WorldWideScience

Sample records for care coverage indicators

  1. Measuring coverage in MNCH: indicators for global tracking of newborn care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allisyn C Moran

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality accounts for 43% of under-five mortality. Consequently, improving newborn survival is a global priority. However, although there is increasing consensus on the packages and specific interventions that need to be scaled up to reduce neonatal mortality, there is a lack of clarity on the indicators needed to measure progress. In 2008, in an effort to improve newborn survival, the Newborn Indicators Technical Working Group (TWG was convened by the Saving Newborn Lives program at Save the Children to provide a forum to develop the indicators and standard measurement tools that are needed to measure coverage of key newborn interventions. The TWG, which included evaluation and measurement experts, researchers, individuals from United Nations agencies and non-governmental organizations, and donors, prioritized improved consistency of measurement of postnatal care for women and newborns and of immediate care behaviors and practices for newborns. In addition, the TWG promoted increased data availability through inclusion of additional questions in nationally representative surveys, such as the United States Agency for International Development-supported Demographic and Health Surveys and the United Nations Children's Fund-supported Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys. Several studies have been undertaken that have informed revisions of indicators and survey tools, and global postnatal care coverage indicators have been finalized. Consensus has been achieved on three additional indicators for care of the newborn after birth (drying, delayed bathing, and cutting the cord with a clean instrument, and on testing two further indicators (immediate skin-to-skin care and applications to the umbilical cord. Finally, important measurement gaps have been identified regarding coverage data for evidence-based interventions, such as Kangaroo Mother Care and care seeking for newborn infection.

  2. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of...

  3. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Lazenby, Helen C.

    1992-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of...

  4. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  5. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.

    1992-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  6. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Sensenig, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  7. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Sivarajan, Lekha

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avail...

  8. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Sensenig, Arthur L.; Heffler, Stephen K.

    1995-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avail...

  9. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Sensenig, Arthur L.; Heffler, Stephen K.

    1995-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  10. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.

    1989-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators.

  11. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Levit, Katharine R.; Maple, Brenda T.; Stewart, Madie W.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more compre...

  12. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Singer, Naphtale; Cowan, Cathy A.

    1991-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more ...

  13. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Lemieux, Jeffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following five topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; hospital skill mix changes: 1980s; and national economic indicators.

  14. Measuring coverage in MNCH: challenges and opportunities in the selection of coverage indicators for global monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Harris Requejo

    Full Text Available Global monitoring of intervention coverage is a cornerstone of international efforts to improve reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health. In this review, we examine the process and implications of selecting a core set of coverage indicators for global monitoring, using as examples the processes used by the Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival and the Commission on Accountability for Women's and Children's Health. We describe how the generation of data for global monitoring involves five iterative steps: development of standard indicator definitions and measurement approaches to ensure comparability across countries; collection of high-quality data at the country level; compilation of country data at the global level; organization of global databases; and rounds of data quality checking. Regular and rigorous technical review processes that involve high-level decision makers and experts familiar with indicator measurement are needed to maximize uptake and to ensure that indicators used for global monitoring are selected on the basis of available evidence of intervention effectiveness, feasibility of measurement, and data availability as well as programmatic relevance. Experience from recent initiatives illustrates the challenges of striking this balance as well as strategies for reducing the tensions inherent in the indicator selection process. We conclude that more attention and continued investment need to be directed to global monitoring, to support both the process of global database development and the selection of sets of coverage indicators to promote accountability. The stakes are high, because these indicators can drive policy and program development at the country and global level, and ultimately impact the health of women and children and the communities where they live.

  15. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  16. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Dupree

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  17. Health Care Coverage among Child Support-Eligible Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Laudan Y.

    Using data from the National Survey of America's Families (a nationally representative survey of the economic, social, and health characteristics of children, adults, and their families), this paper discusses health care coverage among child support eligible children. It begins with a detailed profile of child support eligible children living with…

  18. Health Care Coverage Decision Making in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Experiences from 25 Coverage Schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Hialy; Shewade, Ashwini; Dai, Minghan; Mendoza-Arana, Pedro; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Jain, Nishant; Khonelidze, Irma; Nabyonga-Orem, Juliet; Saleh, Karima; Teerawattananon, Yot; Nishtar, Sania; Hornberger, John

    2015-08-01

    Lessons learned by countries that have successfully implemented coverage schemes for health services may be valuable for other countries, especially low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), which likewise are seeking to provide/expand coverage. The research team surveyed experts in population health management from LMICs for information on characteristics of health care coverage schemes and factors that influenced decision-making processes. The level of coverage provided by the different schemes varied. Nearly all the health care coverage schemes involved various representatives and stakeholders in their decision-making processes. Maternal and child health, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and HIV were among the highest priorities guiding coverage development decisions. Evidence used to inform coverage decisions included medical literature, regional and global epidemiology, and coverage policies of other coverage schemes. Funding was the most commonly reported reason for restricting coverage. This exploratory study provides an overview of health care coverage schemes from participating LMICs and contributes to the scarce evidence base on coverage decision making. Sharing knowledge and experiences among LMICs can support efforts to establish systems for accessible, affordable, and equitable health care. PMID:25393442

  19. Financial literacy and long-term care insurance coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Gousia, K

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of financial literacy on private long-term care insurance coverage as one potential explanation of the small size of the private insurance market. Findings from the recent literature suggest that financial literacy has a significant effect on a number of individual financial decisions. The analysis uses the SHARE dataset that contains rich information on demographic, health and socioeconomic characteristics of the elderly in Europe. More importantly, SHARE also ...

  20. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    James M Dupree

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of h...

  1. Measuring coverage in MNCH: a validation study linking population survey derived coverage to maternal, newborn, and child health care records in rural China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate data on coverage of key maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH interventions are crucial for monitoring progress toward the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Coverage estimates are primarily obtained from routine population surveys through self-reporting, the validity of which is not well understood. We aimed to examine the validity of the coverage of selected MNCH interventions in Gongcheng County, China. METHOD AND FINDINGS: We conducted a validation study by comparing women's self-reported coverage of MNCH interventions relating to antenatal and postnatal care, mode of delivery, and child vaccinations in a community survey with their paper- and electronic-based health care records, treating the health care records as the reference standard. Of 936 women recruited, 914 (97.6% completed the survey. Results show that self-reported coverage of these interventions had moderate to high sensitivity (0.57 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.50-0.63] to 0.99 [95% CI: 0.98-1.00] and low to high specificity (0 to 0.83 [95% CI: 0.80-0.86]. Despite varying overall validity, with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC ranging between 0.49 [95% CI: 0.39-0.57] and 0.90 [95% CI: 0.88-0.92], bias in the coverage estimates at the population level was small to moderate, with the test to actual positive (TAP ratio ranging between 0.8 and 1.5 for 24 of the 28 indicators examined. Our ability to accurately estimate validity was affected by several caveats associated with the reference standard. Caution should be exercised when generalizing the results to other settings. CONCLUSIONS: The overall validity of self-reported coverage was moderate across selected MNCH indicators. However, at the population level, self-reported coverage appears to have small to moderate degree of bias. Accuracy of the coverage was particularly high for indicators with high recorded coverage or low recorded coverage but high specificity. The

  2. ESTIMATION OF SEAGRASS COVERAGE BY DEPTH INVARIANT INDICES ON QUICKBIRD IMAGERY

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    Muhammad Anshar Amran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of seagrass ecosystem requires availability of information on the actual condition of seagrass coverage. Remote sensing technology for seagrass mapping has been used to detect the presence of seagrass coverage, but so far no information on the condition of seagrass could be obtained. Therefore, a research is required using remote sensing imagery to obtain information on the condition of seagrass coverage.The aim of this research is to formulate mathematical relationship between seagrass coverage and depth invariant indices on Quickbird imagery. Transformation was done on multispectral bands which could detect sea floor objects that are in the region of blue, green and red bands.The study areas covered are the seas around Barranglompo Island and Barrangcaddi Island, westward of Makassar city, Indonesia. Various seagrass coverages were detected within the region under study.Mathematical relationship between seagrass coverage and depth invariant indices was obtained by multiple linear regression method. Percentage of seagrass coverage (C was obtained by transformation of depth invariant indices (Xij on Quickbird imagery, with transformation equation as follows:C = 19.934 – 63.347 X12 + 23.239 X23.A good accuracy of 75% for the seagrass coverage was obtained by transformation of depth invariant indices (Xij on Quickbird imagery.

  3. Beyond UHC: monitoring health and social protection coverage in the context of tuberculosis care and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnroth, Knut; Glaziou, Philippe; Weil, Diana; Floyd, Katherine; Uplekar, Mukund; Raviglione, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health problem. In all societies, the disease affects the poorest individuals the worst. A new post-2015 global TB strategy has been developed by WHO, which explicitly highlights the key role of universal health coverage (UHC) and social protection. One of the proposed targets is that "No TB affected families experience catastrophic costs due to TB." High direct and indirect costs of care hamper access, increase the risk of poor TB treatment outcomes, exacerbate poverty, and contribute to sustaining TB transmission. UHC, conventionally defined as access to health care without risk of financial hardship due to out-of-pocket health care expenditures, is essential but not sufficient for effective and equitable TB care and prevention. Social protection interventions that prevent or mitigate other financial risks associated with TB, including income losses and non-medical expenditures such as on transport and food, are also important. We propose a framework for monitoring both health and social protection coverage, and their impact on TB epidemiology. We describe key indicators and review methodological considerations. We show that while monitoring of general health care access will be important to track the health system environment within which TB services are delivered, specific indicators on TB access, quality, and financial risk protection can also serve as equity-sensitive tracers for progress towards and achievement of overall access and social protection.

  4. Beyond UHC: monitoring health and social protection coverage in the context of tuberculosis care and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Lönnroth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a major global public health problem. In all societies, the disease affects the poorest individuals the worst. A new post-2015 global TB strategy has been developed by WHO, which explicitly highlights the key role of universal health coverage (UHC and social protection. One of the proposed targets is that "No TB affected families experience catastrophic costs due to TB." High direct and indirect costs of care hamper access, increase the risk of poor TB treatment outcomes, exacerbate poverty, and contribute to sustaining TB transmission. UHC, conventionally defined as access to health care without risk of financial hardship due to out-of-pocket health care expenditures, is essential but not sufficient for effective and equitable TB care and prevention. Social protection interventions that prevent or mitigate other financial risks associated with TB, including income losses and non-medical expenditures such as on transport and food, are also important. We propose a framework for monitoring both health and social protection coverage, and their impact on TB epidemiology. We describe key indicators and review methodological considerations. We show that while monitoring of general health care access will be important to track the health system environment within which TB services are delivered, specific indicators on TB access, quality, and financial risk protection can also serve as equity-sensitive tracers for progress towards and achievement of overall access and social protection.

  5. Health Care Indicators for the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Levit, Katharine R.

    1992-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators.

  6. Improving Health Care Coverage, Equity, And Financial Protection Through A Hybrid System: Malaysia's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannan-Eliya, Ravindra P; Anuranga, Chamara; Manual, Adilius; Sararaks, Sondi; Jailani, Anis S; Hamid, Abdul J; Razif, Izzanie M; Tan, Ee H; Darzi, Ara

    2016-05-01

    Malaysia has made substantial progress in providing access to health care for its citizens and has been more successful than many other countries that are better known as models of universal health coverage. Malaysia's health care coverage and outcomes are now approaching levels achieved by member nations of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Malaysia's results are achieved through a mix of public services (funded by general revenues) and parallel private services (predominantly financed by out-of-pocket spending). We examined the distributional aspects of health financing and delivery and assessed financial protection in Malaysia's hybrid system. We found that this system has been effective for many decades in equalizing health care use and providing protection from financial risk, despite modest government spending. Our results also indicate that a high out-of-pocket share of total financing is not a consistent proxy for financial protection; greater attention is needed to the absolute level of out-of-pocket spending. Malaysia's hybrid health system presents continuing unresolved policy challenges, but the country's experience nonetheless provides lessons for other emerging economies that want to expand access to health care despite limited fiscal resources.

  7. Improving Health Care Coverage, Equity, And Financial Protection Through A Hybrid System: Malaysia's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannan-Eliya, Ravindra P; Anuranga, Chamara; Manual, Adilius; Sararaks, Sondi; Jailani, Anis S; Hamid, Abdul J; Razif, Izzanie M; Tan, Ee H; Darzi, Ara

    2016-05-01

    Malaysia has made substantial progress in providing access to health care for its citizens and has been more successful than many other countries that are better known as models of universal health coverage. Malaysia's health care coverage and outcomes are now approaching levels achieved by member nations of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Malaysia's results are achieved through a mix of public services (funded by general revenues) and parallel private services (predominantly financed by out-of-pocket spending). We examined the distributional aspects of health financing and delivery and assessed financial protection in Malaysia's hybrid system. We found that this system has been effective for many decades in equalizing health care use and providing protection from financial risk, despite modest government spending. Our results also indicate that a high out-of-pocket share of total financing is not a consistent proxy for financial protection; greater attention is needed to the absolute level of out-of-pocket spending. Malaysia's hybrid health system presents continuing unresolved policy challenges, but the country's experience nonetheless provides lessons for other emerging economies that want to expand access to health care despite limited fiscal resources. PMID:27140990

  8. Selecting performance indicators for prison health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Steven M; Damberg, Cheryl L; Hiatt, Liisa; Teleki, Stephanie S; Shaw, Rebecca; Hill, Terry E; Benjamin-Johnson, Rhondee; Eisenman, David P; Kulkarni, Sonali P; Wang, Emily; Williams, Brie; Yesus, Ambeshie; Grudzen, Corita R

    2011-04-01

    Improving prison health care requires a robust measurement dashboard that addresses multiple domains of care. We sought to identify tested indicators of clinical quality and access that prison health managers could use to ascertain gaps in performance and guide quality improvement. We used the RAND/UCLA modified Delphi method to select the best indicators for correctional health. An expert panel rated 111 indicators on validity and feasibility. They voted to retain 79 indicators in areas such as access, cardiac conditions, geriatrics, infectious diseases, medication monitoring, metabolic diseases, obstetrics/gynecology, screening/prevention, psychiatric disorders/substance abuse, pulmonary conditions, and urgent conditions. Prison health institutions, like all other large health institutions, need robust measurement systems. The indicators presented here provide a basic library for prison health managers developing such systems. PMID:21525117

  9. Quality of care indicators in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetter, P; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; Haustermans, K; Jouret-Mourin, A; Kartheuser, A; Laurent, S; Mollet, G; Nagy, N; Scalliet, P; Van Cutsem, E; Van Den Eynde, M; Van de Stadt, J; Van Eycken, E; Van Laethem, J L; Vindevoghel, K; Penninckx, F

    2011-09-01

    Quality of health care is a hot topic, especially with regard to cancer. Although rectal cancer is, in many aspects, a model oncologic entity, there seem to be substantial differences in quality of care between countries, hospitals and physicians. PROCARE, a Belgian multidisciplinary national project to improve outcome in all patients with rectum cancer, identified a set of quality of care indicators covering all aspects of the management of rectal cancer. This set should permit national and international benchmarking, i.e. comparing results from individual hospitals or teams with national and international performances with feedback to participating teams. Such comparison could indicate whether further improvement is possible and/or warranted. PMID:22103052

  10. Equity in maternal, newborn, and child health care coverage in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Addressing inequitable coverage of maternal and child health care services among different socioeconomic strata of population and across states is an important part of India's contemporary health program. This has wide implications for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal targets. Objective: This paper assesses the inequity in coverage of maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH care services across household wealth quintiles in India and its states. Design: Utilizing the District Level Household and Facility Survey conducted during 2007–08, this paper has constructed a Composite Coverage Index (CCI in MNCH care. Results: The mean overall coverage of 45% was estimated at the national level, ranging from 31% for the poorest to 60% for the wealthiest quintile. Moreover, a massive state-wise difference across wealth quintiles was observed in the mean overall CCI. Almost half of the Indian states and union territories recorded a =50% coverage in MNCH care services, which demands special attention. Conclusion: India needs focused efforts to address the inequity in coverage of health care services by recognising or defining underserved people and pursuing well-planned time-oriented health programs committed to ameliorate the present state of MNCH care.

  11. Wound Coverage Technologies in Burn Care: Established Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Branski, Ludwik K.; Dibildox, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Major advances in burn care have reduced post-burn morbidity and mortality. The development and incorporation of new wound healing modalities into the clinical arena have contributed to this improvement by allowing standard-of-care regimens to be established. These regimens range from early excision to the use of cultured epithelial autograft. Here, we review the wound care options that are now well established and used by many burn surgeons. PMID:24165670

  12. Coverage and Financial Risk Protection for Institutional Delivery: How Universal Is Provision of Maternal Health Care in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Prinja

    Full Text Available India aims to achieve universal access to institutional delivery. We undertook this study to estimate the universality of institutional delivery care for pregnant women in Haryana state in India. To assess the coverage of institutional delivery, we analyze service coverage (coverage of public sector institutional delivery, population coverage (coverage among different districts and wealth quintiles of the population and financial risk protection (catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment as a result of out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery.We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from a randomly selected sample of 12,191 women who had delivered a child in the last one year from the date of data collection in Haryana state. Five indicators were calculated to evaluate coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery--proportion of public sector deliveries, out-of-pocket expenditure, percentage of women who incurred no expenses, prevalence of catastrophic expenditure for institutional delivery and incidence of impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery. These indicators were calculated for the public and private sectors for 5 wealth quintiles and 21 districts of the state.The coverage of institutional delivery in Haryana state was 82%, of which 65% took place in public sector facilities. Approximately 63% of the women reported no expenditure on delivery in the public sector. The mean out-of-pocket expenditures for delivery in the public and private sectors in Haryana were INR 771 (USD 14.2 and INR 12,479 (USD 229, respectively, which were catastrophic for 1.6% and 22% of households, respectively.Our findings suggest that there is considerably high coverage of institutional delivery care in Haryana state, with significant financial risk protection in the public sector. However, coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery vary substantially across districts and among different socio

  13. Quality indicators in breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Turco, M Rosselli; Ponti, A; Bick, U; Biganzoli, L; Cserni, G; Cutuli, B; Decker, T; Dietel, M; Gentilini, O; Kuehn, T; Mano, M P; Mantellini, P; Marotti, L; Poortmans, P; Rank, F; Roe, H; Scaffidi, E; van der Hage, J A; Viale, G; Wells, C; Welnicka-Jaskiewicz, M; Wengstöm, Y; Cataliotti, L

    2010-09-01

    To define a set of quality indicators that should be routinely measured and evaluated to confirm that the clinical outcome reaches the requested standards, Eusoma has organised a workshop during which twenty four experts from different disciplines have reviewed the international literature and selected the main process and outcome indicators available for quality assurance of breast cancer care. A review of the literature for evidence-based recommendations have been performed by the steering committee. The experts have identified the quality indicators also taking into account the usability and feasibility. For each of them it has been reported: definition, minimum and target standard, motivation for selection and level of evidence (graded according to AHRO). In overall 17 main quality indicators have been identified, respectively, 7 on diagnosis, 4 on surgery and loco-regional treatment, 2 on systemic treatment and 4 on staging, counselling, follow-up and rehabilitation. Breast Units in Europe are invited to comply with these indicators and monitor them during their periodic audit meetings. PMID:20675120

  14. Assessing coverage, equity and quality gaps in maternal and neonatal care in sub-saharan Africa: an integrated approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calistus Wilunda

    Full Text Available Gaps in coverage, equity and quality of health services hinder the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa as well as in other high-burden countries, yet few studies attempt to assess all these dimensions as part of the situation analysis. We present the base-line data of a project aimed at simultaneously addressing coverage, equity and quality issues in maternal and neonatal health care in five districts belonging to three African countries.Data were collected in cross-sectional studies with three types of tools. Coverage was assessed in three hospitals and 19 health centres (HCs utilising emergency obstetric and newborn care needs assessment tools developed by the Averting Maternal Death and Disability program. Emergency obstetrics care (EmOC indicators were calculated. Equity was assessed in three hospitals and 13 HCs by means of proxy wealth indices and women delivering in health facilities were compared with those in the general population to identify inequities. Quality was assessed in three hospitals using the World Health Organization's maternal and neonatal quality of hospital care assessment tool which evaluates the whole range of aspects of obstetric and neonatal care and produces an average score for each main area of care.All the three hospitals qualified as comprehensive EmOC facilities but none of the HCs qualified for basic EmOC. None of the districts met the minimum requisites for EmOC indicators. In two out of three hospitals, there were major quality gaps which were generally greater in neonatal care, management of emergency and complicated cases and monitoring. Higher access to care was coupled by low quality and good quality by very low access. Stark inequities in utilisation of institutional delivery care were present in all districts and across all health facilities, especially at hospital level.Our findings confirm the existence of serious issues regarding coverage

  15. Surveillance of mother-to-child HIV transmission: socioeconomic and health care coverage indicators Vigilância da transmissão vertical do HIV: indicadores socioeconômicos e de cobertura de atenção à saúde

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    Christovam Barcellos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify clustering areas of infants exposed to HIV during pregnancy and their association with indicators of primary care coverage and socioeconomic condition. METHODS: Ecological study where the unit of analysis was primary care coverage areas in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, in 2003. Geographical Information System and spatial analysis tools were used to describe indicators of primary care coverage areas and socioeconomic condition, and estimate the prevalence of liveborn infants exposed to HIV during pregnancy and delivery. Data was obtained from Brazilian national databases. The association between different indicators was assessed using Spearman's nonparametric test. RESULTS: There was found an association between HIV infection and high birth rates (r=0.22, pOBJETIVO: Identificar áreas de concentración de niños expuestos al HIV durante la gestación y su asociación con indicadores de cobertura de la atención básica de la salud, y de condiciones socioeconómicas salud. MÉTODOS: Estudio ecológico teniendo como unidad de análisis las áreas que abarcan unidades básicas de salud en Porto Alegre, Sur de Brasil, en 2003. Fueron utilizados Sistema de Informaciones Geográficas y herramientas de análisis espacial para calcular indicadores de cobertura de atención básica de la salud, condiciones socioeconómicas y prevalencia e nacidos vivos expuestos al HIV durante el embarazo y perinatal. Los datos analizados fueron obtenidos en sistemas de información nacionales. La asociación entre los diferentes indicadores fue evaluada por medio de prueba no paramétrica de Spearman. RESULTADOS: Se observó asociación entre infección por el HIV en embarazadas con tasas de natalidad (r=0,22, pOBJETIVO: Identificar áreas de concentração de crianças expostas ao HIV durante a gestação e sua associação com indicadores de cobertura da atenção básica à saúde, e de condições socioeconômicas saúde. M

  16. Achieving universal health care coverage: Current debates in Ghana on covering those outside the formal sector

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    Abiiro Gilbert

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, extending financial protection and equitable access to health services to those outside the formal sector employment is a major challenge for achieving universal coverage. While some favour contributory schemes, others have embraced tax-funded health service cover for those outside the formal sector. This paper critically examines the issue of how to cover those outside the formal sector through the lens of stakeholder views on the proposed one-time premium payment (OTPP policy in Ghana. Discussion Ghana in 2004 implemented a National Health Insurance Scheme, based on a contributory model where service benefits are restricted to those who contribute (with some groups exempted from contributing, as the policy direction for moving towards universal coverage. In 2008, the OTPP system was proposed as an alternative way of ensuring coverage for those outside formal sector employment. There are divergent stakeholder views with regard to the meaning of the one-time premium and how it will be financed and sustained. Our stakeholder interviews indicate that the underlying issue being debated is whether the current contributory NHIS model for those outside the formal employment sector should be maintained or whether services for this group should be tax funded. However, the advantages and disadvantages of these alternatives are not being explored in an explicit or systematic way and are obscured by the considerable confusion about the likely design of the OTPP policy. We attempt to contribute to the broader debate about how best to fund coverage for those outside the formal sector by unpacking some of these issues and pointing to the empirical evidence needed to shed even further light on appropriate funding mechanisms for universal health systems. Summary The Ghanaian debate on OTPP is related to one of the most important challenges facing low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve a universal health care system. It

  17. Wound Coverage Technologies in Burn Care: Novel Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Branski, Ludwik K.; Dibildox, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Improvements in burn wound care have vastly decreased morbidity and mortality in severely burned patients. Development of new therapeutic approaches to increase wound repair has the potential to reduce infection, graft rejection, and hypertrophic scarring. The incorporation of tissue engineering techniques, along with the use of exogenous proteins, genes, or stem cells to enhance wound healing, heralds new treatment regimens based on the modification of already existing biological activity. Refinements to surgical techniques have enabled the creation of protocols for full facial transplantation. With new technologies and advances such as these, care of the severely burned will undergo massive changes over the next decade. This review centers on new developments that have recently shown great promise in the investigational arena. PMID:23877140

  18. Wound Coverage Technologies in Burn Care: Novel Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Branski, Ludwik K.; Dibildox, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Improvements in burn wound care have vastly decreased morbidity and mortality in severely burned patients. Development of new therapeutic approaches to increase wound repair has the potential to reduce infection, graft rejection, and hypertrophic scarring. The incorporation of tissue engineering techniques, along with the use of exogenous proteins, genes, or stem cells to enhance wound healing, heralds new treatment regimens based on the modification of already existing biological activity. R...

  19. Annual influenza vaccination: coverage and attitudes of primary care staff in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kirsten; Seale, Holly; Zwar, Nicholas; Leask, Julie; MacIntyre, C. Raina

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ward et al. (2011) Annual influenza vaccination: coverage and attitudes of primary care staff in Australia. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 135–141. Background  Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all Australian health care workers (HCWs) including those working in primary health care. There is limited published data on coverage, workplace provision, attitudes and personal barriers to influenza vaccination amongst primary health care staff. The aim of this study was to contribute to the limited literature base in this important area by investigating these issues in the primary health care setting in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Methods  A postal survey was sent to general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs) from inner city, semi‐urban and rural areas of NSW, Australia. There were 139 responses in total (response rate 36%) from 79 GPs (response rate 30%) and 60 PNs (response rate 46%). Results  Reported influenza vaccination coverage in both 2007 and 2008 was greater than 70%, with GPs reporting higher coverage than PNs in both years. The main barriers identified were lack of awareness of vaccination recommendations for general practice staff and concern about adverse effects from the vaccine. Conclusions  Rates of influenza vaccination coverage reported in this study were higher than in previous studies of hospital and institutional HCWs, though it is possible that the study design may have contributed to these higher results. Nevertheless, these findings highlight that more needs to be done to understand barriers to vaccination in this group, to inform the development of appropriate strategies to increase vaccination coverage in primary health care staff, with a special focus on PNs. PMID:21306577

  20. Health Care as Commons: An Indigenous Approach to Universal Health Coverage

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    Young Soon Wong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern health care systems of today are predominantly derived from Western models and are either state owned or under private ownership. Government, through their health policies, generally aim to facilitate access for the majority of the population through the design of their health systems. However, there are communities, such as Indigenous peoples, who do not necessarily fall under the formal protection of state systems. Throughout history, these societies have developed different ways to provide health care to its population. These health care systems are held and managed under different property regimes with their attendant advantages and disadvantages. This article investigates the gaps in health coverage among Indigenous peoples using the Malaysian Indigenous peoples as a case study. It conceptually examines a commons approach to health care systems through a study of the traditional health care system of indigenous peoples and suggests how such an approach can help close this gap in the remaining gaps of universal health coverage.

  1. Geographical disparities in core population coverage indicators for roll back malaria in Malawi

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    Appleton Christopher C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of known effective interventions would necessitate the reduction of malaria burden by half by the year 2010. Identifying geographical disparities of coverage of these interventions at small area level is useful to inform where greatest scaling-up efforts should be concentrated. They also provide baseline data against which future scaling-up of interventions can be compared. However, population data are not always available at local level. This study applied spatial smoothing methods to generate maps at subdistrict level in Malawi to serve such purposes. Methods Data for the following responses from the 2000 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey (DHS were aggregated at subdistrict level: (1 households possessing at least one bednet; (2 children under 5 years who slept under a bednet the night before the survey; (3 bednets retreated with insecticide within past 6–12 months preceding the survey; (4 children under 5 who had fever two weeks before the survey and received treatment within 24 hours from the onset of fever; and (5 women who received intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during their last pregnancy. Each response was geographically smoothed at subdistrict level by applying conditional autoregressive models using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Results The underlying geographical patterns of coverage of indicators were more clear in the smoothed maps than in the original unsmoothed maps, with relatively high coverage in urban areas than in rural areas for all indicators. The percentage of households possessing at least one bednet was 19% (95% credible interval (CI: 16–21%, with 9% (95% CI: 7–11% of children sleeping under a net, while 18% (95% CI: 16–19% of households had retreated their nets within past 12 months prior to the survey. The northern region and lakeshore areas had high bednet coverage, but low usage and re-treatment rates. Coverage rate of children who received

  2. Malaria indicator survey 2007, Ethiopia: coverage and use of major malaria prevention and control interventions

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    Graves Patricia M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2005, a nationwide survey estimated that 6.5% of households in Ethiopia owned an insecticide-treated net (ITN, 17% of households had been sprayed with insecticide, and 4% of children under five years of age with a fever were taking an anti-malarial drug. Similar to other sub-Saharan African countries scaling-up malaria interventions, the Government of Ethiopia set an ambitious national goal in 2005 to (i provide 100% ITN coverage in malarious areas, with a mean of two ITNs per household; (ii to scale-up indoor residual spraying of households with insecticide (IRS to cover 30% of households targeted for IRS; and (iii scale-up the provision of case management with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, particularly at the peripheral level. Methods A nationally representative malaria indicator survey (MIS was conducted in Ethiopia between September and December 2007 to determine parasite and anaemia prevalence in the population at risk and to assess coverage, use and access to scaled-up malaria prevention and control interventions. The survey used a two-stage random cluster sample of 7,621 households in 319 census enumeration areas. A total of 32,380 people participated in the survey. Data was collected using standardized Roll Back Malaria Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group MIS household and women's questionnaires, which were adapted to the local context. Results Data presented is for households in malarious areas, which according to the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health are defined as being located Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, respectively. Moderate-severe anaemia (haemoglobin Conclusions Since mid-2005, the Ethiopian National Malaria Control Programme has considerably scaled-up its malaria prevention and control interventions, demonstrating the impact of strong political will and a committed partnership. The MIS showed, however, that besides sustaining and

  3. Coverage and quality of antenatal care provided at primary health care facilities in the 'Punjab' province of 'Pakistan'.

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    Muhammad Ashraf Majrooh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antenatal care is a very important component of maternal health services. It provides the opportunity to learn about risks associated with pregnancy and guides to plan the place of deliveries thereby preventing maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In 'Pakistan' antenatal services to rural population are being provided through a network of primary health care facilities designated as 'Basic Health Units and Rural Health Centers. Pakistan is a developing country, consisting of four provinces and federally administered areas. Each province is administratively subdivided in to 'Divisions' and 'Districts'. By population 'Punjab' is the largest province of Pakistan having 36 districts. This study was conducted to assess the coverage and quality antenatal care in the primary health care facilities in 'Punjab' province of 'Pakistan'. METHODS: Quantitative and Qualitative methods were used to collect data. Using multistage sampling technique nine out of thirty six districts were selected and 19 primary health care facilities of public sector (seventeen Basic Health Units and two Rural Health Centers were randomly selected from each district. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with clients, providers and health managers. RESULTS: The overall enrollment for antenatal checkup was 55.9% and drop out was 32.9% in subsequent visits. The quality of services regarding assessment, treatment and counseling was extremely poor. The reasons for low coverage and quality were the distant location of facilities, deficiency of facility resources, indifferent attitude and non availability of the staff. Moreover, lack of client awareness about importance of antenatal care and self empowerment for decision making to seek care were also responsible for low coverage. CONCLUSION: The coverage and quality of the antenatal care services in 'Punjab' are extremely compromised. Only half of the expected pregnancies are enrolled and

  4. 78 FR 8456 - Coverage of Certain Preventive Services Under the Affordable Care Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... from the Department of Labor concerning employment-based health coverage laws may call the EBSA Toll... of those they serve or hire, and that employment discrimination laws may prohibit them from inquiring..., with respect to women, preventive care and screenings as provided for in comprehensive...

  5. ESTIMATION OF SEAGRASS COVERAGE BY DEPTH INVARIANT INDICES ON QUICKBIRD IMAGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Anshar Amran

    2010-01-01

    Management of seagrass ecosystem requires availability of information on the actual condition of seagrass coverage. Remote sensing technology for seagrass mapping has been used to detect the presence of seagrass coverage, but so far no information on the condition of seagrass could be obtained. Therefore, a research is required using remote sensing imagery to obtain information on the condition of seagrass coverage.The aim of this research is to formulate mathematical relationship between se...

  6. Disparate British Breast Reconstruction Utilization: Is Universal Coverage Sufficient to Ensure Expanded Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offodile, Anaeze C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Our intent is to improve the understanding of the ability of healthcare providers to deliver high-quality care as we approach an era of universal coverage. We adopted 2 unique vantage points in this article: (1) the mandated coverage for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) surgery as a microcosmic surrogate for universal coverage overall and (2) we then scrutinized the respective IBR utilization rates in a contemporaneous system of 2 healthcare delivery models in the United Kingdom, that is, the public National Health Service trust versus private-sector hospitals. A literature review was performed for IBR rates across public trust and private-sector hospitals in the United Kingdom. The IBR rate among public trust hospitals was 17% compared with 43% in the private sector. In the trust hospital setting, the enactment of 2 government mandates, intended to increase the access to cancer care, seemed to fall short in maximizing the ability of surgical practitioners to deliver quality care to patients. Among women who did not receive IBR, 65% felt that they had received the sufficient amount of information to appropriately inform their decision. In addition, only 46% of this same cohort reported a consultation with a reconstructive surgeon preoperatively. Private-sector hospitals delivered better IBR care because of the likely presence of infrastructure and financial incentives for physicians. These results serve as a call for a better alignment between policy initiatives designed to expand care access and the perogatives of physicians to ensure an optimized delivery of the expanded care such policy mandates.

  7. Disparate British Breast Reconstruction Utilization: Is Universal Coverage Sufficient to Ensure Expanded Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offodile, Anaeze C; Guo, Lifei

    2016-06-01

    Our intent is to improve the understanding of the ability of healthcare providers to deliver high-quality care as we approach an era of universal coverage. We adopted 2 unique vantage points in this article: (1) the mandated coverage for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) surgery as a microcosmic surrogate for universal coverage overall and (2) we then scrutinized the respective IBR utilization rates in a contemporaneous system of 2 healthcare delivery models in the United Kingdom, that is, the public National Health Service trust versus private-sector hospitals. A literature review was performed for IBR rates across public trust and private-sector hospitals in the United Kingdom. The IBR rate among public trust hospitals was 17% compared with 43% in the private sector. In the trust hospital setting, the enactment of 2 government mandates, intended to increase the access to cancer care, seemed to fall short in maximizing the ability of surgical practitioners to deliver quality care to patients. Among women who did not receive IBR, 65% felt that they had received the sufficient amount of information to appropriately inform their decision. In addition, only 46% of this same cohort reported a consultation with a reconstructive surgeon preoperatively. Private-sector hospitals delivered better IBR care because of the likely presence of infrastructure and financial incentives for physicians. These results serve as a call for a better alignment between policy initiatives designed to expand care access and the perogatives of physicians to ensure an optimized delivery of the expanded care such policy mandates. PMID:27482486

  8. Continuing Care Retirement Communities: An Analysis of Financial Viability and Health Care Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.

    1988-01-01

    Calculated financial ratios for 109 Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs). Noted problems with regard to asset productivity, profitability, and equity levels. Found that a risk-spreading charge structure for financing health care needs appeared to exist among CCRCs providing a full-care contract. (Author/ABL)

  9. The european primary care monitor: structure, process and outcome indicators

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    Wilson Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scientific research has provided evidence on benefits of well developed primary care systems. The relevance of some of this research for the European situation is limited. There is currently a lack of up to date comprehensive and comparable information on variation in development of primary care, and a lack of knowledge of structures and strategies conducive to strengthening primary care in Europe. The EC funded project Primary Health Care Activity Monitor for Europe (PHAMEU aims to fill this gap by developing a Primary Care Monitoring System (PC Monitor for application in 31 European countries. This article describes the development of the indicators of the PC Monitor, which will make it possible to create an alternative model for holistic analyses of primary care. Methods A systematic review of the primary care literature published between 2003 and July 2008 was carried out. This resulted in an overview of: (1 the dimensions of primary care and their relevance to outcomes at (primary health system level; (2 essential features per dimension; (3 applied indicators to measure the features of primary care dimensions. The indicators were evaluated by the project team against criteria of relevance, precision, flexibility, and discriminating power. The resulting indicator set was evaluated on its suitability for Europe-wide comparison of primary care systems by a panel of primary care experts from various European countries (representing a variety of primary care systems. Results The developed PC Monitor approaches primary care in Europe as a multidimensional concept. It describes the key dimensions of primary care systems at three levels: structure, process, and outcome level. On structure level, it includes indicators for governance, economic conditions, and workforce development. On process level, indicators describe access, comprehensiveness, continuity, and coordination of primary care services. On outcome level, indicators

  10. 42 CFR 440.385 - Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent coverage through managed care entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.385 Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent coverage through managed care entities. In implementing benchmark or...

  11. Women's Preventive Services Guidelines Affordable Care Act Expands Prevention Coverage for Women's Health and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Women’s Preventive Services Guidelines Affordable Care Act Expands Prevention Coverage for ... are delivered by a network provider. Women's Preventive Services Guidelines Supported by the Health Resources and Services ...

  12. Health care financing in Nigeria: Implications for achieving universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzochukwu, B S C; Ughasoro, M D; Etiaba, E; Okwuosa, C; Envuladu, E; Onwujekwe, O E

    2015-01-01

    The way a country finances its health care system is a critical determinant for reaching universal health coverage (UHC). This is so because it determines whether the health services that are available are affordable to those that need them. In Nigeria, the health sector is financed through different sources and mechanisms. The difference in the proportionate contribution from these stated sources determine the extent to which such health sector will go in achieving successful health care financing system. Unfortunately, in Nigeria, achieving the correct blend of these sources remains a challenge. This review draws on relevant literature to provide an overview and the state of health care financing in Nigeria, including policies in place to enhance healthcare financing. We searched PubMed, Medline, The Cochrane Library, Popline, Science Direct and WHO Library Database with search terms that included, but were not restricted to health care financing Nigeria, public health financing, financing health and financing policies. Further publications were identified from references cited in relevant articles and reports. We reviewed only papers published in English. No date restrictions were placed on searches. It notes that health care in Nigeria is financed through different sources including but not limited to tax revenue, out-of-pocket payments (OOPs), donor funding, and health insurance (social and community). In the face of achieving UHC, achieving successful health care financing system continues to be a challenge in Nigeria and concludes that to achieve universal coverage using health financing as the strategy, there is a dire need to review the system of financing health and ensure that resources are used more efficiently while at the same time removing financial barriers to access by shifting focus from OOPs to other hidden resources. There is also need to give presidential assent to the national health bill and its prompt implementation when signed into law.

  13. Influenza immunization coverage of residents and employees of long-term care facilities in New York State, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Cara J; Nadeau, Jessica A; Schaffzin, Joshua K; Pollock, Lynn; Wallace, Barbara J; McNutt, Louise Ann; Blog, Debra

    2013-08-01

    We describe influenza immunization coverage trends from the New York State (NYS) Department of Health long-term care facility (LTCF) reports. Overall median immunization coverage levels for NYS LTCF residents and employees were 84.0% (range: 81.6%-86.0%) and 37.7% (range: 32.7%-50.0%), respectively. LTCF resident immunization coverage levels in NYS have neared the Healthy People 2020 target of 90% but have not achieved high LTCF employee coverage, suggesting a need for more regulatory interventions.

  14. Meningococcal, influenza virus, and hepatitis B virus vaccination coverage level among health care workers in Hajj

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    Ghabrah Tawfik M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the compliance of health care workers (HCWs employed in Hajj in receiving the meningococcal, influenza, and hepatitis B vaccines. Methods A cross-sectional survey of doctors and nurses working in all Mena and Arafat hospitals and primary health care centers who attended Hajj-medicine training programs immediately before the beginning of Hajj of the lunar Islamic year 1423 (2003 using self-administered structured questionnaire which included demographic data and data on vaccination history. Results A total of 392 HCWs were studied including 215 (54.8% nurses and 177 (45.2% doctors. One hundred and sixty four (41.8% HCWs were from Makkah and the rest were recruited from other regions in Saudi Arabia. Three hundred and twenty three (82.4% HCWs received the quadrivalent (ACYW135 meningococcal meningitis vaccine with 271 (83.9% HCWs receiving it at least 2 weeks before coming to Hajj, whereas the remaining 52 (16.1% HCWs received it within Conclusion The meningococcal and hepatitis B vaccination coverage level among HCWs in Hajj was suboptimal and the influenza vaccination level was notably low. Strategies to improve vaccination coverage among HCWs should be adopted by all health care facilities in Saudi Arabia.

  15. Affordable Care Act's Mandate Eliminating Contraceptive Cost Sharing Influenced Choices Of Women With Employer Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Caroline S; Fertig, Angela R; Dowd, Bryan E

    2016-09-01

    Patient cost sharing for contraceptive prescriptions was eliminated for certain insurance plans as part of the Affordable Care Act. We examined the impact of this change on women's patterns of choosing prescription contraceptive methods. Using claims data for a sample of midwestern women ages 18-46 with employer-sponsored coverage, we examined the contraceptive choices made by women in employer groups whose coverage complied with the mandate, compared to the choices of women in groups whose coverage did not comply. We found that the reduction in cost sharing was associated with a 2.3-percentage-point increase in the choice of any prescription contraceptive, relative to the 30 percent rate of choosing prescription contraceptives before the change in cost sharing. A disproportionate share of this increase came from increased selection of long-term contraception methods. Thus, the removal of cost as a barrier seems to be an important factor in contraceptive choice, and our findings about long-term methods may have implications for rates of unintended pregnancy that require further study. PMID:27605640

  16. Impact of state mandatory insurance coverage on the use of diabetes preventive care

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    Barker Lawrence

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 46 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have passed laws and regulations mandating that health insurance plans cover diabetes treatment and preventive care. Previous research on state mandates suggested that these policies had little impact, since many health plans already covered the benefits. Here, we analyze the contents of and model the effect of state mandates. We examined how state mandates impacted the likelihood of using three types of diabetes preventive care: annual eye exams, annual foot exams, and performing daily self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG. Methods We collected information on diabetes benefits specified in state mandates and time the mandates were enacted. To assess impact, we used data that the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System gathered between 1996 and 2000. 4,797 individuals with self-reported diabetes and covered by private insurance were included; 3,195 of these resided in the 16 states that passed state mandates between 1997 and 1999; 1,602 resided in the 8 states or the District of Columbia without state mandates by 2000. Multivariate logistic regression models (with state fixed effect, controlling for patient demographic characteristics and socio-economic status, state characteristics, and time trend were used to model the association between passing state mandates and the usage of the forms of diabetes preventive care, both individually and collectively. Results All 16 states that passed mandates between 1997 and 1999 required coverage of diabetic monitors and strips, while 15 states required coverage of diabetes self management education. Only 1 state required coverage of periodic eye and foot exams. State mandates were positively associated with a 6.3 (P = 0.04 and a 5.8 (P = 0.03 percentage point increase in the probability of privately insured diabetic patient's performing SMBG and simultaneous receiving all three preventive care, respectively; state mandates were not

  17. Indicators for quality of hospital care: Beyond the numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Dishoeck, Anne-Margreet

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis addresses two major topics in measuring, comparing and improving quality of care. We found considerable influence of random variation and case-mix in comparing hospitals using performance indicators. Although we found a significant relation between outcome and care processes, chance variation is the major limitation for the interpretability of indicators used for quality measurement or quality improvement. Like a one hand clock, we roughly know what time i...

  18. Quality Indicators for Hospital Care: Reliability and validity

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Hospital quality indicators are widely implemented for purposes such as accountability, transparency and the overarching aim of quality improvement. However, it is not clear whether currently used hospital quality indicators actually reflect quality of care. The aim of this thesis was to expand our knowledge on how to measure quality of hospital care with the focus on external comparison. I specifically investigated reliability and validity as these are key aspects of...

  19. Vaccination coverage of health care personnel working in health care facilities in France: results of a national survey, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthmann, Jean-Paul; Fonteneau, Laure; Ciotti, Céline; Bouvet, Elisabeth; Pellissier, Gérard; Lévy-Bruhl, Daniel; Abiteboul, Dominique

    2012-06-29

    We conducted a national cross-sectional survey to investigate vaccination coverage (VC) in health care personnel (HCP) working in clinics and hospitals in France. We used a two-stage stratified random sampling design to select 1127 persons from 35 health care settings. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews and completed using information gathered from the occupational health doctor. A total of 183 physicians, 110 nurses, 58 nurse-assistants and 101 midwives were included. VC for compulsory vaccinations was 91.7% for hepatitis B, 95.5% for the booster dose of diphtheria-tetanus-polio (DTP), 94.9% for BCG. For non-compulsory vaccinations, coverage was 11.4% for the 10 year booster of the DTP pertussis containing vaccine, 49.7% for at least one dose of measles, 29.9% for varicella and 25.6% for influenza. Hepatitis B VC did not differ neither between HCP working in surgery and HCP in other sectors, nor in surgeons and anaesthesiologists compared to physicians working in medicine. Young HCP were better vaccinated for pertussis and measles (pvaccinated for influenza and pertussis (pcompulsory vaccinations, whereas VC for non-compulsory vaccinations is very insufficient. The vaccination policy regarding these latter vaccinations should be reinforced in France.

  20. Quality Indicators for Hospital Care : Reliability and validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Fischer (Claudia)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Hospital quality indicators are widely implemented for purposes such as accountability, transparency and the overarching aim of quality improvement. However, it is not clear whether currently used hospital quality indicators actually reflect quality of care. The aim of

  1. Health care coverage among long-distance truckers in India: an evaluation based on the Tanahashi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Varun; Saggurti, Niranjan; Bharat, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    Long-distance truckers (LDTDs) are vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus infection and other sexually transmitted infections due to the nature of their work, working environment, and frequent mobility. This paper examines and comments on the health care coverage provisioned under “Kavach” Project. Data from the Integrated Behavioural and Biological Survey, National Highway gathered from 2,066 LDTDs in Round 1 and 2,085 LDTDs in Round 2, who traveled in four extreme road corridors travelled by LDTDs in India, were used for analysis. Analysis reveals that service capacity in terms of socially marketed condoms per thousand LDTDs has increased from Round 1 to Round 2 (4,430 to 6,876, respectively). Accessibility coverage in terms of knowledge about the Khushi clinic has significantly decreased between Rounds 1 and 2 (60.9% to 54.6%; P<0.001). Acceptability coverage has increased between the two rounds (13.8% to 50.6%; P<0.001). Contact coverage has also increased between the rounds (12.7% to 22.3%; P<0.001). Effectiveness coverage for preventive and curative care has also increased significantly. This paper comments on the gaps in accessibility and acceptability of health care coverage and emphasizes the need for further studies to assess the contextual factors that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of interventions designed to address access barriers and to identify what combination of interventions may generate the best possible outcome. PMID:25848319

  2. Analysis of Universal Health Coverage and Equity on Health Care in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Timothy Chrispinus; Lelegwe, Steve Ltumbesi

    2016-01-01

    Kenya has made progress towards universal health coverage as evidenced in the various policy initiatives and reforms that have been implemented in the country since independence. The purpose of this analysis was to critically review the various initiatives that the government of Kenya has over the years initiated towards the realization of Universal Health Care (UHC) and how this has impacted on health equity. The paper relied heavly on secondary sources of information although primary data data was collected. Whereas secondary data was largely collected through critical review of policy documents and commissioned studies by the Ministry of Health and development partners, primary data was collected through interviews with various stakeholders involved in UHC including policy makers, implementers, researchers and health service providers. Key findings include commitment towards UHC; minimal solidarity in health care financing; cases of dysfunctionalilty of health care system; minimal opportunities for continuous medical training; quality concerns in terms of stock-outs of drugs and other medical supplies, dilapidated health infrastructure and inadequqte number of health workers. Other findings include governance concerns at NHIF coupled with, high operational costs, low capitation, fraud at facility levels, low pay out ratio, accreditation of facilities, and narrowness of the benefit package, among others. In lieu of these, various recommendations have been suggested. Among these include promotion of solidarty in health care financing that are reliable and economical in collecting; political will to enhance commitment towards devolution of health care, engagement of various stakeholders at both county and national government in fast tracking the enactment of Health Act; investment in health infrastructure and training of human resources; revamping NHIF into a full-fledged social health insurance scheme, and enhancing capacity of NHIF human resources, enhanced

  3. Performance of private sector health care: implications for universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rosemary; Ensor, Tim; Waters, Hugh

    2016-08-01

    Although the private sector is an important health-care provider in many low-income and middle-income countries, its role in progress towards universal health coverage varies. Studies of the performance of the private sector have focused on three main dimensions: quality, equity of access, and efficiency. The characteristics of patients, the structures of both the public and private sectors, and the regulation of the sector influence the types of health services delivered, and outcomes. Combined with characteristics of private providers-including their size, objectives, and technical competence-the interaction of these factors affects how the sector performs in different contexts. Changing the performance of the private sector will require interventions that target the sector as a whole, rather than individual providers alone. In particular, the performance of the private sector seems to be intrinsically linked to the structure and performance of the public sector, which suggests that deriving population benefit from the private health-care sector requires a regulatory response focused on the health-care sector as a whole. PMID:27358251

  4. Indicators of health system coverage and activity in Ireland during the economic crisis 2008-2014 - from 'more with less' to 'less with less'.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Sara

    2014-09-01

    A new Irish government came to power in March 2011 with the most radical proposals for health system reform in the history of the state, including improving access to healthcare, free GP care for all by 2015 and the introduction of Universal Health Insurance after 2016. All this was to be achieved amidst the most severe economic crisis experienced by Ireland since the 1930s. The authors assess how well the system coped with a downsizing of resources by an analysis of coverage and health system activity indicators. These show a health system that managed \\'to do more with less\\' from 2008 to 2012. They also demonstrate a system that was \\'doing more with less\\' by transferring the cost of care onto people and by significant resource cuts. From 2013, the indicators show a system that has no choice but \\'to do less with less\\' with diminishing returns from crude cuts. This is evident in declining numbers with free care, of hospital cases and home care hours, alongside increased wait-times and expensive agency staffing. The results suggest a limited window of benefit from austerity beyond which cuts and rationing prevail which is costly, in both human and financial terms.

  5. Indicators for quality of hospital care : Beyond the numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Dishoeck (Anne-Margreet)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis addresses two major topics in measuring, comparing and improving quality of care. We found considerable influence of random variation and case-mix in comparing hospitals using performance indicators. Although we found a significant relation between outcome

  6. Variations in Soil Salinity and Riparian Vegetation Coverage as Indicators of Stress in an Arid Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, M.; Mickus, K.; Johnson, E.

    2003-12-01

    Soil salinity and riparian vegetation coverages of an arid area in northern Mexico through time were investigated. The study area comprises a 10 km segment of the lower Rio Conchos and surrounding undeveloped, non-irrigated land. The amount of area affected by salinity and the type of salinity were determined using EC (electrical conductivity) in conjunction with satellite images and corroborated by field analysis. The soil salinity derived from the remote sensing data was tied to precipitation, greenness of vegetation and water level of a nearby reservoir. The most appropriate method to assess soil salinity was found to be the selective principal component (SPCA) technique of Chavez and Kwarteng while the techniques utilized to discriminate vigorously-growing vegetation were tasseled cap transformation and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). With this region undergoing a severe drought for the last ten years, the response of different parts of the ecosystem and changes in vegetation that so closely affect wildlife and other natural resources in this area can be better evaluated.

  7. Assessment of nursing care using indicators generated by software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Souza Lima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the efficacy of the Nursing Process in an Intensive Care Unit using indicators generated by software. METHOD: cross-sectional study using data collected for four months. RNs and students daily registered patients, took history (at admission, performed physical assessments, and established nursing diagnoses, nursing plans/prescriptions, and assessed care delivered to 17 patients using software. Indicators concerning the incidence and prevalence of nursing diagnoses, rate of effectiveness, risk diagnoses, and rate of effective prevention of complications were computed. RESULTS: the Risk for imbalanced body temperature was the most frequent diagnosis (23.53%, while the least frequent was Risk for constipation (0%. The Risk for Impaired skin integrity was prevalent in 100% of the patients, while Risk for acute confusion was the least prevalent (11.76%. Risk for constipation and Risk for impaired skin integrity obtained a rate of risk diagnostic effectiveness of 100%. The rate of effective prevention of acute confusion and falls was 100%. CONCLUSION: the efficacy of the Nursing Process using indicators was analyzed because these indicators reveal how nurses have identified patients' risks and conditions, and planned care in a systematized manner.

  8. 78 FR 39869 - Coverage of Certain Preventive Services Under the Affordable Care Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... than to provide such coverage, after accounting for both the direct medical costs of pregnancy and the... the PHS Act requires coverage without cost sharing of certain preventive health services by non... (HRSA). As authorized by the current regulations, and consistent with the HRSA guidelines, group...

  9. Prevalence of HBV and HBV vaccination coverage in health care workers of tertiary hospitals of Peshawar, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Ijaz; Khan Shahid; Ayaz Sultan; Naseemullah,; Khan Sanaullah; Attaullah Sobia; Hoti Naseruddin; Siraj Sami

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) may progress to serious consequences and increase dramatically beyond endemic dimensions that transmits to or from health care workers (HCWs) during routine investigation in their work places. Basic aim of this study was to canvass the safety of HCWs and determine the prevalence of HBV and its possible association with occupational and non-occupational risk factors. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage level and main barriers to vaccination were also ta...

  10. Quality indicators for international benchmarking of mental health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Richard C; Mattke, Soeren; Somekh, David;

    2006-01-01

    To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data.......To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data....

  11. Achieving Universal Health Coverage by Focusing on Primary Care in Japan: Lessons for Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Ikegami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When the Japanese government adopted Western medicine in the late nineteenth century, it left intact the infrastructure of primary care by giving licenses to the existing practitioners and by initially setting the hurdle for entry into medical school low. Public financing of hospitals was kept minimal so that almost all of their revenue came from patient charges. When social health insurance (SHI was introduced in 1927, benefits were focused on primary care services delivered by physicians in clinics, and not on hospital services. This was reflected in the development and subsequent revisions of the fee schedule. The policy decisions which have helped to retain primary care services might provide lessons for achieving universal health coverage in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs.

  12. Achieving Universal Health Coverage by Focusing on Primary Care in Japan: Lessons for Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    When the Japanese government adopted Western medicine in the late nineteenth century, it left intact the infrastructure of primary care by giving licenses to the existing practitioners and by initially setting the hurdle for entry into medical school low. Public financing of hospitals was kept minimal so that almost all of their revenue came from patient charges. When social health insurance (SHI) was introduced in 1927, benefits were focused on primary care services delivered by physicians in clinics, and not on hospital services. This was reflected in the development and subsequent revisions of the fee schedule. The policy decisions which have helped to retain primary care services might provide lessons for achieving universal health coverage in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). PMID:27239877

  13. Quality indicators and performance measures in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, David C

    2014-03-01

    The operations of any portion of the healthcare delivery system, eg, ambulatory care, the consultation and referral process, or hospital care, are critically dependent upon their control systems. The quality of health care produced by the system and its components is also subject to "control." One of the regulatory mechanisms involves performance measures. The development of good measures of quality is a complex and dynamic process. Within endocrinology, most measures have addressed diabetes care and most quality measurement in diabetes has focused on the ambulatory setting and mainly includes measures of process and intermediate outcomes. This review addresses quality and performance measures for diabetes, their development, characteristics, use, misuse, and future prospects.

  14. Primary Care Availability, Safety Net Clinics, and Health Insurance Coverage: The Association of These Access Factors With Preventable Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Sharanya; Begley, Charles E; Franzini, Luisa; Swint, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between physician/safety net availability and health insurance coverage and preventable hospitalizations (PHs) in nonelderly adults in an urban area. Preventable conditions (PHs) were identified for nonelderly adults in Harris County using the Texas Health Care Information Collection hospital database. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the association of health insurance and patient proximity to physicians and safety net clinics with the risk of a PH. Safety net availability reduced PH risk by 23% (P insurance increased PH risk by 30% (P < .05). PMID:27232686

  15. The Impact of Nearly Universal Insurance Coverage on Health Care Utilization: Evidence from Medicare

    OpenAIRE

    David Card; Carlos Dobkin; Nicole Maestas

    2008-01-01

    The onset of Medicare eligibility at age 65 leads to sharp changes in the health insurance coverage of the US population. These changes lead to increases in the use of medical services, with a pattern of gains across socioeconomic groups that varies by type of service. While routine doctor visits increase more for groups that previously lacked insurance, hospital admissions for relatively expensive procedures like bypass surgery and joint replacement increase more for previously insured group...

  16. Long-term care and nursing home coverage: are adult children substitutes for insurance policies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, J M

    2001-07-01

    Recent theoretical work suggests that in some cases, parents will forego the purchase of long-term care insurance and rely on child-provided care in old age. This paper uses data from the Asset and Health Dynamics survey and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine whether the availability of children and other potential caregivers explains why so few elderly persons have long-term care insurance. In contrast to the notion that family members serve as substitutes for long-term care insurance, variables measuring the availability of informal caregivers have no statistically significant effect in models of insurance ownership and models of intentions to purchase insurance. PMID:11463187

  17. Quality indicators and performance measures in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, David C

    2014-03-01

    The operations of any portion of the healthcare delivery system, eg, ambulatory care, the consultation and referral process, or hospital care, are critically dependent upon their control systems. The quality of health care produced by the system and its components is also subject to "control." One of the regulatory mechanisms involves performance measures. The development of good measures of quality is a complex and dynamic process. Within endocrinology, most measures have addressed diabetes care and most quality measurement in diabetes has focused on the ambulatory setting and mainly includes measures of process and intermediate outcomes. This review addresses quality and performance measures for diabetes, their development, characteristics, use, misuse, and future prospects. PMID:24496919

  18. A study on coverage utilization and quality of maternal care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Agarwal, Abhiruchi Galhotra, H M Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were yo assess the utilization of various maternal services and to compare the quality of services provided by doctors and health workers in terms of components and advice received by pregnant women during antenatal period. It was a Cross-sectional Study conducted in a village on the border of Chandigarh (U.T. and Mohali (Punjab. All the women who had delivered in the past three years in the village Palsora were included in the study. 92.4% of the pregnancies were registered, 53.2% of which received antenatal care by a Doctor and 46.8% by a health worker. The measuring of blood pressure was significantly higher by the doctor than the health workers who recorded weight more significantly. The advice provided by doctors was significantly higher than health workers regarding diet, danger signs, newborn care, family planning and natal care.

  19. Universal Coverage without Universal Access: Institutional Barriers to Health Care among Women Sex Workers in Vancouver, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eugenia Socías

    Full Text Available Access to health care is a crucial determinant of health. Yet, even within settings that purport to provide universal health coverage (UHC, sex workers' experiences reveal systematic, institutionally ingrained barriers to appropriate quality health care. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and correlates of institutional barriers to care among sex workers in a setting with UHC.Data was drawn from an ongoing community-based, prospective cohort of women sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (An Evaluation of Sex Workers' Health Access. Multivariable logistic regression analyses, using generalized estimating equations (GEE, were employed to longitudinally investigate correlates of institutional barriers to care over a 44-month follow-up period (January 2010-August 2013.In total, 723 sex workers were included, contributing to 2506 observations. Over the study period, 509 (70.4% women reported one or more institutional barriers to care. The most commonly reported institutional barriers to care were long wait times (54.6%, limited hours of operation (36.5%, and perceived disrespect by health care providers (26.1%. In multivariable GEE analyses, recent partner- (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.46, % 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.10-1.94, workplace- (AOR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.05-1.63, and community-level violence (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.04-1.92, as well as other markers of vulnerability, such as self-identification as a gender/sexual minority (AOR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.03-1.69, a mental illness diagnosis (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.34-2.06, and lack of provincial health insurance card (AOR = 3.47, 95% CI 1.59-7.57 emerged as independent correlates of institutional barriers to health services.Despite Canada's UHC, women sex workers in Vancouver face high prevalence of institutional barriers to care, with highest burden among most marginalized women. These findings underscore the need to explore new models of care, alongside broader policy changes to fulfill sex

  20. Can surveys of women accurately track indicators of maternal and newborn care? A validity and reliability study in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Katharine J; Blanc, Ann K; Warren, Charlotte E; Kimani, James; Mdawida, Brian; Ndwidga, Charity

    2016-01-01

    Background Tracking progress on maternal and newborn survival requires accurate information on the coverage of essential interventions. Despite widespread use, most indicators measuring maternal and newborn intervention coverage have not been validated. This study assessed the ability of women delivering in two Kenyan hospitals to recall critical elements of care received during the intrapartum and immediate postnatal period at two time points: hospital discharge and 13–15 months following delivery. Methods Women’s reports of received care were compared against observations by trained third party observers. Indicators selected for validation were either currently in use or have the potential to be included in population–based surveys. We used a mixed–methods approach to validate women’s reporting ability. We calculated individual–reporting accuracy using the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC), population–level accuracy using the inflation factor (IF), and compared the accuracy of women’s reporting at baseline and follow–up. We also assessed the consistency of women’s reporting over time. We used in–depth interviews with a sub–set of women (n = 20) to assess their understanding of key survey terms. Results Of 606 women who participated at baseline and agreed to follow–up, 515 were re–interviewed. Thirty–eight indicators had sufficient sample size for validation analysis; ten met criteria for high or moderate reporting accuracy (0.60birth, episiotomy, caesarean section, and low birthweight infant (<2500 g). Conclusion The few indicators that women reported accurately at baseline were consistently recalled with accuracy at 13–15 months follow–up. Although there is deterioration in women’s recall in some indicators over time, the extent of deterioration does not appreciably compromise reporting accuracy for indicators with high baseline validity. Indicators related to initial client assessment and the immediate

  1. Examining financial performance indicators for acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jeffrey H; Wheeler, John R C

    2013-01-01

    Measuring financial performance in acute care hospitals is a challenge for those who work daily with financial information. Because of the many ways to measure financial performance, financial managers and researchers must decide which measures are most appropriate. The difficulty is compounded for the non-finance person. The purpose of this article is to clarify key financial concepts and describe the most common measures of financial performance so that researchers and managers alike may understand what is being measured by various financial ratios.

  2. Geographical accessibility and spatial coverage modeling of the primary health care network in the Western Province of Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huerta Munoz Ulises

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary health care is essential in improving and maintaining the health of populations. It has the potential to accelerate achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and fulfill the “Health for All” doctrine of the Alma-Ata Declaration. Understanding the performance of the health system from a geographic perspective is important for improved health planning and evidence-based policy development. The aims of this study were to measure geographical accessibility, model spatial coverage of the existing primary health facility network, estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity and the population underserved in the Western Province of Rwanda. Methods This study uses health facility, population and ancillary data for the Western Province of Rwanda. Three different travel scenarios utilized by the population to attend the nearest primary health facility were defined with a maximum travelling time of 60 minutes: Scenario 1 – walking; Scenario 2 – walking and cycling; and Scenario 3 – walking and public transportation. Considering these scenarios, a raster surface of travel time between primary health facilities and population was developed. To model spatial coverage and estimate the number of primary health facilities working under capacity, the catchment area of each facility was calculated by taking into account population coverage capacity, the population distribution, the terrain topography and the travelling modes through the different land categories. Results Scenario 2 (walking and cycling has the highest degree of geographical accessibility followed by Scenario 3 (walking and public transportation. The lowest level of accessibility can be observed in Scenario 1 (walking. The total population covered differs depending on the type of travel scenario. The existing primary health facility network covers only 26.6% of the population in Scenario 1. In Scenario 2, the use of a bicycle

  3. Improving palliative care in selected settings in England using quality indicators: a realist evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, Steve; Davies, Nathan; Manthorpe, Jill; Crome, Peter; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Engels, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a gap between readily available evidence of best practice and its use in everyday palliative care. The IMPACT study evaluated the potential of facilitated use of Quality Indicators as tools to improve palliative care in different settings in England.Methods: 1) Modelling palliative care services and selecting a set of Quality Indicators to form the core of an intervention, 2) Case studies of intervention using the Quality Indicator set supported by an expert in service ch...

  4. Improving palliative care in selected settings in England using quality indicators: a realist evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, S.; Davies, N; Manthorpe, J; Crome, P; Ahmedzai, S.; Vernooij-Dassen, M; Engels, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a gap between readily available evidence of best practice and its use in everyday palliative care. The IMPACT study evaluated the potential of facilitated use of Quality Indicators as tools to improve palliative care in different settings in England. / Methods: 1) Modelling palliative care services and selecting a set of Quality Indicators to form the core of an intervention, 2) Case studies of intervention using the Quality Indicator set supported by an expert in service...

  5. Research tool: Harmonised indicators across the continuum of care

    OpenAIRE

    Makowiecka, K

    2013-01-01

    The IDEAS project at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine created a clear table of indicators that can be harmonised across all maternal and newborn health implementation projects funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Ethiopia, North-Eastern Nigeria and Uttar Pradesh, India. This can now be accessed as a research tool.

  6. Will male advertisement be a reliable indicator of paternal care, if offspring survival depends on male care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Natasha B.; Alonzo, Suzanne H.

    2009-01-01

    Existing theory predicts that male signalling can be an unreliable indicator of paternal care, but assumes that males with high levels of mating success can have high current reproductive success, without providing any parental care. As a result, this theory does not hold for the many species where offspring survival depends on male parental care. We modelled male allocation of resources between advertisement and care for species with male care where males vary in quality, and the effect of care and advertisement on male fitness is multiplicative rather than additive. Our model predicts that males will allocate proportionally more of their resources to whichever trait (advertisement or paternal care) is more fitness limiting. In contrast to previous theory, we find that male advertisement is always a reliable indicator of paternal care and male phenotypic quality (e.g. males with higher levels of advertisement never allocate less to care than males with lower levels of advertisement). Our model shows that the predicted pattern of male allocation and the reliability of male signalling depend very strongly on whether paternal care is assumed to be necessary for offspring survival and how male care affects offspring survival and male fitness. PMID:19520802

  7. Prevalence of HBV and HBV vaccination coverage in health care workers of tertiary hospitals of Peshawar, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ijaz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B Virus (HBV may progress to serious consequences and increase dramatically beyond endemic dimensions that transmits to or from health care workers (HCWs during routine investigation in their work places. Basic aim of this study was to canvass the safety of HCWs and determine the prevalence of HBV and its possible association with occupational and non-occupational risk factors. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage level and main barriers to vaccination were also taken in account. Results A total of 824 health care workers were randomly selected from three major hospitals of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Blood samples were analyzed in Department of Zoology, Kohat University of Science and Technology Kohat, and relevant information was obtained by means of preset questionnaire. HCWs in the studied hospitals showed 2.18% prevalence of positive HBV. Nurses and technicians were more prone to occupational exposure and to HBV infection. There was significant difference between vaccinated and non-vaccinated HCWs as well as between the doctors and all other categories. Barriers to complete vaccination, in spite of good knowledge of subjects in this regard were work pressure (39.8%, negligence (38.8% un-affordability (20.9%, and unavailability (0.5%. Conclusions Special preventive measures (universal precaution and vaccination, which are fundamental way to protect HCW against HBV infection should be adopted.

  8. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Stalpers (Dewi); R.A.M.M. Kieft (Renate A. M. M.); D. van der Linden (Dimitri); M.J. Kaljouw (Marian J.); M.J. Schuurmans (Marieke )

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses' satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-s

  9. Patient characteristics predicting failure to receive indicated care for type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mounce, L T A; Steel, Nicholas; Hardcastle, Antonia; Henley, William E.; Bachmann, Max; Campbell, John; Clark, Allan; Melzer, David; Richards, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine which patient characteristics were associated with failure to receive indicated care for diabetes over time. Methods: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing participants aged 50 or older with diabetes reported receipt of care described by four diabetes quality indicators (QIs) in 2008-9 and 2010-11. Annual checks for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), proteinuria and foot examination were assessed as a care bundle (n=907). A further QI (n=759) assessed whether participants with ca...

  10. Relation Between Quality-of-Care Indicators for Diabetes and Patient Outcomes : A Systematic Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidorenkov, Grigory; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bilo, Henk; Denig, Petra

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review to assess whether quality indicators for diabetes care are related to patient outcomes. Twenty-four studies were included that formally tested this relationship. Quality indicators focusing on structure or processes of care were included. Descript

  11. Patient Safety in Critical Care Unit: Development of a Nursing Quality Indicator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Camila S P; Barbosa, Sayonara F F

    2015-01-01

    This is a methodological study and technological production that aims to describe the development of a computerized system of nursing care quality indicators for the Intensive Care Unit. The study population consisted of a systems analyst and fifteen critical care nurses. For the development of the system we adopted some of the best practices of the Unified Process methodology using the Unified Modeling Language and the programming language Java Enterprise Edition 7. The system consists of an access menu with the following functions: Home (presents general information), New Record (records the indicator), Record (record search), Census (add information and indicators of the patient), Report (generates report of the indicators) and Annex (accesses the Braden Scale). This information system allows for measurement of the quality of nursing care and to evaluate patient safety in intensive care unit by monitoring quality indicators in nursing. PMID:26262049

  12. Inducing Herd Immunity against Seasonal Influenza in Long-Term Care Facilities through Employee Vaccination Coverage: A Transmission Dynamics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Wendelboe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vaccinating healthcare workers (HCWs in long-term care facilities (LTCFs may effectively induce herd immunity and protect residents against influenza-related morbidity and mortality. We used influenza surveillance data from all LTCFs in New Mexico to validate a transmission dynamics model developed to investigate herd immunity induction. Material and Methods. We adjusted a previously published transmission dynamics model and used surveillance data from an active system among 76 LTCFs in New Mexico during 2006-2007 for model validation. We used a deterministic compartmental model with a stochastic component for transmission between residents and HCWs in each facility in order to simulate the random variation expected in such populations. Results. When outbreaks were defined as a dichotomous variable, our model predicted that herd immunity could be induced. When defined as an attack rate, the model demonstrated a curvilinear trend, but insufficiently strong to induce herd immunity. The model was sensitive to changes in the contact parameter β but was robust to changes in the visitor contact probability. Conclusions. These results further elucidate previous studies’ findings that herd immunity may not be induced by vaccinating HCWs in LTCFs; however, increased influenza vaccination coverage among HCWs reduces the probability of influenza infection among residents.

  13. Linking household and facility data for better coverage measures in reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health care: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Mai; Micah, Angela; Brondi, Luciana; Campbell, Harry; Marchant, Tanya; Eisele, Thomas; Munos, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently many measures of intervention coverage obtained from household surveys do not measure actual health intervention/service delivery, resulting in a need for linking reports of care–seeking with assessments of the service environment in order to improve measurements. This systematic review aims to identify evidence of different methods used to link household surveys and service provision assessments, with a focus on reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health care, in low– and middle–income countries. Methods Using pre–defined search terms, articles published in peer–reviewed journals and the grey literature after 1990 were identified, their reference lists scanned and linking methods synthesized. Findings A total of 59 articles and conference presentations were carefully reviewed and categorized into two groups based on the linking method used: 1) indirect/ecological linking that included studies in which health care–seeking behavior was linked to all or the nearest facilities or providers of certain types within a geographical area, and 2) direct linking/exact matching where individuals were linked with the exact provider or facility where they sought care. The former approach was employed in 51 of 59 included studies, and was particularly common among studies that were based on independent sources of household and facility data that were nationally representative. Only eight of the 59 reviewed studies employed direct linking methods, which were typically done at the sub–national level (eg, district level) and often in rural areas, where the number of providers was more limited compared to urban areas. Conclusions Different linking methods have been reported in the literature, each category has its own set of advantages and limitations, in terms of both methodology and practicality for scale–up. Future studies that link household and provider/facility data should also take into account factors such as sources of data, the

  14. Quality of care in one Italian nursing home measured by ACOVE process indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pileggi

    Full Text Available To adapt the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders Quality Indicators (ACOVE QIs for use in Italy, to assess the adherence to these indicators as reported in the medical records of residents in a nursing home (NH, to compare this adherence for general medical and geriatric conditions, and eventually, to identify the relationships between patients' characteristics and reported processes of care.Two physicians collected the data by reviewing medical records of all NH residents in the previous 5 years, for a period of one year. Patients aged <65 years were excluded. A total of 245 patients were reviewed during the study period. The ACOVE QIs set, developed for NH processes of care, was used to assess the quality of care. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify and to assess the role of patients' characteristics on quality of processes of care by several domains of care in general medical and geriatric conditions.With the exception of diabetes management, quality of processes of care for general medical conditions approached adequate adherence. Care falls substantially short of acceptable levels for geriatric conditions (pressure ulcers, falls, dementia. On the contrary, the recommended interventions for urinary incontinence were commonly performed. Adherence to indicators varied for the different domains of care and was proven worse for the screening and prevention indicators both for geriatric and general medical conditions. Statistical analysis showed disparities in provision of appropriate processes of care associated with gender, age, co-morbidities, level of function and mobility, length of stay and modality of discharge by NHs.Adherence to recommended processes of care delivered in NH is inadequate. Substantial work lies ahead for the improvement of care. Efforts should focus particularly on management of geriatric conditions and on preventive healthcare.

  15. Monitoring intervention coverage in the context of universal health coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ties Boerma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring universal health coverage (UHC focuses on information on health intervention coverage and financial protection. This paper addresses monitoring intervention coverage, related to the full spectrum of UHC, including health promotion and disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation. A comprehensive core set of indicators most relevant to the country situation should be monitored on a regular basis as part of health progress and systems performance assessment for all countries. UHC monitoring should be embedded in a broad results framework for the country health system, but focus on indicators related to the coverage of interventions that most directly reflect the results of UHC investments and strategies in each country. A set of tracer coverage indicators can be selected, divided into two groups-promotion/prevention, and treatment/care-as illustrated in this paper. Disaggregation of the indicators by the main equity stratifiers is critical to monitor progress in all population groups. Targets need to be set in accordance with baselines, historical rate of progress, and measurement considerations. Critical measurement gaps also exist, especially for treatment indicators, covering issues such as mental health, injuries, chronic conditions, surgical interventions, rehabilitation, and palliation. Consequently, further research and proxy indicators need to be used in the interim. Ideally, indicators should include a quality of intervention dimension. For some interventions, use of a single indicator is feasible, such as management of hypertension; but in many areas additional indicators are needed to capture quality of service provision. The monitoring of UHC has significant implications for health information systems. Major data gaps will need to be filled. At a minimum, countries will need to administer regular household health surveys with biological and clinical data collection. Countries will also need to improve the

  16. [Association between coverage by oral health teams in the family health and the increase in dental care output in Brazilian municipalities, 1999 and 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Gabriel Trevizan; Celeste, Roger Keller

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between population coverage by oral health teams under the Family Health Strategy (FHS) and the difference in 1999 and 2011 in rates of use of public dental services in Brazilian municipalities. The sample included all 5,507 municipalities in both years. Data were used from government information systems to perform logistic regression for modeling the increase in procedure rates. By 2011, 85% of Brazil's municipalities had oral health teams under the FHS and there had been an increase in infrastructure, human and financial resources. Dental care output increased 49.5% from 1999 to 2011. Municipalities that incorporated more than 3 oral health teams per 10,000 inhabitants showed higher odds of increasing their rates of community procedures (OR = 1.61, 95%CI: 1.23-2.11), prophylactic procedures (OR = 2.05, CI95%: 1.56-2.69), restorations (OR = 2.07, 95%CI: 1.58-2.71), and extractions (OR = 1.53, 95%CI: 1.19-1.97) after adjusting for socio-demographic factors and variations in physical, human and financial resources. The incorporation of oral health teams into the FHS appears more effective for increasing indicators of the use of dental services.

  17. Indicators of Family Care for Development for Use in Multicountry Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Kariger, Patricia; Frongillo, Edward A.; Engle, Patrice; Britto, Pia M. Rebello; Sywulka, Sara M.; Menon, Purnima

    2012-01-01

    Indicators of family care for development are essential for ascertaining whether families are providing their children with an environment that leads to positive developmental outcomes. This project aimed to develop indicators from a set of items, measuring family care practices and resources important for caregiving, for use in epidemiologic surveys in developing countries. A mixed method (quantitative and qualitative) design was used for item selection and evaluation. Qualitative and quanti...

  18. A Purchaser’s Guide to Clinical Preventive Services: A Tool to Improve Health Care Coverage for Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Phillips Campbell, MPH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIn 2005, representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with the National Business Group on Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to form a work group for developing A Purchaser’s Guide to Clinical Preventive Services: Moving Science into Coverage. This guide, designed as a tool for employers, describes recommended clinical preventive services for 46 conditions. The guide includes the scientific evidence and benefits language that employers need to include comprehensive clinical preventive services in their medical benefit plans.MethodsThe work group determined that the guide would address conditions that 1 affected a large percentage of the working population, 2 were costly to control, and 3 had well-defined and accepted recommendations for preventive services. Subject matter experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Business Group on Health, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality developed or reviewed statements of scientific evidence for 46 diseases and conditions.ResultsThe Purchaser’s Guide, written for an employer audience, includes descriptions for recommended clinical preventive services and their cost savings, syntheses of supporting evidence, strategies for prioritization, and recommendations to improve the delivery and use of preventive services. Twelve hundred copies were sent to more than 275 members of the National Business Group on Health and other purchasers of health care; training sessions on the Guide were held for 228 business leaders, health benefit consultants, and health plan administrators; and an online version was created through the Web sites of the National Business Group on Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The online version has received more than 260,000 hits since its release.ConclusionIn 2007, the National Business Group on Health reported that some Fortune 500 companies will be

  19. Self-care behaviors and health indicators in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compeán Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe; Gallegos Cabriales, Esther Carlota; González González, José Gerardo; Gómez Meza, Marco Vinicio

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive correlational study aimed to analyze self-care behaviors and their relationship with health indicators represented by glycemic control, lipid profile, Body Mass Index [BMI], waist circumference and body fat percentage in a sample of 98 adults with type 2 diabetes in an area of Nuevo Leon, Mexico (August 2005/May 2006). The results showed a low self-care behaviors index (X = 36.94, SD=15.14). A significant relationship was found between self-care behaviors and glycosilated hemoglobin [HbA1c] (r s=-.379, pdiet was the most predictive for health indicators, moderated by gender and understanding of diabetes contents (p< .05).

  20. Final Rules for Grandfathered Plans, Preexisting Condition Exclusions, Lifetime and Annual Limits, Rescissions, Dependent Coverage, Appeals, and Patient Protections Under the Affordable Care Act. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-18

    This document contains final regulations regarding grandfathered health plans, preexisting condition exclusions, lifetime and annual dollar limits on benefits, rescissions, coverage of dependent children to age 26, internal claims and appeal and external review processes, and patient protections under the Affordable Care Act. It finalizes changes to the proposed and interim final rules based on comments and incorporates subregulatory guidance issued since publication of the proposed and interim final rules.

  1. Risk adjustment methods for Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs based on the minimum data set for home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirdes John P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increasing interest in enhancing accountability in health care. As such, several methods have been developed to compare the quality of home care services. These comparisons can be problematic if client populations vary across providers and no adjustment is made to account for these differences. The current paper explores the effects of risk adjustment for a set of home care quality indicators (HCQIs based on the Minimum Data Set for Home Care (MDS-HC. Methods A total of 22 home care providers in Ontario and the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA in Manitoba, Canada, gathered data on their clients using the MDS-HC. These assessment data were used to generate HCQIs for each agency and for the two regions. Three types of risk adjustment methods were contrasted: a client covariates only; b client covariates plus an "Agency Intake Profile" (AIP to adjust for ascertainment and selection bias by the agency; and c client covariates plus the intake Case Mix Index (CMI. Results The mean age and gender distribution in the two populations was very similar. Across the 19 risk-adjusted HCQIs, Ontario CCACs had a significantly higher AIP adjustment value for eight HCQIs, indicating a greater propensity to trigger on these quality issues on admission. On average, Ontario had unadjusted rates that were 0.3% higher than the WRHA. Following risk adjustment with the AIP covariate, Ontario rates were, on average, 1.5% lower than the WRHA. In the WRHA, individual agencies were likely to experience a decline in their standing, whereby they were more likely to be ranked among the worst performers following risk adjustment. The opposite was true for sites in Ontario. Conclusions Risk adjustment is essential when comparing quality of care across providers when home care agencies provide services to populations with different characteristics. While such adjustment had a relatively small effect for the two regions, it did

  2. Risk indicators for hearing loss in infants treated in different Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, P.; Mohangoo, A. D.; Verkerk, P. H.; van der Ploeg, C. P. B.; van Straaten, H. L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess which infants' characteristics and specialized procedures are risk indicators for unilateral or bilateral hearing loss (HL) and to evaluate whether these risk indicators are associated with variation in prevalence of HL between Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). Methods: For 2002-

  3. The 'off-hour' effect in trauma care: a possible quality indicator with appealing characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bartolomeo Stefano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper has drawn attention to the paucity of widely accepted quality indicators for trauma care. At the same time, several studies have measured whether mortality of trauma patients changes between normal working time and other parts of the day/week, i.e. the so-called 'off-hour' or 'weekend' effect. This measure has the characteristics to become an accepted quality indicator because it combines the advantages of both outcome and process indicators. As an outcome indicator it would not need validation, a procedure particularly difficult in trauma care where gathering scientific evidence is more difficult than in other disciplines. As a process indicator it would provide indications about where to intervene to improve quality.

  4. Quality indicators for in-hospital pharmaceutical care of Dutch elderly patients : development and validation of an ACOVE-based quality indicator set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, Peter C; Klopotowska, Joanna E; Smorenburg, Susanne M; van Kan, Hendrikus J; Bijleveld, Yuma A; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2001, the ACOVE (Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elders) quality indicators (QIs) were developed in the US to measure the quality of care of vulnerable elderly patients. However, the ACOVE QI set was developed mainly to assess the overall quality of care of community-dwelling vulnerable

  5. Americans' Experiences with ACA Marketplace Coverage: Affordability and Provider Network Satisfaction: Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, February--April 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunja, Munira Z; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    For people with low and moderate incomes, the Affordable Care Act's tax credits have made premium costs roughly comparable to those paid by people with job-based health insurance. For those with higher incomes, the tax credits phase out, meaning that adults in marketplace plans on average have higher premium costs than those in employer plans. The law's cost-sharing reductions are reducing deductibles. Lower-income adults in marketplace plans were less likely than higher-income adults to report having deductibles of $1,000 or more. Majorities of new marketplace enrollees and those who have changed plans since they initially obtained marketplace coverage are satisfied with the doctors participating in their plans. Overall, the majority of marketplace enrollees expressed confidence in their ability to afford care if they were to become seriously ill. This issue brief explores these and other findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, February--April 2016. PMID:27400465

  6. Development of a set of process and structure indicators for palliative care: the Europall project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woitha Kathrin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By measuring the quality of the organisation of palliative care with process and structure quality indicators (QIs, patients, caregivers and policy makers are able to monitor to what extent recommendations are met, like those of the council of the WHO on palliative care and guidelines. This will support the implementation of public programmes, and will enable comparisons between organisations or countries. Methods As no European set of indicators for the organisation of palliative care existed, such a set of QIs was developed. An update of a previous systematic review was made and extended with more databases and grey literature. In two project meetings with practitioners and experts in palliative care the development process of a QI set was finalised and the QIs were categorized in a framework, covering the recommendations of the Council of Europe. Results The searches resulted in 151 structure and process indicators, which were discussed in steering group meetings. Of those QIs, 110 were eligible for the final framework. Conclusions We developed the first set of QIs for the organisation of palliative care. This article is the first step in a multi step project to identify, validate and pilot QIs.

  7. Quality indicators for physiotherapy care in hip and knee osteoarthritis: development and clinimetric properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, W.F.; Wees, P.J. van der; Hendriks, E.J.; Bie, R.A. de; Verhoef, J.; Jong, Z. de; Bodegom-Vos, L. van; Hilberdink, W.K.H.A.; Vlieland, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to develop process quality indicators for physiotherapy care based on key recommendations of the Dutch physiotherapy guideline on hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Guideline recommendations were rated for their relevance by an expert panel, transf

  8. Quality indicators for all dimensions of infertility care quality: consensus between professionals and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; D'Hooghe, T.M.; Spiessens, C.; Sermeus, W.; Neubourg, D. De; Karel, N.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the relative importance of the six dimensions of quality of care according to different stakeholders and can a quality indicator set address all six quality dimensions and incorporate the views from professionals working in different disciplines and from patients? SUMMARY ANS

  9. Development and validation of quality indicators for dementia diagnosis and management in a primary care setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, M.; Draskovic, I.; Achterberg, T. van; Eijken, M.I.J. van; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To construct a set of quality indicators (QIs) for dementia diagnosis and management in a primary care setting. DESIGN: RAND modified Delphi method, including a postal survey, a stakeholders consensus meeting, a scientific expert consensus meeting, and a demonstration project. SETTING: P

  10. The population value of quality indicator reporting: a framework for prioritizing health care performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David O; Chung, Jeanette W

    2014-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports contain more than 250 quality indicators, such as whether a patient with a suspected heart attack received an aspirin. The Department of Health and Human Services National Quality Measures Clearinghouse identifies more than 2,100 such indicators. Because resources for making quality improvements are limited, there is a need to prioritize among these indicators. We propose an approach to assess how reporting specific quality indicators would change care to improve the length and quality of life of the US population. Using thirteen AHRQ quality indicators with readily available data on the benefits of indicator reporting, we found that seven of them account for 93 percent of total benefits, while the remaining six account for only 7 percent of total benefits. Use of a framework such as this could focus resources on indicators having the greatest expected impact on population health.

  11. Quality indicators for pharmaceutical care: a comprehensive set with national scores for Dutch community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Martina; Schoenmakers, Tim; Kylstra, Nico; Mosk, Berend; Bouvy, Marcel L; van de Vaart, Frans; De Smet, Peter A G M; Wensing, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Background The quality of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies in the Netherlands has been assessed annually since 2008. The initial set has been further developed with pharmacists and patient organizations, the healthcare inspectorate, the government and health insurance companies. The set over 2012 was the first set of quality indicators for community pharmacies which was validated and supported by all major stakeholders. The aims of this study were to describe the validated set of quality indicators for community pharmacies and to report their scores over 2012. In subanalyses the score development over 5 years was described for those indicators, that have been surveyed before and remained unchanged. Methods Community pharmacists in the Netherlands were invited in 2013 to provide information for the set of 2012. Quality indicators were mapped by categories relevant for pharmaceutical care and defined for structures, processes and dispensing outcomes. Scores for categorically-measured quality indicators were presented as the percentage of pharmacies reporting the presence of a quality aspect. For numerical quality indicators, the mean of all reported scores was expressed. In subanalyses for those indicators that had been questioned previously, scores were collected from earlier measurements for pharmacies providing their scores in 2012. Multilevel analysis was used to assess the consistency of scores within one pharmacy over time by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results For the set in 2012, 1739 Dutch community pharmacies (88 % of the total) provided information for 66 quality indicators in 10 categories. Indicator scores on the presence of quality structures showed relatively high quality levels. Scores for processes and dispensing outcomes were lower. Subanalyses showed that overall indicators scores improved within pharmacies, but this development differed between pharmacies. Conclusions A set of validated quality indicators provided

  12. Rational use of medicines: prescribing indicators at different levels of health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Cardoso Ferreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This multicenter study aimed to investigate prescribing patterns of drugs at different levels of health care delivery in university-affiliated outpatient clinics located in eight cities in the South and Midwest of Brazil. All prescriptions collected were analyzed for various items, including WHO prescribing indicators. A total of 2,411 prescriptions were analyzed, and 469 drugs were identified. The number of drugs prescribed per encounter, the frequency of polypharmacy, and the percentage of encounters with at least one injection or antibiotic prescribed were higher in centers providing primary health care services, compared to those where this type of care is not provided. Most drugs (86.1% were prescribed by generic name. In centers with primary health care services, drug availability was higher, drugs included in the National and Municipal Lists of Essential Medicines were more frequently prescribed, and patients were given more instructions. However, warnings and non-pharmacological measures were less frequently recommended. This study reveals trends in drug prescribing at different levels of health care delivery in university-affiliated outpatient clinics and indicates possible areas for improvement in prescribing practices.

  13. A decision exercise to engage cancer patients and families in Deliberation about Medicare Coverage for advanced Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Danis, Marion; Abernethy, Amy P; Zafar, S Yousuf; Samsa, Gregory P.; Wolf, Steven P; Howie, Lynn; Taylor, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns about unsustainable costs in the US Medicare program loom as the number of retirees increase and experiences serious and costly illnesses like cancer. Engagement of stakeholders, particularly cancer patients and their families, in prioritizing insured services offers a valuable strategy for informing Medicare coverage policy. We designed and evaluated a decision exercise that allowed cancer patients and family members to choose Medicare benefits for advanced cancer patient...

  14. Gender-affirming Surgeries in the Era of Insurance Coverage: Developing a Framework for Psychosocial Support and Care Navigation in the Perioperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-01-01

    Transgender people have a gender identity different from their birth-assigned sex. Transgender people may seek gender-affirming surgeries to align their body with their identified gender. With increasing visibility of transgender identities, and recognition of the importance of gender-affirming care, has come a policy shift toward mandated coverage or provision of blanket exclusions of these procedures by insurance companies and Medicaid. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health provides guidance to mental health professionals evaluating patients for gender-affirming surgeries, including making a diagnosis and assessing for capacity to consent. However the expansion of covered gender-affirming surgeries to safety-net populations has highlighted the need for an expanded presurgical process which includes a psychosocial assessment and care navigation. The proposed framework expands the preoperative assessment to include these components, and can be used to guide both health systems and insurance providers in the development of transgender medicine programs. PMID:27180683

  15. Gender-affirming Surgeries in the Era of Insurance Coverage: Developing a Framework for Psychosocial Support and Care Navigation in the Perioperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-01-01

    Transgender people have a gender identity different from their birth-assigned sex. Transgender people may seek gender-affirming surgeries to align their body with their identified gender. With increasing visibility of transgender identities, and recognition of the importance of gender-affirming care, has come a policy shift toward mandated coverage or provision of blanket exclusions of these procedures by insurance companies and Medicaid. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health provides guidance to mental health professionals evaluating patients for gender-affirming surgeries, including making a diagnosis and assessing for capacity to consent. However the expansion of covered gender-affirming surgeries to safety-net populations has highlighted the need for an expanded presurgical process which includes a psychosocial assessment and care navigation. The proposed framework expands the preoperative assessment to include these components, and can be used to guide both health systems and insurance providers in the development of transgender medicine programs.

  16. Are diagnosis specific outcome indicators based on administrative data useful in assessing quality of hospital care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, I; Youlden, D; Coory, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hospital performance reports based on administrative data should distinguish differences in quality of care between hospitals from case mix related variation and random error effects. A study was undertaken to determine which of 12 diagnosis-outcome indicators measured across all hospitals in one state had significant risk adjusted systematic (or special cause) variation (SV) suggesting differences in quality of care. For those that did, we determined whether SV persists within hospital peer groups, whether indicator results correlate at the individual hospital level, and how many adverse outcomes would be avoided if all hospitals achieved indicator values equal to the best performing 20% of hospitals. Methods: All patients admitted during a 12 month period to 180 acute care hospitals in Queensland, Australia with heart failure (n = 5745), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n = 3427), or stroke (n = 2955) were entered into the study. Outcomes comprised in-hospital deaths, long hospital stays, and 30 day readmissions. Regression models produced standardised, risk adjusted diagnosis specific outcome event ratios for each hospital. Systematic and random variation in ratio distributions for each indicator were then apportioned using hierarchical statistical models. Results: Only five of 12 (42%) diagnosis-outcome indicators showed significant SV across all hospitals (long stays and same diagnosis readmissions for heart failure; in-hospital deaths and same diagnosis readmissions for AMI; and in-hospital deaths for stroke). Significant SV was only seen for two indicators within hospital peer groups (same diagnosis readmissions for heart failure in tertiary hospitals and inhospital mortality for AMI in community hospitals). Only two pairs of indicators showed significant correlation. If all hospitals emulated the best performers, at least 20% of AMI and stroke deaths, heart failure long stays, and heart failure and AMI readmissions could be avoided

  17. Global quantitative indices reflecting provider process-of-care: data-base derivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Patricia J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controversy has attended the relationship between risk-adjusted mortality and process-of-care. There would be advantage in the establishment, at the data-base level, of global quantitative indices subsuming the diversity of process-of-care. Methods A retrospective, cohort study of patients identified in the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database, 1993-2003, at the level of geographic and ICU-level descriptors (n = 35, for both hospital survivors and non-survivors. Process-of-care indices were established by analysis of: (i the smoothed time-hazard curve of individual patient discharge and determined by pharmaco-kinetic methods as area under the hazard-curve (AUC, reflecting the integrated experience of the discharge process, and time-to-peak-hazard (TMAX, in days, reflecting the time to maximum rate of hospital discharge; and (ii individual patient ability to optimize output (as length-of-stay for recorded data-base physiological inputs; estimated as a technical production-efficiency (TE, scaled [0,(maximum1], via the econometric technique of stochastic frontier analysis. For each descriptor, multivariate correlation-relationships between indices and summed mortality probability were determined. Results The data-set consisted of 223129 patients from 99 ICUs with mean (SD age and APACHE III score of 59.2(18.9 years and 52.7(30.6 respectively; 41.7% were female and 45.7% were mechanically ventilated within the first 24 hours post-admission. For survivors, AUC was maximal in rural and for-profit ICUs, whereas TMAX (≥ 7.8 days and TE (≥ 0.74 were maximal in tertiary-ICUs. For non-survivors, AUC was maximal in tertiary-ICUs, but TMAX (≥ 4.2 days and TE (≥ 0.69 were maximal in for-profit ICUs. Across descriptors, significant differences in indices were demonstrated (analysis-of-variance, P ≤ 0.0001. Total explained variance, for survivors (0.89 and non-survivors (0.89, was maximized by

  18. Immunization coverage and infant mortality rate in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimouchi, A; Ozasa, K; Hayashi, K

    1994-01-01

    We examined whether immunization coverage (IMC) is one of the predictors of infant mortality rate (IMR), as a single indicator representing the availability of primary health care (PHC) services in developing countries. Multiple regression analysis showed that partial correlation coefficients for IMR with immunization coverage (-0.224), logarithm of per capita GNP (-0.294), total fertility rate (0.269), and adult literacy rate (-0.325) were all statistically significant (p immunization coverage is one of the main predictors of the infant mortality rate. It represents one of the health intervention components which can be used as a proxy indicator of the availability of PHC service in developing countries.

  19. Reliability of indicators of nursing care quality: testing interexaminer agreement and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Willamowius Vituri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this study sought to test the interexaminer agreement and reliability of 15 indicators of nursing care quality.METHODS: this was a quantitative, methodological, experimental, and applied study conducted at a large, tertiary, public teaching hospital in the state of Paraná. For data analysis, the Kappa (k statistic was applied to the categorical variables - indicators 1 to 11 and 15 - and the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC to the continuous variables - indicators 12, 13, and 14, with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The categorical data were analyzed using the Lee software, elaborated by the Laboratory of Epidemiology and Statistics of Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology - Brazil, and the continuous data were assessed using BioEstat 5.0.RESULTS: the k-statistic results indicated excellent agreement, which was statistically significant, and the values of the ICC denoted excellent and statistically significant reproducibility/agreement relative to the investigated indicators.CONCLUSION: the investigated indicators exhibited excellent reliability and reproducibility, thus showing that it is possible to formulate valid and reliable assessment instruments for the management of nursing care.

  20. [Pressure ulcer care quality indicator: analysis of medical records and incident report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Pereira, Ana Gabriela da Silva; Suzuki, Lyliam Midori; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2013-03-01

    Cross-sectional study that aimed to compare the data reported in a system for the indication of pressure ulcer (PU) care quality, with the nursing evolution data available in the patients' medical records, and to describe the clinical profile and nursing diagnosis of those who developed PU grade 2 or higher Sample consisted of 188 patients at risk for PU in clinical and surgical units. Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and a computerized system of care indicators and statistically analyzed. Of the 188 patients, 6 (3%) were reported for pressure ulcers grade 2 or higher; however, only 19 (10%) were recorded in the nursing evolution records, thus revealing the underreporting of data. Most patients were women, older adults and patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The most frequent nursing diagnosis was risk of infection. The use of two or more research methodologies such as incident reporting data and retrospective review of patients' records makes the results trustworthy.

  1. Availability and structure of primary medical care services and population health and health care indicators in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Geoffrey

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that greater availability of primary medical care practitioners (GPs contributes to better population health. We evaluated whether measures of the supply and structure of primary medical services are associated with health and health care indicators after adjusting for confounding. Methods Data for the supply and structure of primary medical services and the characteristics of registered patients were analysed for 99 health authorities in England in 1999. Health and health care indicators as dependent variables included standardised mortality ratios (SMR, standardised hospital admission rates, and conceptions under the age of 18 years. Linear regression analyses were adjusted for Townsend score, proportion of ethnic minorities and proportion of social class IV/ V. Results Higher proportions of registered rural patients and patients ≥ 75 years were associated with lower Townsend deprivation scores, with larger partnership sizes and with better health outcomes. A unit increase in partnership size was associated with a 4.2 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 6.7 unit decrease in SMR for all-cause mortality at 15–64 years (P = 0.001. A 10% increase in single-handed practices was associated with a 1.5 (0.2 to 2.9 unit increase in SMR (P = 0.027. After additional adjustment for percent of rural and elderly patients, partnership size and proportion of single-handed practices, GP supply was not associated with SMR (-2.8, -6.9 to 1.3, P = 0.183. Conclusions After adjusting for confounding with health needs of populations, mortality is weakly associated with the degree of organisation of practices as represented by the partnership size but not with the supply of GPs.

  2. Quality indicators for pharmaceutical care: a comprehensive set with national scores for Dutch community pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Teichert, Martina; Schoenmakers, Tim; Kylstra, Nico; Mosk, Berend; Bouvy, Marcel L; van de Vaart, Frans; De Smet, Peter A G M; Wensing, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background The quality of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies in the Netherlands has been assessed annually since 2008. The initial set has been further developed with pharmacists and patient organizations, the healthcare inspectorate, the government and health insurance companies. The set over 2012 was the first set of quality indicators for community pharmacies which was validated and supported by all major stakeholders. The aims of this study were to describe the validated set of q...

  3. Quality Improvement in Critical Care: Selection and Development of Quality Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A. Chrusch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Caring for critically ill patients is complex and resource intensive. An approach to monitor and compare the function of different intensive care units (ICUs is needed to optimize outcomes for patients and the health system as a whole. Objective. To develop and implement quality indicators for comparing ICU characteristics and performance within and between ICUs and regions over time. Methods. Canadian jurisdictions with established ICU clinical databases were invited to participate in an iterative series of face-to-face meetings, teleconferences, and web conferences. Eighteen adult intensive care units across 14 hospitals and 5 provinces participated in the process. Results. Six domains of ICU function were identified: safe, timely, efficient, effective, patient/family satisfaction, and staff work life. Detailed operational definitions were developed for 22 quality indicators. The feasibility was demonstrated with the collection of 3.5 years of data. Statistical process control charts and graphs of composite measures were used for data display and comparisons. Medical and nursing leaders as well as administrators found the system to be an improvement over prior methods. Conclusions. Our process resulted in the selection and development of 22 indicators representing 6 domains of ICU function. We have demonstrated the feasibility of such a reporting system. This type of reporting system will demonstrate variation between units and jurisdictions to help identify and prioritize improvement efforts.

  4. Quality Improvement in Critical Care: Selection and Development of Quality Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrusch, Carla A; Martin, Claudio M; Project, The Quality Improvement In Critical Care

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caring for critically ill patients is complex and resource intensive. An approach to monitor and compare the function of different intensive care units (ICUs) is needed to optimize outcomes for patients and the health system as a whole. Objective. To develop and implement quality indicators for comparing ICU characteristics and performance within and between ICUs and regions over time. Methods. Canadian jurisdictions with established ICU clinical databases were invited to participate in an iterative series of face-to-face meetings, teleconferences, and web conferences. Eighteen adult intensive care units across 14 hospitals and 5 provinces participated in the process. Results. Six domains of ICU function were identified: safe, timely, efficient, effective, patient/family satisfaction, and staff work life. Detailed operational definitions were developed for 22 quality indicators. The feasibility was demonstrated with the collection of 3.5 years of data. Statistical process control charts and graphs of composite measures were used for data display and comparisons. Medical and nursing leaders as well as administrators found the system to be an improvement over prior methods. Conclusions. Our process resulted in the selection and development of 22 indicators representing 6 domains of ICU function. We have demonstrated the feasibility of such a reporting system. This type of reporting system will demonstrate variation between units and jurisdictions to help identify and prioritize improvement efforts.

  5. Nurse staffing and system integration and change indicators in acute care hospitals: evidence from a balanced scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Peterson, Jessica; Baker, G Ross; Brown, Adalsteinn D; Pink, George H; McKillop, Ian; Daniel, Imtiaz; Pedersen, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This study examined relationships between financial indicators for nurse staffing and organizational system integration and change indicators. These indicators, along with hospital location and type, were examined in relation to the nursing financial indicators. Results showed that different indicators predicted each of the outcome variables. Nursing care hours were predicted by the hospital type, geographic location, and the system. Both nursing and patient care hours were significantly related to dissemination and benchmarking of clinical data. PMID:18562867

  6. Nurse staffing and system integration and change indicators in acute care hospitals: evidence from a balanced scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Peterson, Jessica; Baker, G Ross; Brown, Adalsteinn D; Pink, George H; McKillop, Ian; Daniel, Imtiaz; Pedersen, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This study examined relationships between financial indicators for nurse staffing and organizational system integration and change indicators. These indicators, along with hospital location and type, were examined in relation to the nursing financial indicators. Results showed that different indicators predicted each of the outcome variables. Nursing care hours were predicted by the hospital type, geographic location, and the system. Both nursing and patient care hours were significantly related to dissemination and benchmarking of clinical data.

  7. Social support versus chosen health status indicators in primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurpas, Donata

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purposes of our study were to determine the level of total social support, informational support, instrumental support, appraisal support and emotional support received by patients of primary care as well as factors related to this level with reference to health status and sociodemographic variables. Method. The sample for current analysis included 516 patients of primary care clinicsin Poland cooperating with medical universities. Questionnaires: STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, SCL-90 (Symptom Checklist-90, EPQ-R (Eysenck Personality Questionaire–Revised, GHQ (General Health Questionnaireand SSS (Social Support Scalewere used in the study. Results from last two questionnaires are presented in the paper. Results. The highest mean levels were obtained for instrumental support, while the lowest levels were observed for emotional support. The highest means were indicated in the GHQ-28 – social dysfunction, the lowest – GHQ-severe depression. Statistically significant relation was found between the level of social support and gender. Less subjectively evaluated total social support as well as instrumental and appraisal support were obtained by women. The highest Spearman score was found in the case of total GHQ-28 score, somatic symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, severe depression and total support. Taking into account the ANOVA findings, it was observed that an increasing GHQ score was associated with intensively increasing emotional support, informative support, appraisal support and the most – instrumental support. Conclusions. The results display the underestimated role of emotional, informational and appraisal support and the overestimated role of instrumental support in primary care. The consequence may be a more frequent using health care accompanied by low level of patients’ satisfaction, severity of social dysfunction disorders, particularly in patients with chronic diseases, who constitute an increasingly large group

  8. Implementing quality indicators in intensive care units: exploring barriers to and facilitators of behaviour change

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    de Keizer Nicolette F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Quality indicators are increasingly used in healthcare but there are various barriers hindering their routine use. To promote the use of quality indicators, an exploration of the barriers to and facilitating factors for their implementation among healthcare professionals and managers of intensive care units (ICUs is advocated. Methods All intensivists, ICU nurses, and managers (n = 142 working at 54 Dutch ICUs who participated in training sessions to support future implementation of quality indicators completed a questionnaire on perceived barriers and facilitators. Three types of barriers related to knowledge, attitude, and behaviour were assessed using a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. Results Behaviour-related barriers such as time constraints were most prominent (Mean Score, MS = 3.21, followed by barriers related to knowledge and attitude (MS = 3.62; MS = 4.12, respectively. Type of profession, age, and type of hospital were related to knowledge and behaviour. The facilitating factor perceived as most important by intensivists was administrative support (MS = 4.3; p = 0.02; for nurses, it was education (MS = 4.0; p = 0.01, and for managers, it was receiving feedback (MS = 4.5; p = 0.001. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that healthcare professionals and managers are familiar with using quality indicators to improve care, and that they have positive attitudes towards the implementation of quality indicators. Despite these facts, it is necessary to lower the barriers related to behavioural factors. In addition, as the barriers and facilitating factors differ among professions, age groups, and settings, tailored strategies are needed to implement quality indicators in daily practice.

  9. Moving towards Universal Health Coverage through the Development of Integrated Service Delivery Packages for Primary Health Care in the Solomon Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Whiting

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Solomon Islands Government is pursuing integrated care with the goal of improving the quality of health service delivery to rural populations. Under the auspices of Universal Health Coverage, integrated service delivery packages were developed which defined the clinical and public health services that should be provided at different levels of the health system. The process of developing integrated service delivery packages helped to identify key policy decisions the government needed to make in order to improve service quality and efficiency. The integrated service delivery packages have instigated the revision of job descriptions and are feeding into the development of a human resource plan for health. They are also being used to guide infrastructure development and health system planning and should lead to better management of resources. The integrated service delivery packages have become a key tool to operationalise the government’s policy to move towards a more efficient, equitable, quality and sustainable health system.

  10. More Health Care Utilisation With More Insurance Coverage? Evidence from a Latent Class Model with German Data

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We analyse the impact of optional deductibles, private supplementary health insurance and income on the demand for health care utilisation, measured as the number of physician visits with data from the German Socioeconomic Panel. With a set of newly available variables for the years 2002, 2004, and 2006 that measure individual health more accurately and including risk-attitudes towards health we find that possible endogeneity of the insurance choice is ...

  11. Nursing postoperative visit as a quality indicator for surgical patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R; Martins, M M; Jardim, H G

    2016-06-01

    The postoperative visit as a quality indicator for surgical patient care, demands some consideration from perioperative nurses. We evaluated the nursing perioperative interventions on postoperative visits, and adjusted them to the needs of the patients with postoperative pain. Our study indicated that 73% of patients visited didn't have postoperative pain whereas 27% had pain. The pain is aggravated when the patient is mobilised, one of the most common signs and symptoms being gastrointestinal changes. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures were used in pain management. The results showed that the percentage of patients with postoperative visits needs to be improved. We aim to have high quality perioperative nursing interventions which raise levels of patient satisfaction. PMID:27498440

  12. Diagnostic indicators for peptic ulcer perforation at a tertiary care hospital in Thailand

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    Suriya C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chutikarn Suriya1, Nongyao Kasatpibal2, Wipada Kunaviktikul2, Toranee Kayee31Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 2Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University, 3Department of Surgery, Nakornping Hospital, Chiang Mai, ThailandIntroduction: Limited data currently exists regarding the diagnostic indicators of peptic ulcer perforation for early detection among patients in Thailand. Delayed diagnosis and treatment for an ulcer can be life-threatening, resulting in shock or death.Objective: To determine the diagnostic indicators of peptic ulcer perforation.Material and methods: A cohort study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Thailand from 2005 to 2009. Peptic ulcer patients aged 15 years and over admitted to the surgical department were included. The diagnostic indicators used criteria of the patients' final diagnoses and operations, coded according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, which included patient profiles, gender, age, coexisting illnesses, personal habits, signs and symptoms, laboratory investigations, radiological finding, and treatment role. Exponential risk regression analyses to obtain relative risk (RR estimates for diagnostic indicators were analyzed using Stata® statistical software package, version 11 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX.Results: The study included 1290 patients. Of these, 57% reported perforated peptic ulcer. Multivariate analysis showed five diagnostic indicators: signs and symptoms including intense abdominal pain (RR = 1.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14–2.06, tenderness (RR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.17–3.21, and guarding (RR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.05–2.20; X-ray with free air (RR = 2.80, 95% CI 2.08–3.77; and referral from other hospitals (RR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.03–1.82.Conclusion: Five diagnostic indicators for peptic ulcer perforation monitoring were suggested from this study. Improving diagnostic

  13. Maternal near miss: an indicator for maternal health and maternal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Pragti

    2014-07-01

    Maternal mortality is one of the important indicators used for the measurement of maternal health. Although maternal mortality ratio remains high, maternal deaths in absolute numbers are rare in a community. To overcome this challenge, maternal near miss has been suggested as a compliment to maternal death. It is defined as pregnant or recently delivered woman who survived a complication during pregnancy, childbirth or 42 days after termination of pregnancy. So far various nomenclature and criteria have been used to identify maternal near-miss cases and there is lack of uniform criteria for identification of near miss. The World Health Organization recently published criteria based on markers of management and organ dysfunction, which would enable systematic data collection on near miss and development of summary estimates. The prevalence of near miss is higher in developing countries and causes are similar to those of maternal mortality namely hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, sepsis and obstructed labor. Reviewing near miss cases provide significant information about the three delays in health seeking so that appropriate action is taken. It is useful in identifying health system failures and assessment of quality of maternal health-care. Certain maternal near miss indicators have been suggested to evaluate the quality of care. The near miss approach will be an important tool in evaluation and assessment of the newer strategies for improving maternal health.

  14. Maternal near miss: An indicator for maternal health and maternal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragti Chhabra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal mortality is one of the important indicators used for the measurement of maternal health. Although maternal mortality ratio remains high, maternal deaths in absolute numbers are rare in a community. To overcome this challenge, maternal near miss has been suggested as a compliment to maternal death. It is defined as pregnant or recently delivered woman who survived a complication during pregnancy, childbirth or 42 days after termination of pregnancy. So far various nomenclature and criteria have been used to identify maternal near-miss cases and there is lack of uniform criteria for identification of near miss. The World Health Organization recently published criteria based on markers of management and organ dysfunction, which would enable systematic data collection on near miss and development of summary estimates. The prevalence of near miss is higher in developing countries and causes are similar to those of maternal mortality namely hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, sepsis and obstructed labor. Reviewing near miss cases provide significant information about the three delays in health seeking so that appropriate action is taken. It is useful in identifying health system failures and assessment of quality of maternal health-care. Certain maternal near miss indicators have been suggested to evaluate the quality of care. The near miss approach will be an important tool in evaluation and assessment of the newer strategies for improving maternal health.

  15. Evaluation of a demonstration primary health care project in rural Guatemala: the influence of predisposing, enabling and need factors on immunization coverage, equitable use of health care services and application of treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Meredith P; Grembowski, David; Heagerty, Patrick; Lim, Stephen S; Mercer, Mary Anne

    2012-09-01

    In high- and low-resource settings, care is often provided inequitably, with more and higher-quality services being offered to those who need them less. We evaluated the influence of predisposing, enabling and need characteristics on immunization coverage and use of health services in a population-based primary health care model called the Inclusive Health Model in rural Guatemala. We also analyzed providers' application of treatment guidelines for children with pneumonia. A longitudinal cohort design was used from 2006 to 2009 to analyze data from the model's two demonstration sites. We found a significant positive association between families' health risk level and their use of health care services, with the model providing more services to those with greater need. Services are not provided differentially for those families with a higher or lower wealth level or selected sociodemographic characteristics. Distance from a clinic is significantly associated with lower service use, but this constraint decreases with time. Implementation of treatment guidelines does not vary with different provider characteristics. The Inclusive Health Care model's aim of offering care equitably to families living in its catchment area is reflected in these findings. This study offers an approach and conceptual model for tracking equity in service delivery that may be applicable in other settings.

  16. Assuring Access to Affordable Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Under the Affordable Care Act, millions of uninsured Americans will gain access to affordable coverage through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and improvements in...

  17. The use of outcome and process indicators to incentivize integrated care for frail older people: a case study of primary care services in Sweden

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    Anders Lars Anell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of reforms have been implemented in Swedish health care to support integrated care for frail older people and to reduce utilization of hospital care by this group. Outcomes and process indicators have been used in pay-for-performance (P4P schemes by both national and local governments to support developments. Objective: To analyse limitations in the use of outcome and process indicators to incentivize integrated care for elderly patients with significant health care needs in the context of primary care. Method: Data were collected from the Region Skåne county council. Eight primary care providers and associated community services were compared in a ranking exercise based on information from interviews and registered data. Registered data from 150 primary care providers were analysed in regression models. Results and conclusion: Both the ranking exercise and regression models revealed important problems related to risk-adjustment, attribution, randomness and measurement fixation when using indicators in P4P schemes and for external accountability purposes. Instead of using indicators in incentive schemes targeting individual providers, indicators may be used for diagnostic purposes and to support development of new knowledge, targeting local systems that move beyond organizational boundaries.

  18. The use of outcome and process indicators to incentivize integrated care for frail older people: a case study of primary care services in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Lars Anell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of reforms have been implemented in Swedish health care to support integrated care for frail older people and to reduce utilization of hospital care by this group. Outcomes and process indicators have been used in pay-for-performance (P4P schemes by both national and local governments to support developments.Objective: To analyse limitations in the use of outcome and process indicators to incentivize integrated care for elderly patients with significant health care needs in the context of primary care.Method: Data were collected from the Region Skåne county council. Eight primary care providers and associated community services were compared in a ranking exercise based on information from interviews and registered data. Registered data from 150 primary care providers were analysed in regression models.Results and conclusion: Both the ranking exercise and regression models revealed important problems related to risk-adjustment, attribution, randomness and measurement fixation when using indicators in P4P schemes and for external accountability purposes. Instead of using indicators in incentive schemes targeting individual providers, indicators may be used for diagnostic purposes and to support development of new knowledge, targeting local systems that move beyond organizational boundaries.

  19. Quality of Type II Diabetes Care in Primary Health Care Centers in Kuwait: Employment of a Diabetes Quality Indicator Set (DQIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Dalia Badawi; Shadi Saleh; Nabil Natafgi; Yara Mourad; Kazem Behbehani

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the major public health challenges, affecting more than 347 million adults worldwide. The impact of diabetes necessitates assessing the quality of care received by people with diabetes, especially in countries with a significant diabetes burden such as Kuwait. This paper aimed at piloting an approach for measuring Type II diabetes care performance through the use of a diabetes quality indicator set (DQIS) in primary health care. The DQIS for Kuwait was adapted from...

  20. An Analysis of Gap in TQM Indicators in Health Care Institutions (Case: Isfahan Khorshid Hospital

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    M Sadr-Bafghi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many organizations, especially, service organizations, relative to their goals and mission, have a special view towards quality phenomena and its management and are turning to approaches such as TQM to help manage their business. This study examined the TQM indicators gap in Isfahan Khorshid hospital. As fuzzy set theory is better than the logical theory for estimating the linguistic factors, this paper tries to apply fuzzy approach to quality management in hospitals and analyzes the gap between personnel expectations and perception. Methods: This paper analyzes medical total quality management in a case (Internal Section of Khorshid Hospital, based on gap analysis model and fuzzy logic. A questionnaire was therefore applied to measure expectations and perceptions of hospital personnel. Results: This study results show that on the whole, there is a significant difference between TQM expectations and perceptions among K`horshid hospital personnel. Conclusions: Spurred by impressive results in other industries, this compelling and logical approach has begun to penetrate the thinking of health care accrediting agencies, business coalitions, private foundations and leading health care organizations. However, before making a commitment to TQM, hospital decision makers should thoroughly understand what it is they are committing to, and solve the main barriers such as the conflict between hospital management philosophies and TQM philosophies.

  1. Equity in Distribution of Health Care Resources; Assessment of Need and Access, Using Three Practical Indicators.

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    Habib Omrani-Khoo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Equitable distribution of health system resources has been a serious challenge for long ago among the health policy makers. Conducted studies have mostly ever had emphasis on equality rather than equity. In this paper we have attempted to examine both equality and equity in resources distribution.This is an applied and descriptive study in which we plotted Lorenz and concentration curves to describe graphically the distribution of hemodialysis beds and nephrologists as two complementary resources in health care in relation to hemodialysis patients. To end this, inequality and inequity were measured by calculating Gini- coefficient, concentration and Robin Hood indices. We used STATA and EXCEL software to calculate indicators.The results showed that inequality was not seen in hemodialysis beds in population level. However, distribution of nephrologists without considering population needs was accompanied with some sort of inequality. Gini- coefficient for beds and nephrologists distribution in population level was respectively 0.02 and 0.38. Hence, calculation of concentration index for distribution of hemodialysis beds and nephrologists with regard to population needs indicated that unlike beds distribution, equity gap between nephrologists distribution against patients distribution among the provinces was considerably significant again.Our results imply that although hemodialysis beds in Iran have been distributed in connection with the population need, nephrologists' distribution is not the same as hemodialysis beds one and this imbalance in complementary resources, can affect both efficiency and equitable access to services for population.

  2. Prevalence of Frailty Indicators and Association with Socioeconomic Status in Middle-Aged and Older Adults in a Swiss Region with Universal Health Insurance Coverage: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

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    Idris Guessous

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Frailty prevalence in older adults has been reported but is largely unknown in middle-aged adults. We determined the prevalence of frailty indicators among middle-aged and older adults from a general Swiss population characterized by universal health insurance coverage and assessed the determinants of frailty with a special focus on socioeconomic status. Participants aged 50 and more from the population-based 2006–2010 Bus Santé study were included (N = 2,930. Four frailty indicators (weakness, shrinking, exhaustion, and low activity were measured according to standard definitions. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to determine associations. Overall, 63.5%, 28.7%, and 7.8% participants presented no frailty indicators, one frailty indicator, and two or more frailty indicators, respectively. Among middle-aged participants (50–65 years, 75.1%, 22.2%, and 2.7% presented 0, 1, and 2 or more frailty indicators. The number of frailty indicators was positively associated with age, hypertension, and current smoking and negatively associated with male gender, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and serum total cholesterol level. Lower income level but not education was associated with higher number of frailty indicators. Frailty indicators are frequently encountered in both older and middle-aged adults from the Swiss general population. Despite universal health insurance coverage, household income is independently associated with frailty.

  3. Adherence to process of care quality indicators after percutaneous coronary intervention in Ontario, Canada: a retrospective observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnecki, Andrew; Prasad, Treesa J; Wang, Julie; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Cheema, Asim N.; Dz̆avík, Vladimír; Natarajan, Madhu K.; Simpson, Chris S.; So, Derek Y.; Syed, Jaffer; Tu, Jack V.; Ko, Dennis T

    2015-01-01

    Background Public reporting of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) outcomes has been established in many jurisdictions to ensure optimal delivery of care. The majority of PCI report cards examine in-hospital mortality, but relatively little is known regarding the adherence to processes of care. Methods A modified Delphi panel comprising cardiovascular experts was assembled to develop a set of PCI quality indicators. Indicators such as prescription of aspirin, dual antiplatelet therapy, s...

  4. Evaluation of the predictive indices for candidemia in an adult intensive care unit

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    Gilberto Gambero Gaspar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To evaluate predictive indices for candidemia in an adult intensive care unit (ICU and to propose a new index. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted between January 2011 and December 2012. This study was performed in an ICU in a tertiary care hospital at a public university and included 114 patients staying in the adult ICU for at least 48 hours. The association of patient variables with candidemia was analyzed. RESULTS: There were 18 (15.8% proven cases of candidemia and 96 (84.2% cases without candidemia. Univariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: parenteral nutrition, severe sepsis, surgical procedure, dialysis, pancreatitis, acute renal failure, and an APACHE II score higher than 20. For the Candida score index, the odds ratio was 8.50 (95% CI, 2.57 to 28.09; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.78, 0.71, 0.33, and 0.94, respectively. With respect to the clinical predictor index, the odds ratio was 9.45 (95%CI, 2.06 to 43.39; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.89, 0.54, 0.27, and 0.96, respectively. The proposed candidemia index cutoff was 8.5; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.77, 0.70, 0.33, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The Candida score and clinical predictor index excluded candidemia satisfactorily. The effectiveness of the candidemia index was comparable to that of the Candida score.

  5. Endocrine check-up in adolescents and indications for referral: A guide for health care providers

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    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that young people between the ages of 11 and 21 years should be seen annually by their pediatricians, since annual checkups can be an important opportunity for health evaluation and anticipatory guidance. Parents of infants and young children are accustomed to regularly visiting a pediatrician for their child′s checkups. Unfortunately, when children reach the teen years, these annual checkups may decrease in frequency. In routine check-ups and medical office visits, particular attention should be paid to the possibility of a developmental or endocrine disorder. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent medical complications in adulthood and foster age-appropriate development. Our purpose is to acquaint readers with the concept, based on current scientific understanding, that some endocrine disorders may be associated with a wide range of deleterious health consequences including an increased risk of hypertension and hyperlipidemia, increased risk of coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, significant anxiety and lack of self-esteem. Understanding the milestones and developmental stages of adolescence is essential for pediatricians and all other health providers who care for adolescents. Treating adolescents involves knowledge of a variety of medical, social and legal information; in addition, close working relationships must be established within the adolescent′s network to create an effective care system. In summary, we underline the importance of a periodic endocrine checkup in adolescents in order to identify endocrine problems early and develop an approach to treatment for those patients who need help during this time. Indications for endocrine referral for professional and other healthcare providers are also included. These lists are clearly not intended to be comprehensive, but will hopefully serve as a guide for specific clinical circumstances.

  6. Incremental value of thoracic ultrasound in intensive care units: Indications, uses, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardo, Biagio; Martone, Francesca; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Severino, Sergio; Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; D'Andrea, Antonello

    2016-05-28

    Emergency physicians are required to care for unstable patients with life-threatening conditions, and thus must make decisions that are both quick and precise about unclear clinical situations. There is increasing consensus in favor of using ultrasound as a real-time bedside clinical tool for clinicians in emergency settings alongside the irreplaceable use of historical and physical examinations. B-mode sonography is an old technology that was first proposed for medical applications more than 50 years ago. Its application in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases has always been considered limited, due to the presence of air in the lung and the presence of the bones of the thoracic cage, which prevent the progression of the ultrasound beam. However, the close relationship between air and water in the lungs causes a variety of artifacts on ultrasounds. At the bedside, thoracic ultrasound is based primarily on the analysis of these artifacts, with the aim of improving accuracy and safety in the diagnosis and therapy of the various varieties of pulmonary pathologic diseases which are predominantly "water-rich" or "air-rich". The indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages, and techniques of thoracic ultrasound and its related procedures are analyzed in the present review.

  7. [Effective coverage to manage domestic violence against women in Mexican municipalities: limits of metrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviescas-Vargas, Diana P; Idrovo, Alvaro Javier; López-López, Erika; Uicab-Pool, Gloria; Herrera-Trujillo, Mónica; Balam-Gómez, Maricela; Hidalgo-Solórzano, Elisa

    2013-08-01

    The study estimated the effective coverage of health services in primary care for the management of domestic violence against women in three municipalities in Mexico. We estimated the prevalence and severity of violence using a validated scale, and the effective coverage proposed by Shengelia and partners with any modifications. Quality care was considered when there was a suggestion to report it to authorities. The use and quality of care was low in the three municipalities analyzed, used most frequently when there was sexual or physical violence. Effective coverage was 29.41%, 16.67% and zero in Guachochi, Jojutla and Tizimín, respectively. The effective coverage indicator had difficulties in measuring events and responses that were not based on biomedical models. Findings suggest that the indicator can be improved by incorporating other dimensions of quality. PMID:24310672

  8. Using key performance indicators as knowledge-management tools at a regional health-care authority level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berler, Alexander; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2005-06-01

    The advantages of the introduction of information and communication technologies in the complex health-care sector are already well-known and well-stated in the past. It is, nevertheless, paradoxical that although the medical community has embraced with satisfaction most of the technological discoveries allowing the improvement in patient care, this has not happened when talking about health-care informatics. Taking the above issue of concern, our work proposes an information model for knowledge management (KM) based upon the use of key performance indicators (KPIs) in health-care systems. Based upon the use of the balanced scorecard (BSC) framework (Kaplan/Norton) and quality assurance techniques in health care (Donabedian), this paper is proposing a patient journey centered approach that drives information flow at all levels of the day-to-day process of delivering effective and managed care, toward information assessment and knowledge discovery. In order to persuade health-care decision-makers to assess the added value of KM tools, those should be used to propose new performance measurement and performance management techniques at all levels of a health-care system. The proposed KPIs are forming a complete set of metrics that enable the performance management of a regional health-care system. In addition, the performance framework established is technically applied by the use of state-of-the-art KM tools such as data warehouses and business intelligence information systems. In that sense, the proposed infrastructure is, technologically speaking, an important KM tool that enables knowledge sharing amongst various health-care stakeholders and between different health-care groups. The use of BSC is an enabling framework toward a KM strategy in health care. PMID:16138535

  9. Assuring health coverage for all in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Parikh, Rachana; Nandraj, Sunil; Balasubramaniam, Priya; Narayan, Kavita; Paul, Vinod K; Kumar, A K Shiva; Chatterjee, Mirai; Reddy, K Srinath

    2015-12-12

    Successive Governments of India have promised to transform India's unsatisfactory health-care system, culminating in the present government's promise to expand health assurance for all. Despite substantial improvements in some health indicators in the past decade, India contributes disproportionately to the global burden of disease, with health indicators that compare unfavourably with other middle-income countries and India's regional neighbours. Large health disparities between states, between rural and urban populations, and across social classes persist. A large proportion of the population is impoverished because of high out-of-pocket health-care expenditures and suffers the adverse consequences of poor quality of care. Here we make the case not only for more resources but for a radically new architecture for India's health-care system. India needs to adopt an integrated national health-care system built around a strong public primary care system with a clearly articulated supportive role for the private and indigenous sectors. This system must address acute as well as chronic health-care needs, offer choice of care that is rational, accessible, and of good quality, support cashless service at point of delivery, and ensure accountability through governance by a robust regulatory framework. In the process, several major challenges will need to be confronted, most notably the very low levels of public expenditure; the poor regulation, rapid commercialisation of and corruption in health care; and the fragmentation of governance of health care. Most importantly, assuring universal health coverage will require the explicit acknowledgment, by government and civil society, of health care as a public good on par with education. Only a radical restructuring of the health-care system that promotes health equity and eliminates impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditures will assure health for all Indians by 2022--a fitting way to mark the 75th year of India

  10. Assuring health coverage for all in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Parikh, Rachana; Nandraj, Sunil; Balasubramaniam, Priya; Narayan, Kavita; Paul, Vinod K; Kumar, A K Shiva; Chatterjee, Mirai; Reddy, K Srinath

    2015-12-12

    Successive Governments of India have promised to transform India's unsatisfactory health-care system, culminating in the present government's promise to expand health assurance for all. Despite substantial improvements in some health indicators in the past decade, India contributes disproportionately to the global burden of disease, with health indicators that compare unfavourably with other middle-income countries and India's regional neighbours. Large health disparities between states, between rural and urban populations, and across social classes persist. A large proportion of the population is impoverished because of high out-of-pocket health-care expenditures and suffers the adverse consequences of poor quality of care. Here we make the case not only for more resources but for a radically new architecture for India's health-care system. India needs to adopt an integrated national health-care system built around a strong public primary care system with a clearly articulated supportive role for the private and indigenous sectors. This system must address acute as well as chronic health-care needs, offer choice of care that is rational, accessible, and of good quality, support cashless service at point of delivery, and ensure accountability through governance by a robust regulatory framework. In the process, several major challenges will need to be confronted, most notably the very low levels of public expenditure; the poor regulation, rapid commercialisation of and corruption in health care; and the fragmentation of governance of health care. Most importantly, assuring universal health coverage will require the explicit acknowledgment, by government and civil society, of health care as a public good on par with education. Only a radical restructuring of the health-care system that promotes health equity and eliminates impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditures will assure health for all Indians by 2022--a fitting way to mark the 75th year of India

  11. The amount of care delivered : challenges of indices in oral health studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, Paula; Schuller, Annemarie A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Untreated dental caries is the most prevalent medical condition worldwide, with considerable variations in prevalence between regions and countries. The care index (CI) and the restorative index (RI) are generally used to make comparisons between and within countries of levels of care de

  12. Dimensions of health care system quality in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Jenni Pääkkönen; Timo Seppälä

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the determinants of quality - cost relationship in primary health care. We first summarize information from various indicators of care by principal component analysis (PCA), effectively producing quality of care indicators: accessibility, coverage and allocative efficiency. We then regress the costs of care against these indicators to evaluate their relationship. Our results suggest that PCA may be used to produce quality of care indicators. Furthermore, the relationship ...

  13. Assessing Latin America's Progress Toward Achieving Universal Health Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Adam; Dmytraczenko, Tania; Almeida, Gisele; Buisman, Leander; Hoang-Vu Eozenou, Patrick; Bredenkamp, Caryn; Cercone, James A; Diaz, Yadira; Maceira, Daniel; Molina, Silvia; Paraje, Guillermo; Ruiz, Fernando; Sarti, Flavia; Scott, John; Valdivia, Martin; Werneck, Heitor

    2015-10-01

    Two commonly used metrics for assessing progress toward universal health coverage involve assessing citizens' rights to health care and counting the number of people who are in a financial protection scheme that safeguards them from high health care payments. On these metrics most countries in Latin America have already "reached" universal health coverage. Neither metric indicates, however, whether a country has achieved universal health coverage in the now commonly accepted sense of the term: that everyone--irrespective of their ability to pay--gets the health services they need without suffering undue financial hardship. We operationalized a framework proposed by the World Bank and the World Health Organization to monitor progress under this definition and then constructed an overall index of universal health coverage achievement. We applied the approach using data from 112 household surveys from 1990 to 2013 for all twenty Latin American countries. No country has achieved a perfect universal health coverage score, but some countries (including those with more integrated health systems) fare better than others. All countries except one improved in overall universal health coverage over the time period analyzed. PMID:26438747

  14. Initial Implementation Indicators From a Statewide Rollout of SafeCare Within a Child Welfare System

    OpenAIRE

    Whitaker, Daniel J; Ryan, Kerry A.; Wild, Robert C.; Self-Brown, Shannon; John R. Lutzker; Shanley, Jenelle R.; Edwards, Anna M.; McFry, Erin A.; Moseley, Colby N.; Hodges, Amanda E.

    2011-01-01

    There is a strong movement toward implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP) in child welfare systems. The SafeCare parenting model is one of few parent-training models that addresses child neglect, the most common form of maltreatment. Here, the authors describe initial findings from a statewide effort to implement the EBP, SafeCare®, into a state child welfare system. A total of 50 agencies participated in training, with 295 individuals entering training to implement SafeCare. Analyse...

  15. Development of quality indicators for monitoring outcomes of frail elderly hospitalised in acute care health settings: Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travers Catherine M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frail older people admitted to acute care hospitals are at risk of a range of adverse outcomes, including geriatric syndromes, although targeted care strategies can improve health outcomes for these patients. It is therefore important to assess inter-hospital variation in performance in order to plan and resource improvement programs. Clinical quality outcome indicators provide a mechanism for identifying variation in performance over time and between hospitals, however to date there has been no routine use of such indicators in acute care settings. A barrier to using quality indicators is lack of access to routinely collected clinical data. The interRAI Acute Care (AC assessment system supports comprehensive geriatric assessment of older people within routine daily practice in hospital and includes process and outcome data pertaining to geriatric syndromes. This paper reports the study protocol for the development of aged care quality indicators for acute care hospitals. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in three phases: 1. Development of a preliminary inclusive set of quality indicators set based on a literature review and expert panel consultation, 2. A prospective field study including recruitment of 480 patients aged 70 years or older across 9 Australian hospitals. Each patient will be assessed on admission and discharge using the interRAI AC, and will undergo daily monitoring to observe outcomes. Medical records will be independently audited, and 3. Analysis and compilation of a definitive quality indicator set, including two anonymous voting rounds for quality indicator inclusion by the expert panel. Discussion The approach to quality indicators proposed in this protocol has four distinct advantages over previous efforts: the quality indicators focus on outcomes; they can be collected as part of a routinely applied clinical information and decision support system; the clinical data will be robust and will

  16. Self-care assessment as an indicator for clinical supervision in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Marlene Monteiro Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : to evaluate the needs of clinical supervision for nurses to assess the degree of dependence on self- care and planning of nursing interventions. Methods : analytical study, cross-cutting nature, collecting data from a sample of 110 patients. Results : it was shown the differences in the identification of the degree of dependence between registers and experts, as well as the selection of operations for each self-care and failures to the original assessment of the filling level (no evaluation self-care/no identification of the degree of dependence. Conclusion : there were gaps in the nursing process; they have proposed strategies such as clinical supervision sessions, training, case studies, protocols and guidance documents, to be included in a clinical supervision in nursing model.

  17. Self-care assessment as an indicator for clinical supervision in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Marlene Monteiro Teixeira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the needs of clinical supervision for nurses to assess the degree of dependence on self-care and planning of nursing interventions. Methods: analytical study, cross-cutting nature, collecting data from a sample of 110 patients. Results: it was shown the differences in the identification of the degree of dependence between registers and experts, as well as the selection of operations for each self-care and failures to the original assessment of the filling level (no evaluation self-care/no identification of the degree of dependence. Conclusion: there were gaps in the nursing process; they have proposed strategies such as clinical supervision sessions, training, case studies, protocols and guidance documents, to be included in a clinical supervision in nursing model.

  18. Managing schizophrenia in primary care: the utility of remission criteria as outcome indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fear, Christopher; Yeomans, David; Moore, Bryan; Taylor, Mark; Ford, Keith; Currie, Alan; Hynes, Joanne; Sullivan, Gary; Whale, Richard; Burns, Tom

    2009-06-01

    The shared management of patients with schizophrenia in primary care can only succeed if underpinned by valid, easily administered and clinically relevant outcome measures. While conditions such as depression and anxiety lend themselves to this approach through the development, over a number of years, of patient- and observer-rated scales, schizophrenia still lacks the capacity for meaningful outcome measures. Recently, two international working groups have developed the concept of remission in schizophrenia and recommended a simple, brief and clinically valid measure based upon improvement in key symptoms over a specified time period. The authors consider this concept and its application to primary care both as a commissioning tool and to facilitate shared care of this chronic medical condition. PMID:22477899

  19. Selecting process quality indicators for the integrated care of vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebel Paule

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed at evaluating face and content validity, feasibility and reliability of process quality indicators developed previously in the United States or other countries. The indicators can be used to evaluate care and services for vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia within an integrated service system in Quebec, Canada. Methods A total of 33 clinical experts from three major urban centres in Quebec formed a panel representing two medical specialties (family medicine, geriatrics and seven health or social services specialties (nursing, occupational therapy, psychology, neuropsychology, pharmacy, nutrition, social work, from primary or secondary levels of care, including long-term care. A modified version of the RAND®/University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA appropriateness method, a two-round Delphi panel, was used to assess face and content validity of process quality indicators. The appropriateness of indicators was evaluated according to a agreement of the panel with three criteria, defined as a median rating of 7–9 on a nine-point rating scale, and b agreement among panellists, judged by the statistical measure of the interpercentile range adjusted for symmetry. Feasibility of quality assessment and reliability of appropriate indicators were then evaluated within a pilot study on 29 patients affected by cognitive impairment or dementia. For measurable indicators the inter-observer reliability was calculated with the Kappa statistic. Results Initially, 82 indicators for care of vulnerable older adults with cognitive impairment or dementia were submitted to the panellists. Of those, 72 (88% were accepted after two rounds. Among 29 patients for whom medical files of the preceding two years were evaluated, 63 (88% of these indicators were considered applicable at least once, for at least one patient. Only 22 indicators were considered applicable at least once for ten or more out

  20. Predicting Antimicrobial Resistance Prevalence and Incidence from Indicators of Antimicrobial Use: What Is the Most Accurate Indicator for Surveillance in Intensive Care Units?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Fortin

    Full Text Available The optimal way to measure antimicrobial use in hospital populations, as a complement to surveillance of resistance is still unclear. Using respiratory isolates and antimicrobial prescriptions of nine intensive care units (ICUs, this study aimed to identify the indicator of antimicrobial use that predicted prevalence and incidence rates of resistance with the best accuracy.Retrospective cohort study including all patients admitted to three neonatal (NICU, two pediatric (PICU and four adult ICUs between April 2006 and March 2010. Ten different resistance/antimicrobial use combinations were studied. After adjustment for ICU type, indicators of antimicrobial use were successively tested in regression models, to predict resistance prevalence and incidence rates, per 4-week time period, per ICU. Binomial regression and Poisson regression were used to model prevalence and incidence rates, respectively. Multiplicative and additive models were tested, as well as no time lag and a one 4-week-period time lag. For each model, the mean absolute error (MAE in prediction of resistance was computed. The most accurate indicator was compared to other indicators using t-tests.Results for all indicators were equivalent, except for 1/20 scenarios studied. In this scenario, where prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas sp. was predicted with carbapenem use, recommended daily doses per 100 admissions were less accurate than courses per 100 patient-days (p = 0.0006.A single best indicator to predict antimicrobial resistance might not exist. Feasibility considerations such as ease of computation or potential external comparisons could be decisive in the choice of an indicator for surveillance of healthcare antimicrobial use.

  1. Validation of quality indicators for the organization of palliative care: a modified RAND Delphi study in seven European countries (the Europall project)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitha, K.; Beek, K.; Ahmed, N.; Jaspers, B.; Mollard, J.M.; Ahmedzai, S.H.; Hasselaar, J.; Menten, J.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Validated quality indicators can help health-care professionals to evaluate their medical practices in a comparative manner to deliver optimal clinical care. No international set of quality indicators to measure the organizational aspects of palliative care settings exists. AIM: To devel

  2. Methodology for developing quality indicators for the care of older people in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Khan, Melinda; Burkett, Ellen; Schnitker, Linda; Jones, Richard N.; Gray,Leonard C

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared with younger people, older people have a higher risk of adverse health outcomes when presenting to emergency departments. As the population ages, older people will make up an increasing proportion of the emergency department population. Therefore it is timely that consideration be given to the quality of care received by older persons in emergency departments, and to consideration of those older people with special needs. Particular attention will be focused on important g...

  3. Methodology for developing quality indicators for the care of older people in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Khan, Melinda; Burkett, Ellen; Schnitker, Linda; Jones, Richard N.; Gray,Leonard C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared with younger people, older people have a higher risk of adverse health outcomes when presenting to emergency departments. As the population ages, older people will make up an increasing proportion of the emergency department population. Therefore it is timely that consideration be given to the quality of care received by older persons in emergency departments, and to consideration of those older people with special needs. Particular attention will be focused on important ...

  4. Managing schizophrenia in primary care: the utility of remission criteria as outcome indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Fear, Christopher; Yeomans, David; Moore, Bryan; Taylor, Mark; Ford, Keith; Currie, Alan; Hynes, Joanne; Sullivan, Gary; Whale, Richard; Burns, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The shared management of patients with schizophrenia in primary care can only succeed if underpinned by valid, easily administered and clinically relevant outcome measures. While conditions such as depression and anxiety lend themselves to this approach through the development, over a number of years, of patient- and observer-rated scales, schizophrenia still lacks the capacity for meaningful outcome measures. Recently, two international working groups have developed the concept of remission ...

  5. [Early rehabilitation care in the hospital--definition and indication. Results of the expert group "Early Rehabilitation Care in the Hospital"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistner, K; Stier-Jarmer, M; Berleth, B; Braun, J; Koenig, E; Liman, W; Lüttje, D; Meindl, R; Pientka, L; Weber, G; Stucki, G

    2005-06-01

    As a result of the continuing development in recent medicine, and improvements of emergency services, an increasing number of patients are surviving serious disease and injury. This has increased the need for rehabilitation, starting already during the acute hospital stay. Early identification and rehabilitation may reduce overall costs and help patients to regain independence earlier. Since the eighties specialized early post-acute rehabilitation units have been increasingly implemented in German hospitals. With book 9 of the German Social Code (SGB IX) coming into effect in July 2001, early post-acute rehabilitation care in hospitals became accepted as a social right. However, the specifics of early rehabilitation care have not been defined. There is a lack of generally accepted indication criteria for early rehabilitation services. Similarly, the aims, objectives and methods need to be specified. It was the objective of a group of interested experts from different fields and backgrounds to achieve an interdisciplinary consensus in terms of conceptual definitions and terminology for all early rehabilitation care services in the acute hospital. The development of the definitions and criteria was achieved by using a modified Delphi-technique. By publishing this paper the group is providing information about its activities and results. Examples of typical cases from the various fields of early rehabilitation care were identified and described. Furthermore, the report points out a number of other problems in the area of early rehabilitation care, which have yet to be solved.

  6. Adjustment factors to per capita health-care indicators in countries with expatriate male-majority populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, A H

    2014-11-01

    From 2000 to 2010, the population in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries underwent an increase of 53%, compared with an average global increase of 13%. The rates varied by country, ranging from 23% in Oman to 198% in Qatar. The main driving force for this sharp increase in population was the high demand for immigrant labour. The aim of this study was to adjust the population in the GCC countries in order to ensure that the comparisons of health-care key performance indicators with other countries account for the composition of the populations. The conclusion of the study was that adjusting the population in the GCC is instrumental for determining health spending and health outcomes, and that inaccurate forecasting would result in serious overestimation of the need for GCC countries to invest in the health-care sector. Policy-makers can utilize the population models in this study to accurately plan for health-care delivery. PMID:25601807

  7. Cross sectional study of performance indicators for English Primary Care Trusts: testing construct validity and identifying explanatory variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilford Richard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The performance of Primary Care Trusts in England is assessed and published using a number of different performance indicators. Our study has two broad purposes. Firstly, to find out whether pairs of indicators that purport to measure similar aspects of quality are correlated (as would be expected if they are both valid measures of the same construct. Secondly, we wanted to find out whether broad (global indicators correlated with any particular features of Primary Care Trusts, such as expenditure per capita. Methods Cross sectional quantitative analysis using data from six 2004/05 PCT performance indicators for 303 English Primary Care Trusts from four sources in the public domain: Star Rating, aggregated Quality and Outcomes Framework scores, Dr Foster mortality index, Dr Foster equity index (heart by-pass and hip replacements, NHS Litigation Authority Risk Management standards and Patient Satisfaction scores from the Star Ratings. Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis to determine the effect of Primary Care Trust characteristics on performance. Results Star Rating and Quality and Outcomes Framework total, both summary measures of global quality, were not correlated with each other (F = 0.66, p = 0.57. There were however positive correlations between Quality and Outcomes Framework total and patient satisfaction (r = 0.61, p Conclusion Performance assessment in healthcare remains on the Government's agenda, with new core and developmental standards set to replace the Star Ratings in 2006. Yet the results of this analysis provide little evidence that the current indicators have sufficient construct validity to measure the underlying concept of quality, except when the specific area of screening is considered.

  8. Cobertura real de la ley de atención de emergencia y del Seguro Obligatorio contra Accidentes de Tránsito (SOAT Coverage of the emergency health care law and the Compulsory Insurance against Road Traffic Crashes (SOAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jaime Miranda

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar, desde la perspectiva de los pacientes, el grado de conocimiento y de cobertura real de la Ley de Atención de Emergencia y del Seguro Obligatorio Contra Accidentes de Tránsito (SOAT. Materiales y métodos. Estudio transversal de vigilancia activa en los servicios de emergencia de establecimientos de salud (EESS de tres ciudades del país con heterogeneidad económica, social y cultural (Lima, Pucallpa y Ayacucho. Resultados. De 644 encuestados, 77% negaron conocer la Ley de Atención de Emergencia (81% en Lima, 64% en Pucallpa y 93% en Ayacucho; pObjective. The aim of this study was to ascertain, from patients’ perspective, the degree of knowledge and the actual coverage of the Emergency Health Care Law and the Compulsory Insurance against Road Traffic Crashes (SOAT. Material and methods. A cross-sectional, active surveillance of emergency wards of selected health facilities in three Peruvian cities (Lima, Pucallpa y Ayacucho was conducted. Results. Out of 644 surveyed victims, 77% did not know about the law about provision of emergency health care (81% in Lima, 64% in Pucallpa y 93% in Ayacucho; p<0,001. Following the explanation of what this law entails, 46% reported to have received care according to the law specifications. As for SOAT, the health care related costs of 237 persons (37.2% were not covered by any insurance scheme (74% in Pucallpa, 34% in Ayacucho and 26% in Lima: p<0,001. Conclusions. In this study, the lack of knowledge about the provision of emergency health care law was important, and the coverage of care was deficient as nearly half of participants reported not to be treated by one or more of the entitlements stated in such law. Road traffic injuriesrelated health care costs were not covered by any insurance scheme in one of three victims. Improvements on citizens’ information about their rights and of effective law enforcement are badly needed to reach a universal and more equitable coverage in

  9. Nutritional and functional status indicators in residents of a long-term care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A; Ackland, Leigh M

    2009-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we determined whether results from the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL), were associated with nutritional status and mobility in long-term care residents. One hundred and fifteen study participants (mean [SD] age: 80.2 [10.6]) provided informed consent. Fifty eight percent (n = 66) responded to all three questionnaires: 12 were assessed as malnourished (MNA or = 6). Higher levels of depression were associated with lower serum zinc (n = 71, r = -.356, p = .001) and associated with a slower Timed Up and Go test (TUG, n = 38, r = .301, p = .030). MNA was also associated with serum zinc (n = 44, r = .307, P = .021). Non responders to questionnaires (n = 36) had a lower BMI (mean difference: -2.5 +/- 1.0 kg/m(2), p = .013) and serum 25(OH)D (-8.7 +/- 3.8 nmol/l, p = .023) vs. responders. The GDS, in addition to the MNA, is useful in identifying poor nutritional status in residential care. Intervention programs that target depression and poor nutritional status could potentially improve overall quality of life, but it is not clear if depression is leading to poor nutritional status or if poor nutrition is leading to depression. PMID:19234994

  10. Medicare Coverage Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Coverage Database (MCD) contains all National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs), local articles, and proposed NCD...

  11. Care Centre visits to married people living with HIV ? An indicator for measuring AIDS -related stigma & discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Green, David Andrew; Devi, Shyamala; Paulraj, Louis S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract We tested whether observation of the presence and relationship of attendants (i.e. those that accompany upon admission) and visitors to a sample of 230 (128 male, 102 female) married HIV-positive people in an HIV care centre provides an indicator of caregiving AIDS-related stigma and discrimination. Sensitivity to gender, location (urban vs. rural), age (35) and source of infection (spouse vs. non-spouse) ? factors considered to modulate AIDS-related stigma and discriminat...

  12. Factors associated to the notification of congenital syphilis: an indicator of quality of prenatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inacia Sátiro Xavier de França

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze factors associated to the notification of congenital syphilis. Methods: a cross-sectional documentary, quantitative study, made through the National System of Notifiable Diseases. The study consisted of 113 notified cases. A data collection form was used and Chi-square and Fisher tests were made. Results: women had prenatal exams (80.2%, serologic testing before six months of pregnancy (46.7% and after (53.3%. There was an association for the variables race (p = 0.005 and serological test (p = 0.044. The treatment of the pregnant woman was inadequate (64.5% and the partner was not treated (85.7%. Conclusion: it was found that the number of cases is growing, increasing the possibility of children with severe sequelae. So improvements in prenatal care are still needed.

  13. Effective coverage: a metric for monitoring Universal Health Coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in monitoring universal health coverage (UHC is identifying an indicator that can adequately capture the multiple components underlying the UHC initiative. Effective coverage, which unites individual and intervention characteristics into a single metric, offers a direct and flexible means to measure health system performance at different levels. We view effective coverage as a relevant and actionable metric for tracking progress towards achieving UHC. In this paper, we review the concept of effective coverage and delineate the three components of the metric - need, use, and quality - using several examples. Further, we explain how the metric can be used for monitoring interventions at both local and global levels. We also discuss the ways that current health information systems can support generating estimates of effective coverage. We conclude by recognizing some of the challenges associated with producing estimates of effective coverage. Despite these challenges, effective coverage is a powerful metric that can provide a more nuanced understanding of whether, and how well, a health system is delivering services to its populations.

  14. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: an update on its indications, management, complications, and care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Lucendo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous disorders impairing or diminishing a patient's ability to swallow may benefit from a PEG tube placement. This is considered the elective feeding technique if a functional digestive system is present. Methods: A PubMed-based search restricted to the English literature from the last 20 years was conducted. References in the results were also reviewed to identify potential sources of information. Results: PEG feeding has consistently demonstrated to be more effective and safe than nasogastric tube feeding, having also replaced surgical and radiological gastrostomy techniques for long term feeding. PEG is considered a minimally invasive procedure to ensure an adequate source for enteral nutrition in institutionalized and at home patients. Acute and chronic conditions associated with risk of malnutrition and dysphagia benefit from PEG placement: Beyond degenerative neuro-muscular disorders, an increasing body of evidence supports the advantages of PEG tubes in patients with head and neck cancer and in a wide range of situations in pediatric settings. The safety of PEG placement under antithrombotic medication is discussed. While antibiotic prophylaxis reduces peristomal wound infection rates, co-trimoxazole solutions administered through a newly inserted catheter constitutes an alternative to intravenous antibiotics. Early feeding (3-6 hours after PEG placement firmly supports on safety evidences, additionally resulting in reduced costs and hospital stays. Complications of PEG are rare and the majority prevented with appropriated nursing cares. Conclusions: PEG feeding provides the most valuable access for nutrition in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system. Its high effectiveness, safety and reduced cost underlie increasing worldwide popularity.

  15. Women's Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Policy Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Feb 02, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email ... women’s coverage in future years. Sources of Health Insurance Coverage Employer-Sponsored Insurance: Approximately 57 million women ...

  16. Obstetric indications for admission to the intensive care unit of a tertiary referral center; an Iranian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Rasooli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric admissions to the intensive care unit (ICU in the setting of a tertiary referral hospital in an attempt to identify the risk factors influencing maternal outcome.Method: In a prospective, cross-sectional study, all parturient patients during pregnancy and up to 6 weeks postpartum admitted to the ICU of a tertiary referral hospital between 2013 and 2014 were evaluated. Demographic data, medical histories, pregnancy, and intrapartum and postpartum data were collected. Moreover, interventions and fetomaternal outcomes were noted.Results: Ninety nine obstetric patients were admitted to the ICU. Fifty seven percent of the admissions were postpartum. The main indications for admission were hypertensive disorders (37.3%, and obstetric hemorrhage (13.1%. Non-obstetric indications of ICU admission were the cardiac diseases.Conclusion: The major obstetric indications for admission in our study were hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and obstetric hemorrhage.  Keywords: Pregnancy; Intensive care unit; maternal mortality; morbidity

  17. Testing feasibility and reliability of a set of quality indicators to evaluate the organization of palliative care across Europe: a pilot study in 25 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitha, K.; Hasselaar, J.G.; Beek, K.; Ahmed, N.; Jaspers, B.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Radbruch, L.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A well-organized palliative care service is a prerequisite for offering good palliative care. Reliable and feasible quality indicators are needed to monitor the quality of their organization. AIM: To test feasibility and reliability of a previously developed set of quality indicators in

  18. 19. Disparities in health care delivery and hospital outcomes between expatriates and nationals presenting with acute coronary syndromes in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam AlFaleh

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Our findings indicate disparities in hospital care between NS, and SN ACS patients. NS patients had worse hospital outcomes potentially reflecting unequal health coverage, and access to care issues.

  19. Indicators of fatal outcome in severePlasmodium falciparummalaria:a study in a tertiary-care hospital in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NoppadonTangpukdee; KhinMyatWai; SantMuangnoicharoen; ShigeyukiKano; Nanthaporn Phophak; JanramTiemprasert; SrivichaKrudsood; PolratWilairatana

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To illustrate the clinical features and investigate the indicators associated with a fatal outcome in adult patients with severePlasmodium falciparum malaria admitted to the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Bangkok, Thailand.Methods: We studied202adult malaria patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. A total of43 clinical variables were identified by univariate and logistic regression analyses, to eliminate confounding factors.Results: Regarding the statistical methods, only 6variables-jaundice, cerebral malaria, metabolic acidosis, body mass index, initial respiratory rate, and white blood cell count-were significant indicators of death, with adjusted odds ratios (95%CI)of 15.2 (2.1-32.3), 4.3 (2.3-12.6), 3.3 (2.3-5.7), 2.4 (1.9-3.5), 2.2 (1.5-2.6), and1.7 (1.2-3.1), respectively.Conclusions: Our study found that jaundice, cerebral malaria, metabolic acidosis, body mass index, initial respiratory rate and white blood cell count were indicators of fatal outcome in severe Plasmodiumfalciparum malaria. Further studies on the fatal indicators in severe malaria need to be compared with data from different geographical areas, to construct practical measures to address potentially fatal indicators in different settings.

  20. Terminal care in older patients in hospital: development of a quality indicator set and its first application in a retrospective comparison of patients treated in acute geriatric unit and a palliative care unit of a Belgian university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Cools, Annelies; Vaneechoutte, Delphine; Van Den Noortgate, Nele; VERSLUYS, KAREN; De Laat, Martine; Petrovic, Mirko; Piers, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Care at the end-of-life of geriatric inpatients is of increasing importance. Nevertheless, limited research has been conducted on this subject so far. Objectives: To compose a set of quality indicators (QIs) which measure the quality of terminal care for geriatric inpatients and to compare the quality of end-of-life care between the Acute Geriatric Unit (AGU) and the Palliative Care Unit (PCU). Design: Retrospective case study. Setting: Belgian university hospital. Par...

  1. Combining process indicators to evaluate quality of care for surgical patients with colorectal cancer: are scores consistent with short-term outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, N.E.; Gooiker, G.A.; Bastiaannet, E.; Leersum, N.J. van; Velde, C.J. van de; Eddes, E.H.; Marang-van de Mheen, P.J.; Kievit, J.; Harst, E. van der; Wiggers, T.; Wouters, M.W.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Krieken, J.H. van

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if composite measures based on process indicators are consistent with short-term outcome indicators in surgical colorectal cancer care. DESIGN: Longitudinal analysis of consistency between composite measures based on process indicators and outcome indicators for 85 Dutch hosp

  2. Combining process indicators to evaluate quality of care for surgical patients with colorectal cancer : are scores consistent with short-term outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, N. E.; Gooiker, G. A.; Bastiaannet, E.; van Leersum, N. J.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Eddes, E. H.; Marang-van de Mheen, P. J.; Kievit, J.; van der Harst, E.; Wiggers, T.; Wouters, M. W. J. M.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine if composite measures based on process indicators are consistent with short-term outcome indicators in surgical colorectal cancer care. Design: Longitudinal analysis of consistency between composite measures based on process indicators and outcome indicators for 85 Dutch hosp

  3. The Effects of Scheduled Visitation on the Physiological Indices of Conscious Patients Admitted at intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Rezaie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visitation of patients admitted at intensive care units (ICUs is a controversial issue in the field of health care. It is commonly believed that the presence of family members might bring about physiological changes, such as tachycardia and hypertension, in ICU patients. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of scheduled visitation on the physiological indices of conscious patients at the ICU. Method: This experimental study was conducted on 90 conscious patients admitted at the ICU of Ganjavian Hospital in Dezful, Iran in 2014. Patients were randomly divided into two groups of intervention and control. In the control group, patient visits were carried out in accordance with normal procedures of the ward. In the intervention group, patients were visited by relatives and family members for 30 minutes, preferably in evening shifts. Physiological indices of the patients were recorded before, during and after scheduled visitation. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.18 using independent T-test and one-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Results: In this study, mean age of patients in the intervention and control groups was 42.1±19.1 and 39.4±19.6 years, respectively. In the intervention group, systolic blood pressure had a more significant reduction at 10 and 30 minutes after visitation compared to the control group (independent T-test, P0.05. Implications for Practice: According to the results of this study, scheduled visitation by family members caused no significant differences in the physiological indices of ICU patients. It is recommended that future studies be conducted as to confirm this finding and revise patient visitation policies in hospitals.

  4. Indications and Types of Antibiotic Agents Used in 6 Acute Care Hospitals, 2009-2010: A Pragmatic Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Braykov, Nikolay; Uslan, Daniel Z; Morgan, Daniel J; Gandra, Sumanth; Johannsson, Birgir; Schweizer, Marin L; Weisenberg, Scott A; Young, Heather; Cantey, Joseph; Perencevich, Eli; Septimus, Edward; Srinivasan, Arjun; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To design better antimicrobial stewardship programs, detailed data on the primary drivers and patterns of antibiotic use are needed. OBJECTIVE To characterize the indications for antibiotic therapy, agents used, duration, combinations, and microbiological justification in 6 acute-care US facilities with varied location, size, and type of antimicrobial stewardship programs. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Retrospective medical chart review was performed on a random cross-sectional sample of 1,200 adult inpatients, hospitalized (>24 hrs) in 6 hospitals, and receiving at least 1 antibiotic dose on 4 index dates chosen at equal intervals through a 1-year study period (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010). METHODS Infectious disease specialists recorded patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, microbiological and radiological testing, and agents used, dose, duration, and indication for antibiotic prescriptions. RESULTS On the index dates 4,119 (60.5%) of 6,812 inpatients were receiving antibiotics. The random sample of 1,200 case patients was receiving 2,527 antibiotics (average: 2.1 per patient); 540 (21.4%) were prophylactic and 1,987 (78.6%) were therapeutic, of which 372 (18.7%) were pathogen-directed at start. Of the 1,615 empirical starts, 382 (23.7%) were subsequently pathogen-directed and 1,231 (76.2%) remained empirical. Use was primarily for respiratory (27.6% of prescriptions) followed by gastrointestinal (13.1%) infections. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins together accounted for 47.1% of therapy-days. CONCLUSIONS Use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy was prevalent in 6 US acute care facilities and in most instances was not subsequently pathogen directed. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins were the most frequently used antibiotics, particularly for respiratory indications. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):70-79.

  5. Quality of care indicators and their related outcomes: A population-based study in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We describe variations across the regional cancer centres in Ontario, Canada for five prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) quality indicators: incomplete pre-treatment assessment, follow-up care, leg immobilization, bladder filling, and portal film target localization. Along with cancer centre volume, we examined each indicator’s association with relevant outcomes: long-term cause-specific survival, urinary incontinence, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary late morbidities. Materials and methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of 924 prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 1998 who received RT within 9 months of diagnosis. Data sources included treating charts and registry and administrative data. The associations between indicators and outcomes were analysed using regression techniques to control for potential confounders. Results: Practice patterns varied across the regional cancer centres for all indicators (p < 0.0001). Incomplete pre-treatment assessment was associated with worse cause-specific survival although this result was not significant when adjusted for confounding (adjusted RR = 1.78, 95% CI = 0.79–3.98). Treatment without leg immobilization (adjusted RR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.16–2.56) and with an empty bladder (adjusted RR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.08–3.63) was associated with genitourinary late morbidities. Treatment without leg immobilization was also associated with urinary incontinence (adjusted RR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.23–3.87). Conclusions: We documented wide variations in practice patterns. We demonstrated that measures of quality of care can be shown to be associated with clinically relevant outcomes in a population-based sample of prostate cancer patients

  6. Can medical insurance coverage reduce disparities of income in elderly patients requiring long-term care? The case of the People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZY

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhenyu Zhang,1 Jianbing Wang,1 Mingjuan Jin,1 Mei Li,1 Litao Zhou,2 Fangyuan Jing,1 Kun Chen1 1Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Quality Control Department, Zhejiang Hospital, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Background: The People’s Republic of China’s population is aging rapidly, partly because of the impact of the one-child policy and improvements in the health care system. Caring for bedridden seniors can be a challenge for many families in the People’s Republic of China.Objective: To identify the inequality of income among different age groups and social statuses, and evaluate the medical burden and health insurance compensation in the People’s Republic of China.Methods: We measured income inequality and insurance compensation levels among bedridden patients in Zhejiang province, People’s Republic of China. Factor analysis and Gini coefficients were used to evaluate degree of income inequality and insurance compensation level.Results: We found distinct regional disparities in Zhejiang province, including the aspects of income, expenses, and time. Gini coefficients of older adults with long-term care needs in urban and rural areas were 0.335 and 0.602, respectively. In all age groups, Gini coefficients increased after adjustment for medical expenditures, and the inequality persisted after insurance reimbursement was taken into consideration.Conclusion: A significant income disparity between rural and urban areas was observed. Inequality increased with age, and medical expenditure is a huge burden for older people with long-term care needs. Health insurance does not play an important role in reducing inequalities among patients who need long-term care services. Keywords: Gini coefficient, bedridden, long-term care, insurance

  7. Indicators of malnutrition in children with cancer: A study of 690 patients from a tertiary care cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large data pertaining to indicators of malnutrition in children with cancer is lacking from India. In view of this, we prospectively analyzed consecutive de novo childhood patients with cancer presenting at a tertiary care center. Materials And Methods: Height and weight of each child (n = 690 were compared with World Health Organization child growth standards-2006 for that particular age and sex to get weight-for-age, height-for-age, and weight-for-height indices and below 2SD of the reference median on these indices were considered as underweight, stunted, and wasted, respectively. Body mass index (BMI for age was also analyzed for thinness and obesity. Results: Prevalence of malnutrition based on Z-score for weight-for-age, height-for-age, weight-for-height, and BMI-for-age was 30%, 31%, 35%, and 41%, respectively. Weight-for-age (underweight was significantly associated (P = 0.018 with solid tumors. Height-for-age, weight-for-age, and BMI-for-age were significantly associated (P = 0.007, P = 0.016, and P ≤ 0.001, respectively with rural community. Conclusion: Malnutrition was observed in approximately one-third of children with cancer. Malnutrition is associated with solid tumors and those coming from rural community. Wasting has a higher prevalence in children with cancer in <5 years of age group.

  8. Effects of a multi-faceted program to increase influenza vaccine coverage among health care workers : A hospital-based cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riphagen-Dalhuisen, Josien; Burgerhof, Hans; Frijstein, Gerard; Van Der Geest-Blankert, Nannet; Danhof- Pont, Marita; De Jager, Herbert; Bos, Nita; Smeets, Ed; De Vries, Marjan; Gallee, Pieter; Hak, Eelko

    2012-01-01

    Background: Immunizing health care workers (HCWs) against influenza has proven to protect their patients. Despite recommentations of the World Health Organization and the Dutch Health Council, influenza vaccine uptake among hospital HCWs remains low in the Netherlands Objectives: To assess the effec

  9. Effect of transsphenoidal surgery and standard care on fertility related indicators of patients with prolactinomas during child-bearing period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiyue; Wang, Yiming; Shou, Xuefei; Su, Jianguang; Lang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the surgical therapeutic effects in the endocrine and reproductive system of women with prolactinoma at child-bearing age, and to investigate the potential influencing factors for therapeutic outcome. Methods: This retrospective study was performed using the medical records of 99 cases of female patients with pituitary PRL adenomas at child-bearing age, who underwent transsphenoidal surgery and took standard perioperative care from January, 2013 to June, 2013 in Huashan hospital, in which micro adenoma (≤1 cm) of 68 cases, large adenomas (> 1 cm) of 31 cases, 88 cases were total resection, 9 cases were subtotal resection, and 2 cases were massive resection. Retrospective study on the preoperative serum level of PRL, menstruation, galactorrhea and reproductive function, etc. Patients were followed up in 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after operation for endocrine indicators, the situation of menstruation and pregnancy. Results: Overall, 88.9%, 9.1%, and 2% patients underwent total, subtotal, and massive resection of prolactinoma in 99 cases of patients. Before accepting transsphenoidal surgery and standard care, all 99 cases with serum PRL level higher than normal 25 ng/ml, 71.7% (71 cases, all total resection) patients had their serum PRL 0.05). 14 patients out of 17 infertility patients got pregnant after surgery. Conclusion: Transsphenoidal operation combining standardized nursing measures is an effective way to treat pituitary PRL adenoma, and it has high cure rate on abnormal menstruation caused by pituitary PRL adenoma which can recover the fertility of female patients. The preoperative serum level of prolactin could be used as an indicator for postoperative improvement in the endocrine system. The serum level of prolactin on the first day after operation could accurately reflect prognosis, so be regarded as one of the assessment factors for surgical therapeutic effect. PMID:26885105

  10. The Nordic maintenance care program: what are the indications for maintenance care in patients with low back pain? A survey of the members of the Danish Chiropractors' Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Signe F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance care (MC is relatively commonly used among chiropractors. However, factual information is needed on its indications for use. Objectives This study had two objectives: 1 to describe which role patients' past history and treatment outcome play in chiropractors' decision to use MC in patients with low back pain, 2 to investigate if the chiropractors' clinical/educational background has an effect on the frequency of using MC and their indications for use of MC. Method An anonymous questionnaire was sent to all 413 chiropractors practising in Denmark. Its main part consisted of 3 sets of 4 questions relating to one basic case of low back pain. For each case, the chiropractors were asked if they would use MC as they self-defined the term (no/perhaps/yes. There were questions also on gender, age, educational and clinical background, and on the number of MC patients seen by these chiropractors. Their decision to recommend MC was reported. Associations between the demographic variables and 1 the frequency of MC-use and 2 their indications for use of MC were tested through multivariate analysis. Results The response rate was 72%. Non-indications for MC were: 1 a good outcome combined with no previous events, or 2 a past history of LBP and gradual worsening with treatment. Indications for MC were a good outcome combined with a previous history of low back pain between once a month and once a year. The mean proportion of MC patients per week were 22% (SD 19, ranging from 0% to 100%. The use of MC was highest among experienced chiropractors, those who were educated in North America, and clinic owners. However, in Denmark most chiropractors graduated before 1999, are educated abroad, whereas most chiropractors thereafter are educated in Denmark. Therefore, we cannot conclude whether this difference relates to education or years of experience. There were no associations detected between demographic variables and the indications

  11. Quality of Longer Term Mental Health Facilities in Europe : Validation of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care against Service Users' Views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Wright, Christine; Taylor, Tatiana L.; Turton, Penny; Kallert, Thomas; Schuster, Mirjam; Cervilla, Jorge A.; Brangier, Paulette; Raboch, Jiri; Kalisova, Lucie; Onchev, Georgi; Alexiev, Spiridon; Mezzina, Roberto; Ridente, Pina; Wiersma, Durk; Visser, Ellen; Kiejna, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Ploumpidis, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Cardoso, Graca; King, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) is a staff rated, international toolkit that assesses care in longer term hospital and community based mental health facilities. The QuIRC was developed from review of the international literature, an international Delphi exercise wit

  12. The adequacy of college health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, M; Brauer, M; Weader, R; Newacheck, P

    1991-01-01

    This analysis of private health insurance plans offered in 100 four-year colleges and universities in 1988 indicates a tremendous diversity in plan options, benefits covered, cost-sharing requirements, and catastrophic protections. Consistent with relatively low premium prices, most student health insurance plans offer limited benefits and expose students to significant out-of-pocket medical cost liabilities. Only a minority of schools use financial incentives, such as preferred provider arrangements, to integrate their health insurance plans with their university health service system. We conclude that universities should carefully reexamine the adequacy of their health insurance plans and their relationship to student health centers. As more students rely on student health insurance as their only source of coverage, the quality of these plans assumes an even greater importance.

  13. Immunization Coverage Among Juvenile Justice Detainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Gregory L; Glanz, Jason M; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Anoshiravani, Arash

    2015-07-01

    This study sought to (1) quantify the baseline immunization coverage of adolescents entering the juvenile justice system and (2) assess the effect of detention-based care on immunization coverage in youth. A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was performed of 279 adolescents detained at a large juvenile detention facility. Only 3% of adolescents had received all study immunizations prior to detention. Before detention, immunization coverage was significantly lower than that for the general adolescent population for all vaccines except the first doses of hepatitis A and varicella-zoster virus vaccines. Subsequent to detention, most individual immunization coverage levels increased and were significantly higher than in the general adolescent population. The routine administration of immunizations in the juvenile justice setting can help detained youth achieve levels of immunization coverage similar to their nondetained peers.

  14. Changes and inequalities in early birth registration and childhood care and education in Vietnam: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2006 and 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Giang, Kim Bao; Oh, Juhwan; Kien, Vu Duy; Hoat, Luu Ngoc; Choi, Sugy; Lee, Chul Ou; Van Minh, Hoang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Early birth registration, childhood care, and education are essential rights for children and are important for their development and education. This study investigates changes and socioeconomic inequalities in early birth registration and indicators of care and education in children aged under 5 years in Vietnam.Design: The analyses reported here used data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) in 2006 and 2011. The sample sizes in 2006 and 2011 were 2,680 a...

  15. Low vaccination coverage for seasonal influenza and pneumococcal disease among adults at-risk and health care workers in Ireland, 2013: The key role of GPs in recommending vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Coralie; Mereckiene, Jolita; Danis, Kostas; O'Donnell, Joan; O'Flanagan, Darina; Cotter, Suzanne

    2016-07-12

    The World Health Organization (WHO), and European Agencies recommend influenza vaccination for individuals at-risk due to age (≥65 years), underlying diseases, pregnancy and for health care workers (HCWs) in Europe. Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for those at-risk of pneumococcal disease. In Ireland, vaccination uptake among at-risk adults is not routinely available. In 2013, we conducted a national survey among Irish residents ≥18 years of age, to estimate size and vaccination coverage of at-risk groups, and identify predictive factors for influenza vaccination. We used computer assisted telephone interviews to collect self-reported information on health, vaccination status, attitudes towards vaccination. We calculated prevalence and prevalence ratios (PR) using binomial regression. Overall, 1770 individuals participated. For influenza, among those aged 18-64 years, 22% (325/1485) [95%CI: 17%-20%] were at-risk; 28% [95%CI: 23%-33%] were vaccinated. Among those aged ≥65 years, 60% [95%CI: 54%-66%] were vaccinated. Influenza vaccine uptake among HCWs was 28% [95%CI: 21%-35%]. For pneumococcal disease, among those aged 18-64 years, 18% [95%CI: 16%-20%] were at-risk; 16% [95%CI: 12%-21%] reported ever-vaccination; among those aged ≥65 years, 36% [95%CI: 30%-42%] reported ever-vaccination. Main reasons for not receiving influenza vaccine were perceptions of not being at-risk, or not thinking of it; and among HCWs thinking that vaccination was not necessary or they were not at-risk. At-risk individuals were more likely to be vaccinated if their doctor had recommended it (PR 3.2; [95%CI: 2.4%-4.4%]) or they had access to free medical care or free vaccination services (PR 2.0; [95%CI: 1.5%-2.8%]). Vaccination coverage for both influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in at-risk individuals aged 18-64 years was very low. Influenza vaccination coverage among individuals ≥65 years was moderate. Influenza vaccination status was associated with GP vaccination

  16. Wide Coverage Antennas

    OpenAIRE

    Zackrisson, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Small satellites require small and lightweight antennas for telemetry and command function as well as for downlinking of data. We have during the last thirty years developed a large suite of wide coverage antennas. The basic radiator designs used are quadrifilar helices, waveguides, horns and patch excited cups (PEC) depending on frequency range, coverage requirements and application. The antenna designs range from L-band up to Ka-band frequencies. Typical coverages for the antennas are from ...

  17. Measuring coverage in MNCH: total survey error and the interpretation of intervention coverage estimates from household surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Eisele

    Full Text Available Nationally representative household surveys are increasingly relied upon to measure maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH intervention coverage at the population level in low- and middle-income countries. Surveys are the best tool we have for this purpose and are central to national and global decision making. However, all survey point estimates have a certain level of error (total survey error comprising sampling and non-sampling error, both of which must be considered when interpreting survey results for decision making. In this review, we discuss the importance of considering these errors when interpreting MNCH intervention coverage estimates derived from household surveys, using relevant examples from national surveys to provide context. Sampling error is usually thought of as the precision of a point estimate and is represented by 95% confidence intervals, which are measurable. Confidence intervals can inform judgments about whether estimated parameters are likely to be different from the real value of a parameter. We recommend, therefore, that confidence intervals for key coverage indicators should always be provided in survey reports. By contrast, the direction and magnitude of non-sampling error is almost always unmeasurable, and therefore unknown. Information error and bias are the most common sources of non-sampling error in household survey estimates and we recommend that they should always be carefully considered when interpreting MNCH intervention coverage based on survey data. Overall, we recommend that future research on measuring MNCH intervention coverage should focus on refining and improving survey-based coverage estimates to develop a better understanding of how results should be interpreted and used.

  18. Effects of Motor Development Stimulation on Anthropometric Indices of Infants Aged 1-12 Months in Foster Care Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezou NikNezhad Jalali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The first three years of life have a pivotal role in growth and development of infants. Extra-uterine environment largely affects brain development of infants during the first year of life.However,no specific programs are available for brain development stimulation in foster homes. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of motor development stimulation package on anthropometric indices of infants staying in foster homes. Method: This experimental study was conducted on 50 infants aged 1-12 months at Ali Asghar foster home of Mashhad, Iran in 2013. Infants were randomly divided into two groups of intervention (n=25 and control (n=25. Motor development stimulation packages were used for intervention group three times a week for eight consecutive weeks (24 sessions, two hours each. Anthropometric indices of infants were evaluated using standard instruments before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.11.5 using independent T-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: In this study, mean age of infants in intervention and control groups was 6.04±3.48 and 4.3±3.70 months, respectively. In total, 68% of infants were male, and 32% were female. After intervention, Mann-Whitney test results showed no statistically significant difference in height (P=0.47 and head circumference (P=0.11 of infants between the groups. However, independent T-test showed a statistically significant difference in body weight of infants (P=0.007 between the groups after intervention with the stimulation care package. Implications for Practice: According to the results of this study, use of evidence-based motor development stimulation package for eight weeks resulted in increased weight of infants, while it had no effect on height and head circumference. Therefore, it is recommended that complementary studies be conducted in this regard.

  19. Associação entre atenção básica em saúde bucal e indicadores socioeconômicos municipais Association between primary dental care and municipal socioeconomic indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Simara Fernandes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Testar associações entre indicadores de atenção básica em saúde bucal e indicadores municipais socioeconômicos e de provisão de serviços odontológicos. MÉTODOS: Estudo ecológico realizado nos 293 municípios do Estado de Santa Catarina, no período 2000 a 2003. Foram utilizados indicadores de atenção básica a saúde bucal: (1 Cobertura; (2 Razão entre procedimentos odontológicos coletivos e a população de zero a 14 anos de idade; (3 razão entre exodontias de dentes permanentes e procedimentos odontológicos individuais na atenção básica. As variáveis investigadas foram: razão entre o número total de dentistas por mil habitantes, razão entre o número total de dentistas cadastrados no Sistema Único de Saúde por mil habitantes, fluoretação da água de abastecimento, índice de desenvolvimento infantil, índice de desenvolvimento humano municipal e a população do município. Foram realizadas as análises pelos testes de Kruskall-Wallis, qui-quadrado e o teste de Spearman para avaliar a correlação entre as variáveis. RESULTADOS: A cobertura foi de 21,8%, a razão de procedimentos coletivos na população entre zero a 14 anos foi de 0,37 e a proporção de exodontias em relação ao total de procedimentos odontológicos individuais foi de 11,9%. Menores proporções de exodontias foram associadas às maiores proporções de dentistas no Sistema (pOBJECTIVE: To test associations between primary dental care indicators and municipal socioeconomic and dental service provision indicators. METHODS: An ecological study was carried out in the 293 municipalities of the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, between 2000 and 2003. The primary dental care indicators utilized were: (1 coverage; (2 the ratio between preventive dental procedures and the size of the population aged zero to 14 years; and (3 the ratio between the numbers of extractions of permanent teeth and individual dental procedures within primary dental

  20. Identifying patients with advanced chronic conditions for a progressive palliative care approach: a cross-sectional study of prognostic indicators related to end-of-life trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblàs-Novellas, J; Murray, S A; Espaulella, J; Martinez-Muñoz, M; Blay, C; Gómez-Batiste, X

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 2 innovative concepts have lately been developed to radically improve the care of patients with advanced chronic conditions (PACC): early identification of palliative care (PC) needs and the 3 end-of-life trajectories in chronic illnesses (acute, intermittent and gradual dwindling). It is not clear (1) what indicators work best for this early identification and (2) if specific clinical indicators exist for each of these trajectories. The objectives of this study are to explore these 2 issues. Setting 3 primary care services, an acute care hospital, an intermediate care centre and 4 nursing homes in a mixed urban–rural district in Barcelona, Spain. Participants 782 patients (61.5% women) with a positive NECPAL CCOMS-ICO test, indicating they might benefit from a PC approach. Outcome measures The characteristics and distribution of the indicators of the NECPAL CCOMS-ICO tool are analysed with respect to the 3 trajectories and have been arranged by domain (functional, nutritional and cognitive status, emotional problems, geriatric syndromes, social vulnerability and others) and according to their static (severity) and dynamic (progression) properties. Results The common indicators associated with early end-of-life identification are functional (44.3%) and nutritional (30.7%) progression, emotional distress (21.9%) and geriatric syndromes (15.7% delirium, 11.2% falls). The rest of the indicators showed differences in the associations per illness trajectories (ppalliative approach. PMID:27645556

  1. Quality indicators for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease in primary care in nine European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, S.M.; Ludt, S.; Lieshout, J. van; Boffin, N.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Petek, D.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Roland, M.O.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With free movement of labour in Europe, European guidelines on cardiovascular care and the enlargement of the European Union to include countries with disparate health care systems, it is important to develop common quality standards for cardiovascular prevention and risk management acro

  2. The greatest happiness of the greatest number? Policy actors' perspectives on the limits of economic evaluation as a tool for informing health care coverage decisions in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Steve

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents qualitative findings from an assessment of the acceptability of using economic evaluation among policy actors in Thailand. Using cost-utility data from two economic analyses a hypothetical case scenario was created in which policy actors had to choose between two competing interventions to include in a public health benefit package. The two competing interventions, laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC for gallbladder disease versus renal dialysis for chronic renal disease, were selected because they highlighted conflicting criteria influencing the allocation of healthcare resources. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 36 policy actors who play a major role in resource allocation decisions within the Thai healthcare system. These included 14 policy makers at the national level, five hospital directors, ten health professionals and seven academics. Results Twenty six out of 36 (72% respondents were not convinced by the presentation of economic evaluation findings and chose not to support the inclusion of a proven cost-effective intervention (LC in the benefit package due to ethical, institutional and political considerations. There were only six respondents, including three policy makers at national level, one hospital director, one health professional and one academic, (6/36, 17% whose decisions were influenced by economic evaluation evidence. Conclusion This paper illustrates limitations of using economic evaluation information in decision making priorities of health care, perceived by different policy actors. It demonstrates that the concept of maximising health utility fails to recognise other important societal values in making health resource allocation decisions.

  3. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. Objective: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Methods: Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject ...

  4. Premium subsidies for health insurance: excessive coverage vs. adverse selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, T M

    1999-12-01

    The tax subsidy for employment-related health insurance can lead to excessive coverage and excessive spending on medical care. Yet, the potential also exists for adverse selection to result in the opposite problem-insufficient coverage and underconsumption of medical care. This paper uses the model of Rothschild and Stiglitz (R-S) to show that a simple linear premium subsidy can correct market failure due to adverse selection. The optimal linear subsidy balances welfare losses from excessive coverage against welfare gains from reduced adverse selection. Indeed, a capped premium subsidy may mitigate adverse selection without creating incentives for excessive coverage.

  5. Equivalência semântica, conceitual e de itens do Observable Indicators of Nursing Home Care Quality Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Ivan Fonseca de Oliveira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo As Instituições de Longa Permanência para Idosos (ILPI são uma importante alternativa de cuidado no mundo, porém o Brasil ainda não dispõe de instrumento válido para monitorar a qualidade dessas instituições. Portanto, o objetivo do presente artigo é descrever as etapas iniciais da adaptação transcultural do Observable Indicators of Nursing Home Care Quality Instrument (IOQ usado para avaliar a qualidade do cuidado nas ILPI. Realizou-se a equivalência conceitual e de itens para avaliar a pertinência e a viabilidade do IOQ à realidade nacional através do Índice de Validade do Conteúdo (IVC. Em seguida, cumpriu-se a equivalência operacional, a idiomática e a semântica. Esta última tem 5 fases: (1 duas traduções e (2 duas respectivas retraduções; (3 apreciação formal; (4 revisão; e (5 aplicação do pré-teste em três ILPI. Modificações importantes foram realizadas para garantir a validade do IOQ. O IVC do instrumento referentes ao contexto brasileiro foi de 94,3% (viabilidade e 95,3% (relevância. O IOQ mostrou-se compreensível e de fácil aplicação no pré-teste. A adaptação transcultural do IOQ contribui para avaliação e melhoria da qualidade nas ILPI brasileiras, mas os resultados devem ser complementados mediante avaliação psicométrica.

  6. Improvement of clinical quality indicators through reorganization of the acute care by establishing an emergency department-a register study based on data from national indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Maria Søe; Mattsson, N.; Jørsboe, H. B.

    2014-01-01

    of an ED. Patients admitted at Nykobing Falster Hospital in 2008 or 2012 were included in the study and data reports from the national databases (RKKP) regarding stroke, COPD, heart failure, bleeding and perforated ulcer or hip fracture were analysed. Holbk Hospital works as a control hospital. Chi......-square test was used for analysing significant differences from pre-and post intervention and Z-test to compare the experimental groups to the control group (HOL). P ...-intervention data were compared for both NFS and HOL (p = 0.024). Conclusions: During the organisation of the new EDs, several of the indicators improved and the overall 30 days mortality decreased in the five diseases. The development of a common set of indicators for monitoring acute treatment at EDs in Denmark...

  7. Verbal and nonverbal indicators of quality of communication between care staff and residents in ethnoculturally and linguistically diverse long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Jeff; Chan, Sing Mei; Drance, Elisabeth; Globerman, Judith; Hulko, Wendy; O'Connor, Deborah; Perry, JoAnn; Stern, Louise; Ho, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Linguistic and ethnocultural diversity in long-term residential care is a growing trend in many urban settings. When long-term care staff and residents do not share the same language or ethnocultural background, the quality of their communication and care are jeopardized. There is very little research addressing how staff and residents communicate when they experience a mismatch in their language and ethnocultural backgrounds. Thus, the goals of the present study were to 1) document the verbal and nonverbal behaviours used by staff and residents in diverse interactions, and 2) identify and account for behaviours that either promoted or detracted from positive communication by drawing on principles from 'Communication Accommodation Theory'. Two long-term care facilities in British Columbia Canada were selected due to the diverse linguistic and ethnocultural backgrounds of their staff and residents. Twenty-seven staff and 27 residents consented to being video-recorded during routine activities (e.g., mealtimes, recreational activities). The recorded observations were transcribed, translated, and coded using qualitative descriptive and interpretive analyses. A number of verbal and nonverbal behaviours were identified and interpreted in relation to whether they promoted or detracted from positive communication. The findings point to considering a variety of proactive strategies that staff and administrators could employ to effectively accommodate to language and ethnocultural diversity in long-term care practice. PMID:26260486

  8. Quality of longer term mental health facilities in Europe: validation of the quality indicator for rehabilitative care against service users' views.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Killaspy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC is a staff rated, international toolkit that assesses care in longer term hospital and community based mental health facilities. The QuIRC was developed from review of the international literature, an international Delphi exercise with over 400 service users, practitioners, carers and advocates from ten European countries at different stages of deinstitutionalisation, and review of the care standards in these countries. It can be completed in under an hour by the facility manager and has robust content validity, acceptability and inter-rater reliability. In this study, we investigated the internal validity of the QuIRC. Our aim was to identify the QuIRC domains of care that independently predicted better service user experiences of care. METHOD: At least 20 units providing longer term care for adults with severe mental illness were recruited in each of ten European countries. Service users completed standardised measures of their experiences of care, quality of life, autonomy and the unit's therapeutic milieu. Unit managers completed the QuIRC. Multilevel modelling allowed analysis of associations between service user ratings as dependent variables with unit QuIRC domain ratings as independent variables. RESULTS: 1750/2495 (70% users and the managers of 213 units from across ten European countries participated. QuIRC ratings were positively associated with service users' autonomy and experiences of care. Associations between QuIRC ratings and service users' ratings of their quality of life and the unit's therapeutic milieu were explained by service user characteristics (age, diagnosis and functioning. A hypothetical 10% increase in QuIRC rating resulted in a clinically meaningful improvement in autonomy. CONCLUSIONS: Ratings of the quality of longer term mental health facilities made by service managers were positively associated with service users' autonomy and experiences of care

  9. Simultaneous Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Hepatitis B-Hepatitis C Point-of-Care Tests Improve Outcomes in Linkage-to-Care: Results of a Randomized Control Trial in Persons Without Healthcare Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottero, Julie; Boyd, Anders; Gozlan, Joel; Carrat, Fabrice; Nau, Jean; Pauti, Marie-Dominique; Rougier, Hayette; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Lacombe, Karine

    2015-12-01

    Background.  In Europe and the United States, more than two thirds of individuals infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) and 15%-30% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals are unaware of their infection status. Simultaneous HIV-, HBV-, and HCV-rapid tests could help improve infection awareness and linkage-to-care in particularly vulnerable populations. Methods.  The OptiScreen III study was a single-center, randomized, control trial conducted at a free clinic ("Médecins du Monde", Paris, France). Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive 1 of 2 interventions testing for HIV, HBV, and HCV: standard serology-based testing (S-arm) or point-of-care rapid testing (RT-arm). The main study endpoints were the proportion of participants who became aware of their HIV, HBV, and HCV status and who were linked to care when testing positive. Results.  A total of 324 individuals, representing mainly African immigrants, were included. In the S-arm, 115 of 162 (71.0%) participants performed a blood draw and 104 of 162 (64.2%) retrieved their test result. In comparison, 159 of 162 (98.2%) of participants randomized to the RT-arm obtained their results (P testing positive (HIV, n = 7; HBV, n = 23; HCV, n = 8), 15 of 18 (83.3%) in the S-arm and 18 of 20 (90.0%) in the RT-arm were linked-to-care (P = .7). In post hoc analysis assuming the same disease prevalence in those without obtaining test results, difference in linkage-to-care was more pronounced (S-arm = 60.0% vs RT-arm = 90.0%; P = .04). Conclusions.  In a highly at-risk population for chronic viral infections, the simultaneous use of HIV, HBV, and HCV point-of-care tests clearly improves the "cascade of screening" and quite possibly linkage-to-care. PMID:26668814

  10. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, D.; Wensing, M.; Esmail, A.; Valderas, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. OBJECTIVE: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance

  11. Development and Measurement of Guidelines-Based Quality Indicators of Caesarean Section Care in the Netherlands: A RAND-Modified Delphi Procedure and Retrospective Medical Chart Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Melman

    Full Text Available There is an ongoing discussion on the rising CS rate worldwide. Suboptimal guideline adherence may be an important contributor to this rise. Before improvement of care can be established, optimal CS care in different settings has to be defined. This study aimed to develop and measure quality indicators to determine guideline adherence and identify target groups for improvement of care with direct effect on caesarean section (CS rates.Eighteen obstetricians and midwives participated in an expert panel for systematic CS quality indicator development according to the RAND-modified Delphi method. A multi-center study was performed and medical charts of 1024 women with a CS and a stratified and weighted randomly selected group of 1036 women with a vaginal delivery were analysed. Quality indicator frequency and adherence were scored in 2060 women with a CS or vaginal delivery.The expert panel developed 16 indicators on planned CS and 11 indicators on unplanned CS. Indicator adherence was calculated, defined as the number of women in a specific obstetrical situation in which care was performed as recommended in both planned and unplanned CS settings. The most frequently occurring obstetrical situations with low indicator adherence were: 1 suspected fetal distress (frequency 17%, adherence 46%, 2 non-progressive labour (frequency 12%, CS performed too early in over 75%, 3 continuous support during labour (frequency 88%, adherence 37% and 4 previous CS (frequency 12%, with adequate counselling in 15%.We identified four concrete target groups for improvement of obstetrical care, which can be used as a starting point to reduce CS rates worldwide.

  12. The Complexity of Coverage

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Majumdar, Rupak

    2008-01-01

    We study the problem of generating a test sequence that achieves maximal coverage for a reactive system under test. We formulate the problem as a repeated game between the tester and the system, where the system state space is partitioned according to some coverage criterion and the objective of the tester is to maximize the set of partitions (or coverage goals) visited during the game. We show the complexity of the maximal coverage problem for non-deterministic systems is PSPACE-complete, but is NP-complete for deterministic systems. For the special case of non-deterministic systems with a re-initializing ``reset'' action, which represent running a new test input on a re-initialized system, we show that the complexity is again co-NP-complete. Our proof technique for reset games uses randomized testing strategies that circumvent the exponentially large memory requirement in the deterministic case.

  13. Comparison of midwifery care to medical care in hospitals in the Quebec pilot projects study: clinical indicators. L'Equipe dEvaluation des Projets-Pilotes Sages-Femmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, W; Hatem-Asmar, M; Krauss, I; Maillard, F; Bréart, G; Blais, R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare indicators of process and outcome of midwifery services provided in the Quebec pilot projects to those associated with standard hospital-based medical services. Women receiving each type of care (961 per group) were matched on the basis of socio-demographic characteristics and level of obstetrical risk. We found midwifery care to be associated with less obstetrical intervention and a reduction in selected indicators of maternal morbidity (caesarean section and severe perineal injury). For neonatal outcome indicators, midwifery care was associated with a mixture of benefits and risks: fewer babies with preterm birth and low birthweight, but a trend toward a higher stillbirth ratio and more frequent requirement for neonatal resuscitation. The study design does not permit to conclude that the associations were causal in nature. However, the high stillbirth rate observed in the group of women who were selected for midwife care raises concerns both regarding the appropriateness of the screening procedures for admission to such care and regarding the quality of care itself.

  14. Appropriate use of endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases: up-to-date indications for primary care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vien X Nguyen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vien X Nguyen1, Vi Thuy Le Nguyen2, Cuong C Nguyen11Department of Gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Mesa, AZ, USAAbstract: The field of endoscopy has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of ­gastrointestinal (GI diseases in recent years. Besides the ‘traditional’ endoscopic ­procedures (esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, advances in imaging technology (endoscopic ultrasonography, ­wireless capsule endoscopy, and double balloon enteroscopy have allowed GI specialists to detect and manage disorders throughout the digestive system. This article reviews various ­endoscopic procedures and provides up-to-date endoscopic indications based on the ­recommendations of American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and American Cancer Society for primary care providers in order to achieve high-quality and cost-effective care.Keywords: endoscopy, endoscopic indications, endoscopic procedures, imaging, primary care, gastrointestinal disorders, appropriate use

  15. How to implement quality indicators successfully in palliative care services: perceptions of team members about facilitators of and barriers to implementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, K.; Block, L. van den; Stichele, R. Vander; Francke, A.L.; Deliens, L.; Cohen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is an increasing demand for the use of quality indicators in palliative care.With previous research about implementation in this field lacking, we aimed to evaluate the barriers to and facilitators of implementation. Methods: Three focus group interviews were organized with 21 caregiv

  16. Are medical residents a "core group" for future improvement of influenza vaccination coverage in health-care workers? A study among medical residents at the University Hospital of Palermo (Sicily).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, Emanuele; Tramuto, Fabio; Maringhini, Guido; Asciutto, Rosario; Firenze, Alberto; Vitale, Francesco; Costantino, Claudio; Calamusa, Giuseppe

    2011-10-19

    Despite international recommendations, vaccination coverage among European healthcare workers, including physicians, is widely recognized as unsatisfactory. In order to plan tailored vaccination campaigns and increase future coverage, we investigated reasons for refusing vaccination and determinants associated with influenza vaccine uptake among young health care workers. A survey was carried out during September and October 2010 on medical residents attending post-graduate Schools of the Medical Faculty at the University of Palermo (Italy). Each participant completed an anonymous web-based questionnaire including items on demographic and occupational characteristics, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours with regard to influenza and influenza vaccination, and main sources of information. A total of 202 (66.9%) out of 302 medical residents participated in the survey. During the 2009-2010 influenza vaccine campaign, 44 residents (21.8%) were vaccinated against seasonal influenza and 84 (41.6%) against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009. For the impending 2010-2011 influenza season, 45 (22.3%) stated their intention to get vaccinated against seasonal influenza, 40 (19.8%) were uncertain and 117 (57.9%) were opposed. Considering themselves to be a high risk group for developing influenza was significantly associated with vaccination against both 2009-2010 seasonal (adj-OR=1.46; 95% CI=1.05-2.04) and pandemic A (H1N1) influenza (adj-OR 1.38; 95% CI=1.08-1.75). Intention to get vaccinated against 2010-2011 seasonal influenza was significantly more frequent in participants who had a high perception of efficacy/safety (adj-OR=1.49; 95% CI=1.05-2.12). After adjusting for confounding, vaccinations against seasonal 2009-2010 influenza, pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 and seasonal 2010-2011 influenza were significantly more frequent in residents who were vaccinated against influenza at least once in the previous five influenza seasons. Influenza vaccination among medical

  17. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathoulin-Pélissier Simone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. Methods CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery, and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN, non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. Results We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68% with colon and 381 (32% with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location; whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Conclusions Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care

  18. Moving to universal coverage? Trends in the burden of out-of-pocket payments for health care across social groups in India, 1999-2000 to 2011-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Anup; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Mahal, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    In the background of ongoing health sector reforms in India, the paper investigates the magnitude and trends in out-of-pocket and catastrophic payments for key population sub-groups. Data from three rounds of nationally representative consumer expenditure surveys (1999-2000, 2004-05 and 2011-12) were pooled to assess changes over time in a range of out-of-pocket -related outcome indicators for the poorest 20% households, scheduled caste and tribe households and Muslims households relative to their better-off/majority religion counterparts. Our results suggest that the poorest 20% of households experienced a decline in the proportion reporting any OOP for inpatient care relative to the top 20% and Muslim households saw an increase in the proportion reporting any inpatient OOP relative to non-Muslim households during 2000-2012. The change in the proportion of Muslim households or SC/ST households reporting any OOP for outpatient care was similar to that for their respective more advantaged counterparts; but the poorest 20% of households experienced a faster increase in the proportion reporting any OOP for outpatient care than their top 20% counterparts. SC/ST, Muslim and the poorest 20% of households experienced as faster increase in the share of outpatient OOP in total household spending relative to their advantaged counterparts. We conclude that the financial burden of out of pocket spending increased faster among the disadvantaged groups relative to their more advantaged counterparts. Although the poorest 20% saw a relative decline in OOP spending on inpatient care as a share of household spending, this is likely the result of foregoing inpatient care, than of accessing benefits from the recent expansion of cashless publicly financed insurance schemes for inpatient care. Our results highlight the need to explore the reasons underlying the lack of effectiveness of existing public health financing programs and public sector health services in reaching less

  19. Moving to universal coverage? Trends in the burden of out-of-pocket payments for health care across social groups in India, 1999-2000 to 2011-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Karan

    Full Text Available In the background of ongoing health sector reforms in India, the paper investigates the magnitude and trends in out-of-pocket and catastrophic payments for key population sub-groups. Data from three rounds of nationally representative consumer expenditure surveys (1999-2000, 2004-05 and 2011-12 were pooled to assess changes over time in a range of out-of-pocket -related outcome indicators for the poorest 20% households, scheduled caste and tribe households and Muslims households relative to their better-off/majority religion counterparts. Our results suggest that the poorest 20% of households experienced a decline in the proportion reporting any OOP for inpatient care relative to the top 20% and Muslim households saw an increase in the proportion reporting any inpatient OOP relative to non-Muslim households during 2000-2012. The change in the proportion of Muslim households or SC/ST households reporting any OOP for outpatient care was similar to that for their respective more advantaged counterparts; but the poorest 20% of households experienced a faster increase in the proportion reporting any OOP for outpatient care than their top 20% counterparts. SC/ST, Muslim and the poorest 20% of households experienced as faster increase in the share of outpatient OOP in total household spending relative to their advantaged counterparts. We conclude that the financial burden of out of pocket spending increased faster among the disadvantaged groups relative to their more advantaged counterparts. Although the poorest 20% saw a relative decline in OOP spending on inpatient care as a share of household spending, this is likely the result of foregoing inpatient care, than of accessing benefits from the recent expansion of cashless publicly financed insurance schemes for inpatient care. Our results highlight the need to explore the reasons underlying the lack of effectiveness of existing public health financing programs and public sector health services in

  20. Application of WHO ‘Near-Miss’ Tool Indicates Good Quality of Maternal Care in Rural Healthcare Setting in Uttarakhand, Northern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debabrata; Aggarwal, Pradeep; Nautiyal, Ruchira; Chaturvedi, Jaya; Kakkar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women who experienced and survived a severe health condition during pregnancy, childbirth or postpartum are considered as ‘near-miss’ or severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) cases. Women who survive life-threatening conditions arising from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth have many common aspects with those who die of such complications. Aim To evaluate health-care facility preparedness and perfor-mance in reducing severe maternal out comes at all levels of health care. Materials and Methods The present study was carried out over a period of 12 months under the Department of Community Medicine. The cross-sectional study included all the women (937) attending health-care facilities, at all levels of health care i.e. Primary, Secondary & Tertiary level in Doiwala block of Dehradun district. This study was conducted as per the WHO criteria for ‘near-miss’ by using probability sampling for random selection of health facilities. All eligible study subjects visiting health-care facilities during the study period were included, i.e. who were pregnant, in labour, or who had delivered or aborted up to 42 days ago. Results It was found that all women delivering at the THC received oxytocin to prevent postpartum haemorrhage. Treatment of severe post-partum haemorrhage by removal of retained products was significantly associated with levels of health care. Majority (94.73%) women who had eclampsia received magnesium sulfate as primary treatment. Conclusion Application of WHO ‘near-miss’ tool indicates good quality of maternal care in rural healthcare setting in Uttarakhand, North India. The women would have otherwise died due to obstetrics complications, had proper care not been provided to them in time. PMID:26894094

  1. Nursing challenges for universal health coverage: a systematic review1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schveitzer, Mariana Cabral; Zoboli, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone; Vieira, Margarida Maria da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Objectives to identify nursing challenges for universal health coverage, based on the findings of a systematic review focused on the health workforce' understanding of the role of humanization practices in Primary Health Care. Method systematic review and meta-synthesis, from the following information sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Scielo, Web of Science, PsycInfo, SCOPUS, DEDALUS and Proquest, using the keyword Primary Health Care associated, separately, with the following keywords: humanization of assistance, holistic care/health, patient centred care, user embracement, personal autonomy, holism, attitude of health personnel. Results thirty studies between 1999-2011. Primary Health Care work processes are complex and present difficulties for conducting integrative care, especially for nursing, but humanizing practices have showed an important role towards the development of positive work environments, quality of care and people-centered care by promoting access and universal health coverage. Conclusions nursing challenges for universal health coverage are related to education and training, to better working conditions and clear definition of nursing role in primary health care. It is necessary to overcome difficulties such as fragmented concepts of health and care and invest in multidisciplinary teamwork, community empowerment, professional-patient bond, user embracement, soft technologies, to promote quality of life, holistic care and universal health coverage. PMID:27143536

  2. Nursing challenges for universal health coverage: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cabral Schveitzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives to identify nursing challenges for universal health coverage, based on the findings of a systematic review focused on the health workforce' understanding of the role of humanization practices in Primary Health Care. Method systematic review and meta-synthesis, from the following information sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Scielo, Web of Science, PsycInfo, SCOPUS, DEDALUS and Proquest, using the keyword Primary Health Care associated, separately, with the following keywords: humanization of assistance, holistic care/health, patient centred care, user embracement, personal autonomy, holism, attitude of health personnel. Results thirty studies between 1999-2011. Primary Health Care work processes are complex and present difficulties for conducting integrative care, especially for nursing, but humanizing practices have showed an important role towards the development of positive work environments, quality of care and people-centered care by promoting access and universal health coverage. Conclusions nursing challenges for universal health coverage are related to education and training, to better working conditions and clear definition of nursing role in primary health care. It is necessary to overcome difficulties such as fragmented concepts of health and care and invest in multidisciplinary teamwork, community empowerment, professional-patient bond, user embracement, soft technologies, to promote quality of life, holistic care and universal health coverage.

  3. Cost Benefit Analysis of Sports Medicine Team Coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P.; Eck, Brandon; Freedman, Kevin B.; Pepe, Matthew D.; Austin, Luke; Tucker, Bradford S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Coverage of high school athletic football by orthopaedic sports medicine specialists is considered standard of care in many localities. Taking time away from an orthopaedic practice to provide on field athletic care has potential advantages and disadvantages. Determining the economic viability of this endeavor has never been investigated. The purpose of the present investigation was to perform a cost/benefit risk analysis of local high school sports coverage by an orthopaedic spor...

  4. Cardiovascular risk management in patients with coronary heart disease in primary care: variation across countries and practices. An observational study based on quality indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Lieshout Jan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care has an important role in cardiovascular risk management (CVRM and a minimum size of scale of primary care practices may be needed for efficient delivery of CVRM . We examined CVRM in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD in primary care and explored the impact of practice size. Methods In an observational study in 8 countries we sampled CHD patients in primary care practices and collected data from electronic patient records. Practice samples were stratified according to practice size and urbanisation; patients were selected using coded diagnoses when available. CVRM was measured on the basis of internationally validated quality indicators. In the analyses practice size was defined in terms of number of patients registered of visiting the practice. We performed multilevel regression analyses controlling for patient age and sex. Results We included 181 practices (63% of the number targeted. Two countries included a convenience sample of practices. Data from 2960 CHD patients were available. Some countries used methods supplemental to coded diagnoses or other inclusion methods introducing potential inclusion bias. We found substantial variation on all CVRM indicators across practices and countries. We computed aggregated practice scores as percentage of patients with a positive outcome. Rates of risk factor recording varied from 55% for physical activity as the mean practice score across all practices (sd 32% to 94% (sd 10% for blood pressure. Rates for reaching treatment targets for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and LDL cholesterol were 46% (sd 21%, 86% (sd 12% and 48% (sd 22% respectively. Rates for providing recommended cholesterol lowering and antiplatelet drugs were around 80%, and 70% received influenza vaccination. Practice size was not associated to indicator scores with one exception: in Slovenia larger practices performed better. Variation was more related to differences between

  5. Outcome and prognostic indicators of patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplants admitted to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thanh N; Weigt, S Sam; Belperio, John A; Territo, Mary; Keane, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) who require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) has been regarded as extremely poor. We sought to re-evaluate recent outcomes and predictive factors in a retrospective cohort study. Among the 605 adult patients that received an HSCT between 2001 and 2006, 154 required admission to the ICU. Of these, 47% were discharged from the ICU, 36% were discharged from the hospital, and 19% survived 6 months. Allogeneic transplant, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor-use, and neutropenia were each associated with increased mortality, and the mortality of patients with all four characteristics was 100%. Hemodialysis was also associated with increased mortality in a Kaplan-Meier analysis but did not appear important in a multivariate tree analysis. A final Cox model confirmed that allogeneic transplant, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor-use were each independent risk factors for mortality in the 6 months following ICU admission. PMID:20130763

  6. The role of cost-effectiveness analysis in the development of indicators to support incentive-based behaviour in primary care in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nadeem; Weng, Stephen; Hex, Nick

    2016-10-01

    In England, general practitioners are incentivized through a national pay-for-performance scheme to adopt evidence-based quality improvement initiatives using a portfolio of Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) indicators. We describe the development of the methods used to assess the cost-effectiveness of these pay-for-performance indicators and how they have contributed to the development of new indicators. Prior to analysis of new potential indicators, an economic subgroup of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Indicator Advisory Committee is formed to assess evidence on the cost-effectiveness of potential indicators in terms of the health benefits gained, compared to the cost of the intervention and the cost of the incentive. The expert subgroup is convened to reach consensus on the amounts that could potentially be paid to general practices for achieving new indicators. Indicators are also piloted in selected general practices and evidence gathered about their practical implementation. The methods used to assess economic viability of new pilot indicators represent a pragmatic and effective way of providing information to inform recommendations. Current policy to reduce QOF funding could shift the focus from national (QOF) to local schemes, with economic appraisal remaining central. PMID:27207081

  7. The German quality indicators in intensive care medicine 2013 – second edition [Intensivmedizinische Qualitätsindikatoren für Deutschland 2013 – zweite Auflage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiler, Norbert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available [english] Quality indicators are key elements of quality management. The quality indicators for intensive care medicine of the German Interdisciplinary Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI from the year 2010 were recently evaluated when their validity time expired after two years. Overall one indicator was replaced and further three were in part changed. The former indicator I “elevation of head of bed” was replaced by the indic “Daily multi-professional ward rounds with the documentation of daily therapy goals” and added to the indicator IV “Weaning and other measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonias (short: Weaning/VAP Bundle” (VAP = ventilator-associated pneumonia which aims at the reduction of VAP incidence. The indicator VIII “Documentation of structured relative-/next-of-kin communication” was refined. The indic X “Direction of the ICU by a specially trained certified intensivist with no other clinical duties in a department” was also updated according to recent study results. These updated quality indicators are part of the Peer Review in intensive care medicine. The next update of the quality indicators is due in 2016.[german] Qualitätsindikatoren sind elementare Bestandteile des Qualitätsmanagements. Die Qualitätsindikatoren für die Intensivmedizin der Deutschen Interndisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensivmedizin (DIVI aus dem Jahre 2010 sind nun im Rahmen der geplanten Geltungsdauer überarbeitet und angepasst worden. Insgesamt wurde ein Indikator ersetzt und drei weitere zum Teil wesentlich überarbeitet. Der alte Indikator I „Oberkörperhochlagerung“ wurde durch den Indikator „Tägliche multiprofessionelle, klinische Visite mit Dokumentation von Tageszielen“ ersetzt und in den neu geschaffenen Indikator IV „Weaning und Maßnahmen zur Vermeidung von ventilatorassoziierten Pneumonien (kurz: Weaning/VAP Bundle“ (VAP = ventilator-assoziierte Pneumonie integriert, der auf ein

  8. Child immunization coverage in rural hard-to-reach Haor areas of Bangladesh: possible alternative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Jasim; Larson, Charles P; Oliveras, Elizabeth; Khan, Azharul Islam; Quaiyum, Md Abdul; Chandra Saha, Nirod

    2009-01-01

    This article assessed the status of childhood vaccination coverage and the possibility of using selected alternative vaccination strategies in rural hard-to-reach haor (low lying) areas of Bangladesh. Data were collected through survey, in-depth interviews, group discussion, and observations of vaccination sessions. Complete immunization coverage among 12- to 23-month-old children was found to be significantly lower in study areas when compared with the national coverage levels. The study identified reasons for low complete immunization coverage in hard-to-reach areas, including irregular/cancelled extended program on immunization (EPI) sessions, less time spent in EPI spots by field staff, and absence of any alternative strategy for remote areas. The findings indicated that the existing service delivery strategy is not sufficient to improve immunization coverage in hard-to-reach areas. However, most of the strategies assessed are considered possible to implement by health care providers in hard-to-reach areas. The study suggested that before implementing alternative strategies in hard-to-reach areas, feasibility and effectiveness of the possible strategies need to be tested to identify evidence-based strategies.

  9. Changes and inequalities in early birth registration and childhood care and education in Vietnam: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2006 and 2011

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    Kim Bao Giang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early birth registration, childhood care, and education are essential rights for children and are important for their development and education. This study investigates changes and socioeconomic inequalities in early birth registration and indicators of care and education in children aged under 5 years in Vietnam. Design: The analyses reported here used data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS in 2006 and 2011. The sample sizes in 2006 and 2011 were 2,680 and 3,678 for children under 5 years of age. Four indicators of childcare and preschool education were measured: birth registration, possession of books, preschool education attendance, and parental support for early childhood education. The concentration index (CI was used to measure inequalities in gender, maternal education, geographical area, place of residence, ethnicity, and household wealth. Results: There were some improvements in birth registration (86.4% in 2006; 93.8% in 2011, preschool education attendance (57.1% in 2006; 71.9% in 2011, and parental support for early childhood education (68.9 and 76.8%, respectively. However, the possession of books was lower (24.7% in 2006; 19.6% in 2011 and became more unequal over time (i.e. CI=0.370 in 2006; CI=0.443 in 2011 in wealth inequality. Inequalities in the care and education of children were still persistent. The largest inequalities were for household wealth and rural versus urban areas. Conclusion: Although there have been some improvements in this area, inequalities still exist. Policy efforts in Vietnam should be directed towards closing the gap between different socioeconomic groups for the care and education of children under 5 years old.

  10. Indicadores de atenção básica em saúde bucal: associação com as condições socioeconômicas, provisão de serviços, fluoretação de águas e a estratégia de saúde da família no Sul do Brasil Primary dental care indicators: association with socioeconomic status, dental care, water fluoridation and Family Health Program in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Konrad Fischer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados os indicadores de saúde bucal do pacto de atenção básica do SUS (cobertura, razão de exodontias em relação aos procedimentos individuais e cobertura de procedimentos coletivos na população de até 14 anos de idade em municípios do Sul do Brasil (n = 1159 entre 2000 e 2005. Além disso, foram testadas as associações dos indicadores com variáveis socioeconômicas, de provisão de serviços odontológicos, fluoretação de águas e cobertura da saúde bucal na estratégia de saúde da família. Associaram-se positivamente com o aumento da cobertura, o Estado (RS com a menor, população rural, IDH, número de dentistas pela população e cobertura da saúde bucal no PSF. Para razão de exodontias foram associados o Estado (SC e RS maiores, negativamente com população rural, IDH, número de dentistas pela população e cobertura da saúde bucal no PSF e positivamente o índice de Gini. Procedimentos coletivos foram associados negativamente ao índice de Gini, intensidade de indigência e razão do número de dentistas pela população e positivamente com o Estado (menor no RS, população rural, IDH e cobertura da saúde bucal no PSF.This paper analyzed the primary dental care indicators of the Brazilian National Health System (SUS considering coverage of dental care, ratio between dental extraction and dental procedures, and coverage of preventive measures among children up to 14 years-old in the municipalities from the southern region of Brazil (n=1,159 between the years 2000 and 2005. In addition, the association of these indicators with socioeconomic indicators, dental care, water fluoridation and coverage of oral health care by the Family Health Program (FHP was tested. The increase in the coverage of dental care was positively associated with the percentage of rural population, Human Development Index (HDI, number of dentists per capita, and FHP coverage. Dental extraction was negatively associated with

  11. The relationship between general practice characteristics and quality of care: a national survey of quality indicators used in the UK Quality and Outcomes Framework, 2004–5

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    Armstrong David

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The descriptive information now available for primary care in the UK is unique in international terms. Under the 'Quality and Outcomes Framework' (QOF, data for 147 performance indicators are available for each general practice. We aimed to determine the relationship between the quality of primary care, as judged by the total QOF score, social deprivation and practice characteristics. Methods We obtained QOF data for each practice in England and linked these with census derived data (deprivation indices and proportion of patients born in a developing country. Characteristics of practices were also obtained. QOF and census data were available for 8480 practices. Results The median QOF score was 999.7 out of a possible maximum of 1050 points. Three characteristics were independently associated with higher QOF scores: training practices, group practices and practices in less socially deprived areas. In a regression model, these three factors explained 14.6% of the variation in QOF score. Higher list sizes per GP, turnover of registered patients, chronic disease prevalence, proportions of elderly patients or patients born in a developing country did not contribute to lower QOF scores in the final model. Conclusion Socially deprived areas experience a lower quality of primary care, as judged by QOF scores. Social deprivation itself is an independent predictor of lower quality. Training and group practices are independent predictors of higher quality but these types of practices are less well represented in socially deprived areas.

  12. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer treatment: a population-based study of quality-of-care indicators in Italy

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    Sacerdote Carlotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been documented that variations exist in breast cancer treatment despite wide dissemination of clinical practice guidelines. The aim of this population-based study was to evaluate the impact of regional guidelines (Piedmont guidelines, PGL for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment on quality-of-care indicators in the Northwestern Italian region of Piedmont. Methods We included two samples of women aged 50–69 years with incident breast cancer treated in Piedmont before and after the introduction of PGL: 600 in 2002 (pre-PGL and 621 in 2004 (post-PGL. Patients were randomly selected among all incident breast cancer cases identified through the hospital discharge records database. We extracted clinical data on breast cancer cases from medical charts and ascertained vital status through linkage with town offices. We assessed compliance with 14 quality-of-care indicators from PGL recommendations, before and after their introduction in clinical practice. Results Among patients with invasive lesions, 77.1% (N = 368 and 77.5% (N = 383 in the pre-PGL and post-PGL groups, respectively, received breast conservative surgery (BCS as a first-line treatment. Following BCS, 87.7% received radiotherapy in 2002, compared to 87.9% in 2004. Of all patients at medium-to-high risk of distant metastasis, 65.5% (N = 268 and 63.6% (N = 252 received chemotherapy in 2002 and in 2004, respectively. Among the 117 patients with invasive lesions and negative estrogen receptor status in 2002, hormonal therapy was prescribed in 23 of them (19.6%. The incorrect prescription of hormonal therapy decreased to 10.8% (N = 10 among the 92 estrogen receptor-negative patients in 2004 (p Compliance with PGL recommendations was already high in the pre-PGL group, although some quality-of-care indicators did not reach the standard. In the pre/post analysis, 8 out of 14 quality-of-care indicators showed an improvement from 2002 to 2004, but only 4 out of 14

  13. 5 CFR 875.413 - Is it possible to have coverage reinstated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Is it possible to have coverage... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Coverage § 875.413 Is it possible... Carrier will reinstate your coverage if it receives proof satisfactory to it, within 6 months from...

  14. Using the unmet obstetric needs indicator to map inequities in life-saving obstetric interventions at the local health care system in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Dubourg, Dominique; Makokha, Anselimo;

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundDeveloping countries with high maternal mortality need to invest in indicators that not only provide information about how many women are dying, but also where, and what can be done to prevent these deaths. The unmet Obstetric Needs (UONs) concept provides this information. This concept...... was applied at district level in Kenya to assess how many women had UONs and where the women with unmet needs were located.MethodsA facility based retrospective study was conducted in 2010 in Malindi District, Kenya. Data on pregnant women who underwent a major obstetric intervention (MOI) or died...... in facilities that provide comprehensive Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) services in 2008 and 2009 were collected. The difference between the number of women who experienced life threatening obstetric complications and those who received care was quantified. The main outcome measures in the study were...

  15. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov Medicare forms Advance directives & long-term care Electronic prescribing Electronic Health Records (EHRs) Download claims with Medicare’s Blue ... or needed a prescription drug and this created waste and unnecessary additional costs for people with Medicare ...

  16. Indications and expectations for neuropsychological assessment in routine epilepsy care: Report of the ILAE Neuropsychology Task Force, Diagnostic Methods Commission, 2013-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah J; Baxendale, Sallie; Barr, William; Hamed, Sherifa; Langfitt, John; Samson, Séverine; Watanabe, Masako; Baker, Gus A; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Hermann, Bruce P; Smith, Mary-Lou

    2015-05-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Diagnostic Methods Commission charged the Neuropsychology Task Force with the job of developing a set of recommendations to address the following questions: (1) What is the role of a neuropsychological assessment? (2) Who should do a neuropsychological assessment? (3) When should people with epilepsy be referred for a neuropsychological assessment? and (4) What should be expected from a neuropsychological assessment? The recommendations have been broadly written for health care clinicians in established epilepsy settings as well as those setting up new services. They are based on a detailed survey of neuropsychological assessment practices across international epilepsy centers, and formal ranking of specific recommendations for advancing clinical epilepsy care generated by specialist epilepsy neuropsychologists from around the world. They also incorporate the latest research findings to establish minimum standards for training and practice, reflecting the many roles of neuropsychological assessment in the routine care of children and adults with epilepsy. The recommendations endorse routine screening of cognition, mood, and behavior in new-onset epilepsy, and describe the range of situations when more detailed, formal neuropsychological assessment is indicated. They identify a core set of cognitive and psychological domains that should be assessed to provide an objective account of an individual's cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial functioning, including factors likely contributing to deficits identified on qualitative and quantitative examination. The recommendations also endorse routine provision of feedback to patients, families, and clinicians about the implications of the assessment results, including specific clinical recommendations of what can be done to improve a patient's cognitive or psychosocial functioning and alleviate the distress of any difficulties identified. By canvassing the breadth and depth

  17. Socio-economic inequality of immunization coverage in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Jørgen; Pradhan, Jalandhar

    2011-08-05

    To our knowledge, the present study provides a first time assessment of the contributions of socioeconomic determinants of immunization coverage in India using the recent National Family Health Survey data. Measurement of socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care, and understanding the determinants of such inequalities in terms of their contributions, are critical for health intervention strategies and for achieving equity in health care. A decomposition approach is applied to quantify the contributions from socio-demographic factors to inequality in immunization coverage. The results reveal that poor household economic status, mother's illiteracy, per capita state domestic product and proportion of illiterate at the state level is systematically related to 97% of predictable socioeconomic inequalities in full immunization coverage at the national level. These patterns of evidence suggest the need for immunization strategies targeted at different states and towards certain socioeconomic determinants as pointed out above in order to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in immunization coverage.JEL Classification: I10, I12.

  18. Coverage and Connectivity Issue in Wireless Sensor Networks

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    Rachit Trivedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are an emerging area of interest in research and development. It finds use in military surveillance, health care, environmental monitoring, forest fire detection and smart environments. An important research issue in WSNs is the coverage since cost, area and lifetime are directly validated to it.In this paper we present an overview of WSNs and try to refine the coverage and connectivity issues in wireless sensor networks.

  19. Treatment Contact Coverage for Probable Depressive and Probable Alcohol Use Disorders in Four Low- and Middle-Income Country Districts: The PRIME Cross-Sectional Community Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Mary J.; Ssebunnya, Joshua; Breuer, Erica; Murhar, Vaibhav; Luitel, Nagendra P.; Medhin, Girmay; Kigozi, Fred; Shidhaye, Rahul; Fekadu, Abebaw; Jordans, Mark; Patel, Vikram; Tomlinson, Mark; Lund, Crick

    2016-01-01

    Context A robust evidence base is now emerging that indicates that treatment for depression and alcohol use disorders (AUD) delivered in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) can be effective. However, the coverage of services for these conditions in most LMIC settings remains unknown. Objective To describe the methods of a repeat cross-sectional survey to determine changes in treatment contact coverage for probable depression and for probable AUD in four LMIC districts, and to present the baseline findings regarding treatment contact coverage. Methods Population-based cross-sectional surveys with structured questionnaires, which included validated screening tools to identify probable cases. We defined contact coverage as being the proportion of cases who sought professional help in the past 12 months. Setting Sodo District, Ethiopia; Sehore District, India; Chitwan District, Nepal; and Kamuli District, Uganda Participants 8036 adults residing in these districts between May 2013 and May 2014 Main Outcome Measures Treatment contact coverage was defined as having sought care from a specialist, generalist, or other health care provider for symptoms related to depression or AUD. Results The proportion of adults who screened positive for depression over the past 12 months ranged from 11.2% in Nepal to 29.7% in India and treatment contact coverage over the past 12 months ranged between 8.1% in Nepal to 23.5% in India. In Ethiopia, lifetime contact coverage for probable depression was 23.7%. The proportion of adults who screened positive for AUD over the past 12 months ranged from 1.7% in Uganda to 13.9% in Ethiopia and treatment contact coverage over the past 12 months ranged from 2.8% in India to 5.1% in Nepal. In Ethiopia, lifetime contact coverage for probable AUD was 13.1%. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with and contribute to the limited evidence base which indicates low treatment contact coverage for depression and for AUD in LMIC. The planned follow up

  20. Modelling the implications of moving towards universal coverage in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Josephine; Mtei, Gemini; Ally, Mariam

    2012-03-01

    A model was developed to assess the impact of possible moves towards universal coverage in Tanzania over a 15-year time frame. Three scenarios were considered: maintaining the current situation ('the status quo'); expanded health insurance coverage (the estimated maximum achievable coverage in the absence of premium subsidies, coverage restricted to those who can pay); universal coverage to all (government revenues used to pay the premiums for the poor). The model estimated the costs of delivering public health services and all health services to the population as a proportion of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and forecast revenue from user fees and insurance premiums. Under the status quo, financial protection is provided to 10% of the population through health insurance schemes, with the remaining population benefiting from subsidized user charges in public facilities. Seventy-six per cent of the population would benefit from financial protection through health insurance under the expanded coverage scenario, and 100% of the population would receive such protection through a mix of insurance cover and government funding under the universal coverage scenario. The expanded and universal coverage scenarios have a significant effect on utilization levels, especially for public outpatient care. Universal coverage would require an initial doubling in the proportion of GDP going to the public health system. Government health expenditure would increase to 18% of total government expenditure. The results are sensitive to the cost of health system strengthening, the level of real GDP growth, provider reimbursement rates and administrative costs. Promoting greater cross-subsidization between insurance schemes would provide sufficient resources to finance universal coverage. Alternately, greater tax funding for health could be generated through an increase in the rate of Value-Added Tax (VAT) or expanding the income tax base. The feasibility and sustainability of efforts to

  1. Press Coverage and Political Accountability

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, James; Strömberg, David

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the impact of press coverage on citizen knowledge, politicians' actions, and policy. We find that a poor fit between newspaper markets and political districts reduces press coverage of politics. We use variation in this fit due to redistricting to identify the effects of reduced coverage. Exploring the links in the causal chain of media effects -- voter information, politicians' actions and policy -- we find statistically significant and substantively important effec...

  2. TRAVERSAL ALGORITHM FOR COMPLETE COVERAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coimbatore Ganeshsankar Balaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many applications which require complete coverage and obstacle avoidance. The classical A* algorithm provides the user a shortest path by avoiding the obstacle. As well, the Dijkstra’s algorithm finds the shortest path between the source and destination. But in many applications we require complete coverage of the proposed area with obstacle avoidance. There are LSP, LSSP, BSA, spiral-STC and Complete Coverage D* algorithms which do not realize complete (100% coverage. The complete coverage using a critical point algorithm assures complete coverage, but it is not well suited for applications like mine detection. Also for covering the missed region it keeps the obstacle as a critical point which is not advisable in critical applications where obstacle may be a dangerous one. To overcome this and to achieve the complete coverage we propose a novel graph traversal algorithm Traversal Algorithm for Complete Coverage (TRACC. Here the area to be scanned is decomposed into a finite number of cells. The traversal is done through all the cells after making sure the next cell has no obstacle. TRACC assures thorough coverage of the proposed area and ensuring that all the obstacles are avoided. Hence the TRACC always have the safer path while covering the entire area. It also reports the obstacle placed or blocked cell.

  3. Dinâmica da composição e cobertura de espécies de macrófitas aquáticas e a escolha de indicadores de impacto ambiental em um rio com ecoturismo Composition and coverage dynamics of aquatic macrophytes species and the choose of environmental impact indicators in a river with ecotourism tour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio dos Santos Junior

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ResumoEstudos sobre ecologia de macrófitas aquáticas em ambiente natural no Brasil são relativamente escassos. Anualmente, um grande número de turistas é recebido para a prática da flutuação nas águas do rio Sucuri, Bonito, Estado de Mato Grosso do Sul. Os objetivos deste estudo foram: (1 descrever a composição e a cobertura relativa das espécies de macrófitas aquáticas no Rio Sucuri, (2 investigar o padrão de desbaste das macrófitas aquáticas no decorrer do ano e (3 eleger espécies com potencial de serem indicadoras de impacto ambiental da atividade turística. Foi empregado o método do intercepto em linha modificado para amostrar a composição e cobertura relativa das espécies de macrófitas aquáticas. Foram identificadas dezessete espécies macrófitas aquáticas. Durante o estudo foram observadas variações na composição e cobertura relativa das espécies de macrófitas aquáticas. Gomphrena elegans Mart. foi a espécie dominante em termos de cobertura relativa. Duas espécies apresentaram as características consideradas importantes para a indicação de impactos da atividade turística, considerando os resultados de cobertura relativa, frequência e desbaste: Nymphaea gardneriana Planch. e Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell. Verdc. Assim, é sugerido que o monitoramento dos impactos do turismo sobre as macrófitas seja realizado na sua organização biológica populacional.AbstractEcologic studies around aquatic macrophytes in natural environment in Brazil are relatively scarce. Annually, many tourists have been received for floating practice on Sucuri river, in Bonito, Mato Grosso do Sul state. The aims of this research were: (1 describing the composition and the relative coverage of aquatic macrophytes in Sucuri river, (2 investigating the pattern of thinning of aquatic macrophytes during the year, and (3 electing species, such as indicators of environmental impact done by tourism. Intercept line method modified was

  4. No significant improvement of cardiovascular disease risk indicators by a lifestyle intervention in people with Familial Hypercholesterolemia compared to usual care: results of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broekhuizen Karen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH may benefit from lifestyle changes supporting their primary treatment of dyslipidaemia. This project evaluated the efficacy of an individualised tailored lifestyle intervention on lipids (low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, total cholesterol (TC and triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, glucose, body mass index (BMI and waist circumference in people with FH. Methods Adults with FH (n = 340, recruited from a Dutch cascade screening program, were randomly assigned to either a control group or an intervention group. The personalised intervention consisted of web-based tailored lifestyle advice and personal counselling. The control group received care as usual. Lipids, systolic blood pressure, glucose, BMI, and waist circumference were measured at baseline and after 12 months. Regression analyses were conducted to examine differences between both groups. Results After 12 months, no significant between-group differences of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk indicators were observed. LDL-C levels had decreased in both the intervention and control group. This difference between intervention and control group was not statistically significant. Conclusions This project suggests that an individually tailored lifestyle intervention did not have an additional effect in improving CVD risk indicators among people with FH. The cumulative effect of many small improvements in all indicators on long term CVD risk remains to be assessed in future studies. Trial registration NTR1899 at ww.trialregister.nl

  5. Medicare Coverage: You Cannot Play the Game If You Do Not Know the Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaum, Kathleen Dianne

    2013-12-01

    WOUND CARE STAKEHOLDERS SHOULD REMEMBER THAT MEDICARE REIMBURSEMENT REQUIRES THREE PARTS: a relevant code, a published Medicare payment rate, and positive coverage or coverage based upon medical necessity. Qualified healthcare professionals, scientists, and manufacturers should establish a monthly routine, where they personally review revisions to pertinent National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs). These documents provide specific guidelines for positive coverage by the specific Medicare Administrative Contractor that processes the Medicare claims in a specific jurisdiction. When given an opportunity to provide comments on draft coverage determinations, wound care stakeholders should take advantage of the opportunity of educating the contractor medical director. After a LCD has become active, wound care stakeholders can and should request revisions, through the LCD Reconsideration Process, when new clinical evidence becomes available.

  6. Mediating Trust in Terrorism Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    crisis. While the framework is presented in the context of television coverage of a terror-related crisis situation, it can equally be used in connection with all other forms of mediated trust. Key words: National crisis, risk communication, crisis management, television coverage, mediated trust....

  7. Clinical course, characteristics and prognostic indicators in patients presenting with back and leg pain in primary care. The ATLAS study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinou Kika

    2012-01-01

    assessment, together with qualitative enquiries, to describe the course, health care usage, patients' experiences and prognostic indicators in an adult population presenting in primary care with LBP and leg pain with or without nerve root involvement.

  8. Cross-cultural adaptation and reliability testing of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator for optimizing care of Polish patients with frailty syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchmanowicz I

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Izabella Uchmanowicz,1 Beata Jankowska-Polańska,1 Maria Łoboz-Rudnicka,2 Stanislaw Manulik,3 Krystyna Łoboz-Grudzień,1,2 Robbert JJ Gobbens4 1Department of Clinical Nursing, Wroclaw Medical University, 2Department of Cardiology, T Marciniak Memorial Hospital, 3Primary Care Practice, Wroclaw, Poland; 4Research and Development Center Innovations in Care, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Background: Frail older people are at high risk of developing adverse outcomes, such as disability, mortality, hospitalization, and institutionalization. Previous research suggests that the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring frailty. The aim of this study was to adapt and to test the reliability of the Polish version of the TFI. Method: A standard guideline was used for translation and cultural adaptation of the English version of the TFI into Polish. The study included 100 Polish patients (mean age 68.2±6.5 years, among them 42 men and 58 women. Cronbach’s alpha was used for analysis of the internal consistency of the TFI. Results: The mean total TFI score was 6.7±3.1. Forty patients scored ≥5, which corresponded to being frail. Cronbach’s alpha reliability coefficients of the instrument ranged from 0.68 to 0.72 and item-total correlation ranged from 0.12 to 0.52. Conclusion: The TFI is valid and reproducible for assessment of frailty syndrome among a Polish population. The Polish adaptation of the TFI proved a useful and fast tool for assessing frailty. Keywords: internal consistency, validity, older individuals, aging

  9. Financing Universal Coverage in Malaysia: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges to maintain an agenda for universal coverage and equitable health system is to develop effective structuring and management of health financing. Global experiences with different systems of health financing suggests that a strong public role in health financing is essential for health systems to protect the poor and health systems with the strongest state role are likely the more equitable and achieve better aggregate health outcomes. Using Malaysia as a case study, this paper seeks to evaluate the progress and capacity of a middle income country in terms of health financing for universal coverage, and also to highlight some of the key underlying health systems challenges. The WHO Health Financing Strategy for the Asia Pacific Region (2010-2015) was used as the framework to evaluate the Malaysian healthcare financing system in terms of the provision of universal coverage for the population, and the Malaysian National Health Accounts (2008) provided the latest Malaysian data on health spending. Measuring against the four target indicators outlined, Malaysia fared credibly with total health expenditure close to 5% of its GDP (4.75%), out-of-pocket payment below 40% of total health expenditure (30.7%), comprehensive social safety nets for vulnerable populations, and a tax-based financing system that fundamentally poses as a national risk-pooled scheme for the population. Nonetheless, within a holistic systems framework, the financing component interacts synergistically with other health system spheres. In Malaysia, outmigration of public health workers particularly specialist doctors remains an issue and financing strategies critically needs to incorporate a comprehensive workforce compensation strategy to improve the health workforce skill mix. Health expenditure information is systematically collated, but feedback from the private sector remains a challenge. Service delivery-wise, there is a need to enhance financing capacity to expand

  10. Financing universal coverage in Malaysia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Hong Teck; Cheah, Julius Chee Ho

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges to maintain an agenda for universal coverage and equitable health system is to develop effective structuring and management of health financing. Global experiences with different systems of health financing suggests that a strong public role in health financing is essential for health systems to protect the poor and health systems with the strongest state role are likely the more equitable and achieve better aggregate health outcomes. Using Malaysia as a case study, this paper seeks to evaluate the progress and capacity of a middle income country in terms of health financing for universal coverage, and also to highlight some of the key underlying health systems challenges.The WHO Health Financing Strategy for the Asia Pacific Region (2010-2015) was used as the framework to evaluate the Malaysian healthcare financing system in terms of the provision of universal coverage for the population, and the Malaysian National Health Accounts (2008) provided the latest Malaysian data on health spending. Measuring against the four target indicators outlined, Malaysia fared credibly with total health expenditure close to 5% of its GDP (4.75%), out-of-pocket payment below 40% of total health expenditure (30.7%), comprehensive social safety nets for vulnerable populations, and a tax-based financing system that fundamentally poses as a national risk-pooled scheme for the population.Nonetheless, within a holistic systems framework, the financing component interacts synergistically with other health system spheres. In Malaysia, outmigration of public health workers particularly specialist doctors remains an issue and financing strategies critically needs to incorporate a comprehensive workforce compensation strategy to improve the health workforce skill mix. Health expenditure information is systematically collated, but feedback from the private sector remains a challenge. Service delivery-wise, there is a need to enhance financing capacity to expand preventive

  11. Financing universal coverage in Malaysia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Hong Teck; Cheah, Julius Chee Ho

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges to maintain an agenda for universal coverage and equitable health system is to develop effective structuring and management of health financing. Global experiences with different systems of health financing suggests that a strong public role in health financing is essential for health systems to protect the poor and health systems with the strongest state role are likely the more equitable and achieve better aggregate health outcomes. Using Malaysia as a case study, this paper seeks to evaluate the progress and capacity of a middle income country in terms of health financing for universal coverage, and also to highlight some of the key underlying health systems challenges.The WHO Health Financing Strategy for the Asia Pacific Region (2010-2015) was used as the framework to evaluate the Malaysian healthcare financing system in terms of the provision of universal coverage for the population, and the Malaysian National Health Accounts (2008) provided the latest Malaysian data on health spending. Measuring against the four target indicators outlined, Malaysia fared credibly with total health expenditure close to 5% of its GDP (4.75%), out-of-pocket payment below 40% of total health expenditure (30.7%), comprehensive social safety nets for vulnerable populations, and a tax-based financing system that fundamentally poses as a national risk-pooled scheme for the population.Nonetheless, within a holistic systems framework, the financing component interacts synergistically with other health system spheres. In Malaysia, outmigration of public health workers particularly specialist doctors remains an issue and financing strategies critically needs to incorporate a comprehensive workforce compensation strategy to improve the health workforce skill mix. Health expenditure information is systematically collated, but feedback from the private sector remains a challenge. Service delivery-wise, there is a need to enhance financing capacity to expand preventive

  12. Community-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... respite care, transportation, medication coverage, rehabilitation (including maintenance physical and occupational therapy ), hearing aids, eyeglasses, and a variety of other benefits. The program also has the flexibility to pay ...

  13. Sehgal index: A new index and its comparison with other complete blood count-based indices for screening of beta thalassemia trait in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Sehgal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Beta thalassemia trait (BTT must be differentiated from iron deficiency anemia to avoid unnecessary iron therapy and for the prevention of thalassemia major by genetic counseling. In a tertiary care hospital, it is vital that the screening tool is not only sensitive but also specific so as to be cost effective and save time. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the new Sehgal index and compare it to existing complete blood count-based indices for the best combination of sensitivity and specificity to predict BTT. Materials and Methods: Study was done in 2 phases - Phase 1: A retrospective analysis of 1022 consecutive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC cases from July 2008 to June 2011. Phase 2: A prospective analysis of 973 consecutive HPLC cases from July 1, 2011 to June 10, 2013 was done to confirm the results of Phase 1 and the applicability of the new Sehgal index. Results: Prevalence of BTT was 28.8% (294/1022 and 25.39% (247/973 in Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic-area under the curve and Youden index was highest for new Sehgal index, followed by Mentzers index <14. The prospective study shows results similar to those in Phase 1 confirming the superiority of the above two indices. Conclusion: Sehgal index and Mentzers index <14 showed the best combination of sensitivity and specificity in predicting BTT. The best indices or combination can be used as a "validated flag rule" in the analyzer middleware program in a hospital for identifying suspected cases of BTT.

  14. Flood Insurance Coverage in the Coastal Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, Craig E.; Jahan-Parvar, Mohammad R.

    2008-01-01

    We explore behavior and test theory regarding the determinants of flood insurance coverage in the coastal zone using household-level data for nine southeastern counties. We use Tobit regression models to assess the importance and magnitude of insurance cost, risk factors, community characteristics, and household attributes on flood insurance purchase for residential building structures. Overall estimates indicate price inelastic demand, though subsidized policyholders are more sensitive to ...

  15. Socio-economic inequality in oral healthcare coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinpoor, A R; Itani, L; Petersen, P E

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess socio-economic inequality in oral healthcare coverage among adults with expressed need living in 52 countries. Data on 60,332 adults aged 18 years or older were analyzed from 52 countries participating in the 2002-2004 World Health Survey. Oral healthcare...... coverage was defined as the proportion of individuals who received any medical care from a dentist or other oral health specialist during a period of 12 months prior to the survey, among those who expressed any mouth and/or teeth problems during that period. In addition to assessment of the coverage across...... wealth quintiles in each country, a wealth-based relative index of inequality was used to measure socio-economic inequality. The index was adjusted for sex, age, marital status, education, employment, overall health status, and urban/rural residence. Pro-rich inequality in oral healthcare coverage...

  16. Computer copings for partial coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissen, H; van der Zel, J; Reisig, J; Vlaar, S; de Ruiter, W; van Waas, R

    1999-04-01

    Partial coverage posterior tooth preparations are very complex surfaces for computer surface digitization, computer design, and manufacture of ceramic copings. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether the Computer Integrated Crown Reconstruction (Cicero) system was compatible with a proposed partial coverage preparation design and capable of producing ceramic copings. Posterior teeth were prepared for partial coverage copings with deep gingival chamfers in the proximal boxes and around the functional cusps (buccal of mandibular and lingual of maxillary posterior teeth). The nonfunctional cusps (lingual of mandibular and buccal of maxillary posterior teeth) were prepared with broad bevels following the inclined occlusal plane pattern. Optical impressions were taken of stone dies by means of a fast laser-line scanning method that measured the three-dimensional geometry of the partial coverage preparation. Computers digitized the images, and designed and produced the ceramic copings. The Cicero system digitized the partial coverage preparation surfaces precisely with a minor coefficient of variance of 0.2%. The accuracy of the surface digitization, the design, and the computer aided milling showed that the system was capable of producing partial coverage copings with a mean marginal gap of 74 microns. This value was obtained before optimizing the marginal fit by means of porcelain veneering. In summary, Cicero computer technology, i.e., surface digitization, coping design, and manufacture, was compatible with the described partial coverage preparations for posterior teeth. PMID:11351490

  17. Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James; Buchan, James; Cometto, Giorgio; David, Benedict; Dussault, Gilles; Fogstad, Helga; Fronteira, Inês; Lozano, Rafael; Nyonator, Frank; Pablos-Méndez, Ariel; Quain, Estelle E; Starrs, Ann; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2013-11-01

    Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) involves distributing resources, especially human resources for health (HRH), to match population needs. This paper explores the policy lessons on HRH from four countries that have achieved sustained improvements in UHC: Brazil, Ghana, Mexico and Thailand. Its purpose is to inform global policy and financial commitments on HRH in support of UHC. The paper reports on country experiences using an analytical framework that examines effective coverage in relation to the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality (AAAQ) of HRH. The AAAQ dimensions make it possible to perform tracing analysis on HRH policy actions since 1990 in the four countries of interest in relation to national trends in workforce numbers and population mortality rates. The findings inform key principles for evidence-based decision-making on HRH in support of UHC. First, HRH are critical to the expansion of health service coverage and the package of benefits; second, HRH strategies in each of the AAAQ dimensions collectively support achievements in effective coverage; and third, success is achieved through partnerships involving health and non-health actors. Facing the unprecedented health and development challenges that affect all countries and transforming HRH evidence into policy and practice must be at the heart of UHC and the post-2015 development agenda. It is a political imperative requiring national commitment and leadership to maximize the impact of available financial and human resources, and improve healthy life expectancy, with the recognition that improvements in health care are enabled by a health workforce that is fit for purpose.

  18. An equitable way to pay for universal coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasell, E

    1999-01-01

    This article describes a way to finance universal health care coverage that preserves much of the current financing system and replaces funds obtained from regressive sources with revenue from more progressive ones. New funding would be needed for 24 percent of health expenditures and would be raised through an increase in the federal personal income tax. Premiums are eliminated since their cost is the same to everyone regardless of income. Cost sharing and out-of-pocket spending for medically necessary services are also abolished. In a more equitably financed system, employers would pay a new payroll tax that raised the same amount of money they currently spend for employee health insurance premiums; this would require a payroll tax of about 7 percent. Revenue from an increase in federal personal income taxes would replace household out-of-pocket expenditures for medically necessary services and payments for insurance premiums. For the average, middle-income family, the tax increase would total $731 in 1998. In exchange for the tax increase, no American or American employer would need to buy health insurance or face out-of-pocket charges for any medically indicated health care.

  19. Expanding the universe of universal coverage: the population health argument for increasing coverage for immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Arijit; Loue, Sana; Galea, Sandro

    2009-12-01

    As the US recession deepens, furthering the debate about healthcare reform is now even more important than ever. Few plans aimed at facilitating universal coverage make any mention of increasing access for uninsured non-citizens living in the US, many of whom are legally restricted from certain types of coverage. We conducted a critical review of the public health literature concerning the health status and access to health services among immigrant populations in the US. Using examples from infectious and chronic disease epidemiology, we argue that access to health services is at the intersection of the health of uninsured immigrants and the general population and that extending access to healthcare to all residents of the US, including undocumented immigrants, is beneficial from a population health perspective. Furthermore, from a health economics perspective, increasing access to care for immigrant populations may actually reduce net costs by increasing primary prevention and reducing the emphasis on emergency care for preventable conditions. It is unlikely that proposals for universal coverage will accomplish their objectives of improving population health and reducing social disparities in health if they do not address the substantial proportion of uninsured non-citizens living in the US.

  20. 42 CFR 409.20 - Coverage of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a Medicare+Choice (M+C) organization, that includes the benefits described in § 422.101(c) of this... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.20 Coverage of services. (a) Included...

  1. An employer's experience with infertility coverage: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Kaylen; Meletiche, Dennis; Del Rosario, Gina

    2009-12-01

    A case study of Southwest Airlines, a Fortune 500 company, demonstrates that a well-designed infertility coverage plan can control resource use. This successful model could be used by employers who wish to ensure that their employees have access to high-quality, cost-effective infertility services in a managed-care environment. PMID:19631318

  2. Coverage, access, and affordability under health reform: learning from the Massachusetts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sharon K; Stockley, Karen; Nordahl, Kate Willrich

    While the impacts of the Affordable Care Act will vary across the states given their different circumstances, Massachusetts' 2006 reform initiative, the template for national reform, provides a preview of the potential gains in insurance coverage, access to and use of care, and health care affordability for the rest of the nation. Under reform, uninsurance in Massachusetts dropped by more than 50%, due, in part, to an increase in employer-sponsored coverage. Gains in health care access and affordability were widespread, including a 28% decline in unmet need for doctor care and a 38% decline in high out-of-pocket costs.

  3. Young Adult Insurance Coverage And Out-Of-Pocket Spending: Long-Term Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Marc L; Fang, Zhengyi

    2016-04-01

    The Affordable Care Act appears to have improved health insurance coverage for young adults (ages 18-30). But data from twenty national surveys conducted between 1977 and 2013 paint a more complex picture, showing coverage rates lower in 2013 than they were thirty-six years earlier. Racial and ethnic disparities in coverage have declined recently, while out-of-pocket expenditures remain low for most young adults. PMID:27008855

  4. Viewing the Kenyan health system through an equity lens: implications for universal coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Chuma Jane; Okungu Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Equity and universal coverage currently dominate policy debates worldwide. Health financing approaches are central to universal coverage. The way funds are collected, pooled, and used to purchase or provide services should be carefully considered to ensure that population needs are addressed under a universal health system. The aim of this paper is to assess the extent to which the Kenyan health financing system meets the key requirements for universal coverage, includin...

  5. Location Refinement and Power Coverage Analysis Based on Distributed Antenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓楠; 侯春萍; 汪清; 陈华; 浦亮洲

    2016-01-01

    To establish wireless channel suitable for the cabin environment, the power coverage was investigated with distributed antenna system and centralized antenna system based on the actual measurement of channel im-pulse response. The results indicated that the distributed antenna system has more uniform power coverage than the centralized antenna system. The average relative errors of receiving power of both antennas were calculated. The optimal position of the centralized antenna was obtained by Gaussian function refinement, making the system achieve a better transmission power with the same coverage effect, and providing a reference for antenna location in the future real communication in the cabin.

  6. 76 FR 46621 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Coverage of Preventive Services Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... from the Department of Labor concerning employment-based health coverage laws may call the EBSA Toll..., while the law requiring coverage of recommended women's preventive health services was enacted on March... Protection and Affordable Care Act, Public Law 111-148, was enacted on March 23, 2010; the Health Care...

  7. Cribado de retinopatía diabética mediante retinografía midriática en atención primaria Coverage and results of a screening program for diabetic retinopathy using mydriatic retinography in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vargas-Sánchez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Conocer la cobertura de un programa de cribado de retinopatía diabética en atención primaria y la concordancia entre médicos de familia (MF y oftalmólogos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio observacional transversal. Revisión de retinografías midriáticas de pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (2007-2008 solicitadas por MF de tres centros de salud urbanos en Jaén,España. RESULTADOS: En total 296 retinografías (2007 y 380 (2008 (cobertura=26%±2.4.Retinografías patológicas: 181 MF (27%±1.3 y 59 (9%±0.3 oftalmólogos. Concordancia global moderada (kappa=0.408±0.039, que mejora del primer al segundo año (0.34 y 0.45; pOBJECTIVE: To identify the coverage of a diabetic retinopathy screening program in primary health care and to assess agreement between ophthalmologists and family physicians (FP regarding retinography evaluations of diabetic patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional observational study,with a review of diabetic patients' mydriatic retinographies (2007-2008 from three urban primary health centers (PHC(Jaén-Spain. RESULTS: A total of 296 retinographies in 2007 and 380 in 2008 (coverage=26%±2,4 were reviewed. Pathological retinographies were identified by 181 FPs (27%±1,3 and 59 (9%±0,3 ophthalmologists.Total agreement was moderate (kappa=0,408±0,039.Agreement was better in the latter year (0,45 vs 0,34; p<0,001 test χ2. FP evaluations showed 97% sensitivity,80% specificity,33% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, 4, 88 positive likelihood ratio and 0,04 negative likelihood ratio. We find variability in coverage and agreement between PHC. CONCLUSIONS: Mydriatic retinographies performed and evaluated by FPs are useful to retinopathy screening of diabetic patients. Coverage, predictive values and likelihood ratio were better in the latter year, although the interpretation should be homogenized.

  8. Politics and Universal Health Coverage--The Post-2015 Global Health Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vin; Kerry, Vanessa B; Goosby, Eric; Yates, Robert

    2015-09-24

    What political, social, and economic factors allow a movement toward universal health coverage to take hold in some low- and middle-income countries? Can we use that knowledge to help other such countries achieve health care for all?

  9. Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis vaccination coverage before, during, and after pregnancy - 16 States and New York City, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Indu B; Ding, Helen; D'Angelo, Denise; Shealy, Kristen H; Singleton, James A; Liang, Jennifer; Rosenberg, Kenneth D

    2015-05-22

    In June 2011, the Advisory Committee on Immunizations Practices (ACIP) recommended 1 dose of a tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine during pregnancy for women who had not received Tdap previously. Before 2011, Tdap was recommended for unvaccinated women either before pregnancy or postpartum. In October 2012, ACIP expanded the 2011 recommendation, advising pregnant women to be vaccinated with Tdap during each pregnancy to provide maternal antibodies for each infant. The optimal time for vaccination is at 27-36 weeks' gestation as recommended by ACIP. In response to ACIP's Tdap recommendation for pregnant women in 2011, CDC added a supplemental question to the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) survey to determine women's Tdap vaccination status before, during, or after their most recent delivery. This report describes overall and state-specific Tdap vaccination coverage around the time of pregnancy using data from 6,852 sampled women who delivered a live-born infant during September-December 2011 in one of 16 states or New York City (NYC). Among the 17 jurisdictions, the median percentage of women with live births who reported any Tdap vaccination was 55.7%, ranging from 38.2% in NYC to 76.6% in Nebraska. The median percentage who received Tdap before pregnancy was 13.9% (range = 7.7%-20.1%), during pregnancy was 9.8% (range = 3.8%-14.2%), and after delivery was 30.9% (range = 13.6%-46.5%). The PRAMS data indicate a wide variation in Tdap vaccination coverage among demographic groups, with generally higher postpartum coverage for non-Hispanic white women, those who started prenatal care in the first trimester, and those who had private health insurance coverage. This information can be used for promoting evidence-based strategies to communicate the importance of ACIP guidelines related to Tdap vaccination coverage to women and their prenatal care providers.

  10. Coverage Related Issues in Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dossena, Marida

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks consisting of great number of cheap and tiny sensor nodes which are used for military environment controlling, natural events recording, traffic monitoring, robot navigation, and etc. Such a networks encounter with various types of challenges like energy consumption, routing, coverage, reliability. The most significant types of these problems are coverage that originated from the nodes energy consumption constrained. In order to dominate this problem different kinds of methods has been presented where the majority of them based on theoretical methods and used unbalanced and calculated distributions. In all of the proposed methods a large numbers of nodes are used. In this paper our attempt is based on using a few numbers of sensors in order to cover the vast area of environment. We proposed an algorithm that divides the desired environment to several areas and in each of these areas by using the genetic algorithm improve the coverage. The proposed method is simulated in MATLAB softwar...

  11. Mediating Trust in Terrorism Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    crisis. While the framework is presented in the context of television coverage of a terror-related crisis situation, it can equally be used in connection with all other forms of mediated trust. Key words: National crisis, risk communication, crisis management, television coverage, mediated trust.......Mass mediated risk communication can contribute to perceptions of threats and fear of “others” and/or to perceptions of trust in fellow citizens and society to overcome problems. This paper outlines a cross-disciplinary holistic framework for research in mediated trust building during an acute...

  12. Estudo das condições de saúde das crianças do Município de São Paulo (Brasil, 1984/1985: IX - Cobertura e qualidade da assistência materno-infantil A study of children's health in S. Paulo city (Brazil, 1984/1985: IX - Coverage and quality of maternal and child care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Monteiro

    1988-06-01

    características relacionadas à qualidade da assistência, sendo imprescindível, sobretudo nos estratos populacionais de pior nível sócio-econômico, elevar a cobertura da assistência pré-natal precoce e a cobertura de puericultura após o primeiro ano de vida. Um item especialmente preocupante relacionado à assistência ao parto foi a alta incidência de cesareanas, uma das maiores já registrada em uma população.A survey of 1,016 randomly selected children under five years of age was carried out in S. Paulo city, Brazil, with a view to studying the epidemiology of health conditions. The quality and the coverage of maternal and child care were observed. Both characteristics were estimated by means of domiciliary interviews. The prenatal care coverage was 92.9%. In 70% of the cases prenatal care started in the first quarter of pregnancy and the number of visits was 6 or more. Ninety-nine percent of the children were born in hospitals and in 47.1% of the cases caesarean section was mentioned. Ninety-eight percent of the children went, at least once, to well-baby clinics, about two thirds of them during the first two months of life. With regard to the activities provided by those clinics, a great concentration of visits in the first year of life (averaging 7.7 visits per child was observed as well as a high percentage of immunized children (Sabin 86.7%, DPT 85.1%, BCG 89.0%, Measles 85.9%, a striking decrease of visits after 12 months of age and a very small proportion of children attended by an odontology specialist (19.5%. Considering the global coverage of maternal and infant care, minimal differences were observed between socioeconomic strata. Nevertheless the differences were impressive when qualitative aspects of the care were taken into account. Compared with other surveys made in Brazil, the present one shows that the situation of S. Paulo city is better than that of other urban areas of the country. It was also observed that there has been an increase in

  13. TEST COVERAGE ANALYSIS BASED ON PROGRAM SLICING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhenqiang; Xu Baowen; Guanjie

    2003-01-01

    Coverage analysis is a structural testing technique that helps to eliminate gaps in atest suite and determines when to stop testing. To compute test coverage, this letter proposes anew concept coverage about variables, based on program slicing. By adding powers accordingto their importance, the users can focus on the important variables to obtain higher test coverage.The letter presents methods to compute basic coverage based on program structure graphs. Inmost cases, the coverage obtained in the letter is bigger than that obtained by a traditionalmeasure, because the coverage about a variable takes only the related codes into account.

  14. Is expanding Medicare coverage cost-effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muennig Peter

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proposals to expand Medicare coverage tend to be expensive, but the value of services purchased is not known. This study evaluates the efficiency of the average private supplemental insurance plan for Medicare recipients. Methods Data from the National Health Interview Survey, the National Death Index, and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were analyzed to estimate the costs, changes in life expectancy, and health-related quality of life gains associated with providing private supplemental insurance coverage for Medicare beneficiaries. Model inputs included socio-demographic, health, and health behavior characteristics. Parameter estimates from regression models were used to predict quality-adjusted life years (QALYs and costs associated with private supplemental insurance relative to Medicare only. Markov decision analysis modeling was then employed to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results Medicare supplemental insurance is associated with increased health care utilization, but the additional costs associated with this utilization are offset by gains in quality-adjusted life expectancy. The incremental cost-effectiveness of private supplemental insurance is approximately $24,000 per QALY gained relative to Medicare alone. Conclusion Supplemental insurance for Medicare beneficiaries is a good value, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio comparable to medical interventions commonly deemed worthwhile.

  15. Public health challenges for universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Radha Madhab

    2014-01-01

    The effective functioning of any health system requires an efficient public health service. Every human being has the right to enjoy "the highest attainable standard of health," which can be fulfilled by giving every man an affordable and equitable health system he deserves and demands. In these years, complex health changes have complicated the situation in India. Most important gaps in the health care include an understanding of the burden of the disease and what leads to and causes ill health, the availability and use of appropriate technology in the management of disease, ill health and health systems that have an impact on service delivery. Universal Health Coverage (UHC) has the potential to increase economic growth, improve educational opportunities, reduce impoverishment and inequalities, and foster social cohesion. Steps taken for achieving UHC will address the public health challenges and vice versa. PMID:25116820

  16. Coverage of cervical cancer screening in Catalonia for the period 2008-2011 among immigrants and Spanish-born women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa eRodriguez-Sales

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Public Health system in Catalonia, Spain provides a free of charge opportunistic cervical cancer screening. In June 2006 a revised recommendations for cervical cancer screening was introduced to increase coverage and to promote a three-year interval between screening tests. Aim: This study examines cervical cancer screening coverage and prevalence of cytology abnormalities in Catalonia by immigration status.Methods: The study analyses the cytologies registered among women aged 25-65 that have been attended at the Primary Health Centers (PHC for any reason (n=1,242,105 during 2008-11. Coverage was estimated from Governmental data base Information System Primary Care (SISAP that includes 77% of PHC. The database is anonymous, and includes information on age, country of birth, diagnostic center and cytology results Results: During the period 2008-2011, 758,690 smears were performed in a total of 595,868 women over 14 years, of whom 18.3% were immigrants. Cytology coverage was higher among immigrant women compared to Spanish born (51.2% and 39% respectively. Immigrant women also had a higher prevalence of abnormal Paps compared to the Spanish population, 4.9% and 3.3% respectively.Conclusion: Immigrant women in Catalonia have a good access to the Public Health Services and to cervical cancer screening facilities. The higher prevalence of abnormal cytologies in immigrant women compared to native women indicates the relevance to prioritize cervical cancer screening activities on a regular base in new comers.

  17. The development of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC: a measure of best practice for facilities for people with longer term mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Ellen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the progress over recent decades in developing community mental health services internationally, many people still receive treatment and care in institutional settings. Those most likely to reside longest in these facilities have the most complex mental health problems and are at most risk of potential abuses of care and exploitation. This study aimed to develop an international, standardised toolkit to assess the quality of care in longer term hospital and community based mental health units, including the degree to which human rights, social inclusion and autonomy are promoted. Method The domains of care included in the toolkit were identified from a systematic literature review, international expert Delphi exercise, and review of care standards in ten European countries. The draft toolkit comprised 154 questions for unit managers. Inter-rater reliability was tested in 202 units across ten countries at different stages of deinstitutionalisation and development of community mental health services. Exploratory factor analysis was used to corroborate the allocation of items to domains. Feedback from those using the toolkit was collected about its usefulness and ease of completion. Results The toolkit had excellent inter-rater reliability and few items with narrow spread of response. Unit managers found the content highly relevant and were able to complete it in around 90 minutes. Minimal refinement was required and the final version comprised 145 questions assessing seven domains of care. Conclusions Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative evidence directed the development of a robust and comprehensive international quality assessment toolkit for units in highly variable socioeconomic and political contexts.

  18. Foster care as risk or protective factors: institutional evaluation and quality indicators / O abrigo como fator de risco ou proteção: avaliação institucional e indicadores de qualidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Salina-Brandão

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on studies relating the impact of foster care organizations on the development of institutionalized children and adolescents, the present paper conducted an investigation of the strategies used by professionals in charge of foster care evaluation in Brazil, as well as the quality indicators used for this task. Nine evaluators and five foster care coordinators took part in the study. Data collection involved interviews, questionnaires and document analysis, using a framework from Developmental Psychopathology, specifically in terms of its contribution on risk and protective factors. Evaluators used the institutional visit as a predominant assessment strategy, conducting it in different ways and frequency. The quality indicators found were also varied. A low frequency of reports related to the educational practice of frontline staff and institutional efforts in order to maintain family ties were observed as well.

  19. Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James; Buchan, James; Cometto, Giorgio; David, Benedict; Dussault, Gilles; Fogstad, Helga; Fronteira, Inês; Lozano, Rafael; Nyonator, Frank; Pablos-Méndez, Ariel; Quain, Estelle E; Starrs, Ann; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2013-11-01

    Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) involves distributing resources, especially human resources for health (HRH), to match population needs. This paper explores the policy lessons on HRH from four countries that have achieved sustained improvements in UHC: Brazil, Ghana, Mexico and Thailand. Its purpose is to inform global policy and financial commitments on HRH in support of UHC. The paper reports on country experiences using an analytical framework that examines effective coverage in relation to the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality (AAAQ) of HRH. The AAAQ dimensions make it possible to perform tracing analysis on HRH policy actions since 1990 in the four countries of interest in relation to national trends in workforce numbers and population mortality rates. The findings inform key principles for evidence-based decision-making on HRH in support of UHC. First, HRH are critical to the expansion of health service coverage and the package of benefits; second, HRH strategies in each of the AAAQ dimensions collectively support achievements in effective coverage; and third, success is achieved through partnerships involving health and non-health actors. Facing the unprecedented health and development challenges that affect all countries and transforming HRH evidence into policy and practice must be at the heart of UHC and the post-2015 development agenda. It is a political imperative requiring national commitment and leadership to maximize the impact of available financial and human resources, and improve healthy life expectancy, with the recognition that improvements in health care are enabled by a health workforce that is fit for purpose. PMID:24347710

  20. Terrorism and nuclear damage coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with nuclear terrorism and the manner in which nuclear operators can insure themselves against it, based on the international nuclear liability conventions. It concludes that terrorism is currently not covered under the treaty exoneration provisions on 'war-like events' based on an analysis of the concept on 'terrorism' and travaux preparatoires. Consequently, operators remain liable for nuclear damage resulting from terrorist acts, for which mandatory insurance is applicable. Since nuclear insurance industry looks at excluding such insurance coverage from their policies in the near future, this article aims to suggest alternative means for insurance, in order to ensure adequate compensation for innocent victims. The September 11, 2001 attacks at the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC resulted in the largest loss in the history of insurance, inevitably leading to concerns about nuclear damage coverage, should future such assaults target a nuclear power plant or other nuclear installation. Since the attacks, some insurers have signalled their intentions to exclude coverage for terrorism from their nuclear liability and property insurance policies. Other insurers are maintaining coverage for terrorism, but are establishing aggregate limits or sublimits and are increasing premiums. Additional changes by insurers are likely to occur. Highlighted by the September 11th events, and most recently by those in Madrid on 11 March 2004, are questions about how to define acts of terrorism and the extent to which such are covered under the international nuclear liability conventions and various domestic nuclear liability laws. Of particular concern to insurers is the possibility of coordinated simultaneous attacks on multiple nuclear facilities. This paper provides a survey of the issues, and recommendations for future clarifications and coverage options.(author)

  1. The development of the Quality Indicator for Rehabilitative Care (QuIRC) : a measure of best practice for facilities for people with longer term mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Wright, Christine; Taylor, Tatiana L.; Turton, Penny; Schuetzwohl, Matthias; Schuster, Mirjam; Cervilla, Jorge A.; Brangier, Paulette; Raboch, Jiri; Kalisova, Lucie; Onchev, Georgi; Alexiev, Spiridon; Mezzina, Roberto; Ridente, Pina; Wiersma, Durk; Visser, Ellen; Kiejna, Andrzej; Adamowski, Tomasz; Ploumpidis, Dimitri; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose; Cardoso, Graca; King, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the progress over recent decades in developing community mental health services internationally, many people still receive treatment and care in institutional settings. Those most likely to reside longest in these facilities have the most complex mental health problems and are at

  2. The Affordable Care Act and implications for young adult health

    OpenAIRE

    Monaghan, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, young adults are most likely to be uninsured and least likely to report a usual source of medical care than any age group. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) recognizes the critical need for expanded insurance coverage for this age group, and multiple provisions of the ACA address insurance coverage and health care utilization in young adults. This paper presents a brief overview of the challenges of maintaining health insurance coverage and accessing health care...

  3. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Amendments Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health is an important part of ... for dental services. Dental Benefits for Children in CHIP States that provide CHIP coverage to children through ...

  4. Universal health coverage in Turkey: enhancement of equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atun, Rifat; Aydın, Sabahattin; Chakraborty, Sarbani; Sümer, Safir; Aran, Meltem; Gürol, Ipek; Nazlıoğlu, Serpil; Ozgülcü, Senay; Aydoğan, Ulger; Ayar, Banu; Dilmen, Uğur; Akdağ, Recep

    2013-07-01

    Turkey has successfully introduced health system changes and provided its citizens with the right to health to achieve universal health coverage, which helped to address inequities in financing, health service access, and health outcomes. We trace the trajectory of health system reforms in Turkey, with a particular emphasis on 2003-13, which coincides with the Health Transformation Program (HTP). The HTP rapidly expanded health insurance coverage and access to health-care services for all citizens, especially the poorest population groups, to achieve universal health coverage. We analyse the contextual drivers that shaped the transformations in the health system, explore the design and implementation of the HTP, identify the factors that enabled its success, and investigate its effects. Our findings suggest that the HTP was instrumental in achieving universal health coverage to enhance equity substantially, and led to quantifiable and beneficial effects on all health system goals, with an improved level and distribution of health, greater fairness in financing with better financial protection, and notably increased user satisfaction. After the HTP, five health insurance schemes were consolidated to create a unified General Health Insurance scheme with harmonised and expanded benefits. Insurance coverage for the poorest population groups in Turkey increased from 2·4 million people in 2003, to 10·2 million in 2011. Health service access increased across the country-in particular, access and use of key maternal and child health services improved to help to greatly reduce the maternal mortality ratio, and under-5, infant, and neonatal mortality, especially in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Several factors helped to achieve universal health coverage and improve outcomes. These factors include economic growth, political stability, a comprehensive transformation strategy led by a transformation team, rapid policy translation, flexible implementation with

  5. A influência da mídia nos atendimentos cardiológicos de urgência: o caso Bussunda Impact of media coverage on cardiac emergency care: the Bussunda case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Sobreira Taberner

    2007-08-01

    . OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of this media coverage on the emergency service at a Heart Hospital in Brazil (InCor. METHODS: Demographic profiles of patients collected from the InCor's database were analyzed in the days following the death of an important TV personality (Group B. These patients were compared to a Control Group represented by those attended during the first semester of 2006. RESULTS: When compared to the Control Group, Group B disclosed the following significant statistical changes: patients were younger and more of them were male. These findings reflect a change of profile in the control group tending to a greater similarity with the characteristics of the TV personality (man, 43 years old. These changes remained significant for four days (age and one day (gender. Furthermore, the greater demand for the cardiologic emergency service was not followed by an increased number of deaths and hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION: Media exposure on the circumstances of premature death by myocardial infarction of an important TV personality was associated with an increase in the number and a change in the profile of the patients seeking the emergency room at the InCor Heart Hospital. Differently from a situation such as catastrophes, this phenomenon was not followed by an increase in the incidence of myocardial infarction

  6. Assessment of the quality of fall detection and management in primary care in the Netherlands based on the ACOVE quality indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Askari, M.; Eslami, S.; van Rijn, M.; Medlock, S.; Moll van Charante, E. P.; van der Velde, N.; Rooij, S.E. de; Abu-Hanna, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We determined adherence to nine fall-related ACOVE quality indicators to investigate the quality of management of falls in the elderly population by general practitioners in the Netherlands. Our findings demonstrate overall low adherence to these indicators, possibly indicating insufficiency in the quality of fall management. Most indicators showed a positive association between increased risk for functional decline and adherence, four of which with statistical significance. Introduct...

  7. Assessment of the quality of fall detection and management in primary care in the Netherlands based on the ACOVE quality indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askari, M; Eslami, S; van Rijn, M; Medlock, S; Moll van Charante, E P; van der Velde, N; de Rooij, S E; Abu-Hanna, A

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: We determined adherence to nine fall-related ACOVE quality indicators to investigate the quality of management of falls in the elderly population by general practitioners in the Netherlands. Our findings demonstrate overall low adherence to these indicators, possibly indicating insuffici

  8. -Net Approach to Sensor -Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusco Giordano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensors rely on battery power, and in many applications it is difficult or prohibitive to replace them. Hence, in order to prolongate the system's lifetime, some sensors can be kept inactive while others perform all the tasks. In this paper, we study the -coverage problem of activating the minimum number of sensors to ensure that every point in the area is covered by at least sensors. This ensures higher fault tolerance, robustness, and improves many operations, among which position detection and intrusion detection. The -coverage problem is trivially NP-complete, and hence we can only provide approximation algorithms. In this paper, we present an algorithm based on an extension of the classical -net technique. This method gives an -approximation, where is the number of sensors in an optimal solution. We do not make any particular assumption on the shape of the areas covered by each sensor, besides that they must be closed, connected, and without holes.

  9. Root coverage with bridge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession in anterior teeth is a common concern due to esthetic reasons or root sensitivity. Gingival recession, especially in multiple anterior teeth, is of huge concern due to esthetic reasons. Various mucogingival surgeries are available for root coverage. This case report presents a new bridge flap technique, which allows the dentist not only to cover the previously denuded root surfaces but also to increase the zone of attached gingiva at a single step. In this case, a coronally advanced flap along with vestibular deepening technique was used as root coverage procedure for the treatment of multiple recession-type defect. Here, vestibular deepening technique is used to increase the width of the attached gingiva. The predictability of this procedure results in an esthetically healthy periodontium, along with gain in keratinized tissue and good patient′s acceptance.

  10. Supplementary pension coverage in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Armando Barrientos

    1998-01-01

    The 1986 Social Security Act introduced far-reaching changes to the supplementary pension environment in Britain, encouraging the growth of defined contribution pension plans and especially personal pensions. This paper examines the pattern of supplementary pension coverage of employees in Britain five years after the implementation of the Act, using cross-sectional data from the Family Resources Survey 1993-94. Two-thirds of employees in Britain are covered by private contracted-out pension ...

  11. Research on influenza A (H1N1)vaccine coverage and influential factors among health-care workers in the Bao'an District, City of Shenzhen%深圳市宝安区医务人员甲型H1N1流感疫苗接种率及影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李苑; 刘开钳; 于宝柱; 吴泰顺; 马智超

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解深圳市宝安区医务人员甲型H1N1流感疫苗接种率及其影响因素.方法 在宝安区区级医院、街道医院以及所辖社区健康服务中心中随机抽取770名医务人员作为调查对象,进行不记名问卷调查.采用卡方检验和Logistic回归分析分别对疫苗接种率的影响因素进行单因素和多因素分析.结果 宝安区医务人员甲型H1N1流感疫苗接种率为55.03%,未接种的主要原因是担心出现疫苗不良反应,占39.10%.影响疫苗接种率的因素分别为高文化程度(大专:OR=0.462,95%CI 0.269~0.794;大学及以上:OR=0.250,95%CI 0.140~0.446)、医疗岗位为护士(OR=0.392,95%CI 0.228~0.675)、工作年限≤5年(OR=0.303,95%CI 0.197~0.465)、知道甲流疫苗接种时间(OR=1.413,95%CI 1.022~1.953)和近3年接种过季节性流感疫苗(OR=3.822,95%CI 2.634~5.544)等.结论 宝安区医务人员甲流疫苗接种率较高,但仍需加强甲流疫苗有效性和安全性宣传,重点为大专以上文化程度、护士、工作年限小于5年、不知道甲流接种时间和近3年无季节性流感疫苗接种史等人群.%Objective To study influenza A (H1N1) vaccine coverage and influenitial factors among health-care workers in the Bao'an District, City of Shenzhen.Methods A random sample of 770 health-care workers from Bao'an District was sampled, Workers at township hospitals and community health service centers responded to an anonymous questionnaire.The x2 test and logistic regression analysis were used in univariate analysis and multivariate analysis to evaluate factors influencing vaccine coverage.Results Influenza A (H1N1) vaccine coverage of health-care workers in Bao'an District was 55.03%.The main reason for not being vaccinated, which was given by 39.10% of respondents, concerned side effects.The factors influencing vaccine coverage were level of education (junior college: OR= 0.462, 95 % CI= 0.269-0.794; college or higher: OR=0.250, 95

  12. Quality along the continuum: a health facility assessment of intrapartum and postnatal care in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin C Nesbitt

    Full Text Available To evaluate quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care using a health facility assessment, and to estimate "effective coverage" of skilled attendance in Brong Ahafo, Ghana.We conducted an assessment of all 86 health facilities in seven districts in Brong Ahafo. Using performance of key signal functions and the availability of relevant drugs, equipment and trained health professionals, we created composite quality categories in four dimensions: routine delivery care, emergency obstetric care (EmOC, emergency newborn care (EmNC and non-medical quality. Linking the health facility assessment to surveillance data we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance as the proportion of births in facilities of high quality.Delivery care was offered in 64/86 facilities; only 3-13% fulfilled our requirements for the highest quality category in any dimension. Quality was lowest in the emergency care dimensions, with 63% and 58% of facilities categorized as "low" or "substandard" for EmOC and EmNC, respectively. This implies performing less than four EmOC or three EmNC signal functions, and/or employing less than two skilled health professionals, and/or that no health professionals were present during our visit. Routine delivery care was "low" or "substandard" in 39% of facilities, meaning 25/64 facilities performed less than six routine signal functions and/or had less than two skilled health professionals and/or less than one midwife. While 68% of births were in health facilities, only 18% were in facilities with "high" or "highest" quality in all dimensions.Our comprehensive facility assessment showed that quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care was generally low in the study region. While coverage with facility delivery was 68%, we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance at 18%, thus revealing a large "quality gap." Effective coverage could be a meaningful indicator of progress towards

  13. Coverage of abortion controversial in both public and private plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollom, T

    1996-09-01

    During 1995-96, 17 of 50 US states used their own resources, either voluntarily or under state court order, to pay for all or most abortions for low-income women. Alaska, Maryland, New York, and Washington are the only states to voluntarily pay for these abortions. Anti-choice legislators in California, Illinois, New York, and West Virginia tried unsuccessfully to cut funding for these abortions. Arkansas is the only state to circumvent direct payment for abortions for low-income women. Alabama, Mississippi, and South Dakota still are not complying with the court order but remain in the Medicaid program. Massachusetts has passed legislation to allow health insurance to cover abortions for state and city employees, thereby undoing a 17-year ban on the use of public funds for abortions for employees or their spouses. On the other hand, Virginia's governor has unilaterally, via an executive order, eliminated health insurance coverage for most abortions for state employees and their dependents. Anti-choice legislators have shepherded legislation that prohibit private insurance coverage for abortion unless women pay an extra premium in Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, and North Dakota. Legislators in Illinois and Minnesota have passed state subsidized health care reform programs that exclude abortion from coverage except when the mother's life is endangered. There appears to be a loophole in the MinnesotaCare program that allows women to obtain state-financed abortions for other reasons, so antifunding lawmakers will introduce a bill in 1997 to close the loophole. The loophole is a result of a conflict between state and federal laws as a result of a 1995 federal waiver granted to Minnesota. The waiver allows pregnant women who earn up to 275% of the federal poverty level to be eligible for either MinnesotaCare or Medicaid. Abortion-rights legislators find MinnesotaCare's exclusion of abortion coverage to be a violation of the court order. They plan to submit a bill in 1997 to

  14. Problems of health insurance coverage and health care in the United States: public and private solution strategies Problemas de cobertura de seguridade em saúde e serviços nos Estados Unidos da América: estratégias para soluções públicas e privadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Richard Brown

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available A nearly universal consensus has developed in the United States that the current health care financing system is a failure. The system has been unable to control the continuing rapid rise in health care costs (by far, the highest in the world, and it has been unable to stem the growing population that has no health insurance coverage (at least 36 million people. There is nearly universal political agreement that government must provide health insurance to a far greater share of the population than ever before. The political debate now focuses on whether this expanded government role should supplement the private insurance system with an enlarged public program covering those left out of private insurance coverage, or replace private insurance with a universal government health insurance program covering the entire population.É praticamente consenso nos EUA que o atual sistema de saúde está falido. O sistema não foi capaz de controlar o rápido aumento nos custos dos cuidados em saúde (de longe, o mais elevado do mundo, e também não foi capaz de estancar o crescimento da população sem qualquer cobertura de seguro saúde (pelo menos 26 milhões de pessoas. Politicamente, há quase total concordância de que o governo deve prover seguro de saúde a uma parcela bem maior da população do que no passado. O debate político agora centra-se na questão se este papel expandido do governo deve suplementar o sistema de seguridade privado através de um programa aumentado, de modo a cobrir os que ficam de fora da cobertura oferecida pelo seguro privado, ou substituir o seguro privado por um programa de seguro-saúde governamental de abrangência universal, dando cobertura a toda a população.

  15. Bundled automobile insurance coverage and accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chu-Shiu; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Peng, Sheng-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of automobile accidents by taking into account two types of automobile insurance coverage: comprehensive vehicle physical damage insurance and voluntary third-party liability insurance. By using a unique data set in the Taiwanese automobile insurance market, we explore the bundled automobile insurance coverage and the occurrence of claims. It is shown that vehicle physical damage insurance is the major automobile coverage and affects the decision to purchase voluntary liability insurance coverage as a complement. Moreover, policyholders with high vehicle physical damage insurance coverage have a significantly higher probability of filing vehicle damage claims, and if they additionally purchase low voluntary liability insurance coverage, their accident claims probability is higher than those who purchase high voluntary liability insurance coverage. Our empirical results reveal that additional automobile insurance coverage information can capture more driver characteristics and driving behaviors to provide useful information for insurers' underwriting policies and to help analyze the occurrence of automobile accidents.

  16. Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage From the National Health Interview Survey Using linked administrative data, to validate Medicare coverage estimates...

  17. 14 CFR 1260.131 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance coverage. 1260.131 Section 1260... Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Property Standards § 1260.131 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property...

  18. 22 CFR 226.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 226.31 Section 226.31...-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Property Standards § 226.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment...

  19. 32 CFR 32.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 32.31 Section 32.31 National... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 32.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and...

  20. 45 CFR 2543.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage. 2543.31 Section 2543.31 Public... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with...

  1. 15 CFR 14.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance coverage. 14.31 Section 14... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 14.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment...

  2. 45 CFR 74.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage. 74.31 Section 74.31 Public..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 74.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and...

  3. 34 CFR 74.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 74.31 Section 74.31 Education... Property Standards § 74.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with Federal funds as provided to property...

  4. 22 CFR 518.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Insurance coverage. 518.31 Section 518.31... Requirements Property Standards § 518.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with Federal funds as provided...

  5. 20 CFR 435.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 435.31 Section 435.31... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 435.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients must, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with...

  6. 28 CFR 70.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 70.31 Section 70.31...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 70.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients must, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment...

  7. 36 CFR 1210.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 1210.31 Section 1210.31 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL....31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage...

  8. 10 CFR 600.131 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance coverage. 600.131 Section 600.131 Energy... Nonprofit Organizations Post-Award Requirements § 600.131 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with DOE funds...

  9. 22 CFR 145.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 145.31 Section 145.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER... Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for...

  10. 38 CFR 49.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 49.31... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 49.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and...

  11. 49 CFR 19.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage. 19.31 Section 19.31... Requirements Property Standards § 19.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with Federal funds as provided...

  12. 40 CFR 30.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 30.31 Section 30.31... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 30.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and...

  13. 2 CFR 215.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance coverage. 215.31 Section 215.31 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved UNIFORM... Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for...

  14. 24 CFR 84.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 84.31 Section 84.31 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for...

  15. 24 CFR 35.1140 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 35.1140 Section... § 35.1140 Insurance coverage. For the requirements concerning the obligation of a PHA to obtain reasonable insurance coverage with respect to the hazards associated with evaluation and hazard...

  16. A multicentre randomised controlled trial of Transfusion Indication Threshold Reduction on transfusion rates, morbidity and health-care resource use following cardiac surgery (TITRe2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Barnaby C; Pike, Katie; Rogers, Chris A; Brierley, Rachel Cm; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Nash, Rachel L; Miles, Alice; Mumford, Andrew D; Cohen, Alan; Angelini, Gianni D; Murphy, Gavin J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uncertainty about optimal red blood cell transfusion thresholds in cardiac surgery is reflected in widely varying transfusion rates between surgeons and cardiac centres. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that a restrictive compared with a liberal threshold for red blood cell transfusion after cardiac surgery reduces post-operative morbidity and health-care costs. DESIGN Multicentre, parallel randomised controlled trial and within-trial cost-utility analysis from a UK NHS and Personal Social Services perspective. We could not blind health-care staff but tried to blind participants. Random allocations were generated by computer and minimised by centre and operation. SETTING Seventeen specialist cardiac surgery centres in UK NHS hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Patients aged > 16 years undergoing non-emergency cardiac surgery with post-operative haemoglobin research steps to address the new hypothesis about the possible harm of red blood cell transfusion. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN70923932. FUNDING This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 20, No. 60. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:27527344

  17. Is Distance to Provider a Barrier to Care for Medicaid Patients with Breast, Colorectal, or Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, John F.; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Donahue, Sara M. A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Blough, David K.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Distance to provider might be an important barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment for cancer patients who qualify for Medicaid coverage. Whether driving time or driving distance is a better indicator of travel burden is also of interest. Methods: Driving distances and times from patient residence to primary care provider were…

  18. Minimum essential coverage and other rules regarding the shared responsibility payment for individuals. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-26

    This document contains final regulations relating to the requirement to maintain minimum essential coverage enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, as amended by the TRICARE Affirmation Act and Public Law 111-173 (collectively, the Affordable Care Act). These final regulations provide individual taxpayers with guidance under section 5000A of the Internal Revenue Code on the requirement to maintain minimum essential coverage and rules governing certain types of exemptions from that requirement.

  19. The development of leadership outcome-indicators evaluating the contribution of clinical specialists and advanced practitioners to health care: a secondary analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elliott, Naomi

    2014-05-01

    To report a secondary analysis of data collected from the case study phase of a national study of advanced practitioners and to develop leadership outcome-indicators appropriate for advanced practitioners.

  20. Effective coverage and systems effectiveness for malaria case management in sub-Saharan African countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Galactionova

    Full Text Available Scale-up of malaria preventive and control interventions over the last decade resulted in substantial declines in mortality and morbidity from the disease in sub-Saharan Africa and many other parts of the world. Sustaining these gains will depend on the health system performance. Treatment provides individual benefits by curing infection and preventing progression to severe disease as well as community-level benefits by reducing the infectious reservoir and averting emergence and spread of drug resistance. However many patients with malaria do not access care, providers do not comply with treatment guidelines, and hence, patients do not necessarily receive the correct regimen. Even when the correct regimen is administered some patients will not adhere and others will be treated with counterfeit or substandard medication leading to treatment failures and spread of drug resistance. We apply systems effectiveness concepts that explicitly consider implications of health system factors such as treatment seeking, provider compliance, adherence, and quality of medication to estimate treatment outcomes for malaria case management. We compile data for these indicators to derive estimates of effective coverage for 43 high-burden Sub-Saharan African countries. Parameters are populated from the Demographic and Health Surveys and other published sources. We assess the relative importance of these factors on the level of effective coverage and consider variation in these health systems indicators across countries. Our findings suggest that effective coverage for malaria case management ranges from 8% to 72% in the region. Different factors account for health system inefficiencies in different countries. Significant losses in effectiveness of treatment are estimated in all countries. The patterns of inter-country variation suggest that these are system failures that are amenable to change. Identifying the reasons for the poor health system performance and

  1. 深圳市宝安区托幼机构人员甲型H1N1流感疫苗接种率及其影响因素%Vaccination Coverage of Influenza A (H1N1) and the Influential Factors Among Child-care Staff in Bao'an District of Shenzhen City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周海庄; 李苑; 刘开钳; 吴泰顺; 马智超

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the vaccination coverage of influenza A (H1N1) and the its influential factors among child - care staff in Bao'an district of Shenzhen. Methods A survey of random sampling was carried out for 530 health - care workers from 100 kindergartens with anonymous questionnaire. Descriptive statistical analysis, Rank sum test, x2 test and Logistic regression analysis were used for univariate analysis and multiva-riate analysis to evaluate influential factors of vaccine coverage. Results The vaccination coverage rate of influenza A ( H1N1 ) in child - care staff in Bao'an district of Shenzhen was 39. 96%% , the main reason for un - inoculation was concerning about side effects. The multivariate analysis showed that the sex [ male, odds ratio (OR) = 3.193, 95% confidence interval (CI) - 1. 285 - 7. 936 ] , being sanitarian and nursery governess (sanitarian, OR = 12.583, 95% CI = 2.825 - 56.082; nursery governess, OR = 7.581, 95% CI = 1. 881 - 30. 554) , length of service (11 -15, OR =6. 299, 95% CI = 1. 169-33. 945) and with a seasonal influenza vaccination in the past three years (vaccinated, OR =8. 856, 95% CI =4. 139 - 18. 703; obscurity, OR = 4. 322, 95% CI = 1. 588 - 11. 766) were correlated with influenza A ( H1N1) vaccination (P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion The child - care staff in Bao'an had high vaccination coverage of influenza A ( H1N1). It is important to strengthen the propaganda of the effectiveness and security of influenza A (H1N1) vaccine, especially to women, being teacher, people who have length of service less than five years and without the history of seasonal influenza vaccination in the past three years.%目的 了解深圳市宝安区托幼机构人员甲型H1N1流行性感冒(甲流)疫苗接种率及其影响因素.方法 随机抽取深圳市宝安区100家托幼机构530人作为面访匿名问卷调查对象.采用描述性分析、秩和检验、x 2检验和Logistic回归分析分别对疫苗接种率的影响因素进行单

  2. The Impact of an Intervention to Improve Malaria Care in Public Health Centers on Health Indicators of Children in Tororo, Uganda (PRIME): A Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staedke, Sarah G; Maiteki-Sebuguzi, Catherine; DiLiberto, Deborah D; Webb, Emily L; Mugenyi, Levi; Mbabazi, Edith; Gonahasa, Samuel; Kigozi, Simon P; Willey, Barbara A; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R; Chandler, Clare I R

    2016-08-01

    Optimizing quality of care for malaria and other febrile illnesses is a complex challenge of major public health importance. To evaluate the impact of an intervention aiming to improve malaria case management on the health of community children, a cluster-randomized trial was conducted from 2010-2013 in Tororo, Uganda, where malaria transmission is high. Twenty public health centers were included; 10 were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to intervention or control. Households within 2 km of health centers provided the sampling frame for the evaluation. The PRIME intervention included training in fever case management using malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs), patient-centered services, and health center management; plus provision of mRDTs and artemether-lumefantrine. Cross-sectional community surveys were conducted at baseline and endline (N = 8,766), and a cohort of children was followed for approximately 18 months (N = 992). The primary outcome was prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin < 11.0 g/dL) in children under 5 years of age in the final community survey. The intervention was delivered successfully; however, no differences in prevalence of anemia or parasitemia were observed between the study arms in the final community survey or the cohort. In the final survey, prevalence of anemia in children under 5 years of age was 62.5% in the intervention versus 63.1% in control (adjusted risk ratio = 1.01; 95% confidence interval = 0.91-1.13; P = 0.82). The PRIME intervention, focusing on training and commodities, did not produce the expected health benefits in community children in Tororo. This challenges common assumptions that improving quality of care and access to malaria diagnostics will yield health gains. PMID:27273646

  3. 基于患者体验的医疗服务质量关键指标初探%Patient experience based key indicators for quality of care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田常俊; 张亮

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish patient-experience based key indicators for quality of care.Methods Literature review,collection of proven surveys on patient experience and satisfaction,study of China's conditions,with demonstrations by experts team.Results A framework was built for patientexperience based key indicators on quality of care.Level-1 indicators within the framework are tangibility,reliability,responsiveness,assurance,care and continuity.There are 28 level-2 indicators and 83level-3 indicators.Conclusion Such key indicators are highly practical as the basis for developing the scale of patient experience.%目的 建立基于“患者体验”的医疗服务质量关键指标.方法 通过检索国内外的相关文献,收集国内外成熟的患者体验和满意度调查表,结合国内现有情况,成立专家组进行论证.结果 形成了基于“患者体验”的医疗服务质量关键指标框架,构建基于“患者体验”的医疗服务质量关键指标体系,其中一级指标包括有形性、可靠性、反应性、保证性、关怀性和连续性6个,二级指标28个,三级指标83个.结论 基于患者体验的医疗服务质量关键指标体系具有很强的实用性,为患者体验量表的开发奠定了一定的基础.

  4. Vaccination coverage among persons with asthma -- United States, 2010-2011 influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Asthma was the most common underlying condition among persons hospitalized with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in 2009. Although persons with asthma are not more likely than others to get influenza, influenza can make asthma symptoms worse, trigger asthma attacks, and lead to pneumonia or other complications that result in hospitalization and even death. During 1964-2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended that all adults and children aged ≥6 months with asthma receive an influenza vaccination annually. Beginning with the 2010-11 influenza season, ACIP expanded its annual vaccination recommendation to include all persons aged ≥6 months, while emphasizing that protection of persons at higher risk for influenza-related complications continue as a focus of vaccination efforts. To provide the first update of national vaccination coverage among persons aged ≥2 years with asthma since the new ACIP recommendation, CDC analyzed data from the 2010 and 2011 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that influenza vaccination during the 2010-11 season among persons with asthma was 50%, up from 36% 5 years earlier. However, vaccination coverage across all age groups, including among those with health insurance, a usual place for health care, and one or more health-care visits in the past 12 months, remained well below Healthy People 2020 targets of 80% for children aged 6 months-17 years and 90% for adults aged ≥18 years who are at high risk. These findings highlight the need to educate health-care providers and persons with asthma about the importance of annual influenza vaccination.

  5. Indicadores da qualidade dos registros e da assistência ambulatorial em Maringá, (estado do Paraná, Brasil, 1991: um exercício de avaliação Indicators of quality for medical records and ambulatory care in Maringá (state of Paraná, Brazil, 1991: an exercise in evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Scochi

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se indicadores de qualidade da assistência passíveis de análise a partir de registros rotineiros na rede ambulatorial de serviços de saúde da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde de Maringá, Paraná (Brasil. Foram avaliados os atendimentos realizados em três Núcleos Integrados de Saúde (NIS com o objetivo de verificar se o que foi registrado permite a formulação de indicadores de qualidade. Pesquisou-se todos os prontuários dos 7.813 pacientes atendidos durante o mês de outubro de 1991. Foram formulados indicadores de qualidade de registro, procedência da clientela, demanda, cobertura e resolutividade por unidade de saúde. Em 49,7% dos prontuários, as hipóteses diagnósticas (HD estavam ausentes e em 14,8% haviam HD ilegíveis; 78% dos atendimentos foram destinados a moradores que residiam na área de abrangência das unidades; a cobertura de gestantes foi baixa 37%; 70% das crianças menores de um ano da comunidade foram atendidas no mês, e as pessoas atendidas tiveram em média três consultas médicas no ano precedente, 4,3% dos prontuários dos usuários atendidos apresentava registro de encaminhamentos para outros serviços. Os prontuários nestes três núcleos funcionam precariamente como fonte de informação, tanto para uso interno como para avaliação. Apesar destas insuficiências foi possível extrair alguns indicadores de qualidade, sendo necessário, melhoras significativas na qualidade do preenchimento, para sustentar avaliações mais aprofundadas.This study sought to establish health-care quality indicators based on data from routine clinical records produced by the Municipal Health Department in Maringá, Paraná State. Records for 7813 patients seen in the month of October 1991 at three Integrated Health Centers (IHC were assessed to determine whether the recorded information allowed for the formulation of quality indicators. Indicators of data quality, demand, coverage, resolubility, and geographic

  6. Feedback-Based Coverage Directed Test Generation: An Industrial Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Charalambos; Barrett, Geoff; Eder, Kerstin

    Although there are quite a few approaches to Coverage Directed test Generation aided by Machine Learning which have been applied successfully to small and medium size digital designs, it is not clear how they would scale on more elaborate industrial-level designs. This paper evaluates one of these techniques, called MicroGP, on a fully fledged industrial design. The results indicate relative success evidenced by a good level of code coverage achieved with reasonably compact tests when compared to traditional test generation approaches. However, there is scope for improvement especially with respect to the diversity of the tests evolved.

  7. 上海市松江区《全覆盖孕产期系统保健管理》项目效果评估%Effect evaluation of "complete coverage system health care management during pregnant period" project in Songjiang district in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳; 杨青; 杜秉新; 陈秀华

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨《全覆盖孕产期系统保健管理》对孕产妇死亡、围产儿死亡、孕产妇系统管理的影响.方法:开展全社会孕情排摸提高早孕建册率、评估孕期妊娠风险加强重点孕妇管理、设立危重抢救中心提高抢救技能与设立抢救“绿色”通道积极应对危重抢救、政府经济支持设立外来孕产妇住院分娩点及免费产后访视、开展孕产期全程健康教育等方法.结果:评估项目前后(2008年、2011年)非本市孕产妇的系统管理率、早孕建册率、产前检查(产检)≥5次率、产后访视率、围产儿死亡率均有明显改变,经x2检验,差异都具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:项目对降低孕产妇死亡率、围产儿死亡率效果明显,对提高孕产妇系统管理率有一定的作用.%Objective: To explore the effect of "complete systematical health care management during pregnant period" project on maternal death, perinatal death, and maternal system management. Methods: The system management rate, the registration rate of early pregnancy, the rate of prenatal examination≥5 times, the postpartum visit rate, and the perinatal mortality of migrant pregnant women before and after implementation of "complete coverage systematical health care management during pregnant period" project (2008 and 2011, respectively) were evaluated. The contents of the project included conducting maternal investigation to improve the registration rate of early pregnancy, assessing pregnancy risk, enhancing management of key pregnant women, establishing critically ill rescue center, improving rescue skills, setting up green channel of maternal rescue to cope with rescue of critically ill patients, founding hospital delivery sites of migrant pregnant women and performing free postpartum visit based on economic support from the government, and carrying out health education during the whole course of pregnant period. Results: There was statistically significant

  8. Operationalizing universal health coverage in Nigeria through social health insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Ikedichi Okpani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nigeria faces challenges that delay progress toward the attainment of the national government's declared goal of universal health coverage (UHC. One such challenge is system-wide inequities resulting from lack of financial protection for the health care needs of the vast majority of Nigerians. Only a small proportion of Nigerians have prepaid health care. In this paper, we draw on existing evidence to suggest steps toward reforming health care financing in Nigeria to achieve UHC through social health insurance. This article sets out to demonstrate that a viable path to UHC through expanding social health insurance exists in Nigeria. We argue that encouraging the states which are semi-autonomous federating units to setup and manage their own insurance schemes presents a unique opportunity for rapidly scaling up prepaid coverage for Nigerians. We show that Nigeria's federal structure which prescribes a sharing of responsibilities for health care among the three tiers of government presents serious challenges for significantly extending social insurance to uncovered groups. We recommend that rather than allowing this governance structure to impair progress toward UHC, it should be leveraged to accelerate the process by supporting the states to establish and manage their own insurance funds while encouraging integration with the National Health Insurance Scheme.

  9. Cost Benefit Analysis of Sports Medicine Team Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P.; Eck, Brandon; Freedman, Kevin B.; Pepe, Matthew D.; Austin, Luke; Tucker, Bradford S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Coverage of high school athletic football by orthopaedic sports medicine specialists is considered standard of care in many localities. Taking time away from an orthopaedic practice to provide on field athletic care has potential advantages and disadvantages. Determining the economic viability of this endeavor has never been investigated. The purpose of the present investigation was to perform a cost/benefit risk analysis of local high school sports coverage by an orthopaedic sports medicine practice. Methods: From January 2010 to June 2012, a prospective injury report database was used to collect sports injuries from five high school athletic programs covered by a single orthopaedic sports medicine practice. Patients referred for orthopaedic care were then tracked to determine ultimate cost of care (potential revenue). Evaluation and management codes and current procedure terminology codes were obtained to determine the value of physician visits and surgical care rendered using standardized Medicare reimbursement rates. Total values were also analyzed in respect to visits and surgical treatments for the covering practice during this time period. Direct costs were estimated based on physician time required for team coverage and hourly reimbursement rates for orthopaedic surgeons, based on previously reported hourly reimbursement rates. Results: 19,165 athletic trainer evaluations resulted in 473 (2.5%) physician referrals. 185 (39%) of these referrals were to an orthopaedic surgeon. Of the physician referrals, 26 (5.4%) required orthopaedic surgical treatment. The covering team practice handled 89/185 (48%) of the orthopaedic referrals, and handled 17/26 (65%) of the patients that required surgical treatment. The total cost of orthopaedic care for the athletes requiring treatment was $44,239.94 (total potential revenue). The total revenue collected by the covering team practice was $26,226.14 (actual revenue). The cost of a covering team physician for

  10. Analysis of k-Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmi Ranjan Patra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a concept of wireless sensor networks has attracted much attention due to its wide-range of potential applications. Wireless sensor networks also pose a number of challenging optimization problems. One of the fundamental problems in sensor networks is the coverage problem, which reflects the quality of service that can be provided by a particular sensor network. The coverage concept is depending from several points of view due to a variety of sensors and a wide-range of their applications. One fundamental issue in sensor networks is the coverage problem, which reflects how well a sensor network is monitored or tracked by sensors. In this paper, we formulate this problem as a decision problem, whose goal is to determine the degree of coverage of a sensor network, which is covered by at least k sensors, where k is a predefined value. The sensing ranges of sensors can be same or different. Performance evaluation of our protocol indicates that degree of coverage of wireless sensor networks can be determined within small period of time. Therefore energy consumption of the sensor networks can be minimized.

  11. The State of the Great Central Valley of California-Assessing the Region via Indicators: Public Health and Access to Care

    OpenAIRE

    Porter,, F.C.; Fox, MR; Beard,, Renee L. BA; Chapman, MR

    2005-01-01

    Each year the Great Valley Center produces a report in the five part State of the Great Central Valley series. The data is updated in 5-year increments. Based on the data, the Great Valley Center recognizes the potential to improve health outcomes throughout the region. Overall, the indicators suggest five strategies: * Invest in Prevention * Be Strategic With Limited Resources * Model Healthy Lifestyles for Youth * Build Coalitions in Support of a Healthier Environment * Re...

  12. Evaluation of the Apache II and the oncologic history, as indicative predictions of mortality in the unit of intensive care of the INC September 1996 -December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    They are multiple the indexes of severity that have been carried out to value the predict and the quality of a patient's life, especially when this it enters to the unit of intensive care (UIC); however, the oncologic patient presents particularities in their mobility, that it supposes a different behavior in the results of the Indexes. Presently work is compared the Apache scale and the oncologic history like morbid mortality as predictors in the UCI. 207 patients were included that entered the UCI between September of 1996 and December of 1997. It was a mortality of 29%, the stay of most of this group of patient smaller than 24 hours or bigger than 8 days. To the entrance, 50% of the patients presented superior averages at 15 in the Apache Scale and at the 48 hours, alone 30.4% continued with this value. The patients with hematologic neoplasia presented superior average at 15 in 87%, with a mortality of 63.3% with average between 15 and 24 to the entrance, the risk of dying was 9.8 times but that with inferior average. In the hematologic patient, the risk of dying was 5.7 times but regarding the solid tumors. The system but altered it was the breathing one, with an increase in the risk of dying from 2,8 times for each increment utility in the scale. Contrary to described in the literature, the oncologic diagnoses and the neoplasia statistic they didn't influence in the mortality of the patients

  13. Construction of care service quality evaluation indicator for elderly institution in Chongqing based on SERVQUAL Model%SERVQUAL模型构建重庆市养老机构照护服务的质量评价指标

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李培; 沈军

    2014-01-01

    目的 构建重庆市养老机构照护服务质量评价指标并确定各指标权重.方法 以SERVQUAL模型为指导,采用Delphi法确立评价指标,通过层次分析法计算各指标权重并进行指标一致性检验.结果 确立了重庆市养老机构照护服务质量评价5个一级指标、20个二级指标.其中一级指标分别为“有形性”“可靠性”“响应性”“安全性”“移情性”.各级指标一致性比率(CR)均<0.10,具有满意的一致性检验结果.结论 构建重庆市养老机构照护服务质量评价指标的方法较科学,指标较全面,可在一定程度上提高养老机构的照护服务质量,为养老机构照护质量评价提供一定的参考依据.%Objective To set up care service quality evaluation indicators and establish weight coefficient for assessment of elderly institution in Chongqing.Methods SEVQUAL Model was used as the theoretical guidance,through Delphi expert inquiry,analytic hierarchy process (AHP),the weight of each indicator in five grades and consistency check was calculated.Results The care serv ice quality evaluation indicators contained five first-grade indexes and twenty second-grade indexes.The first-grade indexes included tangibles,reliability,responsiveness,assurance,empathy,respectively.The results of the consisten-cy check of the single grade sorts had a satisfying consistency(CR<0.10).Conclusions The scientific meth-ods and comprehensive indicators were applied to the construction of care service quality e-valuation indicators for elderly institution in Chongqing.In some degree,this construction of indicators may improve quality of care service and provide useful reference evidence for quality assessment in elderly in-stitution.

  14. Your Medicare Coverage: Durable Medical Equipment (DME) Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov Medicare forms Advance directives & long-term care Electronic prescribing Electronic Health Records (EHRs) Download claims with Medicare’s Blue ... equipment and supplies if they're provided by contract suppliers. Contract suppliers can't charge you more ...

  15. [Universal coverage of health services in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The reforms made in recent years to the Mexican Health System have reduced inequities in the health care of the population, but have been insufficient to solve all the problems of the MHS. In order to make the right to health protection established in the Constitution a reality for every citizen, Mexico must warrant effective universal access to health services. This paper outlines a long-term reform for the consolidation of a health system that is akin to international standards and which may establish the structural conditions to reduce coverage inequity. This reform is based on a "structured pluralism" intended to avoid both a monopoly exercised within the public sector and fragmentation in the private sector, and to prevent falling into the extremes of authoritarian procedures or an absence of regulation. This involves the replacement of the present vertical integration and segregation of social groups by a horizontal organization with separation of duties. This also entails legal and fiscal reforms, the reinforcement of the MHS, the reorganization of health institutions, and the formulation of regulatory, technical and financial instruments to operationalize the proposed scheme with the objective of rendering the human right to health fully effective for the Mexican people. PMID:24570037

  16. [Universal coverage of health services in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The reforms made in recent years to the Mexican Health System have reduced inequities in the health care of the population, but have been insufficient to solve all the problems of the MHS. In order to make the right to health protection established in the Constitution a reality for every citizen, Mexico must warrant effective universal access to health services. This paper outlines a long-term reform for the consolidation of a health system that is akin to international standards and which may establish the structural conditions to reduce coverage inequity. This reform is based on a "structured pluralism" intended to avoid both a monopoly exercised within the public sector and fragmentation in the private sector, and to prevent falling into the extremes of authoritarian procedures or an absence of regulation. This involves the replacement of the present vertical integration and segregation of social groups by a horizontal organization with separation of duties. This also entails legal and fiscal reforms, the reinforcement of the MHS, the reorganization of health institutions, and the formulation of regulatory, technical and financial instruments to operationalize the proposed scheme with the objective of rendering the human right to health fully effective for the Mexican people.

  17. Collaborative Mobile Charging and Coverage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰

    2014-01-01

    Wireless energy charging using mobile vehicles has been a viable research topic recently in the area of wireless networks and mobile computing. This paper gives a short survey of recent research conducted in our research group in the area of collaborative mobile charging. In collaborative mobile charging, multiple mobile chargers work together to accomplish a given set of ob jectives. These ob jectives include charging sensors at different frequencies with a minimum number of mobile chargers and reaching the farthest sensor for a given set of mobile chargers, subject to various constraints, including speed and energy limits of mobile chargers. Through the process of problem formulation, solution construction, and future work extension for problems related to collaborative mobile charging and coverage, we present three principles for good practice in conducting research. These principles can potentially be used for assisting graduate students in selecting a research problem for a term project, which can eventually be expanded to a thesis/dissertation topic.

  18. Sideline coverage of youth football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzone, Katie; Diamond, Alex; Gregory, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Youth football is a popular sport in the United States and has been for some time. There are currently more than 3 million participants in youth football leagues according to USA Football. While the number of participants and overall injuries may be higher in other sports, football has a higher rate of injuries. Most youth sporting events do not have medical personnel on the sidelines in event of an injury or emergency. Therefore it is necessary for youth sports coaches to undergo basic medical training in order to effectively act in these situations. In addition, an argument could be made that appropriate medical personnel should be on the sideline for collision sports at all levels, from youth to professional. This article will discuss issues pertinent to sideline coverage of youth football, including coaching education, sideline personnel, emergency action plans, age and size divisions, tackle versus flag football, and injury prevention.

  19. ROLE OF RBC COUNT AND RBC INDICES IN DIAGNOSING AND DIFFERENTIATING ANEMIAS CAUSED DUE TO VARIOUS CLINICAL SITUATIONS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN VADODARA, GUJARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Latest technologies have made it easier for the pathologist and clinician to diagnose any case of anemia. Automated cell counters are widely used since last two decades that have further facilitated and made it easy for the clinicians to reach to the root cause of anemia. RBC count and entire RBC indices along with HB estimation gives a definite idea as to what could be the cause of anemia. The whole spectrum of RBC indices i.e. MCV, MCH and MCHC along with RBC count, PCV and Hemoglobin estimation plays a vital role to analyze the cause of anemia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross sectional study was carried out at Parul Institute of Medical Science and Research, Limda, Vadodara, Gujarat. Investigations of RBC count and RBC indic es of patients were carried out on fully automated cell counter – by Merck diagnostics. Study included 700 patients with Hemoglobin <10gm% which included males and females of age group 15 - 50 years. RESULTS: Total 700 anemic patients with Hemoglobin < 10gm % were enrolled in the study. Among them 569 were females which included pregnant females also and 131 were males. Patients were of age group 15 - 50 years. Data revealed that 45 % of patients had iron deficiency anemia, 14 % had megaloblastic anemia, 13% ha d hemolytic anemia, 6 % had anemia due to chronic illness whereas 10 % had dimorphic type of anemia. In iron deficiency anemia, blood picture showed relatively high to normal RBC count and PCV i.e. hematocrit, typically low MCV and MCH values and low to no rmal MCHC. In megaloblastic anemia, RBC count was very low due to premature destruction of RBC’s and they had low PCV whereas high to very high MCV, MCH and MCHC values. In hemolytic anemia it is seen that RBC count is low and so is the PCV or hematocrit w hile such patients have normal to high MCV and normal MCH and MCHC. In anemia of chronic disease all parameters are relatively normal except low to normal MCV. CONCLUSION: RBC indices vary in

  20. The contribution of Portuguese nursing to universal health access and coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ananda Maria; Mendes, Aida Maria de Oliveira Cruz; Leitão, Maria Neto da Cruz; Gomes, Sérgio David Lourenço; Amaral, António Fernando Salgueiro; Bento, Maria da Conceição Saraiva da Silva Costa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the contribution of Portuguese nursing to improving universal health access and coverage by means of the identification of nurses in the health system; evolution of health indicators; and access-promoting systems, in which nurses play a relevant role. Method: this was documentary research of publications fromnational and international organizations on planning and health outcomes. Statistical databases and legislation on health reforms were consulted. Results: nurses represent 30.18% of human resources in the national health service; the systems of access promotion performed by nurses have good levels of efficacy (95.5%) and user satisfaction (99% completely satisfied); in the local care the creation of Community Care Units (185) occurred, and 85.80% of home consultations were performed by nurses. Conclusion: political strategies, the National Health Service and strengthening of human resourcesin healthcareare the main determinants. Nursing is the most numerous professional group in the National Health Service, however numbers remaindeficient in primary health care. The improvement of academic qualification and self-regulation of this professional group has allowed for better answers inimproving health for the Portuguese. PMID:26959331

  1. Health insurance coverage in Jamaica: Multivariate Analyses using two cross-sectional survey data for 2002 and 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Andrew Bourne

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health insurance is established as an indicator of health care-seeking behaviour. Despite this reality, no study existed in Jamaica that examines those factors that determine private health insurance coverage. This study bridges the gap in the literature as it seeks to determine correlates of private health insurance coverage. The aim of this study is to understand those who possess Health insurance coverage in Jamaica so as to aid public health policy formulation.Method: This study used two secondary cross-sectional data from the Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (JSLC. The JSLC was commissioned by the PIOJ and the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN in 1988. The surveys were taken from a national cross-sectional survey of 25 018 respondents (for 2002 and 6,782 people (for 2007 from the 14 parishes across Jamaica. The JSLC is a self-administered questionnaire where respondents are asked to recall detailed information on particular activities. The questionnaire was modelled from the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS household survey. There are some modifications to the LSMS, as JSLC is more focused on policy impacts. The surveys used stratified random probability sampling technique to draw the original sample of respondents. Descriptive statistics were used to provide background information on the sample, and logistic regression was to determine predictors of private health insurance coverage.Results: Health insurance coverage can be predicted by socio-demographic factors (such as area of residence; education, marital status, social support, social class, gender, age, and economic (consumption and income. The findings revealed some similarities and dissimilarities between data for 2002 and 2007. Area of residence, consumption, educational level, marital status, income and social support were determinants over the two periods. Asset ownership was a factor in 2002 but not in 2007. For 2007, age, gender

  2. A road map for universal coverage: finding a pass through the financial mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Samuel Y; Lee, Philip R

    2008-04-01

    Government already pays for more than half of U.S. health care costs, and nearly all universal health insurance proposals assume continued government involvement through tax subsidies and other means. The question of what specific taxes could be used to finance universal coverage is, however, seldom carefully examined, in part due to efforts by health care reform proponents to downplay tax issues. In this article we undertake such an examination. We argue that the challenges of relying on taxes for universal coverage are even greater than is generally appreciated, but that they can nevertheless be met. A proposal to fund a universal health insurance voucher system with a value-added tax illustrates issues that would arise for tax-financed plans in general and provides a broad framework for a bipartisan approach to universal coverage. We discuss significant problems that such an approach would face and suggest solutions. We outline a long-term political and legislative strategy for enacting universal coverage that draws upon precedents set by comparable legislative initiatives, including tax reform and Medicare. The results are an improved understanding of the relationship between systemic health care finance reform and taxation and a politically realistic plan for universal coverage that employs undisguised taxes. PMID:18325897

  3. Investing in Nurses is a Prerequisite for Ensuring Universal Health Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Ann E; Jacob, Sheena; Squires, Allison P; Sliney, Anne; Davis, Sheila; Stalls, Suzanne; Portillo, Carmen J

    2016-01-01

    Nurses and midwives constitute the majority of the global health workforce and the largest health care expenditure. Efficient production, successful deployment, and ongoing retention based on carefully constructed policies regarding the career opportunities of nurses, midwives, and other providers in health care systems are key to ensuring universal health coverage. Yet nurses are constrained by practice regulations, workplaces, and career ladder barriers from contributing to primary health care delivery. Evidence shows that quality HIV care, comparable to that of physicians, is provided by trained nurses and associate clinicians, but many African countries' health systems remain dependent on limited numbers of physicians and fail to meet the demand for treatment. The World Health Organization endorses task sharing to ensure universal health coverage in HIV and maternal health, which requires an investment in nursing education, retention, and professional growth opportunities. Exemplars from Haiti, Rwanda, Republic of Georgia, and multi-country efforts are described. PMID:27086193

  4. Prescription drugs: issues of cost, coverage, and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, C

    1999-04-01

    This Issue Brief closely examines expenditures on prescription drugs, and discusses their potential to substitute for other types of health care services. In addition, it describes employer coverage of prescription drugs, direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs, and potential legislation affecting the prescription drug market. Prescription drug expenditures grew at double-digit rates during almost every year since 1980, accelerating to 14.1 percent in 1997. In contrast, total national health expenditures, hospital service expenditures, and physician service expenditures growth rates decreased from approximately 13 percent in 1980 to less than 5 percent in 1997. Private insurance payments for prescription drugs increased 17.7 percent in 1997, after growing 22.1 percent in 1995 and 18.3 percent in 1996. This growth in prescription drug payments compares with 4 percent or less overall annual growth in private insurance payments for each of those three years. From 1993 to 1997, the overwhelming majority of the increases in expenditures on prescription drugs were attributable to increased volume, mix, and availability of pharmaceutical products. In 1997, these factors accounted for more than 80 percent of the growth in prescription drug expenditures. A leading explanation for the sharp growth in drug expenditures is that prescription drugs are a substitute for other forms of health care. While it is difficult to determine the extent to which this substitution occurs, various studies have associated cost savings with the use of pharmaceutical products in treating specific diseases. Evidence suggests that more appropriate utilization of prescription drugs has the potential to lower total expenditures and improve the quality of care. Also, some studies indicate the U.S. health care system needs to improve the way patients use and physicians prescribe current medications. Prescription drug plans offered by employers are likely to undergo changes to ensure that

  5. Toward a 21st-century health care system: Recommendations for health care reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Arrow (Kenneth); A. Auerbach (Alan); J. Bertko (John); L.P. Casalino (Lawrence Peter); F.J. Crosson (Francis); A. Enthoven (Alain); E. Falcone; R.C. Feldman; V.R. Fuchs (Victor); A.M. Garber (Alan); M.R. Gold (Marthe Rachel); D.A. Goldman; G.K. Hadfield (Gillian); M.A. Hall (Mark Ann); R.I. Horwitz (Ralph); M. Hooven; P.D. Jacobson (Peter); T.S. Jost (Timothy Stoltzfus); L.J. Kotlikoff; J. Levin (Jonathan); S. Levine (Sharon); R. Levy; K. Linscott; H.S. Luft; R. Mashal; D. McFadden (Daniel); D. Mechanic (David); D. Meltzer (David); J.P. Newhouse (Joseph); R.G. Noll (Roger); J.B. Pietzsch (Jan Benjamin); P. Pizzo (Philip); R.D. Reischauer (Robert); S. Rosenbaum (Sara); W. Sage (William); L.D. Schaeffer (Leonard Daniel); E. Sheen; B.N. Silber (Bernie Michael); J. Skinner (Jonathan Robert); S.M. Shortell (Stephen); S.O. Thier (Samuel); S. Tunis (Sean); L. Wulsin Jr.; P. Yock (Paul); G.B. Nun; S. Bryan (Stirling); O. Luxenburg (Osnat); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); J. Cooper (Jim)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a

  6. The importance of Leadership towards universal health coverage in Low Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonani, A; Muula, A S

    2015-03-01

    Universal health coverage--defined as access to the full range of the most appropriate health care and technology for all people at the lowest possible price or with social health protection--was the goal of the 1978 Alma-Ata Conference on Primary Health Care in Kazakhstan. Many low-income (developing) countries are currently unable to reach this goal despite having articulated the same in their health-related documents. In this paper we argue that, over 30 years on, inadequate political and technical leadership has prevented the realization of universal health coverage in low-income countries.

  7. Quality indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth-Andersen, Christian

    1991-01-01

    In recent literature it has been suggested that consumers need have no knowledge of product quality as a number of quality indicators (or signals) may be used as substitutes. Very little attention has been paid to the empirical verification of these studies. The present paper is devoted to the is......In recent literature it has been suggested that consumers need have no knowledge of product quality as a number of quality indicators (or signals) may be used as substitutes. Very little attention has been paid to the empirical verification of these studies. The present paper is devoted...... to the issue of how well these indicators perform, using market data provided by consumer magazines from 3 countries. The results strongly indicate that price is a poor quality indicator. The paper also presents some evidence which suggests that seller reputation and easily observable characteristics are also...... poor indicators...

  8. Patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in Ethiopia: implications for universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Elias; Dominis, Sarah; Palen, John G H; Wong, Wendy; Bekele, Abebe; Kebede, Amha; Johns, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Formalized task shifting structures have been used to rapidly scale up antiretroviral service delivery to underserved populations in several countries, and may be a promising mechanism for accomplishing universal health coverage. However, studies evaluating the quality of service delivery through task shifting have largely ignored the patient perspective, focusing on health outcomes and acceptability to health care providers and regulatory bodies, despite studies worldwide that have shown the significance of patient satisfaction as an indicator of quality. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with task shifting of antiretroviral services in hospitals and health centres in four regions of Ethiopia. This cross-sectional study used data collected from a time-motion study of patient services paired with 665 patient exit interviews in a stratified random sample of antiretroviral therapy clinics in 21 hospitals and 40 health centres in 2012. Data were analyzed using f-tests across provider types, and multivariate logistic regression to identify determinants of patient satisfaction. Most (528 of 665) patients were satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the services received, but patients who received services from nurses and health officers were significantly more likely to report satisfaction than those who received services from doctors [odds ratio (OR) 0.26, P < 0.01]. Investments in the health facility were associated with higher satisfaction (OR 1.07, P < 0.01), while costs to patients of over 120 birr were associated with lower satisfaction (OR 0.14, P < 0.05). This study showed high levels of patient satisfaction with task shifting in Ethiopia. The evidence generated by this study complements previous biomedical and health care provider/regulatory acceptability studies to support the inclusion of task shifting as a mechanism for scaling-up health services to achieve universal health coverage, particularly for underserved areas facing severe health worker

  9. Waste indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  10. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  11. A Hybrid Memetic Framework for Coverage Optimization in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Pang; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Lin, Tzu-Shiang; Liao, Min-Sheng; Wang, Yung-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2015-10-01

    One of the critical concerns in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is the continuous maintenance of sensing coverage. Many particular applications, such as battlefield intrusion detection and object tracking, require a full-coverage at any time, which is typically resolved by adding redundant sensor nodes. With abundant energy, previous studies suggested that the network lifetime can be maximized while maintaining full coverage through organizing sensor nodes into a maximum number of disjoint sets and alternately turning them on. Since the power of sensor nodes is unevenly consumed over time, and early failure of sensor nodes leads to coverage loss, WSNs require dynamic coverage maintenance. Thus, the task of permanently sustaining full coverage is particularly formulated as a hybrid of disjoint set covers and dynamic-coverage-maintenance problems, and both have been proven to be nondeterministic polynomial-complete. In this paper, a hybrid memetic framework for coverage optimization (Hy-MFCO) is presented to cope with the hybrid problem using two major components: 1) a memetic algorithm (MA)-based scheduling strategy and 2) a heuristic recursive algorithm (HRA). First, the MA-based scheduling strategy adopts a dynamic chromosome structure to create disjoint sets, and then the HRA is utilized to compensate the loss of coverage by awaking some of the hibernated nodes in local regions when a disjoint set fails to maintain full coverage. The results obtained from real-world experiments using a WSN test-bed and computer simulations indicate that the proposed Hy-MFCO is able to maximize sensing coverage while achieving energy efficiency at the same time. Moreover, the results also show that the Hy-MFCO significantly outperforms the existing methods with respect to coverage preservation and energy efficiency. PMID:25532143

  12. 29 CFR 801.3 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 General § 801.3 Coverage. (a) The coverage of the Act extends to “any... of lie detector, including polygraph, tests which occur within the territorial jurisdiction of the... a polygraph test that is to be administered on the high seas or in some foreign location....

  13. Computational Methods for Analyzing Health News Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Delano J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers that investigate the media's coverage of health have historically relied on keyword searches to retrieve relevant health news coverage, and manual content analysis methods to categorize and score health news text. These methods are problematic. Manual content analysis methods are labor intensive, time consuming, and inherently…

  14. 24 CFR 1006.330 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 1006.330... DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Program Requirements § 1006.330 Insurance coverage. (a) In general. As a condition to receiving NHHBG funds, the DHHL must require adequate...

  15. Research on LTE Network Coverage Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Gu; Ren Sheng

    2011-01-01

    When deploying an LTE network, coverage planning is critical to reduce construction costs and ensure network quality. This paper considers actual network planning requirements and combines theory with simulation analysis to study LTE wireless access link and network characteristics. A theory for LTE cellular coverage planning and application methods is proposed that lays the basic foundation for LTE cellular networks.

  16. 24 CFR 320.11 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 320.11 Section...-BACKED SECURITIES Pass-Through Type Securities § 320.11 Insurance coverage. The issuer shall maintain, for the benefit of the Association, insurance, errors and omissions, fidelity bond and other...

  17. 43 CFR 12.931 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage. 12.931 Section 12.931 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS AND... Requirements § 12.931 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent...

  18. 7 CFR 3019.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance coverage. 3019.31 Section 3019.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER... Standards § 3019.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent...

  19. 29 CFR 95.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Insurance coverage. 95.31 Section 95.31 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON... § 95.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance...

  20. CDMA coverage under mobile heterogeneous network load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saban, Dorin; Berg, van den Hans; Boucherie, Richard J.; Endrayanto, Irwan

    2002-01-01

    We analytically investigate coverage (determined by the uplink) under non-homogeneous and moving traffic load of third generation UMTS mobile networks. In particular, for different call assignment policies, we investigate cell breathing and the movement of the coverage gap occurring between cells wh

  1. O abrigo como fator de risco ou proteção: avaliação institucional e indicadores de qualidade Foster care as risk or protective factors: institutional evaluation and quality indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Salina-Brandão

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Partindo-se de estudos referentes ao impacto da organização dos abrigos sobre o desenvolvimento de crianças e adolescentes institucionalizados, o presente trabalho objetivou: investigar as estratégias utilizadas por profissionais ao avaliarem abrigos, bem como os indicadores de qualidade que orientam essa tarefa. Participaram do estudo nove avaliadores e cinco coordenadores de abrigos. A coleta de dados deu-se por entrevistas, questionários e análise documental, sendo analisados segundo o referencial teórico da Psicopatologia do Desenvolvimento, especificamente referente aos fatores de risco e proteção. Os avaliadores utilizaram, de forma e freqüência variada, a visita à entidade como estratégia avaliativa. Os indicadores de qualidade identificados, também variaram. Obteve-se baixa freqüência de relatos sobre práticas educativas dos monitores e cuidados da entidade para manutenção dos vínculos familiares.Based on studies relating the impact of foster care organizations on the development of institutionalized children and adolescents, the present paper conducted an investigation of the strategies used by professionals in charge of foster care evaluation in Brazil, as well as the quality indicators used for this task. Nine evaluators and five foster care coordinators took part in the study. Data collection involved interviews, questionnaires and document analysis, using a framework from Developmental Psychopathology, specifically in terms of its contribution on risk and protective factors. Evaluators used the institutional visit as a predominant assessment strategy, conducting it in different ways and frequency. The quality indicators found were also varied. A low frequency of reports related to the educational practice of frontline staff and institutional efforts in order to maintain family ties were observed as well.

  2. Impact of conflict on infant immunisation coverage in Afghanistan: a countrywide study 2000–2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seino Kaoruko

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant immunisation is an effective public health intervention to reduce the morbidity and mortality of vaccine preventable diseases. However, some developing countries fail to achieve desirable vaccination coverage; Afghanistan is one such country. The present study was performed to evaluate the progress and variation in infant immunisation coverage by district and region in Afghanistan and to assess the impact of conflict and resource availability on immunisation coverage. Results This study analysed reports of infant immunisation from 331 districts across 7 regions of Afghanistan between 2000 and 2003. Geographic information system (GIS analysis was used to visualise the distribution of immunisation coverage in districts and to identify geographic inequalities in the process of improvement of infant immunisation coverage. The number of districts reporting immunisation coverage increased substantially during the four years of the study. Progress in Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG immunisation coverage was observed in all 7 regions, although satisfactory coverage of 80% remained unequally distributed. Progress in the third dose of Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus (DPT3 immunisation differed among regions, in addition to the unequal distribution of immunisation coverage in 2000. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated a significant negative association between lack of security in the region and achievement of 80% coverage of immunisation regardless of available resources for immunisation, while resource availability showed no relation to immunisation coverage. Conclusion Although progress was observed in all 7 regions, geographic inequalities in these improvements remain a cause for concern. The results of the present study indicated that security within a country is an important factor for affecting the delivery of immunisation services.

  3. Does health insurance continuity among low-income adults impact their children's insurance coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Melissa; Carlson, Matthew J; Wright, Bill J; Angier, Heather; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2013-02-01

    Parent's insurance coverage is associated with children's insurance status, but little is known about whether a parent's coverage continuity affects a child's coverage. This study assesses the association between an adult's insurance continuity and the coverage status of their children. We used data from a subgroup of participants in the Oregon Health Care Survey, a three-wave, 30-month prospective cohort study (n = 559). We examined the relationship between the length of time an adult had health insurance coverage and whether or not all children in the same household were insured at the end of the study. We used a series of univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to identify significant associations and the rho correlation coefficient to assess collinearity. A dose response relationship was observed between continuity of adult coverage and the odds that all children in the household were insured. Among adults with continuous coverage, 91.4% reported that all children were insured at the end of the study period, compared to 83.7% of adults insured for 19-27 months, 74.3% of adults insured for 10-18 months, and 70.8% of adults insured for fewer than 9 months. This stepwise pattern persisted in logistic regression models: adults with the fewest months of coverage, as compared to those continuously insured, reported the highest odds of having uninsured children (adjusted odds ratio 7.26, 95% confidence interval 2.75, 19.17). Parental health insurance continuity is integral to maintaining children's insurance coverage. Policies to promote continuous coverage for adults will indirectly benefit children.

  4. Federally-Assisted Healthcare Coverage among Male State Prisoners with Chronic Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David L; Grodensky, Catherine A; Holley, Tara K

    2016-01-01

    Prisoners have higher rates of chronic diseases such as substance dependence, mental health conditions and infectious disease, as compared to the general population. We projected the number of male state prisoners with a chronic health condition who at release would be eligible or ineligible for healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). We used ACA income guidelines in conjunction with reported pre-arrest social security benefits and income from a nationally representative sample of prisoners to estimate the number eligible for healthcare coverage at release. There were 643,290 US male prisoners aged 18-64 with a chronic health condition. At release, 73% in Medicaid-expansion states would qualify for Medicaid or tax credits. In non-expansion states, 54% would qualify for tax credits, but 22% (n = 69,827) had incomes of ≤ 100% the federal poverty limit and thus would be ineligible for ACA-mediated healthcare coverage. These prisoners comprise 11% of all male prisoners with a chronic condition. The ACA was projected to provide coverage to most male state prisoners with a chronic health condition; however, roughly 70,000 fall in the "coverage gap" and may require non-routine care at emergency departments. Mechanisms are needed to secure coverage for this at risk group and address barriers to routine utilization of health services. PMID:27479089

  5. Plugging indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is often difficult to measure a plugging temperature when the impurity concentration in liquid sodium is low. Then, the plugging temperature is considered to be inferior to 1100C. Sometimes, a more precise indication is required. We propose a use for the plugging indicator which satisfies this type of requirement. A partial plugging of the indicator orifice is produced and increases at a constant temperature. A mathematical model describes this growth: it is based mainly on the kinetics of Na2O and NaH crystal growth and links the plugging time to oxygen or hydrogen concentrations. (orig.)

  6. The Role of Practical Advice in Bioterrorism News Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Kristen Alley

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of crisis advice appearing in US news coverage of the 2001 anthrax attacks. Coverage of any crisis can spark public outrage, including fear, speculation, and contradictory or confusing evidence, especially when the stories do not contain practical advice. Five coders analyzed 833 news stories from 272 major US newspapers, the Associated Press, National Public Radio, and 4 major US television networks. Practical advice appeared in only a quarter of the stories, even though practical advice for self-protection was mentioned 3 times more often than the vague advice that simply advised people not to panic. Public health officials provided the most practical advice, while scientists provided the least practical advice. Stories containing practical advice also provided more elucidating information, explaining why the threat was low, reducible, treatable, and detectable. Over the 3 phases of the anthrax crisis, an inverse relationship appeared between the amount of news coverage containing practical advice compared to "outrage rhetoric." Stories mentioned practical advice more often during the post-impact phase than earlier in the crisis. Elucidating, explanatory advice emphasized actions, risk comparisons, and tradeoffs. The findings indicate that when journalists use credible sources to provide practical advice and avoid speculation, their coverage can prevent the spread of misinformation and confusion during a bioterror attack. Also, journalists should provide context and sourcing when discussing advice during the outbreak and impact phases of the crisis, because these explanations could counteract outrage and threat distortion.

  7. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  8. Prescription drug coverage and seniors: findings from a 2003 national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Dana Gelb; Neuman, Patricia; Schoen, Cathy; Kitchman, Michelle S; Wilson, Ira B; Cooper, Barbara; Li, Angela; Chang, Hong; Rogers, William H

    2005-01-01

    Beginning in 2006 the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) will offer pharmacy benefits to forty-two million Medicare beneficiaries nationwide. In a 2003 national survey of Medicare beneficiaries age sixty-five and older, more than one-quarter reported no prescription coverage, and nearly half of low-income seniors in some states lacked coverage. Wide coverage differences among states highlight implementation challenges and the need for tailored enrollment strategies. Evidence of Medicaid's highly effective coverage delineates the importance of assuring this group's continued protection under Part D plans. Reports of complex drug regimens, multiple prescribing physicians and pharmacies, nonadherence, and reimportation demonstrate the challenges of integrating seniors' prescription care. We discuss MMA's potential to improve quality and the need to monitor performance. PMID:15840625

  9. Network television news coverage of environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, M.R.; Sandman, P.M.; Sachsman, D.V.; Salomone, K.L.

    1989-03-01

    Despite the criticisms that surround television coverage of environmental risk, there have been relatively few attempts to measure what and whom television shows. Most research has focused analysis on a few weeks of coverage of major stories like the gas leak at Bhopal, the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, or the Mount St. Helen's eruption. To advance the research into television coverage of environmental risk, an analysis has been made of all environmental risk coverage by the network nightly news broadcasts for a period of more than two years. Researchers have analyzed all environmental risk coverage-564 stories in 26 months-presented on ABC, CBS, and NBC's evening news broadcasts from January 1984 through February 1986. The quantitative information from the 564 stories was balanced by a more qualitative analysis of the television coverage of two case studies-the dioxin contamination in Times Beach, Missouri, and the suspected methyl isocyanate emissions from the Union Carbide plant in Institute, West Virginia. Both qualitative and quantitative data contributed to the analysis of the role played by experts and environmental advocacy sources in coverage of environmental risk and to the suggestions for increasing that role.

  10. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hresko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related and pharmacogenetic (PGx tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  11. Insurance coverage policies for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hresko, Andrew; Haga, Susanne B

    2012-10-30

    Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related) and pharmacogenetic (PGx) tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less) of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  12. Can a universal coverage system temper the underwriting cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, J R; Jensen, G A

    1992-01-01

    The health insurance industry has experienced a pronounced six-year cycle of earnings for nearly three decades--three years of profits followed by three years of losses. This profitability cycle triggers a turbulent pricing cycle. After reviewing three schools of thought about the causes of the cycle, in this article we examine new evidence to determine the probable impact on the cycle of a private-public, universal coverage, national health plan. We find no evidence of a cycle in the pricing and use of health care services. Since 1985, the relationship between the overall economy and health insurance trends has weakened. We conclude that the root causes of the cycle are essentially internal to the insurance industry, and, therefore, national health care reform will have little impact on the underwriting cycle.

  13. Missed opportunities in full immunization coverage: findings from low- and lower-middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Clara Restrepo-Méndez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: An estimated 23 million infants are still not being benefitted from routine immunization services. We assessed how many children failed to be fully immunized even though they or their mothers were in contact with health services to receive other interventions. Design: Fourteen countries with Demographic and Health Surveys and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys carried out after 2000 and with coverage for DPT (Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine below 70% were selected. We defined full immunization coverage (FIC as having received one dose of BCG (bacille Calmette-Guérin, one dose of measles, three doses of polio, and three doses of DPT vaccines. We tabulated FIC against: antenatal care (ANC, skilled birth attendance (SBA, postnatal care for the mother (PNC, vitamin A supplementation (VitA for the child, and sleeping under an insecticide-treated bed-net (ITN. Missed opportunities were defined as the percentage of children who failed to be fully immunized among those receiving one or more other interventions. Results: Children who received other health interventions were also more likely to be fully immunized. In nearly all countries, FIC was lowest among children born to mothers who failed to attend ANC, and highest when the mother had four or more ANC visits Côte d'Ivoire presented the largest difference in FIC: 54 percentage points (pp between having four or more ANC visits and lack of ANC. SBA was also related with higher FIC. For instance, the coverage in children without SBA was 36 pp lower than for those with SBA in Nigeria. The largest absolute difference on FIC in relation to PNC was observed for Ethiopia: 31 pp between those without and with PNC. FIC was also positively related with having received VitA. The largest absolute difference was observed in DR Congo: 41 pp. The differences in FIC among whether or not children slept under ITN were much smaller than for other interventions. Haiti presented the largest absolute

  14. Indicadores de gênero da assistência de enfermagem às mulheres Indicadores de género de la asistencia a las mujeres Gender indicators of nursing care for women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enilda Rosendo do Nascimento

    2004-10-01

    care from a gender perspective. The construction of the indicators occurred by means of an investigation that analyzed women's ideas about the pre-natal nursing assistance provided to them, based on the identifications of actions that promote autonomy, merit, and participation. Data collecting was based on a semi-structured interview with 14 women that are users of pre-natal nursing care and accepted to participate in this study and had also been cared by a nurse in a previous pregnancy or during the present one. Two kinds of gender indicators in nursing care were built: practical indicators and strategic gender indicators.

  15. Are we nearly there yet? Coverage and compliance of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Neal D E

    2015-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis has been targeted for elimination by 2020, and a threshold of 65% coverage of mass drug administration (MDA) has been adopted by the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF). A recent review by Babu and Babu of 36 studies of MDA for lymphatic filariasis in India found that coverage, defined as receipt of tablets, ranged from 48.8 to 98.8%, while compliance, defined as actual ingestion of tablets, was 22% lower on average. Moreover, the denominator for these coverage figures is the eligible, rather than total, population. By contrast, the 65% threshold, in the original modelling study, refers to ingestion of tablets in the total population. This corresponds to GPELF's use of 'epidemiological drug coverage' as a trigger for the Transmission Assessment Surveys (TAS), which indicate whether to proceed to post-MDA surveillance. The existence of less strict definitions of 'coverage' should not lead to premature TAS that could impair MDA's sustainability.

  16. Are we nearly there yet? Coverage and compliance of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Neal D E

    2015-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis has been targeted for elimination by 2020, and a threshold of 65% coverage of mass drug administration (MDA) has been adopted by the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF). A recent review by Babu and Babu of 36 studies of MDA for lymphatic filariasis in India found that coverage, defined as receipt of tablets, ranged from 48.8 to 98.8%, while compliance, defined as actual ingestion of tablets, was 22% lower on average. Moreover, the denominator for these coverage figures is the eligible, rather than total, population. By contrast, the 65% threshold, in the original modelling study, refers to ingestion of tablets in the total population. This corresponds to GPELF's use of 'epidemiological drug coverage' as a trigger for the Transmission Assessment Surveys (TAS), which indicate whether to proceed to post-MDA surveillance. The existence of less strict definitions of 'coverage' should not lead to premature TAS that could impair MDA's sustainability. PMID:25575555

  17. Exact Gap Computation for Code Coverage Metrics in ISO-C

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Dirk; 10.4204/EPTCS.80.4

    2012-01-01

    Test generation and test data selection are difficult tasks for model based testing. Tests for a program can be meld to a test suite. A lot of research is done to quantify the quality and improve a test suite. Code coverage metrics estimate the quality of a test suite. This quality is fine, if the code coverage value is high or 100%. Unfortunately it might be impossible to achieve 100% code coverage because of dead code for example. There is a gap between the feasible and theoretical maximal possible code coverage value. Our review of the research indicates, none of current research is concerned with exact gap computation. This paper presents a framework to compute such gaps exactly in an ISO-C compatible semantic and similar languages. We describe an efficient approximation of the gap in all the other cases. Thus, a tester can decide if more tests might be able or necessary to achieve better coverage.

  18. The unmet need for Emergency Obstetric Care in Tanga Region, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mtatifikolo Ferdinand; Hunger Claudia; Kuelker Rainer; Massawe Siriel; Prytherch Helen; Jahn Albrecht

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Improving maternal health by reducing maternal mortality constitutes the fifth Millennium Development Goal and represents a key public health challenge in the United Republic of Tanzania. In response to the need to evaluate and monitor safe motherhood interventions, this study aims at assessing the coverage of obstetric care according to the Unmet Obstetric Need (UON) concept by obtaining information on indications for, and outcomes of, major obstetric interventions. Furth...

  19. Multicriteria decision analysis for including health interventions in the universal health coverage benefit package in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youngkong, S.; Baltussen, R.M.; Tantivess, S.; Mohara, A.; Teerawattananon, Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Considering rising health expenditure on the one hand and increasing public expectations on the other hand, there is a need for explicit health care rationing to secure public acceptance of coverage decisions of health interventions. The National Health Security Office, the institute man

  20. Do registro ao indicador: gestão da produção da informação assistencial nos hospitais From records to indicators: the management of health care information production in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Schout

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A valorização da utilização de indicadores assistenciais no monitoramento do desempenho dos sistemas de serviços de saúde cresceu de forma significativa nas últimas décadas. A expansão do Sistema Único de Saúde/SUS e do Sistema de Saúde Suplementar, e as formas de gestão adotadas estimularam o uso de indicadores na avaliação do desempenho, qualidade e segurança nos hospitais, sendo propostos sistemas de indicadores. Não houve uma correspondente preocupação com as condições de produção dos dados e informações para esses indicadores nos serviços de saúde. O artigo discute algumas das condições necessárias para a qualidade nos indicadores para a gestão da assistência nos hospitais: uma cultura de valorização da informação clínica, administrativa e de pesquisa, compartilhada por todos, e a adequada gestão dos registros clínicos, estatísticas hospitalares e sistemas de informações hospitalares. Não existem propostas prontas para a gestão da informação nos hospitais, fazendo-se necessário desenvolver uma capacidade institucional de incorporar e utilizar, na forma mais adequada para cada instituição e contexto, competências e recursos materiais e humanos diversificados, para que a gestão da informação se transforme em um processo dinâmico e parte da gestão do serviço como um todo.Utilization of health care indicators in the monitoring of health system performance has become increasingly important in the last decades. The expansion of the public National Health System, Sistema Único de Saúde/SUS, growth of the private health sector and implementation of specific types of health care regulation models stimulated the utilization of indicators in the evaluation of hospital care quality and performance and proposals of national indicator systems. This was not accompanied with a corresponding investment in the conditions in which the needed data and information are produced in health services. The

  1. 22 CFR 513.110 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) General § 513.110 Coverage. (a) These regulations... respect to participants and principals in the covered transactions and activities described in...

  2. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  3. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  4. Closing the Prescription Drug Coverage Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coinsurance or copayment for the rest of the year. Your “Explanation of Benefits” (EOB) notice will show any discounts the drug companies paid. Example: Mrs. Anderson reaches the coverage gap in her Medicare drug plan. She goes to ...

  5. Measuring populations to improve vaccination coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Nita; Djibo, Ali; Tatem, Andrew J.; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Ferrari, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    In low-income settings, vaccination campaigns supplement routine immunization but often fail to achieve coverage goals due to uncertainty about target population size and distribution. Accurate, updated estimates of target populations are rare but critical; short-term fluctuations can greatly impact population size and susceptibility. We use satellite imagery to quantify population fluctuations and the coverage achieved by a measles outbreak response vaccination campaign in urban Niger and compare campaign estimates to measurements from a post-campaign survey. Vaccine coverage was overestimated because the campaign underestimated resident numbers and seasonal migration further increased the target population. We combine satellite-derived measurements of fluctuations in population distribution with high-resolution measles case reports to develop a dynamic model that illustrates the potential improvement in vaccination campaign coverage if planners account for predictable population fluctuations. Satellite imagery can improve retrospective estimates of vaccination campaign impact and future campaign planning by synchronizing interventions with predictable population fluxes. PMID:27703191

  6. Length and coverage of inhibitory decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Authors present algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. Inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute ≠ value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. Paper contains also comparison of length and coverage of inhibitory rules constructed by a greedy algorithm and by the dynamic programming algorithm. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Limited Deposit Insurance Coverage and Bank Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Shy, Oz; Stenbacka, Rune; Yankov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Deposit insurance designs in many countries place a limit on the coverage of deposits in each bank. However, no limits are placed on the number of accounts held with different banks. Therefore, under limited deposit insurance, some consumers open accounts with different banks to achieve higher or full deposit insurance coverage. We compare three regimes of deposit insurance: No deposit insurance, unlimited deposit insurance, and limited deposit insurance. We show that limited deposit insuranc...

  8. The professional perspective on patient involvement in the development of quality indicators: a qualitative analysis using the example of chronic heart failure in the German health care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohontsch NJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nadine Janis Pohontsch,1 Heidrun Herzberg,2 Stefanie Joos,3 Felix Welti,4 Martin Scherer,1 Eva Blozik1 1Department of Primary Medical Care, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamberg, Germany; 2Faculty of Health, Nursing, Management, Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences, Neubrandenburg, Germany; 3Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany; 4Faculty of Human Sciences, University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany Purpose: There is an international consensus that quality indicators (QIs of health care ought to represent patient-relevant aspects. Therefore, patient involvement in the development process is essential. However, there is no methodological gold standard for involving patients in QI development. The aim of this study is to explore experts’ views on the representation of patient-relevant aspects in the QI development process using the QIs developed in the context of the German National Disease Management Guideline for Heart Failure as an example. Methods: Semi-structured, open telephone interviews were conducted with 15 German experts (patient representatives, physicians, researchers, and methodologists involved in guideline development or quality assessment. Interview themes were the relevance of the exemplary set of QIs for patients, as well as the legitimacy of, competence of, and collaboration with the patient representative who participated in the development process. Interviews were fully transcribed and content analyzed. Deductive categories derived from the research questions were supplemented by inductively formed categories during the review of the interview material.Results: The qualitative analysis suggests a discrepancy between the guidelines’ QIs and those relevant to patients from an expert’s point of view, such as physician-patient communication and quality of counseling. Experts reported only minor communication and cooperation

  9. Cooperative Cloud Service Aware Mobile Internet Coverage Connectivity Guarantee Protocol Based on Sensor Opportunistic Coverage Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the Internet coverage ratio and provide connectivity guarantee, based on sensor opportunistic coverage mechanism and cooperative cloud service, we proposed the coverage connectivity guarantee protocol for mobile Internet. In this scheme, based on the opportunistic covering rules, the network coverage algorithm of high reliability and real-time security was achieved by using the opportunity of sensor nodes and the Internet mobile node. Then, the cloud service business support platform is created based on the Internet application service management capabilities and wireless sensor network communication service capabilities, which is the architecture of the cloud support layer. The cooperative cloud service aware model was proposed. Finally, we proposed the mobile Internet coverage connectivity guarantee protocol. The results of experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has excellent performance, in terms of the security of the Internet and the stability, as well as coverage connectivity ability.

  10. Evaluating Living Standard Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birčiaková Naďa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of selected available indicators of living standards, divided into three groups, namely economic, environmental, and social. We have selected six countries of the European Union for analysis: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, France, and Great Britain. The aim of this paper is to evaluate indicators measuring living standards and suggest the most important factors which should be included in the final measurement. We have tried to determine what factors influence each indicator and what factors affect living standards. We have chosen regression analysis as our main method. From the study of factors, we can deduce their impact on living standards, and thus the value of indicators of living standards. Indicators with a high degree of reliability include the following factors: size and density of population, health care and spending on education. Emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere also have a certain lower degree of reliability.

  11. Standard wound coverage techniques for extremity war injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand R

    2006-01-01

    Reconstruction of extremity war injuries begins with aggressive forward resuscitative care and stabilization of the trauma patient. After serial care in progressively better supported medical environments, definitive management is done at the level V military treatment facility. Aggressive forward care coupled with rapid air transport has enabled increasingly complex care to be administered at the continental United States military facilities; however, it has also made the decision between limb salvage and amputation more challenging. Yet to be determined are (1) the optimal timing of definitive wound closure or coverage in coordination with fracture stabilization and (2) the optimal types of flap for both upper and lower extremity reconstruction. Records of patients with complex lower and upper extremity wounds who were treated at the National Naval Medical Center between September 2004 and June 2006 reveal useful short-term data. Longer-term data, such as fracture union rate, time to ambulation, range of motion and global function of salvaged limbs, patient satisfaction with limb salvage, and average cost, are not yet available.

  12. Coverage-based treatment planning: Optimizing the IMRT PTV to meet a CTV coverage criterion

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, J. J.; Siebers, J. V.

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates an iterative approach—referred to as coverage-based treatment planning—designed to produce treatment plans that ensure target coverage for a specified percentage of setup errors. In this approach the clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margin is iteratively adjusted until the specified CTV coverage is achieved. The advantage of this approach is that it automatically compensates for the dosimetric margin around the CTV, i.e., the extra margin th...

  13. Other indications for surfactant].

    OpenAIRE

    PROENÇA FERNANDES, E.; Carvalho, C; Silva, A.; Ferreira, P.; Alegria, A.; Lopes, L.; AREIAS, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    An Esp Pediatr. 2002 Jan;56(1):45-8. [Other indications for surfactant] [Article in Spanish] Proença Fernandes E, Carvalho C, Silva A, Ferreira P, Alegria A, Lopes L, Areias MA. Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatales y Pediátricos, Hospital Maria Pia, Spain. Abstract OBJECTIVE: The introduction of surfactant replacement therapy in the management of respiratory distress syndrome in the premature infant was a remarkable advance in neonatal intensive care. In the last few y...

  14. Effect of Antenna Parameters on the Field Coverage in Tunnel Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio wave propagation in confined spaces is consequent upon the reflections of boundaries; thus, the radiation characteristics of the antenna have significant influence on the field coverage in the confined space. This paper investigates the effects of antenna parameters on field coverage characteristics in a tunnel environment. A modified modal method is proposed to analyse the wave propagation properties along the tunnel. The relationships between the amplitudes of modes and the antenna parameters, including the beam width, beam direction, and antenna location, are analysed. The results indicate that by properly selecting the antenna parameters, optimum field coverage in tunnel environments can be realized.

  15. Hispanic-Asian Immigrant Inequality in Perceived Medical Need and Access to Regular Physician Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe Hasanali, Stephanie; De Jong, Gordon F; Roempke Graefe, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    In the face of continuing large immigrant streams, Hispanic and Asian immigrants' human and social capital inequalities will heighten U.S. race/ethnic health and health care disparities. Using data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this study assessed Hispanic-Asian immigrant disparity in access to health care, measured by perceived medical need and regular access to a physician. Logistic regression results indicated that Hispanics had lower perceived met medical need and were less likely to see a doctor regularly. These disparities were significantly attenuated by education and health insurance. Assimilation-related characteristics were significantly associated with a regular doctor visit and were not fully mediated by socioeconomic variables. Findings indicate the importance of education above and beyond insurance coverage for access to health care and suggest the potential for public health efforts to improve preventive care among immigrants. PMID:25420782

  16. The Effect of Increased Coverage of Participatory Women’s Groups on Neonatal Mortality in Bangladesh: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fottrell, Edward; Azad, Kishwar; Kuddus, Abdul; Younes, Layla; Shaha, Sanjit; Nahar, Tasmin; Aumon, Bedowra Haq; Hossen, Munir; Beard, James; Hossain, Tanvir; Pulkki-Brannstrom, Anni-Maria; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Prost, Audrey; Costello, Anthony; Houweling, Tanja A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Community-based interventions can reduce neonatal mortality when health systems are weak. Population coverage of target groups may be an important determinant of their effect on behavior and mortality. A women’s group trial at coverage of 1 group per 1414 population in rural Bangladesh showed no effect on neonatal mortality, despite a similar intervention having a significant effect on neonatal and maternal death in comparable settings. Objective To assess the effect of a participatory women’s group intervention with higher population coverage on neonatal mortality in Bangladesh. Design A cluster randomized controlled trial in 9 intervention and 9 control clusters. Setting Rural Bangladesh. Participants Women permanently residing in 18 unions in 3 districts and accounting for 19 301 births during the final 24 months of the intervention. Interventions Women’s groups at a coverage of 1 per 309 population that proceed through a participatory learning and action cycle in which they prioritize issues that affected maternal and neonatal health and design and implement strategies to address these issues. Main Outcomes and Measures Neonatal mortality rate. Results Analysis included 19 301 births during the final 24 months of the intervention. More than one-third of newly pregnant women joined the groups. The neonatal mortality rate was significantly lower in the intervention arm (21.3 neonatal deaths per 1000 live births vs 30.1 per 1000 in control areas), a reduction in neonatal mortality of 38% (risk ratio, 0.62 [95% CI, 0.43-0.89]) when adjusted for socioeconomic factors. The cost-effectiveness was US $220 to $393 per year of life lost averted. Cause-specific mortality rates suggest reduced deaths due to infections and those associated with prematurity/low birth weight. Improvements were seen in hygienic home delivery practices, newborn thermal care, and breastfeeding practices. Conclusions and Relevance Women’s group community mobilization, delivered

  17. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO. News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND, we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  18. The path towards universal health coverage in the Arab uprising countries Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Shadi S; Alameddine, Mohamad S; Natafgi, Nabil M; Mataria, Awad; Sabri, Belgacem; Nasher, Jamal; Zeiton, Moez; Ahmad, Shaimaa; Siddiqi, Sameen

    2014-01-25

    The constitutions of many countries in the Arab world clearly highlight the role of governments in guaranteeing provision of health care as a right for all citizens. However, citizens still have inequitable health-care systems. One component of such inequity relates to restricted financial access to health-care services. The recent uprisings in the Arab world, commonly referred to as the Arab spring, created a sociopolitical momentum that should be used to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). At present, many countries of the Arab spring are considering health coverage as a priority in dialogues for new constitutions and national policy agendas. UHC is also the focus of advocacy campaigns of a number of non-governmental organisations and media outlets. As part of the health in the Arab world Series in The Lancet, this report has three overarching objectives. First, we present selected experiences of other countries that had similar social and political changes, and how these events affected their path towards UHC. Second, we present a brief overview of the development of health-care systems in the Arab world with regard to health-care coverage and financing, with a focus on Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and Yemen. Third, we aim to integrate historical lessons with present contexts in a roadmap for action that addresses the challenges and opportunities for progression towards UHC.

  19. 构建县级医院护理帮扶需求指标体系的质性研究%Construction of qualitative research needs of the county hospital care aid indicator system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程淑华; 刘聪香; 唐浪娟; 刘珊

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨建立县级医院护理帮扶需求指标体系。方法:采用开放性、半结构式访谈法对11名县级护理部主任进行深度访谈,运用质性研究资料分析的方法对资料进行整理和分析,提炼主题。结果:护理帮扶需求共析出3个主题:(1)对县级医院实施护理帮扶的必要性。(2)县级医院护理帮扶需求指标体系的维度。(3)每个维度具体包括的内容。结论:护理帮扶需求指标体系有助于了解基层医院护理对口帮扶工作的实际需求,为后续工作的针对性和有效性实施提供经验与指导。%Objective:To discuss how to establish need of the county hospital care aid indicator system. Methods:11 nursing director were interviewed witth open,semi-structured interviews. To analyze the data used qualitative research. Results:There were 3 topics of need of nursing:(1)The necessity of helping the county hospitals for nursing. (2)The dimensions of indicator system of nursing needs help. (3)The specific content of each dimension. Conclusion:The indicator system of nursing needs help could understand the ture needs,and provide experience and guidance for the relevance and effectiveness of the imple-mentation of the follow-up work.

  20. Polar constellations design for discontinuous coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Salvatore; Graziano, Maria Daniela; D'Errico, Marco

    2016-10-01

    A novel constellation design method is developed for discontinuous coverage of the globe and polar caps. It integrates and extends the applicability of the coverage regions and mitigates the limitations of the existing techniques based on streets-of-coverage (SOC) theory. In particular, the visibility conditions of the targets are mapped in the (Ω, u)-domain to identify the number of satellites per plane and the distance between successive orbits, whereas the planes are arranged around the equator exploiting satellites both in ascending and descending phase. The proposed approach is applied to design potential space segments in polar LEO supporting the existing maritime surveillance services over the globe and on the future polar routes. Results show they require a smaller total number of satellites with respect to the SOC-based configurations for revisit times less than one hour and wide range of swaths. In details, it is observed a reduction between 6% and 22% for global coverage and between 24% and 33% for the coverage of polar caps.

  1. Area coverage maximization in service facility siting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisziw, Timothy C.; Murray, Alan T.

    2009-06-01

    Traditionally, models for siting facilities in order to optimize coverage of area demand have made use of discrete space representations to efficiently handle both candidate facility locations and demand. These discretizations of space are often necessary given the linear functional forms of many siting models and the complexities associated with evaluating continuous space. Recently, several spatial optimization approaches have been proposed to address the more general problem of identifying facility sites that maximize regional coverage for the case where candidate sites and demand are continuously distributed across space. One assumption of existing approaches is that only demand falling within a prescribed radius of the facility can be effectively served. In many practical applications, however, service areas are not necessarily circular, as terrain, transportation, and service characteristics of the facility often result in irregular shapes. This paper develops a generalized service coverage approach, allowing a sited facility to have any continuous service area shape, not simply a circle. Given that demand and facility sites are assumed to be continuous throughout a region, geometrical properties of the demand region and the service facility coverage area are exploited to identify a facility site to optimize the correspondence between the two areas. In particular, we consider the case where demand is uniformly distributed and the service area is translated to maximize coverage. A heuristic approach is proposed for efficient model solution. Application results are presented for siting a facility given differently shaped service areas.

  2. Housestaff coverage in a nonteaching community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, A

    1994-11-01

    In August 1992, a project team of senior medical and administrative personnel was formed (Housestaff Coverage Project Team) at the Park Ridge Health System, Rochester, N.Y.. The team was given a mandate to address housestaff coverage, primarily from an economic standpoint. Through total quality management (TQM), the project team sought to develop a house coverage plan that was sustainable, efficient, and effective. A plan was developed that includes three layers of service. A minimum "standard hospital coverage" would be available to all physicians and their patients and cover the basic needs of admission, crisis intervention, and issues of length of stay. A complete level of service would be available under the title of "case management" and would consist of total patient management, under the direction of the attending physician, from admission through discharge. The third level of service available to both "standard" and "case managed" patients would be a "consultative service." The latter would function as a traditional in-house medical service and would bill for its services. Park Ridge Hospital believes it has developed a system of housestaff coverage that is sustainable, efficient, and effective. An evaluation mechanism, primarily addressed at length of stay, will tell if we are correct in this assumption. PMID:10140893

  3. Indicadores do Serviço de Atenção Farmacêutica (SAF da Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina Indicators of the pharmaceutical care service at the University of Southern Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Modolon Alano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A Atenção Farmacêutica tem se constituído numa nova prática clínica para o farmacêutico. O estudo tem por objetivo apresentar os indicadores do Serviço de Atenção Farmacêutica da Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina. Foi realizada a análise documental dos prontuários farmacêuticos de 58 pacientes entre setembro de 2007 a março de 2008. A maioria dos pacientes eram mulheres (77,6% com idade média de 54 anos. Identificou-se no primeiro encontro a média de 4,6 problemas de saúde por paciente e no último 4,3. As classes farmacológicas mais prevalentes foram a cardiovascular (30,2% e no sistema nervoso (27,5%. Detectou-se média de 2,7 problemas relacionados com medicamentos por paciente, sendo os mais comuns aqueles relacionados à efetividade e à segurança. Dos problemas identificados 82,2% foram classificados como evitáveis e 63,7% como manifestados. Das intervenções farmacêuticas registradas soube-se da aceitação de 79,0% com 78,9% de resultados positivos. Encontrou-se média de 2,6 necessidades relacionadas ao paciente sendo, principalmente, dúvidas quanto à terapia farmacológica (30,4% sendo em 84,8% dos casos supridas.Pharmaceutical Care has represented a new clinical practice for pharmacists. This study aims to show the indicators of the Pharmaceutical Care Service at the University of Southern Santa Catarina. Documentary analysis of pharmaceutical records of 58 patients was conducted between September 2007 and March 2008 to identify the indicators. Most patients were women (77.6%, with a mean age of 54 years. Average number of health problems per patient was 4.6 in the first visit and 4.3 in the last one. The most widely used drug classes were cardiovascular (30.2% and nervous system (27.5%. On average, 2.7 drug-related problems per patient were detected, the most common being those related to effectiveness and safety. Of the problems identified, 82.2% were classified as preventable and 63.7% as manifested

  4. Increasing Coverage of Hepatitis B Vaccination in China: A Systematic Review of Interventions and Implementation Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengnan; Smith, Helen; Peng, Zhuoxin; Xu, Biao; Wang, Weibing

    2016-05-01

    This study used a system evaluation method to summarize China's experience on improving the coverage of hepatitis B vaccine, especially the strategies employed to improve the uptake of timely birth dosage. Identifying successful methods and strategies will provide strong evidence for policy makers and health workers in other countries with high hepatitis B prevalence.We conducted a literature review included English or Chinese literature carried out in mainland China, using PubMed, the Cochrane databases, Web of Knowledge, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang data, and other relevant databases.Nineteen articles about the effectiveness and impact of interventions on improving the coverage of hepatitis B vaccine were included. Strong or moderate evidence showed that reinforcing health education, training and supervision, providing subsidies for facility birth, strengthening the coordination among health care providers, and using out-of-cold-chain storage for vaccines were all important to improving vaccination coverage.We found evidence that community education was the most commonly used intervention, and out-reach programs such as out-of-cold chain strategy were more effective in increasing the coverage of vaccination in remote areas where the facility birth rate was respectively low. The essential impact factors were found to be strong government commitment and the cooperation of the different government departments.Public interventions relying on basic health care systems combined with outreach care services were critical elements in improving the hepatitis B vaccination rate in China. This success could not have occurred without exceptional national commitment. PMID:27175710

  5. U.S. Health Care Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen Marie Nedde

    1993-01-01

    High and rapidly rising health care costs in the United States and growing ranks of uninsured persons have brought health care reform to the top of the U.S. Administration’s policy agenda. This paper describes the health care financing system in the United States, highlights what are viewed as its most serious shortcomings, and explores possible reasons for high and rising medical care costs. After brief descriptions of alternative reform proposals, the paper discusses universal coverage unde...

  6. Health changes in Sri Lanka: benefits of primary health care and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunathilake, Indika Mahesh

    2012-07-01

    The Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka is an island in the Indian Ocean that has achieved a unique status in the world with health indicators that are comparable with those of developed countries. This is illustrated, among others, by the reduction in both child and maternal mortality in the country. This achievement is the result of a range of long-term interventions, including providing education and health care free of charge, training of health care workers, developing public health infrastructure in rural areas, and adopting steps to improve sanitation, nutrition, and immunization coverage. PMID:22815304

  7. [Increasing immunization coverage in adults and elderly by creating structural relationships with general practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversano, M; Busatta, M; Cipriani, R; Battista, T; Sponselli, G M; Caputi, G; Pesare, A

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach vaccination coverage in adults, the elderly and in high risk subjects, a tight network of collaboration between preventive medicine specialists and general practitioners must be created in the same way that they must be created with pediatricians. In fact, this strategy has brought about very high coverage rates in childhood vaccinations. The solution to propose once again would thus be to develop partnerships between the protagonists of the network (community health district, department of prevention, general practitioners, primary care physicians) so that synergies may be created which permit the realisation of common and specific training programs.

  8. Drug coverage insurance as a novel element of private health insurance in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerw, Aleksandra; Religioni, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there have been observed increased costs of health care in Poland. The patient's out of pocket expenses on drug have grown too. To the above, the insurance companies have offered patients drug coverage insurance policies since recently. Drug insurance policy covers the cost of purchasing pharmaceutical products not reimbursed by the National Health Fund is a modern product on the Polish health insurance market. The aim of the article is to characterize drug coverage insurance policies on the health insurance market in Poland. The Polish insurance market and entities offered these types of insurance are also presented.

  9. Web based geoprocessing tool for coverage data handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K.; Saran, S.

    2014-11-01

    With the advancements in GIS technologies and extensive use of OGC Web Services, geospatial resources and services are becoming progressively copious and convenient over the network. The application of OGC WCS (Web Coverage Service) and WFS (Web Feature Service) standards for geospatial raster and vector data has resulted in an opulent pool of interoperable geodata resources waiting to be used for analytical or modelling purposes. The issue of availing geospatial data processing with the aid of standardised web services was attended to by the OGC WPS (Web Processing Service) 1.0.0 specifications (Schut, 2007) which elucidate WPS as a standard interface which serves for the promulgation of geo-processes and consumption of those processes by the clients. This paper outlines the design and implementation of a geo-processing tool utilizing coverage data. The geo-process selected for application is the calculation of Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI), one of the globally used indices for vegetation cover monitoring. The system is realised using the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Python. The tool accesses the WCS server using the parameters defined in the XML request. The geo-process upon execution, performs the computations over the coverage data and generates the NDVI output. Since open source technology and standards are being used more often, especially in the field of scientific research, so our implementation is also built by using open source tools only.

  10. The Icelandic media coverage of the constitutional assembly election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guðbjörg Hildur Kolbeins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On November 27, 2010, the people of Iceland elected 25 individuals to the country’s constitutional assembly. As there were 522 candidates for the 25 seats in the assembly, the media were faced with a new dilemma, i.e. how to ensure impartiality and objectivity in their coverage of the candidates and the subject matter. The present study compares the media coverage of the constitutional assembly election to two other national elections; the general election in the spring of 2009 and the municipal election in the spring of 2010. All news stories in the 13 major print, broadcast and online news outlets in Iceland were coded two weeks prior to each election. The results indicate that the national media almost ignored the constitutional assembly election in comparison to the other elections. There were 632 news stories on the general election, 590 stories on the municipal election but only 165 stories on the constitutional assembly election. The lack of coverage of the candidates for the constitutional assembly seems to reveal that the traditional media, i.e. the print and broadcast media, and the online media did not know how to best serve and inform the public in the democratic process.

  11. Resolution, coverage, and geometry beyond traditional limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ferber, Ralf

    1998-12-31

    The presentation relates to the optimization of the image of seismic data and improved resolution and coverage of acquired data. Non traditional processing methods such as inversion to zero offset (IZO) are used. To realize the potential of saving acquisition cost by reducing in-fill and to plan resolution improvement by processing, geometry QC methods such as DMO Dip Coverage Spectrum (DDCS) and Bull`s Eyes Analysis are used. The DDCS is a 2-D spectrum whose entries consist of the DMO (Dip Move Out) coverage for a particular reflector specified by it`s true time dip and reflector normal strike. The Bull`s Eyes Analysis relies on real time processing of synthetic data generated with the real geometry. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Coverage statistics for sequence census methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Steven N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We study the statistical properties of fragment coverage in genome sequencing experiments. In an extension of the classic Lander-Waterman model, we consider the effect of the length distribution of fragments. We also introduce a coding of the shape of the coverage depth function as a tree and explain how this can be used to detect regions with anomalous coverage. This modeling perspective is especially germane to current high-throughput sequencing experiments, where both sample preparation protocols and sequencing technology particulars can affect fragment length distributions. Results Under the mild assumptions that fragment start sites are Poisson distributed and successive fragment lengths are independent and identically distributed, we observe that, regardless of fragment length distribution, the fragments produced in a sequencing experiment can be viewed as resulting from a two-dimensional spatial Poisson process. We then study the successive jumps of the coverage function, and show that they can be encoded as a random tree that is approximately a Galton-Watson tree with generation-dependent geometric offspring distributions whose parameters can be computed. Conclusions We extend standard analyses of shotgun sequencing that focus on coverage statistics at individual sites, and provide a null model for detecting deviations from random coverage in high-throughput sequence census based experiments. Our approach leads to explicit determinations of the null distributions of certain test statistics, while for others it greatly simplifies the approximation of their null distributions by simulation. Our focus on fragments also leads to a new approach to visualizing sequencing data that is of independent interest.

  13. Prediction of Low Community Sanitation Coverage Using Environmental and Sociodemographic Factors in Amhara Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, William E; Stewart, Aisha E P; Flanders, W Dana; Kramer, Michael R; Endeshaw, Tekola; Zerihun, Mulat; Melaku, Birhanu; Sata, Eshetu; Gessesse, Demelash; Teferi, Tesfaye; Tadesse, Zerihun; Guadie, Birhan; King, Jonathan D; Emerson, Paul M; Callahan, Elizabeth K; Moe, Christine L; Clasen, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    This study developed and validated a model for predicting the probability that communities in Amhara Region, Ethiopia, have low sanitation coverage, based on environmental and sociodemographic conditions. Community sanitation coverage was measured between 2011 and 2014 through trachoma control program evaluation surveys. Information on environmental and sociodemographic conditions was obtained from available data sources and linked with community data using a geographic information system. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of low community sanitation coverage (< 20% versus ≥ 20%). The selected model was geographically and temporally validated. Model-predicted probabilities of low community sanitation coverage were mapped. Among 1,502 communities, 344 (22.90%) had coverage below 20%. The selected model included measures for high topsoil gravel content, an indicator for low-lying land, population density, altitude, and rainfall and had reasonable predictive discrimination (area under the curve = 0.75, 95% confidence interval = 0.72, 0.78). Measures of soil stability were strongly associated with low community sanitation coverage, controlling for community wealth, and other factors. A model using available environmental and sociodemographic data predicted low community sanitation coverage for areas across Amhara Region with fair discrimination. This approach could assist sanitation programs and trachoma control programs, scaling up or in hyperendemic areas, to target vulnerable areas with additional activities or alternate technologies. PMID:27430547

  14. 29 CFR 2.13 - Audiovisual coverage prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audiovisual coverage prohibited. 2.13 Section 2.13 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.13 Audiovisual coverage prohibited. The Department shall not permit audiovisual coverage of...

  15. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.330 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark coverage is...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1412 - Compensation quarters of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation quarters of coverage. 404.1412... the Railroad Retirement Program § 404.1412 Compensation quarters of coverage. As used in this subpart, a compensation quarter of coverage is any quarter of coverage computed with respect to...

  17. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  18. Extracellular polymeric bacterial coverages as minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, A; Saa, Alberto; Teschke, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces formed by extracellular polymeric substances enclosing individual and some small communities of {\\it Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans} on plates of hydrophobic silicon and hydrophilic mica are analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy imaging. Accurate nanoscale descriptions of such coverage surfaces are obtained. The good agreement with the predictions of a rather simple but realistic theoretical model allows us to conclude that they correspond, indeed, to minimal area surfaces enclosing a given volume associated with the encased bacteria. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first shape characterization of the coverage formed by these biomolecules, with possible applications to the study of biofilms.

  19. 2010 A(H1N1 vaccination in pregnant women in Brazil: identifying coverage and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Andres Mendoza-Sassi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied vaccination coverage and its associated factors in the 2010 pandemic influenza vaccination of Brazilian pregnant women. A cross-sectional study of pregnant women who had given birth was performed in a municipality in southern Brazil, in 2010. Data about vaccination against A(H1N1 and sociodemographic characteristics, morbidities and prenatal care were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using a Poisson regression. Coverage was 77.4%. Most were vaccinated in the public sector (97.6% and in the second trimester (47%. Associated factors that increased vaccination were marriage, older age, first income quartile, prenatal care and influenza before pregnancy. Education and skin color were not significantly associated with vaccination. The vaccination campaign was extensive and exhibited no inequality. Prenatal care was the factor that most affected vaccination coverage, reflecting its importance for vaccination campaign success.

  20. Coverage analysis for sensor networks based on Clifford algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE WeiXin; CAO WenMing; MENG Shan

    2008-01-01

    The coverage performance is the foundation of information acquisition in distrib-uted sensor networks. The previously proposed coverage work was mostly based on unit disk coverage model or ball coverage model in 2D or 3D space, respectively. However, most methods cannot give a homogeneous coverage model for targets with hybrid types. This paper presents a coverage analysis approach for sensor networks based on Clifford algebra and establishes a homogeneous coverage model for sensor networks with hybrid types of targets. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated with examples.

  1. Measuring coverage in MNCH: testing the validity of women's self-report of key maternal and newborn health interventions during the peripartum period in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia K Stanton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As low-income countries strive to meet targets for Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, there is growing need to track coverage and quality of high-impact peripartum interventions. At present, nationally representative household surveys conducted in low-income settings primarily measure contact with the health system, shedding little light on content or quality of care. The objective of this study is to validate the ability of women in Mozambique to report on facility-based care they and their newborns received during labor and one hour postpartum. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The study involved household interviews with women in Mozambique whose births were observed eight to ten months previously as part of a survey of the quality of maternal and newborn care at government health facilities. Of 487 women whose births were observed and who agreed to a follow-up interview, 304 were interviewed (62.4%. The validity of 34 indicators was tested using two measures: area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC and inflation factor (IF; 27 indicators had sufficient numbers for robust analysis, of which four met acceptability criteria for both (AUC >0.6 and 0.75indicators are considered high demand and are recommended for incorporation into international survey programs: presence of a support person during labor/delivery and placement of the newborn skin to skin against the mother. Nine indicators met acceptability criteria for one of the validity measures. All 13 indicators are recommended for use in in-depth maternal/newborn health surveys. CONCLUSIONS: Women are able to report on some aspects of peripartum care. Larger studies may be able to validate some indicators that this study could not assess due to the sample size. Future qualitative research may assist in improving question formulation for some indicators. Studies of similar design in other low-income settings are needed to confirm these results.

  2. Priority-setting for achieving universal health coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkidou, Kalipso; Glassman, Amanda; Marten, Robert; Vega, Jeanette; Teerawattananon, Yot; Tritasavit, Nattha; Gyansa-Lutterodt, Martha; Seiter, Andreas; Kieny, Marie Paule; Hofman, Karen; Culyer, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Governments in low- and middle-income countries are legitimizing the implementation of universal health coverage (UHC), following a United Nation's resolution on UHC in 2012 and its reinforcement in the sustainable development goals set in 2015. UHC will differ in each country depending on country contexts and needs, as well as demand and supply in health care. Therefore, fundamental issues such as objectives, users and cost-effectiveness of UHC have been raised by policy-makers and stakeholders. While priority-setting is done on a daily basis by health authorities - implicitly or explicitly - it has not been made clear how priority-setting for UHC should be conducted. We provide justification for explicit health priority-setting and guidance to countries on how to set priorities for UHC. PMID:27274598

  3. State-based coverage solutions: the California Health Benefit Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Micah; Haase, Leif Wellington

    2011-05-01

    California was the first state to create its own health insurance exchange after the passage of the Affordable Care Act. Because of its front-runner status and the sheer size of its coverage expansion, California's choices will have implications for other states as they address difficult issues, including minimizing adverse selection, promoting cost-conscious consumer choice, and seamlessly coordinating with public programs. California took advantage of the flexibility in the federal health reform law to create an exchange that will function as an active purchaser in the marketplace; take significant steps to combat adverse selection both against and within the exchange, including requiring all insurers to sell all tiers of products and making exchange participation a condition of selling catastrophic plans; and allow community-based health plans to develop commercial offerings for the exchange. This brief examines these decisions, which will provide a roadmap for other states as they set up their exchanges. PMID:21630546

  4. Influenza vaccination coverage among medical residents: an Italian multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Claudio; Mazzucco, Walter; Azzolini, Elena; Baldini, Cesare; Bergomi, Margherita; Biafiore, Alessio Daniele; Bianco, Manuela; Borsari, Lucia; Cacciari, Paolo; Cadeddu, Chiara; Camia, Paola; Carluccio, Eugenia; Conti, Andrea; De Waure, Chiara; Di Gregori, Valentina; Fabiani, Leila; Fallico, Roberto; Filisetti, Barbara; Flacco, Maria E; Franco, Elisabetta; Furnari, Roberto; Galis, Veronica; Gallea, Maria R; Gallone, Maria F; Gallone, Serena; Gelatti, Umberto; Gilardi, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna R; Grillo, Orazio C; Lanati, Niccolò; Mascaretti, Silvia; Mattei, Antonella; Micò, Rocco; Morciano, Laura; Nante, Nicola; Napoli, Giuseppe; Nobile, Carmelo Giuseppe; Palladino, Raffaele; Parisi, Salvatore; Passaro, Maria; Pelissero, Gabriele; Quarto, Michele; Ricciardi, Walter; Romano, Gabriele; Rustico, Ennio; Saponari, Anita; Schioppa, Francesco S; Signorelli, Carlo; Siliquini, Roberta; Trabacchi, Valeria; Triassi, Maria; Varetta, Alessia; Ziglio, Andrea; Zoccali, Angela; Vitale, Francesco; Amodio, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recognized to be safe and effective, recent studies have confirmed that immunization coverage among health care workers remain generally low, especially among medical residents (MRs). Aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate attitudes and determinants associated with acceptance of influenza vaccination among Italian MRs. A survey was performed in 2012 on MRs attending post-graduate schools of 18 Italian Universities. Each participant was interviewed via an anonymous, self-administered, web-based questionnaire including questions on attitudes regarding influenza vaccination. A total of 2506 MRs were recruited in the survey and 299 (11.9%) of these stated they had accepted influenza vaccination in 2011-2012 season. Vaccinated MRs were older (P = 0.006), working in clinical settings (P = 0.048), and vaccinated in the 2 previous seasons (P<0.001 in both seasons). Moreover, MRs who had recommended influenza vaccination to their patients were significantly more compliant with influenza vaccination uptake in 2011-2012 season (P<0.001). "To avoid spreading influenza among patients" was recognized as the main reason for accepting vaccination by less than 15% of vaccinated MRs. Italian MRs seem to have a very low compliance with influenza vaccination and they seem to accept influenza vaccination as a habit that is unrelated to professional and ethical responsibility. Otherwise, residents who refuse vaccination in the previous seasons usually maintain their behaviors. Promoting correct attitudes and good practice in order to improve the influenza immunization rates of MRs could represent a decisive goal for increasing immunization coverage among health care workers of the future.

  5. 5 CFR 610.402 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS HOURS OF DUTY Flexible and Compressed Work Schedules § 610.402 Coverage. The regulations contained in this subpart apply only to flexible work schedules and compressed work schedules established under subchapter 11 of chapter 61...

  6. 77 FR 16453 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... is appropriately sold to students--for instance, foreign students studying for only one semester in the United States or U.S. citizens studying abroad for one summer-- the short-term limited duration... proposed rule (76 FR 7767) regarding section 1560(c) entitled ``Student Health Insurance Coverage.'' In...

  7. 44 CFR 17.610 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) § 17.610 Coverage. (a) This... the laws or regulations of a foreign government. A determination of such inconsistency may be made only by the agency head or his/her designee. (c) The provisions of 2 CFR part 3000 apply to...

  8. 5 CFR 930.103 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 930.103 Section 930.103 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED... ensure the safe and efficient operation of such vehicles....

  9. 27 CFR 24.68 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 24.68... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions Claims § 24.68 Insurance... recompensed for such tax by any valid claim of insurance or otherwise. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859, 72...

  10. Immunization coverage: role of sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhuwan; Mahajan, Hemant; Velhal, G D

    2013-01-01

    Children are considered fully immunized if they receive one dose of BCG, three doses of DPT and polio vaccine each, and one measles vaccine. In India, only 44% of children aged 12-23 months are fully vaccinated and about 5% have not received any vaccination at all. Even if national immunization coverage levels are sufficiently high to block disease transmission, pockets of susceptibility may act as potential reservoirs of infection. This study was done to assess the immunization coverage in an urban slum area and determine various sociodemographic variables affecting the same. A total of 210 children were selected from study population using WHO's 30 cluster sampling method. Coverage of BCG was found to be the highest (97.1%) while that of measles was the lowest. The main reason for noncompliance was given as child's illness at the time of scheduled vaccination followed by lack of knowledge regarding importance of immunization. Low education status of mother, high birth order, and place of delivery were found to be positively associated with low vaccination coverage. Regular IEC activities (group talks, role plays, posters, pamphlets, and competitions) should be conducted in the community to ensure that immunization will become a "felt need" of the mothers in the community.

  11. Binning metagenomic contigs by coverage and composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alneberg, J.; Bjarnason, B.S.; Bruijn, de I.; Schirmer, M.; Quick, J.; Ijaz, U.Z.; Lahti, L.M.; Loman, N.J.; Andersson, A.F.; Quince, C.

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun sequencing enables the reconstruction of genomes from complex microbial communities, but because assembly does not reconstruct entire genomes, it is necessary to bin genome fragments. Here we present CONCOCT, a new algorithm that combines sequence composition and coverage across multiple sam

  12. 5 CFR 730.103 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) NOTIFICATION OF POST-EMPLOYMENT RESTRICTIONS § 730.103 Coverage. (a) The following individuals are subject to the post-employment conflict-of-interest restrictions in 18 U.S.C. 207(c), as amended by section 1125... executive, who is paid at a rate of basic pay equal to or greater than 86.5 percent of the rate for level...

  13. 29 CFR 1603.101 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Administrative Process § 1603.101 Coverage. Section 304 of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 applies to employment, which includes application for employment,...

  14. Coverage and system efficiencies of insecticide-treated nets in Africa from 2000 to 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Samir; Weiss, Daniel J; Mappin, Bonnie; Dalrymple, Ursula; Cameron, Ewan; Bisanzio, Donal; Smith, David L; Moyes, Catherine L; Tatem, Andrew J; Lynch, Michael; Fergus, Cristin A; Yukich, Joshua; Bennett, Adam; Eisele, Thomas P; Kolaczinski, Jan; Cibulskis, Richard E; Hay, Simon I; Gething, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) for malaria control are widespread but coverage remains inadequate. We developed a Bayesian model using data from 102 national surveys, triangulated against delivery data and distribution reports, to generate year-by-year estimates of four ITN coverage indicators. We explored the impact of two potential 'inefficiencies': uneven net distribution among households and rapid rates of net loss from households. We estimated that, in 2013, 21% (17%-26%) of ITNs were over-allocated and this has worsened over time as overall net provision has increased. We estimated that rates of ITN loss from households are more rapid than previously thought, with 50% lost after 23 (20-28) months. We predict that the current estimate of 920 million additional ITNs required to achieve universal coverage would in reality yield a lower level of coverage (77% population access). By improving efficiency, however, the 920 million ITNs could yield population access as high as 95%. PMID:26714109

  15. Sustainable development indicators for territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For different themes (Sustainable consumption and production, Knowledge and social and economic development society, governance, climate change and energy management, sustainable transport and modality, conservation and sustainable management of biodiversity and natural resources, public health, risk prevention and management, social and territorial cohesion), this study proposes a set of axis, and several indicators for each axis. Indicators correspond to different geographical scale and are determined from different sources. These indicators are for example: production of aggregates, proportion of organic agriculture in usable agricultural area, evolution in quantity of household waste collected per inhabitant, employment rate, research spending in relation to GDP, coverage of population by local Agenda 21, and so on. Thus, each indicator is discussed, commented and analysed

  16. Determinants of vaccination coverage in rural Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meurice Francois P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood immunization is a cost effective public health strategy. Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI services have been provided in a rural Nigerian community (Sabongidda-Ora, Edo State at no cost to the community since 1998 through a privately financed vaccination project (private public partnership. The objective of this survey was to assess vaccination coverage and its determinants in this rural community in Nigeria Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in September 2006, which included the use of interviewer-administered questionnaire to assess knowledge of mothers of children aged 12–23 months and vaccination coverage. Survey participants were selected following the World Health Organization's (WHO immunization coverage cluster survey design. Vaccination coverage was assessed by vaccination card and maternal history. A child was said to be fully immunized if he or she had received all of the following vaccines: a dose of Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG, three doses of oral polio (OPV, three doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (DPT, three doses of hepatitis B (HB and one dose of measles by the time he or she was enrolled in the survey, i.e. between the ages of 12–23 months. Knowledge of the mothers was graded as satisfactory if mothers had at least a score of 3 out of a maximum of 5 points. Logistic regression was performed to identify determinants of full immunization status. Results Three hundred and thirty-nine mothers and 339 children (each mother had one eligible child were included in the survey. Most of the mothers (99.1% had very positive attitudes to immunization and > 55% were generally knowledgeable about symptoms of vaccine preventable diseases except for difficulty in breathing (as symptom of diphtheria. Two hundred and ninety-five mothers (87.0% had a satisfactory level of knowledge. Vaccination coverage against all the seven childhood vaccine preventable diseases was 61.9% although it

  17. Coverage-based treatment planning: optimizing the IMRT PTV to meet a CTV coverage criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J J; Siebers, J V

    2009-03-01

    This work demonstrates an iterative approach-referred to as coverage-based treatment planning-designed to produce treatment plans that ensure target coverage for a specified percentage of setup errors. In this approach the clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margin is iteratively adjusted until the specified CTV coverage is achieved. The advantage of this approach is that it automatically compensates for the dosimetric margin around the CTV, i.e., the extra margin that is created when the dose distribution extends beyond the PTV. When applied to 27 prostate plans, this approach reduced the average CTV-to-PTV margin from 5 to 2.8 mm. This reduction in PTV size produced a corresponding decrease in the volume of normal tissue receiving high dose. The total volume of tissue receiving > or =65 Gy was reduced on average by 19.3% or about 48 cc. Individual reductions varied from 8.7% to 28.6%. The volume of bladder receiving > or =60 Gy was reduced on average by 5.6% (reductions for individuals varied from 1.7% to 10.6%), and the volume of periprostatic rectum receiving > or =65 Gy was reduced on average by 4.9% (reductions for individuals varied from 0.9% to 12.3%). The iterative method proposed here represents a step toward a probabilistic treatment planning algorithm which can generate dose distributions (i.e., treated volumes) that closely approximate a specified level of coverage in the presence of geometric uncertainties. The general principles of coverage-based treatment planning are applicable to arbitrary treatment sites and delivery techniques. Importantly, observed deviations between coverage implied by specified CTV-to-PTV margins and coverage achieved by a given treatment plan imply a generic need to perform coverage probability analysis on a per-plan basis to ensure that the desired level of coverage is achieved. PMID:19378757

  18. The Relevance of the Affordable Care Act for Improving Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, David; Olfson, Mark

    2016-03-28

    Provisions of the Affordable Care Act provide unprecedented opportunities for expanded access to behavioral health care and for redesigning the provision of services. Key to these reforms is establishing mental and substance abuse care as essential coverage, extending Medicaid eligibility and insurance parity, and protecting insurance coverage for persons with preexisting conditions and disabilities. Many provisions, including Accountable Care Organizations, health homes, and other structures, provide incentives for integrating primary care and behavioral health services and coordinating the range of services often required by persons with severe and persistent mental health conditions. Careful research and experience are required to establish the services most appropriate for primary care and effective linkage to specialty mental health services. Research providing guidance on present evidence and uncertainties is reviewed. Success in redesign will follow progress building on collaborative care and other evidence-based practices, reshaping professional incentives and practices, and reinvigorating the behavioral health workforce. PMID:26666969

  19. Employment status and differences in the one-year coverage of physician visits: different needs or unequal access to services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivimäki Mika

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dichotomy employed vs. unemployed is still a relevant, but rather crude measure of status in current labour markets. Also, studies concerning the association of employment status with health have to specify the type of the employment as well as the characteristics of the unemployment. This study aims to reveal differences and potential inequalities in physician visits among seven groups in the core-periphery structures of the labour markets. Methods A total of 16 000 Finns responded to a postal survey in 2003. Their visits to physicians in public primary health care, occupational health care, private health services, hospital outpatient clinics and dental care services during previous year were measured as indicators of service utilisation. Participants were classified as employees having a permanent or fixed-term and full-time or part-time contract and as those experiencing short-term, prolonged or long-term unemployment. Differences in the one-year coverage of physician visits between these groups of employees were analysed using logistic regression analyses where differences in the need for services were controlled for by including demographics and self-rated health assessments in the models. Results Permanently employed respondents had visited a physician most often, and the need-adjusted regression models showed significantly lower odds ratios for a visit among fixed-term employees (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.53–0.81 and in particular among the long-term unemployed (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.14–0.31. A stratified analysis according to health care sector showed the lowest odds ratios in occupational health care and private physicians (ORs between 0.05 and 0.73 and also low odds ratios for dentists (ORs between 0.45 and 0.91, whereas visits to public primary health care were more common among non-permanent employees and the unemployed (ORs between 1.46 and 2.39. Conclusion The use of physician services varies according to labour

  20. Public Health Workers and Vaccination Coverage in Eastern China: A Health Economic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hu

    2014-05-01

    no effect on vaccination coverage. Conclusions: A higher density of PHWs (VP would improve the availability of immunization services over time and space, which may increase the possibility of achieving a higher childhood vaccination coverage rate. It was indicated that the level of GDP per person had no association with the improved vaccination coverage after controlling for other potential factors. Our findings implicated that PHW density was a major constraint on immunization coverage in Zhejiang Province.

  1. Radiology 24/7 In-House Attending Coverage: Do Benefits Outweigh Cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stephanie; Holalkere, Nagaraj Setty; O׳Malley, Julie; Doherty, Gemma; Norbash, Alexander; Kadom, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    Many radiology practices, including academic centers, are moving to in-house 24/7 attending coverage. This could be costly and may not be easily accepted by radiology trainees and attending radiologists. In this article, we evaluated the effects of 24/7 in-house attending coverage on patient care, costs, and qualitative aspects such as trainee education. We retrospectively collected report turnaround times (TAT) and work relative value units (wRVU). We compared these parameters between the years before and after the implementation of 24/7 in-house attending coverage. The cost to provide additional attending coverage was estimated from departmental financial reports. A qualitative survey of radiology residents and faculty was performed to study perceived effects on trainee education. There were decreases in report TAT following 24/7 attending implementation: 69% reduction in computed tomography, 43% reduction in diagnostic radiography, 7% reduction in magnetic resonance imaging, and 43% reduction in ultrasound. There was an average daytime wRVU decrease of 9%, although this was compounded by a decrease in total RVUs of the 2013 calendar year. The financial investment by the institution was estimated at $850,000. Qualitative data demonstrated overall positive feedback from trainees and faculty in radiology, although loss of independence was reported as a negative effect. TAT and wRVU metrics changed with implementation of 24/7 attending coverage, although these metrics do not directly relate to patient outcomes. Additional clinical benefits may include fewer discrepancies between preliminary and final reports that may improve emergency and inpatient department workflows and liability exposure. Radiologists reported the impression that clinicians appreciated 24/7 in-house attending coverage, particularly surgical specialists. Loss of trainee independence on call was a perceived disadvantage of 24/7 attending coverage and raised a concern that residency education

  2. Toward a 21st-century health care system: Recommendations for health care reform

    OpenAIRE

    Arrow, Kenneth; Auerbach, Alan; Bertko, John; Casalino, Lawrence Peter; Crosson, Francis; Enthoven, Alain; Falcone, E.; Feldman, R.C.; Fuchs, Victor; Garber, Alan; Gold, Marthe Rachel; Goldman, D A; Hadfield, Gillian; Hall, Mark Ann; Horwitz, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a series of workshops during which physicians, health policy experts, health insurance executives, business leaders, hospital administrators, economists, and others who represent diverse perspective...

  3. Setting the scene: the challenges of universal health coverage and the contribution of management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarricone, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    The last decades are being characterized by global trends such as population growth, aging, escalation of non communicable diseases and technological innovation. These unprecedented changes are moving faster than economic growth and threaten universal health coverage. What is at stake nowadays is governments' and healthcare systems' ability to renovate themselves and develop new paradigms aimed at finding innovative solutions to manage the new global forces so to maintain universal access to care in a changing environment. We have to be imaginative because if we keep relying on current paradigms to answer already too far-ahead complex problems, we will fail. And here education has a role to play. Although the recent years have seen a steep increase in the offerings of post-graduate management education programs in health and healthcare, the majority of these programs are still traditionally conceived and designed, aiming to train students to deal with specific, domestic, current problems. With the promise of making students the best specialists on Earth, to get the highest return on his or her investment in education, the performance of these programs is often measured in terms of earnings maximization. Although an indicator of success, this often incentivizes individuals to be context-based, individualistic, short-sighted and self-focused. Education has the greatest potential to foster imagination, to leverage diversity, to exploit team-working and free creative thinking. Education can substantially contribute to anticipate the impact of global forces by but an endeavor is needed to design programs and measures performances differently.

  4. Immunization coverage and timeliness of vaccination in Italian children with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, E; Carloni, E; Marino, M G; Ciofi degli Atti, M L; Gesualdo, F; Romano, M; Giannattasio, A; Guarino, A; Carloni, R; Borgia, P; Volpe, E; Perrelli, F; Pizzuti, R; Tozzi, A E

    2012-07-20

    Since children with chronic diseases represent a primary target for immunization strategies, it is important that their immunization coverage and timeliness of vaccines is optimal. We performed a study to measure immunization coverage and timeliness of vaccines in children with type 1 diabetes, HIV infection, Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and neurological diseases. A total of 275 children aged 6 months-18 years were included in the study. Coverage for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), polio (Pol), and hepatitis B (HBV) vaccines approximated 85% at 24 months, while measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) coverage was 62%. Immunization coverage for seasonal influenza was 59%. The analysis of timeliness revealed that there was heterogeneity among children with different chronic diseases. A proportional hazard model showed that children with HIV infection had the longest time to complete three doses of DTP, Pol, and HBV, and those with neurological diseases received the first dose of MMR later than the other categories. Causes of missing or delayed vaccination mostly included a concurrent acute disease. Children with chronic diseases should be strictly monitored for routine and recommended vaccinations, and health care providers and families should be properly informed to avoid false contraindications.

  5. The impact of insurance coverage during insurance reform on diagnostic resolution of cancer screening abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Alok; Battaglia, Tracy A; Isabelle, Alexis P; Hanchate, Amresh D; Kalish, Richard L; Bak, Sharon; Mishuris, Rebecca G; Shroff, Swati M; Freund, Karen M

    2014-02-01

    We examined the impact of Massachusetts insurance reform on the care of women at six community health centers with abnormal breast and cervical cancer screening to investigate whether stability of insurance coverage was associated with more timely diagnostic resolution. We conducted Cox proportional hazards models to predict time from cancer screening to diagnostic resolution, examining the impact of 1) insurance status at time of screening abnormality, 2) number of insurance switches over a three-year period, and 3) insurance history over a three-year period. We identified 1,165 women with breast and 781 with cervical cancer screening abnormalities. In the breast cohort, Medicaid insurance at baseline, continuous public insurance, and losing insurance predicted delayed resolution. We did not find these effects in the cervical cohort. These data provide evidence that stability of health insurance coverage with insurance reform nationally may improve timely care after abnormal cancer screening in historically underserved women.

  6. Inconsistent journalism: the coverage of chronic diseases in the Mexican press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Martinez, F J; Robles-Silva, L; Moreno-Leal, N; Franco-Almazan, C

    2001-01-01

    The mass media are recognized by many social scientists as important sources of medical information for lay people and as a positive influence on those working in the health care professions. However, there is a lack of study about print and mass media reporting on major health problems in developing countries such as Mexico. This article presents the findings of a study conducted to identify specific messages that the Mexican print media convey to the general reader about chronic diseases, especially one of the most important and pervasive, diabetes. We undertook a comprehensive review and content analysis of secondary source media reporting in the Boletin (Bulletin)--published by the Department of Education and Health, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Xochimilco. The Boletin summarizes all articles related to health matters published in 12 national daily newspapers and 3 magazines. Our study covered all issues of the Boletin from 1992 through 1996. Our findings indicate that at times the press and popular print media disseminate an incomplete and often biased picture of chronic diseases prevalent in Mexico. Specifically, the press gives equal or more important coverage of acute diseases, or to AIDS, than to other major chronic conditions. The press also reproduces the biomedical model of disease and does not address topics important to certain segments of the population, including the patient. Moreover, the media may present an overly idealized impression of the capability of health services. Consequently, this failure to address the issues of certain widespread, chronic illnesses is severe enough to ask about the role of the press in medical health care reform. We conclude by suggesting areas for further research. PMID:11550591

  7. Determinants of employment-based private health insurance coverage in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Kiil

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the determinants of having employment-based private health insurance (EPHI based on data from a survey of the Danish workforce conducted in 2009. The study contributes to the literature by exploring the role of satisfaction with the tax-financed health care system as a potential determinant of EPHI ownership and by taking into account that some employees receive EPHI free of charge, while others pay the premium out of their pre-tax income and thus make an actual choice. The results indicate that the probability of having EPHI is positively affected by private sector employment, size of the workplace, whether the workplace has a health scheme, income, being employed as a white-collar worker, and age until the age of 49, while the presence of subordinates, gender, education level, membership of 'denmark' and living in the capital region are not significantly associated with EPHI coverage. As expected, the characteristics related to the workplace are by far the quantitatively most important determinants. The association between EPHI and self-assessed health is found to be quadratic such that individuals in good self-assessed health are more likely to be covered by EPHI than those in excellent and fair, poor or very poor self-assessed health, respectively. Finally, the probability of having EPHI is found to be negatively related to the level of satisfaction with the tax-financed health care system. The findings of the study are not affected notably by distinguishing empirically between employees who receive EPHI free of charge and those who pay the premium out of their pre-tax income. Link to Appendix

  8. Global Moon Coverage via Hyperbolic Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Brent; Strange, Nathan; Campagnola, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The scientific desire for global coverage of moons such as Jupiter's Galilean moons or Saturn's Titan has invariably led to the design of orbiter missions. These orbiter missions require a large amount of propellant needed to insert into orbit around such small bodies, and for a given launch vehicle, the additional propellant mass takes away from mass that could otherwise be used for scientific instrumentation on a multiple flyby-only mission. This paper will present methods--expanding upon techniques developed for the design of the Cassini prime and extended missions--to obtain near global moon coverage through multiple flybys. Furthermore we will show with proper instrument suite selection, a flyby-only mission can provide science return similar (and in some cases greater) to that of an orbiter mission.

  9. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Du Li; Rachul Christen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching ...

  10. Is Code Quality Related to Test Coverage?

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Arturo Wong-Mozqueda, Robert Haines, Caroline Jay

    2015-01-01

    A good test suite is vital for minimising errors, and ensuring that software is easy to maintain. Another factor viewed as being important for the success and longevity of software is code quality. We report on work examining whether there is a correlation between code quality and test coverage, using seven different metrics: lines of code, McCabe's cyclomatic complexity, number of local methods, depth of inheritance tree, coupling between objects, improvement of lack of cohesion in methods a...

  11. Implications of spatially heterogeneous vaccination coverage for the risk of congenital rubella syndrome in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, C J E; Cohen, C; Lessler, J; McAnerney, J M; Ntshoe, G M; Puren, A; Klepac, P; Tatem, A; Grenfell, B T; Bjørnstad, O N

    2013-01-01

    Rubella is generally a mild childhood disease, but infection during early pregnancy may cause spontaneous abortion or congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), which may entail a variety of birth defects. Since vaccination at levels short of those necessary to achieve eradication may increase the average age of infection, and thus potentially the CRS burden, introduction of the vaccine has been limited to contexts where coverage is high. Recent work suggests that spatial heterogeneity in coverage should also be a focus of concern. Here, we use a detailed dataset from South Africa to explore the implications of heterogeneous vaccination for the burden of CRS, introducing realistic vaccination scenarios based on reported levels of measles vaccine coverage. Our results highlight the potential impact of country-wide reductions of incidence of rubella on the local CRS burdens in districts with small population sizes. However, simulations indicate that if rubella vaccination is introduced with coverage reflecting current estimates for measles coverage in South Africa, the burden of CRS is likely to be reduced overall over a 30 year time horizon by a factor of 3, despite the fact that this coverage is lower than the traditional 80 per cent rule of thumb for vaccine introduction, probably owing to a combination of relatively low birth and transmission rates. We conclude by discussing the likely impact of private-sector vaccination. PMID:23152104

  12. Expanding insurance coverage through tax credits, consumer choice, and market enhancements: the American Medical Association proposal for health insurance reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Donald J; Emmons, David W; Wozniak, Gregory D

    2004-05-12

    Recent reports showing an increase in the number of uninsured individuals in the United States have given heightened attention to increasing health insurance coverage. The American Medical Association (AMA) has proposed a system of tax credits for the purchase of individually owned health insurance and enhancements to individual and group health insurance markets as a means of expanding coverage. Individually owned insurance would enable people to maintain coverage without disruption to existing patient-physician relationships, regardless of changes in employers or in work status. The AMA's plan would empower individuals to choose their health plan and give patients and their physicians more control over health care choices. Employers could continue to offer employment-based coverage, but employees would not be limited to the health plans offered by their employer. With a tax credit large enough to make coverage affordable and the ability to choose their own coverage, consumers would dramatically transform the individual and group health insurance markets. Health insurers would respond to the demands of individual consumers and be more cautious about increasing premiums. Insurers would also tailor benefit packages and develop new forms of coverage to better match the preferences of individuals and families. The AMA supports the development of new health insurance markets through legislative and regulatory changes to foster a wider array of high-quality, affordable plans. PMID:15138246

  13. Herbal remedy clinical trials in the media: a comparison with the coverage of conventional pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield Timothy; Boon Heather; Bubela Tania

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background This study systematically compares newspaper coverage of clinical trials for herbal remedies, a popular type of complementary and alternative medicine, with clinical trials for pharmaceuticals using a comparative content analysis. This is a timely inquiry given the recognized importance of the popular press as a source of health information, the complex and significant role of complementary and alternative medicine in individual health-care decisions, and the trend toward ...

  14. Managing Access: Extending Medicaid to Children Through School-Based HMO Coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Coulam, Robert F.; Carol V. Irvin; Calore, Kathleen A.; Kidder, David E.; Rosenbach, Margo L.

    1997-01-01

    This study explores how a health maintenance organization's (HMO) capacity and incentives to manage care might be used to improve access. In the early 1990s, the Florida Healthy Kids (FHK) demonstration extended Medicaid-like HMO coverage to indigent children in the public schools of Volusia County, Florida. The study finds that uninsured student months in area public schools were likely reduced by one-half. Utilization and cost levels for these indigent enrollees proved to be indistinguishab...

  15. Towards Universal Health Coverage: An Evaluation of Rwanda Mutuelles in Its First Eight Years

    OpenAIRE

    Chunling Lu; Brian Chin; Jiwon Lee Lewandowski; Paulin Basinga; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Kenneth Hill; Megan Murray; Agnes Binagwaho

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutuelles is a community-based health insurance program, established since 1999 by the Government of Rwanda as a key component of the national health strategy on providing universal health care. The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of Mutuelles on achieving universal coverage of medical services and financial risk protection in its first eight years of implementation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a quantitative impact evaluation of Mutuelles between 2000 and...

  16. Socio-economic inequalities in the use of postnatal care in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: First, our objective was to estimate socio-economic inequalities in the use of postnatal care (PNC compared with those in the use of care at birth and antenatal care. Second, we wanted to compare inequalities in the use of PNC between facility births and home births and to determine inequalities in the use of PNC among mothers with high-risk births. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Rich-poor ratios and concentration indices for maternity care were estimated using the third round of the District Level Household Survey conducted in India in 2007-08. Binary logistic regression models were used to examine the socio-economic inequalities associated with use of PNC after adjusting for relevant socio-economic and demographic characteristics. PNC for both mothers and newborns was substantially lower than the care received during pregnancy and child birth. Only 44% of mothers in India at the time of survey received any care within 48 hours after birth. Likewise, only 45% of newborns received check-up within 24 hours of birth. Mothers who had home births were significantly less likely to have received PNC than those who had facility births, with significant differences across the socio-economic strata. Moreover, the rich-poor gap in PNC use was significantly wider for mothers with birth complications. CONCLUSIONS: PNC use has been unacceptably low in India given the risks of mortality for mothers and babies shortly after birth. However, there is evidence to suggest that effective use of pregnancy and childbirth care in health facilities led to better PNC. There are also significant socio-economic inequalities in access to PNC even for those accessing facility-based care. The coverage of essential PNC is inadequate, especially for mothers from economically disadvantaged households. The findings suggest the need for strengthening PNC services to keep pace with advances in coverage for care at birth and prenatal services in India through targeted policy

  17. Assessing Requirements Quality through Requirements Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Ajitha; Heimdahl, Mats; Woodham, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    In model-based development, the development effort is centered around a formal description of the proposed software system the model. This model is derived from some high-level requirements describing the expected behavior of the software. For validation and verification purposes, this model can then be subjected to various types of analysis, for example, completeness and consistency analysis [6], model checking [3], theorem proving [1], and test-case generation [4, 7]. This development paradigm is making rapid inroads in certain industries, e.g., automotive, avionics, space applications, and medical technology. This shift towards model-based development naturally leads to changes in the verification and validation (V&V) process. The model validation problem determining that the model accurately captures the customer's high-level requirements has received little attention and the sufficiency of the validation activities has been largely determined through ad-hoc methods. Since the model serves as the central artifact, its correctness with respect to the users needs is absolutely crucial. In our investigation, we attempt to answer the following two questions with respect to validation (1) Are the requirements sufficiently defined for the system? and (2) How well does the model implement the behaviors specified by the requirements? The second question can be addressed using formal verification. Nevertheless, the size and complexity of many industrial systems make formal verification infeasible even if we have a formal model and formalized requirements. Thus, presently, there is no objective way of answering these two questions. To this end, we propose an approach based on testing that, when given a set of formal requirements, explores the relationship between requirements-based structural test-adequacy coverage and model-based structural test-adequacy coverage. The proposed technique uses requirements coverage metrics defined in [9] on formal high-level software

  18. A Guide to Health Care Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Cutler, David M.

    1994-01-01

    There are four rationales for health care reform: increasing the efficiency of health delivery; reforming the market for health insurance; providing universal coverage; and reducing the federal deficit. These goals are reflected in most reform proposals. Achieving these goals involves several problems, however. Paying for universal coverage may lead to labor supply or demand reductions. In addition, reform involves large federal risks that must be dealt with through deficit financing, reduced...

  19. 28 CFR 55.7 - Termination of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VOTING RIGHTS ACT REGARDING LANGUAGE MINORITY GROUPS Nature of Coverage § 55.7 Termination of coverage... the applicable language minority group is equal to or less than the national illiteracy rate....

  20. 1990 point population coverage for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a point coverage of the 1990 Census of Population and Housing for the conterminous United States. (Alaska and Hawaii are available separately). The coverage...

  1. Deciphering the complex intermediate role of health coverage through insurance in the context of well-being by network analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cifuentes, Myriam Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Recent initiatives that overstate health insurance coverage for well-being conflict with the recognized antagonistic facts identified by the determinants of health that identify health care as an intermediate factor. By using a network of controlled interdependences among multiple social resources including health insurance, which we reconstructed from survey data of the U.S. and Bayesian networks structure learning algorithms, we examined why health insurance through coverage, which in most countries is the access gate to health care, is just an intermediate factor of well-being. We used social network analysis methods to explore the complex relationships involved at general, specific and particular levels of the model. All levels provide evidence that the intermediate role of health insurance relies in a strong relationship to income and reproduces its unfair distribution. Some signals about the most efficient type of health coverage emerged in our analyses.

  2. Factors associated with vaccination coverage in children < 5 years in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Manuel Falcão Saturnino de; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze vaccination coverage and factors associated with a complete immunization scheme in children children vaccinated, unvaccinated) and the association function was logarithmic and had the children's individual, familial, and socioeconomic factors as independent variables. RESULTS Vaccination coverage was 37.0%, higher in children children of both sexes had no immunization records. The prevalence rate of vaccination significantly varied according to child age, mother's level of education, family size, ownership of household appliances, and destination of domestic waste. CONCLUSIONS Vulnerable groups with vaccination coverage below recommended levels continue to be present. Some factors indicate inequalities that represent barriers to full immunization, indicating the need to implement more equitable policies. The knowledge of these factors contributes to planning immunization promotion measures that focus on the most vulnerable groups.

  3. Single Mothers in California: Understanding Their Health Insurance Coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Wyn, Roberta; Ojeda, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    This policy brief examines the health insurance coverage of single mothers in California, addressing the factors affecting their coverage, as well as changes in coverage between 1994-95 and 1998-99. The descriptive data for this study were obtained from analyses of the 1995, 1996, 1999 and 2000 March Current Population Surveys. The findings in this study illustrate the disadvantage that many single mothers in California experience in their access to heath insurance coverage. Nearly one in thr...

  4. Assessment of the health system and policy environment as a critical complement to tracking intervention coverage for maternal, newborn, and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnero, Eleonora; Daelmans, Bernadette; Gupta, Neeru; Scherpbier, Robert; Shankar, Anuraj

    2008-04-12

    In 2008, the Countdown to 2015 initiative identified 68 priority countries for action on maternal, newborn, and child health. Much attention was paid to monitoring country-level progress in achieving high and equitable coverage with interventions effective in reducing mortality of mothers, newborn infants, and children up to 5 years of age. To have a broader understanding of the environment in which health services are delivered and health outcomes are produced is essential to increase intervention coverage. Programmes to address MNCH rely on health systems to generate information needed for effective decisions and to achieve the expected outcomes. Governance and leadership are needed throughout the process not only to create policies and implement them but also to assure quality and efficiency of care, to finance health services sufficiently and in an equitable way, and to manage the health workforce. We present a systematic approach to assess the wider health system and policy environment needed to achieve positive outcomes for maternal, newborn, and child health. We report on results from 13 indicators and show gaps in policy adoption as well as weaknesses in other health system building blocks. We identify areas for future action in measurement of key indicators and their use to support decision making. We hope that this information will provide an additional dimension to the discussions on feasible and sustainable solutions to accelerate progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, both at the global level but most importantly in individual countries. PMID:18406863

  5. 5 CFR 847.204 - Elections of FERS coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elections of FERS coverage. 847.204... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) ELECTIONS OF RETIREMENT COVERAGE BY CURRENT AND FORMER EMPLOYEES OF NONAPPROPRIATED FUND INSTRUMENTALITIES Elections To Continue Retirement Coverage After a Qualifying Move §...

  6. 5 CFR 847.203 - Elections of CSRS coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elections of CSRS coverage. 847.203... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) ELECTIONS OF RETIREMENT COVERAGE BY CURRENT AND FORMER EMPLOYEES OF NONAPPROPRIATED FUND INSTRUMENTALITIES Elections To Continue Retirement Coverage After a Qualifying Move §...

  7. 42 CFR 436.330 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 436.330 Section 436... Coverage of the Medically Needy § 436.330 Coverage for certain aliens. If an agency provides Medicaid to... condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter to those aliens described in § 436.406(c) of...

  8. 42 CFR 436.128 - Coverage for certain qualified aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain qualified aliens. 436.128... Mandatory Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.128 Coverage for certain qualified aliens. The agency... § 440.255(c) of this chapter to those aliens described in § 436.406(c) of this subpart....

  9. 42 CFR 435.350 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 435.350 Section 435... ISLANDS, AND AMERICAN SAMOA Optional Coverage of the Medically Needy § 435.350 Coverage for certain aliens... treatment of an emergency medical condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter, to those...

  10. 48 CFR 452.228-71 - Insurance Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance Coverage. 452... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 452.228-71 Insurance Coverage. As prescribed in 428.310, insert the following clause: Insurance Coverage (NOV 1996) Pursuant...

  11. 29 CFR 2.12 - Audiovisual coverage permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audiovisual coverage permitted. 2.12 Section 2.12 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.12 Audiovisual coverage permitted. The following are the types of hearings where the...

  12. Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

  13. 42 CFR 457.420 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 457.420 Section 457.420 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.420 Benchmark health benefits coverage....

  14. 48 CFR 1352.228-70 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.228-70 Insurance coverage. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1328.310-70(a), insert the following clause: Insurance Coverage (APR 2010... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage....

  15. 7 CFR 1806.26 - Coverage and premium rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage and premium rates. 1806.26 Section 1806.26... REGULATIONS INSURANCE National Flood Insurance § 1806.26 Coverage and premium rates. Exhibit A sets forth limits of coverage and chargeable premium rates under the program. Insurance policies under the...

  16. Disability, Health Insurance Coverage, and Utilization of Acute Health Services in the United States. Disability Statistics Report 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPlante, Mitchell P.

    This report uses data from the 1989 National Health Interview Survey to estimate health insurance coverage of children and nonelderly adults with disabilities and their utilization of physician and hospital care as a function of health insurance status. In part 1, national statistics on disability and insurance status are provided for different…

  17. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newman Mark J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at http://epitope.liai.org:8080/tools/population. Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine, and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups.

  18. Chemical information science coverage in Chemical Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, G

    1987-02-01

    For many years Chemical Abstracts has included in its coverage publications on chemical documentation or chemical information science. Although the bulk of those publications can be found in section 20 of Chemical Abstracts, many relevant articles were found scattered among 39 other sections of CA in 1984-1985. In addition to the scattering of references in CA, the comprehensiveness of Chemical Abstracts as a secondary source for chemical information science is called into question. Data are provided on the journals that contributed the most references on chemical information science and on the languages of publication of relevant articles.

  19. Methadone Maintenance and State Medicaid Managed Care Programs

    OpenAIRE

    McCarty, Dennis; Frank, Richard G.; Denmead, Gabrielle C.

    1999-01-01

    Coverage for methadone services in state Medicaid plans may facilitate access to the most effective therapy for heroin dependence. State Medicaid plans were reviewed to assess coverage for methadone services, methadone benefits in managed care, and limitations on methadone treatment. Medicaid does not cover methadone maintenance medication in 25 states (59 percent). Only 12 states (24percent) include methadone services in Medicaid managed care plans. Moreover, two of the 12 states limit cover...

  20. Changes in drug utilization during a gap in insurance coverage: an examination of the medicare Part D coverage gap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Polinski

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nations are struggling to expand access to essential medications while curbing rising health and drug spending. While the US government's Medicare Part D drug insurance benefit expanded elderly citizens' access to drugs, it also includes a controversial period called the "coverage gap" during which beneficiaries are fully responsible for drug costs. We examined the impact of entering the coverage gap on drug discontinuation, switching to another drug for the same indication, and drug adherence. While increased discontinuation of and adherence to essential medications is a regrettable response, increased switching to less expensive but therapeutically interchangeable medications is a positive response to minimize costs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We followed 663,850 Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Part D or retiree drug plans with prescription and health claims in 2006 and/or 2007 to determine who reached the gap spending threshold, n = 217,131 (33%. In multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, we compared drug discontinuation and switching rates in selected drug classes after reaching the threshold between all 1,993 who had no financial assistance during the coverage gap (exposed versus 9,965 multivariate propensity score-matched comparators with financial assistance (unexposed. Multivariate logistic regressions compared drug adherence (≤ 80% versus >80% of days covered. Beneficiaries reached the gap spending threshold on average 222 d ±79. At the drug level, exposed beneficiaries were twice as likely to discontinue (hazard ratio [HR]  = 2.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.64-2.43 but less likely to switch a drug (HR  = 0.60, 0.46-0.78 after reaching the threshold. Gap-exposed beneficiaries were slightly more likely to have reduced adherence (OR  = 1.07, 0.98-1.18. CONCLUSIONS: A lack of financial assistance after reaching the gap spending threshold was associated with a doubling in discontinuing essential

  1. Prenatal Care for Adolescents and attributes of Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Barbaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: evaluate prenatal care for adolescents in health units, in accordance with the attributes of Primary Health Care (PHC guidelines. METHOD: quantitative study conducted with health professionals, using the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Brazil to assess the presence and extent of PHC attributes. RESULTS: for all the participating units, the attribute Access scored =6.6; the attributes Longitudinality, Coordination (integration of care, Coordination (information systems and Integrality scored =6.6, and the Essential Score =6.6. Comparing basic units with family health units, the attribute scores were equally distributed; Accessibility scored =6.6, the others attributes scored =6.6; however, in the basic units, the Essential Score was =6.6 and, in the family health units, =6.6. CONCLUSION: expanding the coverage of family health units and the training of professionals can be considered strategies to qualify health care.

  2. Social Gerontology--Integrative and Territorial Aspects: A Citation Analysis of Subject Scatter and Database Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasda Bergman, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the mix of resources used in social gerontology research, a citation analysis was conducted. A representative sample of citations was selected from three prominent gerontology journals and information was added to determine subject scatter and database coverage for the cited materials. Results indicate that a significant portion of…

  3. Monitoring of vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li; Li Li-juan; Liang Li-qiao; Li Jiu-yi

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of vegetation coverage on a small scale is the foundation for the monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage and of the inversion model of monitoring vegetation coverage on a large scale by remote sensing. Using the object-oriented analytical software,Definiens Professional 5,a new method for calculating vegetation coverage based on high-resolution images(aerial photographs or near-surface photography)is proposed. Our research supplies references to remote sensing measurements of vegetation coverage on a small scale and accurate fundamental data for the inversion model of vegetation coverage on a large and intermediatc scale to improve the accuracy of remote sensing monitoring of changes in vegetation coverage.

  4. 支气管镜术在新生儿重症监护病房的应用指征探讨%Indications and safety of clinical application of fiberopitic bronchoscopy in neonatal intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许煊; 祝彬; 任海丽; 孙颖

    2015-01-01

    [Abstact]Objective To explore the indications and safety of clinical application of fiberopitic bronchoscopy (FB) in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods Athe clinic al data of 154 pediatric patients in NICU, 105 boys and 49 girls, aged 1~28 days, witht e body weight 2.85 kg (1.17~4.78 g), 79.8% being full-tgerm, who underwent FB were analyzed respectively. Result The indications for FB included stridor(54 cases,35.1%), dyspnea(n=32,20.8%), repeated apnea caused by choking of milk(n=32,20.8%), atelectasis (n=26, 16.8%), and failed extubation(n=22, 14.2%). In the 54 patients with stridor, laryngomalacia (39 cases, 72.2%), tracheomalacia (11 cases, 20.4%), subglottic stenosis(1 case),laryngeal web(1 case),nasal septum deformity(1 case) and laryngeal stenosis(1 case)were observed;in 3the 2 patients with dyspnea, tracheobronchomalacia stenosis (16 cases, 50%), laryngomalacia (9 cases, 28%) and inflammatory stenosis (7 cases, 22%) were observed; in the 20 patients with repeated apnea, tracheoesophageal fistula (5 cases, 25%) was observed; in the 26 patients with atelectasis 14 cases of inflammatory stenosis(53.8), 8 cases of tracheobronchomalacia stenosis (30.8%), and 4 cases of bronchial stenosis (15.4%) were found .In 22 patients with failed extubation,we found 12cases(54.5% ) of Tracheobronchomalacia stenosis including Inflammatory stenosis (7cases) ,and laryngomalacia(2cases,9.1% ).No procedure-related mortality, life-threatening complications occur in FB therapy. Conclusion Our results suggest that FB can be safely applied for diagnosis and treatment of neonatal airway disease in NICU.Indications for FB therapy may include stridor,dyspnea,repeatedapnea,choke,atelectasis and failed extubation.%目的:临床探支气管镜术在新生儿监护室应用指征及安全性。方法分析2012年1月~2013年12月北京军区总医院附属八一儿童医院儿童重症科应用支气管镜检查的154例因喉鸣、呼吸困难、反复窒息呛奶、肺不张

  5. Overturning anti-miscegenation laws: news media coverage of the Lovings' legal case against the state of Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoewe, Jennifer; Zeldes, Geri Alumit

    2012-01-01

    This study fills a gap in scholarship by exploring historical news coverage of interracial relationships. It examines coverage by The New York Times, Washington Post and Times-Herald, and Chicago Tribune of the progression of the landmark civil rights case of Loving v. Virginia, in which the Supreme Court overturned Virginia's anti-miscegenation law, which prohibited marriage between any White and non-White person. An analysis of the frames and sources used in these publications' news stories about the case indicate all three publications' coverage favored the Lovings.

  6. Improving HSDPA Indoor Coverage and Throughput by Repeater and Dedicated Indoor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The target of the paper is to provide guidelines for indoor planning and optimization using an outdoor-to-indoor repeater or a dedicated indoor system. The paper provides practical information for enhancing the performance of high-speed downlink packet access (HSDPA in an indoor environment. The capabilities of an outdoor-to-indoor analog WCDMA repeater are set against a dedicated indoor system and, furthermore, compared to indoor coverage of a nearby macrocellular base station. An extensive measurement campaign with varying system configurations was arranged in different indoor environments. The results show that compared to dedicated indoor systems, similar HSDPA performance can be provided by extending macrocellular coverage inside buildings using an outdoor-to-indoor repeater. According to the measurements, the pilot coverage planning threshold of about −80 dBm ensures a 2500 kbps throughput for shared HSDPA connections. Improving the coverage above −80 dBm seems to provide only small advantage in HSDPA throughput. Of course, the pilot planning thresholds may change if different channel power allocations are used. In addition, network performance can be further improved by increasing the antenna density in the serving distributed antenna system. Finally, good performance of repeater implementation needs careful repeater gain setting and donor antenna siting.

  7. Improving HSDPA Indoor Coverage and Throughput by Repeater and Dedicated Indoor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isotalo Tero

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The target of the paper is to provide guidelines for indoor planning and optimization using an outdoor-to-indoor repeater or a dedicated indoor system. The paper provides practical information for enhancing the performance of high-speed downlink packet access (HSDPA in an indoor environment. The capabilities of an outdoor-to-indoor analog WCDMA repeater are set against a dedicated indoor system and, furthermore, compared to indoor coverage of a nearby macrocellular base station. An extensive measurement campaign with varying system configurations was arranged in different indoor environments. The results show that compared to dedicated indoor systems, similar HSDPA performance can be provided by extending macrocellular coverage inside buildings using an outdoor-to-indoor repeater. According to the measurements, the pilot coverage planning threshold of about −80 dBm ensures a 2500 kbps throughput for shared HSDPA connections. Improving the coverage above −80 dBm seems to provide only small advantage in HSDPA throughput. Of course, the pilot planning thresholds may change if different channel power allocations are used. In addition, network performance can be further improved by increasing the antenna density in the serving distributed antenna system. Finally, good performance of repeater implementation needs careful repeater gain setting and donor antenna siting.

  8. The readiness of addiction treatment agencies for health care reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molfenter Todd

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA aims to provide affordable health insurance and expanded health care coverage for some 32 million Americans. The PPACA makes provisions for using technology, evidence-based treatments, and integrated, patient-centered care to modernize the delivery of health care services. These changes are designed to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, and cost-savings within the health care system. To gauge the addiction treatment field’s readiness for health reform, the authors developed a Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI survey for addiction treatment agencies. Addiction treatment administrators and providers from around the United States completed the survey located on the http://www.niatx.net website. Respondents self-assessed their agencies based on 13 conditions pertinent to health reform readiness, and received a confidential score and instant feedback. On a scale of “Needs to Begin,” “Early Stages,” “On the Way,” and “Advanced,” the mean scores for respondents (n = 276 ranked in the Early Stages of health reform preparation for 11 of 13 conditions. Of greater concern was that organizations with budgets of  $5 million to have information technology (patient records, patient health technology, and administrative information technology, evidence-based treatments, quality management systems, a continuum of care, or a board of directors informed about PPACA. The findings of the HRRI indicate that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, have much to do to prepare for a future environment that has greater expectations for information technology use, a credentialed workforce, accountability for patient care, and an integrated continuum of care.

  9. Achieving Universal Coverage; Lessons From The Experience of Other Countries for National Health Insurance Implementation in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnaniarti Misnaniarti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is not the only country that will lead to universal coverage. Several countries took an initiative to develop social security, through Universal Health Coverage (UHC to achieve health insurance and welfare for all residents. Even, some countries have already reached universal health coverage since a few years ago. The purpose of this paper is to assess the achievement of universal coverage of the health insurance implementation in several countries. In general, some countries require considerable time to achieve universal coverage. Mechanisms and stages that need attention is on the univeral registration aspects that cover the entire population, progressive and continuous funding sources, comprehensive benefits package, the expansion of gradual coverage for diseases that can cause catastrophic expenditure, increasing capacity and mobilizing supporting resource. National Health Insurance policy in some countries can improve access to care, utilization and quality of quality health services to all citizens. Indonesia is expected to learn from the experience of other countries to achieve UHC, so that the projection of the entire population of Indonesia to have health insurance in 2019 will be reached soon.

  10. Identification and characteristics of patients with palliative care needs in Brazilian primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucci, Fernando C. I.; Cabrera, Marcos A. S.; Perilla, Anamaria Baquero; Brun, Marilia Maroneze; de Barros, Eder Marcos L.; Martins, Vanessa M.; Rosenberg, John P.; Yates, Patsy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brazilian healthcare system offers universal coverage but lacks information about how patients with PC needs are serviced by its primary care program, Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF). Methods Cross-sectional study in community settings. Patients in ESF program were screened using a Palliative Care Screening Tool (PCST). Included patients were assessed with Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). Res...

  11. Hysterectomy and its impact on the calculated incidence of cervical cancer and screening coverage in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Janni Uyen Hoa; Lynge, Elsebeth; Njor, Sisse Helle;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence rates of cervical cancer and the coverage in cervical cancer screening are usually reported by including in the denominator all women from the general population. However, after hysterectomy women are not at risk anymore of developing cervical cancer. Therefore, it makes...... sense to determine the indicators also for the true at-risk populations. We described the frequency of total hysterectomy in Denmark and its impact on the calculated incidence of cervical cancer and the screening coverage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: With data from five Danish population-based registries......, the incidence rate of cervical cancer and the screening coverage for women aged 23-64 years on 31 December 2010 were calculated with and without adjustments for hysterectomies undertaken for reasons other than cervical cancer. They were calculated as the number of cases divided by 1) the total number of woman...

  12. Building blocks for reform: achieving universal coverage with private and public group health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Cathy; Davis, Karen; Collins, Sara R

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for universal health insurance that builds on the current U.S. mixed private-public system by expanding group coverage through private markets and publicly sponsored insurance. This Building Blocks approach includes a new national insurance "connector" that offers small businesses and individuals a structured choice of a Medicare-like public option and private plans. Other features include an individual mandate, required employer contributions, Medicaid/State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) expansion, and tax credits to assure affordability. The paper estimates coverage and costs, and assesses the approach. Our findings indicate that the framework could reach near-universal coverage with little net increase in national health spending. PMID:18474952

  13. Child health insurance coverage and household activity toward child development in four South American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L

    2014-05-01

    We evaluate the association between child health insurance coverage and household activities that enhance child development. We use micro-level data on a unique sample of 2,370 children from four South American countries. Data were collected by physicians via in-person interviews with the mothers. The regression models compare insured and uninsured children seen within the same pediatric care practice for routine well-child care and adjust for several demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. We also stratify these analyses by selective household demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and by country. We find that insurance coverage is associated with increasingly engaging the child in development-enhancing household activity in the total sample. This association significantly varies with ethnic ancestry and is more pronounced for children of Native or African ancestry. When stratifying by country, a significant positive association is observed for Argentina, with two other countries having positive but insignificant associations. The results suggest that insurance coverage is associated with enhanced household activity toward child development. However, other data and research are needed to estimate the causal relationship.

  14. Children’s health insurance coverage in the United States: The role of parents’ ethnicity and immigration status

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Swarn

    2016-01-01

    This study explores whether parents’ decision to carry health insurance for their children varies by race/ethnicity or immigration status. The results indicate that when compared to the reference group of native-born white parents, foreign-born, Hispanic, and black parents were less likely to have private health insurance coverage and more likely to have public health insurance coverage for their children. The likelihood of being uninsured increased with lower educational attai...

  15. Toward universal coverage in Afghanistan: A multi-stakeholder assessment of capacity investments in the community health worker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Anbrasi; Branchini, Casey; Aitken, Iain; Roach, Melissa; Osei-Bonsu, Kojo; Arwal, Said Habib

    2015-11-01

    Global efforts to scale-up the community health workforce have accelerated as a result of the growing evidence of their effectiveness to enhance coverage and health outcomes. Reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan integrated capacity investments for community based service delivery, including the deployment of over 28,000 community health workers (CHWs) to ensure access to basic preventive and curative services. The study aimed to conduct capacity assessments of the CHW system and determine stakeholder perspectives of CHW performance. Structured interviews were conducted on a national sample from 33 provinces and included supervisors, facility providers, patients, and CHWs. Formative assessments were also conducted with national policymakers, community members and health councils in two provinces. Results indicate that more than 70% of the NGO's provide comprehensive training for CHWs, 95% CHWs reported regular supervision, and more than 60% of the health posts had adequate infrastructure and essential commodities. Innovative strategies of paired male and female CHWs, institution of a special cadre of community health supervisors, and community health councils were introduced as systems strengthening mechanisms. Reported barriers included unrealistic and expanding task expectations (14%), unsatisfactory compensation mechanisms (75%), inadequate transport (69%), and lack of commodities (40%). Formative assessments evidenced that CHWs were highly valued as they provided equitable, accessible and affordable 24-h care. Their loyalty, dedication and the ability for women to access care without male family escorts was appreciated by communities. With rising concerns of workforce deficits, insecurity and budget constraints, the health system must enhance the capacity of these frontline workers to improve the continuum of care. The study provides critical insight into the strengths and constraints of Afghanistan's CHW system, warranting further efforts to contextualize

  16. Viewing the Kenyan health system through an equity lens: implications for universal coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuma Jane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Equity and universal coverage currently dominate policy debates worldwide. Health financing approaches are central to universal coverage. The way funds are collected, pooled, and used to purchase or provide services should be carefully considered to ensure that population needs are addressed under a universal health system. The aim of this paper is to assess the extent to which the Kenyan health financing system meets the key requirements for universal coverage, including income and risk cross-subsidisation. Recommendations on how to address existing equity challenges and progress towards universal coverage are made. Methods An extensive review of published and gray literature was conducted to identify the sources of health care funds in Kenya. Documents were mainly sourced from the Ministry of Medical Services and the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation. Country level documents were the main sources of data. In cases where data were not available at the country level, they were sought from the World Health Organisation website. Each financing mechanism was analysed in respect to key functions namely, revenue generation, pooling and purchasing. Results The Kenyan health sector relies heavily on out-of-pocket payments. Government funds are mainly allocated through historical incremental approach. The sector is largely underfunded and health care contributions are regressive (i.e. the poor contribute a larger proportion of their income to health care than the rich. Health financing in Kenya is fragmented and there is very limited risk and income cross-subsidisation. The country has made little progress towards achieving international benchmarks including the Abuja target of allocating 15% of government's budget to the health sector. Conclusions The Kenyan health system is highly inequitable and policies aimed at promoting equity and addressing the needs of the poor and vulnerable have not been successful. Some progress

  17. Quality of Care for HIV/AIDS and for Primary Prevention by HIV Specialists and Nonspecialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landovitz, Raphael J; Desmond, Katherine A; Gildner, Jennifer L; Leibowitz, Arleen A

    2016-09-01

    The role of HIV specialists in providing primary care to persons living with HIV/AIDS is evolving, given their increased incidence of comorbidities. Multivariate logit analysis compared compliance with sentinel preventive screening tests and interventions among publicly insured Californians with and without access to HIV specialists in 2010. Quality-of-care indicators [visit frequency, CD4 and viral load (VL) assessments, influenza vaccine, tuberculosis (TB) testing, lipid profile, glucose blood test, and Pap smears for women] were related to patient characteristics and provider HIV caseload. There were 9377 adult Medicare enrollees (71% also had Medicaid coverage) and 2076 enrollees with only Medicaid coverage. Adjusted for patient characteristics, patients seeing providers with greater HIV caseloads (>50 HIV patients) were more likely to meet visit frequency guidelines in both Medicare [98%; confidence interval (CI 97.5-98.2) and Medicaid (97%; CI 96.2-98.0), compared to 60% (CI 57.1-62.3) and 45% (CI 38.3-50.4), respectively, seeing providers without large HIV caseloads (p lipid or glucose assessments or Pap Smears for women. Patients with access to large-volume providers were more likely to meet clinical guidelines for visits, CD4, VL, tuberculosis testing, and influenza vaccinations, and were not less likely to receive primary preventive care. Substantial insufficiencies remain in both monitoring to assess viral suppression and in preventive care. PMID:27610461

  18. Immunization coverage against capsular bacteria in splenectomized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchar, Ernest; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Stolarczyk, Celina; Kurpas, Donata; Zycinska, Katarzyna; Wardyn, Kazimierz; Szenborn, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    Splenectomy significantly increases the risk of severe invasive infections caused by capsular bacteria, such as sepsis and meningitis. Immunizations before and after splenectomy reduce the risk and are routinely recommended. Little is known about compliance with actual immunization guidelines in Poland. The aim of this study was to analyze the vaccination rate and the knowledge of splenectomized patients concerning immunizations in Poland. We applied a questionnaire to survey 85 adult patients (F/M 49/36) splenectomized in 2009-2010 and analyzed the patients' medical files and immunization certificates. Patients were also questioned over the phone. We found that the patients were most commonly immunized against Streptococcus pneumoniae (17/85, 20 %), less often against Haemophilus influenzae b (8/85, 9.4 %), and rarely against Niesseria meningitidis C (3/85, 3.5 %). In contrast, hepatitis B immunization coverage rate was as high as 67 % (57/85). The majority of respondents (59/85, 69.4 %) regarded information about the recommended immunizations as insufficient and rated their doctor's reasoning as inconsistent, a smaller number (20/85, 23.5 %) confirmed they received sound information before splenectomy. Both surgeons and primary care physicians did not offer immunizations to the majority of patients (59/85, 69.4 %); as a result, only 30.6 % of patients (26/85) were immunized against any capsular bacteria before splenectomy. In conclusion, the majority of splenectomized patients are not immunized despite current guidelines and do show an inadequate level of knowledge concerning the consequences of splenectomy. It is important that both surgeons and primary care doctors give patients clear instructions about immunizations and antibiotics recommended before and after their splenectomy.

  19. [Salter innominate osteotomy : Indications, surgical technique, results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, A; Tingart, M

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of congenital hip dysplasia in Germany is 2-4 % and that of hip dislocation is 0.5-1 %. If early therapy is not successful or the hip dysplasia or dislocation is diagnosed too late (children of over 1 year of age) surgical treatment is indicated to increase the femoral coverage. The innominate osteotomy, published by Robert B. Salter 1961, is a worldwide established technique to improve the lateral and ventral coverage of the femoral head in primary or secondary hip dysplasia or dislocation. In this paper we discuss Salter's technique and present indications, the perioperative procedure, operative modifications and operative extensions and demonstrate the anatomical requirements, postoperative biomechanical changes and long-term results. PMID:27351429

  20. A simple EHF hemispheric coverage antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. C.

    1994-08-01

    A circulary polarized, axially symmetric, wide-beam radiator is required in many applications, including TT&C for UAV's and satellites. This report discusses some existing wide-beam antenna designs including divergent lenses and reflectors and introduces a new antenna design. Using a simple dielectric ring in conjunction with a dielectric loaded circular waveguide opening, a near ideal, axially symmetric, hemispheric coverage antenna with circular polarization of good axial ratio and wide-band impedance match is realized. Mechanically, the antenna is small, lightweight, and low cost. The dielectric used is the common Rexolite. Since no lossy materials or resonant scatterers are used, the antenna performance is inherently broadband and low loss. A K sub a-band prototype as well as compact designs for both Q- and K-bands are described.