidelines in RWP-supported and non-RWP-supported facilities. For all treatment outcomes analyzed, the compliance with care guidelines was at least as good for patients who received care at RWP-supported (vs non-RWP supported facilities. For some outcomes in some states, delivery of recommended care was significantly more common for patients receiving care in RWP-supported facilities: for example, in Louisiana, patients receiving care in RWP-supported facilities were more likely to receive indicated prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and Mycobacterium avium complex, and in all three states, women receiving care in RWP-supported facilities were more likely to have received an annual Pap smear. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The quality of HIV care provided in 1998 to

  5. 38 CFR 17.52 - Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care and medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.52 Hospital care and medical services in... economical hospital care or medical services because of geographic inaccessibility or are not capable...

  6. Effects of a walking exercise program for obese individuals with intellectual disability staying in a residential care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sungmin; Jeon, Byoungjin; Kim, Heejung

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the critical importance of active obesity management through a fitness program, and to provide foundational data required for effective obesity management of disabled persons residing in residential carse facilities. [Subjects and Methods] The study period lasted 16 weeks, from August 1 to November 30, 2014. The study participants comprised 9 individuals and they participated in a walking exercise program. An occupational therapist assessed each participant's body weight, body composition (body mass index [BMI], body fat, and abdominal fat), basic fitness (muscle strength and flexibility), and waist circumference. Collected data were encoded by items and analyzed with SPSS ver.18.0. [Results] It was found that the body weight, body composition (BMI, body fat, and abdominal fat), and waist circumference decreased significantly, while baseline fitness (muscle strength and flexibility) improved significantly. [Conclusion] Obesity management is critically important for intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. Active care through continuous program implementation is needed. Accordingly, walking exercise programs should be offered to obese intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. PMID:27134359

  7. Prevalence of physical and verbal aggressive behaviours and associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desrosiers Johanne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal and physical aggressive behaviours are among the most disturbing and distressing behaviours displayed by older patients in long-term care facilities. Aggressive behaviour (AB is often the reason for using physical or chemical restraints with nursing home residents and is a major concern for caregivers. AB is associated with increased health care costs due to staff turnover and absenteeism. Methods The goals of this secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study are to determine the prevalence of verbal and physical aggressive behaviours and to identify associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area (n = 2 332. Results The same percentage of older adults displayed physical aggressive behaviour (21.2% or verbal aggressive behaviour (21.5%, whereas 11.2% displayed both types of aggressive behaviour. Factors associated with aggressive behaviour (both verbal and physical were male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild and severe cognitive impairment, insomnia, psychological distress, and physical restraints. Factors associated with physical aggressive behaviour were older age, male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild or severe cognitive impairment, insomnia and psychological distress. Finally, factors associated with verbal aggressive behaviour were benzodiazepine and neuroleptic drug use, functional dependency, mild or severe cognitive impairment and insomnia. Conclusion Cognitive impairment severity is the most significant predisposing factor for aggressive behaviour among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area. Physical and chemical restraints were also significantly associated with AB. Based on these results, we suggest that caregivers should provide care to older adults with AB using approaches such as the progressively lowered stress threshold model and reactance theory which stress the importance of paying attention to the severity of cognitive

  8. Measuring patient satisfaction: A case study to improve quality of care at public health facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodani Prahlad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main objective of the study is to measure the satisfaction of OPD (Outpatient Department patients in public health facilities of Madhya Pradesh in India. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from OPD patients through pre-structured questionnaires at public health facilities in the sampled eight districts of Madhya Pradesh. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Settings: Outpatient Departments of district hospital, civil hospital, community health centre, and primary health centre of the eight selected districts of Madhya Pradesh. Results: A total of 561 OPD patients were included in the study to know their perceptions towards the public health facilities, choosing health facility, registration process, basic amenities, perception towards doctors and other staff, perception towards pharmacy and dressing room services. It was found that most of the respondents were youth and having low level of education. The major reason of choosing the public health facility was inexpensiveness, infrastructure, and proximity of health facility. Measuring patient satisfaction were more satisfied with the basic amenities at higher health facilities compared to lower level facilities. It was also observed that the patients were more satisfied with the behavior of doctors and staff at lower health facilities compared to higher level facilities.

  9. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting. PMID:26963227

  10. Client views, perception and satisfaction with immunisation services at Primary Health Care Facilities in Calabar, South-South Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Udonwa NE; Gyuse AN; Etokidem AJ; Ogaji DST

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To determine the degree of client satisfaction with immunisation services at Primary Health facilities in Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria.Method: A semi-structured questionnaire was administered on 402 caregivers who were selected using systematic random sampling from four primary health centres. The four centres were randomly selected from the 19 health centres using the table of random numbers. Data obtained were analysed using Epi-Info software version 2002.Results: The majority of clients were dissatisfied with most aspects of care given at the Health Care Centres including long waiting time, accessibility of immunisation services, poor respect for clients' rights, especially to their dignity, health information and counseling on their medical needs.Conclusions:The study concludes that client satisfaction with immunization service in Calabar was low due to poor attitude of health care providers, long waiting time and lack of respect for clients' rights.

  11. Facility Delivery, Postnatal Care and Neonatal Deaths in India: Nationally-Representative Case-Control Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Fadel, Shaza A; Ram, Usha; Shaun K Morris; Begum, Rehana; Shet, Anita; Jotkar, Raju; Jha, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies demonstrate the efficacy of interventions to reduce neonatal deaths, but there are fewer studies of their real-life effectiveness. In India, women often seek facility delivery after complications arise, rather than to avoid complications. Our objective was to quantify the association of facility delivery and postnatal checkups with neonatal mortality while examining the “reverse causality” in which the mothers deliver at a health facility due to adverse perinatal ev...

  12. Impact of an electronic clinical decision support system on workflow in antenatal care: the QUALMAT eCDSS in rural health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Mensah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of new technology can interrupt established workflows in health care settings. The Quality of Maternal Care (QUALMAT project has introduced an (eCDSS for antenatal care (ANC and delivery in rural primary health care facilities in Africa. Objective: This study was carried out to investigate the influence of the QUALMAT eCDSS on the workflow of health care workers in rural primary health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania. Design: A direct observation, time-and-motion study on ANC processes was conducted using a structured data sheet with predefined major task categories. The duration and sequence of tasks performed during ANC visits were observed, and changes after the implementation of the eCDSS were analyzed. Results: In 24 QUALMAT study sites, 214 observations of ANC visits (144 in Ghana, 70 in Tanzania were carried out at baseline and 148 observations (104 in Ghana, 44 in Tanzania after the software was implemented in 12 of those sites. The median time spent combined for all centers in both countries to provide ANC at baseline was 6.5 min [interquartile range (IQR =4.0–10.6]. Although the time spent on ANC increased in Tanzania and Ghana after the eCDSS implementation as compared to baseline, overall there was no significant increase in time used for ANC activities (0.51 min, p=0.06 in Ghana; and 0.54 min, p=0.26 in Tanzania as compared to the control sites without the eCDSS. The percentage of medical history taking in women who had subsequent examinations increased after eCDSS implementation from 58.2% (39/67 to 95.3% (61/64 p<0.001 in Ghana but not in Tanzania [from 65.4% (17/26 to 71.4% (15/21 p=0.70]. Conclusions: The QUALMAT eCDSS does not increase the time needed for ANC but partly streamlined workflow at sites in Ghana, showing the potential of such a system to influence quality of care positively.

  13. Positive and negative emotional responses to workrelated trauma of intensive care nurses in private health care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lizelle Van der Vyver; Diane Elkonin

    2011-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is a stressful occupation and nurses are continually subjected to both primary and secondary trauma. Responses may be positive in the form of compassion satisfaction, or negative in the form of compassion fatigue. However, nurses tend to deny the negative impact of secondary trauma which leads to the silencing response and subsequent burnout. This article explores and describes the presence of these emotions and the relationships between them. A quantitative approach wi...

  14. The accuracy of clinical malaria case reporting at primary health care facilities in Honiara, Solomon Islands

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    Kunimitsu Ayano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of malaria case reporting is challenging due to restricted human and material resources in many countries. The reporting often depends on the clinical diagnosis because of the scarcity of microscopic examinations. Particularly, clinical malaria case reporting by primary health care facilities (local clinics, which constitutes the baseline data of surveillance, has never previously been sufficiently evaluated. In order to improve the malaria reporting system to the level required to eventually eliminate this disease, this study estimates the gaps between the records of clinics and government statistics regarding the incidence of clinical malaria, and then also examines some factors that might explain the data discrepancy, including such variables as clinic staffing and record keeping. Methods All medical records for outpatients in 2007, handwritten by nurses, were collected from local clinics in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands. The all-monthly clinical malaria cases were then recalculated. The corresponding monthly data in official statistics were provided by the government. Next, in order to estimate any data discrepancy, the ratio of the cases recorded at clinics to the cases reported to the government was determined on the monthly basis. Finally, the associations between the monthly discrepancy and other variables were evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. Results The mean data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics was 21.2% (n = 96. Significant associations were observed between the discrepancy and the average number of patients (coefficient: 0.05, 95%CI: 0.31, 0.07, illegible handwriting (coefficient: 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.15, the use of tally sheets (coefficient:-0.38, 95%CI: -0.54, -0.22, and the clinic level (coefficient:-0.48, 95%CI:-0.89,-0.06. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the huge data discrepancy between the records of clinics and

  15. The accuracy of clinical malaria case reporting at primary health care facilities in Honiara, Solomon Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimitsu, Ayano

    2009-01-01

    Background The accuracy of malaria case reporting is challenging due to restricted human and material resources in many countries. The reporting often depends on the clinical diagnosis because of the scarcity of microscopic examinations. Particularly, clinical malaria case reporting by primary health care facilities (local clinics), which constitutes the baseline data of surveillance, has never previously been sufficiently evaluated. In order to improve the malaria reporting system to the level required to eventually eliminate this disease, this study estimates the gaps between the records of clinics and government statistics regarding the incidence of clinical malaria, and then also examines some factors that might explain the data discrepancy, including such variables as clinic staffing and record keeping. Methods All medical records for outpatients in 2007, handwritten by nurses, were collected from local clinics in Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands. The all-monthly clinical malaria cases were then recalculated. The corresponding monthly data in official statistics were provided by the government. Next, in order to estimate any data discrepancy, the ratio of the cases recorded at clinics to the cases reported to the government was determined on the monthly basis. Finally, the associations between the monthly discrepancy and other variables were evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. Results The mean data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics was 21.2% (n = 96). Significant associations were observed between the discrepancy and the average number of patients (coefficient: 0.05, 95%CI: 0.31, 0.07), illegible handwriting (coefficient: 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.15), the use of tally sheets (coefficient:-0.38, 95%CI: -0.54, -0.22), and the clinic level (coefficient:-0.48, 95%CI:-0.89,-0.06). Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrate the huge data discrepancy between the records of clinics and government statistics in

  16. Design of the study: How can health care help female breast cancer patients reduce their stress symptoms? A randomized intervention study with stepped-care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordin Karin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A life threatening illness such as breast cancer can lead to a secondary diagnosis of PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder with intrusive thoughts and avoidance as major symptoms. In a former study by the research group, 80% of the patients with breast cancer reported a high level of stress symptoms close to the diagnosis, such as intrusive thoughts and avoidance behavior. These symptoms remained high throughout the study. The present paper presents the design of a randomized study evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a stress management intervention using a stepped-care design. Method Female patients over the age of 18, with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer and scheduled for adjuvant treatment in the form of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and/or hormonal therapy are eligible and will consecutively be included in the study. The study is a prospective longitudinal intervention study with a stepped-care approach, where patients will be randomised to one of two interventions in the final stage of treatment. The first step is a low intensity stress-management intervention that is given to all patients. Patients who do not respond to this level are thereafter given more intensive treatment at later steps in the program and will be randomized to more intensive stress-management intervention in a group setting or individually. The primary out-come is subjective distress (intrusion and avoidance assessed by the Impact of Event Scale (IES. According to the power-analyses, 300 patients are planned to be included in the study and will be followed for one year. Other outcomes are anxiety, depression, quality of life, fatigue, stress in daily living and utilization of hospital services. This will be assessed with well-known psychometric tested questionnaires. Also, the cost-effectiveness of the intervention given in group or individually will be evaluated. Discussion This randomized clinical trial will provide

  17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Three Utah Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Removing Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in surface waters has become a growing concern within the last decade although the first mention of human PPCPs in the environment goes back to late 1970s. Pharmaceuticals include prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, and veterinary drugs. Personal care products include products such as lotions, fragrances, and soaps. In addition to traditional personal care products, the term PPCPs has been adopted to represent ...

  18. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Saarland, Germany: The Long-Term Care Facility Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nillius, Dorothea; von Müller, Lutz; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Klein, Renate; Herrmann, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiresistant organisms pose a threat for patients and care recipients. Control interventions need to be tailored to region, the type of institution considered, and risk factors. The German state of Saarland is ideally suited to study colonisation epidemiology throughout its various health and care institutions. After conclusion of a large admission prevalence study in acute care hospitals, we now performed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) point prevalence stud...

  19. Management of Diabetes in Long-term Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Medha N; Florez, Hermes; Huang, Elbert S; Kalyani, Rita R; Mupanomunda, Maria; Pandya, Naushira; Swift, Carrie S; Taveira, Tracey H; Haas, Linda B

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes is more common in older adults, has a high prevalence in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and is associated with significant disease burden and higher cost. The heterogeneity of this population with regard to comorbidities and overall health status is critical to establishing personalized goals and treatments for diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia is the most important factor in determining glycemic goals due to the catastrophic consequences in this population. Simplified treatment regimens are preferred, and the sole use of sliding scale insulin (SSI) should be avoided. This position statement provides a classification system for older adults in LTC settings, describes how diabetes goals and management should be tailored based on comorbidities, delineates key issues to consider when using glucose-lowering agents in this population, and provides recommendations on how to replace SSI in LTC facilities. As these patients transition from one setting to another, or from one provider to another, their risk for adverse events increases. Strategies are presented to reduce these risks and ensure safe transitions. This article addresses diabetes management at end of life and in those receiving palliative and hospice care. The integration of diabetes management into LTC facilities is important and requires an interprofessional team approach. To facilitate this approach, acceptance by administrative personnel is needed, as are protocols and possibly system changes. It is important for clinicians to understand the characteristics, challenges, and barriers related to the older population living in LTC facilities as well as the proper functioning of the facilities themselves. Once these challenges are identified, individualized approaches can be designed to improve diabetes management while lowering the risk of hypoglycemia and ultimately improving quality of life. PMID:26798150

  20. Risk Factors for the Development of Gastrointestinal Colonization With Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jennifer H.; Maslow, Joel; Han, Xiaoyan; Xie, Sharon X; Tolomeo, Pam; Santana, Evelyn; Carson, Lesley; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2013-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to assess risk factors for the development of fluoroquinolone (FQ)–resistant Escherichia coli gastrointestinal tract colonization in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents.

  1. Positive and negative emotional responses to workrelated trauma of intensive care nurses in private health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizelle Van der Vyver

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Intensive care nursing is a stressful occupation and nurses are continually subjected to both primary and secondary trauma. Responses may be positive in the form of compassion satisfaction, or negative in the form of compassion fatigue. However, nurses tend to deny the negative impact of secondary trauma which leads to the silencing response and subsequent burnout. This article explores and describes the presence of these emotions and the relationships between them. A quantitative approach with a non-probability sampling method was used. The sample consisted of 30 registered nurses working in private health care intensive care units in East London, Eastern Cape. Data were gathered via the Professional Quality of Life Scale: Compassion Satisfaction and Fatigue Subscales – Revision IV (ProQOL – R-IV and the Silencing Response Scale and were analysed according to descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients. Findings suggest a high risk for compassion fatigue, a moderate risk for burnout and the silencing response and moderate potential for compassion satisfaction. A marked negative relationship was found between compassion satisfaction and burnout and a substantial positive relationship between compassion fatigue and burnout, as well as compassion fatigue and the silencing response.

    Opsomming

    Intensiewesorgverpleging is ‘n stresvolle beroep en verpleegsters word gedurig aan beide primêre en sekondêre trauma blootgestel. Reaksie hierop kan óf positief wees, in die vorm van empatie-tevredenheid, óf negatief, in die vorm van empatie-uitputting. Verpleegsters is egter geneig om die negatiewe impak van sekondêre trauma te ontken,wat gevolglik tot stilswye en uitbranding kan lei. Hierdie artikel ondersoek en beskryf die teenwoordigheid en verwantskap tussen hierdie emosies. ‘n Kwantitatiewe benadering met ‘n nie-waarskynlikheidsteekproefmetode is gebruik. Die steekproef het bestaan uit 30 geregistreerde

  2. Self-Disorders and Clinical High Risk for Psychosis: An Empirical Study in Help-Seeking Youth Attending Community Mental Health Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raballo, Andrea; Pappagallo, Elena; Dell' Erba, Alice; Lo Cascio, Nella; Patane', Martina; Gebhardt, Eva; Boldrini, Tommaso; Terzariol, Laura; Angelone, Massimiliano; Trisolini, Alberto; Girardi, Paolo; Fiori Nastro, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous subjective experiences involving an alteration of the basic sense of self (ie, Self-disorder [SD]) are emerging as a core marker of schizophrenia spectrum disorders with potential impact on current early detection strategies as well. In this study, we wished to field-test the prevalence of SD in a clinical sample of adolescent/young adult help-seekers at putative risk for psychosis attending standard community mental health facilities in Italy. Participants (n = 47), aged between 14 and 25, underwent extensive psychopathological evaluations with current semi-structured tools to assess Clinical High Risk (CHR) state (ie, Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes/Scale of Prodromal Symptoms [SIPS/SOPS], Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument-Adult/Child and Youth [SPI-A/CY]). SD aggregated in CHR subjects as compared to the non-CHR and revealed substantial association with sub-psychotic symptoms (SIPS), subjective experience of cognitive and cognitive-perceptual vulnerability (basic symptoms) and functional level (Global Assessment of functioning). Moreover, a combination of the 2 approaches (ie, CHR plus SD) enabled further "closing-in" on a subgroup of CHR with lower global functioning. The results confirm SD's relevance for the early profiling of youths at potential high risk for psychosis. PMID:26757754

  3. Measuring Patient Satisfaction: A Case Study to Improve Quality of Care at Public Health Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sodani Prahlad; Kumar Rajeev; Srivastava Jayati; Sharma Laxman

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of the study is to measure the satisfaction of OPD (Outpatient Department) patients in public health facilities of Madhya Pradesh in India. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from OPD patients through pre-structured questionnaires at public health facilities in the sampled eight districts of Madhya Pradesh. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Settings: Outpatient Departments of district hospital, civil hospital, community health centre, and primary ...

  4. CARE. A model for radiation exposure calculations based on measured emission rates from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programme CARE (calculation of the annual radiation exposure) calculates the annual environmental exposure of complex nuclear installations. In the diffusion calculation of pollutants, the real weather conditions of the year concerned are taken into account on an hourly basis together with the associated release rates measured for the various nuclides of individual emitters. According to their location in the plant, the contributions of the time-integrated pollutant concentrations of the individual emitters are superimposed at predefinable receiving points in the vicinity or on the boundary of an installation (plant fencing). In the conception of models for calculating the resultant 50-year dose commitments care was taken to ensure that the programme CARE is capable of treating both individual emissions limited in time and quasi-continuous emissions. The programme CARE can therefore be used also for a subsequent calculation of radiation exposure in the event of accidents. (orig.)

  5. Quality of Longer Term Mental Health Facilities in Europe : Validation of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care against Service Users' Views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Wright, Christine; Taylor, Tatiana L.; Turton, Penny; Kallert, Thomas; Schuster, Mirjam; Cervilla, Jorge A.; Brangier, Paulette; Raboch, Jiri; Kalisova, Lucie; Onchev, Georgi; Alexiev, Spiridon; Mezzina, Roberto; Ridente, Pina; Wiersma, Durk; Visser, Ellen; Kiejna, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Ploumpidis, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Cardoso, Graca; King, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) is a staff rated, international toolkit that assesses care in longer term hospital and community based mental health facilities. The QuIRC was developed from review of the international literature, an international Delphi exercise wit

  6. Is higher volume of postacute care patients associated with a lower rehospitalization rate in skilled nursing facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Cai, Xueya; Yin, Jun; Glance, Laurent G; Mukamel, Dana B

    2012-02-01

    This study determined whether higher patient volume of skilled nursing facility (SNF) care was associated with a lower hospital transfer rate. Using the nursing home Minimum Data Set and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting file, we assembled a national cohort of Medicare SNF postacute care admissions between January and September of 2008. Multivariable analyses based on Cox proportional hazards models found that patients admitted to high-volume SNFs (annual number of admissions in the top tertile group) showed an approximately 15% reduced risk for 30-day rehospitalization and an approximately 25% reduced risk for 90-day rehospitalization, compared with patients admitted to low-volume SNFs (annual number of admissions in the bottom tertile group, or practice makes perfect" effect, a "selective referral" effect, or both. PMID:21810798

  7. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE CHOICE OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDING FACILITY AMONG WORKERS IN A LOCAL GOVERNMENT SECRETARIAT IN SOUTH WESTERN NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Uchendu, O. C.; Ilesanmi, O. S,; Olumide, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest in the choice of health care providing facility in Nigeria. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the factors influencing choice and satisfaction with health service providers among local government staff. Methods: A cross sectional survey of all 312 workers in a Local Government Secretariat in South West Nigeria was done. Chi Square and logistic regression analysis was done. Results: The mean age was 38.6 ± 7.5 years, 55% were females and 71.7% had t...

  8. Improving neonatal care in district and community health facilities in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David Lawrance

    2015-08-01

    A high standard of newborn care, especially at a primary level, is needed to address the neonatal mortality rate in South Africa. The current approach to continuing training of health-care workers uses traditional methods of centralised teaching by formal tutors away from the place of work. This is no longer affordable, achievable or desirable, particularly in rural areas. An innovative system of self-directed learning by groups of nurses caring for mothers and their newborn infants uses specially prepared course books without the need for trainers. Using self-study supported by peer discussion groups, nurses can take responsibility for their own professional growth. This builds competence, confidence and a sense of pride. Since 1993, the Perinatal Education Programme has provided continuing learning opportunities for thousands of nurses in Southern Africa. A number of prospective trials have demonstrated that study groups can significantly improve knowledge and understanding, attitudes, clinical skills and quality of care provided to mothers and infants. A recent review of 10,000 successful participants across a wide range of provinces, ages and home languages documented the success of the project. Using a question-and-answer format to promote problem-solving, case studies, simple skills workshops and multiple choice tests, each module addresses common conditions with appropriate care practices such as thorough drying at birth, delayed cord-clamping, skin-to-skin care, breast feeding, basic resuscitation, correct use of oxygen therapy, hand-washing, blood glucose monitoring and promotion of parental bonding. The training material is now also available free of charge on an on-line website as well as being presented as e-books which can be downloaded onto personal computers, tablet readers and smart phones. This is supplemented by regular SMS text messages providing nurses with relevant 'knowledge bites'. All nurses caring for newborn infants now have easy

  9. Pharmacist-documented interventions during the dispensing process in a primary health care facility in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Kheir, Nadir

    2009-01-01

    Richard Hooper1, Abdullah Adam2, Nadir Kheir31Medical Services Department, 2Pharmacy Department, Medical Services, Qatar Petroleum, Doha, Qatar; 3Qatar University, College of Pharmacy, Doha, QatarObjectives: To characterize prescribing error interventions documented by pharmacists in four pharmacies in a primary health care service in Qatar.Methods: The study was conducted in a primary health care service in the State of Qatar in the period from January to March 2008. Pharmacists in four clin...

  10. Characterization of infectious aerosols in health care facilities: an aid to effective engineering controls and preventive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, E C; Cook, C E

    1998-08-01

    Assessment of strategies for engineering controls for the prevention of airborne infectious disease transmission to patients and to health care and related workers requires consideration of the factors relevant to aerosol characterization. These factors include aerosol generation, particle size and concentrations, organism viability, infectivity and virulence, airflow and climate, and environmental sampling and analysis. The major focus on attention to engineering controls comes from recent increases in tuberculosis, particularly the multidrug-resistant varieties in the general hospital population, the severely immunocompromised, and those in at-risk and confined environments such as prisons, long-term care facilities, and shelters for the homeless. Many workers are in close contact with persons who have active, undiagnosed, or insufficiently treated tuberculosis. Additionally, patients and health care workers may be exposed to a variety of pathogenic human viruses, opportunistic fungi, and bacteria. This report therefore focuses on the nature of infectious aerosol transmission in an attempt to determine which factors can be systematically addressed to result in proven, applied engineering approaches to the control of infectious aerosols in hospital and health care facility environments. The infectious aerosols of consideration are those that are generated as particles of respirable size by both human and environmental sources and that have the capability of remaining viable and airborne for extended periods in the indoor environment. This definition precludes skin and mucous membrane exposures occurring from splashes (rather than true aerosols) of blood or body fluids containing infectious disease agents. There are no epidemiologic or laboratory studies documenting the transmission of bloodborne virus by way of aerosols. PMID:9721404

  11. The development of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC): a measure of best practice for facilities for people with longer term mental health problems

    OpenAIRE

    Visser Ellen; Wiersma Durk; Ridente Pina; Mezzina Roberto; Alexiev Spiridon; Onchev Georgi; Kališová Lucie; Brangier Paulette; Raboch Jiri; Cervilla Jorge A; Schuster Mirjam; Schützwohl Matthias; Turton Penny; Taylor Tatiana L; Wright Christine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the progress over recent decades in developing community mental health services internationally, many people still receive treatment and care in institutional settings. Those most likely to reside longest in these facilities have the most complex mental health problems and are at most risk of potential abuses of care and exploitation. This study aimed to develop an international, standardised toolkit to assess the quality of care in longer term hospital and communi...

  12. Cross-border reproductive care for law evasion: should physicians be allowed to help infertility patients evade the law of their own country?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Wannes; Pennings, Guido; De Sutter, Petra

    2016-07-01

    There are fundamental differences between countries with regard to legislation on assisted reproduction. Many infertility patients are looking to evade the law of their own country and make use of reproductive services abroad. The role of the local physician in cross-border reproductive care for law evasion has been characterized as "channeling local patients to foreign medical establishments" and "against the spirit and essence of the law". The logical view is that by supporting CBRC for law evasion, physicians are essentially supporting immoral behavior. We will tackle this position on two levels. First, we will argue that governments should generally be tolerant toward people with different positions on assisted reproduction. Second, we will show that contributing to cross-border reproductive care for law evasion is not necessarily immoral, because the prima facie wrongness of complicity in law evasion can be outweighed by the fact that physicians should act in the best interest of the patient. Several countries have tried to prevent local physicians from helping patients to make use of reproductive services abroad, but they should rather leave it up to the individual physicians to decide whether or not to support a particular patient. PMID:26372639

  13. Assisted Living Facilities, ElderCareFacilities-Elder care facilities in the State of Utah, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Assisted Living Facilities dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as...

  14. Implementing a Help Desk at a Small Liberal Arts College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Bev

    1993-01-01

    Planning for a computer use "help desk" at Kenyon College (Ohio) was constrained by very limited resources. However, careful and thorough planning resulted in a low-budget, homegrown, but highly effective facility. Staffing, training, staff communication, and marketing the service were essential elements in its success. (MSE)

  15. Help-Seeking Behavior of West African Migrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipscheer, Jeroen W.; Kleber, Rolf J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present essential aspects of the help-seeking behavior with regard to mental health problems of Ghanaian migrants in the Netherlands. Samples of citizens in the general population (n=97) and outpatients treated in mental health care facilities (n=36) were included. Data were acquired by administering a semi-structured…

  16. Levels and variations in the quality of facility-based antenatal care in Kenya: evidence from the 2010 service provision assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Madhavan, Supriya; Bauhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Quality of care is emerging as an important concern for low- and middle-income countries working to expand and improve coverage. However, there is limited systematic, large-scale empirical guidance to inform policy design. Our study operationalized indicators for six dimensions of quality of care that are captured in currently available, standardized Service Provision Assessments. We implemented these measures to assess the levels and heterogeneity of antenatal care in Kenya. Using our indicator mix, we find that performance is low overall and that there is substantial variation across provinces, management authority and facility type. Overall, facilities performed highest in the dimensions of efficiency and acceptability/patient-centeredness, and lowest on effectiveness and accessibility. Public facilities generally performed worse or similarly to private or faith-based facilities. We illustrate how these data and methods can provide readily-available, low-cost decision support for policy. PMID:26879091

  17. A COMPARISON OF MEDICAL CARE FACILITIES AND VARIOUS HEALTH STATISTICS UNDER PRICATE AND PUBLIC SECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nasseri

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of various health statistics among Sweden, The United States of America, and United Kingdom reveals that the U.S. is in an inferior situation. This is traced to those acute and communicable diseases which could very easily be prevented. However medical care services require money and this money due to the nature of health care system in the U.S. has to come from the patients. While the whites can afford the astronomical medical bills, the non-whites can not and this is very vividly reflected in the statistics. On the other hand, the impact of poverty on statistic could have been much smaller if the medical care would have been included, at least partially, within the governmental responsibilities like Sweden and United Kingdom.

  18. Preliminary Report of a Pilot Tele-Health Palliative Care and Bioethics Program for Residents in Skilled Nursing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean O’Mahony

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently about 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, many with poorly controlled pain and other symptoms, with minimal provisions for psychosocial support. New models are necessary to lessen structural and process barriers to give effective end-of-life care in nursing homes. Objectives: 1 To extend hospital-based Bioethics Consultation Services (BCS and Palliative Care Services (PCS at Montefiore Medical Center (MMC in the Bronx to two local Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs, Morningside House Aging in America (MSH using direct face-to-face consultations and Beth Abraham Health Systems (BAHS via video consultations (VC; 2 Achieve improvements in quality of life and comfort for elderly residents and their families; 2a Improve the level of practice and increase staff satisfaction with palliative care content-related knowledge and bioethical analysis. Methods: We report preliminary findings of this two group quasi experimental project with results of pre- and post- tests rating content-related knowledge in aspects of end-of-life care for staff. Select pre-test and post-test questions were given to physicians and other staff, but were re-configured for, registered and licensed practice nurses, social workers, and certified nursing assistants from the End-of-Life Physician Education Resource Center (EPERC. Patient, family, and staff ratings of the quality of palliative care were measured with a Palliative Outcomes Scale (POS one week prior to and post consultation. Results: 72 staff attended in-services; 53 completed pre-tests and 49 post-tests. Overall knowledge scores increased for 9 of the 16 items that were analyzed. There were improvements in knowledge scores in 12 of 16 items tested for staff content related knowledge which were statistically significant in regard to management of cancer pain from 63.8% to 81.5% (p = 0.03 and a trend to significance for assessment and management of delirium from 31.6% to 61.9% (p = 0.073. Seventy five POS

  19. A Preceptorship Model for Nurses in Rural Health Care Facilities. Rural Education Research Series No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottinger, M. Enid

    This report describes a preceptorship model that provides student nurses with clinical practice in rural health facilities. The development and implementation of a preceptorship model reflects a partnership between nursing education and nursing service--between the urban nursing school and the rural hospital. A five-stage preceptorship model is…

  20. Consumer Satisfaction in Long-Term Care: State Initiatives in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Timothy J.; Lucas, Judith A.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Robinson, Joanne P.; Crystal, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a survey of state initiatives that measure resident satisfaction in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and we describe several model programs for legislators and public administrators contemplating the initiation of their own state programs. Design and Methods: Data on state initiatives and programs…

  1. Identifying characteristics associated with performing recommended practices in maternal and newborn care among health facilities in Rwanda: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sipsma Heather L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although rates of maternal and neonatal mortality have decreased in many countries over the last two decades, they remain unacceptably high, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Nevertheless, we know little about the quality of facility-based maternal and newborn care in low-income countries and little about the association between quality of care and health worker training, supervision, and incentives in these settings. We therefore sought to examine the quality of facility-based maternal and newborn health care by describing the implementation of recommended practices for maternal and newborn care among health care facilities. We also aimed to determine whether increased training, supervision, and incentives for health workers were associated with implementing these recommended practices. We chose to study these aims in the Republic of Rwanda, where rates of maternal and newborn mortality are high and where substantial attention is currently focused on strengthening health workforce capacity and quality. Methods We used data from the 2007 Rwanda Service Provision Assessment. Using observations from 455 facilities and interviews from 1357 providers, we generated descriptive statistics to describe the use of recommended practices and frequencies of provider training, supervision, and incentives in the areas of antenatal, delivery, and newborn care. We then constructed multivariable regression models to examine the associations between using recommended practices and health provider training, supervision, and incentives. Results Use of recommended practices varied widely, and very few facilities performed all recommended practices. Furthermore, in most areas of care, less than 25% of providers reported having had any pre-service or in-service training in the last 3 years. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no evidence that training, supervision, or incentives were consistently associated with using recommended practices

  2. Linking household and facility data for better coverage measures in reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health care: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Mai; Micah, Angela; Brondi, Luciana; Campbell, Harry; Marchant, Tanya; Eisele, Thomas; Munos, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently many measures of intervention coverage obtained from household surveys do not measure actual health intervention/service delivery, resulting in a need for linking reports of care–seeking with assessments of the service environment in order to improve measurements. This systematic review aims to identify evidence of different methods used to link household surveys and service provision assessments, with a focus on reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health care, in low– and middle–income countries. Methods Using pre–defined search terms, articles published in peer–reviewed journals and the grey literature after 1990 were identified, their reference lists scanned and linking methods synthesized. Findings A total of 59 articles and conference presentations were carefully reviewed and categorized into two groups based on the linking method used: 1) indirect/ecological linking that included studies in which health care–seeking behavior was linked to all or the nearest facilities or providers of certain types within a geographical area, and 2) direct linking/exact matching where individuals were linked with the exact provider or facility where they sought care. The former approach was employed in 51 of 59 included studies, and was particularly common among studies that were based on independent sources of household and facility data that were nationally representative. Only eight of the 59 reviewed studies employed direct linking methods, which were typically done at the sub–national level (eg, district level) and often in rural areas, where the number of providers was more limited compared to urban areas. Conclusions Different linking methods have been reported in the literature, each category has its own set of advantages and limitations, in terms of both methodology and practicality for scale–up. Future studies that link household and provider/facility data should also take into account factors such as sources of data, the

  3. Legionella spp. and legionellosis in southeastern Italy: disease epidemiology and environmental surveillance in community and health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbuti Giovanna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the publication of the Italian Guidelines for the control and prevention of legionellosis an environmental and clinical surveillance has been carried out in Southeastern Italy. The aim of the study is to identify the risk factors for the disease, so allowing better programming of the necessary prevention measures. Methods During the period January 2000 - December 2009 the environmental surveillance was carried out by water sampling of 129 health care facilities (73 public and 56 private hospitals and 533 buildings within the community (63 private apartments, 305 hotels, 19 offices, 4 churches, 116 gyms, 3 swimming pools and 23 schools. Water sampling and microbiological analysis were carried out following the Italian Guidelines. From January 2005, all facilities were subject to risk analysis through the use of a standardized report; the results were classified as good (G, medium (M and bad (B. As well, all the clinical surveillance forms for legionellosis, which must be compiled by physicians and sent to the Regional Centre for Epidemiology (OER, were analyzed. Results Legionella spp. was found in 102 (79.1% health care facilities and in 238 (44.7% community buildings. The percentages for the contamination levels 10,000 cfu/L were respectively 33.1%, 53.4% and 13.5% for samples from health care facilities and 33.5%, 43.3% and 23.2% for samples from the community. Both in hospital and community environments, Legionella pneumophila serogroup (L. pn sg 2-14 was the most frequently isolate (respectively 54.8% and 40.8% of positive samples, followed by L. pn sg 1 (respectively 31.3% and 33%. The study showed a significant association between M or B score at the risk analysis and Legionella spp. positive microbiological test results (p Conclusions Our experience suggests that risk analysis and environmental microbiological surveillance should be carried out more frequently to control the environmental spread of Legionella

  4. A Practice Improvement Education Program Using a Mentored Approach to Improve Nursing Facility Depression Care-Preliminary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodosh, Joshua; Price, Rachel M; Cadogan, Mary P; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Osterweil, Dan; Czerwinski, Alfredo; Tan, Zaldy S; Merkin, Sharon S; Gans, Daphna; Frank, Janet C

    2015-11-01

    Depression is common in nursing facility residents. Depression data obtained using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 offer opportunities for improving diagnostic accuracy and care quality. How best to integrate MDS 3.0 and other data into quality improvement (QI) activity is untested. The objective was to increase nursing home (NH) capability in using QI processes and to improve depression assessment and management through focused mentorship and team building. This was a 6-month intervention with five components: facilitated collection of MDS 3.0 nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and medication data for diagnostic interpretation; education and modeling on QI approaches, team building, and nonpharmacological depression care; mentored team meetings; educational webinars; and technical assistance. PHQ-9 and medication data were collected at baseline and 6 and 9 months. Progress was measured using team participation measures, attitude and care process self-appraisal, mentor assessments, and resident depression outcomes. Five NHs established interprofessional teams that included nursing (44.1%), social work (20.6%), physicians (8.8%), and other disciplines (26.5%). Members participated in 61% of eight offered educational meetings (three onsite mentored team meetings and five webinars). Competency self-ratings improved on four depression care measures (P = .05 to data, depression scores did not change while medication use declined, from 37.2% of residents at baseline to 31.0% at 9 months (P < .001). This structured mentoring program improved care processes, achieved medication reductions, and was well received. Application to other NH-prevalent syndromes is possible. PMID:26503548

  5. Help from Outside Sources

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Members are usually open about where to find quality services in the area. Most caregivers, though, find that ... nursing homes, or around-the-clock home care services help with the physical tasks of providing care. This allows for quality time which can be spent visiting and sharing ...

  6. Rural-Urban Differences in End-of-Life Nursing Home Care: Facility and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: This study examines urban-rural differences in end-of-life (EOL) quality of care provided to nursing home (NH) residents. Data and Methods: We constructed 3 risk-adjusted EOL quality measures (QMs) for long-term decedent residents: in-hospital death, hospice referral before death, and presence of severe pain. We used…

  7. Menu Planning, Food Consumption, and Sanitation Practices in Day Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratko, Connye N.; Martin, Ruth E.; Lan, William Y.; Chappell, James A.; Ahmad, Mahassen

    2000-01-01

    In 102 day care centers, data were collected on nutritional content of menus, compliance with guidelines, children's food consumption, and safety/sanitation. Although menus exceeded recommended daily allowances, quantities of food were below recommendations. No menu components were consumed by more than 65% of children. Sanitation problems were…

  8. Assessing post-abortion care in health facilities in Afghanistan : a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, Nasratullah; Zainullah, Partamin; Kim, Young Mi; Tappis, Hannah; Kols, Adrienne; Currie, Sheena; Haver, Jaime; van Roosmalen, Jos; Broerse, Jacqueline E. W.; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complications of abortion are one of the leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide, along with hemorrhage, sepsis, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy. In Afghanistan little data exist on the capacity of the health system to provide post-abortion care (PAC). This paper presents f

  9. 78 FR 38594 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities; Hospice Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... all alleged violations involving mistreatment, neglect, or verbal, mental, sexual, and physical abuse... receive services under the Medicare hospice benefit. Medicare does not have a separate payment rate for... patients in their homes, the routine home care hospice rate does not include any payment for room or...

  10. Standards and general criteria for the planning and certification of need of megavoltage radiation oncology units in health care facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimum standards and guidelines to be applied by State agencies and New Jersey health systems agencies in the examination of certificate-of-need applications and in the development of planning activities for radiation oncology units in health care facilities are presented. Radiation oncology is a medical discipline devoted to education and research in the use of ionizing radiation for the treatment of neoplastic disease. The proper application of radiation can be directed at either curative or palliative intent. It is an important and effective technique for the management of cancer. Radiotherapy equipment in clinical use is divided into four main categories: superficial, orthovoltage, megavoltage, and treatment planning facilities. Particular attention is given to megavoltage equipment which emits or generates rays over 1,000 kilovolts. These high energy rays effect better penetration of human tissue and are skin-sparing in nature, thus allowing for better tumor-to- skin dose ratios. The regionalization of megavoltage therapy services is discussed. Data on hospital megavoltage facilities in New Jersey for 1974, 1975, and 1976 are provided. The standards and guidelines pertain to utilization, personnel, and general criteria. A form for use by megavoltage radiation therapy units is appended

  11. Pharmacist-documented interventions during the dispensing process in a primary health care facility in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hooper

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Richard Hooper1, Abdullah Adam2, Nadir Kheir31Medical Services Department, 2Pharmacy Department, Medical Services, Qatar Petroleum, Doha, Qatar; 3Qatar University, College of Pharmacy, Doha, QatarObjectives: To characterize prescribing error interventions documented by pharmacists in four pharmacies in a primary health care service in Qatar.Methods: The study was conducted in a primary health care service in the State of Qatar in the period from January to March 2008. Pharmacists in four clinics within the service used online, integrated health care software to document all clinical interventions made. Documented information included: patient’s age and gender, drug therapy details, the intervention’s details, its category, and its outcome. Interventions were categorized according to the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Classification of drug-related problems (DRP.Results: The number of patients who had their prescriptions intercepted were 589 (0.71% of the total 82,800 prescriptions received. The intercepted prescriptions generated 890 DRP-related interventions (an average of 1.9% DRPs identified across the four clinics. Fifty-four percent of all interventions were classified as drug choice problems, and 42% had safety problems (dose too high, potential significant interaction. The prescriber accepted the intervention in 53% of all interventions, and the treatment was changed accordingly. Interventions as a result of transcription errors, legality and formulary issues were eliminated from this study through the use of computerized physician order entry (CPOE.Conclusions: Documenting and analyzing interventions should be a routine activity in pharmacy practice setting in primary health care services. Educational outreach visits and other strategies can improve prescribing practices and enhance patient safety.Keywords: pharmacists, interventions, prescribing errors

  12. The role of context and the interpersonal experience of loneliness among older people in a residential care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Roos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Older people are more prone to experience loneliness when living in residential care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore older people's experiences of loneliness in the context of institutionalized care. A voluntary and convenience-based sample of 10 white South African older people (age range 62 to 82 years; three men and seven women was drawn. Data on the subjective experience of loneliness were then gathered through the Mmogo-method®, whereby drawings were employed to explore matters and issues of importance in the lives of older people that could be used to deal with loneliness. Data were analyzed thematically and visually as well as through the use of keywords in context. The results showed that older people experienced loneliness in terms of having unavailable interactions due to loss, and an absence of meaningful interpersonal interactions. Meaningful interpersonal interactions were described as when the older people had regular contact and a variety of interactions. Ineffective interpersonal styles (e.g. taking a controlling position in relationships and being rigid elicited rejection and isolation, and were associated with a lack of confirmatory interpersonal relationships. It is recommended that greater emphasis should be placed on creating awareness of unhealthy group dynamics as well as on psychosocial interventions to develop group support. Interpersonal styles, either effective or ineffective, take place in a social context, which, in this research, was observed to be unsafe, lacking in care, and a non-stimulating environment.

  13. Do antenatal care visits always contribute to facility-based delivery in Tanzania? A study of repeated cross-sectional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Seung-Ah; Kim, Jinseob; Kim, Saerom; Park, Yukyung; Kullaya, Siril Michael; Kim, Chang-Yup

    2016-04-01

    There is a known high disparity in access to perinatal care services between urban and rural areas in Tanzania. This study analysed repeated cross-sectional (RCS) data from Tanzania to explore the relationship between antenatal care (ANC) visits, facility-based delivery and the reasons for home births in women who had made ANC visits. We used data from RCS Demographic and Health Surveys spanning 20 years and a cluster sample of 30 830 women from ∼52 districts of Tanzania. The relationship between the number of ANC visits (up to four) and facility delivery in the latest pregnancy was explored. Regional changes in facility delivery and related variables over time in urban and rural areas were analysed using linear mixed models. To explore the disconnect between ANC visits and facility deliveries, reasons for home delivery were analysed. In the analytic model with other regional-level covariates, a higher proportion of ANC (>2-4 visits) and exposure to media related to an increased facility delivery rate in urban areas. For rural women, there was no significant relationship between the number of visits and facility delivery rate. According to the fifth wave result (2009-10), the most frequent reason for home delivery was 'physical distance to facility', and a significantly higher proportion of rural women reported that they were 'not allowed to deliver in facility'. The disconnect between ANC visits and facility delivery in rural areas may be attributable to physical, cultural or familial barriers, and quality of care in health facilities. This suggests that improving access to ANC may not be enough to motivate facility-based delivery, especially in rural areas. PMID:26049085

  14. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Redwood Extended Care Facility, Meath

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elmusharaf, Khalifa

    2015-09-01

    Universal health access will not be achieved unless women are cared for in their own communities and are empowered to take decisions about their own health in a supportive environment. This will only be achieved by community-based demand side interventions for maternal health access. In this review article, we highlight three common strategies to increase demand-side barriers to maternal healthcare access and identify the main challenges that still need to be addressed for these strategies to be effective.

  15. Two Case Studies Using Mock-Ups for Planning Adult and Neonatal Intensive Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Hignett

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes two case studies using a 5-step protocol to determine functional space requirements for cardiac and neonatal intensive care clinical activities. Functional space experiments were conducted to determine the spatial requirements (defined as the minimumsized rectangle to encompass the Link Analysis. The data were collected with multi-directional filming and analysed frame-by-frame to plot the movements between the nurses and other components in the space. The average clinical functional space for the adult critical care unit was 22.83m2 (excluding family and hygiene space and in-room storage. The average functional clinical space for neonatal intensive care unit was 13.5m2 (excluding circulation and storage. The use of the 5-step protocol is reviewed, with limitations in case study 1 addressed in case study 2. The findings from both case studies have been incorporated into government guidance and achieved knowledge transfer by being implemented in building design.

  16. Equity of inpatient health care in rural Tanzania: a population- and facility-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Grace A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To explore the equity of utilization of inpatient health care at rural Tanzanian health centers through the use of a short wealth questionnaire. Methods Patients admitted to four rural health centers in the Kigoma Region of Tanzania from May 2008 to May 2009 were surveyed about their illness, asset ownership and demographics. Principal component analysis was used to compare the wealth of the inpatients to the wealth of the region's general population, using data from a previous population-based survey. Results Among inpatients, 15.3% were characterized as the most poor, 19.6% were characterized as very poor, 16.5% were characterized as poor, 18.9% were characterized as less poor, and 29.7% were characterized as the least poor. The wealth distribution of all inpatients (p Conclusion The findings indicated that while current Tanzanian health financing policies may have improved access to health care for children under five, additional policies are needed to further close the equity gap, especially for obstetric inpatients.

  17. Nutritional and functional status indicators in residents of a long-term care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A; Ackland, Leigh M

    2009-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we determined whether results from the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL), were associated with nutritional status and mobility in long-term care residents. One hundred and fifteen study participants (mean [SD] age: 80.2 [10.6]) provided informed consent. Fifty eight percent (n = 66) responded to all three questionnaires: 12 were assessed as malnourished (MNA or = 6). Higher levels of depression were associated with lower serum zinc (n = 71, r = -.356, p = .001) and associated with a slower Timed Up and Go test (TUG, n = 38, r = .301, p = .030). MNA was also associated with serum zinc (n = 44, r = .307, P = .021). Non responders to questionnaires (n = 36) had a lower BMI (mean difference: -2.5 +/- 1.0 kg/m(2), p = .013) and serum 25(OH)D (-8.7 +/- 3.8 nmol/l, p = .023) vs. responders. The GDS, in addition to the MNA, is useful in identifying poor nutritional status in residential care. Intervention programs that target depression and poor nutritional status could potentially improve overall quality of life, but it is not clear if depression is leading to poor nutritional status or if poor nutrition is leading to depression. PMID:19234994

  18. Health facility environment as humanization strategy care in the pediatric unit: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Portella Ribeiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and analyze the production of knowledge about the strategies that health care institutions have implemented to humanize care of hospitalized children. Method: This is a systematic review conducted in the Virtual Health Library - Nursing and SciELO, using the seven steps proposed by the Cochrane Handbook. Results: 15 studies were selected, and strategies that involved relationship exchanges were used between the health professional, the hospitalized child and their families, which may be mediated by leisure activities, music and by reading fairy tales. We also include the use of the architecture itself as a way of providing welfare to the child and his/her family, as well as facilitating the development of the work process of health professionals. Conclusion: Investments in research and publications about the topic are necessary, so that, the National Humanization Policy does not disappear and that the identified strategies in this study do not configure as isolated and disjointed actions of health policy.

  19. Health-care market robust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Jayne

    2004-01-01

    Construction of health care facilities hit an all-time high in 2002 totalling about $16 billion of work. As baby boomers age health care construction will soar, because seniors are the largest consumers of health care The top five firms--Perkins & Will, HDR, HKS, NBBJ, and Ellerbe Becket--monopolize about 20 percent of the work. H.R. 1 increases Medicare payments to rural hospitals by $25 billion over 10 years--so help is on the way for facilities that are languishing. PMID:15077503

  20. Assessment of pharmacotherapeutic safety of medical prescriptions for elderly residents in a long-term care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Rossi Varallo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of elderly using potentially inappropriate medications (PIM and with occurrence of potentially hazardous drug interactions (PHDI; to identify the risk factors for the prescription of PIM and to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical intervention (PI for the prescription of safer therapeutic alternatives. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was performed in a long-term care facility in São Paulo State, between December/2010 and January/2011. The medical records of the patients >60 years old who took any drugs were consulted to assess the pharmacotherapeutic safety of the medical prescriptions, in order to identify PIM and PHDI, according to the Beers (2003 and World Health Organization criteria, respectively. PI consisted of a guidance letter to the physician responsible for the institution, with the suggestions of safer equivalent therapeutics. Approximately 88% of the elderly took at least one drug, and for 30% of them the PIM had been prescribed. Most of the PIM identified (53.4% act on the central nervous system. Among the 13 different DI detected, 6 are considered PHDI. Polypharmacy was detected as a risk factor for PIM prescription. After the PI there was no change in medical prescriptions of patients who had been prescribed PIM or PHDI. The data suggests that PI performed by letter, as the only interventional, method was ineffective. To contribute it a wide dissemination of PIM and PHDI among prescriber professionals is necessary for the selection of safer treatment for elderly. Additionally, a pharmacist should be part of the health care team in order to help promote rational use of medicines.O presente estudo teve como objetivos estimar a prevalência de idosos em uso de medicamentos potencialmente impróprios (MPI e com ocorrência de interações medicamentosas potencialmente perigosas (IMPP; identificar os fatores de risco para a prescrição de MPI e avaliar o impacto de interven

  1. An Assessment of the Electric Power Quality and Electrical Installation Impacts on Medical Electrical Equipment Operations at Health Care Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário C.G. Ramos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Medical electrical equipments at health care facilities presented malfunction and wrong medical information due to poor electric power quality and to inadequate electrical Installations. Some equipment such as X-ray, computerized axial tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered as polluting ones due to their high amount of harmonics and voltage transients produced on the electrical power supply when in operation, while other equipments, connected to the same power supply, are considered sensitive or victim ones, presenting failure or producing wrong. Approach: The effects on some sensitive medical electrical equipment were verified in a controlled environment at energy quality technological center of the technical school of the University of Sao Paulo. A heart monitor, pulmonary ventilator and pulse oxymeter equipment types were submitted to a controlled voltage supply with high harmonic content and voltage sags. The test methodology used simulated conditions based on Brazilian NBR standards, ANSI/IEEE Std. 519, IEC 60601 and IEC 61000-4-11 standards. Results: The results of the polluting equipment current consumption measurements as well as the three sensitive equipments tested were presented and discussed. The pulmonary ventilator presented problems that range from stoppage to expiratory valve blockage and alarm system failures. The pulse oxymeter presented display malfunctions and it was extremely sensitive to voltage sags. The heart monitor maintained steady operation in all test cases. Conclusion/Recommendations: In spite of several existing recommendations and standards for testing medical electrical equipments, there is a lack of standard related to test cases considering the effects of high harmonic and voltage sags. The quality of electrical installation in health care facilities needs to be improved to reduce risks to the patients and to provide better health treatment.

  2. Infections in Australian Aged-Care Facilities: Evaluating the Impact of Revised McGeer Criteria for Surveillance of Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Noleen J; Johnson, Sandra A; Richards, Michael J; Smith, Mary A; Worth, Leon J

    2016-05-01

    Our survey of 112 Australian aged-care facilities demonstrated the prevalence of healthcare-associated infections to be 2.9%. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) defined by McGeer criteria comprised 35% of all clinically defined UTIs. To estimate the infection burden in these facilities where microbiologic testing is not routine, modified surveillance criteria for UTIs are necessary. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:610-612. PMID:26842775

  3. Accessibility to health care facilities in Montreal Island: an application of relative accessibility indicators from the perspective of senior and non-senior residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morency Catherine

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographical access to health care facilities is known to influence health services usage. As societies age, accessibility to health care becomes an increasingly acute public health concern. It is known that seniors tend to have lower mobility levels, and it is possible that this may negatively affect their ability to reach facilities and services. Therefore, it becomes important to examine the mobility situation of seniors vis-a-vis the spatial distribution of health care facilities, to identify areas where accessibility is low and interventions may be required. Methods Accessibility is implemented using a cumulative opportunities measure. Instead of assuming a fixed bandwidth (i.e. a distance threshold for measuring accessibility, in this paper the bandwidth is defined using model-based estimates of average trip length. Average trip length is an all-purpose indicator of individual mobility and geographical reach. Adoption of a spatial modelling approach allows us to tailor these estimates of travel behaviour to specific locations and person profiles. Replacing a fixed bandwidth with these estimates permits us to calculate customized location- and person-based accessibility measures that allow inter-personal as well as geographical comparisons. Data The case study is Montreal Island. Geo-coded travel behaviour data, specifically average trip length, and relevant traveller's attributes are obtained from the Montreal Household Travel Survey. These data are complemented with information from the Census. Health care facilities, also geo-coded, are extracted from a comprehensive business point database. Health care facilities are selected based on Standard Industrial Classification codes 8011-21 (Medical Doctors and Dentists. Results Model-based estimates of average trip length show that travel behaviour varies widely across space. With the exception of seniors in the downtown area, older residents of Montreal Island tend to be

  4. Pattern of skin diseases in patients visiting a tertiary care health facility at hyderabad, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The morbidity associated with skin diseases makes them an important public health problem. Very scanty literature is found on the problem which is either disease-based, community based or a specified population group-based. objective of this study was to assess the pattern of skin diseases in patients and to determine their relation with demographic characteristics. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at dermatology out-patient department of liaquat university hospital, jamshoro, pakistan for the period from 10th january to 10th february 2008. Four hundred and eleven patients were enrolled during the study period. The study population comprised of newly diagnosed cases as well as relapsing cases presenting at the facility. The criterion for registering the patients was clinical diagnosis although few cases were supported by investigations, too. The data was collected through a pre-designed questionnaire and analysed through spss-12. Result: Skin problems are fairly common among children and women. in children of less than 10 years age, 82.5% visiting the facility suffer from infectious skin diseases. among the infectious diseases, scabies is highly prevalent disease (45.5%). the majority of the patients belong to rural or slum areas (77.2%), low socio-economic strata (68.9%), and living in overcrowded families (82%). a strong association between skin infections and water inadequacy (p=0.016) was found, and scabies shows a strong statistical association with overcrowding (p=0.025). Conclusion: The skin diseases involve every age strata of our population but it is fairly common in younger age group, women, and people who do not practice hygiene. Out-reach services for the rural and slum communities and health education will give good results on prevention of skin diseases. (author)

  5. Inducing Herd Immunity against Seasonal Influenza in Long-Term Care Facilities through Employee Vaccination Coverage: A Transmission Dynamics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Wendelboe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vaccinating healthcare workers (HCWs in long-term care facilities (LTCFs may effectively induce herd immunity and protect residents against influenza-related morbidity and mortality. We used influenza surveillance data from all LTCFs in New Mexico to validate a transmission dynamics model developed to investigate herd immunity induction. Material and Methods. We adjusted a previously published transmission dynamics model and used surveillance data from an active system among 76 LTCFs in New Mexico during 2006-2007 for model validation. We used a deterministic compartmental model with a stochastic component for transmission between residents and HCWs in each facility in order to simulate the random variation expected in such populations. Results. When outbreaks were defined as a dichotomous variable, our model predicted that herd immunity could be induced. When defined as an attack rate, the model demonstrated a curvilinear trend, but insufficiently strong to induce herd immunity. The model was sensitive to changes in the contact parameter β but was robust to changes in the visitor contact probability. Conclusions. These results further elucidate previous studies’ findings that herd immunity may not be induced by vaccinating HCWs in LTCFs; however, increased influenza vaccination coverage among HCWs reduces the probability of influenza infection among residents.

  6. Self Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Connections Experiences Research Learning Evaluation Print Email Self Care If you are living with a chronic ... help you cope can make a real difference. Self-care techniques are things you can do for ...

  7. Guidance for Practitioners on the Use of Antiviral Drugs to Control Influenza Outbreaks in Long-Term Care Facilities in Canada, 2014-2015 Season

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; H Grant Stiver; Michel Laverdière; Danuta Skowronski; Evans, Gerald A

    2015-01-01

    The AMMI Canada Guidelines document ‘The use of antiviral drugs for influenza: A foundation document for practitioners’, published in the Autumn 2013 issue of the Journal, outlines the recommendations for the use of antiviral drugs to treat influenza. This article, which represents the first of two updates to these guidelines published in the current issue of the Journal, aims to inform health care professionals of the increased risk for influenza in long-term care facilities due to a documen...

  8. Presence of selected priority and personal care substances in an onsite bathroom greywater treatment facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Donner, E.; Ledin, Anna

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, concerns about climate change and the inefficient use and ongoing pollution of water resources have increased the political motivation to encourage water recycling. This has led to the widespread introduction of water saving measures and to advances in the decentralised treatment...... and reuse of wastewater. In particular, the treatment and reuse of greywater has received attention, although important information such as greywater substance loadings is still only rarely available. With the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive the focus on controlling and phasing......-out Priority/Priority Hazardous Substances (PS/PHS) is growing, and it is vital to know their sources and flows in order to generate sustainable emission control strategies. The main objective of this study was to quantify the concentrations and loads of PS/PHS and personal care substances in bathroom...

  9. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Redwood Extended Care Facility Ltd, Cavan

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coyne, Imelda

    2013-01-01

    Children\\'s rights to have their views heard in matters that affect their lives are now well established since the publication of the UN Convention treaty (1989). Children with cancer generally prefer to be involved in decision-making and consider it important that they have the opportunity to take part in decision-making concerning their health care, even in end-of-life decisions. There is considerable support for involving children in healthcare decision-making at a level commensurate with their experience, age and abilities. Thus healthcare professionals and parents need to know how they should involve children in decision-making and what interventions are most effective in promoting shared decision-making (SDM) for children with cancer.

  10. Recommendations on Physical Activity and Exercise for Older Adults Living in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Taskforce Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Morley, John E; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; H Pitkala, Kaisu; Weening-Djiksterhuis, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Barbagallo, Mario; Rosendahl, Erik; Sinclair, Alan; Landi, Francesco; Izquierdo, Mikel; Vellas, Bruno; Rolland, Yves

    2016-05-01

    A taskforce, under the auspices of The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-Global Aging Research Network (IAGG-GARN) and the IAGG European Region Clinical Section, composed of experts from the fields of exercise science and geriatrics, met in Toulouse, in December 2015, with the aim of establishing recommendations of physical activity and exercise for older adults living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Due to the high heterogeneity in terms of functional ability and cognitive function that characterizes older adults living in LTCFs, taskforce members established 2 sets of recommendations: recommendations for reducing sedentary behaviors for all LTCF residents and recommendations for defining specific, evidence-based guidelines for exercise training for subgroups of LTCF residents. To promote a successful implementation of recommendations, taskforce experts highlighted the importance of promoting residents' motivation and pleasure, the key factors that can be increased when taking into account residents' desires, preferences, beliefs, and attitudes toward physical activity and exercise. The importance of organizational factors related to LTCFs and health care systems were recognized by the experts. In conclusion, this taskforce report proposes standards for the elaboration of strategies to increase physical activity as well as to prescribe exercise programs for older adults living in LTCFs. This report should be used as a guide for professionals working in LTCF settings. PMID:27012368

  11. Hysterectomy at a Canadian tertiary care facility: results of a one year retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorwill R Hugh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the indications for and approach to hysterectomy at Kingston General Hospital (KGH, a teaching hospital affiliated with Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario. In particular, in light of current literature and government standards suggesting the superiority of vaginal versus abdominal approaches and a high number of concurrent oophorectomies, the aim was to examine the circumstances in which concurrent oophorectomies were performed and to compare abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy outcomes. Methods A retrospective chart audit of 372 consecutive hysterectomies performed in 2001 was completed. Data regarding patient characteristics, process of care and outcomes were collected. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests and linear and logistic regression. Results Average age was 48.5 years, mean body mass index (BMI was 28.6, the mean length of stay (LOS was 5.2 days using an abdominal approach and 3.0 days using a vaginal approach without laparoscopy. 14% of hysterectomies were performed vaginally, 5.9% were laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomies and the rest were abdominal hysterectomies. The most common indication was dysfunctional or abnormal uterine bleeding (37%. The average age of those that had an oophorectomy (removal of both ovaries was 50.8 years versus 44.3 years for those that did not (p Conclusions A significant reduction in LOS was found using the vaginal approach. Both the patient and the health care system may benefit from the tendency towards an increased use of vaginal hysterectomies. The audit process demonstrated the usefulness of an on-going review mechanism to examine trends associated with common surgical procedures.

  12. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: experience from a single tertiary care facility of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the demographic features, outcome and prognostic factors seen in children with acute lymphoplastic leukaemia at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The retrospective descriptive study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, comprising data related to children below 15 years of age and treated between January 1997 and December 2006. Kaplan Meir survival curves were used to describe overall and event-free survival rates. Cox Proportional Hazards model was used to describe factors associated with death and relapse. SPSS 16 was the main statistical tool. Results: Of the total 121 children diagnosed with the condition, 79 (65.3%) were males; 86 (71.1%) patients were between 1-9 years of age; Immunophenotyping was done in 99 (81.81%) patients: 86 (87%) cases had precursor B and 13 (13.13%) had precursor T. Of the total, 106(87.6%) patients opted for treatment, while 15 (11.6%) were lost to follow-up. Besides, 26(21.7%) patients had at least one relapse; the most common site being bone marrow in 13 (50%) followed by central nervous system in 9 (36.6%). There were 20(16.5%) deaths in the sample. Infection was the most frequent cause of death. The event-free survival and overall survival was 63% (n=76) and 65% (n=79) respectively. Conclusion: Through the clinical characteristics of children with acute lymphoblastic leukamia were similar to those reported in literature, the outcomes were inferior. The high rate of infections and relapse warrant better supportive care and risk-based approach. (author)

  13. Treatment gap and help-seeking for postpartum depression in a rural African setting

    OpenAIRE

    Azale, Telake; Fekadu, Abebaw; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Background Postpartum depression (PPD) affects more than one in ten women and is associated with adverse consequences for mother, child and family. Integrating mental health care into maternal health care platforms is proposed as a means of improving access to effective care and reducing the ‘treatment gap’ in low- and middle-income countries. This study aimed to determine the proportion of women with PPD who sought help form a health facility and the associated factors. Methods A community b...

  14. Crushing oral solid drugs: Assessment of nursing practices in health-care facilities in Auvergne, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauson, Hélène; Rull, Françoise; Thibault, Magali; Ordekyan, Audrey; Tavernier, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    Iatrogenic harm from crushing oral drugs, a common but hazardous practice, can be largely avoided by following recommendations for good practice. The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of tablet crushing and opening capsules in hospitals and to compare the nursing practices with national recommendations. From 46 health facilities in Auvergne, 1110 nurses answered an anonymous self-completed questionnaire between September and November 2014 regarding general medication issues, prescription, preparation and administration of crushed medications. Crushing tablets or opening capsules was reported as a daily practice for 28% (increasing to 67% in geriatric units). While most best practice recommendations were followed by most nurses, scope for improvement remained: pharmacists were rarely contacted, rationales for change of medication formulation were seldom recorded in patients' files and medications were often crushed and administered together, risking drug interactions. Study data were used to inform recommendations for practice improvement. As findings bear similarities to those from other countries, this may be a widespread issue and study recommendations may be widely relevant. Practice will be reviewed again once practice improvement has been completed. PMID:27287304

  15. The influence of social environment on the smoking status of women employed in health care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Nikšić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bosnia and Herzegovina has a high prevalence of smoking among women, especially among health care professionals. The goal of this study is to investigate the influence of the social environment of women employed in health institutions in relation to the cigarettes smoking habits.Methods: The study included 477 women employed in hospitals, outpatient and public health institutions in Sarajevo Canton Bosnia and Herzegovina. We used a modifi ed questionnaire assessing smoking habits of medical staff in European hospitalsResults: The results showed that 50% of women are smokers, with the highest incidence among nurses (58.1% and administrative staff (55.6%. The social environment is characterized by a high incidence of colleagues (60.1% and friends who are smokers (54.0% at the workplace and in the family (p<0.005. One third of women (27.8%, mainly non-smokers, states that the work environment supports employees smoking (p=0.003.Conclusion: Workplace and social environment support smoking as an acceptable cultural habit and is contributing to increasing rates of smoking among women.

  16. Medicinal herb use among asthmatic patients attending a specialty care facility in Trinidad

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    Mohammed Rochelle

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing prevalence of asthma in the Caribbean and patients remain non-compliant to therapy despite the development of guidelines for management and prevention. Some patients may self-medicate with medicinal herbs for symptomatic relief, as there is a long tradition of use for a variety of ailments. The study assessed the prevalence of use and the factors affecting the decision to use herbs in asthmatic patients attending a public specialty care clinic in Trinidad. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted at the Chest Clinic in Trinidad using a de novo, pilot-tested, researcher-administered questionnaire between June and July 2003. Results Fifty-eight out of 191 patients (30.4% reported using herbal remedies for symptomatic relief. Gender, age, ethnicity, and asthma severity did not influence the decision to use herbs; however, 62.5% of patients with tertiary level schooling used herbs, p = 0.025. Thirty-four of these 58 patients (58.6% obtained herbs from their backyards or the supermarket; only 14 patients (24.1% obtained herbs from an herbalist, herbal shop or pharmacy. Relatives and friends were the sole source of information for most patients (70.7%, and only 10.3% consulted an herbalist. Ginger, garlic, aloes, shandileer, wild onion, pepper and black sage were the most commonly used herbs. Conclusions Among patients attending the Chest Clinic in Trinidad the use of herbal remedies in asthma is relatively common on the advice of relatives and friends. It is therefore becoming imperative for healthcare providers to become more knowledgeable on this modality and to keep abreast with the latest developments.

  17. How to change organisational culture: Action research in a South African public sector primary care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organisational culture is a key factor in both patient and staff experience of the healthcare services. Patient satisfaction, staff engagement and performance are related to this experience. The department of health in the Western Cape espouses a values-based culture characterised by caring, competence, accountability, integrity, responsiveness and respect. However, transformation of the existing culture is required to achieve this vision. Aim: To explore how to transform the organisational culture in line with the desired values. Setting: Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa. Methods: Participatory action research with the leadership engaged with action and reflection over a period of 18 months. Change in the organisational culture was measured at baseline and after 18 months by means of a cultural values assessment (CVA survey. The three key leaders at the health centre also completed a 360-degree leadership values assessment (LVA and had 6 months of coaching. Results: Cultural entropy was reduced from 33 to 13% indicating significant transformation of organisational culture. The key driver of this transformation was change in the leadership style and functioning. Retreat health centre shifted from a culture that emphasised hierarchy, authority, command and control to one that established a greater sense of cohesion, shared vision, open communication, appreciation, respect, fairness and accountability. Conclusion: Transformation of organisational culture was possible through a participatory process that focused on the leadership style, communication and building relationships by means of CVA and feedback, 360-degree LVA, feedback and coaching and action learning in a co-operative inquiry group.

  18. Nutritional assessment of residents in long-term care facilities (LTCFS): recommendations of the task force on nutrition and ageing of the IAGG Europe region and the IANA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salva, A.; Coll-Planas, L.; Bruce, S.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Andrieu, S.; Abellan, G.; Vellas, B.

    2009-01-01

    Unintentional weight loss and Undernutrition are major problems among older people living in Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCF). Undernutrition manifests in LTCF particularly as weight loss and low Body Mass Index (BMI) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as with functiona

  19. Colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species in long-term care facility residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Han, Jennifer; Santana, Evelyn; Tolomeo, Pam; Bilker, Warren B; Maslow, Joel

    2012-03-01

    We describe the prevalence of and risk factors for colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-EB) in the long-term care facility (LTCF) setting. Colonization prevalence differed significantly across the 3 LTCFs evaluated in the study, with recent use of levofloxacin and fecal incontinence demonstrating borderline significant associations with ESBL-EB colonization. PMID:22314070

  20. Colonization with Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella Species in Long-Term Care Facility Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Lautenbach, Ebbing; Han, Jennifer; Santana, Evelyn; Tolomeo, Pam; Bilker, Warren B.; Maslow, Joel

    2012-01-01

    We describe the prevalence of and risk factors for colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-EB) in the long-term care facility (LTCF) setting. Colonization prevalence differed significantly across the 3 LTCFs evaluated in the study, with recent use of levofloxacin and fecal incontinence demonstrating borderline significant associations with ESBL-EB colonization.

  1. The impact of social networks on knowledge transfer in long-term care facilities: Protocol for a study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valente Thomas W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social networks are theorized as significant influences in the innovation adoption and behavior change processes. Our understanding of how social networks operate within healthcare settings is limited. As a result, our ability to design optimal interventions that employ social networks as a method of fostering planned behavior change is also limited. Through this proposed project, we expect to contribute new knowledge about factors influencing uptake of knowledge translation interventions. Objectives Our specific aims include: To collect social network data among staff in two long-term care (LTC facilities; to characterize social networks in these units; and to describe how social networks influence uptake and use of feedback reports. Methods and design In this prospective study, we will collect data on social networks in nursing units in two LTC facilities, and use social network analysis techniques to characterize and describe the networks. These data will be combined with data from a funded project to explore the impact of social networks on uptake and use of feedback reports. In this parent study, feedback reports using standardized resident assessment data are distributed on a monthly basis. Surveys are administered to assess report uptake. In the proposed project, we will collect data on social networks, analyzing the data using graphical and quantitative techniques. We will combine the social network data with survey data to assess the influence of social networks on uptake of feedback reports. Discussion This study will contribute to understanding mechanisms for knowledge sharing among staff on units to permit more efficient and effective intervention design. A growing number of studies in the social network literature suggest that social networks can be studied not only as influences on knowledge translation, but also as possible mechanisms for fostering knowledge translation. This study will contribute to building

  2. Communities, birth attendants and health facilities: a continuum of emergency maternal and newborn care (the global network's EmONC trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liechty Edward A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal and newborn mortality rates remain unacceptably high, especially where the majority of births occur in home settings or in facilities with inadequate resources. The introduction of emergency obstetric and newborn care services has been proposed by several organizations in order to improve pregnancy outcomes. However, the effectiveness of emergency obstetric and neonatal care services has never been proven. Also unproven is the effectiveness of community mobilization and community birth attendant training to improve pregnancy outcomes. Methods/Design We have developed a cluster-randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a comprehensive intervention of community mobilization, birth attendant training and improvement of quality of care in health facilities on perinatal mortality in low and middle-income countries where the majority of births take place in homes or first level care facilities. This trial will take place in 106 clusters (300-500 deliveries per year each across 7 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research in Argentina, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Pakistan and Zambia. The trial intervention has three key elements, community mobilization, home-based life saving skills for communities and birth attendants, and training of providers at obstetric facilities to improve quality of care. The primary outcome of the trial is perinatal mortality. Secondary outcomes include rates of stillbirth, 7-day neonatal mortality, maternal death or severe morbidity (including obstetric fistula, eclampsia and obstetrical sepsis and 28-day neonatal mortality. Discussion In this trial, we are evaluating a combination of interventions including community mobilization and facility training in an attempt to improve pregnancy outcomes. If successful, the results of this trial will provide important information for policy makers and clinicians as they attempt to improve delivery services for pregnant

  3. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011: A nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Besdine, Richard W; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown.We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates.The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76-88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51-1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25-2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to "high risk" for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001).CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  4. Effect of Talbinah food consumption on depressive symptoms among elderly individuals in long term care facilities, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrasawi MM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Manal M Badrasawi, Suzana Shahar, Zahara Abd Manaf, Hasnah HaronDietetics program, School of Health Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: Talbinah is a barley syrup cooked with milk and sweetened by honey. In his famous Hadith on Talbinah, the Prophet Mohammad (SAW recommended it when sad events happen for its effect on soothing hearts and relieving sadness. This 3-week crossover designed, randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of Talbinah on mood and depression among institutionalized elderly people in Seremban. A sample of 30 depressed elderly subjects (21 men and 9 women was selected from the long term care facility. Three different interview-based validated scales (Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, and Profile of Mood States were used to determine mood, depression, stress, and anxiety at week 0, 3, 4, and 7. The nutritional value of Talbinah was examined using proximate food analysis, minerals content analysis, and differential amino acid analysis. The results indicated that Talbinah is a high carbohydrate food (86.4% and has a high tryptophan: branch chain amino acids ratio (1:2. A Wilcoxon nonparametric test showed that there was a statistically significant decrease on depression, stress, and mood disturbances scores among the intervention group (P < 0.05 for all parameters. In conclusion, Talbinah has the potential to reduce depression and enhance mood among the subjects. Ingestion of functional foods such as Talbinah may provide a mental health benefit to elderly people.Keywords: Talbinah, food and depression, cross over study, elderly

  5. Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

  6. Helpful Contacts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data used to populate the Helpful Contacts database is available for public usage. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  7. Insights into the impact and use of research results in a residential long-term care facility: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cranley Lisa A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engaging end-users of research in the process of disseminating findings may increase the relevance of findings and their impact for users. We report findings from a case study that explored how involvement with the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC study influenced management and staff at one of 36 TREC facilities. We conducted the study at ‘Restwood’ (pseudonym nursing home because the Director of Care engaged actively in the study and TREC data showed that this site differed on some areas from other nursing homes in the province. The aims of the case study were two-fold: to gain a better understanding of how frontline staff engage with the research process, and to gain a better understanding of how to share more detailed research results with management. Methods We developed an Expanded Feedback Report for use during this study. In it, we presented survey results that compared Restwood to the best performing site on all variables and participating sites in the province. Data were collected regarding the Expanded Feedback Report through interviews with management. Data from staff were collected through interviews and observation. We used content analysis to derive themes to describe key aspects related to the study aims. Results We observed the importance of understanding organizational routines and the impact of key events in the facility’s environment. We gleaned additional information that validated findings from prior feedback mechanisms within TREC. Another predominant theme was the sense that the opportunity to engage in a research process was reaffirming for staff (particularly healthcare aides—what they did and said mattered, and TREC provided a means of having one’s voice heard. We gained valuable insight from the Director of Care about how to structure and format more detailed findings to assist with interpretation and use of results. Conclusions Four themes emerged regarding staff engagement with

  8. Evaluation of food handler practices and microbiological status of ready-to-eat foods in long-term care facilities in the Andalusia region of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M; Valero, A; Posada-Izquierdo, G D; Carrasco, E; Zurera, G

    2011-09-01

    Food safety measures in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are being improved by the introduction of quality control management systems during food production and by the implementation of good manufacturing practices. This study was conducted in LTCFs (geriatric homes) in Andalusia, Spain, during 2008 and 2009 to evaluate sanitary conditions and the microbiological quality and safety of salads and cooked meat products served. A regulation-based checklist was applied to the evaluated centers. Samples of ready-to-eat foods (n = 60) were examined for mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB), total coliforms, coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS), Escherichia coli, Listeria spp., and Salmonella. In parallel, food contact surfaces (working tables, cutting boards, sinks, and faucets) were swabbed and analyzed for MAB and Enterobacteriaceae. The air quality in processing rooms, near sinks, and in canteens also was measured through an active air sampling method for MAB and Staphyloccocus spp. The results obtained revealed some deficiencies regarding handling practices and sanitary conditions tested (i.e., use and change of gloves, hand washing, and cleanliness of work surfaces). The microbial safety of foods examined indicated the absence of pathogens. Average levels of coagulase-positive staphylococci were below 10² CFU/g, and prevalence of E. coli was 6.3% in samples collected. Surface counts were higher on cutting boards and faucets, indicating insufficient cleanliness procedures. This study provides a descriptive analysis of the sanitary conditions of food service systems in LTCF, and this information can help risk managers to better define control measures needed to prevent foodborne infections. PMID:21902920

  9. Acceptability and use of portable drinking water and hand washing stations in health care facilities and their impact on patient hygiene practices, Western kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah D Bennett

    Full Text Available Many health care facilities (HCF in developing countries lack access to reliable hand washing stations and safe drinking water. To address this problem, we installed portable, low-cost hand washing stations (HWS and drinking water stations (DWS, and trained healthcare workers (HCW on hand hygiene, safe drinking water, and patient education techniques at 200 rural HCFs lacking a reliable water supply in western Kenya. We performed a survey at baseline and a follow-up evaluation at 15 months to assess the impact of the intervention at a random sample of 40 HCFs and 391 households nearest to these HCFs. From baseline to follow-up, there was a statistically significant increase in the percentage of dispensaries with access to HWSs with soap (42% vs. 77%, p<0.01 and access to safe drinking water (6% vs. 55%, p<0.01. Female heads of household in the HCF catchment area exhibited statistically significant increases from baseline to follow-up in the ability to state target times for hand washing (10% vs. 35%, p<0.01, perform all four hand washing steps correctly (32% vs. 43%, p = 0.01, and report treatment of stored drinking water using any method (73% vs. 92%, p<0.01; the percentage of households with detectable free residual chlorine in stored drinking water did not change (6%, vs. 8%, p = 0.14. The installation of low-cost, low-maintenance, locally-available, portable hand washing and drinking water stations in rural HCFs without access to 24-hour piped water helped assure that health workers had a place to wash their hands and provide safe drinking water. This HCF intervention may have also contributed to the improvement of hand hygiene and reported safe drinking water behaviors among households nearest to HCFs.

  10. Notes from the Field: Strongyloidiasis at a Long-Term-Care Facility for the Developmentally Disabled - Arizona, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jefferson M; Hill, Clancey; Briggs, Graham; Gray, Elizabeth; Handali, Sukwan; McAuliffe, Isabel; Montgomery, Susan; Komatsu, Kenneth; Adams, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode endemic in the tropics and subtropics. Infection is usually acquired through skin contact with contaminated soil, or less commonly, from person to person through fecal contamination of the immediate environment. Infections are often asymptomatic, but can result in a pruritic rash, respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough or wheeze), and gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., diarrhea and vomiting). Immunosuppressed persons can develop strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome, which can be fatal (1). In June 2015, the Pinal County Public Health Services District in Arizona was notified of a suspected strongyloidiasis infection in a resident of a long-term-care facility for developmentally disabled persons. The patient had anemia and chronic eosinophilia. The patient's serum tested positive for S. stercoralis-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and at CDC by a crude antigen ELISA, a quantitative assay for detection of IgG against S. stercoralis. An investigation was conducted to determine the infection source and identify additional cases. PMID:27310213

  11. Obtrusiveness of information-based assistive technologies as perceived by older adults in residential care facilities: a secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L; Demiris, George; Hensel, Brian K

    2007-09-01

    With the anticipated growth in the older adult population in the next few years, information designers are examining new ways for assistive technologies to support independent living and quality of life for adults as they age. Central to the role of assistive technology to support and enhance quality of life is the development of non-obtrusive technologies. Despite the importance of non-obtrusiveness to the design of assistive technologies, there remains no standard definition of obtrusiveness or measurement instrument. A conceptual framework for obtrusiveness in home telehealth technologies has recently been proposed but has not yet been tested empirically. This project performed a secondary analysis of focus group and interview data to explore the presence of the dimensions of the obtrusiveness framework in older adults' responses to information-based assistive technologies in residential care facilities. We found the existing data contained examples of each dimension (physical, usability, privacy, function, human interaction, self-concept, routine, and sustainability) and 16 of the 22 subcategories proposed by the obtrusiveness framework. These results provide general support for the framework, although further prospective validation research is needed. Potential enhancements to the framework are proposed. PMID:17701829

  12. HEPA Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathey, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Poor indoor air quality in school facilities can detract from the health and productivity of students, teachers and other employees. Asthma--often triggered or aggravated by dust--is the No. 1 cause of chronic absenteeism in schools. Using vacuum cleaners equipped with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to clean education institutions…

  13. Use of RDTs to improve malaria diagnosis and fever case management at primary health care facilities in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabakooza Jane

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early and accurate diagnosis of malaria followed by prompt treatment reduces the risk of severe disease in malaria endemic regions. Presumptive treatment of malaria is widely practised where microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs are not readily available. With the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for treatment of malaria in many low-resource settings, there is need to target treatment to patients with parasitologically confirmed malaria in order to improve quality of care, reduce over consumption of anti-malarials, reduce drug pressure and in turn delay development and spread of drug resistance. This study evaluated the effect of malaria RDTs on health workers' anti-malarial drug (AMD prescriptions among outpatients at low level health care facilities (LLHCF within different malaria epidemiological settings in Uganda. Methods All health workers (HWs in 21 selected intervention (where RDTs were deployed LLHF were invited for training on the use RDTs. All HWs were trained to use RDTs for parasitological diagnosis of all suspected malaria cases irrespective of age. Five LLHCFs with clinical diagnosis (CD only were included for comparison. Subsequently AMD prescriptions were compared using both a 'pre - post' and 'intervention - control' analysis designs. In-depth interviews of the HWs were conducted to explore any factors that influence AMD prescription practices. Results A total of 166,131 out-patient attendances (OPD were evaluated at 21 intervention LLHCFs. Overall use of RDTs resulted in a 38% point reduction in AMD prescriptions. There was a two-fold reduction (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.55-0.70 in AMD prescription with the greatest reduction in the hypo-endemic setting (RR 0.46 95% CI 0.51-0.53 but no significant change in the urban setting (RR1.01, p-value = 0.820. Over 90% of all eligible OPD patients were offered a test. An average of 30% (range 25%-35% of the RDT-negative fever patients received

  14. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D.; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Besdine, Richard W.; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown. We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates. The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76–88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83–1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51–1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25–2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to “high risk” for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001). CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  15. ASSESSMENT OF COMPLIANCE TO TREATMENT AMONG AMBULATORY ASTHMATIC PATIENTS IN A SECONDARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Showande et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the level of compliance using three different methods: pill count, self report and peak expiratory flow rate, in asthmatic patients attending a secondary health care facility. Self report (using a pre-tested structured questionnaire, peak expiratory flow rate and pill count were used to assess patient’s compliance and identify the factors which may be responsible for non compliance. Measurement of peak expiratory flow rate and the pill count were done at two different occasions. The data obtained was analysed using descriptive statistics. The study showed that the patients were prescribed a range of one to four drugs: 54% (3 drugs, 32% (2 drugs, 8% (4 drugs and 2% (1 drug. The levels of compliance were 86.57% for self report and 83.56% for pill count (p > 0.05. Reasons given for non compliance were: apparent wellness (33.31%, forgetfulness (26.67%, cost of drugs (6.67%, dysphagia (6.67%, presence of non-disturbing symptoms (6.67%, side effects (6.67%, ignorance/fear of addiction (6.67%, perceived lack of benefit from treatment (6.67%, and lethargy towards chronic medication (6.67%. However, there was a significant difference in the readings of the peak expiratory flow rate measured at two different occasions (p < 0.05. The study showed no significant difference in the methods used to assess the level of compliance. Non compliance can be overcome by proper education of patients on the importance of complying with the administration of medication and proper usage of metered dose devices.

  16. An evaluation of Snoezelen(®) compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the symptoms of wandering and restlessness among residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Rayner, Jo-Anne; Tang, Judy; Koch, Susan; While, Christine; O'Keefe, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    Snoezelen has become an increasingly popular therapy in residential aged care facilities in Australia and elsewhere, despite no conclusive evidence of its clinical efficacy. This paper reports on an evaluation of the use of Snoezelen compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the dementia related behaviors of wandering and restlessness in two residential aged care facilities in Victoria, Australia. Sixteen residents had their behavior and responses to Snoezelen or 'common best practice' observed and recorded over three time periods. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed there was a significant improvement in behaviors immediately after the intervention and after 60 min. However, no significant differences were found between residents receiving Snoezelen and 'common best practice' interventions for the reduction of the dementia related behaviors. PMID:26294096

  17. Programme level implementation of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) use: outcomes and cost of training health workers at lower level health care facilities in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kyabayinze Daniel J; Asiimwe Caroline; Nakanjako Damalie; Nabakooza Jane; Bajabaite Moses; Strachan Clare; Tibenderana James K; Van Geetruyden Jean

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The training of health workers in the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) is an important component of a wider strategy to improve parasite-based malaria diagnosis at lower level health care facilities (LLHFs) where microscopy is not readily available for all patients with suspected malaria. This study describes the process and cost of training to attain competence of lower level health workers to perform malaria RDTs in a public health system setting in eastern U...

  18. Molecular characterization and drug resistance of Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine from long-term care facility residents in Cracow, Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Pobiega, Monika; Wojkowska-Mach, Jadwiga; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Adamski, Paweł; Heczko, Piort B.; Gryglewska, Barbara; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli and extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) pathogens isolated from asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections (UTIs), and the relationship between the phylogeny, antimicrobial resistance, and virulence among isolates in residents of 3 long-term care facilities (LTCF) in Krakow, Poland. Material/Methods This was point prevalence study and prospective infection control in a group of 2...

  19. Fall prediction and a high-intensity functional exercise programme to improve physical functions and to prevent falls among older people living in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Rosendahl, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Impairments in balance, mobility, and lower-limb strength are common in the growing population of older people and can lead to dramatic consequences for the individual, such as dependency in activities of daily living, admission to nursing home, falls, and fractures. The main purposes of this thesis were, among older people in residential care facilities, to validate a fall-risk assessment tool and to evaluate a high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise pro-gramme regarding its applic...

  20. Telemedicine-supported transition of stable coronary artery disease patients from tertiary to primary health care facilities: protocol for a randomized non-inferiority trial

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Joanna d’Arc Lyra; Furtado, Mariana Vargas; Katz, Natan; Agostinho, Milena Rodrigues; Neto, Brasil Silva; Harzheim, Erno; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Many Brazilian patients with complex diseases who are treated in tertiary referral clinics have been stable for long periods. The main needs of these patients involve monitoring of risk factors and review of drug prescriptions, which could be satisfactorily done in primary care facilities. The goal of this protocol is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of telemedicine services to support the transition of patients with stable chronic coronary artery disease from the tertiary ...

  1. Use of hand hygiene agents as a surrogate marker of compliance in Hungarian long-term care facilities: first nationwide survey

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, Rita; Morvai, Júlia; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Pittet, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene practice is an important measure for preventing infections in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). However, low compliance with hand hygiene has been reported in a number of studies. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the first reference data collected on alcohol-based handrub (ABHR) and antiseptic soap consumption, as surrogate markers for hand hygiene compliance by healthcare workers (HCWs) in Hungarian LTCFs. The objective was to inform stakeholde...

  2. Evaluation of Remel Spectra CRE Agar for Detection of Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria from Rectal Swabs Obtained from Residents of a Long-Term-Care Facility

    OpenAIRE

    LaBombardi, Vincent J.; Urban, Carl M.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Chen, Liang; Osorio, Giuliana; Kopacz, Joanna; Labaze, Georges; Segal-Maurer, Sorana

    2015-01-01

    We compared the Remel Spectra CRE agar plate to CDC standard methodology for the isolation of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) from 300 rectal swab specimens obtained from patients residing in a long-term-care facility (LTCF). Multiplex PCR experiments were performed on isolates to identify specific Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC) and additional β-lactamases. Of the 300 patients, 72 (24%) harbored CRE and were PCR positive for KPC enzymes. The Remel Spectra CRE plates ...

  3. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia and Antipsychotic Drug Use in the Elderly with Dementia in Korean Long-Term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Sang-Hwan; Hwang, Hee-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are known predictors of institutionalization, lower quality of life, and caregiver distress. Guidelines recommend initial management with non-pharmacological means, but antipsychotic drugs are widely used for the treatment of certain BPSD. Objectives The objective of the current study is to analyze the prevalence of BPSD and antipsychotic drug use in long-term care facilities in Korea. Methods Retrospective chart review and c...

  4. Knowledge and Use of Zinc Supplementation in the Management of Childhood Diarrhoea among Health Care Workers in Public Primary Health Facilities in Benin-City, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Zinc supplementation reduces the severity, duration and recurrence of childhood acute diarrhoea. These beneficial effects of zinc in the treatment of diarrhoea led to the inclusion of a 10-14 days treatment regimen by the WHO/UNICEF. This study assessed the level of knowledge and use of zinc supplementation in the management of childhood diarrhoea among health care workers in public primary health facilities in Benin-City, Nigeria. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was carried out among...

  5. Maternal Mortality and Distance to Facility-based Obstetric Care in Rural Southern Tanzania: A Secondary Analysis of Cross-sectional Census Data in 226 000 Households.

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Claudia Hanson, PhD; Jonathan Cox, PhD; Godfrey Mbaruku, PhD; Fatuma Manzi, PhD; Sabine Gabrysch, PhD; Prof. David Schellenberg, PhD; Prof. Marcel Tanner, PhD; Prof. Carine Ronsmans, DrPH; Prof. Joanna Schellenberg, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to skilled obstetric delivery and emergency care is deemed crucial for reducing maternal mortality. We assessed pregnancy-related mortality by distance to health facilities and by cause of death in a disadvantaged rural area of southern Tanzania. Methods: We did a secondary analysis of cross-sectional georeferenced census data collected from June to October, 2007, in five rural districts of southern Tanzania. Heads of georeferenced households were asked about household d...

  6. Physical exercise and mental health among older people : measurement methods and exercise effects focusing on people living in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Conradsson, Mia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study the effects of exercise on mental health among older people living in residential care facilities. The aim was also to study the reliability of an assessment scale for balance function and the usefulness of an assessment scale for depressive symptoms among older people, including people with cognitive impairments.   The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) is frequently used to assess balance in older people, but knowledge is lacking about its absolute reliability. The...

  7. Is a change in functional capacity or dependency in activities of daily living associated with a change in mental health among older people living in residential care facilities?

    OpenAIRE

    Conradsson, Mia; Littbrand, Håkan; Boström, Gustaf; Lindelöf, Nina; Gustafson, Yngve; Rosendahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Functional capacity and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) could be important mediators for an association between physical exercise and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL is associated with a change in depressive symptoms and psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities, and whether dementia can be a moderating factor for this association. Methods: A prospec...

  8. Women at risk: why increasing numbers of women are failing to get the health care they need and how the Affordable Care Act will help. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey of 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ruth; Collins, Sara R

    2011-05-01

    Women have greater health care needs than men, and generally play larger roles in the health care of family members. Rising health care costs combined with sluggish income growth has contributed to losses in health insurance among women and rising rates of problems gaining necessary health care and paying medical bills. Women who seek coverage in the individual insurance market face additional hurdles--few plans offer maternity coverage and, in most states, insurance carriers charge higher premium rates to young women than men of the same age. The Affordable Care Act is bringing change for women through required free coverage of preventive care services, small business tax credits, new affordable coverage options, and insurance market reforms, including bans on gender rating. When the law is fully implemented in 2014, nearly all the 27 million working-age women who went without health insurance in 2010 will gain affordable and comprehensive benefits. PMID:21638798

  9. Are incentives everything? payment mechanisms for health care providers in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Gauri, Varun

    2001-01-01

    This paper assesses the extent to which provider payment mechanisms can help developing countries address their leading health care problems. It first identifies four key problems in the health care systems in developing countries: 1) public facilities, which provide the bulk of secondary and tertiary health care services in most countries, offer services of poor quality; 2) providers cann...

  10. Self help.

    OpenAIRE

    Blackmore, David

    1984-01-01

    The work is based on my collection of second hand 'Self help' books. I specifically search out books in which lines or passages of text have been highlighted or underlined by the original owner. The work explores the desire of individuals to reclaim control of different aspects of their life, be it to loose weight, beat depression or to achieve contentment in modern life. The desire to change a trait is the expression of a wish to have more control over day to day existences. For some this de...

  11. The effect of user fee exemption on the utilization of maternal health care at mission health facilities in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Manthalu, Gerald; Yi, Deok Hee; Farrar, Shelley; Nkhoma, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    The Government of Malawi has signed contracts called service level agreements (SLAs) with mission health facilities in order to exempt their catchment populations from paying user fees. Government in turn reimburses the facilities for the services that they provide. SLAs started in 2006 with 28 out of 165 mission health facilities and increased to 74 in 2015. Most SLAs cover only maternal, neonatal and in some cases child health services due to limited resources. This study evaluated the effe...

  12. Guided self-help concreteness training as an intervention for major depression in primary care: a Phase II randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watkins, E R; Taylor, R S; Baeyens, C;

    2012-01-01

    −1.14 to 5.11), although CNT significantly reduced rumination and overgeneralization relative to RT post-treatment, suggesting a specific benefit on these cognitive processes. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence that CNT guided self-help may be a useful addition to TAU in treating...

  13. Child Day Care Centers, Day Care Facilities, Published in 2006, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Steuben County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is...

  14. A Successful Partnership to Help Reduce Health Disparities at Kaiser Permanente: The Institute for Culturally Competent Care and the Kaiser Permanente School of Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Nilda; Elisha, Sassoon M; Maglalang, Maria; Koh, Karen

    2006-01-01

    An innovative partnership with the Kaiser Permanente (KP) Institute for Culturally Competent Care (ICCC) has enabled the KP School of Anesthesia (KPSA) to become one of the first nurse anesthetist programs in the western United States to incorporate a formal cultural competence curriculum into its educational program. Housed administratively in the California State University system since 1981, KPSA is a fully accredited, 24-month program that educates registered nurses to become certified re...

  15. Satisfaction With Massachusetts Nursing Home Care Was Generally High during 2005-09, With Some Variability Across Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yue; Cai, Xueya; Ye, Zhiqiu; Glance, Laurent G; Harrington, Charlene; Mukamel, Dana B

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005 Massachusetts has publicly reported results from biennial surveys of satisfaction with nursing homes, completed by responsible parties for residents, to promote consumer-centered care. Our analysis of the results from 2005, 2007, and 2009 revealed generally high satisfaction with care, which remained stable over time. On a scale of 1 to 5 (from very dissatisfied to very satisfied), average satisfaction with overall care was 4.22–4.31 and satisfaction that overall residents’ needs w...

  16. Comparing day care at green care farms and at regular day care facilities with regard to their effects on functional performance of community-dwelling older people with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de S.R.; Oosting, S.J.; Tobi, H.; Enders-Slegers, M.J.; Zijpp, van der A.J.; Schols, J.M.G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Day care at green care farms (GCFs) is a new care modality for community-dwelling older people with dementia. In view of the more physical and normal daily life activities available at GCFs than at RDCFs, we investigated whether functional decline differed between subjects from both day care setting

  17. Silent and suffering: a pilot study exploring gaps between theory and practice in pain management for people with severe dementia in residential aged care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peisah C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carmelle Peisah,1–3 Judith Weaver,1 Lisa Wong,1 Julie-Anne Strukovski1 1Behaviour Assessment Management Service, Specialist Mental Health Services for Older People, Mental Health Drug and Alcohol, Northern Sydney Local Health District, 2University of Sydney, 3University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: Pain is common in older people, particularly those in residential aged care facilities (RACF and those with dementia. However, despite 20 years of discourse on pain and dementia, pain is still undetected or misinterpreted in people with dementia in residential aged care facilities, particularly those with communication difficulties. Methods: A topical survey typology with semistructured interviews was used to gather attitudes and experiences of staff from 15 RACF across Northern Sydney Local Health District. Results: While pain is proactively assessed and pain charts are used in RACF, this is more often regulatory-driven than patient-driven (eg, prior to accreditation. Identification of pain and need for pain relief was ill defined and poorly understood. Both pharmacological and nonpharmacological regimes were used, but in an ad hoc, variable and unsystematic manner, with patient, staff, and attitudinal obstacles between the experience of pain and its relief.Conclusion: A laborious “pain communication chain” exists between the experience of pain and its relief for people with severe dementia within RACF. Given the salience of pain for older people with dementia, we recommend early, proactive consideration and management of pain in the approach to behaviors of concern. Individualized pain measures for such residents; empowerment of nursing staff as “needs interpreters”; collaborative partnerships with common care goals between patients where possible; RACF staff, doctors, and family carers; and more meaningful use of pain charts to map response to stepped pain protocols may be useful strategies to explore in clinical settings

  18. The doctor/patient relationship for the 21st century. Clash of 'cultural creatives' and 'traditionals' helps focus the future of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottles, K

    2001-01-01

    The doctor/patient relationship is at a crossroads. Some patients--traditionals--want the doctor calling all the shots, deciding the best treatment path to follow. But cultural creatives--heavily influenced by bioethics--desire more of a give and take when it comes to their health care. They see the physician as an advisor, and they want to decide the best treatment on their own terms. Take a close-up look at factors influencing the doctor/patient relationship in the 21st Century. PMID:12881899

  19. Effects of resistance and all-round, functional training on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities: a 'randomized' controlled trial [ISRCTN87177281

    OpenAIRE

    van Mechelen Willem; Twisk Jos WR; van Poppel Mireille NM; Chin A Paw Marijke JM

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Regular physical activity may improve different aspects of wellbeing in older people, such as quality of life, vitality and depression. However, there is little experimental evidence to support this assumption. Therefore, we examined the effect of different training protocols on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities. Methods Subjects (n = 173, aged 64 to 94 years, living in long-term care facilities), were randomized t...

  20. Implementing Role-Changing Versus Time-Changing Innovations in Health Care: Differences in Helpfulness of Staff Improvement Teams, Management, and Network for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Morrow, Christopher T; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2015-12-01

    Health care organizations often fail in their effort to implement care-improving innovations. This article differentiates role-changing innovations, altering what workers do, from time-changing innovations, altering when tasks are performed or for how long. We examine our hypothesis that the degree to which access to groups that can alter organizational learning--staff, management, and external network--facilitates implementation depends on innovation type. Our longitudinal study using ordinal logistic regression and survey data on 517 hospitals' implementation of evidence-based practices for treating heart attack confirmed our thesis for factors granting access to each group: improvement team's representativeness (of affected staff), senior management engagement, and network membership. Although team representativeness and network membership were positively associated with implementing role-changing practices, senior management engagement was not. In contrast, senior management engagement was positively associated with implementing time-changing practices, whereas team representativeness was not, and network membership was not unless there was limited management engagement. These findings advance implementation science by explaining mixed results across past studies: Nature of change for workers alters potential facilitators' effects on implementation. PMID:26116611

  1. Impact of supervised drug consumption services on access to and engagement with care at a palliative and supportive care facility for people living with HIV/AIDS: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan McNeil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Improvements in the availability and effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART have prolonged the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, mortality rates have remained high among populations that encounter barriers to accessing and adhering to HAART, notably people who use drugs. This population consequently has a high burden of illness and complex palliative and supportive care needs, but is often unable to access these services due to anti-drug policies and discrimination. In Vancouver, Canada, the Dr. Peter Centre (DPC, which operates a 24-bed residential HIV/AIDS care facility, has sought to improve access to palliative and supportive care services by adopting a comprehensive harm reduction strategy, including supervised injection services. We undertook this study to explore how the integration of comprehensive harm reduction services into this setting shapes access to and engagement with care. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 DPC residents between November 2010 and August 2011. Interviews made use of a semistructured interview guide which facilitated discussion regarding how the DPC Residence's model of care (a shaped healthcare access, (b influenced healthcare interactions and (c impacted drug use practices and overall health. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Results: Participant accounts highlight how the harm reduction policy altered the structural-environmental context of healthcare services and thus mediated access to palliative and supportive care services. Furthermore, this approach fostered an atmosphere in which drug use could be discussed without the risk of punitive action, and thus increased openness between residents and staff. Finally, participants reported that the environmental supports provided by the DPC Residence decreased drug-related risks and improved health outcomes, including HAART adherence and survival. Conclusions: This study highlights

  2. State trends in premiums and deductibles, 2003-2009: how building on the Affordable Care Act will help stem the tide of rising costs and eroding benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Cathy; Stremikis, Kristof; How, Sabrina K H; Collins, Sara R

    2010-12-01

    Rapidly rising health insurance costs have strained U.S. families and employers in recent years. This issue brief examines data for all states on changes in private employer premiums and deductibles for 2003 and 2009. The analysis finds that premiums for businesses and their employees increased 41 percent across states from 2003 to 2009, while per-person deductibles jumped 77 percent in large as well as small firms. If these trends continue at the rate prior to enactment of the Affordable Care Act, the average premium for family coverage will rise 79 percent by 2020, to more than $23,000. The authors describe how health reform offers the potential to reduce insurance cost growth while improving value and protection. If reforms succeed in slowing premium growth by 1 percentage point annually in all states, by 2020 employers and families together will save $2,323 annually for family coverage, compared with projected trends. PMID:21125770

  3. Effect of antiviral prophylaxis on influenza outbreaks om aged care facilities in three local health districts in New South Wales, Australia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Merritt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There was a record number (n = 111 of influenza outbreaks in aged care facilities in New South Wales, Australia during 2014. To determine the impact of antiviral prophylaxis recommendations in practice, influenza outbreak data were compared for facilities in which antiviral prophylaxis and treatment were recommended and for those in which antivirals were recommended for treatment only. Methods: Routinely collected outbreak data were extracted from the Notifiable Conditions Information Management System for two Local Health Districts where antiviral prophylaxis was routinely recommended and one Local Health District where antivirals were recommended for treatment but not routinely for prophylaxis. Data collected on residents included counts of influenza-like illness, confirmed influenza, hospitalizations and related deaths. Dates of onset, notification, influenza confirmation and antiviral recommendations were also collected for analysis. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to assess the significance of differences between group medians for key parameters. Results: A total of 41 outbreaks (12 in the prophylaxis group and 29 in the treatment-only group were included in the analysis. There was no significant difference in overall outbreak duration; outbreak duration after notification; or attack, hospitalization or case fatality rates between the two groups. The prophylaxis group had significantly higher cases with influenza-like illness (P = 0.03 and cases recommended antiviral treatment per facility (P = 0.01. Discussion: This study found no significant difference in key outbreak parameters between the two groups. However, further high quality evidence is needed to guide the use of antivirals in responding to influenza outbreaks in aged care facilities.

  4. Strengthening Health Systems at Facility-Level: Feasibility of Integrating Antiretroviral Therapy into Primary Health Care Services in Lusaka, Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Topp, Stephanie M; Chipukuma, Julien M; Giganti, Mark; Mwango, Linah K.; Chiko, Like M.; Tambatamba-Chapula, Bushimbwa; Wamulume, Chibesa S; Reid, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Introduction HIV care and treatment services are primarily delivered in vertical antiretroviral (ART) clinics in sub-Saharan Africa but there have been concerns over the impact on existing primary health care services. This paper presents results from a feasibility study of a fully integrated model of HIV and non-HIV outpatient services in two urban Lusaka clinics. Methods Integration involved three key modifications: i) amalgamation of space and patient flow; ii) standardization of medical r...

  5. Nuclear materials accounting, helping the facility operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modern materials control and accounting (MCandA) system can provide major benefits to production personnel. It can enhance understanding of process systems performance, localize and reconcile material losses, and identify instruments that are out-of-calibration or malfunctioning. Examples of the above MCandA system application are given. The authors show how Operations personnel can use an MCandA system to their advantage rather than letting the MCandA systems take advantage of them

  6. The development of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC: a measure of best practice for facilities for people with longer term mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Ellen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the progress over recent decades in developing community mental health services internationally, many people still receive treatment and care in institutional settings. Those most likely to reside longest in these facilities have the most complex mental health problems and are at most risk of potential abuses of care and exploitation. This study aimed to develop an international, standardised toolkit to assess the quality of care in longer term hospital and community based mental health units, including the degree to which human rights, social inclusion and autonomy are promoted. Method The domains of care included in the toolkit were identified from a systematic literature review, international expert Delphi exercise, and review of care standards in ten European countries. The draft toolkit comprised 154 questions for unit managers. Inter-rater reliability was tested in 202 units across ten countries at different stages of deinstitutionalisation and development of community mental health services. Exploratory factor analysis was used to corroborate the allocation of items to domains. Feedback from those using the toolkit was collected about its usefulness and ease of completion. Results The toolkit had excellent inter-rater reliability and few items with narrow spread of response. Unit managers found the content highly relevant and were able to complete it in around 90 minutes. Minimal refinement was required and the final version comprised 145 questions assessing seven domains of care. Conclusions Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative evidence directed the development of a robust and comprehensive international quality assessment toolkit for units in highly variable socioeconomic and political contexts.

  7. Client perspective assessment of women’s satisfaction towards labour and delivery care service in public health facilities at Arba Minch town and the surrounding district, Gamo Gofa zone, south Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Dewana, Zeritu; Fikadu, Teshale; G/ Mariam, Abebe; Abdulahi, Misra

    2016-01-01

    Background A woman’s satisfaction with labour and delivery care service has a good effect on her health and subsequent utilization of the services. Thus knowledge about women’s satisfaction on labour and delivery care used to enhances the services utilization. The objective of this study was to assess the satisfaction of women’s towards labour and delivery care service and identify factors associated it at public health facilities in Arba Minch town and the surrounding district, Gamo Gofa zon...

  8. [Medicine on mission: The international health reform of Seventh-Day Adventists and their health care facilities in Sweden].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, Motzi

    2008-01-01

    The international non-conformist denomination, Seventh-day Adventists, have since their foundation in 1863, had a distinctive health care model for their members. The life-style has included vegetarian diet, abstinence from alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and the observance of a day of rest once a week. The health policy has striven to care for God's creation in the hope of resurrection at the Day of Judgment and to reform the conventional medical practice. The Adventists have pursued an extensive international health care system--from the start based on dietary and physical treatment methods, such as hydrotherapy, massage and physiotherapy--in line with the Christian mission. Health care establishments have been inaugurated around the world as a vehicle for enabling the Christian health care message to reach the upper classes. With Adventist and Doctor, John Harvey Kellogg's Battle Creek Sanatorium in Michigan as both inspirational source and educational institution, the health care mission--including a vegetarian health food industry, following in the footsteps of cornflakes--spread to the Nordic countries by the turn of the century, 1900. Skodsborgs Badesanatorium near Copenhagen became the model institution for several health care establishments in Sweden during the 1900's, such as Hultafors Sanatorium. The American-Nordic link has manifested itself through co-publication of papers, exchange of health care personnel and reporting to the central Adventist church. The American non-conformist domain as well as a private sphere of activity, aiming mainly from the outset at society's upper classes, has encountered certain difficulties in maintaining this distinction in Sweden's officially increasing secularised society, and in relation to a state health insurance and a publicly financed health care system. With the passing of time, the socioeconomic composition of patients at Hultafors became more heterogeneous, and conventional medical procedures were increasingly

  9. Health Facility General Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset contains the locations of Article 28, Article 36 and Article 40 health care facilities and programs from the Health Facilities Information System...

  10. Environmental surveillance and molecular epidemiology of waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila in health-care facilities of Northeastern Greece: a 4-year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandropoulou, Ioanna G; Ntougias, Spyridon; Konstantinidis, Theocharis G; Parasidis, Theodoros A; Panopoulou, Maria; Constantinidis, Theodoros C

    2015-05-01

    A 4-year proactive environmental surveillance of Legionella spp. in the water distribution and cooling systems of five health-care facilities was carried out as part of the strategy for the prevention of hospital-acquired Legionnaires' disease in Northeastern Greece. Legionella spp. were detected in 71 out of 458 collected samples. The majority of strains belonged to Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2-15 (75.0%), while all L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains (23.6%) were isolated from a single hospital. The highest percentage of positive samples was found in distal sites (19.4%), while no Legionella strains were detected in cooling systems. Each hospital was colonized at least once with L. pneumophila, while remedial actions resulted in significant reduction of Legionella concentration. The molecular epidemiology of environmental L. pneumophila strains was also investigated using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multi-gene sequence-based analysis. Based on RAPD patterns, L. pneumophila serogroups 2-15 and serogroup 1 strains were classified into 24 and 9 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. Sequencing of housekeeping and diversifying pressure-related genes recommended by European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) revealed not only a high intraspecies variability but also the circulation and persistence of one specific genotyping profile in the majority of hospitals. This study highlights the necessity for diachronic surveillance of Legionella in health-care facilities by adopting both cultural and molecular methods. PMID:25712880

  11. Is a change in functional capacity or dependency in activities of daily living associated with a change in mental health among older people living in residential care facilities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conradsson M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Conradsson,1 Håkan Littbrand,1,2 Gustaf Boström,1 Nina Lindelöf,1 Yngve Gustafson,1 Erik Rosendahl1,2 1Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Aim: Functional capacity and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL could be important mediators for an association between physical exercise and mental health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL is associated with a change in depressive symptoms and psychological well-being among older people living in residential care facilities, and whether dementia can be a moderating factor for this association. Methods: A prospective cohort study was undertaken. Participants were 206 older people, dependent in ADL, living in residential care facilities, 115 (56% of whom had diagnosed dementia. Multivariate linear regression, with comprehensive adjustment for potential confounders, was used to investigate associations between differences over 3 months in Berg Balance Scale (BBS and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15 scores, and in BBS and Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS scores. Associations were also investigated between differences in Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 scores, and in Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS scores. Results: There were no significant associations between changes in scores over 3 months; the unstandardized β for associations between BBS and GDS-15 was 0.026 (P=0.31, BBS and PGCMS 0.045 (P=0.14, Barthel ADL Index and GDS-15 0.123 (P=0.06, and Barthel ADL Index and PGCMS -0.013 (P=0.86. There were no interaction effects for dementia. Conclusion: A change in functional capacity or dependency in ADL does not appear to be associated with a change in depressive symptoms or psychological well-being among older people living in residential care

  12. Access to Health Service related to Use of Antenatal Care Facilities at the Kawangu Health Centre, East Sumba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Adriana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The study aims to determine factors influencing the utilization of accredited government-run ANC facilities at the Kawangu Health Centre. Methods: Research was a cross-sectional study, with a total sample of 85 respondents taken by consecutive sampling from the Kawangu Health Centre. The dependent variable was the use government-run ANC facility at the Kawangu Health Centre. The independent variables were knowledge, awareness, attitudes, access to health services, frequency of receiving information and family support. The data were collected by interview using questionnaires. The data analysis includes univariate, bivariate (chi-square and multivariate analysis with logistic regression. Results: The results of the study indicates that there was a significant relationship between the use of accredited government-run ANC facilities with maternal knowledge/awareness (p=0.001, attitude (p<0.001, ability to access to health services (p<0.001, frequency of information (p=0.039, and family support (p<0.001. Multivariate analysis indicated that the only significant independent variable related to the use of adequate delivery was the ability to access health services with OR =11.68 (95%CI: 1.37 to 99.89. Conclusion: An inability to access either due to distance to travel, lack of vehicle and/or infrastructure concerns such as poor quality/lack of roads was the dominant variable in the utilization of accredited government-run ANC facility. Keywords: accredited government-run ANC facilities, influencing factors, East Sumba

  13. Factors associated with self and informant ratings of the quality of life of people with dementia living in care facilities: a cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Beer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding the optimal approach to assessment of the quality of life of people with dementia. We undertook the present study to describe and determine the factors associated with ratings of the quality of life of a cohort of people with dementia living in a residential care facility. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 351 people with dementia living in residential care facilities, and their staff and family informants participated in this cross sectional observational study. Quality of life was measured using self (Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease [QoL-AD] scale, and informant (QoL-AD and Alzheimer's Disease Related QoL Scale reports. 226 people (64% with dementia (median MMSE 17; 12-21 were able to self rate the QoL-AD scale and these subjects' ratings were compared to ratings by staff and family. Both staff and family informant ratings of the QoL-AD underestimated self ratings (mean difference -7.8, 95% CI -8.8, -6.7 for staff rated QoL-AD; and mean difference -7.2, 95% CI -8.5, -6.0 for family rated QoL-AD. Self ratings of QoL were lower among people who were restrained, had fallen or had pain. Informant ratings of the QoL of the participants with dementia were consistently and significantly lower for people with severe cognitive impairment, who had fallen, had presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms, or where care giver distress was present. Documented restraint, reported pain and neuropsychiatric symptoms were independently associated with lower self rating of the QoL-AD in multivariate models. Cognitive impairment, case conferencing, hospitalizations and neuropsychiatric symptoms were found to be independently associated with staff rated ADRQL. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of people with dementia living in residential care facilities can rate their own QoL. Informant ratings underestimate self ratings of QoL of people with dementia, and appear to be associated with factors which are not associated with self

  14. Knowledge about childhood autism and opinion among healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igwe Monday N

    2009-02-01

    associated with age group distribution of the healthcare workers, with those age group of fourth decades and above more likely to have higher mean score (p = 0.004 and previous experience of managing children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD (p = 0.000. KCA showed near significant association with area of specialty, with those healthcare workers in psychiatry compared to pediatrics having higher mean score (p = 0.071 and also with years of working experience of the healthcare workers (p = 0.056. More than half of the healthcare workers subscribed to the opinion that facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders are lacking in Nigeria. Conclusion The correlates of KCA may help in selection of those tertiary healthcare workers that would best fit the role of trainers. It is important to update the knowledge gaps of those healthcare workers who scored low in different domains of KCAHW questionnaire. It is imperative for policy makers in Nigeria to advocate and implement multidisciplinary healthcare service system that would ensure early diagnosis and interventions. Nationally representative baseline epidemiological data that would guide policy and planning are also desirable.

  15. 77 FR 43086 - Solicitation of Written Comments on Draft Phase 3 Long-Term Care Facilities Strategy/Module for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... healthcare today. They are defined as localized or systemic adverse events, resulting from the presence of an... are not limited to the following: --General public --Healthcare, professional, and educational... the acute care hospital setting and includes a prioritized research agenda; an integrated...

  16. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features ... facility. Who Needs to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may ...

  17. Facility-based care for delivery and management of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardo Hernández; Eduardo Ortiz-Panozo; Ricardo Pérez-Cuevas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence and management of severe maternal and newborn complications in selected health facilities in Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As part of the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn health, information was collected from medical records of women with deliveries and/or severe maternal complications during pregnancy or puerperium in 14 hospitals in Mexico City and the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. RESULTS: Of 13 311 women, 157 (12 per 1 000 live births) ...

  18. Behavioral and clinical characteristics of people receiving medical care for HIV infection in an outpatient facility in Sicily, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Casuccio, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Paola Di Carlo,1 Giuliana Guadagnino,1 Palmira Immordino,1 Giovanni Mazzola,2 Pietro Colletti,2 Ilenia Alongi,1 Lucia Adamoli,1 Francesco Vitale,1 Alessandra Casuccio1 1Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother-Child Care “G D’Alessandro”, University of Palermo, 2Department of Medicinal Clinics and Emerging Diseases, “Paolo Giaccone” Polyclinic University Hospital, Palermo, Italy Aim: The authors examined a cohort of HIV-positiv...

  19. Behavioral and clinical characteristics of people receiving medical care for HIV infection in an outpatient facility in Sicily, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Di Carlo P; Guadagnino G; Immordino P; Mazzola G; Colletti P; Alongi I; Adamoli L; Vitale F; Casuccio A

    2016-01-01

    Paola Di Carlo,1 Giuliana Guadagnino,1 Palmira Immordino,1 Giovanni Mazzola,2 Pietro Colletti,2 Ilenia Alongi,1 Lucia Adamoli,1 Francesco Vitale,1 Alessandra Casuccio1 1Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother-Child Care “G D’Alessandro”, University of Palermo, 2Department of Medicinal Clinics and Emerging Diseases, “Paolo Giaccone” Polyclinic University Hospital, Palermo, Italy Aim: The authors examined a cohort of HIV-positive outpatients at the...

  20. Scaled-Up Mobile Phone Intervention for HIV Care and Treatment: Protocol for a Facility Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    L'Engle, Kelly L; Green, Kimberly; Succop, Stacey M.; Laar, Amos; Wambugu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to prevention, care, and treatment recommendations among people living with HIV (PLHIV) is a critical challenge. Yet good clinical outcomes depend on consistent, high adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. Mobile phones offer a promising means to improve patient adherence and health outcomes. However, limited information exists on the impact that mobile phones for health (mHealth) programs have on ART adherence or the behavior change processes through which s...

  1. Effect of Talbinah food consumption on depressive symptoms among elderly individuals in long term care facilities, randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Badrasawi MM; Shahar S; Manaf ZA; Haron H

    2013-01-01

    Manal M Badrasawi, Suzana Shahar, Zahara Abd Manaf, Hasnah HaronDietetics program, School of Health Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: Talbinah is a barley syrup cooked with milk and sweetened by honey. In his famous Hadith on Talbinah, the Prophet Mohammad (SAW) recommended it when sad events happen for its effect on soothing hearts and relieving sadness. This 3-week crossover designed, randomized clinical trial was cond...

  2. Emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting: an assessment of health facilities in western Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Thomas F.; Hines, Rosemary; Ahn, Roy; Walters, Michelle; Young, David; Anderson, Rachel Eleanor; Tom, Sabrina M; Clark, Rachel; Obita, Walter; Nelson, Brett D

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Injuries, trauma and non-communicable diseases are responsible for a rising proportion of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. Delivering effective emergency and urgent healthcare for these and other conditions in resource-limited settings is challenging. In this study, we sought to examine and characterise emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting. Methods: We conducted an assessment within all 30 primary and secondary hospitals an...

  3. Emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting: an assessment of health facilities in western Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Thomas F.; Hines, Rosemary; Ahn, Roy; Walters, Michelle; Young, David; Anderson, Rachel Eleanor; Tom, Sabrina M; Clark, Rachel; Obita, Walter; Nelson, Brett D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Injuries, trauma and non-communicable diseases are responsible for a rising proportion of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. Delivering effective emergency and urgent healthcare for these and other conditions in resource-limited settings is challenging. In this study, we sought to examine and characterise emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting. Methods We conducted an assessment within all 30 primary and secondary hospitals and ...

  4. Predictors of attendance to group exercise: a cohort study of older adults in long-term care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Finnegan, Susanne; Bruce, Julie; Lamb, Sarah E; Griffiths, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Background The benefits of regular exercise and physical activity are well known. Those living in long-term care are often frail, but have the potential to benefit from physical activity; yet are less likely to be offered exercise. Promoting exercise within residential and nursing homes may reduce health risks associated with inactivity in this population. The aim of this cohort study is to identify predictors of attendance at physiotherapy led exercise groups offered to older adults residing...

  5. Evaluation of primary care: The "Primary Care Assessment Tools - Facility version" for the Spanish health system Evaluación de la atención primaria de salud: Primary Care Assessment Tools - Facility version para el sistema de salud español

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isabel Pasarín

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain versions of the Primary Care Assessment Tools (PCAT-Facility version to evaluate primary care (PC in the Spanish context, and to analyze its feasibility, reliability and validity. Methods: Cultural adaptation was performed through the use of forward and backward translations into Spanish and Catalan, observations and opinions of a panel of experts, and cognitive interviews with target users (PC team managers. A pilot phase was carried out in a sample of 130 managers of PC teams in Catalonia. A post-test questionnaire was sent 4-5 months later to all 194 managers of PC teams in the Barcelona health region. Analysis of metric properties included: 1 description of items and verification of Likert assumptions, since domain scores are obtained by summing item scores; 2 reliability analysis (Cronbach's alpha coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, test-retest analysis; and 3 validity analysis (expert panel, cognitive interviews, and convergent and discriminant validity. Results: Substantial adaptation was required for the accessory section of the questionnaire, but less was required in PC domain measurements. Items were added to the comprehensiveness domain to reflect services usually available in Spain. The lowest Cronbach's alpha scores were found for Access (0.62 and Coordination (0.59 and 0.65, while values were >0.70 for the remaining domains. Conclusion: The Spanish version of the PCAT-Facility questionnaire is now available and shows adequate reliability and validity. The Spanish PCAT version will facilitate national and international comparisons of PC and analysis of the determinants of quality of service provision.Objetivo: Obtener versiones del Primary Care Assessment Tools-Facility version como herramienta de evaluación de la atención primaria (AP para la aplicación en el contexto español, y analizar su fiabilidad y validez. Métodos: Se realizó una adaptación cultural con traducciones y retrotraducciones

  6. Programme level implementation of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs use: outcomes and cost of training health workers at lower level health care facilities in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyabayinze Daniel J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The training of health workers in the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs is an important component of a wider strategy to improve parasite-based malaria diagnosis at lower level health care facilities (LLHFs where microscopy is not readily available for all patients with suspected malaria. This study describes the process and cost of training to attain competence of lower level health workers to perform malaria RDTs in a public health system setting in eastern Uganda. Methods Health workers from 21 health facilities in Uganda were given a one-day central training on the use of RDTs in malaria case management, including practical skills on how to perform read and interpret the test results. Successful trainees subsequently integrated the use of RDTs into their routine care for febrile patients at their LLHFs and transferred their acquired skills to colleagues (cascade training model. A cross-sectional evaluation of the health workers’ competence in performing RDTs was conducted six weeks following the training, incorporating observation, in-depth interviews with health workers and the review of health facility records relating to tests offered and antimalarial drug (AMD prescriptions pre and post training. The direct costs relating to the training processes were also documented. Results Overall, 135 health workers were trained including 63 (47% nursing assistants, a group of care providers without formal medical training. All trainees passed the post-training concordance test with ≥ 80% except 12 that required re-training. Six weeks after the one-day training, 51/64 (80% of the health workers accurately performed the critical steps in performing the RDT. The performance was similar among the 10 (16% participants who were peer-trained by their trained colleagues. Only 9 (14% did not draw the appropriate amount of blood using pipette. The average cost of the one-day training was US$ 101 (range $92-$112, with the

  7. Addiction Treatment Within U.S. Correctional Facilities: Bridging the Gap Between Current Practice and Evidence-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeman, Sarah E; Rich, Josiah D

    2015-01-01

    The United States leads the world in creating prisoners. This epidemic of incarceration is largely due to the "War on Drugs," which has resulted in criminalization of the disease of addiction. Half of prisoners have an active substance use disorder yet a minority receives formal treatment. Opioid agonist maintenance is among the most effective treatments for opioid use disorder. Maintenance treatment reduces illicit opioid use, crime, recidivism, and cost, yet few correctional facilities provide this lifesaving treatment. Increased access to opioid agonist maintenance as well as reexamination of drug policy is necessary to address this costly and morbid incarceration epidemic. PMID:26076211

  8. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with bathing, ... your home. Some types of care and community services are free or donated. Many other types you ...

  9. Enlarged prostate - after care

    Science.gov (United States)

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... exercises ( Kegel exercises ) that strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. Doing these exercise may help with leaking or ...

  10. Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak at a Long-Term Care Facility Caused by a Cooling Tower Using an Automated Disinfection System--Ohio, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Celia; Demirjian, Alicia; Watkins, Louise Francois; Tomczyk, Sara; Lucas, Claressa; Brown, Ellen; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia; Benitez, Alvaro; Garrison, Laurel E; Kunz, Jasen; Brewer, Scott; Eitniear, Samantha; DiOrio, Mary

    2015-12-01

    On July 9, 2013, an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) was identified at Long-Term Care Facility A in central Ohio. This article describes the investigation of the outbreak and identification of the outbreak source, a cooling tower using an automated biocide delivery system. In total, 39 outbreak LD cases were identified; among these, six patients died. Water samples from a cooling tower were positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, reactive to monoclonal antibody 2, with matching sequence type to a patient isolate. An electronic control system turned off cooling tower pumps during low-demand periods, preventing delivery of disinfectant by a timed-release system, and leading to amplification of Legionella in the cooling tower. Guidelines for tower maintenance should address optimal disinfection when using automated systems. PMID:26738313

  11. Cancer Health Empowerment for Living without Pain (Ca-HELP: study design and rationale for a tailored education and coaching intervention to enhance care of cancer-related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slee Christina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related pain is common and under-treated. This article describes a study designed to test the effectiveness of a theory-driven, patient-centered coaching intervention to improve cancer pain processes and outcomes. Methods/Design The Cancer Health Empowerment for Living without Pain (Ca-HELP Study is an American Cancer Society sponsored randomized trial conducted in Sacramento, California. A total of 265 cancer patients with at least moderate pain severity (Worst Pain Numerical Analog Score >=4 out of 10 or pain-related impairment (Likert score >= 3 out of 5 were randomly assigned to receive tailored education and coaching (TEC or educationally-enhanced usual care (EUC; 258 received at least one follow-up assessment. The TEC intervention is based on social-cognitive theory and consists of 6 components (assess, correct, teach, prepare, rehearse, portray. Both interventions were delivered over approximately 30 minutes just prior to a scheduled oncology visit. The majority of visits (56% were audio-recorded for later communication coding. Follow-up data including outcomes related to pain severity and impairment, self-efficacy for pain control and for patient-physician communication, functional status and well-being, and anxiety were collected at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. Discussion Building on social cognitive theory and pilot work, this study aims to test the hypothesis that a brief, tailored patient activation intervention will promote better cancer pain care and outcomes. Analyses will focus on the effects of the experimental intervention on pain severity and impairment (primary outcomes; self-efficacy and quality of life (secondary outcomes; and relationships among processes and outcomes of cancer pain care. If this model of coaching by lay health educators proves successful, it could potentially be implemented widely at modest cost. Trial Registration [Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT00283166

  12. A Study of Care Work in Welfare Facilities for the Elderly, Using Non Linear Analysis of Finger Plethysmograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohashi, Yoko; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Lee, Sangjae

    2011-06-01

    The fingertip pulse waves of a number of staff working in a daycare center for the elderly and a special nursing home for the elderly were measured several times throughout the day for a period of one or two days, and the chaotic information gained was analyzed using a non linear analysis method. As a result, a relation between the staff's length of career and the change of Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE) of the fingertip pulse waves that synchronized with the mental revitalization degrees and the tension of the sympathetic nerve was evident. The LLE of the staff with short careers dramatically changed and also took a long time to settle down again. In addition, staff LLE changed greatly after sessions of bathing assistance and watching residents with dementia. LLE measurements showed drops in some staff after a period of rest, but this was not the case for other staff. It can be concluded that the LLE is related to the length of the staff member's career and what is actually done during working hours and rest periods. A high level of sympathetic nerve was seen in almost all of the care workers. On this basis, the authors propose that improvements are needed in the content of the care work.

  13. Spread of CTX-M-type ESßLs in isolates of E. coli from long-term care and rehabilitation facilities in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Nucleo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available During the period March 2003 – May 2004 at the Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology “Redaelli” LTCRF in Milan, Italy, a total of 529 E. coli, obtained from inpatients of 3 different Long Term Care Rehabilitation Facilities (LTCRFs in Northern Italy, were processed and 77 ESßLs producers (14.5% were identified by Vitek System. The results were confirmed by double-disk synergy test with tazobactam (TZP. 61/77 isolates were characterized by higher levels of resistance to cefotaxime (CTX than to ceftazidime (CAZ. (ß-lactamase production was investigated by analytical isoelectric focusing (IEF coupled with a bioassay and showed multiple (ß-lactamase bands including one enzyme with pI 8.4 that, in a bioassay, was more active on CTX,ATM than on CAZ. The presence of (ß-lactamase genes was investigated by colony blot hybridization and by PCR amplification of blaTEM, blaSHV and blaCTX-M alleles. 43/61 isolates produced both TEM-1 and CTX-M-type enzymes, 14/61 expressed only CTX-M-type while in 4 cases were found blaCTX-M, blaTEM and blaSHV genes.The remainders (16/77, characterized by high levels of resistance to both CTX and CAZ, produced TEM-1 and SHV-5 enzymes (1/16 and TEM type ESßLs (15/16. Conjugation experiments, performed in liquid medium, confermed that the ESßLs determinants were transferable. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of genomic DNA, digested with NotI, were analysed and revealed clonal heterogeneity. Our work confirms the emergence of CTX-M-type enzymes and their spread in Northern Italy also in longterm care and rehabilitation facilities that may be an important reservoir of ES?L producing E. coli.

  14. Improving obstetric care in low-resource settings: implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews in five pilot hospitals in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fournier Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity are major problems. Service availability and quality of care in health facilities are heterogeneous and most often inadequate. In resource-poor settings, the facility-based maternal death review or audit is one of the most promising strategies to improve health service performance. We aim to explore and describe health workers' perceptions of facility-based maternal death reviews and to identify barriers to and facilitators of the implementation of this approach in pilot health facilities of Senegal. Methods This study was conducted in five reference hospitals in Senegal with different characteristics. Data were collected from focus group discussions, participant observations of audit meetings, audit documents and interviews with the staff of the maternity unit. Data were analysed by means of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Results Health professionals and service administrators were receptive and adhered relatively well to the process and the results of the audits, although some considered the situation destabilizing or even threatening. The main barriers to the implementation of maternal deaths reviews were: (1 bad quality of information in medical files; (2 non-participation of the head of department in the audit meetings; (3 lack of feedback to the staff who did not attend the audit meetings. The main facilitators were: (1 high level of professional qualifications or experience of the data collector; (2 involvement of the head of the maternity unit, acting as a moderator during the audit meetings; (3 participation of managers in the audit session to plan appropriate and realistic actions to prevent other maternal deaths. Conclusion The identification of the barriers to and the facilitators of the implementation of maternal death reviews is an essential step for the future adaptation of this method in countries with few resources. We

  15. Uptake and linkage into care over one year of providing HIV testing and counselling through community and health facility testing modalities in urban informal settlement of Kibera, Nairobi Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Muhula, Samuel; Memiah, Peter; Mbau, Lilian; Oruko, Happiness; Baker, Bebora; Ikiara, Geoffrey; Mungai, Margaret; Ndirangu, Meshack; Achwoka, Dunstan; Ilako, Festus

    2016-01-01

    Background We examine the uptake of HIV Testing and Counselling (HTC) and linkage into care over one year of providing HTC through community and health facility testing modalities among people living in Kibera informal urban settlement in Nairobi Kenya. Methods We analyzed program data on health facility-based HIV testing and counselling and community- based testing and counselling approaches for the period starting October 2013 to September 2014. Univariate and bivariate analysis methods wer...

  16. MANAGING CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS IN PRIVATE HEALTH CARE FACILITIES - A STUDY WITH REFERENCE TO GREATER NOIDA CITY OF UTTAR PRADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Panda

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Customer relationship management (CRM which has overriding significance for any business isno less significant for hospital services. Hospitals are most important elements in any health caredelivery system. A hospital plays a major role in maintaining and restoring the health of the people.Care of the sick and injured, preventive health care, health research, and training of medical andparamedical staff are general broad functions of a hospital. It involves to the outpatient and inpatienthospital services and on many occasions emergency medical services. An important resource in ahospital is a human resource. This should be particularly emphasized. This should be particularlyemphasized in the content of a hospital since relationship of medical staff plays important role intreating patients - the hospital customers. In health care, CRM practices are essentially patient -focused strategies that involve effective management of hospital interface and interaction withpatients. Effective CRM practices in a hospital may mean providing services related information toa patient very quickly. Responding to the patent appointment and an admission requests promptly,dealing with patient queries and complaints expeditiously, exercising all kinds of flexibilities inserving patients to the patients. This research paper made an attempt to analyze the factorsinfluencing the customers to select the hospital and to suggest better ways and means to retain thecustomers. For the study, the researcher has collected data from 200 respondents of 10 privatehospitals located in Greater Noida city. For this purpose stratified random sampling method was usedto select the samples. The present study highlights the extent of utilization of the hospital services bythe selected sample respondents. It also shed light on the common problems faced by therespondents. The major features of the service sectors especially on hospital performance is projectedin order to utilize the

  17. Physical violence between intimate partners during pregnancy and postpartum: a prediction model for use in primary health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Claudia L; Tavares da Silva, Tatiana de S; Reichenheim, Michael E; Azevedo, Gustavo L; Dias Oliveira, Alessandra S; Braga, José U

    2011-09-01

    This article offers a simple predictive model of physical intimate partner violence (PIPV) to be used by primary health care (PHC) professionals. The sample comprised 811 mothers of children 2 children under 5, tobacco smoking, alcohol misuse and illicit drug use by the mother and/or partner, and perception of baby's ill-health were identified as predictors of PIPV. The model-projected prevalence of PIPV for pregnancy and/or postpartum was just 10.1% in the absence of these characteristics, whereas this increased to 96.4% when all the seven characteristics were present. Child, maternal and family characteristics greatly increase the likelihood of PIPV and could be used together as screening indicators. PMID:21819429

  18. Effectiveness of a Staff Promoted Wellness Program to Improve Health in Residents of a Mental Health Long-Term Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Shari L; Terhorst, Lauren; Murtaugh, Stephanie; Gross, Sarah; Kogan, Jane N; Shaffer, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    The current study describes physical and mental health outcomes during a health promotion program for individuals with serious mental illness (SMI). A sample of 43 adults in a long-term residential facility volunteered for an individualized, healthy lifestyle program designed to promote physical activity and combat premature mortality among individuals with SMI. Nurses and residential counselors were trained in the program and encouraged to work collaboratively with the program's personal trainers. Weekly nutrition and activity logs were obtained over the year-long evaluation. Assessments of physical and psychological health indicators were collected quarterly. Qualitative data through focus groups described staff experience. Self-report of moderate and vigorous physical activity improved over time as did fitness level as measured through a walking challenge (p = .001). Significant decreases in weight (p motivation and socialization among participants. A health promotion program with participation encouraged by health care staff is effective for increasing physical activity and improving physical and mental health outcomes in individuals with SMI in long-term residential care. PMID:27031533

  19. Bed leasing program helps hospitals discharge hard-to-place patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    UCLA Health's program that pays a negotiated daily rate to skilled nursing facilities to hold beds for patients who otherwise would stay in an acute care bed saved a total of 2,516 acute care days from June 2014 to July 2015. UCLA Health pays a negotiated daily rate if the beds are occupied or not. The rate covers boarding, nursing care, medications, and physical therapy and occupational therapy Nurse practitioners are embedded in the participating nursing homes and provide care for UCLA Health's patients every day, often treating problems that might cause a readmission. The program helps with emergency department throughput and frees up acute care beds for patients who need them. PMID:26642611

  20. Domestic violence against nurses by their marital partners: A facility-based study at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Kumari Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent times, domestic violence against women by marital partners has emerged as an important public health problem. Objectives: 1. To determine the prevalence, characteristics and impact of domestic violence against nurses by their marital partners, in Delhi, India. 2. To identify nurses′ perceptions regarding acceptable behavior for men and women. Materials and Methods: A facility-based pilot study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi. Data were collected using self-administered standardized questionnaire, among 60 ever married female nurses working at AIIMS hospital, selected by convenience sampling. The principal outcome variables were controlling behavior, emotional, physical and sexual violence by marital partners. Data were analyzed using SPSS 12 software. The test applied was Fisher′s exact test and 1-sided Fisher′s exact test. Results: Sixty percent of nurses reported marital partner perpetrated controlling behavior, 65% reported emotional violence, 43.3% reported physical violence and 30% reported sexual violence. About 3/5 th of nurses (58% opined that no reason justified violence, except wife infidelity (31.67%. Of the physically or sexually abused respondents, 40% were ever injured, and 56.7% reported that violence affected their physical and mental health. Conclusion: There is a high magnitude of domestic violence against nurses and this is reported to have affected their physical and mental health.

  1. Geographic access to care is not a determinant of child mortality in a rural Kenyan setting with high health facility density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Thomas N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy-makers evaluating country progress towards the Millennium Development Goals also examine trends in health inequities. Distance to health facilities is a known determinant of health care utilization and may drive inequalities in health outcomes; we aimed to investigate its effects on childhood mortality. Methods The Epidemiological and Demographic Surveillance System in Kilifi District, Kenya, collects data on vital events and migrations in a population of 220,000 people. We used Geographic Information Systems to estimate pedestrian and vehicular travel times to hospitals and vaccine clinics and developed proportional-hazards models to evaluate the effects of travel time on mortality hazard in children less than 5 years of age, accounting for sex, ethnic group, maternal education, migrant status, rainfall and calendar time. Results In 2004-6, under-5 and under-1 mortality ratios were 65 and 46 per 1,000 live-births, respectively. Median pedestrian and vehicular travel times to hospital were 193 min (inter-quartile range: 125-267 and 49 min (32-72; analogous values for vaccine clinics were 47 (25-73 and 26 min (13-40. Infant and under-5 mortality varied two-fold across geographic locations, ranging from 34.5 to 61.9 per 1000 child-years and 8.8 to 18.1 per 1000, respectively. However, distance to health facilities was not associated with mortality. Hazard Ratios (HR were 0.99 (95% CI 0.95-1.04 per hour and 1.01 (95% CI 0.95-1.08 per half-hour of pedestrian and vehicular travel to hospital, respectively, and 1.00 (95% CI 0.99-1.04 and 0.97 (95% CI 0.92-1.05 per quarter-hour of pedestrian and vehicular travel to vaccine clinics in children Conclusions Significant spatial variations in mortality were observed across the area, but were not correlated with distance to health facilities. We conclude that given the present density of health facilities in Kenya, geographic access to curative services does not influence

  2. Santa Monica Children's Centers, Santa Monica, California: Low-Cost Day Care Facilities for Children of Working Mothers Made Available Through the Cooperation of the California State Government and Local School District. Model Programs--Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Two of the four Santa Monica Children's Centers are nursery schools for children aged 3 to 5; the other two centers serve as extended care facilities for children of school age. All centers are concerned with meeting the physical, intellectual, and emotional needs of children on a long-term basis and stress a program offering a variety of play…

  3. Facility-based care for delivery and management of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Hernández

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence and management of severe maternal and newborn complications in selected health facilities in Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As part of the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn health, information was collected from medical records of women with deliveries and/or severe maternal complications during pregnancy or puerperium in 14 hospitals in Mexico City and the state of Guanajuato, Mexico. RESULTS: Of 13 311 women, 157 (12 per 1 000 live births had severe maternal complications including 4 maternal deaths. The most frequent complications were preeclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, and chronic hypertension. Adverse perinatal outcomes were more frequent among women with severe maternal complications. A high use of uterotonics and parenteral antibiotics was found. A small proportion of women with eclampsia received magnesium sulfate. CONCLUSION: This study provides indicators on the incidence and management of maternal and neonatal complications in Mexico, which may be useful in studying and evaluating the performance of obstetric services.OBJETIVO: Describir la incidencia y manejo de complicaciones maternas y neonatales severas en hospitales seleccionados de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: En el marco de la Encuesta Multipaís de la OMS sobre Salud Materna y Neonatal, se recolectó información de los expedientes médicos de las mujeres que tuvieron su parto o experimentaron complicaciones maternas severas durante el embarazo o puerperio en 14 hospitales de la Ciudad de México y el estado de Guanajuato, México. RESULTADOS: De 13 311 mujeres, 157 (12/1 000 nacidos vivos tuvieron complicaciones maternas severas, incluyendo 4 muertes maternas. Las complicaciones más frecuentes fueron preeclampsia, hemorragia postparto e hipertensión crónica. Los resultados perinatales adversos fueron más frecuentes en las mujeres con complicaciones severas. Hubo un uso amplio de uterotónicos y antibi

  4. Key determinants of induced abortion in women seeking postabortion care in hospital facilities in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilboudo PGC

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Patrick GC Ilboudo,1–3 Serge MA Somda,4 Johanne Sundby3 1Département de Santé Publique, Unité de Recherche sur les Politiques et Systèmes de Santé, Centre Muraz, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso; 2Agence de Formation, de Recherche et d'Expertise en Santé pour l'Afrique (AFRICSanté, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso; 3Department of Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 4Département des Maladies Non Transmissibles, Unité de Formation et d'Appui Méthodologique, Centre Muraz, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso Introduction: Despite the universal recognition of unsafe abortion as a major public health problem, very little research has been conducted to document its precipitating factors in Burkina Faso. Our aim was to investigate the key determinants of induced abortion in a sample of women who sought postabortion care. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional household survey was carried out from February to September 2012 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Data of 37 women who had had an induced abortion and 267 women who had had a spontaneous abortion were prospectively collected on sociodemographic characteristics, pregnancy and birth history, abortion experience, including previous abortion experience, and selected clinical information, including the type of abortion. A two-step regression analysis consisting of a univariate and a multivariate logistic regression was run on Stata version 11.2 in order to identify the key determinants of induced abortion. Results: The findings indicated that 12% of all abortions were certainly induced. Three key factors were significantly and positively associated with the probability of having an induced abortion: whether the woman reported that her pregnancy was unwanted (odds ratio [OR] 10.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–30.41; whether the woman reported was living in a household headed by her parents (OR 6.83, 95% CI 2.42–19.24; and if the woman reported was divorced or widowed (OR 3.47, 95

  5. Economic activities, illness pattern and utilisation of health care facilities in the rural population of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monjurul Hoque

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study was undertaken among the rural and black communities of the Uthungulu health district of the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa.Method: A cross-sectional community-based descriptive study was conducted. A multi-stage sampling strategy was adopted to obtain a representative sample of the communities.Results: The mean age of the population was 27 years and majority was female (54%. Among the adult population only 30% were educated, 19% were engaged in some form of economic activities while 9% were in the formal employment sector. The average monthly income per household was R1 301 (95% CI, R1 283; R1 308. The illnesses were reported by 27% of the total population over a period of one month. Notably higher rates of female individuals (29% were sick compared to males (24%, p < 0.001. The rates of illnesses among adult females (39% were also significantly higher than among males (31%, p < 0.009. Most of them (69% attended primary health care (PHC clinics for medical services, while 67% reported chronic conditions. Age (OR = 1.4, gender (OR = 0.711, education (OR = 0.64 and economic activities (OR = 1.9 were found to be associated with being ill or not.Conclusion: The rural black communities are underdeveloped and deprived, which results in higher prevalence of illnesses; however, the utilisation of PHC facilities is comparatively higher than in the rest of the province and other parts of the country. Interventions to improve community health care services among the deprived population should be focused through public health strategies such as all-encompassing PHC that includes health promotion, education and basic essential amenities.

  6. CSIR helps prevent spontaneous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuuren, M. van (CSIR Energy Technology (South Africa))

    1992-03-01

    Heaps of stockpiled coal could present a fire hazard due to the risk of spontaneous combustion. Regular monitoring of stockpiles and bunker testing of coals help to prevent stockpile fires. This brief article describes the recent upgrading of the CSIR's bunker test facility that enables coal producers, users and exporters to test their products under simulated conditions that duplicate the actual conditions under which coal is stored. 2 photos.

  7. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  8. Helping your child understand a cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... things happening. Being honest tends to lessen a child's stress, guilt, and confusion. Also, many medical terms, including cancer, will be used by health care providers and others. Children ... and discuss feelings. It will help build trust in your family.

  9. Helping You Identify Quality Laboratory Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helping You Identify Quality Laboratory Services Selecting quality health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission has prepared this information ...

  10. Social activity decreases risk of placement in a long-term care facility for a prospective sample of community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lyndsey M; Dieckmann, Nathan F; Mattek, Nora C; Lyons, Karen S; Kaye, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of modifiable factors in the risk of long-term care (LTC) placement. Using data from a cohort of community-residing older adults (N = 189), a secondary analysis was conducted of the contribution of social activity, sleep disturbances, and depressive symptoms to the risk of LTC placement. Analyses controlled for cognitive and functional impairment, age, and medical conditions. Within 5 years, 20% of participants were placed in a LTC facility. Each unit increase in social activity was associated with a 24% decrease in the risk of placement (odds ratio [OR] = 0.763, p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.65, 0.89]). Cognitive impairment (OR = 3.05, p = 0.017, 95% CI [1.23, 7.59]), medical conditions (OR = 1.22, p = 0.039, 95% CI [1.01, 1.47]), and age (OR = 1.101, p = 0.030, 95% CI [1.01, 1.20]) were also significant individual predictors of placement. Although many of the strongest risk factors for placement are not modifiable, older adults who engage in more social activity outside the home may be able to delay transition from independent living. PMID:24444452

  11. Nutritional assessment of residents in long-term care facilities (LTCFs): recommendations of the task force on nutrition and ageing of the IAGG European region and the IANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salva, A; Coll-Planas, L; Bruce, S; De Groot, L; Andrieu, S; Abellan, G; Vellas, B; Andrieu, Sandrine; Bartorelli, Luisa; Berner, Ytshal N; Bruce, Stuart; Corman, Bruno; Domingo, Alex; Egger, Thomas P; de Groot, Lisette; Guigoz, Yves; Imedio, Ana; Planas, Mercè; Porras, Concha; Rovira, Joan Carles; Salvà, Antoni; Serra, José Antonio; Vellas, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    Unintentional weight loss and Undernutrition are major problems among older people living in Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCF). Undernutrition manifests in LTCF particularly as weight loss and low Body Mass Index (BMI) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as with functional decline. There are many factors associated with poor nutritional status and affecting protein-energy intake and/or energy expenditure. These include age of 85 years or older, low nutrient intake, loss of ability to eat independently, swallowing and chewing difficulties, becoming bed-ridden, pressure ulcers, history of hip fracture, dementia, depressive symptoms and suffering from two or more chronic illnesses. Nutritional evaluation is an essential part of the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). This evaluation ranges from methods such as BMI to several validated tools such as Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA). After diagnosis, the management of undernutrition in LTCF requires a multidisciplinary approach which may involve dietary and environmental improvements and managing multiple co-morbidities, while avoiding polypharmacy as far as possible. Finally, the need for supplementation or artificial (tube) feeding may be considered taking into account the CGA and individual needs. This document presents a succinct review and recommendations of evaluation and treatment of undernutrition. PMID:19536415

  12. An outbreak of severe respiratory tract infection caused by human metapneumovirus in a residential care facility for elderly in Utrecht, the Netherlands, January to March 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Wierik, M J; Nguyen, D T; Beersma, M F; Thijsen, S F; Heemstra, K A

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of infections with human metapneumovirus (HMPV) among institutionalised elderly is rising. When HMPV was found to be the causative agent of an outbreak of pneumonia in a residential care facility for elderly in the Netherlands, an elaborate outbreak investigation was set up, including active surveillance for new cases. From clinical cases, defined by fever (> 38°C) and symptoms of respiratory tract infections, respiratory samples for analyses of viral pathogens by real-time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (rRT-PCR) and blood samples for determination of HMPV-specific IgM and IgG antibody titres were taken. Five staff members and 18 residents fulfilled the clinical case definition. Of those, five residents tested positive for HMPV by rRT-PCR. The combination of rRTPCR and serology identified nine confirmed cases, six probable cases, six possible cases and ruled out two persons as cases. Among residents, the outbreak of HMPV had an attack rate, ranging from 5% for laboratory- confirmed cases, to 13% for clinical cases. This outbreak investigation shows that HMPV is a potential serious pathogen for institutionalised elderly. PMID:22490384

  13. Going Online: Helping Technical Communicators Help Translators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Patricia; Lord van Slyke, Melanie; Starke-Meyerring, Doreen; Thompson, Aimee

    1999-01-01

    Explains why technical communicators should help translators. Offers tips for creating "translation-friendly" documentation. Describes the research and design process used by the authors to create an online tutorial that provides technical communicators at a medical technology company the information they need to help them write and design…

  14. Oncology and palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Bausewein, Claudia; Hartenstein, R.

    2000-01-01

    Oncology developed as a discipline over the last decades. Treatment is concentrated on cure or palliation of the illness with the help of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery. Palliative care has its origin in the hospice movement that started around 1960 in the UK. Centre of care is the patient and his family. Focus of care has moved from quantity to quality of life. Symptom control, communication, rehabilitation and care for the dying are main areas of palliative care. Palliative care and ...

  15. Healthcare Facility Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MAP:http://tinyurl.com/HealthcareFacilityLocationsMap The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Center for Health Care Quality, Licensing and Certification...

  16. Skilled nursing and rehabilitation facilities - choosing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000436.htm Skilled nursing and rehabilitation facilities - choosing To use the sharing ... you may need to go to a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility . Skilled nursing facilities provide care ...

  17. A novel influenza A (H1N1 outbreak experience among residents of a long term-care facility in Saudi Arabia during 2010 seasonal flu circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf M. Afifi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to describe and analyze an outbreak of novel 2009 influenza A (H1N1 among residents of a long-term care facility (LTCF in Prince Mansour Military Hospital (PMMH, Taif, Saudi Arabia. These patients had been admitted to the LTCF months or years before the outbreak for several reasons, e.g. cerebral palsy, neurological deficits due to road traffic accidents with resultant handicap, chronic diseases associated with old age. An observational study was carried out to demonstrate and analyze the epidemiological characteristics (demographic factors, risk factors, and outcomes associated with the outbreak in order to clarify which prevention and control measures had been taken and which recommendations were followed. During the period October 28 to November 11 2010, 21 LTCF residents were suspected to be clinically involved: fever ≥38ºC with influenza-like illness (ILI. Age ranged from 9-91 years (mean 46±24.13; 62% were males. Among them, 12 (57% were influenza A (H1N1 positive by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR. Mortality involved 2 (17% of the A (H1N1 laboratory confirmed individuals. Implementation of the recommended infection control measures mitigated the transmission of infection to new individuals. The fulfillment of strict infection control measures could limit H1N1 infection among LTCFPMMH patients. Routine influenza, including specific H1N1 immunization of all LTCF residents together with their healthcare staff, should be mandatory in those settings serving immunocompromised patients.

  18. Help for Mental Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Services Administration : The Health Resources and Services Administration works to improve access to health care. The website has information on finding affordable healthcare, including health centers that offer care on a ...

  19. Help from Outside Sources

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... health hasn't been very good lately. This care I'm giving my wife is really wearing ... that the caregiver will be able to provide care for a longer period of time. They might ...

  20. [Social rehabilitation in day care facilities for psychiatrically ill and handicapped patients--results of a concomitant study of a model program by the Rhine-Land District Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regus, M; Gürtler, A

    1997-05-01

    Within the extension of new services for mentally ill and disabled peoples outside of inpatient settings, the Landschaftsverband Rheinland (LVR) decided in 1990 to finance day care facilities especially for those patients who could previously not be integrated in the existing community psychiatry service structure due to the severity of their illness or handicap. A cost reducing effect in the clinical and residential service area was also intended. The first ten of these facilities were included in a 2-year research project. This report includes findings in various sectors: characteristics of the user group, functions and focal points of care, association with other community psychiatry services, cost effectiveness, and user opinions. Most visitors experienced a stabilisation of their personal situation and improvement of their quality of life. The average length of hospital stays was reduced from 102 to 25 days per year. The hopes accompanied with the programme were only partially fulfilled; possible consequences are discussed. PMID:9289222

  1. Prevalence of HBsAg, knowledge, and vaccination practice against viral hepatitis B infection among doctors and nurses in a secondary health care facility in Lagos state, South-western Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Abiola, Abdul-Hakeem Olatunji; Agunbiade, Adebukola Bola; Badmos, Kabir Bolarinwa; Lesi, Adenike Olufunmilayo; Lawal, Abdulrazzaq Oluwagbemiga; Alli, Quadri Olatunji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis B Virus, a highly infectious blood-borne virus poses a major threat to public health globally due to its high prevalence rate and grave consequence in causing liver cirrhosis and hepatocelullar carcinoma, the third cause of cancer death worldwide. The aim is determine the prevalence of HBsAg, knowledge, and vaccination practices against viral hepatitis B infection among doctors and nurses in a health care facility. Methods Study design was a descriptive cross-sectional ...

  2. Patient and Facility Safety in Hemodialysis: Opportunities and Strategies to Develop a Culture of Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Garrick, Renee; Kliger, Alan; Stefanchik, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Patient safety is the foundation of high-quality health care. More than 350,000 patients receive dialysis in the United States, and the safety of their care is ultimately the responsibility of the facility medical director. The medical director must establish a culture of safety in the dialysis unit and lead the quality assessment and performance improvement process. Several lines of investigation, including surveys of patients and dialysis professionals, have helped to identify important are...

  3. Caring for the caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Caring for the Caregiver is information for persons helping to care for people with cancer. The emphasis is on what caregivers can do to help themselves at this stressful time. Topics included are: Who Is a Caregiver, Your Feelings, Asking For Help, Caring for Yourself, Going With Your Loved One to Medical Visits, Talking With Others, Remember, Other Resources for Caregivers. The information is written on a basic level and it is very suitable for health professionals to share with persons helping to care for family members or friends who have cancer. The National Cancer Institute posted this information on its website last June 29. PMID:19062356

  4. Effects of resistance and all-round, functional training on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities: a 'randomized' controlled trial [ISRCTN87177281

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular physical activity may improve different aspects of wellbeing in older people, such as quality of life, vitality and depression. However, there is little experimental evidence to support this assumption. Therefore, we examined the effect of different training protocols on quality of life, vitality and depression of older adults living in long-term care facilities. Methods Subjects (n = 173, aged 64 to 94 years, living in long-term care facilities, were randomized to six months of three different moderate-intensity group exercise training protocols, or to an 'educational' control condition. Exercise consisted of two 45–60-minute training sessions per week of 1 resistance training; 2 all-round, functional training; or 3 a combination of both. Perceived health, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, the Vitality Plus Scale (VPS and the Dementia Quality of Life questionnaire (DQoL were administered at baseline and after six months. Results In the combined training group a small but significant decline was seen in perceived health, DQoL and VPS score compared to the control group. Conclusions We conclude that neither strength training nor all-round, functional training of moderate intensity is effective in improving quality of life, vitality or depression of older people living in long-term care facilities.

  5. Medical cyclotron facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the separate proposals from the Austin Hospital and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission for a medical cyclotron facility. The proponents have argued that a cyclotron facility would benefit Australia in areas of patient care, availability and export of radioisotopes, and medical research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and neutron beam therapy are also examined

  6. How Exercise Can Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the one that is the most effective at managing and reducing pain. Dr. Roy Altman: It seems ... help people put the social component into their programs, we'll be able to help them maintain ...

  7. How Exercise Can Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... improve muscle tone around the joint -- it actually protects the joint. Dr. Roland Moskowitz: If you strengthen ... buoyancy to help you, you've got the act of sort of assistive motion, help of the ...

  8. Helping Kids Handle Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Helping Kids Handle Worry KidsHealth > For Parents > Helping Kids Handle ... master life's challenges, big and small. What Do Kids Worry About? What kids worry about is often ...

  9. Ayudando a los Ninos a Amarse a Si Mismos y a Otros: Una guia profesional para el cuidado infantil en el hogar (Helping Children Love Themselves and Others: A Professional Handbook for Family Day Care).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, Sandra; And Others

    This Spanish-language guide presents an anti-bias, multicultural approach to family day care. Part A provides a rationale for such an approach. Subsections of this part concern: (1) family day care as a site for the transmission of bias; (2) characteristics of an anti-bias, multicultural approach; (3) language and stereotypes; (4) developmental…

  10. Report on the control of the safety and security of nuclear facilities. Part 2: the reconversion of military plutonium stocks. The use of the helps given to central and eastern Europe countries and to the new independent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with two different aspects of the safety and security of nuclear facilities. The first aspect concerns the reconversion of weapon grade plutonium stocks: the plutonium in excess, plutonium hazards and nuclear fuel potentialities, the US program, the Russian program, the actions of European countries (France, Germany), the intervention of other countries, the unanswered questions (political aspects, uncertainties), the solutions of the future (improvement of reactors, the helium-cooled high temperature reactor technology (gas-turbine modular helium reactor: GT-MHR), the Carlo Rubbia's project). The second aspect concerns the actions carried out by the European Union in favor of the civil nuclear facilities of central and eastern Europe: the European Union competencies through the Euratom treaty, the conclusions of the European audit office about the PHARE and TACIS nuclear programs, the status of committed actions, the coming planned actions, and the critical analysis of the policy adopted so far. (J.S.)

  11. When Teachers Need Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Marilyn; Rothberg, Robert

    1994-01-01

    To help struggling teachers, principals have recourse to the Institute for Professional Development, a program operated by the University of Central Florida. Functioning as a help-line for at-risk teachers, the program offers teaching tips and conducts informal evaluations of teachers seeking help. Teachers gain skills and confidence, and the…

  12. How Exercise Can Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hip disease. You've got the buoyancy to help you, you've got the act of sort of assistive motion, help of the water, and you're not putting ... enjoy being with the people. If we can help people put the social component into their programs, ...

  13. Help! It's Hair Loss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Help! It's Hair Loss! KidsHealth > For Kids > Help! It's Hair Loss! Print A A A Text Size ... part above the skin, is dead. (That's why it doesn't hurt to get a haircut!) This ...

  14. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care is especially useful for persons who need nursing, therapy, or aide services. You may need help if you are dealing with one or more of the following: You have trouble getting around (for example, after a hospital stay or an accident) You have wounds that need to be cleaned, ...

  15. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United ... Facilities Seventeen percent of residential care communities had dementia special care units. Figure 1. Number and percent ...

  16. Child Health USA 2013: Prenatal Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Services Utilization > Prenatal Care Utilization Prenatal Care Utilization Narrative Early and adequate prenatal care helps to ... 20.3 6.0 Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Upon Initiation, * by Maternal Race/Ethnicity, 2011 Race/ ...

  17. Perceived Quality of Care of Community Health Worker and Facility-Based Health Worker Management of Pneumonia in Children Under 5 Years in Western Kenya: A Cross-Sectional Multidimensional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian I; Asadhi, Elijah; Owuor, Kevin; Okoth, Peter; Abdi, Mohammed; Cohen, Craig R; Onono, Maricianah

    2016-05-01

    Integrated community case management (iCCM) programs that train lay community health workers (CHWs) in the diagnosis and treatment of diarrhea, malaria, and pneumonia have been increasingly adopted throughout sub-Saharan Africa to provide services in areas where accessibility to formal public sector health services is low. One important aspect of successful iCCM programs is the acceptability and utilization of services provided by CHWs. To understand community perceptions of the quality of care in an iCCM intervention in western Kenya, we used the Primary Care Assessment Survey to compare caregiver attitudes about the diagnosis and treatment of childhood pneumonia as provided by CHWs and facility-based health workers (FBHWs). Overall, caregivers rated CHWs more highly than FBHWs across a set of 10 domains that capture multiple dimensions of the care process. Caregivers perceived CHWs to provide higher quality care in terms of accessibility and patient relationship and equal quality care on clinical aspects. These results argue for the continued implementation and scale-up of iCCM programs as an acceptable intervention for increasing access to treatment of childhood pneumonia. PMID:26976883

  18. Quality of life of residents with dementia in long-term care settings in the Netherlands and Belgium: design of a longitudinal comparative study in traditional nursing homes and small-scale living facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luijkx Katrien G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in the number of people with dementia will lead to greater demand for residential care. Currently, large nursing homes are trying to transform their traditional care for residents with dementia to a more home-like approach, by developing small-scale living facilities. It is often assumed that small-scale living will improve the quality of life of residents with dementia. However, little scientific evidence is currently available to test this. The following research question is addressed in this study: Which (combination of changes in elements affects (different dimensions of the quality of life of elderly residents with dementia in long-term care settings over the course of one year? Methods/design A longitudinal comparative study in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings, which follows a quasi-experimental design, will be carried out in Belgium and the Netherlands. To answer the research question, a model has been developed which incorporates relevant elements influencing quality of life in long-term care settings. Validated instruments will be used to evaluate the role of these elements, divided into environmental characteristics (country, type of ward, group size and nursing staff; basic personal characteristics (age, sex, cognitive decline, weight and activities of daily living; behavioural characteristics (behavioural problems and depression; behavioural interventions (use of restraints and use of psychotropic medication; and social interaction (social engagement and visiting frequency of relatives. The main outcome measure for residents in the model is quality of life. Data are collected at baseline, after six and twelve months, from residents living in either small-scale or traditional care settings. Discussion The results of this study will provide an insight into the determinants of quality of life for people with dementia living in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings in

  19. Study of obstetric and fetal outcome of twin pregnancy in a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Kaur Nandmer

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Twin pregnancies are high risk pregnancies with more maternal and fetal complications. The use of antenatal care services, identification and anticipation of complications, intrapartum management and good NICU facilities will help to improve maternal and neonatal outcome in twin pregnancies. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 1789-1792

  20. Exploring the role of the public and private funded primary health care facilities for children in a pluralistic health care setting of Barbados: one of the English Caribbean countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings demonstrate the complimentary role of the public and the private sector in the primary health care of children in this country. While the private sector has a major role in the curative acute care of children, the public sector plays a pivotal role in the immunization services.