WorldWideScience

Sample records for care coverage transitions

  1. Ohio study shows that insurance coverage is critical for children with special health care needs as they transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, Anthony; Carle, Adam C

    2011-12-01

    Nearly 30 percent of young adults with special health care needs in Ohio lack health insurance, compared to 5 percent of the state's children with special health care needs. As children with such needs become too old for Medicaid or insurance through their parents' employer, they face great challenges in obtaining insurance. Lack of insurance is highly predictive of unmet needs, which in turn are predictive of costly hospital-based encounters. Young adults with special health care needs who are uninsured are more than twice as likely as their peers with insurance to forgo filling prescriptions and getting care and to have problems getting care. Even after insurance status is accounted for, young adults with special health care needs are more likely than children with such needs to not fill prescriptions because of cost and to delay or forgo needed care. This study demonstrates that continuous and adequate health insurance is vital to the continued well-being of children with special health care needs as they transition to young adulthood.

  2. Contraceptive Coverage and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschann, Mary; Soon, Reni

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is reducing healthcare spending by shifting the focus of healthcare toward preventive care. Preventive services, including all FDA-approved contraception, must be provided to patients without cost-sharing under the ACA. No-cost contraception has been shown to increase uptake of highly effective birth control methods and reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion; however, some institutions and corporations argue that providing contraceptive coverage infringes on their religious beliefs. The contraceptive coverage mandate is evolving due to legal challenges, but it has already demonstrated success in reducing costs and improving access to contraception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Affordable Care Act's Dependent Care Coverage and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Chandler

    2017-05-01

    In September 2010, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) enabled young adults to gain insurance coverage under their parents' policies. Assess the impact of the ACA's dependent care coverage expansion on young adult mortality rates. Using the Multiple Cause Mortality public use database for 2008-2013, the impact of the ACA is examined with a difference-in-differences analysis of monthly mortality rates using individuals aged 26-30 as a natural control group for young adults aged 19-25. The average monthly disease-related mortality rate of the 19-25 years old group fell by between 3.1% and 6.1% in the wake of the dependent care coverage expansion. Reduction in mortality was primarily in disease-related causes which are amenable to general medical care such as cardiovascular disease, while mortality due to trauma-related causes, which must be treated regardless of insurance status under preexisting laws, was unaffected. The reduction in mortality from this single provision of the ACA indicates that larger gains in preventable mortality could be made as health insurance coverage continues to expand under the ACA.

  4. Coverage for Gender-Affirming Care: Making Health Insurance Work for Transgender Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Baker, Kellan

    2017-08-01

    Many transgender Americans continue to remain uninsured or are underinsured because of payers' refusal to cover medically necessary, gender-affirming healthcare services-such as hormone therapy, mental health counseling, and reconstructive surgeries. Coverage refusal results in higher costs and poor health outcomes among transgender people who cannot access gender-affirming care. Research into the value of health insurance coverage for gender-affirming care for transgender individuals shows that the health benefits far outweigh the costs of insuring transition procedures. Although the Affordable Care Act explicitly protects health insurance for transgender individuals, these laws are being threatened; therefore, this article reviews their importance to transgender-inclusive healthcare coverage.

  5. Unmanaged care: towards moral fairness in health care coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Sharona

    2003-01-01

    Health insurers are generally guided by the principle of "actuarial fairness," according to which they distinguish among various risks on the basis of cost-related factors. Thus, insurers often limit or deny coverage for vision care, hearing aids, mental health care, and even AIDS treatment based on actuarial justifications. Furthermore, approximately forty-two million Americans have no health insurance at all, because most of these individuals cannot afford the cost of insurance. This Article argues that Americans have come to demand more than actuarial fairness from health insurers and are increasingly concerned by what I call "moral fairness." This is evidenced by the hundreds of laws that have been passed to constrain insurers' discretion with respect to particular coverage decisions. Legislative mandates are frequent, but seemingly haphazard, following no systematic methodology. This Article suggests an analytical framework that can be utilized to determine which interventions are appropriate and evaluates a variety of means by which moral fairness could be promoted in the arena of health care coverage.

  6. Coverage matters: insurance and health care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Health Care Services Staff; Institute of Medicine Staff; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    2001-01-01

    ...? How does the system of insurance coverage in the U.S. operate, and where does it fail? The first of six Institute of Medicine reports that will examine in detail the consequences of having a large uninsured population, Coverage Matters...

  7. Coverage matters: insurance and health care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Health Care Services Staff; Institute of Medicine Staff; Institute of Medicine; National Academy of Sciences

    2001-01-01

    ...: Insurance and Health Care , explores the myths and realities of who is uninsured, identifies social, economic, and policy factors that contribute to the situation, and describes the likelihood faced...

  8. Contraception and abortion coverage: What do primary care physicians think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cynthia H; Martenis, Melissa E; Parisi, Sara M; Delano, Rachel E; Sobota, Mindy; Nothnagle, Melissa; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2012-08-01

    Insurance coverage for family planning services has been a highly controversial element of the US health care reform debate. Whether primary care providers (PCPs) support public and private health insurance coverage for family planning services is unknown. PCPs in three states were surveyed regarding their opinions on health plan coverage and tax dollar use for contraception and abortion services. Almost all PCPs supported health plan coverage for contraception (96%) and use of tax dollars to cover contraception for low-income women (94%). A smaller majority supported health plan coverage for abortions (61%) and use of tax dollars to cover abortions for low-income women (63%). In adjusted models, support of health plan coverage for abortions was associated with female gender and internal medicine specialty, and support of using tax dollars for abortions for low-income women was associated with older age and internal medicine specialty. The majority of PCPs support health insurance coverage of contraception and abortion, as well as tax dollar subsidization of contraception and abortion services for low-income women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  10. A Novel Trip Coverage Index for Transit Accessibility Assessment Using Mobile Phone Data

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Zhengyi; Wang, Dianhai; Chen, Xiqun

    2017-01-01

    Transit accessibility is an important measure on the service performance of transit systems. To assess whether the public transit service is well accessible for trips of specific origins, destinations, and origin-destination (OD) pairs, a novel measure, the Trip Coverage Index (TCI), is proposed in this paper. TCI considers both the transit trip coverage and spatial distribution of individual travel demands. Massive trips between cellular base stations are estimated by using over four-million...

  11. Disparities in Private Health Insurance Coverage of Skilled Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A. Tovino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article compares and contrasts public and private health insurance coverage of skilled medical rehabilitation, including cognitive rehabilitation, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and skilled nursing services (collectively, skilled care. As background, prior scholars writing in this area have focused on Medicare coverage of skilled care and have challenged coverage determinations limiting Medicare coverage to beneficiaries who are able to demonstrate improvement in their conditions within a specific period of time (the Improvement Standard. By and large, these scholars have applauded the settlement agreement approved on 24 January 2013, by the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont in Jimmo v. Sebelius (Jimmo, as well as related motions, rulings, orders, government fact sheets, and Medicare program manual statements clarifying that Medicare covers skilled care that is necessary to prevent or slow a beneficiary’s deterioration or to maintain a beneficiary at his or her maximum practicable level of function even though no further improvement in the beneficiary’s condition is expected. Scholars who have focused on beneficiaries who have suffered severe brain injuries, in particular, have framed public insurance coverage of skilled brain rehabilitation as an important civil, disability, and educational right. Given that approximately two-thirds of Americans with health insurance are covered by private health insurance and that many private health plans continue to require their insureds to demonstrate improvement within a short period of time to obtain coverage of skilled care, scholarship assessing private health insurance coverage of skilled care is important but noticeably absent from the literature. This article responds to this gap by highlighting state benchmark plans’ and other private health plans’ continued use of the Improvement Standard in skilled care coverage decisions and

  12. A Novel Trip Coverage Index for Transit Accessibility Assessment Using Mobile Phone Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyi Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transit accessibility is an important measure on the service performance of transit systems. To assess whether the public transit service is well accessible for trips of specific origins, destinations, and origin-destination (OD pairs, a novel measure, the Trip Coverage Index (TCI, is proposed in this paper. TCI considers both the transit trip coverage and spatial distribution of individual travel demands. Massive trips between cellular base stations are estimated by using over four-million mobile phone users. An easy-to-implement method is also developed to extract the transit information and driving routes for millions of requests. Then the trip coverage of each OD pair is calculated. For demonstrative purposes, TCI is applied to the transit network of Hangzhou, China. The results show that TCI represents the better transit trip coverage and provides a more powerful assessment tool of transit quality of service. Since the calculation is based on trips of all modes, but not only the transit trips, TCI offers an overall accessibility for the transit system performance. It enables decision makers to assess transit accessibility in a finer-grained manner on the individual trip level and can be well transformed to measure transit services of other cities.

  13. [Strategies to improve influenza vaccination coverage in Primary Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, F; Richart, M J; Serrano, S; Martínez, A M; Pruteanu, D F

    2016-04-01

    Vaccination coverage reached in adults is insufficient, and there is a real need for new strategies. To compare strategies for improving influenza vaccination coverage in persons older than 64 years. New strategies were introduced in our health care centre during 2013-2014 influenza vaccination campaign, which included vaccinating patients in homes for the aged as well as in the health care centre. A comparison was made on vaccination coverage over the last 4 years in 3 practices of our health care centre: P1, the general physician vaccinated patients older than 64 that came to the practice; P2, the general physician systematically insisted in vaccination in elderly patients, strongly advising to book appointments, and P3, the general physician did not insist. These practices looked after P1: 278; P2: 320; P3: 294 patients older than 64 years. Overall/P1/P2/P3 coverages in 2010: 51.2/51.4/55/46.9% (P=NS), in 2011: 52.4/52.9/53.8/50.3% (P=NS), in 2012: 51.9/52.5/55.3/47.6% (P=NS), and in 2013: 63.5/79.1/59.7/52.7 (P=.000, P1 versus P2 and P3; P=NS between P2 and P3). Comparing the coverages in 2012-2013 within each practice P1 (P=.000); P2 (P=.045); P3 (P=.018). In P2 and P3 all vaccinations were given by the nurses as previously scheduled. In P3, 55% of the vaccinations were given by the nurses, 24.1% by the GP, 9.7% rejected vaccination, and the remainder did not come to the practice during the vaccination period (October 2013-February 2014). The strategy of vaccinating in the homes for the aged improved the vaccination coverage by 5% in each practice. The strategy of "I've got you here, I jab you here" in P1 improved the vaccination coverage by 22%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Will health care reform reduce disparities in insurance coverage?: Evidence from the dependent coverage mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Dan M; Ayyagari, Padmaja

    2014-06-01

    We used data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to assess the impact of the Affordable Care Act's dependent coverage mandate on disparities in health insurance coverage rates and evaluated whether non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics gained coverage at the same rates as non-Hispanic whites. To estimate changes in insurance rates, we employed a difference-in-difference regression approach comparing 7962 young adults aged 19-25 to 9321 adults aged 27-34. Separate regressions were estimated for non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites to understand whether the mandate had differential effects by race/ethnicity. Separate regressions by income level and race/ethnicity were also estimated. Insurance rates increased by 9.3 percentage points among non-Hispanic whites, 7.2 percentage points among Hispanics, and 9.4 percentage points among non-Hispanic blacks. These changes were not significantly different from each other. Among individuals with income of insurance rates among all racial and ethnic groups but did not change overall disparities. Disparities may have widened among low-income populations which highlights the importance of Medicaid expansions in reducing disparities. Among higher-income populations, disparities between non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites were reduced.

  15. The scale, scope, coverage, and capability of childbirth care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Oona M R; Calvert, Clara; Testa, Adrienne; Strehlow, Matthew; Benova, Lenka; Keyes, Emily; Donnay, France; Macleod, David; Gabrysch, Sabine; Rong, Luo; Ronsmans, Carine; Sadruddin, Salim; Koblinsky, Marge; Bailey, Patricia

    2016-10-29

    All women should have access to high quality maternity services-but what do we know about the health care available to and used by women? With a focus on low-income and middle-income countries, we present data that policy makers and planners can use to evaluate whether maternal health services are functioning to meet needs of women nationally, and potentially subnationally. We describe configurations of intrapartum care systems, and focus in particular on where, and with whom, deliveries take place. The necessity of ascertaining actual facility capability and providers' skills is highlighted, as is the paucity of information on maternity waiting homes and transport as mechanisms to link women to care. Furthermore, we stress the importance of assessment of routine provision of care (not just emergency care), and contextualise this importance within geographic circumstances (eg, in sparsely-populated regions vs dense urban areas). Although no single model-of-care fits all contexts, we discuss implications of the models we observe, and consider changes that might improve services and accelerate response to future challenges. Areas that need attention include minimisation of overintervention while responding to the changing disease burden. Conceptualisation, systematic measurement, and effective tackling of coverage and configuration challenges to implement high quality, respectful maternal health-care services are key to ensure that every woman can give birth without risk to her life, or that of her baby. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transition care for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alaina M; Brown, Rebekah F; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Epstein, Richard A; McPheeters, Melissa L

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 750,000 children in the United States with special health care needs will transition from pediatric to adult care annually. Fewer than half receive adequate transition care. We had conversations with key informants representing clinicians who provide transition care, pediatric and adult providers of services for individuals with special health care needs, policy experts, and researchers; searched online sources for information about currently available programs and resources; and conducted a literature search to identify research on the effectiveness of transition programs. We identified 25 studies evaluating transition care programs. Most (n = 8) were conducted in populations with diabetes, with a smaller literature (n = 5) on transplant patients. We identified an additional 12 studies on a range of conditions, with no more than 2 studies on the same condition. Common components of care included use of a transition coordinator, a special clinic for young adults in transition, and provision of educational materials. The issue of how to provide transition care for children with special health care needs warrants further attention. Research needs are wide ranging, including both substantive and methodologic concerns. Although there is widespread agreement on the need for adequate transition programs, there is no accepted way to measure transition success. It will be essential to establish consistent goals to build an adequate body of literature to affect practice. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Health insurance coverage and health care access in Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Erica; Roberts, Bayard; Sava, Valeriu; Menon, Rekha; McKee, Martin

    2012-05-01

    In 2004, the Moldovan government introduced mandatory (social) health insurance (MHI) with the goals of sustainable health financing and improved access to services for poorer sections of the population. The government pays contributions for non-employed groups but the self-employed, which in Moldova include many agricultural workers, must purchase their own cover. This paper describes the extent to which the Moldovan MHI scheme has managed to achieve coverage of its population and the characteristics of those who remain without cover. The 2008 July-October enhanced health module of the Moldovan Household Budget Survey was used. The survey uses multi-stage random sampling, identifying individuals within households within 150 primary sampling units. Numbers and characteristics of those without insurance were tabulated and the determinants of lack of cover were assessed using multivariate regression. 3760 respondents were interviewed. Seventy-eight per cent were covered by MHI. Factors associated with being uninsured include being self-employed (particularly in agriculture), unemployed, younger age and low income. Respondents who were self-employed in agriculture were over 27 times more likely to be uninsured than those who were employed. Agricultural workers in Moldova are responsible for purchasing their own cover; most respondents cited cost as the main reason for not doing so. While being uninsured has an impact on utilization, financial barriers persist for those with insurance who seek care. The strengths and weaknesses of the MHI system in Moldova provide valuable lessons for policy makers in low- and middle-income countries addressing the challenges of achieving equitable coverage in health insurance schemes and the complex nature of financial barriers to access.

  18. Effects of the Affordable Care Act's Dependent Coverage Mandate on Private Health Insurance Coverage in Urban and Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, Kevin A; Kim, Nam Hyo; Arora, Prachi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) dependent coverage mandate on insurance coverage among young adults in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from 2006-2009 and 2011 waves of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. A difference-in-difference analysis was used to compare changes in full-year private health insurance coverage among young adults aged 19-25 years with an older cohort aged 27-34 years. Separate regressions were estimated for individuals in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas and were tested for a differential impact by area of residence. Full-year private health insurance coverage significantly increased by 9.2 percentage points for young adults compared to the older cohort after the ACA mandate (P = .00). When stratifying the regression model by residence area, insurance coverage among young adults significantly increased by 9.0 percentage points in metropolitan areas (P = .00) and 10.1 percentage points in nonmetropolitan areas (P = .03). These changes were not significantly different from each other (P = .82), which suggests the ACA mandate's effects were not statistically different by area of residence. Although young adults in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas experienced increased access to private health insurance following the ACA's dependent coverage mandate, it did not appear to directly impact rural-urban disparities in health insurance coverage. Despite residents in both areas gaining insurance coverage, over one-third of young adults still lacked access to full-year health insurance coverage. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  19. Transition care: future directions in education, health policy, and outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Niraj; O'Hare, Kitty; Antonelli, Richard C; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    All youth must transition from pediatric to adult-centered medical care. This process is especially difficult for youth with special health care needs. Many youth do not receive the age-appropriate medical care they need and are at risk during this vulnerable time. Previous research has identified barriers that may prevent effective transition, and protocols have been developed to improve the process. Health outcomes related to successful transition have yet to be fully defined. Health care transition can also be influenced by education of providers, but there are gaps in medical education at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Current changes in federal health policy allow improved health care coverage, provide some new financial incentives, and test new structures for transitional care, including the evolution of accountable care organizations (ACO). Future work must test how these systems changes will affect quality of care. Finally, transition protocols exist in various medical subspecialties; however, national survey results show no improvement in transition readiness, and there are no consistent measures of what constitutes transition success. In order to advance the field of transition, research must be done to integrate transition curricula at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels; to provide advance financial incentives and pilot the ACO model in centers providing care to youth during transition; to define outcome measures of importance to transition; and to study the effectiveness of current transition tools on improving these outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustad EC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliative Research Center, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Background: A fragmented health care system leads to an increased demand for continuity of care across health care levels. Research indicates age-related differences during care transition, with the oldest patients having experiences and needs that differ from those of other patients. To meet the older patients’ needs and preferences during care transition, professionals must understand their experiences.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore how patients ≥80 years of age experienced the care transition from hospital to municipal health care services.Methods: The study has a descriptive, explorative design, using semistructured interviews. Fourteen patients aged ≥80 participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis was used to describe the individuals’ experiences during care transition.Results: Two complementary themes emerged during the analysis: “Participation depends on being invited to plan the care transition” and “Managing continuity of care represents a complex and challenging process”.Discussion: Lack of participation, insufficient information, and vague responsibilities among staff during care transition seemed to limit the continuity of care. The patients are the vulnerable part of the care transition process, although they possess important

  1. Transitioning to Adulthood from Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry; Morgan, Wynne

    2017-04-01

    Transitional age foster youth do not typically receive the types of family supports their nonfoster peers enjoy. Many foster youth experience multiple adversities and often fare worse than nonfoster peers on long-term functional outcomes. Governments increasingly recognize their responsibility to act as parents for state dependents transitioning to adulthood and the need to provide services to address social/emotional supports, living skills, finances, housing, education, employment, and physical and mental health. More research is needed to inform the development of effective programs. Transitional age foster youth benefit from policies promoting a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive, and integrated transition system of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Survey of in-house coverage by pediatric intensivists: characterization of 24/7 in-hospital pediatric critical care faculty coverage*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Kyle J; Cheifetz, Ira M; Markovitz, Barry P; Turner, David A

    2014-02-01

    To characterize the current state of 24/7 in-hospital pediatric intensivist coverage in academic PICUs, including perceptions of faculty and trainees regarding the advantages and disadvantages of in-hospital coverage. Cross-sectional observational study via web-based survey. PICUs at North American academic institutions. Pediatric intensivists, pediatric critical care fellows, and pediatric residents. None. A total of 1,323 responses were received representing a center response rate of 74% (147 of 200). Ninety percent of respondents stated that in-hospital coverage is good for patient care, and 85% stated that in-hospital coverage provides safer care. Sixty-three percent of intensivists stated that working in in-hospital models limits academic productivity, and 65% stated that in-hospital models interfere with nonclinical responsibilities. When compared with intensivists in home coverage models, intensivists working in in-hospital models generally had more favorable perceptions of the effects of in-hospital on patient care (p working in in-hospital models increases burnout risk, burnout scores were not different between coverage models. Seventy-nine percent of intensivists currently working at institutions with in-hospital coverage stated that they would prefer to work in an in-hospital coverage model, compared with 31% of those working in a home coverage model (p work at an institution with in-hospital coverage. Further research is needed to objectively delineate the effects of in-hospital coverage on both patients and faculty.

  3. Collaborative Care Transitions Symposium: Insights from Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; Saragosa, Marianne; Zahradnik, Michelle; Maione, Maria; Hindle, Aimee; Santiago, Cecilia; Krock, Murray; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Bulmer, Beverly; Mitchell, Kaleil; McNamee, Colleen; Ramji, Noor

    2017-01-01

    There are promising signs that interprofessional collaborative practice is associated with quality care transitions and improved access to patient-centred healthcare. A one-day symposium was held to increase awareness and capacity to deliver quality collaborative care transitions to interprofessional health disciplines and service users. A mixed methods study was used that included a pre-post survey design and interviews to examine the impact of the symposium on knowledge, attitudes and practice change towards care transitions and collaborative practice with symposium participants. Our survey results revealed a statistically significant increase in only a few of the scores towards care transitions and collaborative practice among post-survey respondents. Three key themes emerged from the qualitative analysis, including: (1) engaging the patient at the heart of interprofessional collaboration and co-design of care transitions; (2) having time to reach out, share and learn from each other; and (3) reflecting, reinforcing and revising practice. Further efforts that engage inter-organizational learning by exchanging knowledge and evaluating these forums are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. 42 CFR 418.21 - Duration of hospice care coverage-Election periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duration of hospice care coverage-Election periods... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.21 Duration of hospice care coverage—Election periods. (a) Subject to the conditions set forth in...

  5. 78 FR 62506 - TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... nonadjunctive dental care or cosmetic surgery) but only if, the later complication represents a separate medical... TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment AGENCY: Office of the...-covered surgery or treatment was necessary to assure adequate availability of health care to the Active...

  6. Coverage of Certain Preventive Services Under the Affordable Care Act. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-14

    This document contains final regulations regarding coverage of certain preventive services under section 2713 of the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act), added by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended, and incorporated into the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and the Internal Revenue Code. Section 2713 of the PHS Act requires coverage without cost sharing of certain preventive health services by non-grandfathered group health plans and health insurance coverage. These regulations finalize provisions from three rulemaking actions: Interim final regulations issued in July 2010 related to coverage of preventive services, interim final regulations issued in August 2014 related to the process an eligible organization uses to provide notice of its religious objection to the coverage of contraceptive services, and proposed regulations issued in August 2014 related to the definition of "eligible organization,'' which would expand the set of entities that may avail themselves of an accommodation with respect to the coverage of contraceptive services.

  7. [Evaluation of dental care coverage in the State Military Police in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Sobrinho, Clóvis; Souza, Luís Eugênio Portela Fernandes de; Chaves, Sônia Cristina Lima

    2008-02-01

    This study seeks to evaluate dental care coverage in the State Military Police in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil, from 2002 to 2004, estimating potential and real coverage rates. A single descriptive study was performed. Calculations were made of potential coverage rates considering hourly workloads of staff dentists and the real rates resulting from actual outpatient treatment. Potential human resources coverage was adequate (1 dentist per 1,618 policemen), while the real coverage rate was considered below the standard proposed by the Brazilian Ministry of Health (0.39 procedures per policeman per year). The low real coverage rate could be related to low productivity, the reasons for which should be investigated in greater depth in future studies, and might include organizational problems and lack of a management system to improve the quality of professional practice, with specifically defined targets.

  8. Health care transition for youth with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Sheila R; Kuhlthau, Karen; Van Cleave, Jeanne; Knapp, Alixandra A; Newacheck, Paul; Perrin, James M

    2012-09-01

    Youth with special health care needs (YSHCN) increasingly live into adulthood, and approximately 500,000 U.S. youth transition from pediatric to adult health care systems annually. Through a systematic literature review, we sought to (1) determine adult outcomes for YSHCN who have no special transition interventions and (2) identify evidence for strategies that lead to better outcomes, in particular, access to adult health care. We searched the medical, nursing, psychology, and social science literature and reviewed selected articles' reference lists. Transition experts also recommended relevant articles. Search criteria included health conditions, transition-related activities, and health care and related outcomes. We selected English-language articles published from 1986 to 2010, with an abstract, description of transition-related interventions (objective 2), and posttransition outcomes. Investigators abstracted study design, population, sample size, description of intervention, data collection methods, and findings. The search yielded 3,370 articles, of which 15 met study criteria. Although many YSHCN appear to make the transition to adult health providers successfully, some experience serious gaps in outcomes; those with more complex conditions or with conditions affecting the nervous system appear to have less good transitions. Some evidence supports introducing YSHCN to adult providers before leaving the pediatric system; one study supports using care coordinators to improve outcomes. Evidence regarding programs to facilitate transition for YSHCN is inconclusive. Weak evidence suggests that meeting adult providers before transfer may facilitate posttransition access to care. We recommend additional studies with strong research designs to guide best practice in preparing YSHCN for adulthood. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. India's Proposed Universal Health Coverage Policy: Evidence for Age Structure Transition Effect and Fiscal Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Muttur Ranganathan

    2016-12-01

    India's High Level Expert Group on Universal Health Coverage in 2011 recommended a universal, public-funded and national health coverage policy. As a plausible forward-looking macroeconomic reform in the health sector, this policy proposal on universal health coverage (UHC) needs to be evaluated for age structure transition effect and fiscal sustainability to strengthen its current design and future implementation. Macroeconomic analyses of the long-term implications of age structure transition and fiscal sustainability on India's proposed UHC policy. A new measure of age-specific UHC is developed by combining the age profile of public and private health consumption expenditure by using the National Transfer Accounts methodology. Different projections of age-specific public health expenditure are calculated over the period 2005-2100 to account for the age structure transition effect. The projections include changes in: (1) levels of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows, (2) levels and shape of the expenditure as gross domestic product grows and expenditure converges to that of developed countries (or convergence scenario) based on the Lee-Carter model of forecasting mortality rates, and (3) levels of the expenditure as India moves toward a UHC policy. Fiscal sustainability under each health expenditure projection is determined by using the measures of generational imbalance and sustainability gap in the Generational Accounting methodology. Public health expenditure is marked by age specificities and the elderly population is costlier to support for their healthcare needs in the future. Given the discount and productivity growth rates, the proposed UHC is not fiscally sustainable under India's current fiscal policies except for the convergence scenario. However, if the income elasticity of public expenditure on social welfare and health expenditure is less than one, fiscal sustainability of the UHC policy is attainable in all scenarios of projected public

  10. State Medicaid Expansions for Parents Led to Increased Coverage and Prenatal Care Utilization among Pregnant Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, Laura R

    2017-12-28

    To evaluate impacts of state Medicaid expansions for low-income parents on the health insurance coverage, pregnancy intention, and use of prenatal care among mothers who became pregnant. Person-level data for women with a live birth from the 1997-2012 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System. The sample was restricted to women who were already parents using information on previous live births and combined with information on state Medicaid policies for low-income parents. I used a measure of expanded generosity of state Medicaid eligibility for low-income parents to estimate changes in health insurance, pregnancy intention, and prenatal care for pregnant mothers associated with Medicaid expansion. I found an increase in prepregnancy health insurance coverage and coverage during pregnancy among pregnant mothers, as well as earlier initiation of prenatal care, associated with the expansions. Among pregnant mothers with less education, I found an increase in the adequacy of prenatal care utilization. Expanded Medicaid coverage for low-income adults has the potential to increase a woman's health insurance coverage prior to pregnancy, as well as her insurance coverage and medical care receipt during pregnancy. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Häggström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients’ transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient’s care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach.

  12. Organizing safe transitions from intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Marie; Bäckström, Britt

    2014-01-01

    Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients' transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU) to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient's care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach.

  13. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  14. Transitional care management in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldonado, Analiza; Hawk, Ofelia; Ormiston, Thomas; Nelson, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Patients who are high risk high cost (HRHC), those with severe or multiple medical issues, and the chronically ill elderly are major drivers of rising health care costs.1 The HRHC patients with complex health conditions and functional limitations may likely go to emergency rooms and hospitals, need more supportive services, and use long-term care facilities.2 As a result, these patient populations are vulnerable to fragmented care and "falling through the cracks".2 A large county health and hospital system in California, USA introduced evidence-based interventions in accordance with the Triple AIM3 focused on patient-centered health care, prevention, health maintenance, and safe transitions across the care continuum. The pilot program embedded a Transitional Care Manager (TCM) within an outpatient Family Medicine clinic to proactively assist HRHC patients with outreach assistance, problem-solving and facilitating smooth transitions of care. This initiative is supported by a collaborative team that included physicians, nurses, specialists, health educator, and pharmacist. The initial 50 patients showed a decrease in Emergency Department (ED) encounters (pre-vs post intervention: 33 vs 17) and hospital admissions (pre-vs post intervention: 32 vs 11), improved patient outcomes, and cost saving. As an example, one patient had 1 ED visit and 5 hospital admission with total charges of $217,355.75 in the 6 months' pre-intervention with no recurrence of ED or hospital admissions in the 6 months of TCM enrollment. The preliminary findings showed improvement of patient-centered outcomes, quality of care, and resource utilization however more data is required.

  15. Association of the Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Provision With Prenatal Care Use and Birth Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, Jamie R; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2018-02-13

    The effect of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) dependent coverage provision on pregnancy-related health care and health outcomes is unknown. To determine whether the dependent coverage provision was associated with changes in payment for birth, prenatal care, and birth outcomes. Retrospective cohort study, using a differences-in-differences analysis of individual-level birth certificate data comparing live births among US women aged 24 to 25 years (exposure group) and women aged 27 to 28 years (control group) before (2009) and after (2011-2013) enactment of the dependent coverage provision. Results were stratified by marital status. The dependent coverage provision of the ACA, which allowed young adults to stay on their parent's health insurance until age 26 years. Primary outcomes were payment source for birth, early prenatal care (first visit in first trimester), and adequate prenatal care (a first trimester visit and 80% of expected visits). Secondary outcomes were cesarean delivery, premature birth, low birth weight, and infant neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission. The study population included 1 379 005 births among women aged 24-25 years (exposure group; 299 024 in 2009; 1 079 981 in 2011-2013), and 1 551 192 births among women aged 27-28 years (control group; 325 564 in 2009; 1 225 628 in 2011-2013). From 2011-2013, compared with 2009, private insurance payment for births increased in the exposure group (36.9% to 35.9% [difference, -1.0%]) compared with the control group (52.4% to 51.1% [difference, -1.3%]), adjusted difference-in-differences, 1.9 percentage points (95% CI, 1.6 to 2.1). Medicaid payment decreased in the exposure group (51.6% to 53.6% [difference, 2.0%]) compared with the control group (37.4% to 39.4% [difference, 1.9%]), adjusted difference-in-differences, -1.4 percentage points (95% CI, -1.7 to -1.2). Self-payment for births decreased in the exposure group (5.2% to 4.3% [difference, -0.9%]) compared with the

  16. Community Care and the Care Transition in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ymke Kelders

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available “Community care” en de zorgtransitie in Nederland De transitie in de gezondheidszorg in Nederland is al jaren een centraal thema in de politiek en het maatschappelijke debat. De recente veranderingen vereisen (opnieuw aandacht in onder andere onderzoek en onderwijs. In dit artikel reflecteren we op de ideologie en doelen die schuilen achter de transitie in Nederland en linken we deze naar het onderzoek en onderwijs dat georganiseerd wordt door het lectoraat Community Care. Wat betekent het “nieuwe denken” van de transitie voor het Community Care gedachtegoed in relatie tot onderwijs en onderzoek? Het lectoraat Community Care van de Hogeschool van Amsterdam houdt zich bezig met verschillende onderzoeksonderwerpen verdeeld onder drie stromingen: informele zorg, sociale inclusie en netwerkversterking. Binnen deze drie onderzoekslijnen wordt er gefocust op zorg door de samenleving en hoe dit gelinkt kan worden aan professionele zorg. In dit artikel zetten we uiteen waarom dit relevant is in onderzoek en onderwijs, zeker wanneer de transitie in Nederland eens temeer benadrukt dat zorg in en door de samenleving belangrijk is, en de rol van de zorgprofessional verandert. Tot slot reflecteren we op de manieren waarop we dit gedachtegoed en het huidige zorgbeleid kunnen vertalen in onderwijs voor studenten die later in het sociaal- en zorgdomein werkzaam zullen zijn. Community Care and the Care Transition in the NetherlandsThe transition taking place within the Dutch healthcare system has been a central theme in politics and public debate for decades. The recent changes again demand the full attention of researchers and educators in the field. In this article, we reflect on the current ideology and goals of the transition and link these to the range of ideas that lie behind the ideal of “community care”. Additionally, we pose the question of what these changes may mean for research and education within the social care domain in general and

  17. Transitions in care for the disabled

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    the ways professionals and citizens engage with feeding assistive robotics by reporting from an ethnographic study in housing institutions for the disabled. Two examples are discussed, a success, where self-reliance is the result and a failure, leading to indignity. By using material semiotics......This paper discusses transitions in care for the disabled as an effect of technologically driven care innovation. Citizens with low or no function in their arms are eligible to use feeding assistive robotics. However, it is difficult to use them and to recruit suitable citizens. This study explores...

  18. Health Care: Information on Coverage Choices for Servicemembers, Former Servicemembers, and Dependents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    services (including dental and vision). Page 4 GAO-15-4 Health Care Coverage 4. To what extent do servicemembers, former servicemembers...may apply to some types of care, such as dental services, durable medical equipment, and prosthetics. 35With respect to long-term care services, VA...includes medically necessary outpatient hospital services, physicians’ services, and durable medical equipment—such as walkers and wheelchairs .36

  19. Transitions of care in anticoagulated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michota F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Franklin Michota Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Anticoagulation is an effective therapeutic means of reducing thrombotic risk in patients with various conditions, including atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, and major surgery. By its nature, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding; this risk is particularly high during transitions of care. Established anticoagulants are not ideal, due to requirements for parenteral administration, narrow therapeutic indices, and/or a need for frequent therapeutic monitoring. The development of effective oral anticoagulants that are administered as a fixed dose, have low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions, do not require regular anticoagulation monitoring, and are suitable for both inpatient and outpatient use is to be welcomed. Three new oral anticoagulants, the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been approved in the US for reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; rivaroxaban is also approved for prophylaxis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery. This review examines current options for anticoagulant therapy, with a focus on maintaining efficacy and safety during transitions of care. The characteristics of dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are discussed in the context of traditional anticoagulant therapy. Keywords: hemorrhagic events, oral anticoagulation, parenteral anticoagulation, stroke, transitions of care

  20. Falling through the Coverage Cracks: How Documentation Status Minimizes Immigrants' Access to Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Tiffany D

    2017-10-01

    Recent policy debates have centered on health reform and who should benefit from such policy. Most immigrants are excluded from the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) due to federal restrictions on public benefits for certain immigrants. But, some subnational jurisdictions have extended coverage options to federally ineligible immigrants. Yet, less is known about the effectiveness of such inclusive reforms for providing coverage and care to immigrants in those jurisdictions. This article examines the relationship between coverage and health care access for immigrants under comprehensive health reform in the Boston metropolitan area. The article uses data from interviews conducted with a total of 153 immigrants, health care professionals, and immigrant and health advocacy organization employees under the Massachusetts and ACA health reforms. Findings indicate that respondents across the various stakeholder groups perceive that immigrants' documentation status minimizes their ability to access health care even when they have health coverage. Specifically, respondents expressed that intersecting public policies, concerns that using health services would jeopardize future legalization proceedings, and immigrants' increased likelihood of deportation en route to medical appointments negatively influenced immigrants' health care access. Thus, restrictive federal policies and national-level anti-immigrant sentiment can undermine inclusive subnational policies in socially progressive places. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  1. Is universal health coverage the practical expression of the right to health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Gorik; Latif, Laila A; Waris, Attiya; Brolan, Claire E; Hammonds, Rachel; Friedman, Eric A; Mulumba, Moses; Forman, Lisa

    2014-02-24

    The present Millennium Development Goals are set to expire in 2015 and their next iteration is now being discussed within the international community. With regards to health, the World Health Organization proposes universal health coverage as a 'single overarching health goal' for the next iteration of the Millennium Development Goals.The present Millennium Development Goals have been criticised for being 'duplicative' or even 'competing alternatives' to international human rights law. The question then arises, if universal health coverage would indeed become the single overarching health goal, replacing the present health-related Millennium Development Goals, would that be more consistent with the right to health? The World Health Organization seems to have anticipated the question, as it labels universal health coverage as "by definition, a practical expression of the concern for health equity and the right to health".Rather than waiting for the negotiations to unfold, we thought it would be useful to verify this contention, using a comparative normative analysis. We found that--to be a practical expression of the right to health--at least one element is missing in present authoritative definitions of universal health coverage: a straightforward confirmation that international assistance is essential, not optional.But universal health coverage is a 'work in progress'. A recent proposal by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network proposed universal health coverage with a set of targets, including a target for international assistance, which would turn universal health coverage into a practical expression of the right to health care.

  2. Health Care as Commons: An Indigenous Approach to Universal Health Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Soon Wong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern health care systems of today are predominantly derived from Western models and are either state owned or under private ownership. Government, through their health policies, generally aim to facilitate access for the majority of the population through the design of their health systems. However, there are communities, such as Indigenous peoples, who do not necessarily fall under the formal protection of state systems. Throughout history, these societies have developed different ways to provide health care to its population. These health care systems are held and managed under different property regimes with their attendant advantages and disadvantages. This article investigates the gaps in health coverage among Indigenous peoples using the Malaysian Indigenous peoples as a case study. It conceptually examines a commons approach to health care systems through a study of the traditional health care system of indigenous peoples and suggests how such an approach can help close this gap in the remaining gaps of universal health coverage.

  3. Bifurcation of Health Policy Regimes: A Study of Sleep Apnea Care and Benefits Coverage in Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchildon, Gregory P; Beck, Caroline A; Katapally, Tarun R; Abonyi, Sylvia; Dosman, James A; Episkenew, Jo-Ann

    2017-05-01

    A complex, poorly understood bifurcated health policy regime exists for Canada's First Nations people for extended health benefits coverage. This research adds to a small body of literature on the regime's impact on access and quality of care and its role in perpetuating health inequities in First Nations populations. Using a case study of sleep apnea care in Saskatchewan, we identified issues of health service access and coverage through a literature review of extended benefits programs, legislation and policies and through 10 key informant interviews with federal and provincial extended benefit program administrators and sleep medicine physicians. Important access and coverage differences were found for First Nations populations, many of which were recognized by federal and provincial policy makers. Despite these, government respondents recommended few policy ameliorations, perhaps due to system complexities, constitutional constraints or political sensitivities. We suggest three policy options to ameliorate current hardships wrought by this policy bifurcation. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. [Coverage of a screening program and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in primary careç].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, Trinidad; Delgado, Iris; Rojas, Daniel; Coria, Marcelo

    2017-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the first cause of blindness during working years. Provide knowledge of screening coverage, prevalence and level of diabetic retinopathy in patients that belong to the Cardiovascular Health Program in primary care. Analysis of retinographies performed to 9076 diabetic patients aged 61 ± 13 years (61% women) adscribed to a Cardiovascular Health program in primary care centers of South-East Metropolitan Santiago. The examination was carried out by the evaluation of retinographies by trained optometrists. The coverage of the screening program was 21%. The prevalence of sight threatening diabetic retinopathy was 3,1%. The prevalence of these entities was 45% higher in people aged between 18 and 44 years than in older people. Their prevalence in urban communities was 32% higher than in rural locations. The coverage of the screening program is low. Diabetic patients aged 18 to 44 years and those coming from urban communities have a higher prevalence of severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Coverage, quality of and barriers to postnatal care in rural Hebei, China: a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Qiong, Wu; van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Yanfeng, Zhang; Shuyi, Zhang; Ye, Li; Wei, Wang; Xiaozhen, Du; Ting, Zhang

    2014-01-18

    Postnatal care is an important link in the continuum of care for maternal and child health. However, coverage and quality of postnatal care are poor in low- and middle-income countries. In 2009, the Chinese government set a policy providing free postnatal care services to all mothers and their newborns in China. Our study aimed at exploring coverage, quality of care, reasons for not receiving and barriers to providing postnatal care after introduction of this new policy. We carried out a mixed method study in Zhao County, Hebei Province, China from July to August 2011. To quantify the coverage, quality of care and reasons for not using postnatal care, we conducted a household survey with 1601 caregivers of children younger than two years of age. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 township maternal and child healthcare workers to evaluate their views on workload, in-service training and barriers to postnatal home visits. Of 1442 (90% of surveyed caregivers) women who completed the postnatal care survey module, 8% received a timely postnatal home visit (within one week after delivery) and 24% of women received postnatal care within 42 days after delivery. Among women who received postnatal care, 37% received counseling or guidance on infant feeding and 32% on cord care. 24% of women reported that the service provider checked jaundice of their newborns and 18% were consulted on danger signs and thermal care of their newborns. Of 991 mothers who did not seek postnatal care within 42 days after birth, 65% of them said that they did not knew about postnatal care and 24% of them thought it was unnecessary. Qualitative findings revealed that staff shortages and inconvenient transportation limited maternal and child healthcare workers in reaching out to women at home. In addition, maternal and child healthcare workers said that in-service training was inadequate and more training on postnatal care, hands-on practice, and supervision were needed. Coverage

  6. [Coverage for birth care in Mexico and its interpretation within the context of maternal mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Schiavon, Raffaela; Uribe-Zúñiga, Patricia; Walker, Dilys; Suárez-López, Leticia; Luna-Gordillo, Rufino; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate health coverage for birth care in Mexico within the frame of maternal mortality reduction. Two information sources were used: 1) The comparison between the results yield by the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Surveys 2006 and 2012 (ENSANUT 2006 and 2012), and 2) the databases monitoring maternal deaths during 2012 (up to December 26), and live births (LB) in Mexico as estimated by the Mexican National Population Council (Conapo). The national coverage for birth care by medical units is nearly 94.4% at the national level, but in some federal entities such as Chiapas (60.5%), Nayarit (87.8%), Guerrero (91.2%), Durango (92.5%), Oaxaca (92.6%), and Puebla (93.4%), coverage remains below the national average. In women belonging to any social security system (eg. IMSS, IMSS Oportunidades, ISSSTE), coverage is almost 99%, whereas in those affiliated to the Mexican Popular Health Insurance (which depends directly from the Federal Ministry of Health), coverage reached 92.9%. In terms of Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR), there are still large disparities among federal states in Mexico, with a national average of 47.0 per 100 000 LB (preliminary data for 2012, up to December 26). The MMR estimation has been updated using the most recent population projections. There is no correlation between the level of institutional birth care and the MMR in Mexico. It is thus necessary not only to guarantee universal birth care by health professionals, but also to provide obstetric care by qualified personnel in functional health services networks, to strengthen the quality of obstetric care, family planning programs, and to promote the implementation of new and innovative health policies that include intersectoral actions and human rights-based approaches targeted to reduce the enormous social inequity still prevailing in Mexico.

  7. Effects of income and dental insurance coverage on need for dental care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Laura; Bonner, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the strength of the associations among income, dental insurance coverage and need for dental care (both urgent and nonurgent) in Canada. Multinomial logistic models were fit to data from the 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey to test unadjusted associations among household income, dental insurance coverage and the need for urgent and nonurgent dental care. Adjusted associations, controlling for socio-demographic variables (age, sex, immigration status, education and province of residence) and oral health habits (brushing, flossing and visits to the dentist) were also evaluated. In the unadjusted model, need for treatment was lower among people with dental insurance than among those without insurance coverage (for urgent treatment: odds ratio [OR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.89; for nonurgent treatment: OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.50-0.70). In addition, there was an income gradient, whereby people with higher income had less need for dental treatment (for urgent treatment: OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00; for nonurgent treatment: OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.98-0.99). Controlling for socio-demographic and oral health variables decreased the magnitude of the association between dental insurance coverage and need for treatment (for urgent treatment: OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.68-0.95; for nonurgent treatment: OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.63-0.92). An interaction term between dental coverage and income was significant in relation to the need for nonurgent treatment: among lower-income individuals, having insurance slightly decreased the odds of needing nonurgent treatment, with this decrease in odds becoming greater for middle-income earners and even greater for high-income earners. Income-related inequality in need for dental care exists even in the presence of dental insurance coverage and good dental hygiene habits. These findings highlight the need for increased access to dental care for low-income populations and families living in poverty.

  8. Feature article coverage of Australian out-of-home care: portrayals and policy reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCosker, Laura; Lonne, Bob; Gillespie, Kerri; Marston, Greg

    2014-05-01

    This article examines the issues that are typically identified in feature articles written about out-of-home care and how those issues are constructed and portrayed. It also considers the potential impact of the coverage upon the policy debates and outcomes that were occurring at the time. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Medicaid spending on contraceptive coverage and pregnancy-related care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective Up to 50% of pregnancies are unintended in the United States, and the healthcare costs associated with pregnancy are the most expensive among hospitalized conditions. The current study aims to assess Medicaid spending on various methods of contraception and on pregnancy care including unintended pregnancies. Methods We analyzed Medicaid health claims data from 2004 to 2010. Women 14–49 years of age initiating contraceptive methods and pregnant women were included as separate cohorts. Medicaid spending was summarized using mean all-cause and contraceptive healthcare payments per patient per month (PPPM) over a follow-up period of up to 12 months. Medicaid payments were also estimated in 2008 per female member of childbearing age per month (PFCPM) and per member per month (PMPM). Medicaid payments on unintended pregnancies were also evaluated PFCPM and PMPM in 2008. Results For short-acting reversible contraception (SARC) users, all-cause payments and contraceptive payments PPPM were respectively $365 and $18.3 for oral contraceptive (OC) users, $308 and $19.9 for transdermal users, $215 and $21.6 for vaginal ring users, and $410 and $8.8 for injectable users. For long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users (follow-up of 9–10 months), corresponding payments were $194 and $36.8 for IUD users, and $237 and $29.9 for implant users. Pregnancy cohort all-cause mean healthcare payments PPPM were $610. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives were $1.44 and $0.54, while corresponding costs of pregnancies were estimated at $39.91 and $14.81, respectively. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives represented a small fraction at 6.56% ($1.44/$21.95) and 6.63% ($0.54/$8.15), respectively of the estimated payments for unintended pregnancy. Conclusions This study of a large sample of Medicaid beneficiaries demonstrated that, over a follow-up period of 12 months, Medicaid payments for pregnancy were considerably higher than payments for either SARC or

  10. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health Care Personnel - United States, 2016-17 Influenza Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carla L; Yue, Xin; Ball, Sarah W; Fink, Rebecca; de Perio, Marie A; Laney, A Scott; Williams, Walter W; Lindley, Megan C; Graitcer, Samuel B; Lu, Peng-Jun; Devlin, Rebecca; Greby, Stacie M

    2017-09-29

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all health care personnel (HCP) receive an annual influenza vaccination to reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality among HCP and their patients and to reduce absenteeism among HCP (1-4). To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among HCP in the United States during the 2016-17 influenza season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 2,438 HCP. Overall, 78.6% of survey respondents reported receiving vaccination during the 2016-17 season, similar to reported coverage in the previous three influenza seasons (5). Vaccination coverage continued to be higher among HCP working in hospitals (92.3%) and lower among HCP working in ambulatory (76.1%) and long-term care (LTC) (68.0%) settings. As in previous seasons, coverage was highest among HCP who were required by their employer to be vaccinated (96.7%) and lowest among HCP working in settings where vaccination was not required, promoted, or offered on-site (45.8%). Implementing workplace strategies found to improve vaccination coverage among HCP, including vaccination requirements or active promotion of on-site vaccinations at no cost, can help ensure that HCP and patients are protected against influenza (6).

  11. Coverage of certain preventive services under the Affordable Care Act. Interim final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-27

    This document contains interim final regulations regarding coverage of certain preventive services under section 2713 of the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act), added by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended, and incorporated into the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and the Internal Revenue Code. Section 2713 of the PHS Act requires coverage without cost sharing of certain preventive health services by non-grandfathered group health plans and health insurance coverage. Among these services are women's preventive health services, as specified in guidelines supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). As authorized by the current regulations, and consistent with the HRSA Guidelines, group health plans established or maintained by certain religious employers (and group health insurance coverage provided in connection with such plans) are exempt from the otherwise applicable requirement to cover certain contraceptive services. Additionally, under current regulations, accommodations are available with respect to the contraceptive coverage requirement for group health plans established or maintained by eligible organizations (and group health insurance coverage provided in connection with such plans), and student health insurance coverage arranged by eligible organizations that are institutions of higher education, that effectively exempt them from this requirement. The regulations establish a mechanism for separately furnishing payments for contraceptive services on behalf of participants and beneficiaries of the group health plans of eligible organizations that avail themselves of an accommodation, and enrollees and dependents of student health coverage arranged by eligible organizations that are institutions of higher education that avail themselves of an accommodation. These interim final regulations augment current regulations in light of the Supreme Court's interim order in connection with an

  12. Evaluation of spina bifida transitional care practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Maryellen S; Thibadeau, Judy; Struwe, Sara; Ramen, Lisa; Ouyang, Lijing; Routh, Jonathan

    2017-12-11

    Recent studies have revealed that the lack of continuity in preparing patients with spina bifida to transition into adult-centered care may have detrimental health consequences. We sought to describe current practices of transitional care services offered at spina bifida clinics in the US. Survey design followed the validated transitional care survey by the National Cystic Fibrosis center. Survey was amended for spina bifida. Face validity was completed. Survey was distributed to registered clinics via the Spina Bifida Association. Results were analyzed via descriptive means. Total of 34 clinics responded. Over 90 characteristics were analyzed per clinic. The concept of transition is discussed with most patients. Most clinics discuss mobility, bowel and bladder management, weight, and education plans consistently. Most do not routinely evaluate their process or discuss insurance coverage changes with patients. Only 30% communicate with the adult providers. Sexuality, pregnancy and reproductive issues are not readily discussed in most clinics. Overall clinics self-rate themselves as a 5/10 in their ability to provide services for their patients during transition. Characteristics of current transitional care services and formal transitional care programs at US clinics show wide variances in what is offered to patients and families.

  13. Influenza vaccination coverage among health-care personnel--United States, 2012-13 influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Routine influenza vaccination of health-care personnel (HCP) every influenza season can reduce influenza-related illness and its potentially serious consequences among HCP and their patients. To protect HCP and their patients, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all HCP be vaccinated against influenza during each influenza season. To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among HCP during the 2012-13 season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 1,944 self-selected HCP during April 1-16, 2013. This report summarizes the results of that survey, which found that, overall, 72.0% of HCP reported having had an influenza vaccination for the 2012-13 season, an increase from 66.9% vaccination coverage during the 2011-12 season. By occupation type, coverage was 92.3% among physicians, 89.1% among pharmacists, 88.5% among nurse practitioners/physician assistants, and 84.8% among nurses. By occupational setting, vaccination coverage was highest among hospital-based HCP (83.1%) and was lowest among HCP at long-term care facilities (LTCF) (58.9%). Vaccination coverage was higher for HCP in occupational settings offering vaccination on-site at no cost for one (75.7%) or multiple (86.2%) days compared with HCP in occupational settings not offering vaccination on-site at no cost (55.3%). Widespread implementation of comprehensive influenza vaccination strategies that focus on improving access to vaccination services is needed to improve HCP vaccination coverage. Influenza vaccination of HCP in all health-care settings might be increased by providing 1) HCP with information on vaccination benefits and risks for themselves and their patients, 2) vaccinations in the workplace at convenient locations and times, and 3) influenza vaccinations at no cost.

  14. Transitional care in skilled nursing facilities: a multiple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toles, Mark; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Naylor, Mary D; Barroso, Julie; Anderson, Ruth A

    2016-05-17

    Among hospitalized older adults who transfer to skilled nursing facilities (SNF) for short stays and subsequently transfer to home, twenty two percent require additional emergency department or hospital care within 30 days. Transitional care services, that provide continuity and coordination of care as older adults transition between settings of care, decrease complications during transitions in care, however, they have not been examined in SNFs. Thus, this study described how existing staff in SNFs delivered transitional care to identify opportunities for improvement. In this prospective, multiple case study, a case was defined as an individual SNF. Using a sampling plan to assure maximum variation among SNFs, three SNFs were purposefully selected and 54 staff, patients and family caregivers participated in data collection activities, which included observations of care (N = 235), interviews (N = 66) and review of documents (N = 35). Thematic analysis was used to describe similarities and differences in transitional care provided in the SNFs as well as organizational structures and the quality of care-team interactions that supported staff who delivered transitional care services. Staff in Case 1 completed most key transitional care services. Staff in Cases 2 and 3, however, had incomplete and/or absent services. Staff in Case 1, but not in Cases 2 and 3, reported a clear understanding of the need for transitional care, used formal transitional care team meetings and tracking tools to plan care, and engaged in robust team interactions. Organizational structures in SNFs that support staff and interactions among patients, families and staff appeared to promote the ability of staff in SNFs to deliver evidence-based transitional care services. Findings suggest practical approaches to develop new care routines, tools, and staff training materials to enhance the ability of existing SNF staff to effectively deliver transitional care.

  15. Achieving Effective Universal Health Coverage And Diagonal Approaches To Care For Chronic Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Bhadelia, Afsan; Atun, Rifat; Frenk, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Health systems in low- and middle-income countries were designed to provide episodic care for acute conditions. However, the burden of disease has shifted to be overwhelmingly dominated by chronic conditions and illnesses that require health systems to function in an integrated manner across a spectrum of disease stages from prevention to palliation. Low- and middle-income countries are also aiming to ensure health care access for all through universal health coverage. This article proposes a framework of effective universal health coverage intended to meet the challenge of chronic illnesses. It outlines strategies to strengthen health systems through a "diagonal approach." We argue that the core challenge to health systems is chronicity of illness that requires ongoing and long-term health care. The example of breast cancer within the broader context of health system reform in Mexico is presented to illustrate effective universal health coverage along the chronic disease continuum and across health systems functions. The article concludes with recommendations to strengthen health systems in order to achieve effective universal health coverage. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Psychologists and the Transition From Pediatrics to Adult Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wendy N; Monaghan, Maureen C; Gilleland Marchak, Jordan; Driscoll, Kimberly A; Hilliard, Marisa E

    2015-11-01

    Guidelines for optimal transition call for multidisciplinary teams, including psychologists, to address youth and young adults' multifactorial needs. This study aimed to characterize psychologists' roles in and barriers to involvement in transition from pediatric to adult health care. Psychologists were invited via professional listservs to complete an online survey about practice settings, roles in transition programming, barriers to involvement, and funding sources. Participants also responded to open-ended questions about their experiences in transition programs. One hundred participants responded to the survey. Involvement in transition was reported at multiple levels from individual patient care to institutional transition programming, and 65% reported more than one level of involvement. Direct clinical care (88%), transition-related research (50%), and/or leadership (44%) involvement were reported, with 59% reporting more than one role. Respondents often described advocating for their involvement on transition teams. Various sources of funding were reported, yet, 23% reported no funding for their work. Barriers to work in transition were common and included health care systems issues such as poor coordination among providers or lack of a clear transition plan within the clinic/institution. Psychologists assume numerous roles in the transition of adolescents from pediatric to adult health care. With training in health care transition-related issues, psychologists are ideally positioned to partner with other health professionals to develop and implement transition programs in multidisciplinary settings, provided health care system barriers can be overcome. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Essential health care among Mexican indigenous people in a universal coverage context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servan-Mori, Edson; Pelcastre-Villafuerte, Blanca; Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Montoya-Rodríguez, Arain

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the influence of indigenous condition on essential health care among Mexican children, older people and women in reproductive age. The influence of indigenous condition on the probability of receiving medical care due to acute respiratory infection (ARI) and acute diarrheal disease (ADD), vaccination coverage; and antenatal care (ANC) was analyzed using the 2012 National Health Survey and non-experimental matching methods. Indigenous condition does not influence per-se vaccination coverage (in indigenous and older adult increases 9% the probability of receiving a fulfilled vaccination schedule. Unfavorable structural conditions in which Mexican indigenous live constitutes the persistent mechanisms of their health vulnerability. Public policy should consider this level of intervention, in a way that intensive and focalized health strategies contribute to improve their health condition and life.

  18. Fostering Health: The Affordable Care Act, Medicaid, and Youth Transitioning from Foster Care. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Simmons, Renée; Dworsky, Amy; Tongue, Denzel; Hulbutta, Marikate

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act includes language that requires states to provide Medicaid coverage to youth who were in foster care in their state before aging out of the child welfare system. However, most states have interpreted the law differently for youth who move to their state after aging out, determining that automatic Medicaid coverage is an…

  19. Is universal health coverage the practical expression of the right to health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The present Millennium Development Goals are set to expire in 2015 and their next iteration is now being discussed within the international community. With regards to health, the World Health Organization proposes universal health coverage as a ‘single overarching health goal’ for the next iteration of the Millennium Development Goals. The present Millennium Development Goals have been criticised for being ‘duplicative’ or even ‘competing alternatives’ to international human rights law. The question then arises, if universal health coverage would indeed become the single overarching health goal, replacing the present health-related Millennium Development Goals, would that be more consistent with the right to health? The World Health Organization seems to have anticipated the question, as it labels universal health coverage as “by definition, a practical expression of the concern for health equity and the right to health”. Rather than waiting for the negotiations to unfold, we thought it would be useful to verify this contention, using a comparative normative analysis. We found that – to be a practical expression of the right to health – at least one element is missing in present authoritative definitions of universal health coverage: a straightforward confirmation that international assistance is essential, not optional. But universal health coverage is a ‘work in progress’. A recent proposal by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network proposed universal health coverage with a set of targets, including a target for international assistance, which would turn universal health coverage into a practical expression of the right to health care. PMID:24559232

  20. Receipt of health care transition counseling in the national survey of adult transition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Whitworth, Ruth; Gunn, Laura; Butterfield, Ryan; Lukens-Bull, Katryne; Wood, David

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine factors associated with receiving health care transition counseling services as reported by young adults. We analyzed data from the 2007 Survey of Adult Transition and Health, a nationwide survey of young adults aged 19 to 23 years conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, to explore self-reported receipt of services to support transition from pediatric to adult health care. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify whether sociodemographic characteristics, health status, or markers of provider-youth health communication were associated with the receipt of 3 key transition counseling services. Among the 1865 Survey of Adult Transition and Health respondents, 55% reported that their physicians or other health care providers had discussed how their needs would change with age, 53% reported that their physicians or other health care providers had discussed how to obtain health insurance as an adult, and 62% reported having participated in a transition plan in school. Only 24% reported receiving all 3 transition counseling services. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, although gender, age, and race were not associated with increased receipt of the transition-related outcomes, markers of strong communication with the health system were associated with increased rates of receiving transition guidance. Many young adults reported not having received health care transition counseling. Provider-youth communication was associated with increased health care transition guidance, and suggests that a medical home model that promotes anticipatory guidance for health care transition could promote improvements in the transition process.

  1. Confronting the fear factor: the coverage/access disparity in universal health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litow, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    Since their introduction following World War II, single-payer health care systems and universally mandated health care systems have stumbled, but in their pratfalls are many lessons that apply to the universal health care proposals currently on the table in the United States. The critical and often-over-looked point is that universal coverage does not guarantee that individuals will receive needed care--In many cases guaranteed access to care is a false promise or available only on a delayed timetable. A more feasible alternative lies in providing a safety net for citizens who truly need care and financial support with an appropriate system of checks and balances--without disrupting the economic and actuarial fundamental principles of supply and demand and risk classification.

  2. Income, dental insurance coverage, and financial barriers to dental care among Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locker, David; Maggirias, John; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    To explore the issue of affordability in dental care by assessing associations between income, dental insurance, and financial barriers to dental care in Canadian adults. Data were collection from a national sample of adults 18 years and over using a telephone interview survey based on random digit dialing. Questions were asked about household income and dental insurance coverage along with three questions concerning cost barriers to accessing dental care. These were: "In the past three years...has the cost of dental care been a financial burden to you?...have you delayed or avoided going to a dentist because of the cost?...have you been unable to have all of the treatment recommended by your dentist because of the cost?" The survey was completed by 2,027 people, over half of which (56.0%) were covered by private dental insurance and 4.9 percent by public dental programs. The remainder, 39.1 percent, paid for dental care out-of-pocket. Only 19.3 percent of the lowest income group had private coverage compared with 80.5 percent of the highest income group (P report financial barriers to care. While private dental insurance reduced financial barriers to dental care, it did not entirely eliminate it, particularly for those with low incomes. Those reporting such barriers visited the dentist less frequently and had poorer oral health outcomes after controlling for the effects of income and insurance coverage. Canadian adults report financial barriers to dental care, especially those of low income. These barriers appear to have negative effects with respect to dental visiting and oral health outcomes. For policy, appropriateness will be key, as clarity needs to be established in terms of what constitutes actual need, and thus which dental services can then be considered a public health response to affordability. © 2011 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. Characteristics of Young Adults Enrolled Through the Affordable Care Act-Dependent Coverage Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Zhu, Shiyun; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sociodemographic and health care-related characteristics of young adults covered through the Affordable Care Act (ACA)-dependent coverage expansion. Our sample consisted of 36,802 young adults aged 19-25 years from 2011 to 2014 National Health Interview Survey. Sociodemographic differences among young adults with the four insurance types were described: privately insured under parents, privately insured under self/spouse, publicly insured, and uninsured. Multivariable logistic models were fitted to compare those covered under parent with those covered through other traditional insurance types, in terms of the following outcomes: health status, health behaviors, insurance history and experience, access to care, care utilization, and receipt of preventive service, controlling for sociodemographic factors. Young adults who were covered under their parents' insurance were most likely to be college students and non-Hispanic whites. These young adults also had more stable insurance, better access to care, better care utilization patterns, and reported better health status, compared to their peers. The beneficiaries of the ACA-dependent coverage expansion were more likely to be college students from families with high socioeconomic status. Coverage under parents was associated with improved access to care and health outcomes among young adults. The enrollees through the ACA represent the healthiest subgroup of young adults and those with the best care utilization patterns, suggesting that the added cost relative to premium for insurers from this population will likely be minimal. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Health insurance coverage among women of reproductive age before and after implementation of the affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel K; Sonfield, Adam

    2016-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act's expansions to Medicaid and private coverage are of particular importance for women of childbearing age, who have numerous preventive care and reproductive health care needs. We conducted two national surveys, one in 2012 and one in 2015, collecting information about health insurance coverage and access to care from 8000 women aged 18-39. We examine type of insurance and continuity of coverage between time periods, including poverty status and whether or not women live in a state that expanded Medicaid coverage. The proportion of women who were uninsured declined by almost 40% (from 19% to 12%), though several groups, including US-born and foreign-born Latinas, experienced no significant declines. Among low-income women in states that expanded Medicaid, the proportion uninsured declined from 38% to 15%, largely due to an increase in Medicaid coverage (from 40% to 62%). Declines in uninsurance in nonexpansion states were only marginally significant. Despite substantial improvements in health insurance coverage, significant gaps remain, particularly in states that have not expanded Medicaid and for Latinas. This analysis examines changes in insurance coverage that occurred after the Affordable Care Act was implemented. While coverage has improved for many populations, sizeable gaps in coverage remain for Latinas and women in states that did not expand Medicaid. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measuring coverage in MNCH: a validation study linking population survey derived coverage to maternal, newborn, and child health care records in rural China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available Accurate data on coverage of key maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH interventions are crucial for monitoring progress toward the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Coverage estimates are primarily obtained from routine population surveys through self-reporting, the validity of which is not well understood. We aimed to examine the validity of the coverage of selected MNCH interventions in Gongcheng County, China.We conducted a validation study by comparing women's self-reported coverage of MNCH interventions relating to antenatal and postnatal care, mode of delivery, and child vaccinations in a community survey with their paper- and electronic-based health care records, treating the health care records as the reference standard. Of 936 women recruited, 914 (97.6% completed the survey. Results show that self-reported coverage of these interventions had moderate to high sensitivity (0.57 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.50-0.63] to 0.99 [95% CI: 0.98-1.00] and low to high specificity (0 to 0.83 [95% CI: 0.80-0.86]. Despite varying overall validity, with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC ranging between 0.49 [95% CI: 0.39-0.57] and 0.90 [95% CI: 0.88-0.92], bias in the coverage estimates at the population level was small to moderate, with the test to actual positive (TAP ratio ranging between 0.8 and 1.5 for 24 of the 28 indicators examined. Our ability to accurately estimate validity was affected by several caveats associated with the reference standard. Caution should be exercised when generalizing the results to other settings.The overall validity of self-reported coverage was moderate across selected MNCH indicators. However, at the population level, self-reported coverage appears to have small to moderate degree of bias. Accuracy of the coverage was particularly high for indicators with high recorded coverage or low recorded coverage but high specificity. The study provides insights into the accuracy of

  6. Measuring coverage in MNCH: indicators for global tracking of newborn care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allisyn C Moran

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality accounts for 43% of under-five mortality. Consequently, improving newborn survival is a global priority. However, although there is increasing consensus on the packages and specific interventions that need to be scaled up to reduce neonatal mortality, there is a lack of clarity on the indicators needed to measure progress. In 2008, in an effort to improve newborn survival, the Newborn Indicators Technical Working Group (TWG was convened by the Saving Newborn Lives program at Save the Children to provide a forum to develop the indicators and standard measurement tools that are needed to measure coverage of key newborn interventions. The TWG, which included evaluation and measurement experts, researchers, individuals from United Nations agencies and non-governmental organizations, and donors, prioritized improved consistency of measurement of postnatal care for women and newborns and of immediate care behaviors and practices for newborns. In addition, the TWG promoted increased data availability through inclusion of additional questions in nationally representative surveys, such as the United States Agency for International Development-supported Demographic and Health Surveys and the United Nations Children's Fund-supported Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys. Several studies have been undertaken that have informed revisions of indicators and survey tools, and global postnatal care coverage indicators have been finalized. Consensus has been achieved on three additional indicators for care of the newborn after birth (drying, delayed bathing, and cutting the cord with a clean instrument, and on testing two further indicators (immediate skin-to-skin care and applications to the umbilical cord. Finally, important measurement gaps have been identified regarding coverage data for evidence-based interventions, such as Kangaroo Mother Care and care seeking for newborn infection.

  7. Measuring the "triple aim" in transition care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Megan; McManus, Margaret; White, Patience; Davidson, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Without adequate support, adolescents transitioning from the pediatric to the adult health care system are at increased risk for poor health outcomes. Numerous interventions attempt to improve this transition, yet few comprehensively evaluate efficacy. To advance evaluation methods and ultimately the quality of transition services, it is necessary to understand the current state of health care transition measurement. This study examines and categorizes transition measures by using the "Triple Aim" framework of experience of care, population health, and cost of care. Ovid Medline and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published between 1995 and 2013. Two reviewers independently screened studies and included those that evaluated the impact of a health care transition intervention. Measures were subsequently classified according to population health, experience of care, and costs of care. Of the 2282 studies initially identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Population health measures were used in 27 studies, with disease-specific measures collected most frequently. Fifteen studies measured cost, most often service utilization. Eight studies measured experience of care, with satisfaction assessed most commonly. Only 3 studies examined all 3 domains of the "Triple Aim." Transition interventions described in the gray literature were not reviewed. Transition programs are inconsistently evaluated in terms of their impact on population health, patient experience, and cost. To demonstrate improvement in the transition from pediatric to adult health care, a more robust and consistent set of measures is needed. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Uninsured migrants: Health insurance coverage and access to care among Mexican return migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Wassink

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite an expansive body of research on health and access to medical care among Mexican immigrants in the United States, research on return migrants focuses primarily on their labor market mobility and contributions to local development. Objective: Motivated by recent scholarship that documents poor mental and physical health among Mexican return migrants, this study investigates return migrants' health insurance coverage and access to medical care. Methods: I use descriptive and multivariate techniques to analyze data from the 2009 and 2014 rounds of Mexico's National Survey of Demographic Dynamics (ENADID, combined n = 632,678. Results: Analyses reveal a large and persistent gap between recent return migrants and nonmigrants, despite rising overall health coverage in Mexico. Multivariate analyses suggest that unemployment among recent arrivals contributes to their lack of insurance. Relative to nonmigrants, recently returned migrants rely disproportionately on private clinics, pharmacies, self-medication, or have no regular source of care. Mediation analysis suggests that returnees' high rate of uninsurance contributes to their inadequate access to care. Contribution: This study reveals limited access to medical care among the growing population of Mexican return migrants, highlighting the need for targeted policies to facilitate successful reintegration and ensure access to vital resources, such as health care.

  9. Uninsured Migrants: Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care Among Mexican Return Migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassink, Joshua

    2018-01-01

    Despite an expansive body of research on health and access to medical care among Mexican immigrants in the United States, research on return migrants focuses primarily on their labor market mobility and contributions to local development. Motivated by recent scholarship that documents poor mental and physical health among Mexican return migrants, this study investigates return migrants' health insurance coverage and access to medical care. I use descriptive and multivariate techniques to analyze data from the 2009 and 2014 rounds of Mexico's National Survey of Demographic Dynamics (ENADID, combined n=632,678). Analyses reveal a large and persistent gap between recent return migrants and non-migrants, despite rising overall health coverage in Mexico. Multivariate analyses suggest that unemployment among recent arrivals contributes to their lack of insurance. Relative to non-migrants, recently returned migrants rely disproportionately on private clinics, pharmacies, self-medication, or have no regular source of care. Mediation analysis suggests that returnees' high rate of uninsurance contributes to their inadequate access to care. This study reveals limited access to medical care among the growing population of Mexican return migrants, highlighting the need for targeted policies to facilitate successful reintegration and ensure access to vital resources such as health care.

  10. Reducing Young Adults' Health Care Spending through the ACA Expansion of Dependent Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Novak, Priscilla

    2017-10-01

    To estimate health care expenditure trends among young adults ages 19-25 before and after the 2010 implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision that extended eligibility for dependent private health insurance coverage. Nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2008 to 2012. We conducted repeated cross-sectional analyses and employed a difference-in-differences quantile regression model to estimate health care expenditure trends among young adults ages 19-25 (the treatment group) and ages 27-29 (the control group). Our results show that the treatment group had 14 percent lower overall health care expenditures and 21 percent lower out-of-pocket payments compared with the control group in 2011-2012. The overall reduction in health care expenditures among young adults ages 19-25 in years 2011-2012 was more significant at the higher end of the health care expenditure distribution. Young adults ages 19-25 had significantly higher emergency department costs at the 10th percentile in 2011-2012. Differences in the trends of costs of private health insurance and doctor visits are not statistically significant. Increased health insurance enrollment as a consequence of the ACA provision for dependent coverage has successfully reduced spending and catastrophic expenditures, providing financial protections for young adults. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Medicaid Expansion Under the Affordable Care Act and Insurance Coverage in Rural and Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Aparna; Hendryx, Michael; Simon, Kosali

    2017-04-01

    To analyze the differential rural-urban impacts of the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion on low-income childless adults' health insurance coverage. Using data from the American Community Survey years 2011-2015, we conducted a difference-in-differences regression analysis to test for changes in the probability of low-income childless adults having insurance in states that expanded Medicaid versus states that did not expand, in rural versus urban areas. Analyses employed survey weights, adjusted for covariates, and included a set of falsification tests as well as sensitivity analyses. Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act increased the probability of Medicaid coverage for targeted populations in rural and urban areas, with a significantly greater increase in rural areas (P rural populations (P urban and rural low-income populations, and it specifically increased Medicaid coverage more in rural versus urban populations. There was some evidence that the expansion was accompanied by some shifting from individual purchased insurance to Medicaid in rural areas, and there is a need for future work to understand the implications of this shift on expenditures, access to care and utilization. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  12. Environmental conditions in health care facilities in low- and middle-income countries: Coverage and inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2018-01-11

    Safe environmental conditions and the availability of standard precaution items are important to prevent and treat infection in health care facilities (HCFs) and to achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets for health and water, sanitation, and hygiene. Baseline coverage estimates for HCFs have yet to be formed for the SDGs; and there is little evidence describing inequalities in coverage. To address this, we produced the first coverage estimates of environmental conditions and standard precaution items in HCFs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); and explored factors associated with low coverage. Data from monitoring reports and peer-reviewed literature were systematically compiled; and information on conditions, service levels, and inequalities tabulated. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with low coverage. Data for 21 indicators of environmental conditions and standard precaution items were compiled from 78 LMICs which were representative of 129,557 HCFs. 50% of HCFs lack piped water, 33% lack improved sanitation, 39% lack handwashing soap, 39% lack adequate infectious waste disposal, 73% lack sterilization equipment, and 59% lack reliable energy services. Using nationally representative data from six countries, 2% of HCFs provide all four of water, sanitation, hygiene, and waste management services. Statistically significant inequalities in coverage exist between HCFs by: urban-rural setting, managing authority, facility type, and sub-national administrative unit. We identified important, previously undocumented inequalities and environmental health challenges faced by HCFs in LMICs. The information and analyses provide evidence for those engaged in improving HCF conditions to develop evidence-based policies and efficient programs, enhance service delivery systems, and make better use of available resources. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  13. Using Quality Improvement in Resident Education to Improve Transition Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volertas, Sofija D; Rossi-Foulkes, Rita

    2017-05-01

    The importance of a specific transition process is recognized by many health organizations. Got Transition, a cooperative endeavor aimed at improving the transition from pediatric to adult health care, developed Six Core Elements defining the basic components of health care transition support. In this article, we review the Six Core Elements by presenting a model that combines resident quality improvement and transition care training. In this Internal Medicine-Pediatrics residency program, ambulatory training for residents takes place in a combined adult and pediatric clinic. Aligned with the Six Core Elements, the program has crafted and disseminated a transition policy for the practice, designed a portable health summary template for the electronic medical record (EMR), created EMR tools for assessing transition readiness and setting transition goals, formed a registry of patients, and audited charts. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e203-e206.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Adolescent and young adult oncology: transition of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, David R; Brugieres, Laurence

    2008-05-01

    The fundamental purposes underlying formal health care transition from the pediatric to adult setting for young adult survivors of childhood cancer are to facilitate the continuous, medically and developmentally appropriate implementation of risk-based guidelines for the monitoring and management of late effects of childhood cancer and its treatment; and to support the normal maturational processes involved with growing from childhood to adulthood. To achieve these, this article identifies specific goals and action items in the following key areas: Models of Transitional Care, Survivor/Family Education, Post-Transitional Care Outcomes, Education of Health Care Professionals, and Health Care Policy and Advocacy. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Insurers' policies on coverage for behavior management services and the impact of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton L

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on dental insurance coverage for behavior management services depends upon the child's source of insurance (Medicaid, CHIP, private commercial) and the policies that govern each such source. This contribution describes historical and projected sources of pediatric dental coverage, catalogues the seven behavior codes used by dentists, compares how often they are billed by pediatric and general dentists, assesses payment policies and practices for behavioral services across coverage sources, and describes how ACA coverage policies may impact each source. Differences between Congressional intent to ensure comprehensive oral health services with meaningful consumer protections for all legal-resident children and regulatory action by the Departments of Treasury and Health and Human Services are explored to explain how regulations fail to meet Congressional intent as of 2014. The ACA may additionally impact pediatric dentistry practice, including dentists' behavior management services, by expanding pediatric dental training and safety net delivery sites and by stimulating the evolution of novel payment and delivery systems designed to move provider incentives away from procedure-based payments and toward health outcome-based payments.

  16. Racial Disparities in Access to Care Under Conditions of Universal Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Arjumand A; Wang, Susan; Quinn, Kelly; Nguyen, Quynh C; Christy, Antony Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Racial disparities in access to regular health care have been reported in the U.S., but little is known about the extent of disparities in societies with universal coverage. To investigate the extent of racial disparities in access to care under conditions of universal coverage by observing the association between race and regular access to a doctor in Canada. Racial disparities in access to a regular doctor were calculated using the largest available source of nationally representative data in Canada--the Canadian Community Health Survey. Surveys from 2000-2010 were analyzed in 2014. Multinomial regression analyses predicted odds of having a regular doctor for each racial group compared to whites. Analyses were stratified by immigrant status--Canadian-born versus shorter-term immigrant versus longer-term immigrants--and controlled for sociodemographics and self-rated health. Racial disparities in Canada, a country with universal coverage, were far more muted than those previously reported in the U.S. Only among longer-term Latin American immigrants (OR=1.90, 95% CI=1.45, 2.08) and Canadian-born Aboriginals (OR=1.34, 95% CI=1.22, 1.47) were significant disparities noted. Among shorter-term immigrants, all Asians were more likely than whites, and among longer-term immigrants, South Asians were more like than whites, to have a regular doctor. Universal coverage may have a major impact on reducing racial disparities in access to health care, although among some subgroups, other factors may also play a role above and beyond health insurance. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving equity in health care financing in China during the progression towards Universal Health Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Palmer, Andrew J; Si, Lei

    2017-12-29

    China is reforming the way it finances health care as it moves towards Universal Health Coverage (UHC) after the failure of market-oriented mechanisms for health care. Improving financing equity is a major policy goal of health care system during the progression towards universal coverage. We used progressivity analysis and dominance test to evaluate the financing channels of general taxation, pubic health insurance, and out-of-pocket (OOP) payments. In 2012 a survey of 8854 individuals in 3008 households recorded the socioeconomic and demographic status, and health care payments of those households. The overall Kakwani index (KI) of China's health care financing system is 0.0444. For general tax KI was -0.0241 (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.0315 to -0.0166). The indices for public health schemes (Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance, Urban Resident's Basic Medical Insurance, New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme) were respectively 0.1301 (95% CI: 0.1008 to 0.1594), -0.1737 (95% CI: -0.2166 to -0.1308), and -0.5598 (95% CI: -0.5830 to -0.5365); and for OOP payments KI was 0.0896 (95%CI: 0.0345 to 0.1447). OOP payments are still the dominant part of China's health care finance system. China's health care financing system is not really equitable. Reducing the proportion of indirect taxes would considerably improve health care financing equity. The flat-rate contribution mechanism is not recommended for use in public health insurance schemes, and more attention should be given to optimizing benefit packages during China's progression towards UHC.

  18. 9 CFR 3.90 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.90 Section 3.90 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Primates 2 Transportation Standards § 3.90 Care in transit. (a) Surface transportation (ground and water...

  19. 9 CFR 3.39 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.39 Section 3.39 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Pigs and Hamsters Transportation Standards § 3.39 Care in transit. (a) During surface transportation...

  20. 9 CFR 3.116 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.116 Section 3.116 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Mammals Transportation Standards § 3.116 Care in transit. (a) A licensed veterinarian, employee, and/or...

  1. 50 CFR 14.109 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Care in transit. 14.109 Section 14.109 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States § 14.109 Care in transit. (a) During transportation to the...

  2. 50 CFR 14.133 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Care in transit. 14.133 Section 14.133 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING..., Sea Otters, Pinnipeds, and Polar Bears) § 14.133 Care in transit. (a) Any marine mammal shall be...

  3. 9 CFR 3.64 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.64 Section 3.64 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Transportation Standards § 3.64 Care in transit. (a) During surface transportation, it shall be the...

  4. 9 CFR 3.140 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.140 Section 3.140 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Mammals Transportation Standards § 3.140 Care in transit. (a) During surface transportation, it shall be...

  5. 9 CFR 3.17 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Care in transit. 3.17 Section 3.17 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Cats 1 Transportation Standards § 3.17 Care in transit. (a) Surface transportation (ground and water...

  6. Improving Health Care Coverage, Equity, And Financial Protection Through A Hybrid System: Malaysia's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannan-Eliya, Ravindra P; Anuranga, Chamara; Manual, Adilius; Sararaks, Sondi; Jailani, Anis S; Hamid, Abdul J; Razif, Izzanie M; Tan, Ee H; Darzi, Ara

    2016-05-01

    Malaysia has made substantial progress in providing access to health care for its citizens and has been more successful than many other countries that are better known as models of universal health coverage. Malaysia's health care coverage and outcomes are now approaching levels achieved by member nations of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Malaysia's results are achieved through a mix of public services (funded by general revenues) and parallel private services (predominantly financed by out-of-pocket spending). We examined the distributional aspects of health financing and delivery and assessed financial protection in Malaysia's hybrid system. We found that this system has been effective for many decades in equalizing health care use and providing protection from financial risk, despite modest government spending. Our results also indicate that a high out-of-pocket share of total financing is not a consistent proxy for financial protection; greater attention is needed to the absolute level of out-of-pocket spending. Malaysia's hybrid health system presents continuing unresolved policy challenges, but the country's experience nonetheless provides lessons for other emerging economies that want to expand access to health care despite limited fiscal resources. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Effective cataract surgical coverage: An indicator for measuring quality-of-care in the context of Universal Health Coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Ramke

    Full Text Available To define and demonstrate effective cataract surgical coverage (eCSC, a candidate UHC indicator that combines a coverage measure (cataract surgical coverage, CSC with quality (post-operative visual outcome.All Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness (RAAB surveys with datasets on the online RAAB Repository on April 1 2016 were downloaded. The most recent study from each country was included. By country, cataract surgical outcome (CSOGood, 6/18 or better; CSOPoor, worse than 6/60, CSC (operated cataract as a proportion of operable plus operated cataract and eCSC (operated cataract and a good outcome as a proportion of operable plus operated cataract were calculated. The association between CSC and CSO was assessed by linear regression. Gender inequality in CSC and eCSC was calculated.Datasets from 20 countries were included (2005-2013; 67,337 participants; 5,474 cataract surgeries. Median CSC was 53.7% (inter-quartile range[IQR] 46.1-66.6%, CSOGood was 58.9% (IQR 53.7-67.6% and CSOPoor was 17.7% (IQR 11.3-21.1%. Coverage and quality of cataract surgery were moderately associated-every 1% CSC increase was associated with a 0.46% CSOGood increase and 0.28% CSOPoor decrease. Median eCSC was 36.7% (IQR 30.2-50.6%, approximately one-third lower than the median CSC. Women tended to fare worse than men, and gender inequality was slightly higher for eCSC (4.6% IQR 0.5-7.1% than for CSC (median 2.3% IQR -1.5-11.6%.eCSC allows monitoring of quality in conjunction with coverage of cataract surgery. In the surveys analysed, on average 36.7% of people who could benefit from cataract surgery had undergone surgery and obtained a good visual outcome.

  8. Transition from Pediatric to Adult OI Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moving from Pediatric to Adult Care Introduction Teen and young adult years are a critical time for major life changes. An ... for youth who have OI is moving from pediatric care into the adult care system. Children’s hospitals ...

  9. Quality of Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care for Children in Low-Income Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Amanda R; French, Benjamin; Aysola, Jaya; Saloner, Brendan; Noonan, Kathleen G; Rubin, David M

    2016-01-01

    An increasing diversity of children's health coverage options under the US Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, together with uncertainty regarding reauthorization of the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) beyond 2017, merits renewed attention on the quality of these options for children. To compare health care access, quality, and cost outcomes by insurance type (Medicaid, CHIP, private, and uninsured) for children in households with low to moderate incomes. A repeated cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the 2003, 2007, and 2011-2012 US National Surveys of Children's Health, comprising 80,655 children 17 years or younger, weighted to 67 million children nationally, with household incomes between 100% and 300% of the federal poverty level. Multivariable logistic regression models compared caregiver-reported outcomes across insurance types. Analysis was conducted between July 14, 2014, and May 6, 2015. Insurance type was ascertained using a caregiver-reported measure of insurance status and each household's poverty status (percentage of the federal poverty level). Caregiver-reported outcomes related to access to primary and specialty care, unmet needs, out-of-pocket costs, care coordination, and satisfaction with care. Among the 80,655 children, 51,123 (57.3%) had private insurance, 11,853 (13.6%) had Medicaid, 9554 (18.4%) had CHIP, and 8125 (10.8%) were uninsured. In a multivariable logistic regression model (with results reported as adjusted probabilities [95% CIs]), children insured by Medicaid and CHIP were significantly more likely to receive a preventive medical (Medicaid, 88% [86%-89%]; P insured children (medical, 83% [82%-84%]; dental, 73% [72%-74%]). Children with all insurance types experienced challenges in access to specialty care, with caregivers of children insured by CHIP reporting the highest rates of difficulty accessing specialty care (28% [24%-32%]), problems obtaining a referral (23% [18%-29%]), and

  10. Transition of care for young adult survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer: rationale and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, David R

    2010-11-10

    Young adult survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer are an ever-growing population of patients, many of whom remain at lifelong risk for potentially serious complications of their cancer therapy. Yet research shows that many of these older survivors have deficient health-related knowledge and are not engaging in recommended health promotion and screening practices that could improve their long-term outcomes. The purpose of this review is to address these disparities by discussing how formal transition of care from pediatric to adult-focused survivorship services may help meet the unique medical, developmental, and psychosocial challenges of these young adults. Literature review and discussion. This article summarizes current research documenting the medical needs of young adult survivors, their suboptimal compliance with recommended follow-up, and the rationale, essential functions, current models, and innovative approaches for transition of follow-up care. Systematic health care transition constitutes the standard of care for young adult survivors of childhood cancer. In developing a transitional care program, it is necessary to consider the scope of services to be provided, available resources, and other local exigencies that help determine the optimal model for use. Additional research is needed to improve health services delivery to this population. Effective advocacy is needed, particularly in the United States, to ensure the availability of uninterrupted health insurance coverage for survivorship services in young adulthood.

  11. Local Television News Coverage of the Affordable Care Act: Emphasizing Politics Over Consumer Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollust, Sarah E; Baum, Laura M; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Barry, Colleen L; Fowler, Erika Franklin

    2017-05-01

    To examine the public health and policy-relevant messages conveyed through local television news during the first stage of Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementation, when about 10 million Americans gained insurance. We conducted a content analysis of 1569 ACA-related local evening television news stories, obtained from sampling local news aired between October 1, 2013, and April 19, 2014. Coders systematically collected data using a coding instrument tracking major messages and information sources cited in the news. Overall, only half of all ACA-related news coverage focused on health insurance products, whereas the remainder discussed political disagreements over the law. Major policy tools of the ACA-the Medicaid expansion and subsidies available-were cited in less than 10% of news stories. Number of enrollees (27%) and Web site glitches (33%) were more common features of coverage. Sources with a political affiliation were by far the most common source of information (> 40%), whereas research was cited in less than 4% of stories. The most common source of news for Americans provided little public health-relevant substance about the ACA during its early implementation, favoring political strategy in coverage.

  12. Duplicate coverage and demand for health care. The case of Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Hernández, A M

    1999-11-01

    An individual has duplicate coverage when he enjoys a compulsory medical public insurance, and in addition he has purchased a private one. This paper studies the implications of duplicate coverage on both demand for visits to specialists and on the selection process of the private insurance market. Econometric models, estimated by the generalized method of moments, accommodate both the endogeneity of insurance choice decision and the non-negativity of the variable number of visits. The choice of instrumental variables is motivated within a theoretical model of demand for health care. The results shows that endogeneity is important for the subsample of heads of household, but not for the subsample of non-heads of household. For the subsample of non-heads of household, a positive effect of duplicate coverage on the number of visits to specialists is found. Health related variables, education and income are also important. Results are consistent with the idea that heads of household that buy private insurance are the ones with poor unobservable health conditions. It is argued that this last result is related to the existence of a compulsory public insurance. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of a diabetes care program using the effective coverage framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Erika; Gutiérrez-Soria, David; Idrovo, Alvaro J

    2012-12-01

    To measure the effective coverage of a program to control type 2 diabetes. Observational study combining multiple Hidalgo state, Mexico. Adults without social security health benefits and patients with a diagnosis of diabetes participating in the program. Detection of diabetes; glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride and blood pressure control; education; diabetic retinopathy, diabetic foot and nephropathy prevention. Only 7.1% of individuals with diabetes participated in the control program. Fasting glucose and HbA1c values were available for 95.6 and 35.6 of patients, respectively. There were measurements of total cholesterol (52.1%), triglyceride (50.6%) and blood pressure (99.6%). Educative activities were realized for 64.8% of patients. The most important gaps were related with detection of illness, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control, glucose control with HbA1c and nephropathy prevention. Effective coverage of these medical actions was 6.22, 5.07, 5.01 and 0.34%, respectively. The greatest challenge to overcome is the detection of individuals with illness because a large number of individuals with type 2 diabetes do not use health services and the health system does not systematically search them out. Medical actions that require resources that must be paid for by patients tend to be used less and to be of lower quality. The use of effective coverage to measure the performance of diabetes care program provides practical information to improve health services.

  14. Regional disparities in child mortality within China 1996-2004: epidemiological profile and health care coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xing Lin; Guo, Sufang; Yang, Qing; Xu, Ling; Zhu, Jun; Guo, Yan

    2011-07-01

    China was one of the 68 "countdown" countries prioritized to attain Millennium Development Goals (MDG 4). The aim of this study was to analyze data on child survival and health care coverage of proven cost-effective interventions in China, with a focus on national disparities. National maternal and child mortality surveillance data were used to estimate child mortality. Coverage for proven interventions was analyzed based on data from the National Health Services Survey, National Nutrition and Health Survey, and National Immunization Survey. Consultations and qualitative field observations by experts were used to complement the Survey data. Analysis of the data revealed a significant reduction in the overall under-5 (U5) child mortality rate in China from 1996 to 2007, but also great regional disparities, with the risk of child mortality in rural areas II-IV being two- to sixfold higher than that in urban areas. Rural areas II-IV also accounted for approximately 80% of the mortality burden. More than 60% of child mortality occurred during the neonatal period, with 70% of this occurring during the first week of life. The leading causes of neonatal mortality were asphyxia at birth and premature birth; during the post-neonatal period, these were diarrhea and pneumonia, especially in less developed rural areas. Utilization of health care services in terms of both quantity and quality was positively correlated with the region's development level. A large proportion of children were affected by inadequate feeding, and the lack of safe water and essential sanitary facilities are vital indirect factors contributing to the increase in child mortality. The simulation analysis revealed that increasing access to and the quality of the most effective interventions combined with relatively low costs in the context of a comprehensive approach has the potential to reduce U5 deaths by 34%. China is on track to meet MDG 4; however, great disparities in health care do exist within

  15. Use of performance metrics for the measurement of universal coverage for maternal care in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serván-Mori, Edson; Contreras-Loya, David; Gomez-Dantés, Octavio; Nigenda, Gustavo; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G; Lozano, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    This study provides evidence for those working in the maternal health metrics and health system performance fields, as well as those interested in achieving universal and effective health care coverage. Based on the perspective of continuity of health care and applying quasi-experimental methods to analyse the cross-sectional 2009 National Demographic Dynamics Survey (n = 14 414 women), we estimated the middle-term effects of Mexico's new public health insurance scheme, Seguro Popular de Salud (SPS) (vs women without health insurance) on seven indicators related to maternal health care (according to official guidelines): (a) access to skilled antenatal care (ANC); (b) timely ANC; (c) frequent ANC; (d) adequate content of ANC; (e) institutional delivery; (f) postnatal consultation and (g) access to standardized comprehensive antenatal and postnatal care (or the intersection of the seven process indicators). Our results show that 94% of all pregnancies were attended by trained health personnel. However, comprehensive access to ANC declines steeply in both groups as we move along the maternal healthcare continuum. The percentage of institutional deliveries providing timely, frequent and adequate content of ANC reached 70% among SPS women (vs 64.7% in the uninsured), and only 57.4% of SPS-affiliated women received standardized comprehensive care (vs 53.7% in the uninsured group). In Mexico, access to comprehensive antenatal and postnatal care as defined by Mexican guidelines (in accordance to WHO recommendations) is far from optimal. Even though a positive influence of SPS on maternal care was documented, important challenges still remain. Our results identified key bottlenecks of the maternal healthcare continuum that should be addressed by policy makers through a combination of supply side interventions and interventions directed to social determinants of access to health care. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The

  16. Health system and community level interventions for improving antenatal care coverage and health outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Medley, Nancy; Darzi, Andrea J; Richardson, Marty; Habiba Garga, Kesso; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least four antenatal care (ANC) visits for all pregnant women. Almost half of pregnant women worldwide, and especially in developing countries do not receive this amount of care. Poor attendance of ANC is associated with delivery of low birthweight babies and more neonatal deaths. ANC may include education on nutrition, potential problems with pregnancy or childbirth, child care and prevention or detection of disease during pregnancy. This review focused on community-based interventions and health systems-related interventions. Objectives To assess the effects of health system and community interventions for improving coverage of antenatal care and other perinatal health outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (7 June 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials and cluster-randomised trials. Trials of any interventions to improve ANC coverage were eligible for inclusion. Trials were also eligible if they targeted specific and related outcomes, such as maternal or perinatal death, but also reported ANC coverage. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Main results We included 34 trials involving approximately 400,000 women. Some trials tested community-based interventions to improve uptake of antenatal care (media campaigns, education or financial incentives for pregnant women), while other trials looked at health systems interventions (home visits for pregnant women or equipment for clinics). Most trials took place in low- and middle-income countries, and 29 of the 34 trials used a cluster-randomised design. We assessed 30 of the 34 trials as of low or unclear overall risk of bias. Comparison 1: One intervention versus no intervention We

  17. Impact of state mandatory insurance coverage on the use of diabetes preventive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Lawrence

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 46 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have passed laws and regulations mandating that health insurance plans cover diabetes treatment and preventive care. Previous research on state mandates suggested that these policies had little impact, since many health plans already covered the benefits. Here, we analyze the contents of and model the effect of state mandates. We examined how state mandates impacted the likelihood of using three types of diabetes preventive care: annual eye exams, annual foot exams, and performing daily self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG. Methods We collected information on diabetes benefits specified in state mandates and time the mandates were enacted. To assess impact, we used data that the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System gathered between 1996 and 2000. 4,797 individuals with self-reported diabetes and covered by private insurance were included; 3,195 of these resided in the 16 states that passed state mandates between 1997 and 1999; 1,602 resided in the 8 states or the District of Columbia without state mandates by 2000. Multivariate logistic regression models (with state fixed effect, controlling for patient demographic characteristics and socio-economic status, state characteristics, and time trend were used to model the association between passing state mandates and the usage of the forms of diabetes preventive care, both individually and collectively. Results All 16 states that passed mandates between 1997 and 1999 required coverage of diabetic monitors and strips, while 15 states required coverage of diabetes self management education. Only 1 state required coverage of periodic eye and foot exams. State mandates were positively associated with a 6.3 (P = 0.04 and a 5.8 (P = 0.03 percentage point increase in the probability of privately insured diabetic patient's performing SMBG and simultaneous receiving all three preventive care, respectively; state mandates were not

  18. Transitional care interventions: Relevance for nursing in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Alice; Mulcahy, Helen; Savage, Eileen; Fitzgerald, Serena; Bradley, Colin; Benefield, Lazelle; Leahy-Warren, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    The coordination and integration of health care is compromised by complex challenges related to transitions between care settings, greater prevalence of chronic health conditions, and older individuals with increasing levels of dependency. Transitional care incorporates a broad range of services designed to provide care continuity. This systematic review aims to synthesize and present findings regarding the relevance of transitional care interventions to community nursing. A systematic search of electronic databases was conducted as part of a larger review to identify evidence-based interventions to support a model to guide nursing and midwifery in the community in Ireland. All relevant empirical studies published in English between 2010 and 2015 were included. Studies were assessed based on inclusion criteria. The Cochrane Risk of Bias and AMSTAR tools were used to assess the methodological quality of studies. Key themes and concepts were extracted and synthesized. Transitional care interventions had significant positive effects in reducing all-cause readmissions, mortality, and heart failure-related rehospitalizations. Effective transitional care requires excellent communication between acute and primary care providers. This has implications for integration and organization of care across settings and nursing competence. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Impact of the Affordable Care Act's Dependent Coverage Mandate on Use of Dental Treatments and Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Dan M; Wehby, George L

    2017-09-01

    Oral health problems are the leading chronic conditions among children and younger adults. Lack of dental coverage is thought to be an important barrier to care but little empirical evidence exists on the causal effect of private dental coverage on use of dental services. We explore the relationship between dental coverage and dental services utilization with an analysis of a natural experiment of increasing private dental coverage stemming from the Affordable Care Act's (ACA)-dependent coverage mandate. To evaluate whether increased private dental insurance due to the spillover effect of the ACA-dependent coverage health insurance mandate affected utilization of dental services among a group of affected young adults. 2006-2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. We used a difference-in-difference regression approach comparing changes in dental care utilization for 25-year olds affected by the policy to unaffected 27-year olds. We evaluate effects on dental treatments and preventive services RESULTS:: Compared to 27-year olds, 25-year olds were 8 percentage points more likely to have private dental coverage in the 3 years following the mandate. We do not find compelling evidence that young adults increased their use of preventive dental services in response to gaining insurance. We do find a nearly 5 percentage point increase in the likelihood of dental treatments among 25-year olds following the mandate, an effect that appears concentrated among women. Increases in private dental coverage due to the ACA's-dependent coverage mandate do not appear to be driving significant changes in overall preventive dental services utilization but there is evidence of an increase in restorative care.

  20. Negotiating futility, managing emotions: nursing the transition to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Good, Phillip; Wootton, Julia; Yates, Patsy; Hardy, Janet

    2015-03-01

    Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for patients during the transition from life-prolonging care to palliative care. This is an area of nursing prone to emotional difficulty, interpersonal complexity, and interprofessional conflict. It is situated within complex social dynamics, including those related to establishing and accepting futility and reconciling the desire to maintain hope. Here, drawing on interviews with 20 Australian nurses, we unpack their accounts of nursing the transition to palliative care, focusing on the purpose of nursing at the point of transition; accounts of communication and strategies for representing palliative care; emotional engagement and burden; and key interprofessional challenges. We argue that in caring for patients approaching the end of life, nurses occupy precarious interpersonal and interprofessional spaces that involve a negotiated order around sentimental work, providing them with both capital (privileged access) and burden (emotional suffering) within their day-to-day work. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Early antenatal care visit: a systematic analysis of regional and global levels and trends of coverage from 1990 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Ann-Beth; Petzold, Max; Chou, Doris; Say, Lale

    2017-10-01

    The timing of the first antenatal care visit is paramount for ensuring optimal health outcomes for women and children, and it is recommended that all pregnant women initiate antenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy (early antenatal care visit). Systematic global analysis of early antenatal care visits has not been done previously. This study reports on regional and global estimates of the coverage of early antenatal care visits from 1990 to 2013. Data were obtained from nationally representative surveys and national health information systems. Estimates of coverage of early antenatal care visits were generated with linear regression analysis and based on 516 logit-transformed observations from 132 countries. The model accounted for differences by data sources in reporting the cutoff for the early antenatal care visit. The estimated worldwide coverage of early antenatal care visits increased from 40·9% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 34·6-46·7) in 1990 to 58·6% (52·1-64·3) in 2013, corresponding to a 43·3% increase. Overall coverage in the developing regions was 48·1% (95% UI 43·4-52·4) in 2013 compared with 84·8% (81·6-87·7) in the developed regions. In 2013, the estimated coverage of early antenatal care visits was 24·0% (95% UI 21·7-26·5) in low-income countries compared with 81·9% (76·5-87·1) in high-income countries. Progress in the coverage of early antenatal care visits has been achieved but coverage is still far from universal. Substantial inequity exists in coverage both within regions and between income groups. The absence of data in many countries is of concern and efforts should be made to collect and report coverage of early antenatal care visits to enable better monitoring and evaluation. Department of Reproductive Health and Research, WHO and UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Copyright © This is an Open Access article published under the

  2. Achieving universal health care coverage: Current debates in Ghana on covering those outside the formal sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiiro Gilbert

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, extending financial protection and equitable access to health services to those outside the formal sector employment is a major challenge for achieving universal coverage. While some favour contributory schemes, others have embraced tax-funded health service cover for those outside the formal sector. This paper critically examines the issue of how to cover those outside the formal sector through the lens of stakeholder views on the proposed one-time premium payment (OTPP policy in Ghana. Discussion Ghana in 2004 implemented a National Health Insurance Scheme, based on a contributory model where service benefits are restricted to those who contribute (with some groups exempted from contributing, as the policy direction for moving towards universal coverage. In 2008, the OTPP system was proposed as an alternative way of ensuring coverage for those outside formal sector employment. There are divergent stakeholder views with regard to the meaning of the one-time premium and how it will be financed and sustained. Our stakeholder interviews indicate that the underlying issue being debated is whether the current contributory NHIS model for those outside the formal employment sector should be maintained or whether services for this group should be tax funded. However, the advantages and disadvantages of these alternatives are not being explored in an explicit or systematic way and are obscured by the considerable confusion about the likely design of the OTPP policy. We attempt to contribute to the broader debate about how best to fund coverage for those outside the formal sector by unpacking some of these issues and pointing to the empirical evidence needed to shed even further light on appropriate funding mechanisms for universal health systems. Summary The Ghanaian debate on OTPP is related to one of the most important challenges facing low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve a universal health care system. It

  3. Health system strategies supporting transition to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Charlotte Moore; Cohen, Eyal; Bhawra, Jasmin; Weiser, Natalie; Hayeems, Robin Z; Guttmann, Astrid

    2015-06-01

    The transition from paediatric to adult care is associated with poor clinical outcomes, increased costs and low patient and family satisfaction. However, little is known about health system strategies to streamline and safeguard care for youth transitioning to adult services. Moreover, the needs of children and youth are often excluded from broader health system reform discussions, leaving this population especially vulnerable to system 'disintegration'. (1) To explore the international policy profile of paediatric-to-adult care transitions, and (2) to document policy objectives, initiatives and outcomes for jurisdictions publicly committed to addressing transition issues. An international policy scoping review of all publicly available government documents detailing transition-related strategies was completed using a web-based search. Our analysis included a comparable cohort of nine wealthy Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) jurisdictions with Beveridge-style healthcare systems (deemed those most likely to benefit from system-level transition strategies). Few jurisdictions address transition of care issues in either health or broader social policy documents. While many jurisdictions refer to standardised practice guidelines, a few report the intention to use powerful policy levers (including physician remuneration and non-physician investments) to facilitate the uptake of best practice. Most jurisdictions do not address the policy infrastructure required to support successful transitions, and rigorous evaluations of transition strategies are rare. Despite the well-documented risks and costs associated with a poor transition from paediatric to adult care, little policy attention has been paid to this issue. We recommend that healthcare providers engage health system planners in the design and evaluation of system-level, policy-sensitive transition strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  4. 50 CFR 14.123 - Care in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Care in transit. 14.123 Section 14.123 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING... transit. (a) A primate shall be observed for signs of distress and given food and water according to the...

  5. Nurses' knowledge of universal health coverage for inclusive and sustainable elderly care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Ling Ngai Tung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to explore nurses' knowledge of universal health coverage (UHC for inclusive and sustainable development of elderly care services. Method: this was a cross-sectional survey. A convenience sample of 326 currently practicing enrolled nurses (EN or registered nurses (RN was recruited. Respondents completed a questionnaire which was based on the implementation strategies advocated by the WHO Global Forum for Governmental Chief Nursing Officers and Midwives (GCNOMs. Questions covered the government initiative, healthcare financing policy, human resources policy, and the respondents' perception of importance and contribution of nurses in achieving UHC in elderly care services. Results: the knowledge of nurses about UHC in elderly care services was fairly satisfactory. Nurses in both clinical practice and management perceived themselves as having more contribution and importance than those in education. They were relatively indifferent to healthcare policy and politics. Conclusion: the survey uncovered a considerable knowledge gap in nurses' knowledge of UHC in elderly care services, and shed light on the need for nurses to be more attuned to healthcare policy. The educational curriculum for nurses should be strengthened to include studies in public policy and advocacy. Nurses can make a difference through their participation in the development and implementation of UHC in healthcare services.

  6. [The transition from paediatric to adult care: a new paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, Salvatore; Biermann, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In healthcare, the child-adult transition is the point of intersection between two health care systems organized in a network (pediatric and adult care), each with its own specificities and dysfunctions. Information, education and empowerment of young adults are crucial in preparing them for the transition to adult care while centrality of the patient, patient preferences, sharing with patients and their families, and multi-disciplinary approach, are the key words of the transition process. Barriers to overcome include the reluctance of patients and their families to separate from the pediatric care system, the tendency of pediatric healthcare workers not to favour the emancipation process and the inability of healthcare workers providing adult care to perceive the sense of insecurity and dependence experienced by young adults.

  7. Changes in drug coverage generosity and untreated serious mental illness: transitioning from Medicaid to Medicare Part D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Jeanne M; Adams, Alyce S; LeCates, Robert F; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Zhang, Fang; Huskamp, Haiden A; Gilden, Daniel M; Soumerai, Stephen B

    2015-02-01

    More than 1 in 5 disabled people with dual Medicare-Medicaid enrollment have schizophrenia or a bipolar disorder (ie, a serious mental illness). The effect of their transition from Medicaid drug coverage, which varies in generosity across states, to the Medicare Part D drug benefit is unknown. Many thousands make this transition annually. To determine the effect of transitioning from Medicaid drug benefits to Medicare Part D on medication use by patients with a serious mental illness and to determine the influence of Medicaid drug caps. In time-series analysis of continuously enrolled patient cohorts (2004-2007), we estimated changes in medication use before and after transitioning to Part D, comparing states that capped monthly prescription fills with states with no prescription limits. We used Medicaid and Medicare claims from a 5% national sample of community-dwelling, nonelderly disabled dual enrollees with schizophrenia (n = 5554) or bipolar disorder (n = 3675). Psychotropic treatments included antipsychotics for schizophrenia and antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium for bipolar disorder. We measured monthly rates of untreated illness, intensity of treatment, and overall prescription medication use. Prior to Part D, the prevalence of untreated illness among patients with a bipolar disorder was 30.0% in strict-cap states and 23.8% in no-cap states. In strict-cap states, the proportion of untreated patients decreased by 17.2% (relatively) 1 year after Part D, whereas there was no change in the proportion of untreated patients in no-cap states. For patients with schizophrenia, the untreated rate (20.6%) did not change in strict-cap states, yet it increased by 23.3% (from 11.6%) in no-cap states. Overall medication use increased substantially after Part D in strict-cap states: prescription fills were 35.5% higher among patients with a bipolar disorder and 17.7% higher than predicted among schizophrenic patients; overall use in no-cap states was

  8. Health Care Transition Experiences of Young Adults With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Ellen McLaughlin

    2015-01-01

    Health care transition (HCT) describes the purposeful, planned movement of adolescents from child to adult-orientated care. The purpose of this qualitative study is to uncover the meaning of transition to adult-centered care as experienced by young adults with cerebral palsy (YA-CP) through the research question: What are the lived experiences of young adults with cerebral palsy transitioning from pediatric to adult healthcare? Six females and 3 males, aged 19-25 years of age, who identified as carrying the diagnosis of cerebral palsy without cognitive impairment, were interviewed. Giorgi's (1985) method for analysis of phenomenology was the framework for the study and guided the phenomenological reduction. The meaning of the lived experiences of YA-CPs transition to adult health care is expert novices with evidence and experience-based expectations, negotiating new systems interdependently and accepting less than was expected. More information and support is needed for the YA-CP during transition to ensure a well-organized move to appropriate adult-oriented health care that is considerate of the lifelong impact of the disorder. The nurses' role as advocate, mentor and guide can optimize the individual's response to the transition process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The utilization of dental care services according to health insurance coverage in Catalonia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Vladimir; Ferrer, Montse; Domingo-Salvany, Antonia; Benach, Joan; Borrell, Carme; Pont, Angels; Schiaffino, Anna; Almansa, Josue; Tresserras, Ricard; Alonso, Jordi

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of dental care service use with health insurance and its evolution. The Catalan Health Interview Survey is a cross-sectional study conducted in 1994 (n = 15 000) and 2001-2 (n = 8400) by interviews at home to a representative sample of Catalonia (Spain). All the estimates were obtained by applying weights to restore the representativeness of the Catalonia general population. In the bivariate analysis, age, gender, social class and health insurance coverage were statistically associated with a dental visit in the previous year (P use in the previous year, from 26.7% in 1994 to 34.3% in 2002. Future studies will be needed to monitor this tendency.

  10. A difficult balancing act: policy actors' perspectives on using economic evaluation to inform health-care coverage decisions under the Universal Health Insurance Coverage scheme in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawattananon, Yot; Russell, Steve

    2008-03-01

    In Thailand, policymakers have come under increasing pressure to use economic evaluation to inform health-care resource allocation decisions, especially after the introduction of the Universal Health Insurance Coverage (UC) scheme. This article presents qualitative findings from research that assessed a range of policymakers' perspectives on the acceptability of using economic evaluation for the development of health-care benefit packages in Thailand. The policy analysis examined their opinions about existing decision-making processes for including health interventions in the UC benefit package, their understanding of health economic evaluation, and their attitudes, acceptance, and values relating to the use of the method. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 36 policy actors who play a major role or have some input into health resource allocation decisions within the Thai health-care system. These included 14 senior policymakers at the national level, 5 hospital directors, 10 health professionals, and 7 academics. Policy actors thought that economic evaluation information was relevant for decision-making because of the increasing need for rationing and more transparent criteria for making UC coverage decisions. Nevertheless, they raised several difficulties with using economic evaluation that would pose barriers to its introduction, including distrust in the method, conflicting philosophical positions and priorities compared to that of "health maximization," organizational allegiances, existing decision-making procedures that would be hard to change, and concerns about political pressure and acceptability.

  11. Diabetes care for emerging adults: transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ah Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus in children, transitioning patients from childhood to adulthood are increasing. High-risk behaviors and poor glycemic control during the transition period increase the risk for hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia as well as chronic microvascular and macrovascular complications. Discussions regarding complications and preparations for transition must take place before the actual transition to adult care systems. Pediatric care providers should focus on diabetes self-management skills and prepare at least 1 year prior to the transfer. Pediatric providers should also provide a written summary about previous and current glycemic control, complications and the presence of mental health problems such as disordered eating behaviors and affective disorders. Transition care should be individualized, with an emphasis on diabetes self-management to prevent acute and long-term complications. Regular screening and management of complications should proceed according to pediatric and adult guidelines. Birth control, use of alcohol, smoking and driving should also be discussed. Barriers to self-management and care must be recognized and solutions sought. The goals of transitional care are to effectively transition the diabetic patient from the pediatric to adult care system with less elapsed time in between and to improve post-transition outcome. Previous studies regarding diabetes transitional care programs including patient education programs, medical coordinators and auxiliary service systems reported promising results. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding best practices in transition care. Further studies are needed to provide evidence based transitional care programs that take both medical and psychosocial aspects of diabetes care into consideration.

  12. Youth with special health care needs: transition to adult health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Donald P; Gilles, Donna L; Cannady, Mariel S; Wenzel, Donna B; Willis, Janet H; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2013-12-01

    Transition to adult services for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) has emerged as an important event in the life course of individuals with disabilities. Issues that interfere with efficient transition to adult health care include the perspectives of stakeholders, age limits on pediatric service, complexity of health conditions, a lack of experienced healthcare professionals in the adult arena, and health care financing for chronic and complex conditions. The purposes of this study were to develop a definition of successful transition and to identify determinants that were associated with a successful transition. The 2007 Survey of Adult Transition and Health dataset was used to select variables to be considered for defining success and for identifying predictors of success. The results showed that a small percentage of young adults who participated in the 2007 survey had experienced a successful transition from their pediatric care.

  13. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cystic fibrosis and transition to adult medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Lisa K; Schwartz, Lisa A; Sawicki, Gregory S; Britto, Maria T

    2010-03-01

    Transition of young adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) from pediatric to adult medical care is an important priority, because many patients are living well into their fourth decade, and by 2010 more than half of all people living with CF will be older than 18 years. Transition to adulthood, a developmental process of skill-building in self-management supported by the health system, is important for the successful transfer to adult CF care. The US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has been proactive in preparing for increasing numbers of young adults in need of specialized adult-oriented care by creating specialized clinical fellowships for physician providers and mandating establishment of adult CF programs. Despite these initiatives, how to best facilitate transition and to define and measure successful outcomes after transfer to adult care remains unclear. Many adults with CF continue to receive care in the pediatric setting, whereas others transfer before being developmentally prepared. In this state-of-the-art review we provide context for the scope of the challenges associated with designing and evaluating health care transition for adolescents and young adults with CF and implications for all youth with special health care needs.

  15. Older Persons’ Transitions in Care (OPTIC: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Greta G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in health status, triggered by events such as infections, falls, and geriatric syndromes, are common among nursing home (NH residents and necessitate transitions between NHs and Emergency Departments (EDs. During transitions, residents frequently experience care that is delayed, unnecessary, not evidence-based, potentially unsafe, and fragmented. Furthermore, a high proportion of residents and their family caregivers report substantial unmet needs during transitions. This study is part of a program of research whose overall aim is to improve quality of care for frail older adults who reside in NHs. The purpose of this study is to identify successful transitions from multiple perspectives and to identify organizational and individual factors related to transition success, in order to inform improvements in care for frail elderly NH residents during transitions to and from acute care. Specific objectives are to: 1. define successful and unsuccessful elements of transitions from multiple perspectives; 2. develop and test a practical tool to assess transition success; 3. assess transition processes in a discrete set of transfers in two study sites over a one year period; 4. assess the influence of organizational factors in key practice locations, e.g., NHs, emergency medical services (EMS, and EDs, on transition success; and 5. identify opportunities for evidence-informed management and quality improvement decisions related to the management of NH – ED transitions. Methods/Design This is a mixed-methods observational study incorporating an integrated knowledge translation (IKT approach. It uses data from multiple levels (facility, care unit, individual and sources (healthcare providers, residents, health records, and administrative databases. Discussion Key to study success is operationalizing the IKT approach by using a partnership model in which the OPTIC governance structure provides for team decision-makers and

  16. Clinical trial insurance coverage for cancer patients under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine B. Mackay

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Three main factors limit the effectiveness of the ACA provisions in expanding clinical trial coverage: 1 ‘grandfathered’ self-funded employer plans not subject to state Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA regulations, 2 Medicaid coverage limits not addressed under the ACA, 3 populations that remain uninsured. Kansas saw a negligible increase in insurance coverage as a result of the ACA thus lack of insurance coverage is likely to remain a concern for cancer patients.

  17. Discontinuity in the transition from pediatric to adult health care for patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, C Brendan; Young, Joel

    2012-09-01

    Although attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic disorder, treatment declines dramatically in adolescence and into early adulthood. This premature termination of care is likely compounded by the difficulty many patients have switching from a pediatric to an adult provider. To review, from the adult primary care provider perspective, the barriers to continuity of care and their implications for patients with ADHD who transition from pediatric to adult health care. Literature review. Relevant articles were identified by searches of the PubMed and EMBASE databases and by reviewing the reference lists of articles obtained from these searches. Health care transition for adolescents and young adults with ADHD remains a crucial area of research. The current literature reveals a number of barriers to the continuity of care, including disparities and inadequacies in ADHD education in primary care and internal medicine residencies, prohibitive prescribing practices with respect to stimulants, inadequate clinic staffing, lack of support in the college health care system, inadequate health insurance coverage, and failure to conduct transitional planning. Without improved continuity of care and adherence to medication, adolescents and young adults with ADHD are at greater risk of academic, social, and vocational difficulties, as well as behavioral problems, including substance abuse, unsafe driving, and criminal activity. If we are to adequately address the health care needs of adolescents and young adults with ADHD, we need to educate primary care providers and support additional research.

  18. Health Care Transition in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Wolpert, Howard A.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Laffel, Lori M.; Kleinman, Ken; Beste, Margaret G.; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine characteristics of the transition from pediatric to adult care in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes and evaluate associations between transition characteristics and glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We developed and mailed a survey to evaluate the transition process in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes, aged 22 to 30 years, receiving adult diabetes care at a single center. Current A1C data were obtained from the medical record. RESULTS The response rate was 53% (258 of 484 eligible). The mean transition age was 19.5 ± 2.9 years, and 34% reported a gap >6 months in establishing adult care. Common reasons for transition included feeling too old (44%), pediatric provider suggestion (41%), and college (33%). Less than half received an adult provider recommendation and 6 months between pediatric and adult care (adjusted odds ratio 0.47 [95% CI 0.25–0.88]). In multivariate analysis, pretransition A1C (β = 0.49, P < 0.0001), current age (β = −0.07, P = 0.03), and education (β = −0.55, P = 0.01) significantly influenced current posttransition A1C. There was no independent association of transition preparation with posttransition A1C (β = −0.17, P = 0.28). CONCLUSIONS Contemporary transition practices may help prevent gaps between pediatric and adult care but do not appear to promote improvements in A1C. More robust preparation strategies and handoffs between pediatric and adult care should be evaluated. PMID:22699289

  19. Providing Coverage for the Unique Lifelong Health Care Needs of Living Kidney Donors Within the Framework of Financial Neutrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J S; Delmonico, F; Klarenbach, S; Capron, A M

    2017-05-01

    Organ donation should neither enrich donors nor impose financial burdens on them. We described the scope of health care required for all living kidney donors, reflecting contemporary understanding of long-term donor health outcomes; proposed an approach to identify donor health conditions that should be covered within the framework of financial neutrality; and proposed strategies to pay for this care. Despite the Affordable Care Act in the United States, donors continue to have inadequate coverage for important health conditions that are donation related or that may compromise postdonation kidney function. Amendment of Medicare regulations is needed to clarify that surveillance and treatment of conditions that may compromise postdonation kidney function following donor nephrectomy will be covered without expense to the donor. In other countries lacking health insurance for all residents, sufficient data exist to allow the creation of a compensation fund or donor insurance policies to ensure appropriate care. Providing coverage for donation-related sequelae as well as care to preserve postdonation kidney function ensures protection against the financial burdens of health care encountered by donors throughout their lives. Providing coverage for this care should thus be cost-effective, even without considering the health care cost savings that occur for living donor transplant recipients. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Assessment of levels of hospice care coverage offered to commercial managed care plan members in California: implications for the California Health Insurance Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyusuk; Jahng, Joelle; Petrosyan, Syuzanna; Kim, Soo In; Yim, Victoria

    2015-06-01

    The implementation of the Affordable Care Act that provides for the expansion of affordable insurance to uninsured individuals and small businesses, coupled with the provision of mandated hospice coverage, is expected to increase the enrollment of the terminally ill younger population in hospice care. We surveyed health insurance companies that offer managed care plans in the 2014 California health insurance exchange and large hospice agencies that provided hospice care to privately insured patients in 2011. Compared with Medicare and Medicaid hospice benefits, hospice benefits for privately insured patients, particularly those enrolled in managed care plans, varied widely. Mandating hospice care alone may not be sufficient to ensure that individuals enrolled in different managed care plans receive the same level of coverage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Implementation of the care transitions intervention: sustainability and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Monique M; O'Malley, Kate; Adams, Rachel I; Adams, Sara R; Coleman, Eric A

    2009-01-01

    During care transitions, the movement of patients from one healthcare practitioner or setting to another, patients are vulnerable to serious lapses in the quality and safety of their medical care. The Care Transitions Intervention (CTI), a 4-week, low-cost, low-intensity self-management program designed to provide patients discharged from the acute care setting with skills, tools, and the support of a transition coach to ensure that their health and self-management needs are met, was implemented in 10 hospital-community-based partnership sites in California over a 12-month period. Five of the partnerships were hospital-led sites, and 5 were county-led sites. The primary goal of the project was to identify factors that promote sustainability of the intervention by (1) assessing features of each site's implementation and the site's likelihood of continuing the program; (2) soliciting feedback from the sites; and (3) analyzing site and patient characteristic data and data from the CTI measurement instruments (the 3-item Care Transition Measure [CTM-3] and the Patient Activation Assessment [PAA] tool). The CTI was implemented in 10 California hospital and community-based organizations that received training and technical support to implement the intervention. Presence of leadership support was determined to be the critical factor for sites reporting interest in and capacity for long-term support of the CTI. Sites identified engaging hospital- and community-based leaders, providing additional transition coach training, and the assigning of consistent and dedicated (funded) transition coaches as valuable lessons learned. Key findings from the measurement instruments indicate that future CTI implementations should focus on medication management, patients with cardiovascular conditions and diabetes, patients older than 85 years, and African American and Latino patients. Mean PAA scores were moderately higher for patients from hospital-led sites than for patients from

  2. Using economic levers to change behaviour: the case of Thailand's universal coverage health care reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David; Leethongdee, Songkramchai; Osiri, Sunantha

    2010-02-01

    Thailand's universal coverage health care policy has been presented as a knowledge-based reform involving substantial pre-planning, including expert economic analysis of the financing mechanism. This paper describes the new financing system introduced from 2001 in which the Ministry of Public Health allocated monies to local Contracted Units for Primary Care (CUPs) on the basis of population. It discusses the policy intention to use capitation funding to change incentive structures and engineer a transfer of professional staff from over-served urban areas to under-served rural areas. The paper utilises qualitative data from national policy makers and health service staff in three north-eastern provinces to tell the story of the reforms. We found that over time government moved away from the original capitation funding model as the result of (a) a macro-allocation problem arising from system disturbance and professional opposition, and (b) a micro-allocation problem that emerged when local budgets were not shared equitably. In many CUPs, the hospital directors controlling resource allocation channelled funds more towards curative services than community facilities. Taken together the macro and micro problems led to the dilution of capitation funding and reduced the re-distributive effects of the reforms. This strand of policy foundered in the face of structural and institutional barriers to change. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Youth with Special Health Care Needs: Transition to Adult Health Care Services

    OpenAIRE

    Oswald, Donald P.; Gilles, Donna L.; Cannady, Mariel S.; Wenzel, Donna B.; Willis, Janet H.; Bodurtha, Joann N.

    2013-01-01

    Transition to adult services for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) has emerged as an important event in the life course of individuals with disabilities. Issues that interfere with efficient transition to adult health care include the perspectives of stakeholders, age limits on pediatric service, complexity of health conditions, a lack of experienced healthcare professionals in the adult arena, and health care financing for chronic and complex conditions. The purposes...

  4. Coverage and Financial Risk Protection for Institutional Delivery: How Universal Is Provision of Maternal Health Care in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Gupta, Rakesh; Sharma, Atul; Rana, Saroj Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    India aims to achieve universal access to institutional delivery. We undertook this study to estimate the universality of institutional delivery care for pregnant women in Haryana state in India. To assess the coverage of institutional delivery, we analyze service coverage (coverage of public sector institutional delivery), population coverage (coverage among different districts and wealth quintiles of the population) and financial risk protection (catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment as a result of out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery). We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from a randomly selected sample of 12,191 women who had delivered a child in the last one year from the date of data collection in Haryana state. Five indicators were calculated to evaluate coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery--proportion of public sector deliveries, out-of-pocket expenditure, percentage of women who incurred no expenses, prevalence of catastrophic expenditure for institutional delivery and incidence of impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery. These indicators were calculated for the public and private sectors for 5 wealth quintiles and 21 districts of the state. The coverage of institutional delivery in Haryana state was 82%, of which 65% took place in public sector facilities. Approximately 63% of the women reported no expenditure on delivery in the public sector. The mean out-of-pocket expenditures for delivery in the public and private sectors in Haryana were INR 771 (USD 14.2) and INR 12,479 (USD 229), respectively, which were catastrophic for 1.6% and 22% of households, respectively. Our findings suggest that there is considerably high coverage of institutional delivery care in Haryana state, with significant financial risk protection in the public sector. However, coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery vary substantially across districts and among different socio

  5. Complexities of Medication Management Across Care Transitions: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knisely, Mitchell R; Bartlett Ellis, Rebecca J; Carpenter, Janet S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify medication-related considerations for clinical nurse specialist practice by presenting a case report detailing the complexities of medication management, unresolved medication discrepancies, and reconciliation across care transitions. Care transitions are a vulnerable time for medication-related problems to occur. Unresolved medication discrepancies can lead to adverse drug events and other poor health outcomes, including hospital readmissions and increased healthcare costs. Reconciling medication discrepancies during care transitions has been identified as a national patient safety goal to prevent medication-related problems. Clinical nurse specialists are uniquely qualified to lead and manage efforts to mitigate these problems during care transitions. A 72-year-old male patient diagnosed with oral cancer underwent 8 weeks of chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Throughout these 8 weeks, the patient was seen by 4 providers and admitted to the hospital for neutropenia. As a result, a total of 19 new medications were prescribed and 5 medications were discontinued. Medication reconciliation was completed at each visit and at admission and discharge at the hospital. At discharge, the patient's medication regimen was complex, with 38 separate doses of 17 different medications per 24-hour period. Understanding and organizing the daily medication regimen were a consistent challenge for the patient during his illness. This case highlights the complexities of medication regimens and opportunities to improve medication management and reconciliation across care transitions. This case underscores the need for and importance of quality patient-provider communication, assessing and managing medication regimen complexity, evaluating medications against the American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria, evaluating potential drug-drug or drug-food interactions, and recognizing at-risk behaviors that may lead to medication discrepancies and

  6. Trends in Disparities in Low-Income Children's Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care by Family Immigration Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlenski, Marian; Baller, Julia; Borrero, Sonya; Bennett, Wendy L

    2016-03-01

    To examine time trends in disparities in low-income children's health insurance coverage and access to care by family immigration status. We used data from the National Survey of Children's Health in 2003 to 2011-2012, including 83,612 children aged 0 to 17 years with family incomes poverty level. We examined 3 immigration status categories: citizen children with nonimmigrant parents; citizen children with immigrant parents; and immigrant children. We used multivariable regression analyses to obtain adjusted trends in health insurance coverage and access to care. All low-income children experienced gains in health insurance coverage and access to care from 2003 to 2011-2012, regardless of family immigration status. Relative to citizen children with nonimmigrant parents, citizen children with immigrant parents had a 5 percentage point greater increase in health insurance coverage (P = .06), a 9 percentage point greater increase in having a personal doctor or nurse (P still exist. Policy efforts are needed to ensure that children of immigrant parents and immigrant children are able to access health insurance and health care. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Women's Preventive Services Guidelines Affordable Care Act Expands Prevention Coverage for Women's Health and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Act Expands Prevention Coverage for Women’s Health and Well-Being The Affordable Care Act – the health insurance reform ... preventive services are necessary for women’s health and well-being and therefore should be considered in the development ...

  8. Health transition in Africa: practical policy proposals for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, D; Smeeth, L; Sekajugo, J

    2010-12-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is undergoing health transition as increased globalization and accompanying urbanization are causing a double burden of communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Rates of communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria in Africa are the highest in the world. The impact of noncommunicable diseases is also increasing. For example, age-standardized mortality from cardiovascular disease may be up to three times higher in some African than in some European countries. As the entry point into the health service for most people, primary care plays a key role in delivering communicable disease prevention and care interventions. This role could be extended to focus on noncommunicable diseases as well, within the context of efforts to strengthen health systems by improving primary-care delivery. We put forward practical policy proposals to improve the primary-care response to the problems posed by health transition: (i) improving data on communicable and noncommunicable diseases; (ii) implementing a structured approach to the improved delivery of primary care; (iii) putting the spotlight on quality of clinical care; (iv) aligning the response to health transition with health system strengthening; and (v) capitalizing on a favourable global policy environment. Although these proposals are aimed at primary care in sub-Saharan Africa, they may well be relevant to other regions also facing the challenges of health transition. Implementing these proposals requires action by national and international alliances in mobilizing the necessary investments for improved health of people in developing countries in Africa undergoing health transition.

  9. Student Confidence in the Management of Patient Care Transitions: Impact of a Care Transitions Course in an Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Janet L; Dallwig, Amber L

    2015-09-01

    For nursing professionals to direct and influence the health care changes for implementing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, emerging graduate nurses must be prepared as leaders and advocates for smooth patient care transitions for patients and caregivers. This article reports on how an undergraduate nursing program and its clinical partner created a course to allow students to step back from direct patient care and explore diverse nursing roles, team collaboration, communication, and processes that aim to collectively promote safe and effective quality care. Students completed online pre- and posttest surveys to rate their confidence levels with skills across seven measures. Comparative analysis of the pre- and posttest surveys indicated a significant increase in students' perception of their knowledge and skills across all areas. The instructional framework, using a care transitions model and clinical experiences, prepared students to work with health care teams and community partners for managing patient and family transitions in a variety of health care settings. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Survey of primary care pediatricians on the transition and transfer of adolescents to adult health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert; Spoerri, Michael; Price, Ashley; Cardosi, Ann-Marie; Flanagan, Patricia

    2008-05-01

    The transition and transfer from pediatrics to adult health care of youth with and without special health care needs has become a focus of professional organizations, health care insurers, national policy makers, and providers. To understand transition and transfer at a primary care practice level, all primary care pediatricians in Rhode Island were surveyed. Responses were received from 103 of 169 (60.9%) practicing pediatricians. Few responders had practice policies on transfer. Most reported that transition should begin later than recommended. Few practices communicated with adult providers at transfer. Most reported that health insurers were of little help in transfer. Many pediatric practices had young adults after age 22 and many with special needs. Responders reported adolescents left their practices by 1 of 6 methods. The survey indicates the need for further study of transition and transfer and the need for additional training and education if transfers are to be successful.

  11. Effects of the Affordable Care Act's young adult insurance expansion on prescription drug insurance coverage, utilization, and expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, Kevin A; Arora, Prachi

    2016-01-01

    The US Affordable Care Act (ACA) extended the age of eligibility for young adults to remain on their parents' health insurance plans in order to address the disproportionate number of uninsured young adults in the United States. Effective September 23, 2010, the ACA has required all private health insurance plans to cover dependents until the age of 26. However, it is unknown whether the ACA dependent coverage expansion had an impact on prescription drug insurance or the use of prescription drugs. To evaluate short-term changes in prescription health insurance coverage, prescription drug insurance coverage, prescription drug use, and prescription drug expenditures following implementation of the ACA young adult insurance expansion using national data from 2009 and 2011. Full-year health insurance coverage increased 4.9 percentage points during the study period, which was mainly due to increases in private health insurance among middle- and high-income young adults. In contrast, full-year prescription drug insurance coverage increased 5.5 percentage points and was primarily concentrated among high-income young adults. Although no significant short-term changes in overall prescription drug use were observed, a 30% decrease in out-of-pocket expenditures was seen among young adults. While the main goal of the ACA's young adult insurance expansion was to increase health insurance coverage among young adults, it also had the unintended positive effect of increasing coverage for prescription drug insurance. Additionally, young adults experienced substantial decreases in out-of-pocket spending for prescription drugs. It is important for evaluations of health care policies to assess both intended and unintended outcomes to better understand the implications for the broader health system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The importance of health information technology in care coordination and transitional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Pamela F; Bowles, Kathryn; Dailey, Maureen; Dykes, Patricia; Lamb, Gerri; Naylor, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Care coordination and transitional care services are strategically important for achieving the priorities of better care, better health, and reduced costs embodied in the National Strategy for Quality Improvement in Health Care (National Quality Strategy [NQS]). Some of the most vulnerable times in a person’s care occur with changes in condition as well as movement within and between settings of care. The American Academy of Nursing (AAN) believes it is essential to facilitate the coordination of care and transitions by using health information technology (HIT) to collect, share, and analyze data that communicate patient-centered information among patients, families, and care providers across communities. HIT makes information accessible, actionable, timely, customizable, and portable. Rapid access to information also creates efficiencies in care by eliminating redundancies and illuminating health history and prior care. The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and information systems can enable care coordination to be more effective but only when a number of essential elements are addressed to reflect the team-based nature of care coordination as well as a focus on the individual’s needs and preferences. To that end, the AAN offers a set of recommendations to guide the development of the infrastructure, standards, content, and measures for electronically enabled care coordination and transitions in care as well as research needed to build the evidence base to assess outcomes of the associated interventions.

  13. Primary care provider perceptions of intake transition records and shared care with outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamnik Veronica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recommended that records are kept between primary care providers (PCPs and specialists during patient transitions from hospital to community care, this communication is not currently standardized. We aimed to assess the transmission of cardiac rehabilitation (CR program intake transition records to PCPs and to explore PCPs' needs in communication with CR programs and for intake transition record content. Method 144 PCPs of consenting enrollees from 8 regional and urban Ontario CR programs participated in this cross-sectional study. Intake transition records were tracked from the CR program to the PCP's office. Sixty-six PCPs participated in structured telephone interviews. Results Sixty-eight (47.6% PCPs received a CR intake transition record. Fifty-eight (87.9% PCPs desired intake transition records, with most wanting it transmitted via fax (n = 52, 78.8%. On a 5-point Likert scale, PCPs strongly agreed that the CR transition record met their needs for providing patient care (4.32 ± 0.61, with 48 (76.2% reporting that it improved their management of patients' cardiac risk. PCPs rated the following elements as most important to include in an intake transition record: clinical status (4.67 ± 0.64, exercise test results (4.61 ± 0.52, and the proposed patient care plan (4.59 ± 0.71. Conclusions Less than half of intake transition records are reaching PCPs, revealing a large gap in continuity of patient care. PCP responses should be used to develop an evidence-based intake transition record, and procedures should be implemented to ensure high-quality transitional care.

  14. Homelessness and the transition from foster care to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy; Courtney, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    Prior research suggests that homelessness is a significant problem among young people aging out of foster care. However, these studies have not attempted to identify potential risk or protective factors that might affect the likelihood of becoming homeless during the transition to adulthood. This paper uses data from a longitudinal study to examine both the occurrence and predictors of homelessness among a sample of young people from three Midwestern states who recently aged out of foster care.

  15. Departure from Pediatric Care: Transitioning of Adolescents with Chronic Pain to Adult Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgeron, Paula; Higginson, Andrea; Truskoski, Carolyn

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about specific factors related to chronic pain that need to be considered to support successful transition from pediatric to adult health care settings. This is troubling because 1 in 5 adolescents may experience chronic pain and many will continue to live with pain into adulthood. This paper reviews what is known about successful transition processes for adolescents with various chronic conditions and the unique factors associated with chronic pain and includes a call for further research on transition. Transitioning from the pediatric to the adult health care setting is challenging for adolescents with chronic conditions and their families. Loss to follow-up and negative health outcomes are linked to poor transition processes. Despite studies examining factors associated with successful transition, not all of the findings are transferable to adolescents with chronic pain. We need to support adolescents, young adults, and their parents as they prepare for transition, engage pediatric and adult care providers in care, advocate for system change, and systematically examine the processes that support the successful health care transition of adolescents and young people with chronic pain. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Maternal pertussis and influenza immunization coverage and attitude of health care workers towards these recommendations in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, Kirsten; Braeckman, Tessa; Top, Geert; Van Damme, Pierre; Leuridan, Elke

    2016-11-11

    In Belgium, pertussis vaccination is recommended for all pregnant women in every pregnancy. Adults in close contact with young infants are equally advised to receive a pertussis containing booster dose. Maternal influenza vaccination is likewise recommended in Belgium in the second or third trimester of pregnancy, within the influenza season. A quantitative multicenter survey study has been performed between October 2014 and May 2015 in both postpartum women (N=823, response rate=89.2%) and health care workers (HCWs) (N=261) to assess the coverage of both vaccines during pregnancy along with the coverage of the pertussis cocoon strategy, and to evaluate the knowledge and recommending attitude of HCWs towards the maternal vaccination strategies and the cocoon strategy among surveyed women and HCWs. Overall coverage of pertussis vaccination during pregnancy was 64.0%. Most women were vaccinated by their general practitioner (GP) (82.4%), and most often in the third trimester (74.0%) of pregnancy. Overall coverage of influenza vaccination during pregnancy was 45.0%. Again the GP administered most vaccines (67.6%); vaccines were equally administered in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. Educational level had a significant influence on both the pertussis and influenza vaccination coverage during pregnancy while working situation and parity had only an influence on the maternal pertussis vaccination coverage and country of birth only on the maternal influenza vaccination coverage. Overall, 78.4% of gynecologists and GPs recommends both maternal pertussis and influenza vaccination and 67.0% recommends both maternal vaccination strategies and the cocoon strategy. Within the group of the midwives, only 23.7% recommends both maternal pertussis and influenza vaccination and 10.5% recommends both maternal vaccination strategies and the cocoon strategy. High coverage is reached among pregnant women for pertussis and influenza vaccination. Several underserved

  17. Breadth of Coverage, Ease of Use, and Quality of Mobile Point-of-Care Tool Information Summaries: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emily; Emani, Vamsi K; Ren, Jinma

    2016-10-12

    With advances in mobile technology, accessibility of clinical resources at the point of care has increased. The objective of this research was to identify if six selected mobile point-of-care tools meet the needs of clinicians in internal medicine. Point-of-care tools were evaluated for breadth of coverage, ease of use, and quality. Six point-of-care tools were evaluated utilizing four different devices (two smartphones and two tablets). Breadth of coverage was measured using select International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes if information on summary, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis was provided. Quality measures included treatment and diagnostic inline references and individual and application time stamping. Ease of use covered search within topic, table of contents, scrolling, affordance, connectivity, and personal accounts. Analysis of variance based on the rank of score was used. Breadth of coverage was similar among Medscape (mean 6.88), Uptodate (mean 6.51), DynaMedPlus (mean 6.46), and EvidencePlus (mean 6.41) (P>.05) with DynaMed (mean 5.53) and Epocrates (mean 6.12) scoring significantly lower (PUpToDate and DynaMedPlus allow for search within a topic. All point-of-care tools have remote access with the exception of UpToDate and Essential Evidence Plus. All tools except Medscape covered criteria for quality evaluation. Overall, there was no significant difference between the point-of-care tools with regard to coverage on common topics used by internal medicine clinicians. Selection of point-of-care tools is highly dependent on individual preference based on ease of use and cost of the application.

  18. Transition from Long Day Care to Kindergarten: Continuity or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barblett, Lennie; Barratt-Pugh, Caroline; Kilgallon, Pam; Maloney, Carmel

    2011-01-01

    Transition practices that ensure continuity between early childhood settings have been shown to be important in assisting children's short-term and long-term growth and development (Vogler, Cravello & Woodhead, 2008). In Western Australia many young children move from and between long day care (LDC) settings to kindergarten. In that state,…

  19. Real estate implications of transitions in Dutch health care institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Alexander; Bollinger, Daan; de Jong, P.; van der Voordt, Theo

    2017-01-01

    Due to structural changes in laws and regulations and ways of financing, Dutch health care organisations are in a phase of reorientation and transition. As such, many strategical issues have to be solved that will influence their corporate real estate strategy. In such a dynamic context real estate

  20. Health Care Reform for Children with Public Coverage: How Can Policymakers Maximize Gains and Prevent Harm? Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Genevieve M.; Dorn, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Moving toward universal coverage has the potential to increase access to care and improve the health and well-being of uninsured children and adults. The effects of health care reform on the more than 25 million children who currently have coverage under Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) are less clear. Increased parental…

  1. Pediatric Nurse Practitioners' Perspectives on Health Care Transition From Pediatric to Adult Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestishock, Lisa; Daley, Alison Moriarty; White, Patience

    2018-01-12

    This study examined the perspectives of pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) regarding the needs of adolescents, parents/caregivers, clinicians, and institutions in the health care transition (HCT) process for adolescents/young adults. PNPs (N = 170) participated in a luncheon for those interested in transition at an annual conference. Small groups discussed and recorded their perspectives related to health care transition from adolescent to adult services. Content analysis was used to analyze responses (Krippendorff, 2013). Four themes, Education, Health care system, Support, and Communication, emerged from the data analysis. PNPs identified health care informatics and adolescents' use of technology as additional critical aspects to be considered in health care transition. Opportunities and challenges identified by the PNPs are discussed to improve the quality and process of transitioning adolescents to adult services. This report will help National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners formulate a new Health Care Transition Policy Statement for the organization. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Health Care Transition Curriculum for Primary Care Residents: Identifying Goals and Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Alice A; Ciccarelli, Mary R; Sharma, Niraj; Lotstein, Debra S

    2018-04-01

    The transition from pediatric to adult health care is a vulnerable period for youth with special health care needs. Although successful transitions are recognized as critical for improving adult outcomes and reducing health care utilization and cost, an educational gap in health care transitions for physicians persists. Our aim with this project was to develop a national health care transition residency curriculum for primary care physicians, using an expert-based, consensus-building process. Medical professionals with expertise in health care transition were recruited to participate in a survey to assist in the development of a health care transition curriculum for primary care physicians. By using a modified Delphi process, curricular goals and objectives were drafted, and participants rated the importance of each objective, feasibility of developing activities for objectives, and appropriateness of objectives for specified learners. Mean and SDs for each response and percent rating for the appropriateness of each objective were calculated. Fifty-six of 246 possible respondents participated in round 1 of ratings and 36 (64%) participated in the second round. Five goals with 32 associated objectives were identified. Twenty-five of the 32 objectives (78%) were rated as being appropriate for "proficient" learners, with 7 objectives rated as "expert." Three objectives were added to map onto the Got Transition guidelines. The identified goals and objectives provide the foundation and structure for future curriculum development, facilitating the sharing of curricular activities and evaluation tools across programs by faculty with a range of expertise. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. [Vaccination coverage among health care workers in the pediatric emergency and intensive care department of Edouard Herriot hospital in 2007, against influenza, pertussis, varicella, and measles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, L; Afroukh, N; Floret, D

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the vaccination coverage among the medical and paramedical health care workers of the pediatric intensive care and emergency department of Edouard Herriot hospital in Lyon, with respect to influenza, pertussis, varicella, and measles, 4 diseases with air transmission and vaccination recommendations. During February and March 2007, a questionnaire was given by hand to 123 health care workers by a medical student working there or available in the intensive care unit. The response rate to the questionnaire was 68.3%. The vaccination coverage against influenza was 42.8%; men and medical health care workers were better vaccinated. With respect to vaccination against pertussis, one third had received an injection in adulthood, adults under age 30 and medical health care workers were better vaccinated, but the difference was not statistically significant. Ten health care workers were not vaccinated and had no history of measles: only 1 had had a measles serology and none were vaccinated. Eleven had no history of varicella: 6 had had a varicella serology and none were vaccinated. Vaccination coverage against influenza is higher than what has been reported in the literature, possibly because of a mobile vaccination campaign against influenza made during winter 2006 in this pediatric department. Vaccination coverage against pertussis is encouraging and probably the consequence of an awareness of the gravity of the disease among infants. Individual information is necessary for health care workers on the nosocomial risk for influenza and pertussis in infants, and vaccination must be proposed. Serology against varicella and measles is compulsory for all health care workers with no history and no vaccination against these 2 diseases, to track and vaccinate the nonimmunized personnel. Occupational physicians have a very important role to play in meeting this goal.

  4. Health care transition from pediatric care to adult care: opportunities and challenges under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Lauren; Shah, Parag K; Harisiades, James P; Boudos, Rebecca; Agrawal, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Enrollment of young adults is foundational to the success of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This article analyzes the implications for young adults transitioning from pediatric to adult care with the implementation of the ACA. We review the key characteristics of this population relevant to health care utilization and access as well as the impact of private insurance market reforms, health insurance marketplaces, Medicaid expansion, and workforce development provisions on this population. We then analyze how reform is impacting and will continue to impact specific populations of young adults, including individuals with disabilities, college students, immigrants, young adults who age out of the foster care system and individuals involved with the criminal justice system. Finally, we look at the socio-economic and political factors influencing outreach efforts, and make recommendations to maximize the benefits of the law for young adults to empower them to have access to care and financial security.

  5. [Transition from paediatric to adult cystic fibrosis care centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieu, I; Reynaud, Q; Nove-Josserand, R

    2016-02-01

    The number of adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases has increased dramatically over the last decade. This led paediatric teams to organize the transition to adult centres with the aim to ensure the quality of care and prognosis, adherence to survey and treatment. To promote a good work and family life is also a challenge. Several studies have shown the importance of a successful transition in cystic fibrosis (CF) in order to prevent complications and loss monitoring and to improve the perception of patients and their families. In France in 2003, cystic fibrosis centres (CRCM) have been identified and among them of adult CF centres. The regular increase of the adult centre's active file requires improving the transition process. It is necessary to improve the transition process and to prepare the young patient and their family early during adolescence. The process in place should concern the whole aspects of care, i.e., medical, psychological and educational. The transition to adulthood will be successful if it results in a stable state of the disease allowing family and career plans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Addressing transition to adult health care for adolescents with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scal, Peter; Ireland, Marjorie

    2005-06-01

    To determine the factors associated with addressing the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care among US adolescents with special health care needs. Data for 4332 adolescents, 14 to 17 years of age, from the 2000-2001 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs were used. The adequacy of transition services was determined by parent self-report. Explanatory variables, including parental education, family poverty status, race/ethnicity, measures of the severity and complexity of conditions, health insurance status, having a personal doctor, and the quality of the parent's relationship with the adolescent's doctor, were entered into a regression model. Overall, 50.2% of parents reported that they had discussed transition issues with their adolescent's doctor and 16.4% had discussed and developed a plan for addressing those needs. In a multivariate regression analysis, correlates of the adequacy of transition services included older age, female gender, complexity of health care needs, and higher quality of the parent-doctor relationship. Among adolescents with special health care needs, those who were older and those with more complicated needs were more likely to have addressed the transition from a pediatric to adult-oriented system of care. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrated a strong association between a high-quality parent-provider relationship and the extent to which transition issues were addressed. The importance of transition services for adolescents with less complex needs and the overall impact of health care transition services were not assessed in this study and remain important questions for future investigations.

  7. Assessing coverage, equity and quality gaps in maternal and neonatal care in sub-saharan Africa: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilunda, Calistus; Putoto, Giovanni; Dalla Riva, Donata; Manenti, Fabio; Atzori, Andrea; Calia, Federico; Assefa, Tigist; Turri, Bruno; Emmanuel, Onapa; Straneo, Manuela; Kisika, Firma; Tamburlini, Giorgio; Tarmbulini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in coverage, equity and quality of health services hinder the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa as well as in other high-burden countries, yet few studies attempt to assess all these dimensions as part of the situation analysis. We present the base-line data of a project aimed at simultaneously addressing coverage, equity and quality issues in maternal and neonatal health care in five districts belonging to three African countries. Data were collected in cross-sectional studies with three types of tools. Coverage was assessed in three hospitals and 19 health centres (HCs) utilising emergency obstetric and newborn care needs assessment tools developed by the Averting Maternal Death and Disability program. Emergency obstetrics care (EmOC) indicators were calculated. Equity was assessed in three hospitals and 13 HCs by means of proxy wealth indices and women delivering in health facilities were compared with those in the general population to identify inequities. Quality was assessed in three hospitals using the World Health Organization's maternal and neonatal quality of hospital care assessment tool which evaluates the whole range of aspects of obstetric and neonatal care and produces an average score for each main area of care. All the three hospitals qualified as comprehensive EmOC facilities but none of the HCs qualified for basic EmOC. None of the districts met the minimum requisites for EmOC indicators. In two out of three hospitals, there were major quality gaps which were generally greater in neonatal care, management of emergency and complicated cases and monitoring. Higher access to care was coupled by low quality and good quality by very low access. Stark inequities in utilisation of institutional delivery care were present in all districts and across all health facilities, especially at hospital level. Our findings confirm the existence of serious issues regarding coverage, equity and

  8. Assessing coverage, equity and quality gaps in maternal and neonatal care in sub-saharan Africa: an integrated approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calistus Wilunda

    Full Text Available Gaps in coverage, equity and quality of health services hinder the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa as well as in other high-burden countries, yet few studies attempt to assess all these dimensions as part of the situation analysis. We present the base-line data of a project aimed at simultaneously addressing coverage, equity and quality issues in maternal and neonatal health care in five districts belonging to three African countries.Data were collected in cross-sectional studies with three types of tools. Coverage was assessed in three hospitals and 19 health centres (HCs utilising emergency obstetric and newborn care needs assessment tools developed by the Averting Maternal Death and Disability program. Emergency obstetrics care (EmOC indicators were calculated. Equity was assessed in three hospitals and 13 HCs by means of proxy wealth indices and women delivering in health facilities were compared with those in the general population to identify inequities. Quality was assessed in three hospitals using the World Health Organization's maternal and neonatal quality of hospital care assessment tool which evaluates the whole range of aspects of obstetric and neonatal care and produces an average score for each main area of care.All the three hospitals qualified as comprehensive EmOC facilities but none of the HCs qualified for basic EmOC. None of the districts met the minimum requisites for EmOC indicators. In two out of three hospitals, there were major quality gaps which were generally greater in neonatal care, management of emergency and complicated cases and monitoring. Higher access to care was coupled by low quality and good quality by very low access. Stark inequities in utilisation of institutional delivery care were present in all districts and across all health facilities, especially at hospital level.Our findings confirm the existence of serious issues regarding coverage

  9. Treatment issues for children with epilepsy transitioning to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbout, Rima; Camfield, Carol S; Andrade, Danielle M; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Chiron, Catherine; Cramer, Joyce A; French, Jacqueline A; Kossoff, Eric; Mula, Marco; Camfield, Peter R

    2017-04-01

    This is the third of three papers that summarize the second symposium on Transition in Epilepsies held in Paris in June 2016. This paper focuses on treatment issues that arise during the course of childhood epilepsy and make the process of transition to adult care more complicated. Some AEDs used during childhood, such as stiripentol, vigabatrin, and cannabidiol, are unfamiliar to adult epilepsy specialists. In addition, new drugs are being developed for treatment of specific childhood onset epilepsy syndromes and have no indication yet for adults. The ketogenic diet may be effective during childhood but is difficult to continue in adult care. Regional adult epilepsy diet clinics could be helpful. Polytherapy is common for patients transitioning to adult care. Although these complex AED regimes are difficult, they are often possible to simplify. AEDs used in childhood may need to be reconsidered in adulthood. Rescue medications to stop prolonged seizures and clusters of seizures are in wide home use in children and can be continued in adulthood. Adherence/compliance is notoriously difficult for adolescents, but there are simple clinical approaches that should be helpful. Mental health issues including depression and anxiety are not always diagnosed and treated in children and young adults even though effective treatments are available. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and aggressive behavior disorders may interfere with transition and successful adulthood but these can be treated. For the majority, the adult social outcome of children with epilepsy is unsatisfactory with few proven interventions. The interface between pediatric and adult care for children with epilepsy is becoming increasingly complicated with a need for more comprehensive transition programs and adult epileptologists who are knowledgeable about special treatments that benefit this group of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. HPV vaccination coverage of teen girls: the influence of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip J; Stokley, Shannon; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Orenstein, Walter A; Omer, Saad B

    2016-03-18

    Between 2010 and 2014, the percentage of 13-17 year-old girls administered ≥3 doses of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine ("fully vaccinated") increased by 7.7 percentage points to 39.7%, and the percentage not administered any doses of the HPV vaccine ("not immunized") decreased by 11.3 percentage points to 40.0%. To evaluate the complex interactions between parents' vaccine-related beliefs, demographic factors, and HPV immunization status. Vaccine-related parental beliefs and sociodemographic data collected by the 2010 National Immunization Survey-Teen among teen girls (n=8490) were analyzed. HPV vaccination status was determined from teens' health care provider (HCP) records. Among teen girls either unvaccinated or fully vaccinated against HPV, teen girls whose parent was positively influenced to vaccinate their teen daughter against HPV were 48.2 percentage points more likely to be fully vaccinated. Parents who reported being positively influenced to vaccinate against HPV were 28.9 percentage points more likely to report that their daughter's HCP talked about the HPV vaccine, 27.2 percentage points more likely to report that their daughter's HCP gave enough time to discuss the HPV shot, and 43.4 percentage points more likely to report that their daughter's HCP recommended the HPV vaccine (pteen girls administered 1-2 doses of the HPV vaccine, 87.0% had missed opportunities for HPV vaccine administration. Results suggest that an important pathway to achieving higher ≥3 dose HPV vaccine coverage is by increasing HPV vaccination series initiation though HCP talking to parents about the HPV vaccine, giving parents time to discuss the vaccine, and by making a strong recommendation for the HPV. Also, HPV vaccination series completion rates may be increased by eliminating missed opportunities to vaccinate against HPV and scheduling additional follow-up visits to administer missing HPV vaccine doses. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Coverage and timing of antenatal care among poor women in 6 Mesoamerican countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansereau, Emily; McNellan, Claire R; Gagnier, Marielle C; Desai, Sima S; Haakenstad, Annie; Johanns, Casey K; Palmisano, Erin B; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Schaefer, Alexandra; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Hernandez, Bernardo; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2016-08-19

    Poor women in the developing world have a heightened need for antenatal care (ANC) but are often the least likely to attend it. This study examines factors associated with the number and timing of ANC visits for poor women in Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and El Salvador. We surveyed 8366 women regarding the ANC they attended for their most recent birth in the past two years. We conducted logistic regressions to examine demographic, household, and health characteristics associated with attending at least one skilled ANC visit, four skilled visits, and a skilled visit in the first trimester. Across countries, 78 % of women attended at least one skilled ANC visit, 62 % attended at least four skilled visits, and 56 % attended a skilled visit in the first trimester. The proportion of women attending four skilled visits was highest in Nicaragua (81 %) and lowest in Guatemala (18 %) and Panama (38 %). In multiple countries, women who were unmarried, less-educated, adolescent, indigenous, had not wanted to conceive, and lacked media exposure were less likely to meet international ANC guidelines. In countries with health insurance programs, coverage was associated with attending skilled ANC, but not the timeliness. Despite significant policy reforms and initiatives targeting the poor, many women living in the poorest regions of Mesoamérica are not meeting ANC guidelines. Both supply and demand interventions are needed to prioritize vulnerable groups, reduce unplanned pregnancies, and reach populations not exposed to common forms of media. Top performing municipalities can inform effective practices across the region.

  12. Change in health status and access to care in young adults with special health care needs: results from the 2007 national survey of adult transition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Megumi J; Hersh, Aimee O; Hilton, Joan F; Lotstein, Debra S

    2013-04-01

    Despite over 500,000 adolescents with special health care needs transitioning to adulthood each year, limited information is available on their health status or their access to care after transition. To describe the change in health status and access to care of a nationally sampled, longitudinal cohort of young adults with special health care needs (ASHCN). We analyzed follow-up data collected in the 2007 Survey of Adult Transition and Health on young adults who were 14-17 years of age when their parents participated in the 2001 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. We describe changes in access to care and health status over time, and used logistic regression to identify characteristics that were associated with declining health status in this cohort. 1,865 participants, aged 19-23 years, completed the Survey of Adult Transition and Health. Between 2001 and 2007, there was a 3.6 fold increase in the proportion experiencing delayed or forgone care; 10% reported a decline in health status. There was a 7.7-fold increase in the proportion reporting no insurance. In regression analysis, factors associated with declining health status between 2001 and 2007 included underlying disease severity and delayed or forgone care in young adulthood. We found significant deterioration in insurance coverage, usual source of care and receiving timely health care as ASHCN aged into adulthood, and that this was associated with decline in health status. Our findings suggest that further population-based analyses of health outcomes are needed to plan for interventions to assist this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Health care transition in thalassemia: pediatric to adult-oriented care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Laurice; Levine, Matthew

    2010-08-01

    Improved technology and medical advances have increased the lifespan for people with thalassemia. As thalassemia is no longer exclusively a pediatric blood disorder, consideration must now be given to transition planning from pediatric to adult care. The complexity of thalassemia disease, coupled with the changing face of U.S. health care, creates barriers to transitional planning. Additional barriers develop because this chronic disease is less common in adults, leaving caregivers unprepared to facilitate proper adult treatment. This paper will discuss two common U.S. health care settings where care is provided to adults with thalassemia. It will also offer health care administrators, providers, policy makers, and the thalassemia community at large some recommendations on the provision of comprehensive, quality care to assure the best possible outcomes no matter what setting is available to adult patients living with thalassemia.

  14. International and Interdisciplinary Identification of Health Care Transition Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Cynthia; Cuttance, Jessica; Sharma, Niraj; Maslow, Gary; Wiener, Lori; Betz, Cecily; Porter, Jerlym; McLaughlin, Suzanne; Gilleland-Marchak, Jordan; Renwick, Amy; Naranjo, Diana; Jan, Sophia; Javalkar, Karina; Ferris, Maria

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of agreement on what constitutes successful outcomes for the process of health care transition (HCT) among adolescent and young adults with special health care needs. To present HCT outcomes identified by a Delphi process with an interdisciplinary group of participants. A Delphi method involving 3 stages was deployed to refine a list of HCT outcomes. This 18-month study (from January 5, 2013, of stage 1 to July 3, 2014, of stage 3) included an initial literature search, expert interviews, and then 2 waves of a web-based survey. On this survey, 93 participants from outpatient, community-based, and primary care clinics rated the importance of the top HCT outcomes identified by the Delphi process. Analyses were performed from July 5, 2014, to December 5, 2014. Health care transition outcomes of adolescents and young adults with special health care needs. Importance ratings of identified HCT outcomes rated on a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 9 (very important). The 2 waves of surveys included 117 and 93 participants as the list of outcomes was refined. Transition outcomes were refined by the 3 waves of the Delphi process, with quality of life being the highest-rated outcome with broad agreement. The 10 final outcomes identified included individual outcomes (quality of life, understanding the characteristics of conditions and complications, knowledge of medication, self-management, adherence to medication, and understanding health insurance), health services outcomes (attending medical appointments, having a medical home, and avoidance of unnecessary hospitalization), and a social outcome (having a social network). Participants indicated that different outcomes were likely needed for individuals with cognitive disabilities. Quality of life is an important construct relevant to HCT. Future research should identify valid measures associated with each outcome and further explore the role that quality of life plays in the HCT process. Achieving

  15. An Expanded Theoretical Framework of Care Coordination Across Transitions in Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwin, Laurel E; Castonguay, Denise; Keenan, Carolyn B; Hermann, Cherice

    2016-01-01

    For many patients, high-quality, patient-centered, and cost-effective health care requires coordination among multiple clinicians and settings. Ensuring optimal care coordination requires a clear understanding of how clinician activities and continuity during transitions affect patient-centeredness and quality outcomes. This article describes an expanded theoretical framework to better understand care coordination. The framework provides clear articulation of concepts. Examples are provided of ways to measure the concepts.

  16. Systematic review: Health care transition practice service models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Cecily L; O'Kane, Lisa S; Nehring, Wendy M; Lobo, Marie L

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 750,000 adolescents and emerging adults with special health care needs (AEA-SHCN) enter into adulthood annually. The linkages to ensure the seamless transfer of care from pediatric to adult care and transition to adulthood for AEA-SHCN have yet to be realized. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the state of the science of health care transition (HCT) service models as described in quantitative investigations. A four-tier screening approach was used to obtain reviewed articles published from 2004 to 2013. A total of 17 articles were included in this review. Transfer of care was the most prominent intervention feature. Overall, using the Effective Public Health Practice Project criteria, the studies were rated as weak. Limitations included lack of control groups, rigorous designs and methodology, and incomplete intervention descriptions. As the findings indicate, HCT is an emerging field of practice that is largely in the exploratory stage of model development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. When coverage expands: children's health insurance program as a natural experiment in use of health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggins, Adrianne; Patrick, Stephen; Demonner, Sonya; Davis, Matthew M

    2013-10-01

    Expanding insurance coverage is designed to improve access to primary care and reduce use of emergency department (ED) services. Whether expanding coverage achieves this is of paramount importance as the United States prepares for the Affordable Care Act. Emergency and outpatient department use was examined after the State Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage expansion, focusing on adolescents (a major target group for CHIP) versus young adults (not targeted). The hypothesis was that coverage would increase use of outpatient services, and ED use would decrease. Using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), the years 1992-1996 were analyzed as baseline and then compared to use patterns in 1999-2009, after the CHIP launch. Primary outcomes were population-adjusted annual visits to ED versus nonemergency outpatient settings. Interrupted time series were performed on use rates to ED and outpatient departments between adolescents (11 to 18 years old) and young adults (19 to 29 years old) in the pre-CHIP and CHIP periods. Outpatient-to-ED ratios were calculated and compared across time periods. A stratified analysis by payer and sex was also performed. The mean number of outpatient adolescent visits increased by 299 visits per 1,000 persons (95% confidence interval [CI] = 140 to 457), while there was no statistically significant increase in young adult outpatient visits across time periods. There was no statistically significant change in the mean number of adolescent ED visits across time periods, while young adult ED use increased by 48 visits per 1,000 persons (95% CI = 24 to 73). The adolescent outpatient-to-ED ratio increased by 1.0 (95% CI = 0.49 to 1.6), while the young adults ratio decreased by 0.53 across time periods (95% CI = -0.90 to -0.16). Since CHIP, adolescent non-ED outpatient visits have increased, while ED visits have remained unchanged. In

  18. Insurance coverage among women diagnosed with a gynecologic malignancy before and after implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Haley A; Havrilesky, Laura J; Chino, Junzo

    2017-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) included provisions to expand insurance coverage by expanding Medicaid eligibility, providing subsidies of private coverage and enforcing an individual mandate. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of the ACA on insurance rates among women diagnosed with a gynecologic malignancy. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 18 registries database, women newly diagnosed with cervical, uterine or ovarian cancer between 2008 and 2014 were identified. Insurance rates were examined before and after the passage of the ACA (2011) as well as before (January 2011-December 2013) versus after (January 2014-December 2014) Medicaid expansion to examine the impact of specific provisions. Rates of insurance were then compared between states that elected for expansion of Medicaid in 2014 vs. those states that had not. Among 181,866 diagnosed with cervical, uterine or ovarian cancer, there was a significant increase in patients enrolled in Medicaid after 2011. Between 2011 and 2014, there was a significant decrease in the rates of uninsured for all cancer types (p=0.001). Uninsured rates decreased by 50% for those diagnosed with uterine and ovarian cancer (6% to 3% and 8% to 4% respectively, p≤0.001), and by 25% in cervical cancer (8.9% to 6.7%, p=0.001) after January 2014. Decreases in the rate of the uninsured and associated increases in insurance coverage were only observed in states which expanded Medicaid coverage (p≤0.001). The Affordable Care Act resulted in expanded insurance coverage for women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer, however, the impact was significantly increased in states which increased their Medicaid eligibility in 2014. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transition from specialist to primary diabetes care: A qualitative study of perspectives of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddy Clare

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing prevalence of diabetes and heightened awareness of the benefits of early and intensive disease management have increased service demands and expectations not only of primary care physicians but also of diabetes specialists. While research has addressed issues related to referral into specialist care, much less has been published about the transition from diabetes specialists back to primary care. Understanding the concerns of family physicians related to discharge of diabetes care from specialist centers can support the development of strategies that facilitate this transition and result in broader access to limited specialist services. This study was undertaken to explore primary care physician (PCP perspectives and concerns related to reassuming responsibility for diabetes care after referral to a specialized diabetes center. Methods Qualitative data were collected through three focus groups. Sessions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and sorted with themes identified using a constant comparison method. The study was undertaken through the regional academic referral center for adult diabetes care in Ottawa, Canada. Participants included 22 primary care physicians representing a variety of referral frequencies, practice types and settings. Results Participants described facilitators and barriers to successful transition of diabetes care at the provider, patient and systems level. Major facilitators included clear communication of a detailed, structured plan of care, ongoing access to specialist services for advice or re-referral, continuing education and mentoring for PCPs. Identified provider barriers were gaps in PCP knowledge and confidence related to diabetes treatment, excessive workload and competing time demands. Systems deterrents included reimbursement policies for health professionals and inadequate funding for diabetes medications and supplies. At the PCP-patient interface

  20. Innovative Models of Dental Care Delivery and Coverage: Patient-Centric Dental Benefits Based on Digital Oral Health Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John; Mills, Shannon; Foley, Mary E

    2018-04-01

    Innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are emerging across oral health care systems causing changes to treatment and benefit plans. A novel addition to these models is digital risk assessment, which offers a promising new approach that incorporates the use of a cloud-based technology platform to assess an individual patient's risk for oral disease. Risk assessment changes treatment by including risk as a modifier of treatment and as a determinant of preventive services. Benefit plans are being developed to use risk assessment to predetermine preventive benefits for patients identified at elevated risk for oral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trends in insurance coverage and treatment among persons with opioid use disorders following the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Kenneth A; Mojtabai, Ramin; Krawczyk, Noa; Young, Andrea S; Kealhofer, Marc; Tormohlen, Kayla N; Crum, Rosa M

    2017-10-01

    This short communication examines the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) on insurance coverage and substance use treatment access among persons with opioid use disorders. Data came from the 2010-2015 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Among persons with heroin and opioid pain-reliever use disorders, measures of insurance coverage and treatment access were compared before and after the implementation of major PPACA provisions that expanded access to insurance in 2014. The prevalence of uninsured persons among those with heroin use disorders declined dramatically following PPACA implementation (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), largely due to an increase in the prevalence of Medicaid coverage (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.21-3.18). There was no evidence of an increase in the prevalence of treatment, but among persons who received treatment, there was an increase in the proportion whose treatment was paid for by insurance (OR 3.75, 95% CI 2.13-3.18). By contrast, there was no evidence the uninsured rate declined among persons with pain-reliever use disorders. The PPACA Medicaid expansion increased insurance coverage among persons with heroin use disorders, and likely plays an essential role in protecting the health and financial security of this high-risk group. More research is needed on the relationship between insurance acquisition and utilization of substance use treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The care transitions innovation (C-TraIn) for socioeconomically disadvantaged adults: results of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Honora; Michaels, Leann; Chan, Benjamin; Kansagara, Devan

    2014-11-01

    Despite growing emphasis on transitional care to reduce costs and improve quality, few studies have examined transitional care improvements in socioeconomically disadvantaged adults. It is important to consider these patients separately as many are high-utilizers, have different needs, and may have different responses to interventions. To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent transitional care improvement program on 30-day readmissions, emergency department (ED) use, transitional care quality, and mortality. Clustered randomized controlled trial conducted at a single urban academic medical center in Portland, Oregon. Three hundred eighty-two hospitalized low-income adults admitted to general medicine or cardiology who were uninsured or had public insurance. Multicomponent intervention including (1) transitional nurse coaching and education, including home visits for highest risk patients; (2) pharmacy care, including provision of 30 days of medications after discharge for those without prescription drug coverage; (3) post-hospital primary care linkages; (4) systems integration and continuous quality improvement. Primary outcomes included 30-day inpatient readmission and ED use. Readmission data were obtained using state-wide administrative data for all participants (insured and uninsured). Secondary outcomes included quality (3-item Care Transitions Measure) and mortality. Research staff administering questionnaires and assessing outcomes were blinded. There was no significant difference in 30-day readmission between C-TraIn (30/209, 14.4 %) and control patients (27/173, 16.1 %), p = 0.644, or in ED visits between C-TraIn (51/209, 24.4 %) and control (33/173, 19.6 %), p = 0.271. C-TraIn was associated with improved transitional care quality; 47.3 % (71/150) of C-TraIn patients reported a high quality transition compared to 30.3 % (36/119) control patients, odds ratio 2.17 (95 % CI 1.30-3.64). Zero C-TraIn patients died in the 30-day post-discharge period

  3. Transitioning Adolescents and Young Adults With HIV Infection to Adult Care: Pilot Testing the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturo, Donna; Powell, Alexis; Major-Wilson, Hannah; Sanchez, Kenia; De Santis, Joseph P; Friedman, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    Advances in care and treatment of adolescents/young adults with HIV infection have made survival into adulthood possible, requiring transition to adult care. Researchers have documented that the transition process is challenging for adolescents/young adults. To ensure successful transition, a formal transition protocol is needed. Despite existing research, little quantitative evaluation of the transition process has been conducted. The purpose of the study was to pilot test the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol, a formalized protocol developed to assist transition to adult care. A retrospective medical/nursing record review was conducted with 38 clients enrolled in the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol at a university-based adolescent medicine clinic providing care to adolescents/young adults with HIV infection. Almost half of the participants were able to successfully transition to adult care. Reasons for failure to transition included relocation, attrition, lost to follow-up, and transfer to another adult service. Failure to transition to adult care was not related to adherence issues, X(2) (1, N=38)=2.49, p=.288; substance use, X(2) (1, N=38)=1.71, p=.474; mental health issues, X(2) (1, N=38)=2.23, p=.322; or pregnancy/childrearing, X(2) (1, N=38)=0.00, p=.627). Despite the small sample size, the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol appears to be useful in guiding the transition process of adolescents/young adults with HIV infection to adult care. More research is needed with a larger sample to fully evaluate the "Movin' Out" Transitioning Protocol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improving Incident ESRD Care Via a Transitional Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Brendan; Zheng, Sijie; Yang, Alex; Schiller, Brigitte; Morfín, José A; Seek, Melvin; Lockridge, Robert S

    2018-03-03

    Dialysis care in the United States continues to move toward an emphasis on continuous quality improvement and performance benchmarking. Government- and industry-sponsored programs have evolved to assess and incentivize outcomes for many components of end-stage renal disease care. One aspect that remains largely unaddressed at a systemic level is the high-risk transition period from chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury to permanent dialysis dependence. Incident dialysis patients experience disproportionately high mortality and hospitalization rates coupled with high costs. This article reviews the clinical case for a special emphasis on this transition period, reviews published literature regarding prior transitional care programs, and proposes a novel iteration of the first 30 days of dialysis care: the transitional care unit (TCU). The goal of a TCU is to improve awareness of all aspects of renal replacement therapy, including modalities, access, transplantation options, and nutritional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This enables patients to make truly informed decisions regarding their care. The TCU model is open to all patients, including incident patients with end-stage renal disease, those for whom peritoneal dialysis is failing, or those with failing transplants. This model may be especially beneficial to those who are deemed inadequately prepared or "crash start" patients. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Excellence in Transitional Care of Older Adults and Pay-for-Performance: Perspectives of Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaje, Alicia I; Newcomer, Alison R; Maynor, Kenric A; Duhaney, Robert L; Eubank, Kathryn J; Carrese, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background: Care transitions across health care settings are common and can result in adverse outcomes for older adults. Few studies have examined health care professionals' perspectives on important process measures or pay-for-performance (P4P) strategies related to transitional care. A study was conducted to characterize health care professionals' perspectives on (1) successful transitional care of older adults (age 65 years and older), (2) suggestions for improvement, and (3) P4P strategies related to transitional care. In a qualitative study, one-hour semistructured in-depth interviews were conducted in an acute care hospital, a skilled nursing facility, two community-based primary care practices, and one home health care agency with 20 health care professionals (18 physicians and 2 home health care administrators) with direct experience in care transitions of older adults and who were likely to be affected by P4P strategies. Findings were organized into three thematic domains: (1) components and markers of effective transitional care, (2) difficulties in design and implementation of P4P strategies, and (3) health care professionals' concerns and unmet needs related to delivering optimal care during transitions. A conceptual framework was developed on the basis of the findings to guide design and implementation of P4P strategies for improving transitional care. In characterizing health care professionals' perspectives, specific care processes to target, challenges to address in the design of P4P strategies, and unmet needs to consider regarding education and feedback for health care professionals were described. Future investigations could evaluate whether performance targets, educational interventions, and implementation strategies based on this conceptual framework improve quality of transitional care.

  6. Problems of transition from tax-based system of health care finance to mandatory health insurance model in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, S

    1999-06-01

    This article examines three problems burdening the Russian system of health care finance in transition period: (a) unrealistic government promise to cover health care coverage too wide to be achieved with available resources; (b) inefficient management of health care delivery systems; and (c) lack in evidence of actual positive changes effected by the new players: mandatory health insurance carriers and funds. Radical reshaping of the health benefits promised by the government and introduction of patient co-payments are considered as a way to normalize public health sector finance and operations. Two alternative approaches to the reform of the existing eclectic system of health care management are available. Institutional preconditions for operational effectiveness of third-party purchasers of health services in public-financed health sector are defined.

  7. Transition to Adult Care for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Markowitz, Jessica T.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor glycemic control, gaps in medical care, and adverse health outcomes. With the increasing incidence in type 1 diabetes in the pediatric population, there will be an increase in the numbers of teens and young adults transferring their care from pediatric providers to adult diabetes services in the future. In recent years, the topic of transitioning pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes to adult diabetes care has been discussed at length in the literature and there have been many observational studies. However, there are few interventional studies and, to date, no randomized clinical trials. This paper discusses the rationale for studying this important area. We review both observational and interventional literature over the past several years, with a focus on new research. In addition, important areas for future research are outlined. PMID:22922877

  8. Adult care transitioning for adolescents with special health care needs: a pivotal role for family centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Naomi N; Scal, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    To examine the relationship between having a usual source of care, family centered care, and transition counseling for adolescents with special health care needs. Data are from 18,198 parents/guardians, of youth aged 12-17 years, who participated in the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. Linear and logistic regression models were used to define relationships between parent report of identification of a usual place and provider of medical care for their child and counseling on four transition issues: transfer to adult providers, review of future health needs, maintaining health insurance in adulthood, and youth taking responsibility for care. The direct mediating effect of family centered care was evaluated. Youth having a usual source of care (vs. not) were more likely to receive counseling on future health needs (47.4 vs. 33.6%, P needs (56.3 vs. 39.6%, P needs and 94.9% of the effect of a usual source of care on encouragement to take responsibility for care. Study findings support the development of health care delivery models focusing on family centered care to the same degree as other health care access issues.

  9. The effect of supplemental medical and prescription drug coverage on health care spending for Medicare beneficiaries with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, Mujde Z; Davidoff, Amy J; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Shaffer, Thomas; Dougherty, J Samantha; Ke, Xuehua; Stuart, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether patients with newly diagnosed cancer respond differently to supplemental coverage than the general Medicare population. A cohort of newly diagnosed cancer patients (n = 1,799) from the 1997-2007 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey and a noncancer cohort (n = 9,726) were identified and matched by panel year. Two-year total medical care spending was estimated by using generalized linear models with gamma distribution and log link-including endogeneity-corrected models. Interactions between cancer and type of insurance allowed testing for differential effects of a cancer diagnosis. The cancer cohort spent an adjusted $15,605 more over 2 years than did the noncancer comparison group. Relative to those without supplemental coverage, beneficiaries with employer-sponsored insurance, other private with prescription drug coverage, and public coverage had significantly higher total spending ($3,510, $2,823, and $4,065, respectively, for main models). For beneficiaries with cancer, supplemental insurance effects were similar in magnitude yet negative, suggesting little net effect of supplemental insurance for cancer patients. The endogeneity-corrected models produced implausibly large main effects of supplemental insurance, but the Cancer × Insurance interactions were similar in both models. Medicare beneficiaries with cancer are less responsive to the presence and type of supplemental insurance than are beneficiaries without cancer. Proposed restrictions on the availability of supplemental insurance intended to reduce Medicare spending would be unlikely to limit expenditures by beneficiaries with cancer, but would shift the financial burden to those beneficiaries. Policymakers should consider welfare effects associated with coverage restrictions. © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Published by International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) All rights reserved.

  10. Achieving Universal Health Coverage by Focusing on Primary Care in Japan: Lessons for Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki

    2016-02-25

    When the Japanese government adopted Western medicine in the late nineteenth century, it left intact the infrastructure of primary care by giving licenses to the existing practitioners and by initially setting the hurdle for entry into medical school low. Public financing of hospitals was kept minimal so that almost all of their revenue came from patient charges. When social health insurance (SHI) was introduced in 1927, benefits were focused on primary care services delivered by physicians in clinics, and not on hospital services. This was reflected in the development and subsequent revisions of the fee schedule. The policy decisions which have helped to retain primary care services might provide lessons for achieving universal health coverage in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  11. Achieving Universal Health Coverage by Focusing on Primary Care in Japan: Lessons for Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Ikegami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When the Japanese government adopted Western medicine in the late nineteenth century, it left intact the infrastructure of primary care by giving licenses to the existing practitioners and by initially setting the hurdle for entry into medical school low. Public financing of hospitals was kept minimal so that almost all of their revenue came from patient charges. When social health insurance (SHI was introduced in 1927, benefits were focused on primary care services delivered by physicians in clinics, and not on hospital services. This was reflected in the development and subsequent revisions of the fee schedule. The policy decisions which have helped to retain primary care services might provide lessons for achieving universal health coverage in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs.

  12. Immunization Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Immunization coverage Fact sheet Reviewed January 2018 Key facts ... at least 90% coverage of DTP3 vaccine. Global immunization coverage 2016 A summary of global vaccination coverage ...

  13. From homeless to housed: caring for people in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Lin J

    2008-01-01

    This ethnographic study was conducted to determine what homeless people experience during the transition from street life into community housing. Data were gathered through participant observation at a program designed to secure housing and support services for homeless people upon discharge from a psychiatric hospital. Sixty homeless, mentally ill adults were followed from hospital discharge through their first 2 years in community housing. Homeless people interact with health care providers across a cultural divide produced by vast differences in their lived experiences. This cultural distance limits access to the services that these individuals require to achieve residential stability.

  14. Transitional Care Units: Expanding the Role of Pharmacists Providing Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Andrea C; Cash, Patricia; Jordan, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    To describe two innovative practice models that expand pharmacy services within a nursing facility's transitional care unit (TCU) to meet the needs of patients transitioning to subacute or community care. TCU in a hospital-based vs. a community-based facility. The two TCUs involved in these practices differ in that one is hospital-owned and the other is community-based and run by a nonprofit organization. Patients involved in the models are those who have been admitted to the TCU from a hospital and will eventually return home to the community. Pharmacy services beyond the federally required, monthly drug regimen review are described, including pharmacist-conducted medication reconciliation, which identifies the drugs the patient is taking on admission and those prescribed before discharge from the TCU. Post-TCU discharge follow-up is also provided via telephone call or home visit. Description of practice models. Timely medication reconciliation and review on TCU admission is key to safe medication use during transitions of care. Incorporating pharmacy students and residents can promote awareness of the service. Partnerships with health systems and colleges or schools of pharmacy can provide financial support of these innovative practice models. Pharmacist-driven medication reconciliation and review can improve medication safety across transitions of care involving TCUs. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of these models on outcomes before they are replicated.

  15. Understanding the factors behind the decision to purchase varying coverage amounts of long-term care insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N; Cohen, M A; Bishop, C E; Wallack, S S

    1995-02-01

    This article examines the factors related to an individual's decision to purchase a given amount of long-term care insurance coverage. DATA SOURCE AND STUDY SETTING: Primary data analyses were conducted on an estimation sample of 6,545 individuals who had purchased long-term care (LTC) insurance policies in late 1990 and early 1991, and 1,248 individuals who had been approached by agents but chose not to buy such insurance. Companies contributing the two samples represented 45 percent of total sales during the study year. A two-stage logit-OLS (ordinary least squares) choice-based sampling model was used to examine the relationship between the expected value of purchased coverage and explanatory variables that included: demographic traits, attitudes, risk premium, nursing home bed supply, and Medicaid program configurations. Mail surveys were used to collect information about individuals' reasons for purchase, attitudes about long-term care, and demographic characteristics. Through an identification code, information on the policy designs chosen by these individuals was linked to each of the returned mail surveys. The response rate to the survey was about 60 percent. The model explains about 47 percent of the variance in the dependent variable-expected value of policy coverage. Important variables negatively associated with the dependent variable include advancing age, being married, and having less than a college education. Variables positively related include being male, having more income, and having increasing expected LTC costs. Medicaid program configuration also influences the level of benefits purchased: state reimbursement rates and the presence of comprehensive estate recovery programs are both positively related to the expected value of purchased benefits. Finally, as the difference between the premium charged and the actuarially fair premium increases, individuals buy less coverage. An important finding with implications for policymakers is that changes

  16. Transition from paediatric care to adult care for patients with mucopolysaccharidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, M L; Del Toro, M; García-Jiménez, M C; Gutierrez-Solana, L; Hermida-Ameijeiras, Á; López-Rodríguez, M; Pérez-López, J; Torralba, M Á

    Mucopolysaccharidosis are multisystem diseases that require large multidisciplinary teams for their care. Specific recommendations are therefore needed for the transition from childhood to adulthood in this patient group. To overcome the barriers that might arise during the transition, the authors consider it essential to implement a flexible plan with a coordinator for the entire process, systematising the information through a standardised paediatric discharge report and educating the patient and their family about the disease, showing the characteristics of the healthcare system in this new stage. The final objective is that, once the transition to adulthood has been completed, the patient's autonomy and potential development are maximised and that the patient receives appropriate healthcare during this transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  17. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting.

  18. Pediatric to adult transition: a quality improvement model for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Margaret; White, Patience; Barbour, April; Downing, Billie; Hawkins, Kirsten; Quion, Nathalie; Tuchman, Lisa; Cooley, W Carl; McAllister, Jeanne W

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between quality improvement activities with pediatric and adult primary care practices and improvements in transition from pediatric to adult care. This was a time-series comparative study of changes in pediatric and adult practices involving five large pediatric and adult academic health centers in the District of Columbia. Using the Health Care Transition Index (pediatric and adult versions), we examined improvements in specific indicators of transition performance, including development of an office transition policy, provider knowledge and skills related to transition, identification of transitioning youth, transition preparation of youth, transition planning, and transfer of care. Improvements took place in all six transition quality indicators in the pediatric and adult practices that participated in a 2-year learning collaborative to implement the "Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition," a quality improvement intervention modeled after the American Academy of Pediatrics/American Academy of Family Physicians/American College of Physicians Clinical Report on Transition. All sites established a practice-wide policy on transition and created an organized clinical process for tracking transition preparation. The pediatric sites conducted transition readiness assessments with 88% of eligible youth and prepared transition plans for 29% of this group. The adult sites conducted transition readiness assessments with 73% of eligible young adults and developed plans for 33%. A total of 50 were transferred in a systematic way to adult primary care practices. Quality improvement using the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition resulted in the development of a systematic clinical transition process in pediatric and adult academic primary care practices. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Broad- versus Narrow-Spectrum Oral Antibiotic Transition and Outcomes in Health Care-associated Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckel, Whitney R; Stenehjem, Edward; Sorensen, Jeff; Dean, Nathan; Webb, Brandon

    2017-02-01

    Guidelines recommend a switch from intravenous to oral antibiotics once patients who are hospitalized with pneumonia achieve clinical stability. However, little evidence guides the selection of an oral antibiotic for patients with health care-associated pneumonia, especially where no microbiological diagnosis is made. To compare outcomes between patients who were transitioned to broad- versus narrow-spectrum oral antibiotics after initially receiving broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic coverage. We performed a secondary analysis of an existing database of adults with community-onset pneumonia admitted to seven Utah hospitals. We identified 220 inpatients with microbiology-negative health care-associated pneumonia from 2010 to 2012. After excluding inpatient deaths and treatment failures, 173 patients remained in which broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics were transitioned to an oral regimen. We classified oral regimens as broad-spectrum (fluoroquinolone) versus narrow-spectrum (usually a β-lactam). We compared demographic and clinical characteristics between groups. Using a multivariable regression model, we adjusted outcomes by severity (electronically calculated CURB-65), comorbidity (Charlson Index), time to clinical stability, and length of intravenous therapy. Age, severity, comorbidity, length of intravenous therapy, and clinical response were similar between the two groups. Observed 30-day readmission (11.9 vs. 21.4%; P = 0.26) and 30-day all-cause mortality (2.3 vs. 5.3%; P = 0.68) were also similar between the narrow and broad oral antibiotic groups. In multivariable analysis, we found no statistically significant differences for adjusted odds of 30-day readmission (adjusted odds ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-5.2; P = 0.61) or 30-day all-cause mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-1.6; P = 0.26) between narrow and broad oral antibiotic groups. On the basis of analysis of a limited number of patients

  20. Uninsured veterans who will need to obtain insurance coverage under the patient protection and affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert

    2014-03-01

    We examined the number and clinical needs of uninsured veterans, including those who will be eligible for the Medicaid expansion and health insurance exchanges in 2014. We analyzed weighted data for 8710 veterans from the 2010 National Survey of Veterans, classifying it by veterans' age, income, household size, and insurance status. Of 22 million veterans, about 7%, or more than 1.5 million, were uninsured and will need to obtain coverage by enrolling in US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) care or the Medicaid expansion or by participating in the health insurance exchanges. Of those uninsured, 55%, or more than 800 000, are likely eligible for the Medicaid expansion if states implement it. Compared with veterans with any health coverage, those who were uninsured were younger and more likely to be single, Black, and low income and to have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is likely to have a considerable impact on uninsured veterans, which may have implications for the VA, the Medicaid expansion, and the health insurance exchanges.

  1. Determining immunisation coverage rates in primary health care practices: a simple goal but a complex task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Grant, Cameron; York, Deon; Kenealy, Tim; Copp, Jackie; Petousis-Harris, Helen; Turner, Nikki; Kerse, Ngaire

    2008-07-01

    To explore the quality of data recording by practices and identify issues to be considered and addressed before such data can be used as a continuous measure of immunisation delivery. One hundred and twenty-four randomly selected general practices visited to measure immunisation coverage using the various practice management systems (PMS) in use. To capture all target children it was necessary to build two queries: one generated a list of all children aged between 6 weeks and 2 years who had been to the practice, regardless of enrollment status; the other asked dates and nature of all immunisations given. Each different PMS required a unique query to extract the necessary information. Variability encountered included different types and versions of PMS and operating systems; variable degree of staff technical competence with their PMS; proportion of enrolled children ranging from nearly 0 to 100%; lack of consistency of the nature and location of data entry and coding; and unreliability of dates relating to some vaccination events. To improve recording of immunisation coverage we recommend a standard early age of registration and enrollment; standard definitions of the denominator and of immunisation delay; greater uniformity of PMS; improved staff training; intrinsic data quality checks; integration of PMS with changes in the immunisation schedule; incentives and interval electronic checks to improve data quality.

  2. Parents' perspectives of the transition to home when a child has complex technological health care needs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brenner, Maria

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing number of children with complex care needs, however, there is limited evidence of the experience of families during the process of transitioning to becoming their child\\'s primary care giver. The aim of this study was to explore parents\\' perspectives of the transition to home of a child with complex respiratory health care needs.

  3. Resident Dyads Providing Transition Care to Adolescents and Young Adults With Chronic Illnesses and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Richard J; Jasien, Joan; Maslow, Gary R

    2017-04-01

    Youth with special health care needs often experience difficulty transitioning from pediatric to adult care. These difficulties may derive in part from lack of physician training in transition care and the challenges health care providers experience establishing interdisciplinary partnerships to support these patients. This educational innovation sought to improve pediatrics and adult medicine residents' interdisciplinary communication and collaboration. Residents from pediatrics, medicine-pediatrics, and internal medicine training programs participated in a transitions clinic for patients with chronic health conditions aged 16 to 26 years. Residents attended 1 to 4 half-day clinic sessions during 1-month ambulatory rotations. Pediatrics/adult medicine resident dyads collaboratively performed psychosocial and medical transition consultations that addressed health care navigation, self-care, and education and vocation topics. Two to 3 attending physicians supervised each clinic session (4 hours) while concurrently seeing patients. Residents completed a preclinic survey about baseline attitudes and experiences, and a postclinic survey about their transitions clinic experiences, changes in attitudes, and transition care preparedness. A total of 46 residents (100% of those eligible) participated in the clinic and completed the preclinic survey, and 25 (54%) completed the postclinic survey. A majority of respondents to the postclinic survey reported positive experiences. Residents in both pediatrics and internal medicine programs reported improved preparedness for providing transition care to patients with chronic health conditions and communicating effectively with colleagues in other disciplines. A dyadic model of collaborative transition care training was positively received and yielded improvements in immediate self-assessed transition care preparedness.

  4. Transition From Pediatric to Adult Care by Young Adults With Chronic Granulomatous Disease: The Patient's Viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Rachel; Wiener, Lori; Pao, Maryland; Malech, Harry L; Holland, Steven M; Driscoll, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    Children with chronic illnesses are living longer, prompting health care provider attention to the transition from pediatric to adult care. Transition of care is successful when youth are independent in managing their health. The aims of this study were to identify the strengths and barriers to transition from pediatric to adult care and to determine strategies that could enhance the transition process. A survey was administered via a structured interview to 33 young adult participants (19-27 years of age), living with chronic granulomatous disease all of whom transitioned from pediatric to adult care. The participants were predominately male (88%) and Caucasian (73%). Topics covered in the survey included understanding of disease and treatment, adherence, advance care planning, and barriers to transition. Data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis approach. Seventy-six percent of the participants did not understand their disease process and only 50% understood their prophylactic medication regimen. Seventy-five percent of participants perceived their transition as uneventful. Ninety-four percent were independent in self-management skills such as making appointments and 90% in refilling prescriptions. More than half of the participants thought that the transition process needed improvement. Specific suggestions to create a practical approach to transition were offered. Gaps in disease-related knowledge and transition planning were identified by adolescents and young adults living with chronic granulomatous disease. The findings suggest the need for enhancing the transition process utilizing interdisciplinary collaboration to develop a transition policy and program. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Examining the Role of Primary Care Physicians and Challenges Faced When Their Patients Transition to Home Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ariel; Phongtankuel, Veerawat; Lampa, Katherine; Reid, M C; Eiss, Brian M; Bhatia, Sonica; Adelman, Ronald D

    2018-04-01

    The transition into home hospice care is often a critical time in a patient's medical care. Studies have shown patients and caregivers desire continuity with their physicians at the end of life (EoL). However, it is unclear what roles primary care physicians (PCPs) play and what challenges they face caring for patients transitioning into home hospice care. To understand PCPs' experiences, challenges, and preferences when their patients transition to home hospice care. Nineteen semi-structured phone interviews with PCPs were conducted. Study data were analyzed using standard qualitative methods. Participants included PCPs from 3 academic group practices in New York City. Measured: Physician recordings were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Most PCPs noted that there was a discrepancy between their actual role and ideal role when their patients transitioned to home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed a desire to maintain continuity, provide psychosocial support, and collaborate actively with the hospice team. Better establishment of roles, more frequent communication with the hospice team, and use of technology to communicate with patients were mentioned as possible ways to help PCPs achieve their ideal role caring for their patients receiving home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed varying degrees of involvement during a patient's transition to home hospice care, but many desired to be more involved in their patient's care. As with patients, physicians desire to maintain continuity with their patients at the EoL and solutions to improve communication between PCPs, hospice providers, and patients need to be explored.

  6. Improving care transitions through meaningful use stage 2: continuity of care document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Wilson, Marisa L; Newhouse, Robin P

    2013-02-01

    In this department, Drs Murphy, Wilson, and Newhouse highlight hot topics in nursing outcomes, research, and evidence-based practice relevant to the nurse administrator. The goal is to discuss the practical implications for nurse leaders in diverse healthcare settings. Content includes evidence-based projects and decision making, locating measurement tools for quality improvement and safety projects, using outcome measures to evaluate quality, practice implications of administrative research, and exemplars of projects that demon strate innovative approaches to organizational problems. In this article, the authors describe the elements of continuity of care documentation, how sharing information can improve the quality and safety of care transitions and the implications for nurse executives.

  7. Coverage of emergency obstetric care and availability of services in public and private health facilities in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Badrul; Mridha, Malay K; Biswas, Taposh K; Roy, Lumbini; Rahman, Maksudur; Chowdhury, Mahbub E

    2015-10-01

    To assess the coverage of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and the availability of obstetric services in Bangladesh. In a national health facility assessment performed between November 2007 and July 2008, all public EmOC facilities and private facilities providing obstetric services in the 64 districts of Bangladesh were mapped. The performance of EmOC services in these facilities during the preceding month was investigated using a semi-structured questionnaire completed through interviews of managers and service providers, and record review. In total, 8.6 (2.1 public and 6.5 private) facilities per 500000 population offered obstetric care services. Population coverage by obstetric care facilities varied by region. Among 281 public facilities designated for comprehensive EmOC, cesarean delivery was available in only 215 (76.5%) and blood transfusion services in 198 (70.5%). In the private sector (for profit and not for profit), these services were available in more than 80% of facilities. In all facility types, performance of assisted vaginal delivery (range 12.2%-48.4%) and use of parenteral anticonvulsants to treat pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (range 48.6%-80.8%) were low. The main reason for non-availability of EmOC services was a lack of specialist/trained providers. Bangladesh needs to increase the availability of EmOC services through innovative public-private partnerships. In the public sector, additional trained manpower supported by an incentivized package should be deployed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Current Issues in Transitioning from Pediatric to Adult-Based Care for Youth with Chronic Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenroeder, Albert C; Wiemann, Constance M; Cohen, Mitchell B

    2015-12-01

    For over 25 years, with medical advances increasing the lifespan of YYASHCN, we have been aware of the need to improve health care transition to adult-based care services. Barriers to health care transition have been identified and in a number of settings, recognition of the problem and preliminary success has been achieved for pilot programs. Evidence-based solutions to improve health care transition for YYASHCN are needed. There are barriers at the patient, family, pediatric, and adult provider, and insurance system levels that must be overcome.

  9. Evidence-Based Interventions for Transitions in Care for Individuals Living With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschman, Karen B; Hodgson, Nancy A

    2018-01-18

    Despite numerous, often predictable, transitions in care, little is known about the core elements of successful transitions in care specifically for persons with dementia. The paper examines available evidence-based interventions to improve the care transitions for persons with dementia and their caregivers. A state-of-the-art review was conducted for research published on interventions targeting transitions in care for persons living with dementia and their caregivers through January 2017. Our review revealed seven evidence-based interventions to postpone/prevent or reduce care transitions specific to persons living with dementia. Effective approaches appear to be those that involve the individual and caregiver in establishing goals of care, educate the individual and caregiver about likely transitions in care; provide timely communication of information about the individual, create strong inter professional teams with competencies in dementia care, and implement evidence-based models of practice. Five essential features for consistent and supported care transitions for persons with dementia and their caregivers are recommended. Findings reinforce the need for additional research and adaptation of evidence-based transitions in care interventions. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Informal payments for health care in transition economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensor, Tim

    2004-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that unofficial payments are deeply embedded in the markets for health care in transition countries. Numerous surveys indicate that these payments provide a significant but possibly distorting contribution to health care financing. Unofficial payments can be characterised into three groups: cost contributions, including supplies and salaries, misuse of market position and payments for additional services. There is evidence from across the region on the presence of payment in each category although it is often difficult to distinguish between payment types. Regulatory policy must address a number of issues. Imposing penalties may help to reduce some payments but if the system is simply unable to provide services, such sanctions will drive workers into the private sector. There appears to be some support for formalising payments in order to reduce unofficial charges although the impact must be monitored and the danger is that formal fees add to the burden of payment. Regulation might also attempt to increase the amount of competition, provide information on good performing facilities and develop the legal basis of patient rights. Ultimately, unless governments address the endemic nature of payments across all sectors, policy interventions are unlikely to be fully effective.

  11. Gender and Transition From Pediatric to Adult Health Care Among Youth With Acquired Brain Injury: Experiences in a Transition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; Proulx, Meghann; Maxwell, Joanne; Hamdani, Yani; Bayley, Mark; Macarthur, Colin; Colantonio, Angela

    2016-02-01

    To explore gender and sex differences in experiences of transitioning to adult health care among young adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) who take part in a coordinated model of transitional care. Descriptive design using in-depth semistructured qualitative interviews. Interviews over the phone and in person. Participants (N=18) included 10 young adults with a diagnosis of ABI (4 women, 6 men; age range, 19-21y) and 9 parents (8 women, 1 man) from the Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada. Not applicable. Semistructured interviews with participants. Our findings highlight several commonalities and differences relative to sex and gender among young adults with ABI who are transitioning from pediatric to adult care. Both young adult men and women experienced a similar transition process and similar organization, continuity, and availability of care. Sex differences were found in relational factors (eg, communication, family involvement, social support). Young adult men, and parents of the men, differed in their transition regarding relational factors (eg, communication, family involvement). Our findings show that young adult men and women with ABI who have taken part in a transition preparation program experience similarities in organization, continuity, and availability of care, but they experience differences in relational factors (eg, communication, family involvement). Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunizations against respiratory infections in children in primary health care in poland: coverage and delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, K; Kuchar, E; Nitsch-Osuch, A; Preisner, K; Szenborn, L

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal infections, pertussis, and influenza are vaccine-preventable diseases. The aim of this study was to determine vaccine coverage and compliance with the dosage regimen among children in Poland. We performed a retrospective chart analysis of 1,356 children in a large primary healthcare establishment. The complete primary pertussis vaccination, 3 doses in the first year of life, was administered to 1,310/1,356 patients (96.6 %). The self-paid combined acellular vaccine was given in 55.2 % of children. The first dose of the pertussis vaccine was administered in a timely manner to 67.1 % of children. The self-paid pneumococcal vaccine was administered in 499/1,356 (36.8 %) children. In 46.1 % of them immunization started within the first 6 months of life; in 12.6 % aged 7-11 months, in 12.6 % aged 12-23 months, and in 28.7 % aged over 24 months. The dosage regimen was compliant in 49.2 % of patients. Only 3.5 % of patients were immunized against both pneumococci and influenza. Compliance with the Polish immunization program should be increased by reducing the number of injections and the cost of vaccines. Education is essential to facilitate simultaneous administration of vaccines during one visit and to prepare the parents for judicious decision-making when it comes to vaccinations.

  13. Private Health Care Coverage in the Brazilian population, according to the 2013 Brazilian National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Stopa, Sheila Rizzato; Pereira, Cimar Azeredo; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; Oliveira, Martha; Reis, Arthur Chioro Dos

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to present the percentages of the Brazilian population holding health insurance plans, itemized by social-demographic characteristics, based on the data of the National Health Survey carried out in 2013, and to compare this information with the administrative data of the National Supplementary Health Agency for the same year. Data from the National Health Survey, and from the Beneficiaries Information System of the National Health Agency for the year 2013, were used. The percentage of people having a health plan was described according to stratification for: all of Brazil, urban/rural, Brazilian official Regions, Brazilian States and state capitals, gender, age group, level of schooling, position in the workforce, ethnic classification, and self-assessed state of health. Results include the following: The percentage of people saying they had some health plan in Brazil was 27.9% (CI 95%: 27.1-28.8). A significant difference was found relating to level of schooling - the percentage being highest for those who stated they had complete secondary education (68.8% CI 95%: 67.2-70.4) and for those who said they were currently in work (32.5% CI 95%: 31.5-33.5). The increase in health plan coverage in the Brazilian population reflects the improvement of the suply of employment and the growth in the country's economy.

  14. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act dependent coverage expansion: Disparities in impact among young adult oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Elysia M; Keegan, Theresa H; Johnston, Emily E; Haile, Robert; Sanders, Lee; Wise, Paul H; Saynina, Olga; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2018-01-01

    Private health insurance is associated with improved outcomes in patients with cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, little is known regarding the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Expansion (ACA-DCE), which extended private insurance to young adults (to age 26 years) beginning in 2010, on the insurance status of young adults with cancer. The current study was a retrospective, population-based analysis of hospitalized young adult oncology patients (aged 22-30 years) in California during 2006 through 2014 (11,062 patients). Multivariable regression analyses examined factors associated with having private insurance. Results were presented as adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A difference-in-difference analysis examined the influence of the ACA-DCE on insurance coverage by race/ethnicity and federal poverty level. Multivariable regression demonstrated that patients of black and Hispanic race/ethnicity were less likely to have private insurance before and after the ACA-DCE, compared with white patients. Younger age (22-25 years) was associated with having private insurance after implementation of the ACA-DCE (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.35). In the difference-in-difference analysis, private insurance increased among white patients aged 22 to 25 years who were living in medium-income (2006-2009: 64.6% vs 2011-2014: 69.1%; P = .003) and high-income (80.4% vs 82%; P = .043) zip codes and among Asians aged 22 to 25 years living in high-income zip codes (73.2 vs 85.7%; P = .022). Private insurance decreased for all Hispanic patients aged 22 to 25 years between the 2 time periods. The ACA-DCE provision increased insurance coverage, but not among all patients. Private insurance increased for white and Asian patients in higher income neighborhoods, potentially widening social disparities in private insurance coverage among young adults with cancer. Cancer 2018;124:110-7. © 2017 American

  15. Geographical accessibility and spatial coverage modeling of the primary health care network in the Western Province of Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huerta Munoz Ulises

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary health care is essential in improving and maintaining the health of populations. It has the potential to accelerate achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and fulfill the “Health for All” doctrine of the Alma-Ata Declaration. Understanding the performance of the health system from a geographic perspective is important for improved health planning and evidence-based policy development. The aims of this study were to measure geographical accessibility, model spatial coverage of the existing primary health facility network, estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity and the population underserved in the Western Province of Rwanda. Methods This study uses health facility, population and ancillary data for the Western Province of Rwanda. Three different travel scenarios utilized by the population to attend the nearest primary health facility were defined with a maximum travelling time of 60 minutes: Scenario 1 – walking; Scenario 2 – walking and cycling; and Scenario 3 – walking and public transportation. Considering these scenarios, a raster surface of travel time between primary health facilities and population was developed. To model spatial coverage and estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity, the catchment area of each facility was calculated by taking into account population coverage capacity, the population distribution, the terrain topography and the travelling modes through the different land categories. Results Scenario 2 (walking and cycling has the highest degree of geographical accessibility followed by Scenario 3 (walking and public transportation. The lowest level of accessibility can be observed in Scenario 1 (walking. The total population covered differs depending on the type of travel scenario. The existing primary health facility network covers only 26.6% of the population in Scenario 1. In Scenario 2, the use of a bicycle

  16. Geographical accessibility and spatial coverage modeling of the primary health care network in the Western Province of Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta Munoz, Ulises; Källestål, Carina

    2012-09-17

    Primary health care is essential in improving and maintaining the health of populations. It has the potential to accelerate achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and fulfill the "Health for All" doctrine of the Alma-Ata Declaration. Understanding the performance of the health system from a geographic perspective is important for improved health planning and evidence-based policy development. The aims of this study were to measure geographical accessibility, model spatial coverage of the existing primary health facility network, estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity and the population underserved in the Western Province of Rwanda. This study uses health facility, population and ancillary data for the Western Province of Rwanda. Three different travel scenarios utilized by the population to attend the nearest primary health facility were defined with a maximum travelling time of 60 minutes: Scenario 1--walking; Scenario 2--walking and cycling; and Scenario 3--walking and public transportation. Considering these scenarios, a raster surface of travel time between primary health facilities and population was developed. To model spatial coverage and estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity, the catchment area of each facility was calculated by taking into account population coverage capacity, the population distribution, the terrain topography and the travelling modes through the different land categories. Scenario 2 (walking and cycling) has the highest degree of geographical accessibility followed by Scenario 3 (walking and public transportation). The lowest level of accessibility can be observed in Scenario 1 (walking). The total population covered differs depending on the type of travel scenario. The existing primary health facility network covers only 26.6% of the population in Scenario 1. In Scenario 2, the use of a bicycle greatly increases the population being served to 58% of inhabitants

  17. The Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT): A Social Work-Led Model of Transitional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Lipani, Maria; Holster, Kathleen; Bussey, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, the Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT), a social work-led transitional care model, was developed at Mount Sinai to reduce 30-day readmissions among high-risk patients. PACT begins with a comprehensive bedside assessment to identify the psychosocial drivers of readmission. In partnership with the patient and family, a patient-centered action plan is developed and carried out through phone calls, accompaniments, navigations and home visits, as needed, in the first 30 days following discharge. 620 patients were enrolled during the pilot from September 2010-August 2012. Outcomes demonstrated a 43% reduction in inpatient utilization and a 54% reduction in emergency department visits among enrollees. In addition, 93% of patients had a follow-up appointment within 7-10 days of discharge and 90% of patients attended the appointment. The success of PACT has led to additional funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under the Community-based Care Transitions Program and several managed care companies seeking population health management interventions for high risk members.

  18. From home to 'home': Mapping the caregiver journey in the transition from home care into residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainstock, Taylor; Cloutier, Denise; Penning, Margaret

    2017-12-01

    Family caregivers play a pivotal role in supporting the functional independence and quality of life of older relatives, often taking on a wide variety of care-related activities over the course of their caregiving journey. These activities help family members to remain in the community and age-in-place for as long as possible. However, when needs exceed family capacities to provide care, the older family member may need to transition from one care environment to another (e.g., home care to nursing home care), or one level of care to another (from less intense to more intensive services). Drawing upon qualitative interview data collected in a populous health region in British Columbia, Canada, this study explores the roles and responsibilities of family caregivers for family members making the care transition from home care to residential care. A thematic analysis of the interview transcripts resulted in the development of a conceptual framework to characterize the "Caregiver Journey" as a process that could be divided into at least three phases: 1) Precursors to transition - recognizing frailty in family members and caregivers prior to transition; 2) Preparing to transition into residential nursing home care (RC) and 3) Post-transition: Finding a new balance - where caregivers adjust and adapt to new caregiving responsibilities. Our analyses revealed that the second phase is the most complex involving a consideration of the various activities, and roles that family caregivers take on to prepare for the care transition including: information gathering, advocacy and system navigation. We conclude that there is a need for family caregivers to be better supported during care transitions; notably through ongoing and enhanced investments in strategies to support caregiver communication and education. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identifying Challenges Associated With the Care Transition Workflow From Hospital to Skilled Home Health Care: Perspectives of Home Health Care Agency Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasarwanji, Mahiyar; Werner, Nicole E; Carl, Kimberly; Hohl, Dawn; Leff, Bruce; Gurses, Ayse P; Arbaje, Alicia I

    2015-01-01

    Older adults discharged from the hospital to skilled home health care (SHHC) are at high risk for experiencing suboptimal transitions. Using the human factors approach of shadowing and contextual inquiry, we studied the workflow for transitioning older adults from the hospital to SHHC. We created a representative diagram of the hospital to SHHC transition workflow, we examined potential workflow variations, we categorized workflow challenges, and we identified artifacts developed to manage variations and challenges. We identified three overarching challenges to optimal care transitions-information access, coordination, and communication/teamwork. Future investigations could test whether redesigning the transition from hospital to SHHC, based on our findings, improves workflow and care quality.

  20. 78 FR 76212 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Maximizing January 1, 2014 Coverage Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... Federal government identification, commenters are encouraged to leave their comments in the CMS drop slots... SHOP QHPs, multi-State plans, and stand-alone dental plans. While we do not expect to do so, we will... disruptions in treatment of episodes of care (for example, considering a provider as in the plan's network for...

  1. A composite indicator to measure universal health care coverage in India: way forward for post-2015 health system performance monitoring framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Gupta, Rakesh; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Sharma, Atul; Kumar Aggarwal, Arun; Phogat, Amit; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-02-01

    There is limited work done on developing methods for measurement of universal health coverage. We undertook a study to develop a methodology and demonstrate the practical application of empirically measuring the extent of universal health coverage at district level. Additionally, we also develop a composite indicator to measure UHC. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken among 51 656 households across 21 districts of Haryana state in India. Using the WHO framework for UHC, we identified indicators of service coverage, financial risk protection, equity and quality based on the Government of India and the Haryana Government's proposed UHC benefit package. Geometric mean approach was used to compute a composite UHC index (CUHCI). Various statistical approaches to aggregate input indicators with or without weighting, along with various incremental combinations of input indicators were tested in a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The population coverage for preventive and curative services is presented. Adjusting for inequality, the coverage for all the indicators were less than the unadjusted coverage by 0.1-6.7% in absolute term and 0.1-27% in relative term. There was low unmet need for curative care. However, about 11% outpatient consultations were from unqualified providers. About 30% households incurred catastrophic health expenditures, which rose to 38% among the poorest 20% population. Summary index (CUHCI) for UHC varied from 12% in Mewat district to 71% in Kurukshetra district. The inequality unadjusted coverage for UHC correlates highly with adjusted coverage. Our paper is an attempt to develop a methodology to measure UHC. However, careful inclusion of others indicators of service coverage is recommended for a comprehensive measurement which captures the spirit of universality. Further, more work needs to be done to incorporate quality in the measurement framework. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London

  2. Universal Coverage without Universal Access: Institutional Barriers to Health Care among Women Sex Workers in Vancouver, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eugenia Socías

    Full Text Available Access to health care is a crucial determinant of health. Yet, even within settings that purport to provide universal health coverage (UHC, sex workers' experiences reveal systematic, institutionally ingrained barriers to appropriate quality health care. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and correlates of institutional barriers to care among sex workers in a setting with UHC.Data was drawn from an ongoing community-based, prospective cohort of women sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (An Evaluation of Sex Workers' Health Access. Multivariable logistic regression analyses, using generalized estimating equations (GEE, were employed to longitudinally investigate correlates of institutional barriers to care over a 44-month follow-up period (January 2010-August 2013.In total, 723 sex workers were included, contributing to 2506 observations. Over the study period, 509 (70.4% women reported one or more institutional barriers to care. The most commonly reported institutional barriers to care were long wait times (54.6%, limited hours of operation (36.5%, and perceived disrespect by health care providers (26.1%. In multivariable GEE analyses, recent partner- (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.46, % 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.10-1.94, workplace- (AOR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.05-1.63, and community-level violence (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.04-1.92, as well as other markers of vulnerability, such as self-identification as a gender/sexual minority (AOR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.03-1.69, a mental illness diagnosis (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.34-2.06, and lack of provincial health insurance card (AOR = 3.47, 95% CI 1.59-7.57 emerged as independent correlates of institutional barriers to health services.Despite Canada's UHC, women sex workers in Vancouver face high prevalence of institutional barriers to care, with highest burden among most marginalized women. These findings underscore the need to explore new models of care, alongside broader policy changes to fulfill sex

  3. Improving the quality of transition and transfer of care in young adults with congenital heart disease.

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    Everitt, Ian K; Gerardin, Jennifer F; Rodriguez, Fred H; Book, Wendy M

    2017-05-01

    The transition and transfer from pediatric to adult care is becoming increasingly important as improvements in the diagnosis and management of congenital heart disease allow patients to live longer. Transition is a complex and continuous process that requires careful planning. Inadequate transition has adverse effects on patients, their families and healthcare delivery systems. Currently, significant gaps exist in patient care as adolescents transfer to adult care and there are little data to drive the informed management of transition and transfer of care in adolescent congenital heart disease patients. Appropriate congenital heart disease care has been shown to decrease mortality in the adult population. This paper reviews the transition and transfer of care processes and outlines current congenital heart disease specific guidelines in the United States and compares these recommendations to Canadian and European guidelines. It then reviews perceived and real barriers to successful transition and identifies predictors of success during transfer to adult congenital heart disease care. Lastly, it explores how disease-specific markers of outcomes and quality indicators are being utilized to guide transition and transfer of care in other chronic childhood illnesses, and identifies existing knowledge gaps and structural impediments to improving the management of transition and transfer among congenital heart disease patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Provider-to-Provider Communication during Transitions of Care from Outpatient to Acute Care: A Systematic Review.

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    Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pitts, Samantha; Petty, Brent; Sawyer, Melinda D; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl; Boonyasai, Romsai Tony; Maruthur, Nisa M

    2016-04-01

    Most research on transitions of care has focused on the transition from acute to outpatient care. Little is known about the transition from outpatient to acute care. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the transition from outpatient to acute care, focusing on provider-to-provider communication and its impact on quality of care. We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases for English-language articles describing direct communication between outpatient providers and acute care providers around patients presenting to the emergency department or admitted to the hospital. We conducted double, independent review of titles, abstracts, and full text articles. Conflicts were resolved by consensus. Included articles were abstracted using standardized forms. We maintained search results via Refworks (ProQuest, Bethesda, MD). Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the Downs' and Black's tool. Of 4009 citations, twenty articles evaluated direct provider-to-provider communication around the outpatient to acute care transition. Most studies were cross-sectional (65%), conducted in the US (55%), and studied communication between primary care and inpatient providers (62%). Of three studies reporting on the association between communication and 30-day readmissions, none found a significant association; of these studies, only one reported a measure of association (adjusted OR for communication vs. no communication, 1.08; 95% CI 0.92-1.26). The literature on provider-to-provider communication at the transition from outpatient to acute care is sparse and heterogeneous. Given the known importance of communication for other transitions of care, future studies are needed on provider-to-provider communication during this transition. Studies evaluating ideal methods for communication to reduce medical errors, utilization, and optimize patient satisfaction at this transition are especially needed.

  5. Use of Transition Resources by Primary Care Providers for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

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    Dressler, Paul B.; Nguyen, Teresa K.; Moody, Eric J.; Friedman, Sandra L.; Pickler, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often experience difficulties with successful transition from pediatric to adult healthcare. A consultative Transition Clinic for youth with IDD was piloted as a quality improvement project, and assessed the engagement of primary care providers (PCPs) for transition planning after…

  6. Validity and reliability of the Palliative Care Transition Measure for Caregivers (PCTM-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Daniela; Mastroianni, Chiara; Artico, Marco; Biagioli, Valentina; Latina, Roberto; Guarda, Michela; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2018-01-21

    Patients suffering from advanced disease face different care transitions. The transition from acute to palliative care is challenging and may lead to the discontinuity of care. Family caregivers become important sources of information, as patients begin to experience difficulties in coping with emotional transition events. The Care Transition Measure was developed to evaluate care transitions as experienced by the elderly. It has never been used in palliative care. The aim of this study was to test the validity and reliability of a modified version of the Palliative Care Transition Measure, specifically the Palliative Care Transition Measure for Caregivers (PCTM-C). The study included two main phases. Phase I focused on the construction of a modified version of the Palliative Care Transition Measure through two focus groups and by computing the content validity index. Phase II focused on testing the psychometric properties of the PCTM-C on 272 family caregivers through confirmatory factor analysis. Result The content validity index for each of the items was higher than 0.80, whereas that for the scale was 0.95. The model tested with confirmatory factor analysis fitted the data well and confirmed that the transition measures referred to communication, integrated care and a trusting-relationship, and therefore the core dimensions of continuity according to existing conceptual models. The internal consistency was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94). Significance of results The PCTM-C proved to be a suitable measure of the quality of such transitions. It may be used in clinical practice as a continuity quality indicator and has the potential to guide interventions to enhance family caregivers' experience of care continuity.

  7. Improved outcomes for elderly patients who received care on a transitional care unit.

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    Manville, Margaret; Klein, Michael C; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether providing elderly alternate level of care (ALC) patients with interdisciplinary care on a transitional care unit (TCU) achieves better clinical outcomes and lowers costs compared with providing them with standard hospital care. Before-and-after structured retrospective chart audit. St Joseph's Hospital in Comox, BC. One hundred thirty-five consecutively admitted patients aged 70 years and older with ALC designation during 5-month periods before (n = 49) and after (n = 86) the opening of an on-site TCU. Length of stay, discharge disposition, complications of the acute and ALC portions of the patients' hospital stays, activities of daily living (mobility, transfers, and urinary continence), psychotropic medications and vitamin D prescriptions, and ALC patient care costs, as well as annual hospital savings, were examined. Among the 86 ALC patients receiving care during the postintervention period, 57 (66%) were admitted to the TCU; 29 of the 86 (34%) patients in the postintervention group received standard care (SC). All 86 ALC patients in the postintervention group were compared with the 49 preintervention ALC patients who received SC. Length of stay reduction occurred among the postintervention group during the acute portion of the hospital stay (14.0 days postintervention group vs 22.5 days preintervention group; P TCU costs per patient were lower ($155/d postintervention period vs $273/d preintervention period). Elderly ALC patients experienced improvements in health and function at reduced cost after the creation of an interdisciplinary TCU, to which most of the nonpalliative ALC patients were transferred. Although all the postintervention ALC patients (those admitted to the TCU and those who received SC) were analyzed together, it is very likely that the greatest gains were made in the ALC patients who received care in the TCU. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  8. User experience and care for older people transitioning from hospital to home: Patients' and carers' perspectives.

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    Allen, Jacqueline; Hutchinson, Alison M; Brown, Rhonda; Livingston, Patricia M

    2017-11-09

    Transitioning from hospital to home is challenging for many older people living with chronic health conditions. Transitional care facilitates safe and timely transfer of patients between levels of care and across care settings and includes communication between practitioners, assessment and planning, preparation, medication reconciliation, follow-up care and self-management education. To date, there is limited understanding of how to actively involve care recipient service users in transitional care. This study was part of a larger research project. The objective of this article was to report the first study phase, in which we aimed to describe user experience pertaining to patients and carers. The study design was qualitative descriptive using interviews. Patients (n = 19) and carers (n = 7) participated in semi-structured interviews about their experience of transition from hospital to home in an urban Australian health-care setting. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. All participants reported that they needed to become independent in transition. Participants perceived a range of social processes supported their independence at home: supportive relationships with carers, caring relationships with health-care practitioners, seeking information, discussing and negotiating the transitional care plan and learning to self-care. Findings contribute to our understanding that quality transitional care should focus on patients' need to regain independence. Social processes supporting the capacities of patients and carers should be emphasized in future initiatives. Future transitional care interventions should emphasize strategies to enable negotiation for suitable supports and assist care recipients to overcome barriers identified in this study. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Health care transition for adolescents with CKD-the journey from pediatric to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lorraine E; Ferris, Maria E; Fenton, Nicole; Hooper, Stephen R

    2011-09-01

    The design of Health Care Transition (HCT) services for adolescents and emerging adults with CKD or end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) needs to take into account patient cognition/developmental stage, family factors, and health resources within the hospital setting and community. Patient and family education is fundamental and teaching and learning tools must be literacy-accessible. Adolescents and emerging adults with CKD/ESDK have complex medical and dietary regimes, and therapeutic adherence is important for optimizing their health, quality of life, and longevity. Health providers need to identify ways of engaging them to become successful disease self-mangers. Interdisciplinary collaboration between the pediatric- and adult-focused health care teams and the services of a dedicated transition coordinator are paramount to ensure clear communication between the patient and the health professionals involved. Valid measurement tools to monitor and assess the HCT process and health outcomes need to be developed. The aims of planned HCT for adolescents and/or emerging adults with CKD/ESKD are anchored by the goals of optimizing health outcomes, health-related quality of life, and continuous quality improvement. The care of young people with CKD/ESKD can be both challenging and rewarding; we offer strategies for planned HCT services geared to these vulnerable patients. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Slums’ Access to and Coverage of Primary Health Care Services: A Cross-Sectional Study in Shiraz, a Metropolis in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Joulaei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The United Nations has predicted that the population of slum dwellers will have grown from one billion people worldwide to 2 billion by 2030. This trend is also predictable in Iran. In the Iranian metropolis of Shiraz, more than 10% of the residents live in slum areas. There are several problems regarding the delivery of social services in these areas. The aim of this study was to evaluate slums dwellers’ access to and coverage of health care. Methods: This cross-sectional face-to-face study included 380 household of slum dwellers via stratified random sampling. Demographics, accessibility of health services, coverage of health care, and route of receiving health services were recorded through interviews. Results: Approximately, 21.6% of the households had no physical access to health centers. The coverage rate of family planning programs for safe methods was 51.4% (95% CI: 48.86-53.9%. Vaccination coverage among children under 5 years old was 98% (95% CI: 97-99%. Furthermore, 34% of pregnant women had not received standard health care due to a lack of access to health centers. Conclusion: Limited access to health services along with inadequate knowledge of slum residents about health care facilities was the main barrier to the utilization of the health care in the slums.

  11. Influence of municipality-level mean income on access to aortic valve surgery: a cross-sectional observational study under Japan's universal health-care coverage.

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    Lee, Seitetsu L; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kohro, Takahide; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Koide, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Universal health-care coverage has attracted the interest of policy makers as a way of achieving health equity. However, previous reports have shown that despite universal coverage, socioeconomic disparity persists in access to high-tech invasive care, such as cardiac treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between socioeconomic status and care of aortic stenosis in the context of Japan's health-care system, which is mainly publicly funded. We chose aortic stenosis in older people as a target because such patients are likely to be affected by socioeconomic disparity. Using a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database, we identified 12,893 isolated aortic stenosis patients aged over 65 years who were hospitalized between July 2010 and March 2012. Municipality socioeconomic status was represented by the mean household income of the patients' residential municipality, categorized into quartiles. The likelihood of undergoing aortic valve surgery and in-hospital mortality was regressed against socioeconomic status level with adjustments for hospital volume, regional number of cardiac surgeons per 1 million population, and patients' clinical status. We found no significant differences between the highest and lowest quartile groups in surgical indication (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-1.03) or in-hospital mortality (1.00; 0.68-1.48). Hospital volume was significantly associated with lower postoperative mortality (odds ratio of the highest volume tertile to the lowest, 0.49; 0.34-0.71). Under Japan's current universal health-care coverage, municipality socioeconomic status did not appear to have a systematic relationship with either treatment decision for surgical intervention or postoperative survival following aortic valve surgery among older patients. Our results imply that universal health-care coverage with high publicly funded coverage offers equal access to high-tech cardiovascular care.

  12. 'Innovation' in health care coverage decisions: all talk and no substance?

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    Bryan, Stirling; Lee, Helen; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    There has been much discussion recently about 'innovation', or more precisely the lack of it, in pharmaceuticals and devices in health care. The concern has been expressed by national guideline bodies, such as the Common Drugs Review in Canada and the National Institute for Health & Clinical Excellence in the UK, applying strict cost-effectiveness criteria in their decision-making and, therefore, failing adequately to recognize the full benefits that come from innovation. In order to explore the legitimacy of such claims, we first define innovation, and second, explore the basis for assuming an independent and separable social value associated with innovation. We conclude that demands relating to innovation, such as relaxation of thresholds and premium prices for innovatory products, remain hollow until we have a compelling case on the demand side for a separable social value on 'innovation'. We see no such case currently.

  13. Facilitating the transition of patients with special health care needs from pediatric to adult oral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Arthur J; Casamassimo, Paul S; Slayton, Rebecca L

    2010-11-01

    Without guidelines or policies in dentistry for transitioning adolescents with special heath care needs from pediatric to adult oral health care, little is known about traditional support services. The authors surveyed pediatric dentists about their transition of adolescent patients with and without special health care needs (SHCNs) to adult care. In 2009, the authors e-mailed a pilot-tested survey modified from a survey used for U.S. pediatricians to 4,000 pediatric dentists. The survey included demographic questions and questions regarding services and barriers associated with the transition of patients to adult care. Responses were obtained from 1,686 (42.2 percent response) pediatric dentists who were mostly in group or solo private practices and were younger, in that most had completed their education in the preceding 15 years. More than one-half practiced in suburban settings, and most worked with both dental hygienists and dental assistants. Most assisted patients with SHCNs with their transitions to adult care, and the predominant barrier to transitioning to adult care was availability of general dentists and specialists who were willing to accept these new patients. Pediatric dentists' answers paralleled those of pediatricians for the most part in terms of services provided and barriers to transition. Most responding dentists helped adolescents with and without SHCNs make the transition into adult care, but the major barrier was the availability of general dentists and specialists. With an office protocol in place that includes trained staff members, transitioning patients (especially those with SHCNs) to adult care can be facilitated to provide the appropriate oral health and support services.

  14. Planning for health care transitions: results from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotstein, Debra S; Ghandour, Reem; Cash, Amanda; McGuire, Elizabeth; Strickland, Bonnie; Newacheck, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Many youth with special health care needs have difficulties transferring to adult medical care. To address this, the Maternal and Child Health Bureau has made receipt of transition services a core performance outcome for community-based systems of care for youth with special health care needs. In this article we describe the results for the transition core outcome from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. We also describe changes in the measurement strategy for this outcome since the first National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs in 2001. In the nationally representative, cross-sectional 2005-2006 National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs, parent or guardian respondents of 18198 youth with special health care needs (aged 12-17) were asked if they have had discussions with their child's health care providers about (1) future adult providers, (2) future adult health care needs, (3) changes in health insurance, and (4) encouraging their child to take responsibility for his or her care. All 4 components had to be met for the youth to meet the overall transition core outcome. Those who had not had transition discussions reported if such discussions would have been helpful. Overall, 41% of youth with special health care needs met the core performance outcome for transition. Forty-two percent had discussed shifting care to an adult provider, 62% discussed their child's adult health care needs, and 34% discussed upcoming changes in health insurance. Most (78%) respondents said that providers usually or always encourage their child to take responsibility for his or her health. Non-Hispanic black or Hispanic race/ethnicity, lower income level, not speaking English, and not having a medical home reduced the odds of meeting the transition core outcome. Current performance on the transition core outcome leaves much room for improvement. Many parents feel that having transition-related discussions with their

  15. Transition of care in congenital heart disease from pediatrics to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Sameh M; Driscoll, David J; Dearani, Joseph A

    2015-04-01

    Improvement in surgical techniques, anesthesia, and perioperative care has resulted in the majority of children born with congenital heart defects surviving into adulthood with a normal or near-normal quality of life. A careful transition from pediatric to adult care providers is important to avoid issues related to loss of continuity of care and any undue financial or psychological burdens to the patients and their families. The patients, their families, and the health care providers are faced with many challenges during this transition process that can be optimized and overcome by education about the heart defects and a team approach with clear lines of communication. This review addresses the challenges related to the transition of care from pediatrics to adults and provides the necessary recommendations to ensure a smooth transition process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Coverage and development of specialist palliative care services across the World Health Organization European Region (2005-2012): Results from a European Association for Palliative Care Task Force survey of 53 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Carlos; Lynch, Thomas; Garralda, Eduardo; Carrasco, José Miguel; Guillen-Grima, Francisco; Clark, David

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of the provision of palliative care specialised services is important for planning and evaluation. To examine the development between 2005 and 2012 of three specialised palliative care services across the World Health Organization European Region - home care teams, hospital support teams and inpatient palliative care services. Data were extracted and analysed from two editions of the European Association for Palliative Care Atlas of Palliative Care in Europe. Significant development of each type of services was demonstrated by adjusted residual analysis, ratio of services per population and 2012 coverage (relationship between provision of available services and demand services estimated to meet the palliative care needs of a population). For the measurement of palliative care coverage, we used European Association for Palliative Care White Paper recommendations: one home care team per 100,000 inhabitants, one hospital support team per 200,000 inhabitants and one inpatient palliative care service per 200,000 inhabitants. To estimate evolution at the supranational level, mean comparison between years and European sub-regions is presented. Of 53 countries, 46 (87%) provided data. Europe has developed significant home care team, inpatient palliative care service and hospital support team in 2005-2012. The improvement was statistically significant for Western European countries, but not for Central and Eastern countries. Significant development in at least a type of services was in 21 of 46 (46%) countries. The estimations of 2012 coverage for inpatient palliative care service, home care team and hospital support team are 62%, 52% and 31% for Western European and 20%, 14% and 3% for Central and Eastern, respectively. Although there has been a positive development in overall palliative care coverage in Europe between 2005 and 2012, the services available in most countries are still insufficient to meet the palliative care needs of the population. © The

  17. Leading by walking around in long-term care and transitional care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerer, Douglas; Cwiekala-Lewis, Klaudia

    2017-05-30

    Nursing staff in long-term care/transitional care (LTC/TC) facilities in the US work in unique environments that can be stressful and demanding. There is much in the literature that describes different leadership styles in nursing, but a limited amount on leadership in LTC/TC environments. This article explores the concept of leading by walking around (LBWA), also known as leadership by walking, to cultivate therapeutic work environments in LTC/TC facilities in the US. It defines therapeutic work environments and describes the specific environment of LTC/TC facilities. It also briefly describes the nursing hierarchy and nurse education in the US. Finally, it describes the cultivation of therapeutic work environments by using LBWA and includes two examples of the concept in action.

  18. Health and health-care systems in southeast Asia: diversity and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Phua, Kai Hong; Yap, Mui Teng; Pocock, Nicola S; Hashim, Jamal H; Chhem, Rethy; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; Lopez, Alan D

    2011-01-29

    Southeast Asia is a region of enormous social, economic, and political diversity, both across and within countries, shaped by its history, geography, and position as a major crossroad of trade and the movement of goods and services. These factors have not only contributed to the disparate health status of the region's diverse populations, but also to the diverse nature of its health systems, which are at varying stages of evolution. Rapid but inequitable socioeconomic development, coupled with differing rates of demographic and epidemiological transitions, have accentuated health disparities and posed great public health challenges for national health systems, particularly the control of emerging infectious diseases and the rise of non-communicable diseases within ageing populations. While novel forms of health care are evolving in the region, such as corporatised public health-care systems (government owned, but operating according to corporate principles and with private-sector participation) and financing mechanisms to achieve universal coverage, there are key lessons for health reforms and decentralisation. New challenges have emerged with rising trade in health services, migration of the health workforce, and medical tourism. Juxtaposed between the emerging giant economies of China and India, countries of the region are attempting to forge a common regional identity, despite their diversity, to seek mutually acceptable and effective solutions to key regional health challenges. In this first paper in the Lancet Series on health in southeast Asia, we present an overview of key demographic and epidemiological changes in the region, explore challenges facing health systems, and draw attention to the potential for regional collaboration in health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Care transitions between hospitals are associated with treatment delay for patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J.; Handorf, Elizabeth; Corcoran, Anthony T.; Wong, Yu-Ning; Mehrazin, Reza; Bekelman, Justin E.; Canter, Daniel; Kutikov, Alexander; Chen, David Y.T.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Smaldone, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypothesizing that changing hospitals between diagnosis and definitive therapy (care transition) may delay timely treatment, our objective was to identify the association between care transitions and treatment delay ≥3 months in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). Methods Using the National Cancer Database, all patients with stage ≥II urothelial carcinoma treated from 2003–2010 were identified. A care transition was defined as a change in hospital from diagnosis to definitive course of treatment (diagnosis to RC or start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy). Logistic regression models were used to test the association between care transition and treatment delay. Results Of 22,251 patients, 14.2% experienced a treatment delay of ≥3 months, and this proportion increased over time (13.5% [2003–2006] versus 14.8% [2007–2010], p=0.01). 19.4% of patients undergoing a care transition experienced a delay to definitive treatment compared to 10.7% of patients diagnosed and treated at the same hospital (p<0.001). The proportion of patients experiencing a care transition increased over the study period (37.4% [2003–2006] versus 42.3% [2007–2010], p<0.001). Following adjustment, patients were more likely to experience a treatment delay when undergoing a care transition (OR 2.0 [CI 1.8–2.2]). Conclusions Patients with MIBC who underwent a care transition were more likely to experience a treatment delay of ≥3 months. Strategies to expedite care transitions at the time of hospital referral may be a means to improve quality of care. PMID:24835054

  20. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient-provider language concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nosaiba; Admi, Hanna; Shadmi, Efrat

    2014-01-01

    Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients' discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient-provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0-100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient-provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients' discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients.

  1. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review" found on pages 19-28, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until February 29, 2020. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Discuss problematic barriers during care transitions

  2. Transitioning HIV-Positive Adolescents to Adult Care: Lessons Learned From Twelve Adolescent Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2016-01-01

    To maximize positive health outcomes for youth with HIV as they transition from youth to adult care, clinical staff need strategies and protocols to help youth maintain clinic engagement and medication adherence. Accordingly, this paper describe transition processes across twelve clinics within the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) to provide lessons learned and inform the development of transition protocols to improve health outcomes as youth shift from adolescent to adult HIV care. During a large multi-method Care Initiative program evaluation, three annual visits were completed at each site from 2010-2012 and conducted 174 semi-structured interviews with clinical and program staff (baseline n=64, year 1 n=56, year 2=54). The results underscore the value of adhering to recent American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) transition recommendations, including: developing formal transition protocols, preparing youth for transition, facilitating youth's connection to the adult clinic, and identifying necessary strategies for transition evaluation. Transitioning youth with HIV involves targeting individual-, provider-, and system-level factors. Acknowledging and addressing key barriers is essential for developing streamlined, comprehensive, and context-specific transition protocols. Adolescent and adult clinic involvement in transition is essential to reduce service fragmentation, provide coordinated and continuous care, and support individual and community level health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transitioning adolescents living with HIV/AIDS to adult-oriented health care: an emerging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daisy Maria; Succi, Regina C; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2010-01-01

    To review the literature on transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care and discuss this issue in the specific context of chronic conditions. MEDLINE and LILACS were searched for relevant English and French-language articles published between 1990 and 2010. The transition of adolescents with chronic diseases from pediatric care to adult-oriented services has been a growing concern among pediatric specialties. In recent years, young people living with HIV/AIDS have begun to reach adulthood, giving rise to several challenges. The studies reviewed herein discuss such relevant topics as: the difference between transfer, an isolated event, and transition, a gradual process; the transition models used in different services; the importance of transitioning in a planned and individualized manner; the need for comprehensive interaction between pediatric and adult-oriented care teams; the importance of joint participation of adolescents, their families, and health professionals in the process; barriers to and factors that promote successful transitions; and the special needs of adolescents with HIV/AIDS in this important period of life. Several authors agree that transitioning adolescents to adult-oriented health care should be a gradual process not determined by age alone. It requires a plan established with ample dialogue among adolescents, their families, and pediatric and adult care teams. However, there is little evidence to support any specific model of health care transition. This should prompt researchers to conduct more prospective studies on the theme, especially in more vulnerable groups such as adolescents living with HIV/AIDS.

  4. Transitions to Adult Care for Rhode Island Youth with Special Healthcare Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Suzanne; Terry, Christopher; Neukirch, Jodie; Garneau, Deborah; Golding, Deb; Brown, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    The transitioning of youth from pediatric to adult care systems is often fraught with discontinuity, miscommunication and gaps in care. This is most significant for youth with special health care needs. A panel discussion on transitioning youth to adult care systems that was part of a learning collaborative held by The RI Care Transformation Collaborative (CTC) is presented here, illustrated by a pertinent case of a youth with type 1 diabetes. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-08.asp, free with no login].

  5. Centering the concept of transitional care: a teaching-learning innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mood, Laura C; Neunzert, Caroline; Tadesse, Ruth

    2014-05-01

    Coordination of care, including the provision of safe and effective transitions, is a core professional standard for nurses. However, as currently designed, prelicensure nursing education prepares nurses to function in discrete settings rather than across settings. A teaching-learning innovation focusing on transitional care was implemented as an educational pilot project with 20 senior-level baccalaureate students in their leadership course. Students in the educational pilot immersed in the subject of transitional care via concept-based learning activities and performance improvement projects. During the course, students were assigned to designated clinical sites representative of a continuum of care. An integrated clinical postconference offered students the opportunity to discover the role of the nurse in transitional care from a systems perspective and facilitated a deeper understanding of the subject that extended beyond the walls of students' discrete clinical sites. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Changes in primary health care centres over the transition period in Slovenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albreht, T.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Klazinga, N.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary health care centres (PHCCs) were a characteristic of the former Yugoslav health care system introduced widely in Slovenia. Transition brought structural changes to health care and the position of the PHCC's was challenged. This paper investigates (i) PHCCs' perception of

  7. Changes in primary health care centres over the transition period in Slovenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albreht, Tit; Delnoij, Diana M. J.; Klazinga, Niek

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary health care centres (PHCCs) were a characteristic of the former Yugoslav health care system introduced widely in Slovenia. Transition brought structural changes to health care and the position of the PHCC's was challenged. This paper investigates (i) PHCCs' perception of

  8. The Medical Transition from Pediatric to Adult-Oriented Care: Considerations for Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Laura C; Maslow, Gary

    2018-01-01

    More adolescents and young adults are surviving previously fatal childhood illness and need support to transition from pediatric care to adult-oriented care. There are many barriers, but guidelines and tools assist providers with emphasis on gradually addressing transition with patients and families. Child and adolescent psychiatrists should be particularly attuned to the needs of adolescents with previously identified mental illness who are at high risk of falling out of regular care during transition. Providers are also uniquely suited to address the needs of adolescents and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Concept Analysis of Health Care Transition in Adolescents with Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladores, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Children with chronic conditions are living into adulthood and present with unique needs. One such need is their transition from pediatric to adult health care. This paper examined the literature to analyze and synthesize the concept of transition within two contexts, health care and adolescents with chronic conditions. Fifty multidisciplinary sources were included for analysis. A refined, working definition of the concept of health care transition in adolescents with chronic conditions is presented. Results will enable the scientific community to discuss salient issues using well-defined, uniform terminology. Nursing implications are delineated to ensure that these youths thrive into adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health care transition for adolescents with special health care needs: a report on the development and use of a clinical transition service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Suzanne; Bowering, Nancy; Crosby, Barbara; Neukirch, Jodie; Gollub, Eliza; Garneau, Deborah

    2013-04-01

    A growing population of adolescents with special healthcare needs is aging into adulthood. These emerging adults face the transition challenges of their healthy peers but also potentially heightened risks and challenges related to their conditions. We describe the process of developing a pilot program to support healthcare services for emerging adults with chronic conditions and present preliminary data on utilization. An outpatient multidisciplinary consult model was developed based on patient, family and physician feedback. Patients with diverse conditions were equally referred from primary care, subspecialists and families and community agencies. Services provided included needs assessments (100%), referral to adult physicians (77%), care coordination (52%) and referrals to adult community services (10%). Clinical billing did not fully support the cost of providing services. The pilot program offered multidisciplinary transition services that were utilized by a diverse patient population. Local and national resources for health care transition are provided.

  11. User Experience and Care Integration in Transitional Care for Older People From Hospital to Home: A Meta-Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqueline; Hutchinson, Alison M; Brown, Rhonda; Livingston, Patricia M

    2017-01-01

    This meta-synthesis aimed to improve understanding of user experience of older people, carers, and health providers; and care integration in the care of older people transitioning from hospital to home. Following our systematic search, we identified and synthesized 20 studies, and constructed a comprehensive framework. We derived four themes: (1) 'Who is taking care of what? Trying to work together"; (2) 'Falling short of the mark'; (3) 'A proper discharge'; and (4) 'You adjust somehow.' The themes that emerged from the studies reflected users' experience of discharge and transitional care as a social process of 'negotiation and navigation of independence (older people/carers), or dependence (health providers).' Users engaged in negotiation and navigation through the interrogative strategies of questioning, discussion, information provision, information seeking, assessment, and translation. The derived themes reflected care integration that facilitated, or a lack of care integration that constrained, users' experiences of negotiation and navigation of independence/dependence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. A prospective observational description of frequency and timing of antenatal care attendance and coverage of selected interventions from sites in Argentina, Guatemala, India, Kenya, Pakistan and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Sherri; Marete, Irene; Tenge, Constance; Liechty, Edward A; Esamai, Fabian; Patel, Archana; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Kodkany, Bhalchandra; Garces, Ana; Chomba, Elwyn; Althabe, Fernando; Barreuta, Mabel; Pasha, Omrana; Hibberd, Patricia; Derman, Richard J; Otieno, Kevin; Hambidge, K; Krebs, Nancy F; Carlo, Waldemar A; Chemweno, Carolyne; Goldenberg, Robert L; McClure, Elizabeth M; Moore, Janet L; Wallace, Dennis D; Saleem, Sarah; Koso-Thomas, Marion

    2015-01-01

    The Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research is one of the largest international networks for testing and generating evidence-based recommendations for improvement of maternal-child health in resource-limited settings. Since 2009, Global Network sites in six low and middle-income countries have collected information on antenatal care practices, which are important as indicators of care and have implications for programs to improve maternal and child health. We sought to: (1) describe the quantity of antenatal care attendance over a four-year period; and (2) explore the quality of coverage for selected preventative, screening, and birth preparedness components. The Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR) is a prospective, population-based birth and pregnancy outcomes registry in Global Network sites, including: Argentina, Guatemala, India (Belgaum and Nagpur), Kenya, Pakistan, and Zambia. MNHR data from these sites were prospectively collected from January 1, 2010 - December 31, 2013 and analyzed for indicators related to quantity and patterns of ANC and coverage of key elements of recommended focused antenatal care. Descriptive statistics were generated overall by global region (Africa, Asia, and Latin America), and for each individual site. Overall, 96% of women reported at least one antenatal care visit. Indian sites demonstrated the highest percentage of women who initiated antenatal care during the first trimester. Women from the Latin American and Indian sites reported the highest number of at least 4 visits. Overall, 88% of women received tetanus toxoid. Only about half of all women reported having been screened for syphilis (49%) or anemia (50%). Rates of HIV testing were above 95% in the Argentina, African, and Indian sites. The Pakistan site demonstrated relatively high rates for birth preparation, but for most other preventative and screening interventions, posted lower coverage rates as compared to other Global Network sites. Results

  13. Exploring end-of-residency transitions in a VA Patient Aligned Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Emily S; Conde, Michelle V; Simon, Bret; Leykum, Luci K

    2014-07-01

    End-of-residency transitions create disruptions in primary care continuity. The national implementation of Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) in Veterans Health Administration (VA) primary care clinics creates an opportunity to mitigate this discontinuity through the provision of team-based care. To identify team-based solutions to end-of-residency transitions in a resident PACT continuity clinic by assessing the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of non-physician PACT members and resident PACT physicians. Cross-sectional survey of 27 resident physicians and 24 non-physician PACT members in the Internal Medicine Clinic at the Audie L. Murphy VA Hospital in the South Texas Veterans Health Care System. Twenty-seven residents and 24 non-physician PACT members completed the survey, with response rates of 90 % and 100 %, respectively. All residents and 96 % of non-physician PACT members agreed or strongly agreed that the residents were responsible for informing patients about end-of-residency transitions. Only 38 % of non-physician PACT members versus 52 % of residents indicated that non-physician PACT members should be responsible for this transition. Approximately 80 % of resident physicians and non-physician PACT members agreed there should be a formalized approach to these transitions; 67 % of non-physician PACT members were willing to support this transition. Potential barriers to team-based care transitions were identified. Major themes of write-in suggestions for improving the transition focused on communication and relationships between the patient and PACT and among the PACT members. PACT implementation changes the roles and relationship structures among all team members. While end-of-residency transitions create a disruption in the relationship system, the remainder of the PACT may bridge this transition. Our results demonstrate the importance of a team-based solution that engages all PACT members by improving communication and fostering effective team

  14. The experience of transition in adolescents and young adults transferring from paediatric to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fegran, Liv; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne

    : To synthesize qualitative studies on how adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases experience transition from paediatric to adult care. Methods: Literature search in major databases covering the years from 1999 to November 2010 was performed. Further forward citation snowballing search was conducted...... responsibility. Conclusion: Young adults’ transition experiences seem to be commensurable across diagnoses and cultures. Feelings of not belonging and being redundant during the transfer process moving from paediatric to adult ward, is striking. Appreciating young adults’ need to be acknowledged and valued......Introduction: Despite research and implementation of transition models in the last decades, transfer from paediatric to adult care still poses great challenges. Predominantly studies on health care transition have been based on the perspective of experts or health care professionals. Aim...

  15. Transition from Pediatric to Adult Health Care for Dravet Syndrome Patients

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators from University Hospital of Rennes; Necker Hospital, Paris; and University Paris Descartes, France used a questionnaire to study the transition and transfer from pediatric to adult health-care system in patients with Dravet syndrome and their families.

  16. Curative to palliative care-transition and communication issues: Surgeons perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Suryanarayana Deo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition of a cancer patient from curative to palliative stage is one of the most difficult and challenging phases of cancer care both from patient and physician point of view. Most of the time the treating surgeons are expected to facilitate this transition but due to a number of reasons surgeons often fail to fulfill this crucial responsibility. This article highlights the various issues involved in the transition phase from a surgeons perspective.

  17. Interprofessional education involving medical and pharmacy students during transitions of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Carrie; Arnoldi, Jennifer; Moose, Helen; Hingle, Susan T

    2017-05-01

    The transition of care from hospital to home is susceptible to clinical errors and adverse drug events. Despite this risk and the benefits of an interprofessional approach to patient care, medicine and pharmacy do not often collaborate during transitions of care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an interprofessional education experience consisting of medical and pharmacy students performing transitions of care. A total of 88 students (13 pharmacy students and 75 medical students) participated and were surveyed before and after the experience, to evaluate their confidence in performing aspects of the transition of care process as well as their attitudes towards interprofessional care. Pharmacy students had higher baseline levels of confidence compared with the medical students, and both student groups revealed a significantly greater level of confidence in their abilities after the experience. The impact of the experience on students' attitudes towards interprofessional care varied, with medical students showing very little change from baseline and pharmacy students showing improved attitudes in several areas. The results of this study have positive implications for an interprofessional approach to transitions of care while highlighting potential future areas of study.

  18. A qualitative study of patient and provider experiences during preoperative care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malley, Ann M; Young, Gary J

    2017-07-01

    To explore the issues and challenges of care transitions in the preoperative environment. Ineffective transitions play a role in a majority of serious medical errors. There is a paucity of research related to the preoperative arena and the multiple inherent transitions in care that occur there. Qualitative descriptive design was used. Semistructured interviews were conducted in a 975-bed academic medical centre. A total of 30 providers and 10 preoperative patients participated. Themes that arose were as follows: (1) need for clarity of purpose of preoperative care, (2) care coordination, (3) interprofessional boundaries of care and (4) inadequate time and resources. Effective transitions in the preoperative environment require that providers bridge scope of practice barriers to promote good teamwork. Preoperative care that is a product of well-informed providers and patients can improve the entire perioperative care process and potentially influence postoperative patient outcomes. Nurses are well positioned to bridge the gaps within transitions of care and accordingly affect health outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  20. 77 FR 59543 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Continuum of Care Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... the new Continuum of Care program. The Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 578 RIN 2506-AC29 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to...

  1. Health Care Transition Preparation and Experiences in a U.S. National Sample of Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C; Foster, Nicole C; Agarwal, Shivani; DiMeglio, Linda A; Anderson, Barbara J; Corathers, Sarah D; Desimone, Marisa E; Libman, Ingrid M; Lyons, Sarah K; Peters, Anne L; Raymond, Jennifer K; Laffel, Lori M

    2017-03-01

    Young adults with type 1 diabetes transitioning from pediatric to adult care are at risk for adverse outcomes. We developed a survey to evaluate transition experiences in two groups of young adults with type 1 diabetes, before (PEDS) and after (ADULT) transition to adult care. We fielded an electronic survey to young adults (18 to 6 months between pediatric and adult care. Receipt of transition preparation counseling was not associated with self-reported hemoglobin A 1c <7.0% in either group. These results support the need for intensive efforts to integrate transition preparation counseling and care coordination into pediatric type 1 diabetes care. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Multi-professional communication for older people in transitional care: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Ottmann, Goetz; Roberts, Gail

    2013-12-01

    To synthesise research-reporting literature about multi-professional communication between health and social care professionals within transitional care for older people, with particular attention on outcomes, enabling contextual factors and constraints. Older adults experience high rates of morbidity and health care usage, and frequently transit between health services, and community and social care providers. These transition episodes place elders at increased risk of adverse incidents due to poor communication of information. Integrated multi-professional models of care built on enhanced communication have been widely promoted as a strategy to improve transitional care for older people. However, a range of findings exist in the literature to guide service providers and researchers. Comprehensive literature search and review strategies were employed to identify, describe and synthesise relevant studies. Ten databases were searched in addition to Google Scholar. Specified discharge worker roles, multi-professional care coordination teams, and information technology systems promote better service satisfaction and subjective quality of life for older people when compared with standard hospital discharge. Improved multi-professional communication reduces rates of re-admission and length of stay indicating greater cost effectiveness and efficiency for the health and social care systems. Systems of care emphasizing information exchange, education and negotiation between stakeholders facilitate communication in transitional care contexts for older adults. Conversely, lack of dialogue and lack of understanding of others' roles are barriers to communication in transitional care. Enhanced multi-professional communication, transitional pathways, and role clarity are required to improve the quality, sustainability and responsiveness of aged care into the future. Recommendations for further research include: (i) Investigation of pathways promoting person-centred care planning

  3. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Admi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines care transition experiences of cancer patients and assesses barriers to effective transitions.Methods: Participants were adult Hebrew, Arabic, or Russian speaking oncology patients and health care providers from hospital and community settings. Qualitative (n=77 and quantitative (n=422 methods such as focus groups, interviews and self-administered questionnaires were used. Qualitative analysis showed that patients faced difficulties navigating a complex and fragmented healthcare system.Results: Mechanisms to overcome barriers included informal routes such as personal relationships, coordinating roles by nurse coordinators and the patients' general practitioners (GPs. The most significant variable was GPs involvement, which affected transition process quality as rated on the CTM (p<0.001. Our findings point to the important interpersonal role of oncology nurses to coordinate and facilitate the care transition process.Conclusion: Interventions targeted towards supporting the care transition process should emphasize ongoing counseling throughout a patient’s care, during and after hospitalization.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Admi H, Muller E, Shadmi E. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34011.[This abstract was presented at the BIT’s 8th Annual World Cancer Congress, which was held from May 15-17, 2015 in Beijing, China.

  4. The persistent gap in health-care coverage between low- and high-income workers in Washington State: BRFSS, 2003-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z Joyce; Anderson, Naomi J; Foley, Michael; Rauser, Eddy; Silverstein, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    We examined the disparities in health-care coverage between low- and high-income workers in Washington State (WA) to provide support for possible policy decisions for uninsured workers. We examined data from the WA Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2003-2007 and compared workers aged 18-64 years of low income (annual household income income (annual household income ≥$35,000) on proportions and sources of health-care coverage. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analyses on factors that were associated with the uninsured. Of the 54,536 survey respondents who were working-age adults in WA, 13,922 (25.5%) were low-income workers. The proportions of uninsured were 38.2% for low-income workers and 6.3% for high-income workers. While employment-based health benefits remained a dominant source of health insurance coverage, they covered only 40.2% of low-income workers relative to 81.5% of high-income workers. Besides income, workers were more likely to be uninsured if they were younger; male; Hispanic; less educated; not married; current smokers; self-employed; or employed in agriculture/forestry/fisheries, construction, and retail. More low-income workers (28.7%) reported cost as an issue in paying for health services than did their high-income counterparts (6.7%). A persistent gap in health-care coverage exists between low- and high-income workers. The identified characteristics of these workers can be used to implement policies to expand health insurance coverage.

  5. Care transitions service: a pharmacy-driven program for medication reconciliation through the continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Jessica R; Togami, John C; Burnett, Allison; Dodd, Melanie A; Ray, Gretchen M

    2014-05-15

    A quality-improvement program at University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH) encompassing admission, discharge, and postdischarge medication reconciliation activities is described, with a report on initial assessments of the program's impact on rates of medication-related problems (MRPs). Pharmacists conducted a five-month evaluation of the UNMH Care Transitions Service (CTS), which serves inpatients admitted to the hospital's family medicine service, providing medication reconciliation and targeted MRP interventions. Selected patients who received CTS services from November 2012 through March 2013 (n = 191) were included in the analysis. The study endpoints were the rates and types of MRPs identified, the most commonly implicated medication classes, and predictors of MRPs. Postdischarge MRP rates during a two-month trial of CTS services at a UNMH outpatient clinic were also evaluated. During the five-month evaluation of inpatient CTS services, a total of 1140 MRPs were identified (an average of 6 per patient), about 70% of which were resolved independently of provider review using pharmacy-driven protocols. During the two-month pilot test of CTS outpatient services (n = 16), a total of 28 MRPs were identified; in over 80% of cases, there was a decline in the number of MRPs from the admission to the postdischarge medication reconciliation. MRPs were identified through the continuum of care. The majority of MRPs identified in both the inpatient and outpatient settings involved patient variables and patient nonadherence. Seventy percent of inpatient MRPs were resolved independently by the CTS team under pharmacy-driven protocols.

  6. Experiences of health care transition voiced by young adults with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C; Beste, Margaret G; Luff, Donna; Atakov-Castillo, Astrid; Wolpert, Howard A; Ritholz, Marilyn D

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore the experience of transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care reported by posttransition emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), with a focus on preparation for the actual transfer in care. Twenty-six T1D emerging adults (mean age 26.2±2.5 years) receiving adult diabetes care at a single center participated in five focus groups stratified by two levels of current glycemic control. A multidisciplinary team coded transcripts and conducted thematic analysis. FOUR KEY THEMES ON THE PROCESS OF TRANSFER TO ADULT CARE EMERGED FROM A THEMATIC ANALYSIS: 1) nonpurposeful transition (patients reported a lack of transition preparation by pediatric providers for the transfer to adult diabetes care); 2) vulnerability in the college years (patients conveyed periods of loss to follow-up during college and described health risks and diabetes management challenges specific to the college years that were inadequately addressed by pediatric or adult providers); 3) unexpected differences between pediatric and adult health care systems (patients were surprised by the different feel of adult diabetes care, especially with regards to an increased focus on diabetes complications); and 4) patients' wish list for improving the transition process (patients recommended enhanced pediatric transition counseling, implementation of adult clinic orientation programs, and peer support for transitioning patients). Our findings identify modifiable deficiencies in the T1D transition process and underscore the importance of a planned transition with enhanced preparation by pediatric clinics as well as developmentally tailored patient orientation in the adult clinic setting.

  7. Enhancing Care Transitions for Older People through Interprofessional Simulation: A Mixed Method Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Sykes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The educational needs of the health and social care workforce for delivering effective integrated care are important. This paper reports on the development, pilot and evaluation of an interprofessional simulation course, which aimed to support integrated care models for care transitions for older people from hospital to home. Theory and methods: The course development was informed by a literature review and a scoping exercise with the health and social care workforce. The course ran six times and was attended by health and social care professionals from hospital and community (n = 49. The evaluation aimed to elicit staff perceptions of their learning about care transfers of older people and to explore application of learning into practice and perceived outcomes. The study used a sequential mixed method design with questionnaires completed pre (n = 44 and post (n = 47 course and interviews (n = 9 2–5 months later. Results: Participants evaluated interprofessional simulation as a successful strategy. Post-course, participants identified learning points and at the interviews, similar themes with examples of application in practice were: Understanding individual needs and empathy; Communicating with patients and families; Interprofessional working; Working across settings to achieve effective care transitions. Conclusions and discussion: An interprofessional simulation course successfully brought together health and social care professionals across settings to develop integrated care skills and improve care transitions for older people with complex needs from hospital to home.

  8. Outcomes and patients’ perspectives of transition from paediatric to adult care in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alice L; Moore, David; Bampton, Peter A; Bryant, Robert V; Andrews, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the disease and psychosocial outcomes of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) transition cohort and their perspectives. METHODS: Patients with IBD, aged > 18 years, who had moved from paediatric to adult care within 10 years were identified through IBD databases at three tertiary hospitals. Participants were surveyed regarding demographic and disease specific data and their perspectives on the transition process. Survey response data were compared to contemporaneously recorded information in paediatric service case notes. Data were compared to a similar age cohort who had never received paediatric IBD care and therefore who had not undergone a transition process. RESULTS: There were 81 returned surveys from 46 transition and 35 non-transition patients. No statistically significant differences were found in disease burden, disease outcomes or adult roles and responsibilities between cohorts. Despite a high prevalence of mood disturbance (35%), there was a very low usage (5%) of psychological services in both cohorts. In the transition cohort, knowledge of their transition plan was reported by only 25/46 patients and the majority (54%) felt they were not strongly prepared. A high rate (78%) of discussion about work/study plans was recorded prior to transition, but a near complete absence of discussion regarding sex (8%), and other adult issues was recorded. Both cohorts agreed that their preferred method of future transition practices (of the options offered) was a shared clinic appointment with all key stakeholders. CONCLUSION: Transition did not appear to adversely affect disease or psychosocial outcomes. Current transition care processes could be optimised, with better psychosocial preparation and agreed transition plans. PMID:26937149

  9. Using the Right to Health to Promote Universal Health Coverage: A Better Tool for Protecting Non-Nationals' Access to Affordable Health Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougarre, Claire

    2016-12-01

    Five years ago, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution on universal health coverage, followed a year later by a resolution from the United Nations General Assembly. In these resolutions, states promised to deliver affordable health care for everyone, referring to notions of equity and human rights law, particularly a human right to health. However, the explosion of migration coupled with the post-2008 bleak economic climate have led societies worldwide to restrict, or at least challenge, the affordability of access to national health systems for non-nationals. It is in this light that the claims of universality made by universal health coverage should be challenged. This article, therefore, will question the effectiveness of this global health policy in guaranteeing access to affordable health care for non-nationals and will ask whether and how legal avenues such as the right to health should be used to address potential weaknesses.

  10. Promoting Smooth School Transitions for Children in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviolette, Ghyslyn T.

    2011-01-01

    Children in foster care move two times per year on average. School records are not always transferred in a timely manner, which leads to a lack of services. Schools often are not aware of the legal issues surrounding foster care, such as who has legal rights to sign field trip permission slips or consent for educational evaluations. This study led…

  11. Health insurance coverage and use of family planning services among current and former foster youth: implications of the health care reform law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy; Ahrens, Kym; Courtney, Mark

    2013-04-01

    This research uses data from a longitudinal study to examine how two provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act could affect health insurance coverage among young women who have aged out of foster care. It also explores how allowing young people to remain in foster care until age twenty-one affects their health insurance coverage, use of family planning services, and information about birth control. We find that young women are more likely to have health insurance if they remain in foster care until their twenty-first birthday and that having health insurance is associated with an increase in the likelihood of receiving family planning services. Our results also suggest that many young women who would otherwise lack health insurance after aging out of foster care will be eligible for Medicaid under the health care reform law. Because having health insurance is associated with use of family planning services, this increase in Medicaid eligibility may result in fewer unintended pregnancies among this high-risk population.

  12. AIDS as chronic illness: epidemiological transition and health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper suggests that people in south-eastern Botswana experience the AIDS epidemic as part of a recent epidemiological transition in which rates of chronic debilitating illness have risen, even as the degree of acute infectious disease has fallen (HIV/AIDS aside). Whereas international health programmes and ...

  13. Warm Handoffs: a Novel Strategy to Improve End-of-Rotation Care Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saag, Harry S; Chen, Jingjing; Denson, Joshua L; Jones, Simon; Horwitz, Leora; Cocks, Patrick M

    2018-01-01

    Hospitalized medical patients undergoing transition of care by house staff teams at the end of a ward rotation are associated with an increased risk of mortality, yet best practices surrounding this transition are lacking. To assess the impact of a warm handoff protocol for end-of-rotation care transitions. A large, university-based internal medicine residency using three different training sites. PGY-2 and PGY-3 internal medicine residents. Implementation of a warm handoff protocol whereby the incoming and outgoing residents meet at the hospital to sign out in-person and jointly round at the bedside on sicker patients using a checklist. An eight-question survey completed by 60 of 99 eligible residents demonstrated that 85% of residents perceived warm handoffs to be safer for patients (p rotation (p rotation care transitions. Additional studies analyzing patient outcomes will be needed to assess the impact of this strategy.

  14. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Storm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures.Methodology: Included in the study were elderly patients (75+ receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41 were carried out by two researchers.Results: Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1 next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering, (2 patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions, (3 health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles, (4 information exchange (oral, written, electronic, (5 context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers and (6 patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment.Conclusion: Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings.

  15. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Storm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures. Methodology: Included in the study were elderly patients (75+ receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41 were carried out by two researchers. Results: Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1 next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering, (2 patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions, (3 health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles, (4 information exchange (oral, written, electronic, (5 context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers and (6 patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment. Conclusion: Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings.

  16. Psychosocial changes following transition to an aged care home: qualitative findings from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Pakpour, Vahid; Chenoweth, Lynnette Lorraine; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2017-06-01

    The study explored the psychosocial effects of transitioning from home to an aged care home for older Iranian people. Moving from one's own home to a communal aged care home is challenging for older people and may give rise to numerous psychosocial responses. The extent and intensity of such changes have rarely been explored in Middle Eastern countries. Data were collected through purposive sampling by in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 participants (17 people living in aged care homes and three formal caregivers). All the interviews were recorded and typed, and conventional qualitative content analysis was used, eliciting common themes. There were four common themes: communication isolation, resource change, monotone institutional life and negative emotional response. Participants lost their previous support systems when transitioning to an aged care home and were not able to establish new ones. Routine care was provided by formal caregivers with little attention to individual needs, and minimal support was given to help maintain the older person's independence. These losses gave rise to negative emotions in some of the participants, depending on their previous lifestyle and accommodation arrangements. The extent and intensity of psychosocial changes occurring in most of the participants following their transition to an aged care home indicates the need for a review of Iranian aged care services. To assist older Iranian people adapt more readily when making the transition to aged care home and to meet their unique psychosocial needs, a family-centred approach to service delivery is recommended. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Building mobile technologies to improve transitions of care in adolescents with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are the most common type of birth defects. Improvements in CHD care have led to roughly 1.4 million survivors reaching adulthood. This emerging "survivor" population are often palliated but not cured. Thus successful transition from pediatric to adult care for CHD pa...

  18. Fathers' Involvement in Child Care and Perceptions of Parenting Skill over the Transition to Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Amy A.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.; Deutsch, Francine M.; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    This study explored first-time fathers' perceived child care skill over the transition to parenthood, based on face-to-face interviews of 152 working-class, dual-earner couples. Analyses examined the associations among fathers' perceived skill and prenatal perception of skill, child care involvement, mothers' breastfeeding, maternal gatekeeping,…

  19. Work satisfaction and future career intentions of experienced nurses transitioning to primary health care employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Christine; Peters, Kath; Brown, Angela; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2018-02-12

    To explore registered nurses' reflections on transitioning from acute to primary health care employment, and future career intentions. Reforms in primary health care have resulted in increasing demands for a skilled primary health care nursing workforce. To meet shortfalls, acute care nurses are being recruited to primary health care employment, yet little is known about levels of satisfaction and future career intentions. A sequential mixed methods study consisting of a survey and semi-structured interviews with nurses who transition to primary health care. Most reported positive experiences, valuing work/life balance, role diversity and patient/family interactions. Limited orientation and support, loss of acute skills and inequitable remuneration were reported negatively. Many respondents indicated an intention to stay in primary health care (87.3%) and nursing (92.6%) for the foreseeable future, whilst others indicated they may leave primary health care as soon as convenient (29.6%). Our findings provide guidance to managers in seeking strategies to recruit and retain nurses in primary health care employment. To maximize recruitment and retention, managers must consider factors influencing job satisfaction amongst transitioning nurses, and the impact that nurses' past experiences may have on future career intentions in primary health care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Delayed transition of care: a national study of visits to pediatricians by young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Robert J; Halterman, Jill S; Pulcino, Tiffany; Robbins, Brett W

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous policy statements and an increased focus on transition of care, little is known about young adults who experience delayed transition to adult providers. We used cross-sectional data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey between 1998 and 2008 to examine delayed transition among young adults ages 22 to 30. We defined delayed transition as continuing to visit a pediatrician after the age of 21 years. Overall, we found that 1.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-1.7) of visits by young adults to primary care physicians were seen by pediatricians, approximately 445,000 visits per year. We did not find a significant change in delayed transition during the past decade (β = -.01; P = .77). Among young adults, visits to pediatricians were more likely than visits to adult-focused providers to be for a chronic disease (25.7% vs 12.6%; P = .002) and more likely to be billed to public health insurance (23.5% vs 14.1%; P = .01). In adjusted models, visits by young adults to pediatric healthcare providers were more likely associated with chronic disease (adjusted relative risk [ARR] 2.2; 95% CI 1.5-3.4), with public health insurance (ARR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3-2.9), or with no health insurance (ARR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.4). Although most young adult visits were to adult providers, a considerable number of visits were to pediatricians, indicating delayed transition of care. There has been no substantial change in delayed transition during the past decade. Visits by young adults with chronic disease, public health insurance, or no health insurance were more likely to experience delayed transition of care. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adolescents growing with HIV/AIDS: experiences of the transition from pediatrics to adult care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Maria Machado

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to describe the formation of the Transition Adolescent Clinic (TAC and understand the process of transitioning adolescents with HIV/AIDS from pediatric to adult care, from the vantage point of individuals subjected to this process. A qualitative method and an intentional sample selected by criteria were adopted for this investigation, which was conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. An in-depth semi-structured interview was conducted with sixteen HIV-infected adolescents who had been part of a transitioning protocol. Adolescents expressed the need for more time to become adapted in the transition process. Having grown up under the care of a team of health care providers made many participants have reluctance toward transitioning. Concerns in moving away from their pediatricians and feelings of disruption, abandonment, or rejection were mentioned. Participants also expressed confidence in the pediatric team. At the same time they showed interest in the new team and expected to have close relationships with them. They also ask to have previous contacts with the adult health care team before the transition. Their talks suggest that they require slightly more time, not the time measured in days or months, but the time measured by constitutive experiences capable of building an expectation of future. This study examines the way in which the adolescents feel, and help to transform the health care transition model used at a public university. Listening to the adolescents’ voices is crucial to a better understanding of their needs. They are those who can help the professionals reaching alternatives for a smooth and successful health care transition.

  2. Adolescents growing with HIV/AIDS: experiences of the transition from pediatrics to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daisy Maria; Galano, Eliana; de Menezes Succi, Regina Célia; Vieira, Carla Maria; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to describe the formation of the Transition Adolescent Clinic (TAC) and understand the process of transitioning adolescents with HIV/AIDS from pediatric to adult care, from the vantage point of individuals subjected to this process. A qualitative method and an intentional sample selected by criteria were adopted for this investigation, which was conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. An in-depth semi-structured interview was conducted with sixteen HIV-infected adolescents who had been part of a transitioning protocol. Adolescents expressed the need for more time to become adapted in the transition process. Having grown up under the care of a team of health care providers made many participants have reluctance toward transitioning. Concerns in moving away from their pediatricians and feelings of disruption, abandonment, or rejection were mentioned. Participants also expressed confidence in the pediatric team. At the same time they showed interest in the new team and expected to have close relationships with them. They also ask to have previous contacts with the adult health care team before the transition. Their talks suggest that they require slightly more time, not the time measured in days or months, but the time measured by constitutive experiences capable of building an expectation of future. This study examines the way in which the adolescents feel, and help to transform the health care transition model used at a public university. Listening to the adolescents' voices is crucial to a better understanding of their needs. They are those who can help the professionals reaching alternatives for a smooth and successful health care transition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Discussing Future Goals and Legal Aspects of Health Care: Essential Steps in Transitioning Youth to Adult-Oriented Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lynn F; Doyle, Maya; Silver, Ellen J

    2017-09-01

    Discussing realistic future goals with the adolescent alone and with family, and reviewing legal aspects of health care transition (HCT), are essential steps in the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented care. Secondary analysis of datasets from 2 studies related to HCT assessed differences in provider practice for youth with and without special health care needs (SHCNs). Across both datasets, between 57% and 68.6% of providers reported some discussion of future goals with adolescent or with family. However, only 28.6% to 31% of providers reported discussing future goals with youth with SHCNs alone. It was rare for providers to report discussing legal aspects of HCT with any youth. Findings identify a gap in discussing future goals and legal aspects of HCT, as part of routine care for adolescents. Additional research to understand barriers and improve likelihood of these steps within HCT is needed.

  4. Health transition in Africa: practical policy proposals for primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, D; Smeeth, L; Sekajugo, J

    2010-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is undergoing health transition as increased globalization and accompanying urbanization are causing a double burden of communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Rates of communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria in Africa are the highest in the world. The impact of noncommunicable diseases is also increasing. For example, age-standardized mortality from cardiovascular disease may be up to three times higher in some African than in some European coun...

  5. Incorporating the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition Into a Medicaid Managed Care Plan: Lessons Learned From a Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Margaret; White, Patience; Pirtle, Robin; Hancock, Catina; Ablan, Michael; Corona-Parra, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This pediatric-to-adult health care transition pilot project describes the process and results of incorporating the "Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition (2.0)" into a Medicaid managed care plan with a group of 35 18-23 year olds who have chronic mental health, developmental, and complex medical conditions. The pilot project demonstrated an effective approach for customizing and delivering recommended transition services. At the start of the 18-month project, the Medicaid plan was at the basic level (1) of transition implementation of the Six Core Elements with no transition policy, member transition readiness assessment results, health care transition plans of care, updated medical summaries, transfer package for the adult-focused provider, and assurance of transfer completion and consumer feedback. At the conclusion of the pilot project, the plan scored at level 3 on each core element. The primary reason for not scoring at the highest level (4) was because the transition elements have not been incorporated into services for all enrollees within the plan. Future efforts in managed care will benefit from starting the transition process much earlier (ages 12-14), expanding the role of nurse care managers and participating pediatric and adult-focused clinicians in transition, and offering payment incentives to clinicians to implement the Six Core Elements of Health Care Transition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Does the liaison Nurse have an Effective Role in Transitional Care Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Rezapour

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nurses play a pivotal role in the care of chronic patients. In consequence, innovations relating to the nursing practiceas a liaison nurse and care for chronic patients are being implemented in many countries to produce new forms ofhealth care model. These innovations often aim to break care gap and deliver long term after care for chronicpatients. Long term after care means a shift of care givers responsibilities and tasks from hospital to patients homethat qualitatively good care is provided by the most appropriate health care provider at the lowest cost level.Implementing transitional care model show that it is indeed possible to decrease rates of re-hospitalization alsoduration of hospitalization of chronic patients. Patients and loved ones are better able to manage their careindependently and their quality of life will be promoted.Improved coordination of care leads to better communication and improved satisfaction ratings between patients andhealthcare providers. Also improve quality of care and decrease health care costs.In this paper author try to introduces a new model of nursing care, especially in patients with chronic diseases thatwill full care gap between hospital and home. Also the author suggests the positive and effective role of the liaisonnurse in promote of quality of life of the patients with chronic diseases in this new model of care.

  7. Transition of care for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus from pediatric to adult health care systems

    OpenAIRE

    Buschur, Elizabeth O.; Glick, Bethany; Kamboj, Manmohan K.

    2017-01-01

    Planning for the transition from pediatric to adult healthcare is broadly understood to be beneficial to the quality of care of patients with chronic illness. Due to the level of self-care that is necessary in the maintenance of most chronic diseases, it is important that pediatric settings can offer support during a time when adolescents are beginning to take more responsibility in all areas of their lives. Lack of supportive resources for adolescents with chronic conditions often results in...

  8. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  9. Innovative interprofessional geriatric education for medical and nursing students: focus on transitions in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, S A; Rose, K; Thomas, S; Owen, J; Brashers, V

    2015-06-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is crucial in fostering effective collaboration and optimal team-based patient care, all of which improve patient care and outcomes. Appropriate interprofessional communication is especially important in geriatrics where patients are vulnerable to adverse effects across the care continuum. Transitions in geriatric care are complex, involving several disciplines and requiring careful coordination. As part of the University of Virginia's initiative on IPE, we developed and implemented an interprofessional geriatric education workshop for nursing and medical students with a focus on transitions in care. A total of 254 students (144 medical students, 107 nursing students and 3 unknown) participated in a 90-min interactive, case-based workshop. Nursing and medical faculty facilitated the monthly workshops with small groups of medical and nursing students over 1 year. Self-perceived competencies in IPE skills and attitudes toward interprofessional teamwork were measured through post-workshop surveys. Data were analyzed using descriptive and nonparametric statistics, excluding the three unknown students. Over 90% of students were better able to describe the necessary interprofessional communication needed to develop a patient-centered care plan in transitioning patients between clinical sites. Four out of five students reported an enhanced appreciation of interprofessional teamwork. They were also able to identify legal, financial and social implications in transitions of care (75%). Nursing students consistently rated the workshop more highly than medical students across most domains (P interprofessional communication and teamwork skills required in transitions of geriatric care. Introducing these concepts in medical and nursing training may help in fostering effective interprofessional communication and collaboration. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved

  10. Engaging patients and families in communication across transitions of care: an integrative review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknall, Tracey K; Hutchinson, Alison M; Botti, Mari; McTier, Lauren; Rawson, Helen; Hewitt, Nicky A; McMurray, Anne; Marshall, Andrea P; Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    To describe an integrative review protocol to analyse and synthesize peer-reviewed research evidence in relation to engagement of patients and their families in communication during transitions of care to, in and from acute care settings. Communication at transitions of care in acute care settings can be complex and challenging, with important information about patients not always clearly transferred between responsible healthcare providers. Involving patients and their families in communication during transitions of care may improve the transfer of clinical information and patient outcomes and prevent adverse events during hospitalization and following discharge. Recently, optimizing patient and family participation during care transitions has been acknowledged as central to the implementation of patient-centred care. Integrative review with potential for meta-analysis and application of framework synthesis. The review will evaluate and synthesize qualitative and quantitative research evidence identified through a systematic search. Primary studies will be selected according to inclusion criteria. Data collection, quality appraisal and analysis of the evidence will be conducted by at least two authors. Nine electronic databases (including CINAHL and Medline) will be searched. The search will be restricted to 10 years up to December 2013. Data analysis will include content and thematic analysis. The review will seek to identify all types of patient engagement activities employed during transitions of care communication. The review will identify enablers for and barriers to engagement for patients, families and health professionals. Key strategies and tools for improving patient engagement, clinical communication and promoting patient-centred care will be recommended based on findings. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Voices not heard: a systematic review of adolescents' and emerging adults' perspectives of health care transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Cecily L; Lobo, Marie L; Nehring, Wendy M; Bui, Kim

    2013-01-01

    A better understanding of the needs of adolescents and emerging adults with special health care needs (AEA-SHCNs) is essential to provide health care transition services that represent best practices. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the research on health care transition for AEA-SHCNs from their perspectives. A comprehensive literature review of research publications since 2005 was performed using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and EBSCO databases. Thirty-five studies met the final review criteria. The process of transition from child to adult for AEA-SHCNs is complex. Individuals experiencing the transition desire to be a part of the process and want providers who will listen and be sensitive to their needs, which are often different from others receiving health care at the same facility. More research that considers the voice of the AEA-SHCNs related to transition from pediatric to adult care is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Care ‘going market’: Finnish elderly-care policies in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Anttonen

    2011-06-01

    -ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The article evaluates marketization and its effects on elderly-care policies in Finland, where the welfare state has been the most important mechanism in mitigating failures caused by the functioning of market. In addition, since the 1960s the public sector has been regarded as the guarantee for citizens' social rights and the common good. Therefore, marketization, denoting to market logics intervened with social-care practices that construct care as a commodity and the individual in need of care as a consumer, is a critical juncture for an evaluation of the underlying pattern change. To evaluate the change this article employs a framework of institutional policy analysis. By focusing on institutional framing of care policies, institutionalized responsibilities, policy discourses, and policy outcomes and by using textual and statistical data, this article aims to reach a detailed but comprehensive picture on marketization and its influence in the Finnish social-care regime. All institutional aspects analysed in the study show a clear transition from universal social policies based on public responsibility to market-friendly policies and the marketization of social care. However, they also imply that marketization is regulated by public authorities. On the basis of these results, we argue that Finnish elderly-care policies is going through a profound change, in magnitude similar to what occurred 30-40 years ago when the politics of universalism was breaking through. The new direction points to the market and a deep-going reform of social-care service provision is taking place, and the earlier state-centred welfare production mode is at least partly withering away. In this respect the pattern of social-care service

  13. 77 FR 14364 - Comment Sought on Funding Pilot Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care Pilot Program in Funding Year 2012 AGENCY..., the Wireline Competition Bureau seeks comment on whether to fund Rural Health Care Pilot Program... transition them into the permanent Rural Health Care support mechanism (RHC support mechanism). DATES...

  14. Experiences of health care transition voiced by young adults with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvey KC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Katharine C Garvey,1,5 Margaret G Beste,2 Donna Luff,3,5 Astrid Atakov-Castillo,2 Howard A Wolpert,2,5 Marilyn D Ritholz4–61Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Adult Section, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA; 3Institute for Professionalism and Ethical Practice, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 4Behavioral and Mental Health Unit, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA; 5Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 6Department of Psychiatry, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAObjective: This qualitative study aimed to explore the experience of transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care reported by posttransition emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D, with a focus on preparation for the actual transfer in care.Methods: Twenty-six T1D emerging adults (mean age 26.2±2.5 years receiving adult diabetes care at a single center participated in five focus groups stratified by two levels of current glycemic control. A multidisciplinary team coded transcripts and conducted thematic analysis.Results: Four key themes on the process of transfer to adult care emerged from a thematic analysis: 1 nonpurposeful transition (patients reported a lack of transition preparation by pediatric providers for the transfer to adult diabetes care; 2 vulnerability in the college years (patients conveyed periods of loss to follow-up during college and described health risks and diabetes management challenges specific to the college years that were inadequately addressed by pediatric or adult providers; 3 unexpected differences between pediatric and adult health care systems (patients were surprised by the different feel of adult diabetes care, especially with regards to an increased focus on diabetes complications; and 4 patients’ wish list for improving the transition process (patients recommended enhanced pediatric transition counseling, implementation of adult clinic orientation programs, and peer

  15. Percent Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Percent Coverage is a spreadsheet that keeps track of and compares the number of vessels that have departed with and without observers to the numbers of vessels...

  16. Transforming nursing home-based day care for people with dementia into socially integrated community day care: process analysis of the transition of six day care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haeften-van Dijk, A M; Meiland, F J M; van Mierlo, L D; Dröes, R M

    2015-08-01

    The community-based Meeting Centres Support Programme for people with dementia and their carers has been proven more effective in influencing behaviour and mood problems of people with dementia and improving sense of competence of carers compared to nursing home-based day care centres for people with dementia. Six Dutch nursing home-based day care centres were transformed into Community-based day care centres with carer support, according to this Meeting Centres model. To determine which factors facilitate or impede the transition to Community-based day care. A process evaluation was conducted with a qualitative study design. Six nursing home-based day care centres transformed into Community-based day care centres for people with dementia and their carers. Stakeholders (n=40) that were involved during the transition. Factors that facilitated or impeded the transition were traced by means of (audiotaped and transcribed) interviews with stakeholders and document analysis. All data were coded by two independent researchers and analyzed using thematic analysis based on the Theoretical framework of adaptive implementation. Six nursing home-based day care centres successfully made the transition to Community-based day care with carer support. Success factors for the start of the project were: the innovation being in line with the current trend towards more outpatient care and having motivated pioneers responsible for the execution of the transition. Barriers were difficulties reaching/recruiting the target group (people with dementia and carers), inflexible staff and little or no experience with collaboration with community-based care and welfare organizations. Facilitating factors during the implementation phase were: finding a suitable location in the community, positive changes in staff attitude and adoption of the new vision, and good cooperation with care and welfare organizations. Barriers were insufficient involvement of, and support from the managers of the

  17. 42 CFR 488.3 - Conditions of participation; conditions for coverage; and long-term care requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... coverage under the Medicare program, a prospective provider or supplier must: (1) Meet the applicable statutory definition in section 1138(b), 1819, 1832(a)(2)(F), 1861, 1881, or 1919 of the Act; and (2) Be in... and safety requirements for providers and suppliers in that State, which are higher than those...

  18. Assessing Private Sector Involvement in Health Care and Universal Health Coverage in Light of the Right to Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wolf, Antenor Hallo; Toebes, Brigit

    2016-01-01

    The goal of universal health coverage is to "ensure that all people obtain the health services they need without suffering financial hardship when paying for them." There are many connections between this goal and the state's legal obligation to realize the human right to health. In the context of

  19. Self-care and anticipated transition into retirement and later life in a Nordic welfare context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Olle Söderhamn1–3, Anne Skisland1,2, Margaretha Herrman31Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad and Kristiansand, Norway; 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Grimstad, Norway; 3Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, SwedenAbstract: Few studies have appeared in the health care literature on the meaning of transition into retirement and later life. However, this predictable-involuntary transition may influence personal health and well-being, and studying it from a self-care perspective could be useful. The aim of this study was to illuminate aspects of self-care in a group of middle-aged individuals in relation to their anticipated transition into retirement in the Nordic welfare context. A total of 13 individuals, aged 55 to 65 years, were randomly chosen from the total number of inhabitants in three municipalities in mid-west Sweden. Conversational interviews took place, during which the informants shared important events in their lives that had occurred from early childhood until the present time, together with thoughts about their anticipated future developmental transition into later life. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. After content analyses and interpretation, a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon was revealed. The results showed that there were opportunities, expectations, wishes, concerns, and worries related to the transition into retirement and old age among informants from both rural and urban municipalities. Self-care, in connection with this, depended on motivating and demotivating factors. Autonomy and mature dependence seemed to be positive driving forces for reaching a successful transition into later life. Supporting autonomy should be a way of facilitating the transition into retirement and later life.Keywords: aging, autonomy, motivation, older people, successful aging

  20. Epilepsy: Transition from pediatric to adult care. Recommendations of the Ontario epilepsy implementation task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Danielle M; Bassett, Anne S; Bercovici, Eduard; Borlot, Felippe; Bui, Esther; Camfield, Peter; Clozza, Guida Quaglia; Cohen, Eyal; Gofine, Timothy; Graves, Lisa; Greenaway, Jon; Guttman, Beverly; Guttman-Slater, Maya; Hassan, Ayman; Henze, Megan; Kaufman, Miriam; Lawless, Bernard; Lee, Hannah; Lindzon, Lezlee; Lomax, Lysa Boissé; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Menna-Dack, Dolly; Minassian, Berge A; Mulligan, Janice; Nabbout, Rima; Nejm, Tracy; Secco, Mary; Sellers, Laurene; Shapiro, Michelle; Slegr, Marie; Smith, Rosie; Szatmari, Peter; Tao, Leeping; Vogt, Anastasia; Whiting, Sharon; Carter Snead, O

    2017-09-01

    The transition from a pediatric to adult health care system is challenging for many youths with epilepsy and their families. Recently, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care of the Province of Ontario, Canada, created a transition working group (TWG) to develop recommendations for the transition process for patients with epilepsy in the Province of Ontario. Herein we present an executive summary of this work. The TWG was composed of a multidisciplinary group of pediatric and adult epileptologists, psychiatrists, and family doctors from academia and from the community; neurologists from the community; nurses and social workers from pediatric and adult epilepsy programs; adolescent medicine physician specialists; a team of physicians, nurses, and social workers dedicated to patients with complex care needs; a lawyer; an occupational therapist; representatives from community epilepsy agencies; patients with epilepsy; parents of patients with epilepsy and severe intellectual disability; and project managers. Three main areas were addressed: (1) Diagnosis and Management of Seizures; 2) Mental Health and Psychosocial Needs; and 3) Financial, Community, and Legal Supports. Although there are no systematic studies on the outcomes of transition programs, the impressions of the TWG are as follows. Teenagers at risk of poor transition should be identified early. The care coordination between pediatric and adult neurologists and other specialists should begin before the actual transfer. The transition period is the ideal time to rethink the diagnosis and repeat diagnostic testing where indicated (particularly genetic testing, which now can uncover more etiologies than when patients were initially evaluated many years ago). Some screening tests should be repeated after the move to the adult system. The seven steps proposed herein may facilitate transition, thereby promoting uninterrupted and adequate care for youth with epilepsy leaving the pediatric system. Wiley

  1. Pax Iliev: law, life and care in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, T

    2000-01-01

    The presentation proceeds from a clinical case of domestic violence, its management in terms of professional roles and institutional involvement and the analysis of the dynamic mental processes. It is argued that regimes of total control abolish legal systems and leave a void behind. In the course of transition to civil society, rule by intimidation and threat at a local community level is the rule. Suffering and trauma are intense and health systems necessarily become involved. A pattern of decontextualizing depression may be common and revealing of institutional defence mechanisms at work. Continuous affirmation of procedures of good practice, e.g. supervision, gives a chance for the preservation of institutional sanity and professional ethics.

  2. Transitioning adolescents with sickle cell disease to adult-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, E S; Dorn, L

    1999-01-01

    Efforts have been made to formalize transitioning of adolescents with chronic health conditions such as sickle cell disease (SCD), from child-centered care (CCC) to adult-centered care (ACC). A dearth of literature exists that examines the transition of adolescents with SCD or offers guidance for transitioning. This study sought to explore concerns, expectations, and needs regarding the transition from CCC to ACC and to generate a framework for transitioning. Separate focus groups were conducted with adolescents (n = 22), their parents (n = 22), and practitioners (n = 8). Focus group interviews revealed that concerns, expectations, and needs for adolescents and their parents were parallel. Adolescents and their parents had concerns about: (a) leaving a familiar setting and physician whom they trusted, (b) going to an adult provider who may or may not be familiar with managing sickle cell disease, and (c) establishing new family roles. Practitioners affirm the need for transitioning that prepares the adolescents and their families for ACC. Findings led to a draft framework for transitioning that which will be tested at a later date. The framework is based on an ecological perspective that includes physiologic, developmental and psychosocial, and educational/vocational components.

  3. Child maltreatment and the transition to adult-based medical and mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Cindy W; Schwarz, Donald F

    2011-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a public health problem with lifelong health consequences for survivors. Each year, >29 000 adolescents leave foster care via emancipation without achieving family permanency. The previous 30 years of research has revealed the significant physical and mental health consequences of child maltreatment, yet health and well-being have not been a priority for the child welfare system. To describe the health outcomes of maltreated children and those in foster care and barriers to transitioning these adolescents to adult systems of care. We reviewed the literature about pediatric and adult health outcomes for maltreated children, barriers to transition, and recent efforts to improve health and well-being for this population. The health of child and adult survivors of child maltreatment is poor. Both physical and mental health problems are significant, and many maltreated children have special health care needs. Barriers to care include medical, child welfare, and social issues. Although children often have complex medical problems, they infrequently have a medical home, their complex health care needs are poorly understood by the child welfare system that is responsible for them, and they lack the family supports that most young adults require for success. Recent federal legislation requires states and local child welfare agencies to assess and improve health and well-being for foster children. Few successful transition data are available for maltreated children and those in foster care, but opportunities for improvement have been highlighted by recent federal legislation.

  4. A pilot randomized control trial: testing a transitional care model for acute psychiatric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Nancy P; Solomon, Phyllis; Hurford, Matthew O

    2014-01-01

    People with multiple and persistent mental and physical health problems have high rates of transition failures when transferring from a hospital level of care to home. The transitional care model (TCM) is evidence-based and demonstrated to improve posthospital outcomes for elderly with physical health conditions, but it has not been studied in the population with serious mental illness. Using a randomized controlled design, 40 inpatients from two general hospital psychiatric units were recruited and randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 20) that received the TCM intervention that was delivered by a psychiatric nurse practitioner for 90 days posthospitalization, or a control group (n = 20) that received usual care. Outcomes were as follows: service utilization, health-related quality of life, and continuity of care. The intervention group showed higher medical and psychiatric rehospitalization than the control group (p = .054). Emergency room use was lower for intervention group but not statistically significant. Continuity of care with primary care appointments were significantly higher for the intervention group (p = .023). The intervention group's general health improved but was not statistically significant compared with controls. A transitional care intervention is recommended; however, the model needs to be modified from a single nurse to a multidisciplinary team with expertise from a psychiatric nurse practitioner, a social worker, and a peer support specialist. A team approach can best manage the complex physical/mental health conditions and complicated social needs of the population with serious mental illness. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Barriers and facilitators to successful transition from pediatric to adult inflammatory bowel disease care from the perspectives of providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Christine W; Stollon, Natalie B; Lucas, Matthew S; Brumley, Lauren D; Poole, Erika S; Peyton, Tamara; Grant, Anne W; Jan, Sophia; Trachtenberg, Symme; Zander, Miriam; Mamula, Petar; Bonafide, Christopher P; Schwartz, Lisa A

    2014-11-01

    For adolescents and young adults (AYA) with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the transition from pediatric to adult care is often challenging and associated with gaps in care. Our study objectives were to (1) identify outcomes for evaluating transition success and (2) elicit the major barriers and facilitators of successful transition. We interviewed pediatric and adult IBD providers from across the United States with experience caring for AYAs with IBD until thematic saturation was reached after 12 interviews. We elicited the participants' backgrounds, examples of successful and unsuccessful transition of AYAs for whom they cared, and recommendations for improving transition using the Social-Ecological Model of Adolescent and Young Adult Readiness to Transition framework. We coded interview transcripts using the constant comparative method and identified major themes. Participants reported evaluating transition success and failure using health care utilization outcomes (e.g., maintaining continuity with adult providers), health outcomes (e.g., stable symptoms), and quality of life outcomes (e.g., attending school). The patients' level of developmental maturity (i.e., ownership of care) was the most prominent determinant of transition outcomes. The style of parental involvement (i.e., helicopter parent versus optimally involved parent) and the degree of support by providers (e.g., care coordination) also influenced outcomes. IBD transition success is influenced by a complex interplay of patient developmental maturity, parenting style, and provider support. Multidisciplinary IBD care teams should aim to optimize these factors for each patient to increase the likelihood of a smooth transfer to adult care.

  6. Connect-Home: Transitional Care of Skilled Nursing Facility Patients and their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toles, Mark; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Naylor, Mary D; Asafu-Adjei, Josephine; Hanson, Laura C

    2017-10-01

    Older adults that transfer from skilled nursing facilities (SNF) to home have significant risk for poor outcomes. Transitional care of SNF patients (i.e., time-limited services to ensure coordination and continuity of care) is poorly understood. To determine the feasibility and relevance of the Connect-Home transitional care intervention, and to compare preparedness for discharge between comparison and intervention dyads. A non-randomized, historically controlled design-enrolling dyads of SNF patients and their family caregivers. Three SNFs in the Southeastern United States. Intervention dyads received Connect-Home; comparison dyads received usual discharge planning. Of 173 recruited dyads, 145 transferred to home, and 133 completed surveys within 3 days of discharge. The Connect-Home intervention consisted of tools and training for existing SNF staff to deliver transitional care of patient and caregiver dyads. Feasibility was assessed with a chart review. Relevance was assessed with a survey of staff experiences using the intervention. Preparedness for discharge, the primary outcome, was assessed with Care-Transitions Measure-15 (CTM-15). The intervention was feasible and relevant to SNF staff (i.e., 96.9% of staff recommended intervention use in the future). Intervention dyads, compared to comparison dyads, were more prepared for discharge (CTM-15 score 74.7 vs 65.3, mean ratio 1.16, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.24). Connect-Home is a promising transitional care intervention for older patients discharged from SNF care. The next step will be to test the intervention using a cluster randomized trial, with patient outcomes including re-hospitalization. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Implementing a Pharmacist-Led Medication Management Pilot to Improve Care Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Root

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this project was to design and pilot a pharmacist-led process to address medication management across the continuum of care within a large integrated health-system. Summary: A care transitions pilot took place within a health-system which included a 150-bed community hospital. The pilot process expanded the pharmacist's medication management responsibilities to include providing discharge medication reconciliation, a patient-friendly discharge medication list, discharge medication education, and medication therapy management (MTM follow-up. Adult patients with a predicted diagnosis-related group (DRG of congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical-surgical and intensive care units who utilized a primary care provider within the health-system were included in the pilot. Forty patients met the inclusion criteria and thirty-four (85% received an intervention from an inpatient or MTM pharmacist. Within this group of patients, 88 drug therapy problems (2.6 per patient were identified and 75% of the drug therapy recommendations made by the pharmacist were accepted by the care provider. The 30-day all-cause readmission rates for the intervention and comparison groups were 30.5% and 35.9%, respectively. The number of patients receiving follow-up care varied with 10 (25% receiving MTM follow-up, 26 (65% completing a primary care visit after their first hospital discharge, and 23 (58% receiving a home care visit. Conclusion: Implementation of a pharmacist-led medication management pilot across the continuum of care resulted in an improvement in the quality of care transitions within the health-system through increased identification and resolution of drug therapy problems and MTM follow-up. The lessons learned from the implementation of this pilot will be used to further refine pharmacy care transitions programs across the health-system.   Type: Original Research

  8. Implementing a Pharmacist-Led Medication Management Pilot to Improve Care Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Root, PharmD, MS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this project was to design and pilot a pharmacist-led process to address medication management across the continuum of care within a large integrated health-system.Summary: A care transitions pilot took place within a health-system which included a 150-bed community hospital. The pilot process expanded the pharmacist’s medication management responsibilities to include providing discharge medication reconciliation, a patient-friendly discharge medication list, discharge medication education, and medication therapy management (MTM follow-up.Adult patients with a predicted diagnosis-related group (DRG of congestive heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical-surgical and intensive care units who utilized a primary care provider within the health-system were included in the pilot. Forty patients met the inclusion criteria and thirty-four (85% received an intervention from an inpatient or MTM pharmacist. Within this group of patients, 88 drug therapy problems (2.6 per patient were identified and 75% of the drug therapy recommendations made by the pharmacist were accepted by the care provider. The 30-day all-cause readmission rates for the intervention and comparison groups were 30.5% and 35.9%, respectively. The number of patients receiving follow-up care varied with 10 (25% receiving MTM follow-up, 26 (65% completing a primary care visit after their first hospital discharge, and 23 (58% receiving a home care visit.Conclusion: Implementation of a pharmacist-led medication management pilot across the continuum of care resulted in an improvement in the quality of care transitions within the health-system through increased identification and resolution of drug therapy problems and MTM follow-up. The lessons learned from the implementation of this pilot will be used to further refine pharmacy care transitions programs across the health-system.

  9. Making the transition to restraint-free care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, J A; Goldman, B D; Papougenis, D; Torell, C A

    1991-02-01

    When implementing a change to restraint-free care, education and communication at all levels of the organization are powerful strategies to overcome resistance. Within each facility, there are at least six identifiable groups, with attitudes based on their educational background, life experiences and perceptions that are targets for change. An anonymous attitudinal survey and sensitivity session serve as effective "unfreezing" tools for all levels of staff to express concerns regarding physical restraints and to recognize the need for change. Change requires a slow, methodical system where specific alternatives are gradually introduced. Success with the easier cases encourages staff to continue efforts with more challenging cases.

  10. Perspectives of Post-Acute Transition of Care for Cardiac Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Stoicea

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-acute care (PAC facilities improve patient recovery, as measured by activities of daily living, rehabilitation, hospital readmission, and survival rates. Seamless transitions between discharge and PAC settings continue to be challenges that hamper patient outcomes, specifically problems with effective communication and coordination between hospitals and PAC facilities at patient discharge, patient adherence and access to cardiac rehabilitation (CR services, caregiver burden, and the financial impact of care. The objective of this review is to examine existing models of cardiac transitional care, identify major challenges and social factors that affect PAC, and analyze the impact of current transitional care efforts and strategies implemented to improve health outcomes in this patient population. We intend to discuss successful methods to address the following aspects: hospital-PAC linkages, improved discharge planning, caregiver burden, and CR access and utilization through patient-centered programs. Regular home visits by healthcare providers result in decreased hospital readmission rates for patients utilizing home healthcare while improved hospital-PAC linkages reduced hospital readmissions by 25%. We conclude that widespread adoption of improvements in transitional care will play a key role in patient recovery and decrease hospital readmission, morbidity, and mortality.

  11. Outcome Evidence for Structured Pediatric to Adult Health Care Transition Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Phabinly; McManus, Margaret; Rogers, Katherine; White, Patience

    2017-09-01

    To identify statistically significant positive outcomes in pediatric-to-adult transition studies using the triple aim framework of population health, consumer experience, and utilization and costs of care. Studies published between January 1995 and April 2016 were identified using the CINAHL, Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases. Included studies evaluated pre-evaluation and postevaluation data, intervention and comparison groups, and randomized clinic trials. The methodological strength of each study was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool. Out of a total of 3844 articles, 43 met our inclusion criteria. Statistically significant positive outcomes were found in 28 studies, most often related to population health (20 studies), followed by consumer experience (8 studies), and service utilization (9 studies). Among studies with moderate to strong quality assessment ratings, the most common positive outcomes were adherence to care and utilization of ambulatory care in adult settings. Structured transition interventions often resulted in positive outcomes. Future evaluations should consider aligning with professional transition guidance; incorporating detailed intervention descriptions about transition planning, transfer, and integration into adult care; and measuring the triple aims of population health, experience, and costs of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients in transition--improving hospital-home care collaboration through electronic messaging: providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Line; Brattheim, Berit J; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2015-12-01

    To explore how the use of electronic messages support hospital and community care nurses' collaboration and communication concerning patients' admittance to and discharges from hospitals. Nurses in hospitals and in community care play a crucial role in the transfer of patients between the home and the hospital. Several studies have shown that transition situations are challenging due to a lack of communication and information exchange. Information and communication technologies may support nurses' work in these transition situations. An electronic message system was introduced in Norway to support patient transitions across the health care sector. A descriptive, qualitative interview study was conducted. One hospital and three adjacent communities were included in the study. We conducted semi-structured interviews with hospital nurses and community care nurses. In total, 41 persons were included in the study. The analysis stemmed from three main topics related to the aims of e-messaging: efficiency, quality and safety. These were further divided into sub-themes. All informants agreed that electronic messaging is more efficient, i.e. less time-consuming than previous means of communication. The shift from predominantly oral communication to writing electronic messages has brought attention to the content of the information exchanged, thereby leading to more conscious communication. Electronic messaging enables improved information security, thereby enhancing patient safety, but this depends on nurses using the system as intended. Nurses consider electronic messaging to be a useful tool for communication and collaboration in patient transitions. Patient transitions are demanding situations both for patients and for the nurses who facilitate the transitions. The introduction of information and communication technologies can support nurses' work in the transition situations, and this is likely to benefit the patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Improving Care Transitions Management: Examining the Role of Accountable Care Organization Participation and Expanded Electronic Health Record Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Thomas P; Shortell, Stephen M; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2017-08-01

    Examine the extent to which physician organization participation in an accountable care organization (ACO) and electronic health record (EHR) functionality are associated with greater adoption of care transition management (CTM) processes. A total of 1,398 physician organizations from the third National Study of Physician Organization survey (NSPO3), a nationally representative sample of medical practices in the United States (January 2012-May 2013). We used data from the third National Study of Physician Organization survey (NSPO3) to assess medical practice characteristics, including CTM processes, ACO participation, EHR functionality, practice type, organization size, ownership, public reporting, and pay-for-performance participation. Multivariate linear regression models estimated the extent to which ACO participation and EHR functionality were associated with greater CTM capabilities, controlling for practice size, ownership, public reporting, and pay-for-performance participation. Approximately half (52.4 percent) of medical practices had a formal program for managing care transitions in place. In adjusted analyses, ACO participation (p management of care transitions by physician organizations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. Resident and Staff Satisfaction of Pediatric Graduate Medical Education Training on Transition to Adult Care of Medically Complex Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Matthew; Cole, Brandon; Flake, Eric; Roy, Daniel

    2018-04-11

    This study aims to describe the quantity and satisfaction current residents and experienced pediatricians have with graduate medical education on transitioning medically complex patients to adult care. There is an increasing need for transitioning medically complex adolescents to adult care. Over 90% now live into adulthood and require transition to adult healthcare providers. The 2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs found that only 40% of youth 12-17 yr receive the necessary services to appropriately transition to adult care. Prospective, descriptive, anonymous, web-based survey of pediatric residents and staff pediatricians at Army pediatric residency training programs was sent in March 2017. Questions focused on assessing knowledge of transition of care, satisfaction with transition training, and amount of education on transition received during graduate medical education training. Of the 145 responders (310 potential responders, 47% response rate), transition was deemed important with a score of 4.3 out of 5. The comfort level with transition was rated 2.6/5 with only 4.2% of participants receiving formal education during residency. The most commonly perceived barriers to implementing a curriculum were time constraints and available resources. Of the five knowledge assessment questions, three had a correct response rate of less than 1/3. The findings show the disparity between the presence of and perceived need for a formal curriculum on transitioning complex pediatric patients to adult care. This study also highlighted the knowledge gap of the transition process for novice and experienced pediatricians alike.

  15. Patients in transition - improving hospital-home care collaboration through electronic messaging: Providers’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Melby, L.; Brattheim, B.J.; Hellesø, R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To explore how the use of electronic messages support hospital and community care nurses’ collaboration and communication concerning patients’ admittance to and discharges from hospitals. Background: Nurses in hospitals and in community care play a crucial role in the transfer of patients between the home and the hospital. Several studies have shown that transition situations are challenging due to a lack of communication and information exchange. Information and commu...

  16. [The mobile emergency and intensive care service, a place of transition for families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioni, Violaine; Micaëlli, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    When the mobile emergency and intensive care service (Smur) intervenes with a child, the parents are in a completely unknown and anxiety-generating situation. The care team helps families to find their place, depending on the medical context and health status of the child. The intervention of the Smur therefore represents a place of transition for the parents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [From paediatric urological care to adult urology. Assessment of a transition consultation for adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, L; Mouttalib, S; Moscovici, J; Soulie, M; Rischmann, P; Game, X; Galinier, P; Bouali, O

    2017-10-01

    To provide an adequate lifelong urological care in the complex period of adolescence, a transition consultation conducted by a paediatric surgeon and an urologist was developed in our institution. As a real rite of passage, it allows the follow-up and the adapted care of urological conditions, sometimes complex, and permits the transition between childhood and the world of grown-ups. We reported our experience at the Children Hospital of our institution (paediatric surgery and urology departments). During a 6 months period (January-July 2015), forty-five young adults with a mean age of 17.8±3.6 years were seen in transition consultation. Eight patients had neurogenic voiding disorders (4 spina bifida, 1 multiple sclerosis, 1 mitochondrial encephalopathy, 1 metachromic leucodystrophy, 1 paraplegia), 9 patients had idiopathic voiding disorders, 1 patient had a non obstructive malformative uropathy; and 30 patients had surgery during infancy and childhood: hypospadias in 17 young men and malformative uropathy in 13 patients. This consultation occurred within 4.6±4.5 years after the last consultation with paediatric surgeon. For 6 patients, the transition consultation was the first for the urological problem. After this consultation, 8 patients stayed in paediatric surgery and 37 patients were referred to adult urologist. Among those 8 patients: 2 patients had cognitive and psychiatric disorders; 4 patients refused to be transferred to adult unit; 2 patients wanted to come back at transition consultation. Among the 37 patients transferred in adult urological care: 6 patients had urological surgery, and one patient was referred to a sexology consultation. The remaining 30 patients have initiated long-term monitoring. All reconvened patients came back at the follow-up visit (at least 12 months follow-up). A 16-year-old patient (spina bifida with polymalformative syndrome) developed a depressive syndrome at the end of the consultation, in the motive of an awareness of

  18. Canadian rural-urban differences in end-of-life care setting transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna M; Thomas, Roger; Kovacs Burns, Katharina Kathy; Hewitt, Jessica A; Osei-Waree, Jane; Robertson, Sandra

    2012-06-25

    Few studies have focused on the care setting transitions that occur in the last year of life. People living in rural areas may have more difficult care setting transitions and also more moves in the last year of life as health changes occur. A mixed-methods study was conducted to gain an understanding of the number and implications or impact of care setting transitions in the last year of life for rural Canadians. Rural Albertans had significantly more healthcare setting transitions than urbanites in the last year of life (M=4.2 vs 3.3). Online family respondents reported 8 moves on average occurred in the last year of life. These moves were most often identified (65%) on a likert-type scale as "very difficult," with the free text information revealing these trips were often emotionally painful for themselves and physically painful for the decedent. Eleven informants were then interviewed until data saturation, with constant-comparative data analysis conducted. Moving from place to place for needed care in the last year of life was identified as common and concerning for rural people and their families, with three data themes developing: (a) needed care in the last year of life is scattered across many places, (b) traveling is very difficult for terminally-ill persons and their caregivers, and (c) local rural services are minimal. These findings indicate planning is needed to avoid unnecessary end-of-life care setting transitions and to make needed moves for essential services in the last year of life less costly, stressful, and socially disruptive for rural people and their families.

  19. Developing a rural transitional care community case management program using clinical nurse specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Black, Denice; Hammond, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    This quality improvement project developed a community nursing case management program to decrease preventable readmissions to the hospital and emergency department by providing telephonic case management and, if needed, onsite assessment and treatment by a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with prescriptive authority. As more people reach Medicare age, the number of individuals with worsening chronic diseases with dramatically increases unless appropriate disease management programs are developed. Care transitions can result in breakdown in continuity of care, resulting in increased preventable readmissions, particularly for indigent patients. The CNS is uniquely educated to managing care transitions and coordination of community resources to prevent readmissions. After a thorough SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, we developed and implemented a cost-avoidance model to prevent readmissions in our uninsured and underinsured patients. The project CNS used a wide array of interventions to decrease readmissions. In the last 2 years, there have been a total of 22 less than 30-day readmissions to the emergency department or hospital in 13 patients, a significant decrease from readmissions in these patients prior to the program. Three of them required transfer to a larger hospital for a higher level of care. Using advanced practice nurses in transitional care can prevent readmissions, resulting in cost avoidance. The coordination of community resources during transition from hospital to home is a job best suited to CNSs, because they are educated to work within organizations/systems. The money we saved with this project more than justified the cost of hiring a CNS to lead it. More research is needed into this technology. Guidelines for this intervention need to be developed. Replicating our cost-avoidance transitional care model can help other facilities limit that loss.

  20. A double whammy! New baccalaureate registered nurses' transitions into rural acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jean; Vandall-Walker, Virginia

    2017-12-01

    Transitioning into the Canadian rural acute care environment can be challenging for new RNs, and so retention is of concern. Currently, few seasoned registered nurses (RNs) are available to support new RNs during transition because (a) the Canadian RN workforce countrywide is aging and significant numbers are retiring, and (b) the number of Canadian RNs working rurally has plummeted in the past 10 years. Investigations into the phenomenon of new RNs\\' transitions into the workforce have been conducted, but little is known about this phenomenon as it relates to Canadian rural acute care hospitals. Most findings have been based on data from urban or mixed rural–urban samples. An interpretive description research approach was used to understand new RNs\\' transition experiences into the Alberta, Canada, rural acute care environment including supports and challenges specific to recruitment and retention. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 12 new RNs who had been employed in one or more Alberta rural acute care hospitals from 1 month to less than 2 years. In this study, participants experienced a double whammy consisting of learning I\\'m a generalist! and managing the responsibility of I\\'m it! Participants experienced contradictory emotions of exhilaration and shock that set them on an emotional roller coaster, a finding that differs from previously reported findings, wherein transition was frequently identified as only shocking. The few participants who were well supported by their colleagues and employersreportedexperiencing minor emotional fluctuations and described transition as exciting, good, and manageable. Thosewho were not experienced major fluctuations from exhilaration to shock. They described transition as exhilarating, but overwhelming, and unsafe. Notably, 9 of the 12 participants changed jobs within their first 2 years of practice. Other significant findings included problems with the outdated definitions of rural

  1. Administration of care to older patients in transition from hospital to home care services: home nursing leaders' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale,1 Sigrun Hvalvik21Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Social Studies, Telemark University College, Porsgrunn, NorwayBackground: Older persons in transition between hospital and home care services are in a particularly vulnerable situation and risk unfortunate consequences caused by organizational inefficiency. The purpose of the study reported here was to elucidate how home nursing leaders experience the administration of care to older people in transition from hospital to their own homes.Methods: A qualitative study design was used. Ten home nursing leaders in two municipalities in southern Norway participated in individual interviews. The interview texts were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by use of a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach.Results: Three main themes and seven subthemes were deduced from the data. The first main theme was that the home nursing leaders felt challenged by the organization of home care services. Two subthemes were identified related to this. The first was that the leaders lacked involvement in the transitional process, and the second was that they were challenged by administration of care being decided at another level in the municipality. The second main theme found was that the leaders felt that they were acting in a shifting and unsettled context. Related to this, they had to adjust internal resources to external demands and expectations, and experienced lack of communication with significant others. The third main theme identified was that the leaders endeavored to deliver care in accordance with professional values. The two related subthemes were, first, that they provided for appropriate internal systems and routines, and, second, that they prioritized available professional competence, and made an effort to promote a professional

  2. Know Your Client and Know Your Team: A Complexity Inspired Approach to Understanding Safe Transitions in Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Tregunno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transitions in care are one of the most important and challenging client safety issues in healthcare. This project was undertaken to gain insight into the practice setting realities for nurses and other health care providers as they manage increasingly complex care transitions across multiple settings. Methods. The Appreciative Inquiry approach was used to guide interviews with sixty-six healthcare providers from a variety of practice settings. Data was collected on participants’ experience of exceptional care transitions and opportunities for improving care transitions. Results. Nurses and other healthcare providers need to know three things to ensure safe care transitions: (1 know your client; (2 know your team on both sides of the transfer; and (3 know the resources your client needs and how to get them. Three themes describe successful care transitions, including flexible structures; independence and teamwork; and client and provider focus. Conclusion. Nurses often operate at the margins of acceptable performance, and flexibility with regulation and standards is often required in complex sociotechnical work like care transitions. Priority needs to be given to creating conditions where nurses and other healthcare providers are free to creatively engage and respond in ways that will optimize safe care transitions.

  3. DOD and VA Health Care: Medication Needs during Transitions May Not Be Managed for All Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Servicemembers Why GAO Did This Study Medication management is critical to effective continuity of care for servicemembers transitioning out of the...Buspirone Hydrochloride  1.4 Divalproex Sodium  1.4 Nortriptyline Hydrochloride  1.2 Lamotrigine  1.1 Risperidone  0.8 Modafinil 0.7

  4. Cultural Mistrust of Mental Health Professionals among Black Males Transitioning from Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lionel D.; McCoy, Henrika; Munson, Michelle R.; Snowden, Lonnie R.; McMillen, J. Curtis

    2011-01-01

    We examined cultural mistrust of mental health professionals among Black males who are transitioning from the foster care system (N = 74) and its relationship to their level of satisfaction with child welfare services and the frequency of negative social contextual experiences. Results of hierarchical regression analysis showed that the level of…

  5. Health Care Transition for Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Stakeholder Engagement for Defining Optimal Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jessica S; Aroian, Karen; Schifano, Elizabeth; Milkes, Amy; Schwindt, Tiani; Gannon, Anthony; Wysocki, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Research on the transition to adult care for young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) emphasizes transition readiness, with less emphasis on transition outcomes. The relatively few studies that focus on outcomes use a wide variety of measures with little reliance on stakeholder engagement for measure selection. This study engaged multiple stakeholders (i.e., young adults with T1D, parents, pediatric and adult health care providers, and experts) in qualitative interviews to identify the content domain for developing a multidimensional measure of health care transition (HCT) outcomes. The following constructs were identified for a planned measure of HCT outcomes: biomedical markers of T1D control; T1D knowledge/skills; navigation of a new health care system; integration of T1D into emerging adult roles; balance of parental involvement with autonomy; and "ownership" of T1D self-management. The results can guide creation of an initial item pool for a multidimensional profile of HCT outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. 75 FR 67751 - Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... Improvement Organizations, Administration on Aging grantees, and other healthcare providers to receive useful... meeting in person or via Webinar are encouraged to register in advance. Special Accommodations... notice. Presentation materials will be posted on the CMS Care Transitions Web site prior to the meeting...

  7. Focus on transitions of care: description and evaluation of an educational intervention for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboumatar, Hanan; Allison, Robert D; Feldman, Leonard; Woods, Kevin; Thomas, Patricia; Wiener, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Transitions of care between physicians and from inpatient to outpatient settings leave patients vulnerable to medical errors and adverse events. A transitions of care workshop consisting of 2 sessions, Sign-Out Success (SOS) and Transition To Home (TTH), taught sign-out and discharge skills to incoming internal medicine interns during orientation. The workshop used role-playing exercises, didactics, demonstrations, and peer and self-evaluations. Interns completed a survey at 3 months post workshop. Using pre-post workshop measures, SOS increased the quality of intern-rated sign-outs (P = .004). Interns reported more confidence in their ability to effectively sign out (P = .016) and a greater understanding of problems that might arise while on call (P = .012). TTH increased intern-reported confidence in their ability to communicate discharge instructions (P institutions. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  8. Preparing childhood cancer survivors for transition to adult care: The young adult perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Natasha N; Bober, Sharon L; Berwick, Lexie; Tower, Mary; Kenney, Lisa B

    2017-10-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) remain at risk for developing treatment-associated health conditions as they age; however, many do not obtain recommended follow-up, putting them at unnecessary risk for morbidity. Educational interventions targeted at providing survivors with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthcare independence might improve adherence and outcomes as they transition care to the adult medical system. To identify informational needs, educational preferences, and support that young adult CCSs perceive as beneficial for transition from pediatric to adult medical care. Sixteen young adult CCSs (ages 22-39 years) who have transitioned to adult care participated in focus groups led by a trained moderator and analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Four major themes emerged: (1) education preferences-pediatric oncology provider as the primary source of information and guidance, enhanced by other formats, and early and ongoing engagement in education; (2) family role in transition-desire for independence and acknowledgement of need for ongoing parental support; (3) expectations for adult providers, such as close relationships, open communication, and care coordination; and (4) knowledge deficits regarding disease/treatment history, risk for long-term complications, and navigation of the adult medical system. Transition education as described by young adult CCSs should be a developmentally appropriate process beginning in early adolescents, primarily administered by pediatric oncology providers, and delivered in multiple formats. While healthcare independence is a goal for young adult CCSs, all stakeholders must recognize that families and providers continue to have an important role supporting survivors with transition logistics and medical decision-making. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Design and implementation of a targeted approach for pharmacist-mediated medication management at care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploenzke, Chris; Kemp, Tessa; Naidl, Todd; Marraffa, Rebecca; Bolduc, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To improve patient care through the development of a clinical risk stratification tool to identify high-risk patients and implementation of pharmacist-mediated medication management after patient care transitions. Minneapolis Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System from December 1, 2014, to April 1, 2015. A composite care transition score was developed based on risk factors obtained from a literature review and combined with a national stratification tool unique to the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care population, the Care Assessment Need (CAN) score. High-risk individuals were identified to receive a comprehensive medication therapy management (MTM) encounter within 7 days of a recent transition of care. Pharmacists identified and resolved medication-related problems and drug discrepancies using an independent scope of practice. Pharmacists with an independent scope of practice, using a novel risk-stratification tool, are able have a positive impact on transitions of care for high-risk patients. High-risk patients engaged in comprehensive medication therapy management appointments performed by primary care clinical pharmacists with an independent scope of practice. Medication-related problems, drug discrepancies, and pharmacist mediated interventions were analyzed after completion of MTM encounters in 31 high-risk patients. Patient characteristics and time demands per encounter were also assessed. A total of 31 patients were seen for MTM encounters. A total of 127 medication-related problems were identified, resulting in an average of 4.1 ± 2.9 (range, 0-14) problems per patient. In addition, 137 drug discrepancies were found during medication reconciliation, with an average of 4.4 ± 2.8 (range, 0-13) discrepancies per patient. Pharmacist-mediated interventions were performed in 84% (n = 26) of patients, totaling 121 interventions with an average of 3.9 ±3.8 (range, 0-13) interventions per patient. Stratification of patients and pharmacist

  10. Representations and coverage of non-English-speaking immigrants and multicultural issues in three major Australian health care publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Pamela W; Dickson, Hugh G; Whelan, Anna Klinken; Whyte, Linda

    2010-01-03

    No recent Australian studies or literature, provide evidence of the extent of coverage of multicultural health issues in Australian healthcare research. A series of systematic literature reviews in three major Australian healthcare journals were undertaken to discover the level, content, coverage and overall quality of research on multicultural health. Australian healthcare journals selected for the study were The Medical Journal of Australia (MJA), The Australian Health Review (AHR), and The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health (ANZPH). Reviews were undertaken of the last twelve (12) years (1996-August 2008) of journal articles using six standard search terms: 'non-English-speaking', 'ethnic', 'migrant', 'immigrant', 'refugee' and 'multicultural'. In total there were 4,146 articles published in these journals over the 12-year period. A total of 90 or 2.2% of the total articles were articles primarily based on multicultural issues. A further 62 articles contained a major or a moderate level of consideration of multicultural issues, and 107 had a minor mention. The quantum and range of multicultural health research and evidence required for equity in policy, services, interventions and implementation is limited and uneven. Most of the original multicultural health research articles focused on newly arrived refugees, asylum seekers, Vietnamese or South East Asian communities. While there is some seminal research in respect of these represented groups, there are other communities and health issues that are essentially invisible or unrepresented in research. The limited coverage and representation of multicultural populations in research studies has implications for evidence-based health and human services policy.

  11. Representations and coverage of non-English-speaking immigrants and multicultural issues in three major Australian health care publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background No recent Australian studies or literature, provide evidence of the extent of coverage of multicultural health issues in Australian healthcare research. A series of systematic literature reviews in three major Australian healthcare journals were undertaken to discover the level, content, coverage and overall quality of research on multicultural health. Australian healthcare journals selected for the study were The Medical Journal of Australia (MJA), The Australian Health Review (AHR), and The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health (ANZPH). Reviews were undertaken of the last twelve (12) years (1996-August 2008) of journal articles using six standard search terms: 'non-English-speaking', 'ethnic', 'migrant', 'immigrant', 'refugee' and 'multicultural'. Results In total there were 4,146 articles published in these journals over the 12-year period. A total of 90 or 2.2% of the total articles were articles primarily based on multicultural issues. A further 62 articles contained a major or a moderate level of consideration of multicultural issues, and 107 had a minor mention. Conclusions The quantum and range of multicultural health research and evidence required for equity in policy, services, interventions and implementation is limited and uneven. Most of the original multicultural health research articles focused on newly arrived refugees, asylum seekers, Vietnamese or South East Asian communities. While there is some seminal research in respect of these represented groups, there are other communities and health issues that are essentially invisible or unrepresented in research. The limited coverage and representation of multicultural populations in research studies has implications for evidence-based health and human services policy. PMID:20044938

  12. Improving interunit transitions of care between emergency physicians and hospital medicine physicians: a conceptual approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Christopher; Cheung, Dickson S; Apker, Julie; Horwitz, Leora I; Howell, Eric E; O'Leary, Kevin J; Patterson, Emily S; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Wears, Robert; Williams, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Patient care transitions across specialties involve more complexity than those within the same specialty, yet the unique social and technical features remain underexplored. Further, little consensus exists among researchers and practitioners about strategies to improve interspecialty communication. This concept article addresses these gaps by focusing on the hand-off process between emergency and hospital medicine physicians. Sensitivity to cultural and operational differences and a common set of expectations pertaining to hand-off content will more effectively prepare the next provider to act safely and efficiently when caring for the patient. Through a consensus decision-making process of experienced and published authorities in health care transitions, including physicians in both specialties as well as in communication studies, the authors propose content and style principles clinicians may use to improve transition communication. With representation from both community and academic settings, similarities and differences between emergency medicine and internal medicine are highlighted to heighten appreciation of the values, attitudes, and goals of each specialty, particularly pertaining to communication. The authors also examine different communication media, social and cultural behaviors, and tools that practitioners use to share patient care information. Quality measures are proposed within the structure, process, and outcome framework for institutions seeking to evaluate and monitor improvement strategies in hand-off performance. Validation studies to determine if these suggested improvements in transition communication will result in improved patient outcomes will be necessary. By exploring the dynamics of transition communication between specialties and suggesting best practices, the authors hope to strengthen hand-off skills and contribute to improved continuity of care. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. The Chinese health care regulatory institutions in an era of transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of Chinese health care regulation in an era of transition. It describes the major health care regulatory institutions operating currently in China and analyzes the underlying factors. The paper argues that in the transition from a planned to a market economy, the Chinese government has been employing a hybrid approach where both old and new institutions have a role in the management of emerging markets, including the health care market. This approach is consistent with the incremental reform strategy adopted by the Party-state. Although a health care regulatory framework has gradually taken shape, the framework is incomplete, with a particular lack of emphasis on professional self-regulation. In addition, its effectiveness is limited despite the existence of many regulatory institutions. In poor rural areas, the effectiveness of the regulatory framework is further undermined or distorted by the extremely difficult financial position that local governments find themselves in. The interpretations of the principle of 'rule of law' by policy makers and officials at different levels and the widespread informal network of relations between known individuals (Guanxi) play an important role in the operation of the regulatory framework. The findings of this paper reveal the complex nature of regulating health care in transitional China.

  14. Policy characteristics facilitating primary health care in Thailand: A pilot study in transitional country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivanichakorn Supattra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to the considerable evidence of inequitable distribution of health, little is known about how health services (particularly primary care services are distributed in less developed countries. Using a version of primary health care system questionnaire, this pilot study in Thailand assessed policies related to the provision of primary care, particularly with regard to attempts to distribute resources equitably, adequacy of resources, comprehensiveness of services, and co-payment requirement. Information on other main attributes of primary health care policy was also ascertained. Methods Questionnaire survey of 5 policymakers, 5 academicians, and 77 primary care practitioners who were attending a workshop on primary care. Descriptive statistics with Fischer's exact test were used for data analysis. Results All policymakers and academicians completed the mailed questionnaire; the response rate among the practitioners was 53.25% (41 out of 77. However, the responses from all three groups were consistent in reporting that (1 financial resources were allocated based on different health needs and special efforts were made to assure primary care services to the needy or underserved population, (2 the supply of essential drugs was adequate, (3 clinical services were distributed equitably, (4 out-of-pocket payment was low, and that some primary health care attributes, particularly longitudinality (patients are seen by same doctor or team each time they make a visit, coordination, and family- and community-orientation were satisfactory. Geographical variations were present, suggesting inequitable distribution of primary care across regions. The questionnaire was robust across key stakeholders and feasible for use in a transitional country. Conclusion A primary care systems questionnaire administered to different types of health professionals was able to show that resource distribution was equitable at a national level but

  15. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faucher J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Joshua Faucher,1 Jordan Rosedahl,2 Dawn Finnie,3 Amy Glasgow,3 Paul Takahashi4 1Mayo Medical School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, 3Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, 4Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Background: Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL. Aims: To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods: A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results: MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16. Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21. Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant

  16. Therapeutic nursing care: transition in sexuality of the elderly caregiving spouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Feio da Maia Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To understand the transitions experienced, and the conditions and expected response patterns to changes in sexuality of the spouse-caregiver of the elderly, during progression of the dementia process. Method: A qualitative research study, conducted at the neurogeriatric clinic between May of 2014 and May of 2015. An intensive, individual interview was administered to 12 elderly caregivers. Thematic content analysis was applied, using the theoretical model of Transition Theory. Results: Seven categories emerged, involving relationship and conjugal sexuality; disease repercussions; care and professional approach; attitudes, beliefs and social imagery of sexuality and care; family relationship and redefining of sexuality. Final considerations: Family development and marital life, the aspects of formation and development of sexuality, the specifics that involved living and caring for the other were understood, with successive events and changes influenced by old age, dementia, beliefs and social imagery.

  17. [Transition of Adolescents with Chronic Neurologic Disorders into Adult Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, L; Koch, E-L; Lingen, M; von Kries, R; Brockmann, K

    2016-09-01

    Transition of care from pediatric to adult services is a complex process. Factors influencing the success of health care transition of adolescents with chronic neurological disorders are poorly understood. Young adults with chronic neurological disorders who had been cared for in an Interdisciplinary Pediatric Center participated in this study. Using the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire Short-form (PSQ-18) we investigated whether satisfaction of these patients with their medical care in adult services was depending on the severity and complexity of their condition. They were assigned to a group of severely disabled patients (group 1; intellectual disability or learning disability plus motor handicap or degree of disability≥80, n=11) or a group 2 of patients with milder impairment (N=39). We used descriptive and t-statistics to compare both groups. Patients of group 1 reported slightly lower satisfaction with their present medical care in adult services (M=3.25; 95%-KI=[2.96-3.55]) compared to patients of group 2 (M=3.59; 95%.KI=[3.37-3.81]; p=0.084). Satisfaction with transition was significantly lower in group 1 (M=2.65; 95% KI=[2.29-3.01]) than in group 2 (M=3.11; 95% KI=[2.89-3.33], p=0.045). The difference of mean values of 0.46 reflects a moderate effect size (Hedges' g=0.68). Health care transition of adolescent patients with chronic neurological disorders is significantly more successful in patients with minor impairment compared to patients with severe complex neurological conditions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Toward Advanced Nursing Practice along with People-Centered Care Partnership Model for Sustainable Universal Health Coverage and Universal Access to Health 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Tomoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Omori, Junko; Arimori, Naoko; Hishinuma, Michiko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Shimpuku, Yoko; Ohashi, Kumiko; Tashiro, Junko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: this study developed a people-centered care (PCC) partnership model for the aging society to address the challenges of social changes affecting people’s health and the new role of advanced practice nurses to sustain universal health coverage. Method: a people-centered care partnership model was developed on the basis of qualitative meta-synthesis of the literature and assessment of 14 related projects. The ongoing projects resulted in individual and social transformation by improving community health literacy and behaviors using people-centered care and enhancing partnership between healthcare providers and community members through advanced practice nurses. Results: people-centered care starts when community members and healthcare providers foreground health and social issues among community members and families. This model tackles these issues, creating new values concerning health and forming a social system that improves quality of life and social support to sustain universal health care through the process of building partnership with communities. Conclusion: a PCC partnership model addresses the challenges of social changes affecting general health and the new role of advanced practice nurses in sustaining UHC. PMID:28146179

  19. Recent Changes in Health Insurance Coverage for Urban and Rural Veterans: Evidence from the First Year of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Michel; Barath, Deanna; Blewett, Lynn A

    2018-04-25

    Prior to the Affordable Care Act, as many as 1.3 million veterans lacked health insurance. With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, veterans now have new pathways to coverage through Medicaid expansion in those states that chose to expand Medicaid and through private coverage options offered through the Health Insurance Marketplace. We examined the impact of the ACA on health insurance coverage for veterans in expansion and non-expansion states and for urban and rural veterans. We examined changes in veterans' health insurance coverage following the first year of the ACA, focusing on whether they lived in an urban or rural area and whether they live in a Medicaid expansion state. We used data on approximately 200,000 non-elderly community-dwelling veterans, obtained from the 2013-2014 American Community Survey and estimated differences in the adjusted probability of being uninsured between 2013 and 2014 for both urban and rural areas. Adjusted probabilities were computed by fitting logistic regressions controlling for age, gender, race, marital status, poverty status, education, and employment. There were an estimated 10.1 million U.S. non-elderly veterans in 2013; 82% lived in predominantly urban areas (8.3 million), and the remaining 18% (1.8 million) lived in predominately rural areas. Most veterans lived in the South (43.6%), and rural veterans were more likely to be Southerners than their urban counterparts. On every marker of economic well-being, rural veterans fared worse than urban veterans. They had a statistically significant higher chance of having incomes below 138% of FPG (20.0% versus 17.0%), of being out of the labor force (29.1% versus 23.0%), and of having no more than a high school education (39.6% versus 28.8%). Rural veterans were also more likely to experience at least one functional limitation. Overall, veterans in Medicaid expansion states experienced a significantly larger increase in insurance compared to veterans living in non

  20. Youth transitioning out of foster care: an evaluation of a Supplemental Security Income policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laura; Rukh-Kamaa, Aneer

    2013-01-01

    Youths with disabilities face numerous challenges when they transition to adulthood. Those who are aging out of foster care face the additional challenge of losing their foster care benefits, although some will be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments after foster care ceases. However, the time needed to process SSI applications exposes those youths to a potential gap in the receipt of benefits as they move between foster care and SSI. We evaluate the effects of a 2010 Social Security Administration policy change that allows such youths to apply for SSI payments 60 days earlier than the previous policy allowed. The change provides additional time for processing claims before the applicant ages out of the foster care system. We examine administrative records on SSI applications from before and after the policy change to determine if the change has decreased the gap between benefits for the target population.

  1. A complex transition: lessons learned as three young adults with complex care needs transition from an inpatient paediatric hospital to adult community residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, S; Hoffman, A

    2015-05-01

    Whether young adults with complex care needs live at home with their family, in institutional or group home settings finding appropriate care as they transition from paediatric to adult systems can be difficult. Our objective was to understand the experiences, barriers and enablers entailed in transitioning three young adults with complex care needs from an institutional paediatric hospital setting to an adult community residence. A descriptive design involving in-depth, semi-structured, qualitative interviews and a review of 14 h of meeting minutes. Interviews were conducted over the phone, in participants' homes, and at a paediatric rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-three participants, including 10 clinicians, 11 community partners, two young adults (21-23 years old) with complex care needs from [metropolitan area] Ontario, Canada. Our findings indicate that clinicians, community partners and young adults with complex care needs encountered several enablers and barriers influencing their transition from a paediatric hospital to adult supportive housing. Enablers included structural factors (leadership, advocacy, timing/funding), availability of care (inter-agency partnerships), organization of care (model of care, inter-professional teamwork, extension of roles), and relational factors (communication, development of trust and rapport, family involvement). Barriers included structural factors (timing, funding), availability of care (appropriateness of housing), organization of care (changes in model of care, teamwork, role clarity), relational factors (communication, trust/rapport, family involvement) and personal factors (transition readiness). There are several challenges to overcome in preparing long-term hospitalized young adults with complex care needs to transition to adult supportive housing; however, these challenges may be overcome with targeted supports in several key areas. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Health care transition for adolescents with special healthcare needs: where is nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Cecily L

    2013-01-01

    The population of adolescents with special healthcare needs (ASHCN) surviving into adulthood has increased dramatically over the past two decades. Approximately, nine of every 10 children diagnosed with a chronic condition are expected to reach adulthood. Experts estimate nearly 750,000 ASHCN enter into adulthood each year. Advances in medical treatments, new technologies and scientific discoveries have all contributed to the increases in ASHCN life expectancies. As a result, new demands for services have emerged to address their clear needs for long-term services and supports. Foremost among the ASHCN service needs are healthcare transition services. Healthcare transition is recognized as a needed area of practice to facilitate ASHCN transfer of care from pediatric to adult healthcare and to support the acquisition of the developmental competencies needed to successfully transition to adulthood. Yet, few evidence-based and exemplary models of care exist. Healthcare transition research is in the early stages of development. The medical community has provided the leadership with the development of healthcare transition policy, practice, and research. As a result, policymaking, practice issues, and research have a prominent medically related focus. In contrast, the influence of nursing as it pertains to these areas of professional practice is limited. Opportunities exist for pediatric and child health nursing leaders to provide direction for greater involvement in this emerging and growing field of specialty practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Age-Based Differences in Care Setting Transitions over the Last Year of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Little is known about the number and types of moves made in the last year of life to obtain healthcare and end-of-life support, with older adults more vulnerable to care setting transition issues. Research Objective. Compare care setting transitions across older (65+ years and younger individuals. Design. Secondary analyses of provincial hospital and ambulatory database data. Every individual who lived in the province for one year prior to death from April 1, 2005 through March 31, 2007 was retained (N=19,397. Results. Transitions averaged 3.5, with 3.9 and 3.4 for younger and older persons, respectively. Older persons also had fewer ER and ambulatory visits, fewer procedures performed in the last year of life, but longer inpatient stays (42.7 days versus 36.2 for younger persons. Conclusion. Younger and older persons differ somewhat in the number and type of end-of-life care setting transitions, a matter for continuing research and healthcare policy.

  4. A coordinated transition model for patients with cystinosis: from pediatrics to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariceta, Gema; Camacho, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Obispo, Matilde; Fernández-Polo, Aurora; Gámez, Josep; García-Villoria, Judit; Lara, Enrique; Leyes, Pere; Martín-Begué, Nieves; Perelló, Manel; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Torra, Roser; Torregrosa, J Vicens; Torres-Sierra, Sandra; Vila-Santandreu, Anna; Güell, Ana

    Improved outcome and longer life-expectancy in patients with cystinosis, and disease complexity itself, justify planning a guided-transition of affected patients from Pediatrics to adult medicine. The aims of the process are to guarantee the continuum of care and patient empowerment, moving from guardian-care to self-care. review of articles, expert opinion and anonymous surveys of patients, relatives and patient advocacy groups. elaboration a new document to support and coordinate the transition of patients with cystinosis providing specific proposals in a variety of medical fields, and adherence promotion. Nephrologists play a key role in transition due the fact that most cystinotic patients suffer severe chronic kidney disease, and need kidney transplantation before adulthood. we present a document providing recommendations and suggesting a chronogram to help the process of transition of adolescents and young adults with cystinosis in our area. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Home care for older people in Sweden: a universal model in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebehely, Marta; Trydegård, Gun-Britt

    2012-05-01

    One aspect of universalism in Swedish eldercare services is that publicly financed and publicly provided services have been both affordable for the poor and attractive enough to be preferred by the middle class. This article identifies two trends in home care for older people in Sweden: a decline in the coverage of publicly funded services and their increasing marketisation. We explore the mechanisms behind these trends by reviewing policy documents and official reports, and discuss the distributional consequences of the changes by analysing two data sets from Statistics Sweden: the Swedish Level of Living surveys from 1988/1989 and 2004/2005 and a database on all users of tax deductions on household and care services in 2009. The analysis shows that the decline of tax-funded home care is not the result of changing eldercare legislation and was not intended by national policy-makers. Rather the decline was caused by a complex interplay of decision-making at central and local levels, resulting in stricter municipal targeting. The trend towards marketisation has been more clearly intended by national policy-makers. Legislative changes have opened up tax-funded services to private provision, and a customer-choice (voucher) model and a tax deduction for household- and care services have been introduced. As a result of declining tax-funded home-care services, older persons with lower education increasingly receive family care, while those with higher education are more likely to buy private services. The combination of income-related user fees, customer-choice models and the tax deduction has created an incentive for high-income older persons to turn to the market instead of using public home-care services. Thus, Swedish home care, as a universal welfare service, is now under threat and may become increasingly dominated by groups with less education and lower income which, in turn, could jeopardise the quality of care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Assuring Access to Affordable Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Under the Affordable Care Act, millions of uninsured Americans will gain access to affordable coverage through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and improvements in...

  7. Bridging the gap: metabolic and endocrine care of patients during transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Hokken-Koelega

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Seamless transition of endocrine patients from the paediatric to adult setting is still suboptimal, especially in patients with complex disorders, i.e., small for gestational age, Turner or Prader–Willi syndromes; Childhood Cancer Survivors, and those with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency. Methods: An expert panel meeting comprised of European paediatric and adult endocrinologists was convened to explore the current gaps in managing the healthcare of patients with endocrine diseases during transition from paediatric to adult care settings. Results: While a consensus was reached that a team approach is best, discussions revealed that a ‘one size fits all’ model for transition is largely unsuccessful in these patients. They need more tailored care during adolescence to prevent complications like failure to achieve target adult height, reduced bone mineral density, morbid obesity, metabolic perturbations (obesity and body composition, inappropriate/inadequate puberty, compromised fertility, diminished quality of life and failure to adapt to the demands of adult life. Sometimes it is difficult for young people to detach emotionally from their paediatric endocrinologist and/or the abrupt change from an environment of parental responsibility to one of autonomy. Discussions about impending transition and healthcare autonomy should begin in early adolescence and continue throughout young adulthood to ensure seamless continuum of care and optimal treatment outcomes. Conclusions: Even amongst a group of healthcare professionals with a great interest in improving transition services for patients with endocrine diseases, there is still much work to be done to improve the quality of healthcare for transition patients.

  8. [Organizational and medical aspects of transition of juveniles with congenital heart defects to adult cardiology care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, E; Hoffmann, A

    2001-02-01

    A growing, heterogeneous group of children with congenital heart disease is surviving into adulthood due to advances in medicine. These patients including those with simple and complex congenital heart disease and operated on during childhood are facing long-term complications. Superspecialist care and expertise are required during their life to deal with their unique problems the most common being ventricular failure, arrhythmias, valve and conduit longevity. Teenagers and adolescents disappear from both medical and parental care because of the lack of transition programs. Transition of care from pediatric to adult cardiologists must be organized in each country and must reflect regional history, regional politics and realities. Transition of care requires goodwill from parents, adolescents, pediatric and adult cardiologists. Transition clinics being held jointly by pediatric and adult cardiologists between the age of 16 and 18 years are essential to encourage the adolescents to take charge of their own life and health issues. Adequate information about their heart defect, their operations and their residual lesions may help them understand the implications for the future and improve their compliance. A transition program must include counseling on education, career, endocarditis prophylaxis, insurance and lifestyle issues such as sexuality and reproduction (including anticonception, pregnancy), cardiovascular risk factors and sports activities. Medical reports including operative reports and heart catheterization reports must be transferred to the adult cardiologists. In Switzerland, care of adults with congenital heart disease is based on three levels: 1) primary caregivers including general practiioners, internists and community cardiologists; 2) cardiologists with special commitment and expertise to patients with congenital heart disease who organize regional outpatient clinics; 3) supraregional referral centers with cardiologists trained in pediatric and

  9. Why has the Universal Coverage Scheme in Thailand achieved a pro-poor public subsidy for health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limwattananon, Supon; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Tisayaticom, Kanjana; Boonyapaisarncharoen, Tawekiat; Prakongsai, Phusit

    2012-01-01

    Thailand has achieved universal health coverage since 2002 through the implementation of the Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) for 47 million of the population who were neither private sector employees nor government employees. A well performing UCS should achieve health equity goals in terms of health service use and distribution of government subsidy on health. With these goals in mind, this paper assesses the magnitude and trend of government health budget benefiting the poor as compared to the rich UCS members. Benefit incidence analysis was conducted using the nationally representative household surveys, Health and Welfare Surveys, between 2003 and 2009. UCS members are grouped into five different socio-economic status using asset indexes and wealth quintiles. The total government subsidy, net of direct household payment, for combined outpatient (OP) and inpatient (IP) services to public hospitals and health facilities provided to UCS members, had increased from 30 billion Baht (US$ 1 billion) in 2003 to 40-46 billion Baht in 2004-2009. In 2003 for 23% and 12% of the UCS members who belonged to the poorest and richest quintiles of the whole-country populations respectively, the share of public subsidies for OP service was 28% and 7% for the poorest and the richest quintiles, whereby for IP services the share was 27% and 6% for the poorest and richest quintiles respectively. This reflects a pro-poor outcome of public subsidies to healthcare. The OP and IP public subsidies remained consistently pro-poor in subsequent years.The pro-poor benefit incidence is determined by higher utilization by the poorest than the richest quintiles, especially at health centres and district hospitals. Thus the probability and the amount of household direct health payment for public facilities by the poorest UCS members were less than their richest counterparts. Higher utilization and better financial risk protection benefiting the poor UCS members are the results of extensive

  10. Parents’ perspectives of the transition to home when a child has complex technological health care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Brenner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an increasing number of children with complex care needs, however, there is limited evidence of the experience of families during the process of transitioning to becoming their child's primary care giver. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ perspectives of the transition to home of a child with complex respiratory health care needs.Methods: Parents of children with a tracheostomy with or without other methods of respiratory assistance, who had transitioned to home from a large children's hospital in the last 5 years, were invited to participate in the interviews. Voice-centred relational method of qualitative analysis was used to analyse parent responses.Results: Four key themes emerged from the interviews including “stepping stones: negotiating the move to home”, “fighting and frustration”, “questioning competence” and “coping into the future”.Discussion: There is a need for clear and equitable assessments and shared policies and protocols for the discharge of children with complex care needs. Direction and support are required at the level of health service policy and planning to redress these problems. This study provides evidence that the transition of children with complex care needs from hospital to home is a challenging dynamic in need of further improvement and greater negotiation between the parent and health service provider. There are tangible issues that could be addressed including the introduction of a standardised approach to assessment of the needs of the child and family in preparation for discharge and for clear timelines and criteria for reassessment of needs once at home.

  11. A systematic review of curricular interventions teaching transitional care to physicians-in-training and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Ian M; Besdine, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    To systematically review and describe published interventions about teaching continuity-of-care best practices, embodied by transitional care, to physician-trainees and physicians. The authors performed a systematic review of interventions indexed in PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Educational Resources Information Center, professional society Web sites, education databases, and hand-selected references. English-language articles published between 1973 and 2010 that demonstrated purposeful, directed education of physician-trainees and physicians on topics consistent with the contemporary definition of transitional care were included. Abstracted data included intended audience, duration/intensity, objectives, resources used, learner assessment, and curricular evaluation method. A dramatic increase in the number of published interventions teaching transitional care was noted in the last 10 years. Learners included preclinical medical students through attending physicians and also included allied health professionals. Brief, self-limited interactions in large groups were the most frequent mode of interaction. A wide array of objectives and resources used were represented. Most interventions provided a method for assessing knowledge acquisition by the learner; however, few interventions provided a mechanism for eliciting feedback from learners. Proficiency in providing transitional care is an essential skill for medical practitioners. Historically, there have been few curricular interventions teaching this topic; however, recently a dramatic increase in the number of interventions has occurred. A diverse range of learners, modes of delivery, and intended objectives are represented. In establishing a pooled description of published interventions, this review provides a comprehensive and novel resource for educators charged with designing curricula for all medical professionals. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  12. Individual versus interprofessional team performance in formulating care transition plans: A randomised study of trainees from five professional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Timothy W; Supiano, Katherine P; Wong, Bob; Luptak, Marilyn K; Luther, Brenda; Andersen, Troy C; Wilson, Rebecca; Wilby, Frances; Yang, Rumei; Pepper, Ginette A; Brunker, Cherie P

    2018-05-01

    Health professions trainees' performance in teams is rarely evaluated, but increasingly important as the healthcare delivery systems in which they will practice move towards team-based care. Effective management of care transitions is an important aspect of interprofessional teamwork. This mixed-methods study used a crossover design to randomise health professions trainees to work as individuals and as teams to formulate written care transition plans. Experienced external raters assessed the quality of the written care transition plans as well as both the quality of team process and overall team performance. Written care transition plan quality did not vary between individuals and teams (21.8 vs. 24.4, respectively, p = 0.42). The quality of team process did not correlate with the quality of the team-generated written care transition plans (r = -0.172, p = 0.659). However, there was a significant correlation between the quality of team process and overall team performance (r = 0.692, p = 0.039). Teams with highly engaged recorders, performing an internal team debrief, had higher-quality care transition plans. These results suggest that high-quality interprofessional care transition plans may require advance instruction as well as teamwork in finalising the plan.

  13. Quality and safety in transitional care of the elderly: The study protocol of a case study research design (Phase 1)

    OpenAIRE

    Aase, Karina; Laugaland, Kristin A; Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden; Storm, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    This is an article originally published in BMJ Open; and distributed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0). See doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003506. Introduction: Although international studies have documented that patients ’ transitions between care providers are associated with the risk of adverse events and uncoordinated care, research directed towards the quality and safety of transitional care between primary and secondary health and car...

  14. Disparities in Insurance Coverage, Health Services Use, and Access Following Implementation of the Affordable Care Act: A Comparison of Disabled and Nondisabled Working-Age Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jae; Wood, Elizabeth Geneva; Frieden, Lex

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess trends in health insurance coverage, health service utilization, and health care access among working-age adults with and without disabilities before and after full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and to identify current disability-based disparities following full implementation of the ACA. The ACA was expected to have a disproportionate impact on working-age adults with disabilities, because of their high health care usage as well as their previously limited insurance options. However, most published research on this population does not systematically look at effects before and after full implementation of the ACA. As the US Congress considers new health policy reforms, current and accurate data on this vulnerable population are essential. Weighted estimates, trend analyses and analytic models were conducted using the 1998-2016 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS) and the 2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Compared with working-age adults without disabilities, those with disabilities are less likely to work, more likely to earn below the federal poverty level, and more likely to use public insurance. Average health costs for this population are 3 to 7 times higher, and access problems are far more common. Repeal of key features of the ACA, like Medicaid expansion and marketplace subsidies, would likely diminish health care access for working-age adults with disabilities.

  15. Project ACHIEVE - using implementation research to guide the evaluation of transitional care effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Brock, Jane; Jack, Brian; Mittman, Brian; Naylor, Mary; Sorra, Joanna; Mays, Glen; Williams, Mark V

    2016-02-19

    Poorly managed hospital discharges and care transitions between health care facilities can cause poor outcomes for both patients and their caregivers. Unfortunately, the usual approach to health care delivery does not support continuity and coordination across the settings of hospital, doctors' offices, home or nursing homes. Though complex efforts with multiple components can improve patient outcomes and reduce 30-day readmissions, research has not identified which components are necessary. Also we do not know how delivery of core components may need to be adjusted based on patient, caregiver, setting or characteristics of the community, or how system redesign can be accelerated. Project ACHIEVE focuses on diverse Medicare populations such as individuals with multiple chronic diseases, patients with low health literacy/numeracy and limited English proficiency, racial and ethnic minority groups, low-income groups, residents of rural areas, and individuals with disabilities. During the first phase, we will use focus groups to identify the transitional care outcomes and components that matter most to patients and caregivers to inform development and validation of assessment instruments. During the second phase, we will evaluate the comparative effectiveness of multi-component care transitions programs occurring across the U.S. Using a mixed-methods approach for this evaluation, we will study historical (retrospective) and current and future (prospective) groups of patients, caregivers and providers using site visits, surveys, and clinical and claims data. In this natural experiment observational study, we use a fractional factorial study design to specify comparators and estimate the individual and combined effects of key transitional care components. Our study will determine which evidence-based transitional care components and/or clusters most effectively produce patient and caregiver desired outcomes overall and among diverse patient and caregiver populations in

  16. GPs' and community pharmacists' opinions on medication management at transitions of care in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Patrick; Carroll, Hailey; Grimes, Tamasine; Galvin, Rose; McDonnell, Ronan; Boland, Fiona; McDowell, Ronald; Hughes, Carmel; Fahey, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to survey GPs and community pharmacists (CPs) in Ireland regarding current practices of medication management, specifically medication reconciliation, communication between health care providers and medication errors as patients transition in care. A national cross-sectional survey was distributed electronically to 2364 GPs, 311 GP Registrars and 2382 CPs. Multivariable associations comparing GPs to CPs were generated and content analysis of free text responses was undertaken. There was an overall response rate of 17.7% (897 respondents-554 GPs/Registrars and 343 CPs). More than 90% of GPs and CPs were positive about the effects of medication reconciliation on medication safety and adherence. Sixty per cent of GPs reported having no formal system of medication reconciliation. Communication between GPs and CPs was identified as good/very good by >90% of GPs and CPs. The majority (>80%) of both groups could clearly recall prescribing errors, following a transition of care, they had witnessed in the previous 6 months. Free text content analysis corroborated the positive relationship between GPs and CPs, a frustration with secondary care communication, with many examples given of prescribing errors. While there is enthusiasm for the benefits of medication reconciliation there are limited formal structures in primary care to support it. Challenges in relation to systems that support inter-professional communication and reduce medication errors are features of the primary/secondary care transition. There is a need for an improved medication management system. Future research should focus on the identified barriers in implementing medication reconciliation and systems that can improve it. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Novice nurse practitioner workforce transition and turnover intention in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraz, Asefeh

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the workforce transition and turnover intention of novice nurse practitioners (NPs) in primary care (PC). This research aimed to describe the individual characteristics, role acquisition and job satisfaction of novice NPs, and identify factors associated with their successful transition and turnover intention in the first year of PC practice. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted via online survey administered to a national sample of 177 NPs who graduated from an accredited NP program and were practicing in a PC setting for 3-12 months. This study demonstrated that greater professional autonomy in the workplace is a critical factor in turnover intention in novice NPs in the PC setting. Further research is needed regarding the novice NP workforce transition to provide adequate professional autonomy and support during this critical period. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. Strengthening patient safety in transitions of care: an emerging role for local medical centres in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsvik, Trond; Halvorsen, Kristin; Osmundsen, Tonje; Gjøsund, Gudveig

    2016-08-30

    Patient safety has gained less attention in primary care in comparison to specialised care. We explore how local medical centres (LMCs) can play a role in strengthening patient safety, both locally and in transitions between care levels. LMCs represent a form of intermediate care organisation in Norway that is increasingly used as a strategy for integrated care policies. The analysis is based on institutional theory and general safety theories. A qualitative design was applied, involving 20 interviews of nursing home managers, managers at local medical centres and administrative personnel. The LMCs mediate important information between care levels, partly by means of workarounds, but also as a result of having access to the different information and communications technology (ICT) systems in use. Their knowledge of local conditions is found to be a key asset. LMCs are providers of competence and training for the local level, as well as serving as quality assurers. As a growing organisational form in Norway, LMCs have to legitimise their role in the health care system. They represent an asset to the local level in terms of information, competence and quality assurance. As they have overlapping competencies, tasks and responsibilities with other parts of the health care system, they add to organisational redundancy and strengthen patient safety.

  19. Transitioning HIV care and treatment programs in southern Africa to full local management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermund, Sten H; Sidat, Mohsin; Weil, Lori F; Tique, José A; Moon, Troy D; Ciampa, Philip J

    2012-06-19

    Global AIDS programs such as the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) face a challenging health care management transition. HIV care must evolve from vertically-organized, externally-supported efforts to sustainable, locally controlled components that are integrated into the horizontal primary health care systems of host nations. We compared four southern African nations in AIDS care, financial, literacy, and health worker capacity parameters (2005 to 2009) to contrast in their capacities to absorb the huge HIV care and prevention endeavors that are now managed with international technical and fiscal support. Botswana has a relatively high national income, a small population, and an advanced HIV/AIDS care program; it is well poised to take on management of its HIV/AIDS programs. South Africa has had a slower start, given HIV denialism philosophies of the previous government leadership. Nonetheless, South Africa has the national income, health care management, and health worker capacity to succeed in fully local management. The sheer magnitude of the burden is daunting, however, and South Africa will need continuing fiscal assistance. In contrast, Zambia and Mozambique have comparatively lower per capita incomes, many fewer health care workers per capita, and lower national literacy rates. It is improbable that fully independent management of their HIV programs is feasible on the timetable being contemplated by donors, nor is locally sustainable financing conceivable at present. A tailored nation-by-nation approach is needed for the transition to full local capacitation; donor nation policymakers must ensure that global resources and technical support are not removed prematurely.

  20. Medical homelessness and candidacy: women transiting between prison and community health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope; Magin, Parker; Davison, Joyce; Hu, Wendy

    2017-07-20

    Women in contact with the prison system have high health needs. Short periods in prison and serial incarcerations are common. Examination of their experiences of health care both in prison and in the community may assist in better supporting their wellbeing and, ultimately, decrease their risk of returning to prison. We interviewed women in prisons in Sydney, Australia, using pre-release and post-release interviews. We undertook thematic analysis of the combined interviews, considering them as continuing narratives of their healthcare experiences. We further reviewed the findings using the theoretical lens of candidacy to generate additional insights on healthcare access. Sixty-nine interviews were conducted with 40 women pre-release and 29 of these post-release. Most had histories of substance misuse. Women saw prison as an opportunity to address neglected health problems, but long waiting lists impeded healthcare delivery. Both in prison and in the community, the dual stigmas of substance misuse and being a prisoner could lead to provider judgements that their claims to care were not legitimate. They feared they would be blocked from care even if seriously ill. Family support, self-efficacy, assertiveness, overcoming substance misuse, compliance with health system rules and transitional care programs increased their personal capacity to access health care. For women in transition between prison and community, healthcare access could be experienced as 'medical homelessness' in which women felt caught in a perpetual state of waiting and exclusion during cycles of prison- and community-based care. Their healthcare experiences were characterized by ineffectual attempts to access care, transient relationships with healthcare providers, disrupted medical management and a fear that stigma would prevent candidacy to health care even in the event of serious illness. Consideration of the vulnerabilities and likely points of exclusion for women in contact with the criminal

  1. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  2. Ready, set, stop: mismatch between self-care beliefs, transition readiness skills, and transition planning among adolescents, young adults, and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Kelemen, Skyler; Weitzman, Elissa R

    2014-10-01

    Health care transition (HCT) from pediatric to adult-focused systems is a key milestone for youth. Developing self-care skills and HCT planning are key elements. In a survey at 4 pediatric specialty clinics to 79 youth aged 16 to 25 years and 52 parents, skill-based HCT readiness was assessed using the Transition Readiness Assessment Questionnaire (TRAQ). Multivariable logistic regression evaluated the association between TRAQ scores and self-care beliefs. In all, 70% of youth and 67% of parents believed that they/their child could manage their care. Only 38% of youth and 53% of parents reported thinking about HCT; only 18% of youth and 27% of parents reported having a HCT plan. Youth with higher TRAQ scores were more likely to believe they could manage their care, controlling for age and gender (adjusted odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.7-9.5). Transition readiness skills are associated with self-care beliefs. However, a mismatch exists between high reported self-care beliefs and low levels of transition planning. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Leadership transitions in multisectoral health care alliances: Implications for member perceptions of participation value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shi, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative forms of organizations such as multisectoral health care alliances play an increasingly prominent role in the U.S. health care system. A key feature of these organizations highlighted in previous research is leadership, yet little research has examined what happens when there is a change in leadership. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leadership transitions in an alliance and member assessments of the benefits and costs of participation, indicators of the value that members derive from their involvement in the alliance. The study used quantitative data collected from three rounds of surveys of alliance members participating in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality Program. Qualitative interview data supplemented this analysis by providing examples of why leadership transitions may affect participation benefits and costs. Quantitative analysis indicated that alliance members who experienced a change in leadership reported both higher and lower levels of participation benefits and costs, depending on the type of leadership change (i.e., alliance leader vs. programmatic leader). Qualitative analysis suggested that the scope of responsibilities of different types of leaders plays an important role in how members perceive changes. Likewise, interviews indicated that timing influences how disruptive a leadership transition is and whether it is perceived positively or negatively. Leadership transitions present both challenges and opportunities; whether the effects are felt positively or negatively depends on when a transition occurs and how it is handled by incoming leaders and remaining members. Furthermore, different types of members report higher levels of participation benefits and lower levels of participation costs, suggesting that efforts to maintain a sense of alliance value during times of transitions may be able to target certain types of individuals.

  4. Psychometric analysis of the TRANSIT quality indicators for cardiovascular disease prevention in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanji, Cynthia; Bareil, Céline; Hudon, Eveline; Goudreau, Johanne; Duhamel, Fabie; Lussier, Marie-Thérèse; Perreault, Sylvie; Lalonde, Gilles; Turcotte, Alain; Berbiche, Djamal; Martin, Élisabeth; Lévesque, Lise; Gagnon, Marie-Mireille; Lalonde, Lyne

    2017-12-01

    To assess a selection of psychometric properties of the TRANSIT indicators. Using medical records, indicators were documented retrospectively during the 14 months preceding the end of the TRANSIT study. Primary care in Quebec, Canada. Indicators were documented in a random subsample (n = 123 patients) of the TRANSIT study population (n = 759). For every patient, the mean compliance to all indicators of a category (subscale score) and to the complete set of indicators (overall scale score) were established. To evaluate test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities, indicators were applied twice, two months apart, by the same evaluator and independently by different evaluators, respectively. To evaluate convergent validity, correlations between TRANSIT indicators, Burge et al. indicators and Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS) indicators were examined. Test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, and convergent validity. Test-retest reliability, as measured by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) was equal to 0.99 (0.99-0.99) for the overall scale score while inter-rater reliability was equal to 0.95 (0.93-0.97) for the overall scale score. Convergent validity, as measured by Pearson's correlation coefficients, was equal to 0.77 (P TRANSIT indicators were compared to Burge et al. indicators and to 0.82 (P TRANSIT indicators were compared to INESSS indicators. Reliability was excellent except for eleven indicators while convergent validity was strong except for domains related to the management of CVD risk factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Hospitalization of elderly Medicaid long-term care users who transition from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Andrea; Kane, Robert L; Dowd, Bryan; Golberstein, Ezra; Lum, Terry; Shippee, Tetyana

    2014-01-01

    To compare hospitalizations of dually eligible older adults who had an extended Medicaid nursing home (NH) stay and transitioned out to receive Medicaid home- and community-based services (HCBS) with hospitalizations of those who remained in the NH. Retrospective matched cohort study using Medicaid and Medicare claims and NH assessment data. Community (receiving Medicaid HCBS) or NH. Dually eligible fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 and older in Arkansas, Florida, Minnesota, New Mexico, Texas, Vermont, and Washington from 2003 to 2005. Individuals who had a Medicaid NH stay of at least 90 days and transitioned to Medicaid HCBS (N = 1,169) were matched to individuals who had a Medicaid NH stay of at least 90 days and remained in the NH (N = 1,169). Potentially preventable hospitalizations (defined according to ambulatory-care-sensitive conditions) and all hospitalizations were examined. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of hospitalization between the groups, accounting for the differing time at risk and censoring. Being a NH transitioner increased the hazard of experiencing a potentially preventable hospitalization by 40% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.93) over remaining in the NH. NH transitioners had a 58% (95% CI = 1.32-1.91) greater risk of experiencing any type of hospitalization than NH stayers. Individuals who transitioned from the NH to HCBS had a greater risk of hospitalization. Most of the attention in long-term care transition programs has been focused on NH readmission, but programs encouraging NH transition should recognize that individuals may be at greater risk for hospitalization after returning to the community. Planning for the medical needs of individuals who transition from an extended NH stay may improve their posttransition outcomes. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Investing in Post-Acute Care Transitions: Electronic Information Exchange Between Hospitals and Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Dori A; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health information exchange (HIE) is expected to help improve care transitions from hospitals to long-term care (LTC) facilities. We know little about the prevalence of hospital LTC HIE in the United States and what contextual factors may motivate or constrain this activity. Cross-sectional analysis of U.S. acute-care hospitals responding to the 2014 AHA IT Supplement survey and with available readmissions data (n = 1,991). We conducted multivariate logistic regression to explore the relationship between hospital LTC HIE and selected IT and policy characteristics. Over half of the hospitals in our study (57.2%) reported engaging in some form of HIE with LTC providers: 33.9% send-only, 0.5% receive-only, and 22.8% send and receive. Hospitals that engaged in some form of LTC HIE were more likely than those that did not engage to have attested to meaningful use (odds ratio [OR], 1.87; P = .01 for stage 1 and OR, 2.05; P investing in electronic information exchange with LTCs as part of a general strategy to adopt EHRs and engage in HIE, but also potentially to strengthen ties to LTC providers and to reduce readmissions. To achieve widespread connectivity, continued focus on adoption of related health IT infrastructure and greater emphasis on aligning incentives for hospital-LTC care transitions would be valuable. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vaccination coverage in a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving care at an AIDS outpatient clinic in Espírito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the immunization status of human immune deficiency virus (HIV-infected patients receiving care at an outpatient clinic in Brazil. The sociodemographic characteristics, CD4 count and HIV viral load of 281 out of 612 adult outpatients were analyzed. A total of 331 patients were excluded because of no availability of vaccination cards. Chi-square or Fisher's exact test were used. Immunization coverage was higher for diphtheria/tetanus (59.79% and hepatitis B (56.7%, and lowest for hepatitis A (6.8% and for meningococcal group C (6%. Only 11.74% of the patients had received the influenza virus vaccine yearly since their HIV-infection diagnosis. No vaccination against influenza (p < 0.034 or hepatitis B (p < 0.029 were associated with CD4 counts <500 cells/mL; no vaccination against flu or pneumococcus were associated with detectable HIV viral load (p < 0.049 and p < 0.002, respectively. Immunization coverage is still very low among HIV-infected adults in this setting despite recommendations and high infection-related mortality.

  8. Cystic fibrosis: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care

    OpenAIRE

    Kreindler, James L; Miller, Victoria A

    2013-01-01

    James L Kreindler,1,2 Victoria A Miller1,31The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Survival for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) increased to nearly 40 years in 2012 from the early childhood years in the 1940s. Therefore, patients are living long enough to require transition from pediatric CF centers to ...

  9. Assessment of systems for paying health care providers in Vietnam: implications for equity, efficiency and expanding effective health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Nguyen Khanh; Oanh, Tran Thi Mai; Phuong, Hoang Thi; Tien, Tran Van; Cashin, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Provider payment arrangements are currently a core concern for Vietnam's health sector and a key lever for expanding effective coverage and improving the efficiency and equity of the health system. This study describes how different provider payment systems are designed and implemented in practice across a sample of provinces and districts in Vietnam. Key informant interviews were conducted with over 100 health policy-makers, purchasers and providers using a structured interview guide. The results of the different payment methods were scored by respondents and assessed against a set of health system performance criteria. Overall, the public health insurance agency, Vietnam Social Security (VSS), is focused on managing expenditures through a complicated set of reimbursement policies and caps, but the incentives for providers are unclear and do not consistently support Vietnam's health system objectives. The results of this study are being used by the Ministry of Health and VSS to reform the provider payment systems to be more consistent with international definitions and good practices and to better support Vietnam's health system objectives.

  10. Immunisation coverage in the rural Eastern Cape – are we getting the basics of primary care right? Results from a longitudinal prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K le Roux

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Immunisations are one of the most cost-effective public health interventions available and South Africa (SA has implemented a comprehensive immunisation schedule. However, there is disagreement about the level of immunisation coverage in the country and few studies document the immunisation coverage in rural areas. Objective. To examine the successful and timely delivery of immunisations to children during the first 2 years of life in a deeply rural part of the Eastern Cape Province of SA. Methods. From January to April 2013, a cohort of sequential births (N=470 in the area surrounding Zithulele Hospital in the OR Tambo District of the Eastern Cape was recruited and followed up at home at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 months post birth, up to May 2015. Immunisation coverage was determined using Road-to-Health cards. Results. The percentages of children with all immunisations up to date at the time of interview were: 48.6% at 3 months, 73.3% at 6 months, 83.9% at 9 months, 73.3% at 12 months and 73.2% at 24 months. Incomplete immunisations were attributed to stock-outs (56%, lack of awareness of the immunisation schedule or of missed immunisations by the mother (16% and lack of clinic attendance by the mother (19%. Of the mothers who had visited the clinic for baby immunisations, 49.8% had to make multiple visits because of stock-outs. Measles coverage (of at least one dose was 85.2% at 1 year and 96.3% by 2 years, but 20.6% of babies had not received a second measles dose (due at 18 months by 2 years. Immunisations were often given late, particularly the 14-week immunisations. Conclusions. Immunisation rates in the rural Eastern Cape are well below government targets and indicate inadequate provision of basic primary care. Stock-outs of basic childhood immunisations are common and are, according to mothers, the main reason for their children’s immunisations not being up to date. There is still much work to be done to ensure that the basics of

  11. Improving services for glaucoma care in Nigeria: implications for policy and programmes to achieve universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyari, Fatima; Gilbert, Clare; Blanchet, Karl; Wormald, Richard

    2017-05-01

    Glaucoma in Africa is sometimes referred to as the silent thief of sight. In Nigeria, glaucoma is common, it is serious, ophthalmologists face many constraints in managing it, people do not even know they have it until it is advanced, patients do not understand or comply with treatment after they are diagnosed and the poor are more likely to be glaucoma blind. Available evidence indicates that the health system in Nigeria is failing to meet the needs of patients with glaucoma. Based on evidence, we propose future directions for improving services for glaucoma care in Nigeria, and the implications for policy and programmes to control glaucoma blindness, using a health system-oriented approach. Three complementary strategies are required: (i) strengthening clinical services for glaucoma-by developing models of glaucoma care, improving clinical treatment options, making medicines and equipment available, financing glaucoma care and training eye care workers; (ii) introducing initiatives for earlier detection of glaucoma in the clinic and approaches in the community and (iii) strengthening health system governance. Glaucoma is a complex disease to manage and addressing it as a public health problem is challenging. However, we need to change the paradigm to recognise that glaucoma is a potentially avoidable cause of blindness in Africa. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. [Comparison of the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization among children with different health care coverage in the cities of Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Montevideo (Uruguay)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Jordi, María del Carmen; Cortese, Silvina G; Álvarez, Licet; Salveraglio, Inés; Ortolani, Andrea M; Biondi, Ana M

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) among children with different health care coverage in Buenos Aires and Montevideo. An observational, cross-sectional and descriptive study was designed, considering children born from 1993-2003 who were seen in the Chairs of Comprehensive Children's Dentistry (Universidad de Buenos Aires) and of Pediatric Dentistry (Universidad de la República) and at five private dental offices between April and December 2010. Two groups were defined: A (Buenos Aires; n=1,090) and B (Montevideo; n=626). The clinical diagnosis was carried out with calibrated examiners (Kappa: 0.94) using the Mathu-Muju and Wright criteria. The prevalence of MIH was found to be 16.1% in A and 12.3% in B (p=0.03), with statistically significant differences between the public and private care sectors in both groups (A p=0.0008; B p=0.0004) and a positive correlation between MIH and year of birth (A p=0.001; B p=0.005). The results show that MIH is an emerging pathology and that MIH prevalence is related to year of birth and access to health care.

  13. Vaccine effectiveness and severity of varicella among previously vaccinated children during outbreaks in day-care centers with low vaccination coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Dan; Lavi, Idit; Kitov, Rachel; Hendler, Avishag

    2005-03-01

    Varicella vaccine effectiveness (VE) during outbreaks has been reported to be 71-100% against any disease and >90% against moderate/severe disease even in day-care centers (DCCs) and schools with low vaccination rates. A recent report suggested an effectiveness rate of 44% during a DCC outbreak despite a high vaccination rate. To reassess vaccination coverage, VE and severity of disease among previously vaccinated children after exposure during DCC outbreaks in northern Israel, where vaccination rates are low. During January to June 2003, active surveillance for varicella among children in northern Israel revealed outbreaks in 8 DCCs with children 3-6 years of age. Data concerning symptoms of the disease and the age at vaccination (for previously vaccinated children) were obtained from parents and health care providers for children who contracted the disease. Analysis of VE was limited to children who were continuously enrolled in DCCs during the outbreaks. The overall vaccination rate was 37%. The incidences of natural varicella and breakthrough varicella (BV) were 79 of 153 [52%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 44-60%] and 37 of 89 (41.5%; 95% CI 31-52%), respectively. VE was 20% (95% CI 0-40%) against disease of any severity and 93.4% (95% CI 75-98%) against moderate/severe disease. Ninety-four percent and 14% of children with BV and natural varicella, respectively, had mild disease (P vaccinated >2 years before the outbreak. During varicella outbreaks in DCCs with low vaccine coverage, previous vaccination provided poor protection against chickenpox, mostly among children who had been vaccinated >2 years earlier, but the disease appeared to be much milder among children with BV than among nonvaccinated children.

  14. Factors related to home health-care transition in trisomy 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitase, Yuma; Hayakawa, Masahiro; Kondo, Taiki; Saito, Akiko; Tachibana, Takashi; Oshiro, Makoto; Ieda, Kuniko; Kato, Eiko; Kato, Yuichi; Hattori, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Seiji; Ito, Masatoki; Hyodo, Reina; Muramatsu, Yukako; Sato, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Trisomy 13 (T13) is accompanied by severe complications, and it can be challenging to achieve long-term survival without aggressive treatment. However, recently, some patients with T13 have been receiving home care. We conducted this study to investigate factors related to home health-care transition for patients with T13.We studied 28 patients with T13 born between January 2000 and December 2014. We retrospectively compared nine home care transition patients (the home care group) and 19 patients that died during hospitalization (the discharge at death group). The median gestational age of the patients was 36.6 weeks, with a median birth weight of 2,047 g. Currently, three patients (11%) have survived, and 25 (89%) have died. The home care group exhibited a significantly longer gestational age (38.9 vs. 36.3 weeks, p = 0.039) and significantly larger occipitofrontal circumference Z score (-0.04 vs. -0.09, p = 0.019). Congenital heart defects (CHD) was more frequent in the discharge at death group, with six patients in the home care group and 18 patients in the discharge at death group (67% vs. 95%, p = 0.047), respectively. Survival time was significantly longer in the home care group than in the discharge at death group (171 vs. 19 days, p = 0.012). This study has shown that gestational age, occipitofrontal circumference Z score at birth, and the presence of CHD are helpful prognostic factors for determining treatment strategy in patients with T13. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Validation of the care transition measure in multi-ethnic South-East Asia in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi Anu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 15-item Care Transition Measure (CTM-15 is a measure for assessing the quality of care during transition from the patients’ perspective. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the CTM-15 and CTM-3 (a 3-item version of the CTM-15 in Singapore, a multi-ethnic urban state in South-east Asia. Methods A consecutive sample of patients was recruited from two tertiary hospitals. The subjects or their proxies were interviewed 3 weeks after discharge from hospital to home in English or Chinese using the CTM-15 questionnaire. Information about patients’ visit to emergency department (ED, non-elective rehospitalisation for the condition of index hospitalisation, and care experience after discharge was also collected from respondents. Psychometric properties of CTM-15 and CTM-3 based on the five-point response scale (i.e. strongly disagree, disagree, neutral, agree, and strongly agree and the three-point response scale (i.e. [strongly] agree, neutral, and [strongly] disagree were tested for English and Chinese versions separately. Internal consistency reliability was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha and construct validity was tested with T-test or Pearson’s correlation by examining hypothesised association of CTM scores with ED visit, rehospitalisation, and experience with care after discharge. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to examine latent dimensions of CTM-15. Results A total of 414 (proxy: 96.1% and 165 (proxy: 84.8% subjects completed the interviews in English and Chinese, respectively. Cronbach’s alpha values of the different CTM-15 versions ranged from 0.81 to 0.87. In contrast, Cronbach’s alpha values of the CTM-3 ranged from 0.42 to 0.63. Both CTM-15 and CTM-3 were correlated with care experience after discharge regardless of survey language or response scale (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: 0.36 to 0.46. Among the English-speaking respondents, the CTM-15 and CTM-3

  16. Democratic candidates call for change in the health care system: wider use of home and community-based care, chronic disease management, universal coverage, and greater use of telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Aaron G

    2008-10-01

    Senator Barack Obama, the Democratic candidate for president, and Senator Joe Biden, the party's candidate for vice president, have made health care reform a central pillar of their campaign. The Democrats want to target the 12 percent of Americans who are responsible for 69 percent of health care costs. Such individuals generally have multiple and complex health care problems, which if left untreated, require them to seek care in hospital emergency rooms which are vastly overcrowded. In order to solve the problem, they believe first that universal coverage along the lines of the Federal Government Employees' health plan is necessary, followed by a shift away from institutionally-based care, making home and community-based care, which integrates telehealth and other technologies, the norm. The party's platform includes this committment to help solve the problem of long-term care, which affects not only the nation's 35 million elderly, but increasingly will affect the 78 million baby boomers who are entering their retirement years.

  17. Health care transition in patients with type 1 diabetes: young adult experiences and relationship to glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C; Wolpert, Howard A; Rhodes, Erinn T; Laffel, Lori M; Kleinman, Ken; Beste, Margaret G; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2012-08-01

    To examine characteristics of the transition from pediatric to adult care in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes and evaluate associations between transition characteristics and glycemic control. We developed and mailed a survey to evaluate the transition process in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes, aged 22 to 30 years, receiving adult diabetes care at a single center. Current A1C data were obtained from the medical record. The response rate was 53% (258 of 484 eligible). The mean transition age was 19.5 ± 2.9 years, and 34% reported a gap >6 months in establishing adult care. Common reasons for transition included feeling too old (44%), pediatric provider suggestion (41%), and college (33%). Less than half received an adult provider recommendation and 6 months between pediatric and adult care (adjusted odds ratio 0.47 [95% CI 0.25-0.88]). In multivariate analysis, pretransition A1C (β = 0.49, P < 0.0001), current age (β = -0.07, P = 0.03), and education (β = -0.55, P = 0.01) significantly influenced current posttransition A1C. There was no independent association of transition preparation with posttransition A1C (β = -0.17, P = 0.28). Contemporary transition practices may help prevent gaps between pediatric and adult care but do not appear to promote improvements in A1C. More robust preparation strategies and handoffs between pediatric and adult care should be evaluated.

  18. Integration of Community Pharmacists in Transition of Care (TOC) Services: Current Trends and Pharmacist Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznikar, Elizabeth A; Kroehl, Miranda E; Perica, Katharine M; Thompson, Angela M; Trinkley, Katy E

    2017-01-01

    Barriers exist for patients transitioning from one health-care setting to another, or to home, and health-care systems are falling short of meeting patient needs during this time. Community pharmacist incorporation poses a solution to the current communication breakdown and high rates of medication errors during transitions of care (TOC). The purpose of this study was to determine community pharmacists' involvement in and perceptions of TOC services. Cross-sectional study using electronic surveys nationwide to pharmacists employed by a community pharmacy chain. Of 7236 pharmacists surveyed, 546 (7.5%) responded. Only 33 (6%) pharmacists reported their pharmacy participates in TOC services. Most pharmacists (81.5%) reported receiving discharge medication lists. The most common reported barrier to TOC participation is lack of electronic integration with surrounding hospitals (51.1%). Most pharmacists agreed that (1) it is valuable to receive discharge medication lists (83.3%), (2) receiving discharge medication lists is beneficial for patients' health (89.1%), (3) discharge medication list receipt improves medication safety (88.8%). Most pharmacists reported receiving discharge medication lists and reported discharge medication lists are beneficial, but less than half purposefully used medication lists. To close TOC gaps, health-care providers must collaborate to overcome barriers for successful TOC services.

  19. Lessons learned in building a hospital-wide transition program from pediatric to adult-based health care for youth with special health care needs (YSHCN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenroeder, Albert C; Wiemann, Constance M; Bowman, Valerie F

    2016-11-01

    Advancements in medicine have increased the likelihood that children with chronic illnesses will survive childhood. The success in treatment for their conditions has not been matched by methods to effectively facilitate their transition to adult care. This short report describes lessons learned in building a hospital-wide health care transition (HCT) planning infrastructure that could help patients transition from pediatric to adult-based care regardless of disease/disability. A solid foundation on which to build a hospital-based HCT planning program includes the following: focusing on structure and processes needed to facilitate medical transition; conducting a baseline assessment of current transition policy/practice; building an understanding of the complexity and necessity of transition planning; identifying advocates for transition planning and adult providers who will accept youth with chronic medical conditions; and establishing methods to evaluate transition program building activities. The implementation of any HCT program will depend on creating a culture that expects successful HCT to be the culmination of successful pediatric care. Hospital support (resources, staff training and an expanded infrastructure into which the program can fit) is necessary for a sustainable HCT planning program.

  20. [Difficulties in communication with parents of pediatric cancer patients during the transition to palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirő, Judit; Hauser, Péter; Zörgő, Szilvia; Hegedűs, Katalin

    2017-07-01

    Adequate communication by medical personnel is especially important at certain points during the treatment of childhood cancer patients. To investigate the timing and manner of communication with parents concerning the introduction of palliative care in pediatric oncology. Structured interviews, containing 14 questions, were carried out with physicians working in pediatric oncology (n = 22). Codes were generated inductively with the aid of Atlas.ti 6.0 software. Interviews show a tendency of a one-step transition to palliative care following curative therapy. Another expert is usually involved in communication, most likely a psychologist. Regarding communication, there are expressions utilized or avoided, such as expressing clarity, self-defense and empathy. The communication of death and dying was the most contradictory. This was the first investigation regarding communication in pediatric palliative care in Hungary. Our results show that a modern perspective of palliative communication is present, but necessitates more time to become entrenched. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(30): 1175-1181.

  1. Importance and Feasibility of Transitional Care for Children With Medical Complexity: Results of a Multistakeholder Delphi Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyenaar, JoAnna K; Rizzo, Paul A; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Leslie, Laurel K; Lindenauer, Peter K; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    Children with medical complexity (CMC) account for disproportionate hospital utilization and adverse outcomes after discharge, and several gaps exist regarding the quality of hospital to home transitional care for this population. We conducted an expert elicitation process to identify important and feasible hospital to home transitional care interventions for CMC from the perspectives of parents and health care professionals. We conducted a 2-round electronic Delphi process to identify important and feasible transitional care interventions. Panelists included parents of CMC and multidisciplinary health care professionals. In the first round, panelists rated the importance and feasibility of 39 transitional care interventions on a 9-point Likert scale; agreement between panelists was defined according to RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Methods. The second round of data collection evaluated 16 interventions that panelists did not agree on in the first round and 8 new or revised interventions, accompanied by quantitative and qualitative data summaries. A total of 29 parents of CMC and 37 health care professionals participated in the Delphi process (response rate 75%). Both stakeholder panels endorsed most interventions as important; health care professionals were less likely to rate several interventions as feasible compared with the parent panel. Over 2 rounds of data collection, the 2 stakeholder panels endorsed 25 interventions as important as well as feasible. These interventions related to family engagement during the hospitalization, care coordination and social support assessment, predischarge education, and written materials. Parents and health care professionals considered several transitional care interventions important as well as feasible. This research might inform hospitals' transitional care programs and policies. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surveillance of mother-to-child HIV transmission: socioeconomic and health care coverage indicators Vigilância da transmissão vertical do HIV: indicadores socioeconômicos e de cobertura de atenção à saúde

    OpenAIRE

    Christovam Barcellos; Lisiane Morelia Weide Acosta; Eugenio Lisboa; Francisco Inácio Bastos

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify clustering areas of infants exposed to HIV during pregnancy and their association with indicators of primary care coverage and socioeconomic condition. METHODS: Ecological study where the unit of analysis was primary care coverage areas in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, in 2003. Geographical Information System and spatial analysis tools were used to describe indicators of primary care coverage areas and socioeconomic condition, and estimate the prevalence of...

  3. The Medical Home and Health Care Transition for Youth With Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Jessica E; Shattuck, Paul T; Roux, Anne M; Anderson, Kristy A; Kuo, Alice

    2018-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to describe the association between the receipt of health care transition services (HCTS) and having a medical home in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Youth with ASD receive HCTS less often than other youth with special health care needs but are in particular need of continuous, comprehensive health care. We used the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs to describe the receipt of HCTS in youth with ASD and its association with presence of a medical home. Descriptive statistics are presented, and logistic regression is used to assess the association between medical home and HCTS. Twenty-one percent of youth with ASD met the criteria for receiving HCTS. Youth with ASD and a medical home were almost 3 times as likely to receive HCTS as youth without a medical home, and youth who received family-centered care and have adequate care coordination within the medical home were more than twice as likely to receive HCTS as those who did not. Youth with ASD are not receiving HCTS at the same rate as their peers. Increasing provider awareness of autism, the components of a medical home, and of the importance of HCTS could greatly help increase the percentage of youth who receive effective HCTS. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Existence and functionality of emergency obstetric care services at district level in Kenya: theoretical coverage versus reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Kombe, Yeri; Dubourg, Dominique; Makokha, Anselimo; Evjen-Olsen, Bjørg; Mwangi, Moses; Byskov, Jens; Olsen, Øystein Evjen; Mutisya, Richard

    2013-03-25

    The knowledge on emergency obstetric care (EmOC) is limited in Kenya, where only partial data from sub-national studies exist. The EmOC process indicators have also not been integrated into routine health management information system to monitor progress in safe motherhood interventions both at national and lower levels of the health system. In a country with a high maternal mortality burden, the implication is that decision makers are unaware of the extent of need for life-saving care and, therefore, where to intervene. The objective of the study was to assess the actual existence and functionality of EmOC services at district level. This was a facility-based cross-sectional study. Data were collected from 40 health facilities offering delivery services in Malindi District, Kenya. Data presented are part of the "Response to accountable priority setting for trust in health systems" (REACT) study, in which EmOC was one of the service areas selected to assess fairness and legitimacy of priority setting in health care. The main outcome measures in this study were the number of facilities providing EmOC, their geographical distribution, and caesarean section rates in relation to World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Among the 40 facilities assessed, 29 were government owned, seven were private and four were voluntary organisations. The ratio of EmOC facilities to population size was met (6.2/500,000), compared to the recommended 5/500,000. However, using the strict WHO definition, none of the facilities met the EmOC requirements, since assisted delivery, by vacuum or forceps was not provided in any facility. Rural-urban inequities in geographical distribution of facilities were observed. The facilities were not providing sufficient life-saving care as measured by caesarean section rates, which were below recommended levels (3.7% in 2008 and 4.5% in 2009). The rates were lower in the rural than in urban areas (2.1% vs. 6.8%; p EmOC services revealed in this

  5. Universal health coverage in emerging economies: findings on health care utilization by older adults in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Williams, Jennifer Stewart; Kowal, Paul; Negin, Joel; Snodgrass, James Josh; Yawson, Alfred; Minicuci, Nadia; Thiele, Liz; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Biritwum, Richard Berko; Naidoo, Nirmala; Chatterji, Somnath

    2014-01-01

    The achievement of universal health coverage (UHC) in emerging economies is a high priority within the global community. This timely study uses standardized national population data collected from adults aged 50 and older in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa. The objective is to describe health care utilization and measure association between inpatient and outpatient service use and patient characteristics in these six low- and middle-income countries. Secondary analysis of data from the World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health Wave 1 was undertaken. Country samples are compared by socio-demographic characteristics, type of health care, and reasons for use. Logistic regressions describe association between socio-demographic and health factors and inpatient and outpatient service use. In the pooled multi-country sample of over 26,000 adults aged 50-plus, who reported getting health care the last time it was needed, almost 80% of men and women received inpatient or outpatient care, or both. Roughly 30% of men and women in the Russian Federation used inpatient services in the previous 3 years and 90% of men and women in India used outpatient services in the past year. In China, public hospitals were the most frequently used service type for 52% of men and 51% of women. Multivariable regression showed that, compared with men, women were less likely to use inpatient services and more likely to use outpatient services. Respondents with two or more chronic conditions were almost three times as likely to use inpatient services and twice as likely to use outpatient services compared with respondents with no reported chronic conditions. This study provides a basis for further investigation of country-specific responses to UHC.

  6. Health Care Transition Services for Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Perspectives of Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlthau, Karen A; Delahaye, Jennifer; Erickson-Warfield, Marji; Shui, Amy; Crossman, Morgan; van der Weerd, Emma

    2016-02-01

    This paper seeks to describe the experience of youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in making the health care transition (HCT) to adult care. We surveyed 183 parents and guardians of youth with ASD, assessing the extent to which youth and families experienced and desired HCT services, their satisfaction with services, and obstacles to transition. Descriptive statistics were used to examine HCT measures and Fisher's exact and t tests assessed whether demographic or health measures were associated with service receipt. Any measures with a P value depression to be the only variable significantly associated with service receipt. Youth who were identified by their caregivers as having depression experienced a higher rate of transition service receipt than those not identified as having depression. Findings suggest that there is a great need to address the provision of HCT services for youth with ASD. Although families who received HCT services were generally satisfied, overall rates of service receipt were quite low, and those who were not provided with services generally desired them. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Affordable Care Act's Cadillac Tax Could Affect One-Fourth Of Workers With Employer Health Coverage By 2025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshawsky, Mark J; Leahy, Michael

    2018-04-01

    The excise tax on high-cost health insurance plans (known as the Cadillac tax) under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is an important part of the law's attempt to control rising health care costs. Analysts using different data sources have come to divergent estimates of how many people would be affected by this tax. We used the National Compensation Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is better suited to this analysis because of its law-relevant details on employer-provided health benefits. Our research clarifies an important area of empirical uncertainty, thereby informing the debate about the ACA and its proposed replacements. Our base estimate of impact, 12 percent of workers participating in employer-provided health plans in 2020, lies in the middle of other estimates, but it is considerably more comprehensive, accurate, and delineated by worker characteristics (region, number of employees at the firm, industry, occupation, and so on) than others. Workers affected at the highest rate include those in education occupations and high-income workers, while those in industries involving manual labor and public safety are affected at some of the lowest rates.

  8. Meaning-Making Dynamics of Emancipated Foster Care Youth Transitioning into Higher Education: A Constructivist-Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, Jacob O.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored college transition meaning-making dynamics of emancipated foster care youth and the role campus environments play in that process. It adds to the college student development theoretical base by acknowledging the needs, goals, and values of disenfranchised college students transitioning into higher education. Emancipated foster…

  9. What does the media say about palliative care? A descriptive study of news coverage in written media in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Miriam; Navas, Alejandro; Olza, Inés; Gómez-Baceiredo, Beatriz; Pujol, Francesc; Garralda, Eduardo; Centeno, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The goal of palliative care (PC) is to improve the quality of life of terminal stage patients and their families. The subject frequently appears in the mass-media and this helps create a socially accepted identity. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse PC related news items appeared in the Spanish written media. Methodology A descriptive cross-sectional study was designed. Considering diffusion, scope and the range in editorial policy criteria, four printed newspapers (PN) were selected, together with four exclusively digital media sources (DM). Through Mynews, a newspaper content depository, and the search tool for each DM website, articles published between 2009 and 2014 which included the terms "palliative care" and "palliative medicine" were sought. A questionnaire was created to characterise each article identified and a descriptive analysis was undertaken. Results A total of 627 articles were identified, of which 359 (57%) were published in PN (42% in the printed editions -PE- 16% in their online editions -OE-) and 268 (43%) in DM. In general, they appeared mainly in sections concerning Health (23%), Culture and Society (18%) and General/Home News (15%). In PE, just 2% were found in the Health section and nearly 70% in Culture and Society and General/Home News. Most of the articles were informative in nature and contained socio-political messages (90%). Statements by PC professionals were found in 35% of the articles and by politicians in 32%. The most frequent content was related to facing end of life (74%) and patient quality of life (70%). Conclusions The Spanish written media reflects the socio-political interest aroused by PC. Nevertheless, messages circulating about PC do not describe professional practice, or the contribution of the same for patients. Content more in line with the clinical practice might help contribute to the development of this new area of medicine. PMID:28968433

  10. What does the media say about palliative care? A descriptive study of news coverage in written media in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, José Miguel; García, Miriam; Navas, Alejandro; Olza, Inés; Gómez-Baceiredo, Beatriz; Pujol, Francesc; Garralda, Eduardo; Centeno, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The goal of palliative care (PC) is to improve the quality of life of terminal stage patients and their families. The subject frequently appears in the mass-media and this helps create a socially accepted identity. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse PC related news items appeared in the Spanish written media. A descriptive cross-sectional study was designed. Considering diffusion, scope and the range in editorial policy criteria, four printed newspapers (PN) were selected, together with four exclusively digital media sources (DM). Through Mynews, a newspaper content depository, and the search tool for each DM website, articles published between 2009 and 2014 which included the terms "palliative care" and "palliative medicine" were sought. A questionnaire was created to characterise each article identified and a descriptive analysis was undertaken. A total of 627 articles were identified, of which 359 (57%) were published in PN (42% in the printed editions -PE- 16% in their online editions -OE-) and 268 (43%) in DM. In general, they appeared mainly in sections concerning Health (23%), Culture and Society (18%) and General/Home News (15%). In PE, just 2% were found in the Health section and nearly 70% in Culture and Society and General/Home News. Most of the articles were informative in nature and contained socio-political messages (90%). Statements by PC professionals were found in 35% of the articles and by politicians in 32%. The most frequent content was related to facing end of life (74%) and patient quality of life (70%). The Spanish written media reflects the socio-political interest aroused by PC. Nevertheless, messages circulating about PC do not describe professional practice, or the contribution of the same for patients. Content more in line with the clinical practice might help contribute to the development of this new area of medicine.

  11. The impact of transitional programmes on post-transition outcomes for youth leaving out-of-home care: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerde, Jessica A; Hemphill, Sheryl A; Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E

    2018-01-01

    Youth residing in out-of-home care settings have often been exposed to childhood trauma, and commonly report experiencing adverse outcomes after transitioning from care. This meta-analysis appraised internationally published literature investigating the impact of transitional programme participation (among youth with a baseline age of 15-24 years) on post-transition outcomes of housing, education, employment, mental health and substance use. A comprehensive search of sociology (e.g. ProQuest Sociology), psychology (e.g. PsycInfo) and health (e.g. ProQuest Family Health) electronic abstraction databases was conducted for the period 1990-2014. Search terms included 'out-of-home care', 'transition', 'housing', 'education', 'employment', 'mental health' and 'substance use'. Nineteen studies, all from the United States, met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Living independently and homelessness were the most commonly described housing outcomes. Rates of post-transition employment varied, while rates of post-secondary education were low. Depression and alcohol use were commonly reported among transitioning youth. Findings of the meta-analysis showed that attention should be given to the potential benefit of transitional programme participation on outcomes such as housing, employment and education. Moderator analyses showed that these benefits may differ based on study design, sample size and sampling unit, but not for mean age or gender. Detailed and rigorous research is needed internationally to examine the characteristics of transitional programmes resulting in more successful outcomes for youth, and whether these outcomes are sustained longitudinally. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A European study investigating patterns of transition from home care towards institutional dementia care: the protocol of a RightTimePlaceCare study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Hilde; Meyer, Gabriele; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Saks, Kai; Soto, Maria Eugenia; Challis, David; Sauerland, Dirk; Hamers, Jan P H

    2012-01-23

    Health care policies in many countries aim to enable people with dementia to live in their own homes as long as possible. However, at some point during the disease the needs of a significant number of people with dementia cannot be appropriately met at home and institutional care is required. Evidence as to best practice strategies enabling people with dementia to live at home as long as possible and also identifying the right time to trigger admission to a long-term nursing care facility is therefore urgently required. The current paper presents the rationale and methods of a study generating primary data for best-practice development in the transition from home towards institutional nursing care for people with dementia and their informal caregivers. The study has two main objectives: 1) investigate country-specific factors influencing institutionalization and 2) investigate the circumstances of people with dementia and their informal caregivers in eight European countries. Additionally, data for economic evaluation purposes are being collected. This paper describes a prospective study, conducted in eight European countries (Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom). A baseline assessment and follow-up measurement after 3 months will be performed. Two groups of people with dementia and their informal caregivers will be included: 1) newly admitted to institutional long-term nursing care facilities; and 2) receiving professional long-term home care, and being at risk for institutionalization. Data will be collected on outcomes for people with dementia (e.g. quality of life, quality of care), informal caregivers (e.g. caregiver burden, quality of life) and costs (e.g. resource utilization). Statistical analyses consist of descriptive and multivariate regression techniques and cross-country comparisons. The current study, which is part of a large European project 'RightTimePlaceCare', generates primary data on outcomes and costs

  13. Development and testing of a measure designed to assess the quality of care transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Coleman

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: To improve the quality of care delivered to older persons receiving care across multiple settings, interventions are needed. However, the absence of a patient-centred measure specifically designed to assess this care has constrained innovation. Objective: To develop a rigorously designed and tested measure, the Care Transition Measure (CTM. Setting: A large, integrated managed care organisation in Colorado with approximately 55,000 members over the age of 65 years. Participants: Patients 65 years and older who were recently discharged from hospital and received subsequent skilled nursing care in a facility or in the home. Methods: Six focus groups of older persons and their caregivers (n=49 were established. Standard qualitative analytic techniques were applied to written transcripts and four key domains were identified: (1 information transfer; (2 patient and caregiver preparation; (3 self-management support; and (4 empowerment to assert preferences. Specific CTM items were developed, pilot tested, and refined. Psychometric testing, conducted in a different population but selected using the same entry criteria (n=60, included content and construct validity, intra-item variation, and floor/ceiling properties. Results: Older patients and clinicians found the measure to be highly relevant and comprehensive (i.e. content validity. Construct validity was assessed by comparing items from the CTM to selected items from a measure developed by Hendriks and colleagues (Medical Care 2001; 39(3: 270–283. Inter-item Spearman correlations ranged 0.388–0.594. No significant floor or ceiling effects were detected. Conclusions: The CTM was developed with substantial input from older patients and their caregivers. Psychometric testing suggested that the measure was valid. The CTM may serve to fill an important gap in health system performance evaluation by measuring the quality of care delivered across settings.

  14. Transitions between health care settings in the final three months of life in four EU countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Block, Lieve; Pivodic, Lara; Pardon, Koen; Donker, Gé; Miccinesi, Guido; Moreels, Sarah; Vega Alonso, Tomas; Deliens, Luc; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje

    2015-08-01

    Transitions between care settings may be related to poor quality in end-of-life care. Yet there is a lack of cross-national population-based data on transitions at the end of life. International mortality follow-back study with data collection in Belgium, Netherlands, Italy and Spain (2009-11) via existing representative epidemiological surveillance networks of general practitioners (GPs). All general practitioners reported weekly, on a standardized registration form, every deceased patient (≥18 years) in their practice and identified those who died 'non-suddenly'. Among 4791 non-sudden deaths in Belgium, Netherlands, Italy and Spain, 59%, 55%, 60% and 58%, respectively, were transferred between care settings at least once in the final 3 months of life (10%, 8%, 10% and 13% in final 3 days of life); 10%, 5%, 8% and 12% were transferred three times or more (P Spain, respectively (P EU countries, in particular late hospitalizations for people residing at home. Frequency, type and reasons for terminal hospitalizations vary between countries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  15. Transitions of Care in Medical Education: A Compilation of Effective Teaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBryde, Meagan; Vandiver, Jeremy W; Onysko, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Transitioning patients safely from the inpatient environment back to an outpatient environment is an important component of health care, and multidisciplinary cooperation and formal processes are necessary to accomplish this task. This Transitions of Care (TOC) process is constantly being shaped in health care systems to improve patient safety, outcomes, and satisfaction. While there are many models that have been published on methods to improve the TOC process systematically, there is no clear roadmap for educators to teach TOC concepts to providers in training. This article reviews published data to highlight specific methods shown to effectively instill these concepts and values into medical students and residents. Formal, evidence-based, TOC curriculum should be developed within medical schools and residency programs. TOC education should ideally begin early in the education process, and its importance should be reiterated throughout the curriculum longitudinally. Curriculum should have a specific focus on recognition of common causes of hospital readmissions, such as medication errors, lack of adequate follow-up visits, and social/economic barriers. Use of didactic lectures, case-based workshops, role-playing activities, home visits, interprofessional activities, and resident-led quality improvement projects have all be shown to be effective ways to teach TOC concepts.

  16. Health trajectories of family caregivers: associations with care transitions and adult day service use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H

    2015-06-01

    The study examines family caregivers' health changes over 1 year on four health dimensions and explores the association of differential health trajectories with adult day service (ADS) use and caregiving transitions. The participants were 153 primary caregivers of individuals with dementia (IWDs) who provided information on care situations and their own health at baseline, 6-month, and 12-month interviews. Caregivers showed increasing functional limitations and decreasing bodily pain over time, whereas role limitation and general health perception remained stable. Furthermore, caregivers' trajectories of functional limitation were associated with their extent of ADS use at baseline and their relatives' placement. Health is multidimensional; all dimensions of caregiver health do not change in a uniform manner. The findings underscore the importance of the association of caregiving transitions and caregiver health and the potential health benefits of ADS use for family caregivers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Economic transition and maternal health care for internal migrants in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaokang, Zhan; Zhenwei, Sun; Blas, Erik

    2002-12-01

    Economic migration and growth in informal employment in many of the major cities of developing countries, combined with health sector reforms that are increasingly relying on insurance and out-of-pocket payment, are raising concerns about equity and sustainability of economic and social development. In China, the number of internal migrants has dramatically grown since economic transition started in 1980, and maternal health care for these is a pressing issue to be addressed. To provide information for policy-makers and health administrators, a medical records review, a questionnaire survey and qualitative interviews were carried out in Minhang District, Shanghai. This paper describes important inequities in main maternal health outcomes and utilization indicators relating to economic and social transformation of the Chinese society. Analysis of the data collected clarifies that insufficient antenatal care is one of the main determinants for poor maternal health outcomes and that migrants are using antenatal care services significantly less than permanent residents. The data suggest that there is no single explanatory factor, but that migrants are faced with a package of obstacles to accessing health care services, and that health systems may need to rethink and redesign their delivery approaches to specifically target those groups that are faced with such multi-faceted packages of obstacles to service-access. Although the study addresses a specific Chinese phenomenon related to internal migration and registration of residency, parallels can be drawn to other settings where a combination of economic and social transitions of the society and a reform of health care financing are potentially creating the same conditions of significant inequalities.

  18. Transition of Care from the Emergency Department to the Outpatient Setting: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad S. Kessler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of this study was to characterize current practices in the transition of care between the emergency department and primary care setting, with an emphasis on the use of the electronic medical record (EMR. Methods: Using literature review and modified Delphi technique, we created and tested a pilot survey to evaluate for face and content validity. The final survey was then administered face-to-face at eight different clinical sites across the country. A total of 52 emergency physicians (EP and 49 primary care physicians (PCP were surveyed and analyzed. We performed quantitative analysis using chi-square test. Two independent coders performed a qualitative analysis, classifying answers by pre-defined themes (inter-rater reliability > 80%. Participants’ answers could cross several pre-defined themes within a given question. Results: EPs were more likely to prefer telephone communication compared with PCPs (30/52 [57.7%] vs. 3/49 [6.1%] P < 0.0001, whereas PCPs were more likely to prefer using the EMR for discharge communication compared with EPs (33/49 [67.4%] vs. 13/52 [25%] p < 0.0001. EPs were more likely to report not needing to communicate with a PCP when a patient had a benign condition (23/52 [44.2%] vs. 2/49 [4.1%] p < 0.0001, but were more likely to communicate if the patient required urgent follow-up prior to discharge from the ED (33/52 [63.5%] vs. 20/49 [40.8%] p = 0.029. When discussing barriers to effective communication, 51/98 (52% stated communication logistics, followed by 49/98 (50% who reported setting/environmental constraints and 32/98 (32% who stated EMR access was a significant barrier. Conclusion: Significant differences exist between EPs and PCPs in the transition of care process. EPs preferred telephone contact synchronous to the encounter whereas PCPs preferred using the EMR asynchronous to the encounter. Providers believe EP-to-PCP contact is important for improving patient care, but report varied

  19. Transition of Care from the Emergency Department to the Outpatient Setting: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Chad S.; Schwarz, Whitney W.; Schmitz, Gillian R.; Oh, Laura; Smith, Michael D.; Gross, Eric A.; House, Hans; Wadman, Michael C.; Lo, Bruce M.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to characterize current practices in the transition of care between the emergency department and primary care setting, with an emphasis on the use of the electronic medical record (EMR). Methods Using literature review and modified Delphi technique, we created and tested a pilot survey to evaluate for face and content validity. The final survey was then administered face-to-face at eight different clinical sites across the country. A total of 52 emergency physicians (EP) and 49 primary care physicians (PCP) were surveyed and analyzed. We performed quantitative analysis using chi-square test. Two independent coders performed a qualitative analysis, classifying answers by pre-defined themes (inter-rater reliability > 80%). Participants’ answers could cross several pre-defined themes within a given question. Results EPs were more likely to prefer telephone communication compared with PCPs (30/52 [57.7%] vs. 3/49 [6.1%] P < 0.0001), whereas PCPs were more likely to prefer using the EMR for discharge communication compared with EPs (33/49 [67.4%] vs. 13/52 [25%] p < 0.0001). EPs were more likely to report not needing to communicate with a PCP when a patient had a benign condition (23/52 [44.2%] vs. 2/49 [4.1%] p < 0.0001), but were more likely to communicate if the patient required urgent follow-up prior to discharge from the ED (33/52 [63.5%] vs. 20/49 [40.8%] p = 0.029). When discussing barriers to effective communication, 51/98 (52%) stated communication logistics, followed by 49/98 (50%) who reported setting/environmental constraints and 32/98 (32%) who stated EMR access was a significant barrier. Conclusion Significant differences exist between EPs and PCPs in the transition of care process. EPs preferred telephone contact synchronous to the encounter whereas PCPs preferred using the EMR asynchronous to the encounter. Providers believe EP-to-PCP contact is important for improving patient care, but report varied expectations

  20. Type 1 diabetes mellitus care and education in China: The 3C study of coverage, cost, and care in Beijing and Shantou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Helen C; Ji, Linong; Kissimova-Skarbek, Katarzyna; Whiting, David; Aguirre, Florencia; Zhang, Puhong; Lin, Shaoda; Gong, Chunxiu; Zhao, Weigang; Lu, Juming; Guo, Xiaohui; Ji, Ying; Seuring, Till; Hong, Tianpei; Chen, Lishu; Weng, Jianping; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2017-07-01

    The paucity of data on Type 1 diabetes in China hinders progress in care and policy-making. This study compares Type 1 diabetes care and clinical outcomes in Beijing and Shantou with current clinical guidelines. The 3C Study was a cross-sectional study of the clinical practices and outcomes of people with Type 1 diabetes. The study sequentially enrolled 849 participants from hospital records, inpatient wards, and outpatient clinics. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews with patients and health professionals, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, medical records, and venous blood samples. Care was audited using ISPAD/IDF indicators. Data underwent descriptive analysis and tests for association. The median age was 22years (IQR=13-34years), and 48.4% of the sample had diabetes less than six years. The median HbA1c was 8.5% (69mmol/mol) (IQR 7.2-10.5%), with significant regional variance (p=0.002). Insulin treatment was predominantly two injections/day (45% of patients). The highest incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis was 14.4 events/100 patient years among adolescents. Of the 57.3% of patients with LDL-C>2.6mmol/L, only 11.2% received treatment. Of the 10.6% considered hypertensive, 47.1% received treatment. Rates of documented screening for retinopathy, nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy were 35.2%, 42.3%, and 25.0%, respectively. The median number of days of self-monitoring/week was 3.0 (IQR=1.0-7.0). There were significant differences in care practices across regions. The study documented an overall deficit in care with significant regional differences noted compared to practice guidelines. Modifications to treatment modalities and the structure of care may improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Young adults with spina bifida transitioned to a medical home: a survey of medical care in Jacksonville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Antonio M; Wood, David L; Keeley, Cortney; James, Hector E; Aldana, Philipp R

    2015-10-23

    OBJECT The transition of the young adult with spina bifida (YASB) from pediatric to adult health care is considered a priority by organized pediatrics. There is a paucity of transition programs and related studies. Jacksonville Health and Transition Services (JaxHATS) is one such transition program in Jacksonville, Florida. This study's purpose was to evaluate the health care access, utilization, and quality of life (QOL) of a group of YASBs who have transitioned from pediatric care. METHODS A survey tool addressing access to health care and quality of health and life was developed based on an established survey. Records of the Spinal Defects Clinic held at Wolfson Children's Hospital and JaxHATS Clinic were reviewed and YASBs (> 18 and spina bifida (SB) specialists; none reported difficulty or delays in obtaining health care. Only 2 patients required emergent care in the last year for an SB-related medical problem. Seven respondents reported very good to excellent QOL. Family, lifestyle, and environmental factors were also examined. CONCLUSIONS In this small group of YASBs with a medical home, easy access to care for medical conditions was the norm, with few individuals having recent emergency visits and almost all reporting at least a good overall QOL. Larger studies of YASBs are needed to evaluate the positive effects of medical homes on health and QOL in this population.

  2. The Role of Team Climate in Improving the Quality of Chronic Care Delivery: A Longitudinal Study among Professionals Working with Chronically Ill Adolescents in Transitional Care Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objectives:This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes inimproving the quality of chronic care delivery and(2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) teamclimate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time.

  3. Rural-urban differences in receiving guideline-recommended diabetes care and experiencing avoidable hospitalizations under a universal coverage health system: evidence from the past decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-C; Chen, L-W; Cheng, S-H

    2017-10-01

    Rural-urban differences in health remain a concern worldwide. Few studies have investigated the dynamic changes in health between rural and urban areas. This study aims to examine whether the rural-urban gap in patients' receipt of guideline-recommended care and avoidable hospitalizations has decreased in 10 years under a universal coverage health system. A retrospective cohort study design. This study utilized nationwide health insurance claims data of 3 representative cohorts of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in 2000, 2005, and 2010 in Taiwan. The two outcome variables were receipt of guideline-recommended care and avoidable hospitalizations for diabetes. Generalized estimating equations models were used to estimate the rural-urban differences while controlling for physician-clustering effects. Rural diabetic patients were less likely to receive guideline-recommended examinations/tests in 2000 (e β  = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.96-0.99); however, the average number of examinations/tests increased and the rural-urban difference had diminished in 2010. The likelihood of avoidable hospitalizations for diabetes among rural diabetic patients was higher than that for their urban counterparts in 2000 (odds ratio [OR]: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01-1.25). Although the likelihood of avoidable hospitalizations for diabetes decreased from 2000 to 2010, the rural-urban gap remained during this period. The rural-urban disparity in receiving recommended diabetes care diminished over the past decade. However, significant gaps between rural and urban areas in avoidable hospitalizations for diabetes persisted despite the universal health system. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Amendment to the interim final rules for group health plans and health insurance coverage relating to status as a grandfathered health plan under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Amendment to interim final rules with request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    This document contains an amendment to interim final regulations implementing the rules for group health plans and health insurance coverage in the group and individual markets under provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act regarding status as a grandfathered health plan; the amendment permits certain changes in policies, certificates, or contracts of insurance without loss of grandfathered status.

  5. Antipsychotic utilization in the intensive care unit and in transitions of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; Herzig, Shoshana J; Howell, Michael D; Le, Stephen H; Mathew, Chris; Kats, Julia S; Stevens, Jennifer P

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the rate at which newly initiated antipsychotic therapy is continued on discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU) and describe risk factors for continuation post-ICU discharge. This is a retrospective cohort study of all patients receiving an antipsychotic in the ICUs of a large academic medical center from January 1, 2005, to October 31, 2011. Medical record review was conducted to ascertain whether a patient was newly started on antipsychotic therapy and whether therapy was continued post-ICU discharge. A total of 39,248 ICU admissions over the 7-year period were evaluated. Of these, 4468 (11%) were exposed to antipsychotic therapy, of which 3119 (8%) were newly initiated. In the newly initiated cohort, 642 (21%) were continued on therapy on discharge from the hospital. Type of drug (use of quetiapine vs no use of quetiapine: odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-4.0; P antipsychotics on discharge despite adjustment for clinical factors. Antipsychotic use is common in the ICU setting, and a significant number of newly initiated patients have therapy continued upon discharge from the hospital. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transition into adult care: factors associated with level of preparedness among adolescents living with HIV in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Ngin, Chanrith; Pal, Khuondyla; Khol, Vohith; Tuot, Sovannary; Sau, Sokunmealiny; Chhoun, Pheak; Mburu, Gitau; Choub, Sok Chamreun; Chhim, Kolab; Ly, Penhsun

    2017-07-17

    Preparing adolescents for transition into adult care and supporting their acquisition of self-health care management skills is a critical determinant of their post-transition HIV care outcomes. However, there is a scarcity of research on effective transition strategies. This study explores factors associated with adolescent preparedness for transition into adult care in Cambodia. In August 2016, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 223 adolescents living with HIV aged 15-17, randomly selected from 11 antiretroviral therapy clinics, utilizing a structured questionnaire. The level of preparedness was determined using a pre-existing scale, and adolescents were categorized as having a high- or low level of preparedness for transition. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Of 223 adolescents, 55.2% were male, and their mean age was 15.8 years. Overall, 53.3% had a high level of preparedness for transition. As part of the transition protocol, 2.7% had completed a transfer form, 24.7% had a transition case manager, 29.6% had been counselled about the transition, and 19.7% had visited an adult ART clinic. In multivariate analysis, a higher level of preparedness for transition was independently associated with older age (AOR 2.44, 95% CI 1.34-4.46; p = 0.004), family having received social support for their health (AOR 5.32, 95% CI 1.97-14.36; p = 0.001), knowing the kind of treatment they received (ART) (AOR 12.67, 95% CI 2.91-15.19; p = 0.001), trust in friends or family for HIV treatment (AOR 7.82, 95% CI 1.13-8.89; p = 0.008), receiving counseling on transition (AOR 3.17, 95% CI 1.15-8.76; p = 0.03), having a 'Case Manager' identified to support them during the preparation process for transition (AOR 3.89, 95% CI 1.08-13.96; p = 0.04), and satisfaction with preparation process for transition in general (AOR 0.35, 95% CI 0.03-0.87; p = 0.01). A range of individual, social and health system and services factors may determine successful

  7. A Review of Interventions Aimed at Facilitating Successful Transition Planning and Transfer to Adult Care Among Youth with Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Shapiro, Jenna B

    2017-05-01

    This article reviews studies that developed interventions aimed at facilitating the transition process and/or the transfer of youth with chronic illness to adult programs during the past decade. Three key intervention approaches have been studied. Data assessing the impact of transition coordinators suggest that the most successful outcomes occur when coordinators meet with patients prior to the transfer of care, support them as they negotiate the adult programs, and facilitate appointment keeping. Data assessing the impact of transition clinics suggest that the key to positive outcomes is helping patients develop a trusting relationship with the adult providers before fully transferring their care to the adult clinic. Similar conclusions can be drawn for transition programs, where it appears that the opportunity to discuss and plan transition with a pediatric provider over time and to meet with both the pediatric and adult providers simultaneously are beneficial for facilitating successful transfer to adult care. Although aspects of these care processes appear promising for improving transition success, this review identifies areas that need further study. We argue that studies are needed that examine individual patient and family-focused interventions as well as looking at other potential interventions in the health care system. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e182-e187.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Transition from pediatric to adult care for adolescents and young adults with a disorder of sex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullmann, Stephanie E; Chalmers, Laura J; Wisniewski, Amy B

    2012-04-01

    Over the past twenty years, there has been an increasing awareness of the transition to adult-oriented health care in adolescents and young adults with a chronic illness. While general guidelines for health care transition have been established, some have called for illness-specific guidelines which are tailored to the needs of specific illness populations. The current paper sought to outline illness-specific guidelines for health care transition in adolescents and young adults with disorders of sex development based upon the recent American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. We also suggest indicators of successful transition for adolescents and young adults with disorders of sex development as well as areas for future research.

  9. Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care. Issue Brief 1: Education Programs. OPRE Report No. 2014-66

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy; Smithgall, Cheryl; Courtney, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care and into adulthood need many supports to navigate the challenges they face. Over the past three decades, federal child welfare policy has significantly increased the availability of those supports. In 1999, the Foster Care Independence Act amended Title IV-E of the Social Security Act to create the Chafee…

  10. Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care. Issue Brief 3: Employment Programs. OPRE Report No. 2014-70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Sara; Lowenstein, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This issue brief is one of three that focus on programs providing services to youth transitioning out of foster care in three common service domains: education, employment, and financial literacy and asset building. This brief highlights why employment services are important to youth currently or formerly in foster care, what we know about the…

  11. Balancing explicit with general information and realism with hope. Communication at the transition to palliative breast cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    The transition to palliative (breast)cancer care is a stressful event. It is important to communicate such information with care for patients’ needs. Patients seem to have two distinct needs, the need to know and understand and the need to feel known and understood. Oncologists can respond to these

  12. Dementia and Transitioning from Assisted Living to Memory Care Units: Perspectives of Administrators in Three Facility Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Susan G.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines transitioning residents with Alzheimer's disease or a related disorder (ADRD) from assisted living facilities (ALFs) to memory care units (MCUs) from the perspective of 3 ALF organizational models: freestanding ALFs, ALFs with MCUs, and ALFs in continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) with MCUs. Design and…

  13. Consensus statement on the management of the GH-treated adolescent in the transition to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, P E; Cuneo, R C; Juul, A

    2005-01-01

    The European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology held a consensus workshop in Manchester, UK in December 2003 to discuss issues relating to the care of GH-treated patients in the transition from paediatric to adult life. Clinicians experienced in the care of paediatric and adult patients on GH t...

  14. Consensus statement on the management of the GH-treated adolescent in the transition to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, P E; Cuneo, R C; Juul, A

    2005-01-01

    The European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology held a consensus workshop in Manchester, UK in December 2003 to discuss issues relating to the care of GH-treated patients in the transition from paediatric to adult life. Clinicians experienced in the care of paediatric and adult patients on GH...

  15. Professional's Perspectives on Care Management of Young People with Perinatally Acquired HIV during Transition: A Qualitative Study in Adult Care Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enora Le Roux

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of young people with perinatally acquired HIV are surviving to adulthood. When they come of age, they leave pediatric services in which they were followed and have to be transferred to the adult health care system. Difficulties in adaptation to adult care and the numbers of young people lost to follow up after transfer to adult care have been reported. This transition phase and their retention in adult care are crucial in maintaining the clinical status of these young with HIV in adulthood. Our study aimed to explore how HIV professionals working in adult care perceive and adapt their practices to young people in transition.Qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 health and social services professionals in hospitals or patient associations in France. A thematic analysis was conducted.Adult care professionals were found to be making a distinction between these young people and their patients who were infected during adulthood. On the basis of the healthcare teams' experience, a simplified categorization of these young people into four levels can be used: those "who have everything good"; those who have some deficiencies that must be addressed; those "who have everything bad"; and those lost to follow up. Professionals interviewed highlighted the difficulties they encountered with young people in transition. Three types of problematic situations were identified: problems of acceptance of the disease; communication problems; and problems of disorientation in the new care environment.Despite the lack of specific training or national policy recommendations for the integration of young people with perinatally acquired HIV into adult services, all the adult healthcare teams interviewed tried to adapt their practice to this population. The results suggested that professional involvement during transition should depend on the characteristics of the patient, not be limited to a single transition model and that a dedicated

  16. Assessing the congruence of transition preparedness as reported by parents and their adolescents with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Caprice; Huang, I-Chan; Hinojosa, Melanie; Baker, Kimberly; Sloyer, Phyllis

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have investigated how prepared adolescents are to transition to adult health care and barriers to transition for adolescents with special health care needs. The majority of these studies, however, have only assessed these experiences from the parents' point of view. Our study aims to assess the congruence of adolescents and parents reported transition planning and the factors associated with planning. A secondary data analysis was conducted using telephone survey data. Data were collected from parents and adolescents with special health care needs who received health care through Florida's Title V public insurance program. The final sample included 376 matched pairs of adolescent-parent surveys. To assess health care transition planning, respondents were asked if discussions had occurred with the adolescents' doctor, nurse, or with each other. Parents reported higher levels of planning than adolescents. Results show the lowest level of agreement between the parent and adolescent reports (κ < 0.2) and the highest level of agreement when parents and adolescents were asked if they discussed transition with each other (κ = 0.19). Regression results suggest that older adolescents are more prepared (vs. younger) and that adolescents whose parents have lower educational attainment are less prepared for transition. Results from this study suggest that there may be miscommunication around discussions related to transition, although further research is warranted. It is important to ensure that adolescents, not just parents, have a thorough understanding of transition since they will ultimately be responsible for their own health care once they reach adulthood.

  17. Center for stroke disparities solutions community- based care transition interventions: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Penny H; McDonald, Margaret V; Trachtenberg, Melissa A; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Coyne, Noreen; Teresi, Jeanne

    2015-01-27

    Racial and ethnic disparities persist in stroke occurrence, recurrence, morbidity and mortality. Uncontrolled hypertension (HTN) is the most important modifiable risk factor for stroke risk. Home health care organizations care for many patients with uncontrolled HTN and history of stroke; however, recurrent stroke prevention has not been a home care priority. We are conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to compare the effectiveness, relative to usual home care (UHC), of two Community Transitions Interventions (CTIs). The CTIs aim to reduce recurrent stroke risk among post-stroke patients via home-based transitional care focused on better HTN management. This 3-arm trial will randomly assign 495 black and Hispanic post-stroke home care patients with uncontrolled systolic blood pressure (SBP) to one of three arms: UHC, UHC complemented by nurse practitioner-delivered transitional care (UHC + NP) or UHC complemented by an NP plus health coach (UHC + NP + HC). Both intervention arms emphasize: 1) linking patients to continuous, responsive preventive and primary care, 2) increasing patients'/caregivers' ability to manage a culturally and individually tailored BP reduction plan, and 3) facilitating the patient's reintegration into the community after home health care discharge. The primary hypothesis is that both NP-only and NP + HC transitional care will be more effective than UHC alone in achieving a SBP reduction. The primary outcome is change in SPB at 3 and 12 months. The study also will examine cost-effectiveness, quality of life and moderators (for example, race/ethnicity) and mediators (for example, changes in health behaviors) that may affect treatment outcomes. All outcome data are collected by staff blinded to group assignment. This study targets care gaps affecting a particularly vulnerable black/Hispanic population characterized by persistent stroke disparities. It focuses on care transitions, a juncture when patients are

  18. Transitioning from caregiver to visitor in a long-term care facility: the experience of caregivers of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, K; Digby, R; Bloomer, M; Tan, H; Williams, A

    2015-01-01

    Transitioning from the primary caregiver to the visitor in a long-term care facility may be challenging for the caregiver; they are required to surrender their caring duties to the medical and nursing staff. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of caregivers during their transition from day-to-day caregiver of a person with dementia to a visitor in a long-term care facility. This study utilised a qualitative descriptive design. Twenty caregivers of people with dementia were recruited from the one Aged Rehabilitation and Geriatric Evaluation and Management facility, located in Victoria, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the caregiver's experiences. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The interview data revealed that the participants were undergoing similar experiences. The findings revealed that it was difficult for the caregiver to transition to their new role of visitor; negative reactions of grief, loss of motivation and loneliness were also coupled with positive feelings of relief and the reassurance that their relative or friend would be well cared for and safe within the long-term care facility. The findings offer insight into the experiences felt by caregivers when their relative or friend with dementia is admitted to hospital. Implications of this study include the need to improve the transition process for the caregiver by allowing them to be involved in the decision-making process, keeping them informed of care decisions, and importantly, providing emotional support to help the caregiver positively adapt to this transition.

  19. Adolescent and Adult HIV Providers' Definitions of HIV-Infected Youths' Successful Transition to Adult Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; Ma, Alice; Chambers, Brittany D; Ware, Samuella; Kinnard, Elizabeth N; Hussen, Sophia A; Lee, Sonia; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2017-10-01

    It is important for both individual- and population-level health that HIV-infected individuals progress through the Care Continuum. However, HIV-infected youth frequently disengage from care during transition from pediatric/adolescent to adult care; only 50% remain in adult care after 1 year. Understanding how providers define and approach a successful healthcare transition can improve the delivery of HIV-related services during critical years of HIV treatment. We conducted 58 staff interviews across 14 Adolescent Trials Network clinics (n = 30) and 20 adult clinics (n = 28). We used the constant comparative method to examine how providers defined and approached youths' successful transition. Providers identified four components critical to successful transition: (1) clinical outcomes (e.g., medication adherence and viral suppression); (2) youth knowing how to complete treatment-related activities (e.g., refilling prescriptions and making appointments); (3) youth taking responsibility for treatment-related activities and their overall health (e.g., "when they stop reaching out to the adolescent [clinic] to solve all their problems."); and (4) youth feeling a connection and trust toward the adult clinic (e.g., "they feel safe here"), with some providers even prioritizing connectedness over clinical outcomes (e.g., "Even if they're not taking meds but are connected [to care], …that's a success."). The identification of key components of successful transition can guide focused interventions and resources to improve youth maintenance in the HIV Care Continuum as they transition to adult care. Identifying what facilitates successful transitions, and the gaps that interventions can target, will help to ensure HIV-infected youth remain healthy across their lifespan.

  20. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct Telephonic Communication in a Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Ken S; Beutler, David S; Sheikh, Hassam; Weiss, Jessica L; Parkinson, Dallin; Nguyen, Peter; Gerkin, Richard D; Loli, Akil I

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the trend of phone calls in the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center (BGSMC) Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). The primary goal of the HFTCP is to reduce 30-Day readmissions for heart failure patients by using a multi-pronged approach. This study included 104 patients in the HFTCP discharged over a 51-week period who had around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Cellular phone records were reviewed. This study evaluated the length and timing of calls. A total of 4398 telephone calls were recorded of which 39% were inbound and 61% were outbound. This averaged to 86 calls per week. During the "Weekday Daytime" period, Eighty-five percent of the totals calls were made. There were 229 calls during the "Weekday Nights" period with 1.5 inbound calls per week. The "Total Weekend" calls were 10.2% of the total calls which equated to a weekly average of 8.8. Our experience is that direct, physician-patient telephone contact is feasible with a panel of around 100 HF patients for one provider. If the proper financial reimbursements are provided, physicians may be apt to participate in similar transitional care programs. Likewise, third party payers will benefit from the reduction in unnecessary emergency room visits and hospitalizations.

  2. Pediatric Provider's Perspectives on the Transition to Adult Health Care for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Strategies and Promising New Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlthau, Karen A.; Warfield, Marji E.; Hurson, Jill; Delahaye, Jennifer; Crossman, Morgan K.

    2015-01-01

    Few youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) nationally report receiving services to help them transition from the pediatric health care system to the adult health care system. For example, only one-fifth (21.1%) of youth with ASD receive any transition planning services. To better understand why the transition from pediatric to adult health care…

  3. Transition from pediatric to adult care in sickle cell disease: Establishing evidence-based practice and directions for research

    OpenAIRE

    Treadwell, Marsha; Telfair, Joseph; Gibson, Robert W.; Johnson, Shirley; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa

    2011-01-01

    Transition of young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) from pediatric to adult medical care is an important priority, given medical advances that have transformed SCD into a lifelong chronic condition, rather than a disease of childhood. Successful transfer from pediatric to adult care has its foundation in collaboration among the young adult, the family, and the health care system to support building skills in positive disease management and independent living. Systemic issues in transiti...

  4. The Health Care Transition of Youth With Liver Disease into the Adult Health System: Position Paper from ESPGHAN and EASL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajro, Pietro; Fischler, Björn; Burra, Patrizia; Debray, Dominique; Dezsofi, Antal; Guercio Nuzio, Salvatore; Hadzic, Nedim; Hierro, Loreto; Jahnel, Joerg; Lamireau, Thierry; McKiernan, Patrick; McLin, Valerie; Nobili, Valerio; Socha, Piotr; Smets, Francoise; Baumann, Ulli; Verkade, Henkjan J

    2018-03-22

    Medical advances have dramatically improved the long-term prognosis of children and adolescents with once-fatal hepatobiliary diseases. However, there is no generally accepted optimal pathway of care for the transition from paediatric care to the adult health system. The purpose of this position paper is to propose a transition process for young people with paediatric onset hepatobiliary diseases from child-centred to adult-centred healthcare services. Seventeen ESPGHAN/EASL physicians from 13 countries (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and United Kingdom) formulated and answered questions after examining the currently published literature on transition from childhood to adulthood. Pubmed and Google Scholar were systematically searched between 1980 and January 2018. Quality of evidence was assessed by the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Expert opinions were used to support recommendations when the evidence was graded weak. All authors voted on each recommendation, using the nominal voting technique. We reviewed the literature regarding the optimal timing for the initiation of the transition process and the transfer of the patient to adult services, principal documents, transition multi-professional team components, main barriers and goals of the general transition process. A transition plan based on available evidence was agreed focusing on the individual young people's readiness and on coordinated teamwork, with transition monitoring continuing until the first year of adult services.We further agreed on selected features of transitioning processes inherent to the most frequent paediatric-onset hepatobiliary diseases. The discussion highlights specific clinical issues that will probably present to adult gastrointestinal specialists and that should be considered, according to published evidence, in the long-term tracking of patients

  5. Health status transitions in community-living elderly with complex care needs: a latent class approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béland François

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For older persons with complex care needs, accounting for the variability and interdependency in how health dimensions manifest themselves is necessary to understand the dynamic of health status. Our objective is to test the hypothesis that a latent classification can capture this heterogeneity in a population of frail elderly persons living in the community. Based on a person-centered approach, the classification corresponds to substantively meaningful groups of individuals who present with a comparable constellation of health problems. Methods Using data collected for the SIPA project, a system of integrated care for frail older people (n = 1164, we performed latent class analyses to identify homogenous categories of health status (i.e. health profiles based on 17 indicators of prevalent health problems (chronic conditions; depression; cognition; functional and sensory limitations; instrumental, mobility and personal care disability Then, we conducted latent transition analyses to study change in profile membership over 2 consecutive periods of 12 and 10 months, respectively. We modeled competing risks for mortality and lost to follow-up as absorbing states to avoid attrition biases. Results We identified four health profiles that distinguish the physical and cognitive dimensions of health and capture severity along the disability dimension. The profiles are stable over time and robust to mortality and lost to follow-up attrition. The differentiated and gender-specific patterns of transition probabilities demonstrate the profiles' sensitivity to change in health status and unmasked the differential relationship of physical and cognitive domains with progression in disability. Conclusion Our approach may prove useful at organization and policy levels where many issues call for classification of individuals into pragmatically meaningful groups. In dealing with attrition biases, our analytical strategy could provide critical

  6. Systems of care: transition from the bio-psycho-social perspective of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus de Camargo, O

    2011-11-01

    The transition process of vulnerable adolescents, including those with complex health conditions, occurs in all domains of their life. Systems of care are usually designed but also restricted within certain aspects of life, as addressed by health, education and social welfare. The need for a co-ordinated approach to support the transition process has been voiced before, but usually publications focus on one system of care, usually the healthcare system or the education system. Recent moves, especially in the UK, are trying to integrate these different systems allowing for a more integrated transition process. This article illustrates how these developments are represented within the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and provides arguments that favour a greater integration of systems of care. Examples of systems of care from North America and the EU (Germany and the UK) are described. They were selected from a literature search using the terms 'systems of care', 'transition' and 'transitional care' in different combinations. Further supportive information derives from personal experience working in some of these systems in different countries. The systems were analysed according to the components of health they address within the ICF. In order to assist adolescents in transition of services, there is a consensus that the approach should be individualized. The overall goal of any intervention or service should be to achieve optimal functioning of the patients. In the framework of the ICF, this means that biomedical and contextual (psychosocial) issues need to be taken into consideration. This requires an exchange of information between the different systems or the integration of those systems involved with the patient. To facilitate transition, it has been shown that close collaboration between agencies, a transdisciplinary approach of the professionals involved and the use of key workers are helpful. © 2011

  7. Medicare Coverage Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Coverage Database (MCD) contains all National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs), local articles, and proposed NCD...

  8. Quality and safety in transitional care of the elderly: the study protocol of a case study research design (phase 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aase, Karina; Laugaland, Kristin Alstveit; Dyrstad, Dagrunn Nåden; Storm, Marianne

    2013-08-07

    Although international studies have documented that patients' transitions between care providers are associated with the risk of adverse events and uncoordinated care, research directed towards the quality and safety of transitional care between primary and secondary health and care services, especially for the elderly receiving care from multiple healthcare providers due to complex health problems, is lacking. This study investigates how different aspects of transitional care can explain the quality and safety of elderly healthcare services in Norway. The overall aim of the study was to explore different aspects of transitional care of the elderly, in different contexts and how they might explain the quality and safety of care. The study applies a case study design. Two cases are chosen: one city-based hospital and one rural hospital with associated nursing homes and home-based nursing services. Admission and discharge to/from hospital to/from nursing homes or home-based nursing services constitute the main focal areas of the study, including the patient, next-of-kin and the professional perspective. The qualitative methods employed include participant observation, individual interviews and document analysis. To ensure trustworthiness in the data analysis, we will apply analyst triangulation and member checks. A total impression of the data material will first be created in a systematic text condensation approach. Second, the qualitative data analysis will involve in-depth analyses of two specific themes: the risk perspective and the patient perspective in transitional care. The study is approved by the Norwegian Regional Committees for Medical and Health Research Ethics. The study is based on informed written consent, and informants can withdraw from the study at any point in time. Interview and observation data material will be managed confidentially. It will be disseminated at research conferences, in peer-reviewed journals and through public presentations to

  9. UK guideline on transition of adolescent and young persons with chronic digestive diseases from paediatric to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Alenka J; Smith, Philip J; Cohen, Richard; Collins, Paul; Douds, Andrew; Forbes, Valda; Gaya, Daniel R; Johnston, Brian T; McKiernan, Patrick J; Murray, Charles D; Sebastian, Shaji; Smith, Monica; Whitley, Lisa; Williams, Lesley; Russell, Richard K; McCartney, Sara A; Lindsay, James O

    2017-06-01

    The risks of poor transition include delayed and inappropriate transfer that can result in disengagement with healthcare. Structured transition care can improve control of chronic digestive diseases and long-term health-related outcomes. These are the first nationally developed guidelines on the transition of adolescent and young persons (AYP) with chronic digestive diseases from paediatric to adult care. They were commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee of the British Society of Gastroenterology under the auspices of the Adolescent and Young Persons (A&YP) Section. Electronic searches for English-language articles were performed with keywords relating to digestive system diseases and transition to adult care in the Medline (via Ovid), PsycInfo (via Ovid), Web of Science and CINAHL databases for studies published from 1980 to September 2014. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The limited number of studies in gastroenterology and hepatology required the addition of relevant studies from other chronic diseases to be included.These guidelines deal specifically with the transition of AYP living with a diagnosis of chronic digestive disease and/or liver disease from paediatric to adult healthcare under the following headings;1. Patient populations involved in AYP transition2. Risks of failing transition or poor transition3. Models of AYP transition4. Patient and carer/parent perspective in AYP transition5. Surgical perspective. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Hospital to community transitional care by nurse practitioners: a systematic review of cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Faith; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Reid, Kim; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia; Marshall, Deborah; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-01-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners delivering transitional care. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Ten electronic databases, bibliographies, hand-searches, study authors, and websites. We included randomised controlled trials that compared formally trained nurse practitioners to usual care and measured health system outcomes. Two reviewers independently screened articles and assessed study quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias and the Quality of Health Economic Studies tools. We pooled data for similar outcomes and applied the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation tool to rate the quality of evidence for each outcome. Five trials met the inclusion criteria. One evaluated one alternative provider nurse practitioner (154 patients) and four evaluated six complementary provider nurse practitioners (1017 patients). Two were at low and three at high risk of bias and all had weak economic analyses. The alternative provider nurse practitioner had similar patient outcomes and resource use to the physician (low quality). Complementary provider nurse practitioners scored similarly to the control group in patient outcomes except for anxiety in rehabilitation patients (MD: -15.7, 95%CI: -20.73 to -10.67, pnurse practitioner care. Meta-analyses of index re-hospitalisation up to 42 days (n=766, pooled relative risk (RR): 0.69, 95%CI: 0.34-1.43, I(2)=0%) and any re-hospitalisation up to 180 days (n=800, pooled RR: 0.87, 95%CI: 0.69-1.09, I(2)=32%) were inconclusive (low quality). Complementary provider nurse practitioners significantly reduced index re-hospitalisation over 90 days (RR: 0.55, 95%CI: 0.32-0.94, p=0.03) and 180 days (RR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.40-0.95, p=0.03) in complex care patients (both low quality) and they significantly reduced the number and duration of rehabilitation patient-to-staff consultation calls (pnurse practitioners evaluated in each study, evidence of the cost-effectiveness of nurse

  11. Functional health literacy among primary health care users in transitional Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamberi, Haxhi; Hysa, Bajram; Toçi, Ervin; Jerliu, Naim; Qirjako, Gentiana; Burazeri, Genc

    2013-01-01

    Adequate functional health literacy is considered as a basic prerequisite for a proper health-seeking behavior of adult individuals. Our aim was to assess the levels and socioeconomic correlates of functional health literacy among adult primary care users in transitional Kosovo. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Kosovo in November 2012-February 2013 including a representative sample of 1035 primary health care users aged > or = 18 years (60% females; overall mean age: 44.3 +/- 16.9 years; overall response rate: 86%). The cross-culturally adapted long version of TOFHLA test (an instrument assessing reading comprehension and numerical abilities) was used to assess functional health literacy among study participants. TOFHLA scores range between 0-100 with higher scores implying better functional health literacy. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the association of functional health literacy with demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Mean score of the functional health literacy was significantly higher among younger participants, in men, in highly educated individuals and participants with better self-reported income level. Our findings indicate that vulnerable socioeconomic individuals exhibit lower functional health literacy levels in post-war Kosovo. Health care professionals and particularly policy makers in Kosovo must be aware of the excess risk among the low socioeconomic groups and should tailor intervention programs accordingly.

  12. Engagement-focused care during transitions from inpatient and emergency psychiatric facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velligan DI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dawn I Velligan, Megan M Fredrick, Cynthia Sierra, Kiley Hillner, John Kliewer,† David L Roberts, Jim MintzDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA†Dr John Kliewer passed away on April 5, 2017 Objectives: As many as 40% of those with serious mental illness (SMI do not attend any outpatient visits in the 30 days following discharge. We examined engagement-focused care (EFC versus treatment as usual in a university-based transitional care clinic (TCC with a 90-day program serving individuals with SMI discharged from hospitals and emergency rooms. EFC included a unique group intake process (access group designed to get individuals into care rapidly and a shared decision-making coach.Methods: Assessments of quality of life, symptomatology, and shared decision-making preferences were conducted at baseline, at 3 months corresponding to the end of TCC treatment and 6 months after TCC discharge. Communication among the patients and providers was assessed at each visit as was service utilization during and after TCC.Results: Subjective quality of life improved in EFC. Prescribers and patients saw communication more similarly as time went on. Ninety-one percent of patients wanted at least some say in decisions about their treatment.Conclusions: SDM coaching and improved access improve quality of life. Most people want a say in treatment decisions. Keywords: shared decision making, mental illness, community mental health, patient education

  13. Transition of Care Practices from Emergency Department to Inpatient: Survey Data and Development of Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangil Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess the current scope of handoff education and practice among resident physicians in academic centers and to propose a standardized handoff algorithm for the transition of care from the emergency department (ED to an inpatient setting. This was a cross-sectional survey targeted at the program directors, associate or assistant program directors, and faculty members of emergency medicine (EM residency programs in the United States (U.S.. The web-based survey was distributed to potential subjects through a listserv. A panel of experts used a modified Delphi approach to develop a standardized algorithm for ED to inpatient handoff. 121 of 172 programs responded to the survey for an overall response rate of 70.3%. Our survey showed that most EM programs in the U.S. have some form of handoff training, and the majority of them occur either during orientation or in the clinical setting. The handoff structure from ED to inpatient is not well standardized, and in those places with a formalized handoff system, over 70% of residents do not uniformly follow it. Approximately half of responding programs felt that their current handoff system was safe and effective. About half of the programs did not formally assess the handoff proficiency of trainees. Handoffs most commonly take place over the phone, though respondents disagree about the ideal place for a handoff to occur, with nearly equivalent responses between programs favoring the bedside over the phone or faceto-face on a computer. Approximately two-thirds of responding programs reported that their residents were competent in performing ED to inpatient handoffs. Based on this survey and on the review of the literature, we developed a five-step algorithm for the transition of care from the ED to the inpatient setting. Our results identified the current trends of education and practice in transitions of care, from the ED to the inpatient setting in U.S. academic medical centers. An algorithm

  14. Transitions of Care Between Acute and Chronic Heart Failure: Critical Steps in the Design of a Multidisciplinary Care Model for the Prevention of Rehospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Lupón, Josep; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Badosa, Neus; Verdú, José María

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, mortality, the number of readmissions, and their associated health care costs are very high. Heart failure care models inspired by the chronic care model, also known as heart failure programs or heart failure units, have shown clinical benefits in high-risk patients. However, while traditional heart failure units have focused on patients detected in the outpatient phase, the increasing pressure from hospital admissions is shifting the focus of interest toward multidisciplinary programs that concentrate on transitions of care, particularly between the acute phase and the postdischarge phase. These new integrated care models for heart failure revolve around interventions at the time of transitions of care. They are multidisciplinary and patient-centered, designed to ensure continuity of care, and have been demonstrated to reduce potentially avoidable hospital admissions. Key components of these models are early intervention during the inpatient phase, discharge planning, early postdischarge review and structured follow-up, advanced transition planning, and the involvement of physicians and nurses specialized in heart failure. It is hoped that such models will be progressively implemented across the country. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Social-support needs among adolescents living with HIV in transition from pediatric to adult care in Cambodia: findings from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Graham; Mburu, Gitau; Tuot, Sovannary; Khol, Vohith; Ngin, Chanrith; Chhoun, Pheak; Yi, Siyan

    2018-03-28

    social care. Multi-sectoral interventions, supporting school attendance, adolescent-friendly clinic scheduling, reductions in child employment, mitigation of HIV-related stigma and strengthening of peer-to-peer support are required to improve coverage of social protection interventions for adolescents in transition.

  16. Health coverage in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolone, Giovanni; Lattuada, Luca

    2003-01-01

    Italy, as other developed European countries, has a national health service (NHS) that, in principle, offers universal health care and coverage to Italians and other legal (non-Italian) residents who have full access to health care. Although Italy has always spent less for health care than other European countries (Italy, in 2002, spent about 8% of its gross national product for health care, which is approximately half the level of spending in the U.S.), the government's lack of control over spending remained the most relevant problem. To enhance the capability to control and monitor the system, mainly in terms of expenditures and costs, from the late 1990s to the present, new health reforms were introduced. These reforms were in the context of a wider change involving other politics and administrative aspects, with a strong push to decentralize the decisions and the accountability at the regional level. Now, each region has an individual Health Regional Fund allocated for health care, along with the subsequent need to implement regional and individualized strategies to assure the governance of the cost and quality of care. The National Department of Health now is solely responsible to control and monitor the delivery of the essential level of care at the regional level, and they have maintained the governance of the drug policy. Although the changes synthesized above will require a long period to be fully implemented, a few negative effects have already occurred. Nevertheless, all citizens in Italy will have full access to any level of care, without any restrictions, for complex and costly procedures (as no explicit selection/adverse criteria were implemented), and the current policy on drugs does not imply any barriers for people (as essential drugs are directly and fully reimbursed by the NHS, with a small copayment being the only intervention that may be occasionally implemented when considered necessary).

  17. Can the Medical Home eliminate racial and ethnic disparities for transition services among Youth with Special Health Care Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Nicole E; Tran, Tri; Berry, Susan

    2012-05-01

    The Medical Home (MH) is shown to improve health outcomes for Youth with Special Health Care Needs (YSHCN). Some MH services involve Transition from pediatric to adult providers to ensure YSHCN have continuous care. Studies indicate racial/ethnic disparities for Transition, whereas the MH is shown to reduce health disparities. This study aims to (1) Determine the Transition rate for YSHCN with a MH (MH Transition) nationally, and by race/ethnicity (2) Identify which characteristics are associated with MH Transition (3) Determine if racial/ethnic disparities exist after controlling for associated characteristics, and (4) Identify which characteristics are uniquely associated with each race/ethnic group. National survey data were used. YSCHN with a MH were grouped as receiving Transition or not. Characteristics included race, ethnicity (Non-Hispanic (NH), Hispanic), sex, health condition effect, five special health care need categories, education, poverty, adequate insurance, and urban/rural residence. Frequencies, chi-square, and logistic regression were used to calculate rates and define associations. Alpha was set to 0.05. About 57.0% of YSHCN received MH Transition. Rates by race/ethnicity were 59.0, 45.5, 60.2, 41.9, and 44.6% for NH-White, NH-Black, NH-Multiple race, NH-Other, and Hispanic YSHCN, respectively. Disparities remained between NH-White and NH-Black YSHCN. All characteristics except urban/rural status were associated. Adequate insurance was associated for all race/ethnic groups, except NH-Black YSHCN. Almost 57.0% of YSHCN received MH Transition. Disparities remained. Rates and associated characteristics differed by race/ethnic group. Culturally tailored interventions incorporating universal factors to improve MH Transition outcomes are warranted.

  18. Asthma Self-Management Goals, Beliefs and Behaviors of Urban African American Adolescents Prior to Transitioning to Adult Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Gourdin, Dustin; Krouse, Helene J

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a unique time of development incorporating a transition from child centered to adult centered health care. This transition period can be particularly challenging for individuals with a chronic disease such as asthma. Inadequate transition planning during adolescence may place an already vulnerable population such as African American adolescents with known health disparities in asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality at risk for a continuation of poor health outcomes across the lifespan. Central to transition planning for these youth is the core element of developing and prioritizing goals. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the asthma self-management goals, beliefs and behaviors of urban African American adolescents prior to transitioning from pediatric to adult health care. A focus group composed of 13 African American adolescents with asthma ages 14-18 years from an urban population was conducted. Responses from transcripts and field notes were reviewed using an iterative process to best characterize asthma self-management goals and beliefs that emerged. Four core themes were identified: 1) medication self-management, 2) social support, 3) independence vs. interdependence, and 4) self-advocacy. Medication self-management included subthemes of rescue medications, controller medications and medication avoidance. The social support theme included three subthemes: peer support, caregiver support and healthcare provider support. Findings suggest that adolescents with asthma form both short term and long term goals. Their goals indicated a need for guided support to facilitate a successful health care transition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of Knowledge and Low Readiness for Health Care Transition in Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluri, Swathi; Book, Wendy M; Kodroff, Ellyn; Strobel, Mary Jo; Gebhart, Jessica H; Jones, Patricia D; Menard-Katcher, Paul; Ferris, Maria E; Dellon, Evan S

    2017-07-01

    A growing population of adolescents/young adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) will need to transition from pediatric to adult health providers. Measuring health care transition (HCT) readiness is critical, but no studies have evaluated this process in EoE/EGE. We determined the scope and predictors of HCT knowledge in patients and parents with EoE/EGE and measured HCT readiness in adolescents/young adults. We conducted an online survey of patients 13 years or older and parents of patients with EoE/EGE who were diagnosed when 25 years or younger. Parents answered questions regarding their children and their own knowledge of HCT. HCT readiness was assessed in adolescents/young adults aged 13 to 25 years with the Self-Management and Transition to Adulthood with Rx Questionnaire (a 6-domain self-report tool) with a score range of 0 to 90. Four hundred fifty participants completed the survey: 205 patients and 245 parents. Included in the analysis (those diagnosed with EoE/EGE at age 25 years or younger) were 75 of 205 patients and children of 245 parent respondents. Overall, 78% (n = 52) of the patients and 76% (n = 187) of parents had no HCT knowledge. Mean HCT readiness score in adolescents/young adults (n = 50) was 30.4 ± 11.3 with higher scores in domains of provider communication and engagement during appointments. Mean parent-reported (n = 123) score was 35.6 ± 9.7 with higher scores in medication management and disease knowledge. There was a significant deficit in HCT knowledge, and HCT readiness scores were lower than other chronic health conditions. HCT preparation and readiness assessments should become a priority for adolescents/young adults with EoE/EGE and their parents.

  20. Interprofessional collaboration at transition of care: perspectives of child and family health nurses and midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaila, Kim; Schmied, Virginia; Fowler, Cathrine; Kruske, Sue

    2015-01-01

    professional differences is affected by system constraints and differing perspectives of what constitutes collaboration. Developing the capacity to collaborate is essential to ensure smooth transition of care given ongoing changes to the system. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Transitional dialysis care units: A new approach to increase home dialysis modality uptake and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfín, José A; Yang, Alex; Wang, Elizabeth; Schiller, Brigitte

    2018-01-01

    Home hemodialysis (HHD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) are associated with better clinical outcomes, lower hospitalization rates, and improved quality of life compared with conventional in-center hemodialysis. However, dialysis therapy use HHD or PD in the United States, even though over 90% of nephrologists would choose home-based dialysis modalities for themselves. Inadequate patient education and decision-making support are key barriers to patients choosing home-based therapy. Likewise, there are key challenges for dialysis providers, including development and optimal delivery of education materials, appropriate staffing, and training. The Satellite Healthcare Optimal Transitions (OT) Program was developed to provide education and decision support to patients during the transitional period. OT provides in-depth education in all dialysis modalities at the start of dialysis over a flexible time period (1-4 weeks, adapted for various learning curves) to allow for time to physical stabilization, self-care training, and modality choice based on each patient's individual life motivations, goals, and environments. OT may provide value to patients and providers by providing comprehensive support for dialysis modality selection, resulting in increased patient confidence to execute home dialysis with the potential for improved patient outcomes, and reduced hospitalizations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Up against the System: A Case Study of Young Adult Perspectives Transitioning from Pediatric Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Cook

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in pediatric care have not provided the interdisciplinary support services required by those young adults with pediatric life-threatening conditions (pedLTCs who live beyond childhood but have limited expectations to live past early adulthood. These young adults, the first generation to live into adulthood, face multiple challenges transitioning from a plethora of pediatric palliative services to scant adult health services. In a case study, using an innovative bulletin board focus group, we describe the complex interplay of the health, education, and social service sectors in this transition. Our descriptions include system deficits and strengths and the young adults’ resilience and coping strategies to overcome those deficits and move forward with their lives. Young adults with pedLTC need knowledgeable providers, coordinated and accessible services, being respected and valued, and services and supports that promote independence. We recommend implementation of multidisciplinary solutions that are focused on young adult priorities to ensure seamless access to resources to support these young adults’ health, educational, vocational, and social goals. The input and voice of young adults in the development of these services are imperative to ensure that multisystem services support their needs and life goals.

  3. On the ferries: the unmet health care needs of transiting refugees in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Clare K; Glazik, Rosanna; Sornum, Alvin; Pritchard, Ceri

    2017-09-01

    In 2015, over 850 000 refugees, asylum seekers and migrants arrived in Greece. In response to an overwhelming need for access to healthcare for them, Doctors of the World established the Refugee Ferry Project, which comprised of a clinic providing primary health care, and integrated mental health and psychosocial support on board a commercial ferry. Of the 1405 service users, 87.5% (1229/1405) originated from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq. The majority were women 801/1405 (57%) and children 511/1405 (36%), including 50 pregnant women and 19 unaccompanied minors. The most common diagnoses were respiratory tract infections, dehydration, nausea and vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain with 39.4% of the disease burden being classified as non-communicable. Exposure to violence was associated with an increased risk of developing mental health issues. Humanitarian actors face huge challenges trying to respond to the needs of transiting populations. It is only by continuous reassessment and having the capacity to mobilize and adapt to an ever-evolving situation that we can try to meet these needs. Having an integrated, flexible and multidisciplinary approach remains crucial, despite the shift from a transit to static population. With over 62 000 refugees stranded in Greece, the need to develop innovative ways to respond to their needs is greater than ever. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Physician-directed heart failure transitional care program: a retrospective case review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Ken S; Beutler, David S; Gerkin, Richard D; Weiss, Jessica L; Loli, Akil I

    2013-10-01

    Despite a variety of national efforts to improve transitions of care for patients at risk for rehospitalization, 30-day rehospitalization rates for patients with heart failure have remained largely unchanged. This is a retrospective review of 73 patients enrolled in our hospital-based, physican-directed Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). This study evaluated the 30- and 90- day readmission rates before and after enrollment in the program. The Transitionalist's services focused on bedside consultation prior to hospital discharge, follow-up home visits within 72 hours of discharge, frequent follow-up phone calls, disease-specific education, outpatient intravenous diuretic therapy, and around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. The pre-enrollment 30-day readmission rates for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and all-cause readmission was 26.0% and 28.8%, respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for ADHF and all-cause readmission were 4.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.2% (P = 0.002), respectively. The pre-enrollment 90-day all-cause and ADHF readmission rates were 69.8%, and 58.9% respectively, while the post-enrollment rates for all-cause and ADHF were 27.3% (P < 0.001) and 16.4% (P < 0.001) respectively. Our physician-implemented HFTCP reduced rehospitalization risk for patients enrolled in the program. This program may serve as a model to assist other hospital systems to reduce readmission rates of patients with HF.

  5. End-of-Life Transitions and Hospice Utilization for Adolescents: Does Having a Usual Source of Care Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Lindley, Lisa C

    2017-08-01

    Adolescents with life-limiting illnesses have intensive end-of-life trajectories and could benefit from initiation of hospice services. The medical home model, which includes having a usual source of primary care, may help facilitate quality outcomes at the end-of-life for adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between having a usual source of primary care on hospice utilization and end-of-life transitions among adolescents between 15-20 years with a life-limiting illness. A retrospective cohort design used 2007-2010 California Medicaid claims data (n=585). Our dependent variables were hospice utilization (i.e., hospice enrollment, hospice length of stay) and the independent variable was usual source of primary care. Multivariate regression techniques including least squares regression, multivariate logistic regression, and negative binomial regression were used in the analysis of the relationship between usual source of primary care and hospice utilization and end-of-life transitions. Ten percent of our sample utilized hospice services. Having a usual source of primary care was associated with an increase in hospice enrollment, hospice length of stay, and end-of-life transitions. Adolescents with a cancer diagnosis were more likely to enroll in hospice services. For adolescents at the end of life, having a usual source of primary care had a significant impact on hospice enrollment and length of stay. This study is among the first to demonstrate a relationship between primary care and hospice use among this vulnerable population.

  6. Universal Health Coverage and Primary Healthcare: Lessons From Japan Comment on "Achieving Universal Health Coverage by Focusing on Primary Care in Japan: Lessons for Low- and Middle-Income Countries".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Gerald

    2016-08-28

    A recent editorial by Naoki Ikegami has proposed three key lessons from Japan's experience of achieving virtually universal coverage with primary healthcare services: the need to integrate the existing providers of primary healthcare services into the organised health system; the need to limit government commitments to finance hospital services and the need to empower providers of primary healthcare to influence decisions that influence their livelihoods. Although the context of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) differs in many ways from Japan in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the lesson that short-term initiatives to achieve universal coverage need to be complemented by an understanding of the factors influencing long-term change management remains highly relevant. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  7. TRACER: an 'eye-opener' to the patient experience across the transition of care in an internal medicine resident program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Lauren B; Hall, Susana L; Kleppel, Reva W; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    A safe patient transition requires a complex set of physician skills within the interprofessional practice. To evaluate a rotation which applies self-reflection and workplace learning in a TRAnsition of CarE Rotation (TRACER) for internal medicine (IM) residents. TRACER is a 2-week required IM resident rotation where trainees join a ward team as a quality officer and follow patients into postacute care. In 2010, residents participated in semistructured, one-on-one interviews as part of ongoing program evaluation. They were asked what they had learned on TRACER, the year prior, and how they used those skills in their practice. Using transcripts, the authors reviewed and coded each transcript to develop themes. Five themes emerged from a qualitative, grounded theory analysis: seeing things from the other side, the 'ah ha' moment of fragmented care, team collaboration including understanding nursing scope of practice in different settings, patient understanding, and passing the learning on. TRACER gives residents a moment to breathe and open their eyes to the interprofessional practice setting and the patient's experience of care in transition. Residents learn about transitions of care through self-reflection. This learning is sustained over time and is valued enough to teach to their junior colleagues.

  8. Lack of Preparedness for Pediatric to Adult-Oriented Health Care Transition in Hospitalized Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer-Matzky, Keely; Blatt, Amy; Asselin, Barbara L; Wood, David L

    We examined the self-reported preparedness of hospitalized adolescents and young adults (AYA) for transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care with regard to: 1) previous health care transition (HCT) preparation, 2) Self-Determination Theory (SDT) constructs of health self-management autonomy and competence, and 3) their perception of medical knowledge, attitudes, and concerns. From 2013 to 2015, 139 hospitalized patients aged 15 to 21 years completed a 40-item survey on HCT preparation, attitudes, concerns, and perception of knowledge adapted in part from validated questionnaires of the Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and SDT Treatment Self-Regulation Study. Fewer than 40% of all respondents endorsed previous HCT preparation such as providers discussing taking responsibility for their health, transitioning to adult providers, and only 20% had discussed future health insurance needs. Of our AYA population, 84% had 1 or more special health care needs. Older patients, female patients, and those with increased HCT preparation scores had increased autonomous motivation, positive attitudes toward transition, yet also increased transition concerns. Higher autonomous motivation and perceived competence correlated with increased perception of knowledge (P = .002, < .001 respectively) and more positive attitudes toward transition planning (P < .001, .054 respectively). Multivariate regression analysis revealed those with increased HCT preparation and those with increased perceived competence had increased perception of knowledge (β = .25, P = .005 and β = .35, P < .001). Our findings suggest that hospitalized AYA received limited education and preparation regarding key elements of HCT to adult-oriented health care. Moreover, those previously exposed to transition preparation efforts were more likely to have motivation and a sense of competence in HCT skills. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association

  9. Stepping Down and Stepping In: Youth’s Perspectives on Making the Transition from Residential Treatment to Treatment Foster Care

    OpenAIRE

    Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Fedoravicius, Nicole; McMillen, J. Curtis; McNelly, David; Robinson, Debra R.

    2012-01-01

    Older youth preparing to emancipate from the foster care system are often served in residential treatment settings where they have limited opportunities to practice skills for independent living in a community setting. Stepping these youth down to less restrictive environments such as treatment foster care is a growing trend, especially for youth with mental health issues. Yet, few studies have explored the youth’s perspective on making this transition. This study utilized qualitative intervi...

  10. Transition of pediatric to adult care in inflammatory bowel disease: Is it as easy as 1, 2, 3?

    OpenAIRE

    Afzali, Anita; Wahbeh, Ghassan

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous group of chronic diseases with a rising prevalence in the pediatric population, and up to 25% of IBD patients are diagnosed before 18 years of age. Adolescents with IBD tend to have more severe and extensive disease and eventually require graduation from pediatric care toadult services. The transition of patients from pediatric to adult gastroenterologists requires careful preparation and coordination, with involvement of all key players to ...

  11. Therapeutic nursing care: transition in sexuality of the elderly caregiving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Claudia Feio da Maia; Caldas, Célia Pereira; Santos, Iraci Dos; Trotte, Liana Amorim Correa; Silva, Bárbara Martins Corrêa da

    2017-01-01

    To understand the transitions experienced, and the conditions and expected response patterns to changes in sexuality of the spouse-caregiver of the elderly, during progression of the dementia process. A qualitative research study, conducted at the neurogeriatric clinic between May of 2014 and May of 2015. An intensive, individual interview was administered to 12 elderly caregivers. Thematic content analysis was applied, using the theoretical model of Transition Theory. Seven categories emerged, involving relationship and conjugal sexuality; disease repercussions; care and professional approach; attitudes, beliefs and social imagery of sexuality and care; family relationship and redefining of sexuality. Family development and marital life, the aspects of formation and development of sexuality, the specifics that involved living and caring for the other were understood, with successive events and changes influenced by old age, dementia, beliefs and social imagery. compreender as transições vivenciadas, suas condições e os padrões de resposta esperados a mudanças na sexualidade do cônjuge-cuidador do idoso em processo demencial. pesquisa de abordagem qualitativa, realizada no ambulatório de neurogeriatria, entre maio de 2014 e maio de 2015. Aplicou-se a entrevista individual e intensiva a 12 cônjuges-cuidadores de idosos. Fez-se a análise de conteúdo temática, com aplicação do modelo teórico da Teoria das Transições. emergiram sete categorias, que envolveram relação e sexualidade conjugal; repercussões da doença; o cuidado e a abordagem profissional; atitudes, crenças e imaginário social de sexualidade e cuidado; relação familiar e ressignificação de sexualidade. compreendeu-se a construção de vida familiar e conjugal; os aspectos de formação e desenvolvimento da sexualidade; as especificidades que envolvem viver e cuidar do outro, com sucessivos acontecimentos e mudanças influenciados pela velhice, por processo demencial, crenças e

  12. The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-05-22

    This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme 'On Your Own Feet Ahead!' in the Netherlands. A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1 year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Transition programme. Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents' characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (pteam climate (pteam climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. The Transition of Primary Care Group Practices to Next Generation Models: Satisfaction of Staff, Clinicians, and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Therese; Kralewski, John; Dowd, Bryan

    Restructuring primary care is essential to achieve the triple aim. This case study examines the human factors of extensive redesign on 2 midsized primary care clinics (clinics A and B) in the Midwest United States that are owned by a large health care system. The transition occurred when while the principles for patient-centered medical home were being rolled out nationally, and before the Affordable Care Act. After the transition, interviews and discussions were conducted with 5 stakeholder groups: health system leaders, clinic managers, clinicians, nurses, and reception staff. Using a culture assessment instrument, the responses of personnel at clinics A and B were compared with comparison clinics from another health system that had not undergone transition. Patient satisfaction scores are presented. Clinics A and B were similar in size and staffing. Three human factor themes emerged from interviews: responses to change, professional and personal challenges due to role redefinition, and the importance of communication. The comparison clinics had an equal or higher mean culture scores compared with the transition clinics (A and B). Patient satisfaction in improved in Clinic A. The transition took more time than expected. Health system leaders underestimated the stress and the role adjustments for clinicians and nurses. Change leaders need to anticipate the challenge of role redefinition until health profession schools graduate trainees with more experience in new models of team-based care. Incorporating experience with team based, interprofessional care into training is essential to properly prepare future health professionals. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  14. Following the ACA Repeal-and-Replace Effort, Where Does the U.S. Stand on Insurance Coverage? Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March--June 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Gunja, Munira Z; Doty, Michelle M

    2017-09-01

    After Congress's failure to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, some policy leaders are calling for bipartisan approaches to address weaknesses in the law’s coverage expansions. To do this, policymakers will need data about trends in insurance coverage, reasons why people remain uninsured, and consumer perceptions of affordability. To examine U.S. trends in insurance coverage and the demographics of the remaining uninsured population, as well as affordability and satisfaction among adults with marketplace and Medicaid coverage. Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March–June 2017 The uninsured rate among 19-to-64-year-old adults was 14 percent in 2017, or an estimated 27 million people, statistically unchanged from one year earlier. Uninsured rates ticked up significantly in three subgroups: 35-to-49-year-olds, adults with incomes of 400 percent of poverty or more (about $48,000 for an individual), and adults living in states that had not expanded Medicaid. Half of uninsured adults, or an estimated 13 million, are likely eligible for marketplace subsidies or the Medicaid expansion in their state. Four of 10 uninsured adults are unaware of the marketplaces. Adults in marketplace plans with incomes below 250 percent of poverty are much more likely to view their premiums as easy to afford compared with people with higher incomes. Policies to improve coverage include a federal commitment to supporting the marketplaces and the 2018 open enrollment period, expansion of Medicaid in 19 remaining states, and enhanced subsidies for people with incomes of 250 percent of poverty or more.

  15. Care Transitions and Adult Day Services Moderate the Longitudinal Links between Stress Biomarkers and Family Caregivers' Functional Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Almeida, David M; Rovine, Michael J; Zarit, Steven H

    2017-01-01

    Stress biomarkers have been linked to health and well-being. There are, however, few studies on how dysregulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system actually affects functional health of family caregivers of persons with dementia. Further, it is not clear whether and how factors affecting caregiving stressor exposures such as care transitions and adult day services (ADS) use may affect such association. First, to examine the association of daily stress biomarkers and functional health over time among family caregivers of persons with dementia. Second, to examine effects of care transitions and ADS use on the association between baseline stress biomarkers and functional health over time. At baseline, caregivers provided 5 saliva samples each day during an 8-day diary study, where all caregivers were having a varying number of ADS days per week. There were 2 longitudinal follow-ups at 6 and 12 months on ADS use, care transitions, and caregivers' functional health. The average daily total output across days was computed at baseline for salivary cortisol, the sulfated form of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA-s), and salivary alpha amylase (sAA), which were used as predictors of caregivers' longitudinal functional limitation trajectories. Care transitions and total number of ADS days per week at baseline were considered as moderators of the associations between stress biomarkers and health over time. The associations between functional limitation trajectories and daily total outputs of cortisol and sAA were modified by ADS use and care transitions. Among caregivers who experienced a transition, and who used less than average ADS days per week, lower daily cortisol total output and lower daily sAA total output were associated with increasing functional limitations. Caregivers who experienced a transition but used greater than average ADS days per week did not show such patterns of association. No significant effect was found for DHEA

  16. Russian Federation : The Demographic Transition and Its Implications for Adult Learning and Long-Term Care Policies

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the demographic transition in the Russian Federation and its implications for adult learning and long-term care policies. The population of Russia is aging and declining rapidly compared to other European nations. Russia's current age structure results from decades of complex demographic trends that have created a population structure with increasingly fewer young peo...

  17. Sexual orientation of trans adults is not linked to outcome of transition-related health care, but worth asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Timo O; Elaut, Els; Richards, Christina; Dekker, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of contemporary transition-related care at the outset of the 20th century, sexual orientation has ben considered to be closely connected with gender identity and the developmental trajectories of trans people. Specifically, health professionals have regarded the anticipated post-transitional heterosexual behaviour of trans adults as predictive of a good outcome of cross-sex hormones and gender-confirming surgeries. This article reviews the current literature according to the question of whether the sexual orientation of trans people is linked to outcome measures following transition-related interventions. A comprehensive review was undertaken using the Medline database, searching for empirical studies published between 2010 and 2015. Out of a total of 474 studies, only 10 studies reported a follow-up of trans adults and assessed sexual orientation in the study protocol at all. Sexual orientation was predominantly assessed as homosexual versus non-homosexual related to sex assigned at birth. Only one 1 of 10 follow-up studies found a significant association according to the outcome between groups differentiated by sexual orientation. Empirically there is no link between sexual orientation and outcome of transition-related health care for trans adults. In order to provide comprehensive health care, we recommend asking for sexual behaviours, attractions and identities, as well as for gender experiences and expressions; however, this knowledge should not drive, but simply inform, such comprehensive care.

  18. After Foster Care and Juvenile Justice: A Preview of the Youth Villages Transitional Living Evaluation. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Ravett, Sara; Jacobs, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Young people who are leaving the foster care and juvenile justice systems often experience a difficult transition to adulthood that is characterized by a number of troubling outcomes, including poverty, low levels of education and employment, and housing instability. While some services are available for these populations, there is little evidence…

  19. Budget Impact Analysis of a Pharmacist-Provided Transition of Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weiyi; Colayco, Danielle; Hashimoto, Jonathan; Komoto, Kevin; Gowda, Chandrakala; Wearda, Bruce; McCombs, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    Postdischarge medication management services have been shown to reduce the incidence of medication-related problems during the transition from inpatient to outpatient care. A pharmacist-run transition of care (TOC) program has been developed to reduce the unplanned readmissions of a high-risk managed Medicaid population after hospitalization. To estimate the budget impact of adding an outpatient pharmacy-based TOC program to a medical benefit from the payer perspective. A budget impact analysis was conducted using a decision-tree model developed in Microsoft Excel. The effect on inpatient and total health care costs from the payer perspective was estimated for the 2-year period following initial hospital discharge. Inputs were based on a total plan population of 240,000 lives, with a high-risk population of 7.5%, of whom 37% were hospitalized and potentially qualified for TOC services, resulting in an eligible population of 6,660 patients. The TOC program was assumed to initially cover 30% of the eligible population, with expansion to 60% over the 2 years. We previously reported that this program reduced the risk of readmission by 32% within 6 months and saved the health plan $2,139 per patient referred to the program, inclusive of program cost, compared with patients receiving usual discharge care. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the impact of uncertainty of model inputs on the results, with the cost of TOC services ranging from $99 to $2,000 per patient referred. The model showed that the TOC program was cost saving at over $3 per member per month in the first 6 months, which translates to over $25 million in total health care cost savings over 2 years. These results were primarily driven by the estimated reduction in inpatient costs associated with the program, which were estimated at $20 million over the 2 years. Sensitivity analyses illustrated that within all the reasonable ranges of model input parameters, including the upper limit of TOC

  20. Experiences of non-specialist nurses caring for patients and their significant others undergoing transitions during palliative end-of-life cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorn, Hrønn; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    knowledge and personal growth. Objective/question: What are non-specialist nurses’ experiences when providing palliative end-of-life cancer care that involves the psychosocial and existential transitions of their patients and significant others? Inclusion criteria Types of participants: The current review......Background: Non-specialist nurses, who are providing palliative end-of-life cancer care to patients and significant others undergoing psychosocial and existential transitions, may experience dissatisfaction, frustration and sorrow. On the other hand, they may also experience happiness, increased...... considered studies that included a description of the experiences of non-specialist trained registered nurses (RNs) working in non-specialist wards. Phenomena of interest: The current review considered studies that investigated experiences of RNs when providing palliative end-of-life cancer care...

  1. Transitioning young adults from paediatric to adult care and the HIV care continuum in Atlanta, Georgia, USA: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussen, Sophia A; Chakraborty, Rana; Knezevic, Andrea; Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Huang, Eugene; Stephenson, Rob; Del Rio, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    The transition from paediatric to adult HIV care is a particularly high-risk time for disengagement among young adults; however, empirical data are lacking. We reviewed medical records of 72 youth seen in both the paediatric and the adult clinics of the Grady Infectious Disease Program in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, from 2004 to 2014. We abstracted clinical data on linkage, retention and virologic suppression from the last two years in the paediatric clinic through the first two years in the adult clinic. Of patients with at least one visit scheduled in adult clinic, 97% were eventually seen by an adult provider (median time between last paediatric and first adult clinic visit = 10 months, interquartile range 2-18 months). Half of the patients were enrolled in paediatric care immediately prior to transition, while the other half experienced a gap in paediatric care and re-enrolled in the clinic as adults. A total of 89% of patients were retained (at least two visits at least three months apart) in the first year and 56% in the second year after transition. Patients who were seen in adult clinic within three months of their last paediatric visit were more likely to be virologically suppressed after transition than those who took longer (Relative risk (RR): 1.76; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-2.9; p  = 0.03). Patients with virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA below the level of detection of the assay) at the last paediatric visit were also more likely to be suppressed at the most recent adult visit (RR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.34-3.9; p  = 0.002). Retention rates once in adult care, though high initially, declined significantly by the second year after transition. Pre-transition viral suppression and shorter linkage time between paediatric and adult clinic were associated with better outcomes post-transition. Optimizing transition will require intensive transition support for patient