WorldWideScience

Sample records for care consumers internet

  1. Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila J. Finney Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty around the value of and appropriate regulatory models for direct-to-consumer (DTC genetic testing underscores the importance of tracking public awareness of these services. We analyzed nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2008 (n=7,674 and 2011 (n=3,959 to assess population-level changes in awareness of DTC genetic testing in the U.S. and to explore sociodemographic, health care, Internet use, and population density correlates. Overall, awareness increased significantly from 29% in 2008 to 37% in 2011. The observed increase in awareness from 2008 to 2011 remained significant (OR=1.39 even when adjusted for sociodemographic variables, health care access, Internet use, and population density. Independent of survey year, the odds of awareness of DTC genetic tests were significantly higher for those aged 50–64 (OR=1.64, and 65–74 (OR=1.60; college graduates (OR=2.02; those with a regular source of health care (OR=1.27; those with a prior cancer diagnosis (OR=1.24; those who use the Internet (OR=1.27; and those living in urban areas (OR=1.25. Surveillance of awareness—along with empirical data on use of and response to genetic risk information—can inform public health and policy efforts to maximize benefits and minimize risks of DTC genetic testing.

  2. Impact of the internet on consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Badea, Mihaela; Bogdan PÎRVULESCU

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to show the current opportunities, prospects and the impact of the Internet on the consumer. This will be achieved by comparing the behaviour of the British consumer and the Romanian consumer and the changes that appeared under the influence of the Internet. Among the actions undertaken by the Internet marketing, which deals with the promotion of products at a certain price, a concept that has become significant in recent years, there is the placement of prod...

  3. Gender and internet consumers' decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chyan; Wu, Chia-Chun

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide managers of shopping websites information regarding consumer purchasing decisions based on the Consumer Styles Inventory (CSI). According to the CSI, one can capture what decision-making styles online shoppers use. Furthermore, this research also discusses the gender differences among online shoppers. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to understand the decision-making styles and discriminant analysis was used to distinguish the differences between female and male shoppers. The result shows that there are differences in purchasing decisions between online female and male Internet users.

  4. Health care consumer reports: an evaluation of consumer perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Daniel R; Everet, Kevin D

    2003-01-01

    There has been a proliferation of health care consumer reports, also known as "consumer guides," "report cards," and "performance reports," which are designed to assist consumers in making more informed health care decisions. While there is evidence that providers use such reports to identify and make changes in practice, thus improving the quality of care, there is little empirical evidence on how consumer guides/report cards are used by consumers. This study fills that gap by surveying 925 patients as they wait for ambulatory care in several clinics in a midwestern city. Findings indicate that consumers are selective in their use of these reports and quickly identify those sections of the report of most interest to them. Report developers should take precautions to ensure such reports are viewed as credible sources of health care information.

  5. Mobile Phone and Internet Consumers Rights Compliance in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorela Iacovoiu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study highlights the extent to which rights of mobile phone and internet consumers are respected by the most important operators in Romania, namely Orange, Vodafone and Cosmote, in the context of accelerated technological changes on a highly competitive market. The research is focused on the analysis of regulations and contractual grievance procedures, number, distribution and motivation of consumer complaints, administrative quality indicators of data services and main consumer complaints. Among the documents under analysis we can mention contractual agreements, applicable procedures, as well as relevant empirical data provided by NAPC, NAMRC, economic operators and a site for online complaints, namely ReclamatieOnline.ro. The analyses emphasize that consumer complaints are mainly due to problems arising from contracts with service providers, billing services and defects of electronic terminals under warranty. The main cause for all this is the insufficient information users are provided with and, therefore, consumers’ decreased ability in the decision making process involved in the purchase of mobile technology and internet services. To better inform consumers, at the end of the study we propose a series of measures that could be adopted by mobile and internet service providers and regulatory, supervision and control institutions, as well as future directions of research in the field.

  6. Financing the health care Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J C

    2000-01-01

    Internet-related health care firms have accelerated through the life cycle of capital finance and organizational destiny, including venture capital funding, public stock offerings, and consolidation, in the wake of heightened competition and earnings disappointments. Venture capital flooded into the e-health sector, rising from $3 million in the first quarter of 1998 to $335 million two years later. Twenty-six e-health firms went public in eighteen months, raising $1.53 billion at initial public offering (IPO) and with post-IPO share price appreciation greater than 100 percent for eighteen firms. The technology-sector crash hit the e-health sector especially hard, driving share prices down by more than 80 percent for twenty-one firms. The industry now faces an extended period of consolidation between e-health and conventional firms.

  7. Effects of consumer motives on search behavior using internet advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kenneth C C

    2004-08-01

    Past studies on uses and gratifications theory suggested that consumer motives affect how they will use media and media contents. Recent advertising research has extended the theory to study the use of Internet advertising. The current study explores the effects of consumer motives on their search behavior using Internet advertising. The study employed a 2 by 2 between-subjects factorial experiment design. A total of 120 subjects were assigned to an experiment condition that contains an Internet advertisement varying by advertising appeals (i.e., rational vs. emotional) and product involvement levels (high vs. low). Consumer search behavior (measured by the depth, breadth, total amount of search), demographics, and motives were collected by post-experiment questionnaires. Because all three dependent variables measuring search behavior were conceptually related to each other, MANCOVA procedures were employed to examine the moderating effects of consumer motives on the dependent variables in four product involvement-advertising appeal conditions. Results indicated that main effects for product involvements and advertising appeals were statistically significant. Univariate ANOVA also showed that advertising appeals and product involvement levels influenced the total amount of search. Three-way interactions among advertising appeals, product involvement levels, and information motive were also statistically significant. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  8. Consumers on the Internet: ethical and legal aspects of commercialization of personalized nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, Jennie; Nordgren, Anders; Perrudin, Maud; Ronteltap, Amber; Savigny, Jean; van Trijp, Hans; Nordström, Karin; Görman, Ulf

    2013-07-01

    Consumers often have a positive attitude to the option of receiving personalized nutrition advice based upon genetic testing, since the prospect of enhancing or maintaining one's health can be perceived as empowering. Current direct-to-consumer services over the Internet, however, suffer from a questionable level of truthfulness and consumer protection, in addition to an imbalance between far-reaching promises and contrasting disclaimers. Psychological and behavioral studies indicate that consumer acceptance of a new technology is primarily explained by the end user's rational and emotional interpretation as well as moral beliefs. Results from such studies indicate that personalized nutrition must create true value for the consumer. Also, the freedom to choose is crucial for consumer acceptance. From an ethical point of view, consumer protection is crucial, and caution must be exercised when putting nutrigenomic-based tests and advice services on the market. Current Internet offerings appear to reveal a need to further guaranty legal certainty by ensuring privacy, consumer protection and safety. Personalized nutrition services are on the borderline between nutrition and medicine. Current regulation of this area is incomplete and undergoing development. This situation entails the necessity for carefully assessing and developing existing rules that safeguard fundamental rights and data protection while taking into account the sensitivity of data, the risks posed by each step in their processing, and sufficient guarantees for consumers against potential misuse.

  9. Consumers' willingness to buy food through the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Ramus, Kim

    2005-01-01

    are sorted into the categories medium, product, consumer, firm, and environment. In order to draw the various results together and provide a coherent framework for future research, a model is proposed that combines the theory of planned behaviour and the lifestyle construct. Findings: While a lot...... the internet. Practical implications: The literature review suggests that concepts combining convenience and an emphasis on information intensive food products will be most successful, and that consumers having a "wired lifestyle" are the most likely users. However, much more detailed insights will be possible...

  10. Trademarks, consumer protection and domain names on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kelblová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with current problems of the conflict of domain names on the Internet with trade marks in relation to the consumer protection. The aim of the article is to refer to ways and means of protection against of the speculative registration of a domain name. In the Czech legal order these means represent legal regulation of the unfair competition in Commercial Code, regulation of liability for damage together with the Trademarks Act.

  11. Internet Banking and E-commerce: A Consumer Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrett JE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No better news this past holiday season was the news about internet shopping and E-commerce. New information provided by such firms as MasterCard and Amazon produced evidence of the continued growth of orders by internet and the not so wonderful news from the “brick and mortar retail spaces. New jobs information summarized by increase job creation and reduced the U.S. Labor Department Unemployment Rate to levels not seen in recent decades. Except for unintelligent and politically motivated rhetoric from some political candidates running for the presidential office about a year in advance of election, the nation would be wholly rejoicing in the latest news from the media about employment. From the consumer perspective, we discuss the major problems in this industry.

  12. Consumer-driven health care marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, R L

    1997-01-01

    In this article, a health care marketing executive takes an opposing view: That the consumer will not only continue to exercise choice but also, at annual renewal time, veto power. In part, that is because the consumers are feeling the rising cost of health care much more directly than in the past, through ever-higher premiums, deductibles and copayments. As they assumed more of the burden of medical care delivery, consumers are becoming more knowledgeable about and discriminating toward the health care system and provider plans they are offered. They understand--as does their employer--that no longer are all health care plans alike or at parity with each other. The consumer is also demanding greater access to freedom of provider choice, quality of health care coverage.

  13. Consumer Motivation On Internet Shopping An Exploratory Study on Consumer Motivation of Online Shopping in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Ghogar, Vandhana

    2010-01-01

    The growth of B2C shopping has soared massively over the last few years in Thailand. Although B2C has created an immense amount of new opportunities for Thai companies and businesses, questions still arise about why consumers are motivated to use the Internet as a medium to shop over conventional shopping. Due to the rapid increase in online stores, competition has also risen remarkably. Therefore it is imperative for all online businesses in Thailand to have an understanding of consumer moti...

  14. Free medical care and consumer protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Aniket Deepak; Banerjee, Arunabha

    2011-01-01

    This paper will examine the question of whether patients, who receive free medical care, whether from private charitable or governmental hospitals, can claim rights as 'consumers' under the Consumer Protection Act, 1986. The issue will be discussed from a constitutional perspective as well as that of the law of torts.

  15. [Consumer health-care information technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyaev, A

    2013-06-01

    Consumer health-care information technology is intended to improve patients' opportunities to gather information about their own health. Ideally, this will be achieved through an improved involvement of existing data bases and an improved communication of information to patients and to care providers, if desired by patients. Additionally, further interconnection of existing and new systems and pervasive system design may be used. All consumer health-care information technology services are optional and leave patients in control of their medical data at all times. This article reflects the current status of consumer health-care information technology research and suggests further research areas that should be addressed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Duties of care on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; van Engers, T.; Wiersma, C.; Jasserand, C.; Abel, W.

    2011-01-01

    Internet Service Providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national and international context, with regard to their relationship both with governments and other private parties, on for example questions of (civil) liability. The paper focuses on duties of care as concerns the r

  17. Duties of care on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; van Engers, T.; Wiersma, C.; Jasserand, C.; Abel, W.

    2011-01-01

    Internet Service Providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national and international context, with regard to their relationship both with governments and other private parties, on for example questions of (civil) liability. The paper focuses on duties of care as concerns the

  18. Digital health care--the convergence of health care and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S R

    2000-04-01

    The author believes that interactive media (the Internet and the World Wide Web) and associated applications used to access those media (portals, browsers, specialized Web-based applications) will result in a substantial, positive, and measurable impact on medical care faster than any previous information technology or communications tool. Acknowledging the dynamic environment, the author classifies "pure" digital health care companies into three business service areas: content, connectivity, and commerce. Companies offering these services are attempting to tap into a host of different markets within the health care industry including providers, payers, pharmaceutical and medical products companies, employers, distributors, and consumers. As the fastest growing medium in history, and given the unique nature of health care information and the tremendous demand for content among industry professionals and consumers, the Internet offers a more robust and targeted direct marketing opportunity than traditional media. From the medical consumer's standpoint (i.e., the patient) the author sees the Internet as performing five critical functions: (1) Disseminate information, (2) Aid informed decision making, (3) Promote health, (4) Provide a means for information exchange and support--the community concept, and (5) Increase self-care and manage demand for health services, lowering direct medical costs. The author firmly submits the Web will provide overall benefits to the health care economy as health information consumers manage their own health problems that might not directly benefit from an encounter with a health professional. Marrying the Internet to other interactive technologies, including voice recognition systems and telephone-based triage lines among others, holds the promise of reducing unnecessary medical services.

  19. Factors influencing consumer satisfaction with health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Satish P; Deshpande, Samir S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that impact consumer satisfaction with health care. This is a secondary analysis of the Center for Studying Health System Change's 2010 Health Tracking Household Survey. Regression analysis was used to examine the impact of treatment issues, financial issues, family-related issues, sources of health care information, location, and demographics-related factors on satisfaction with health care. The study involved 12280 subjects, 56% of whom were very satisfied with their health care, whereas 66% were very satisfied with their primary care physician. Fourteen percent of the subjects had no health insurance; 34% of the subjects got their health care information from the Web. Satisfaction with primary care physician, general health status, promptness of visit to doctor, insurance type, medical cost per family, annual income, persons in family, health care information from friends, and age significantly impacted satisfaction with health care. The regression models accounted for 23% of the variance in health care satisfaction. Satisfaction with primary care physicians, health insurance, and general health status are the 3 most significant indicators of an individual's satisfaction with health care.

  20. Information search in health care decision-making: a study of word-of-mouth and internet information users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Robin L; Ingram, Rhea; Jiang, Pingjun

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how individual consumers may differ in their information search behavior in health care decision-making. Results indicate that most consumers still use word-of-mouth as a primary information source for health care decisions. However, usage of the Internet is increasing. The results of this study indicate that consumers who are most likely to use the Internet for health care information are single, younger, and less educated, whereas consumers who are most likely to use word-of-mouth are middle-aged, married, with higher income and higher education. Surprisingly, no significant gender difference was found in information search behavior for health care decision-making. The results also suggest that consumers with the highest tendency to use word-of-mouth are also the lowest users of the Internet in health care decision-making. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. The rudiments of an Internet-based health plan for consumers: an interview with John Danaher, MD, MBA. Interview by Richard L. Reece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, J

    2000-01-01

    Richard L. Reece, MD, interviewed John Danaher, MD, MBA, on August 16, 2000, to discuss how his new company is preparing for the perfect storm--the looming convergence of demanding consumers, defined contributions, and Internet-based health plans. He describes how his firm is putting financial and clinical tools in the hands of consumers and physicians, so consumers can be more enlightened in their health care choices. Danaher says, "We're not about buying goods and services online. We are transforming the way consumers buy health care and seek insurance. We're trying to be a 401 k where people get on, knowing their risk profile and return horizons. We aim to motivate consumers to be proactive in making health care choices. How do we make consumers responsible and motivated enough to take control of managing their health care costs? How well we articulate this call to consumer action will be the key to our success."

  2. Towards managing consumer energy demand with the aid of the internet of things

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Andrew C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available and designed to be incorporated into the Internet of Things. We describe the technology used and dedicate a section on the potential benefits of making consumer energy demand information available at regional and national levels....

  3. Quick Tips for Buying Medicines Over the Internet: A Consumer Safety Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alert: Internet Sales of Laser Products Online Pet Pharmacies Purchasing Pet Drugs Online: Buyer Beware Other Resources State Pharmacy Boards ... Medicines Over the Internet BeSafeRx: Know Your Online Pharmacy Resources for You Protecting ... Counterfeit Medicine Medication Health Fraud For Consumers ...

  4. Third party internet seals: reviewing the effects on online consumer trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, P.; van Noort, G.; Lee, I.

    2010-01-01

    Buying online is still perceived as risky. A key strategy of online marketers to increase consumer trust in online ordering is to display privacy and security seals on their web sites. Although research indicates that these Internet seals do not necessarily mean better safety for online consumers,

  5. Third party internet seals: reviewing the effects on online consumer trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, P.; van Noort, G.; Lee, I.

    2010-01-01

    Buying online is still perceived as risky. A key strategy of online marketers to increase consumer trust in online ordering is to display privacy and security seals on their web sites. Although research indicates that these Internet seals do not necessarily mean better safety for online consumers, f

  6. Consumers on the Internet: ethical and legal aspects of commercialization of personalized nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlgren, J.; Nordgren, A.; Perrudin, M.; Ronteltap, A.; Savigny, J.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Nordström, K.; Görman, U.

    2013-01-01

    Consumers often have a positive attitude to the option of receiving personalized nutrition advice based upon genetic testing, since the prospect of enhancing or maintaining one’s health can be perceived as empowering. Current direct-to-consumer services over the Internet, however, suffer from a ques

  7. Consumers on the Internet: ethical and legal aspects of commercialization of personalized nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlgren, J.; Nordgren, A.; Perrudin, M.; Ronteltap, A.; Savigny, J.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Nordström, K.; Görman, U.

    2013-01-01

    Consumers often have a positive attitude to the option of receiving personalized nutrition advice based upon genetic testing, since the prospect of enhancing or maintaining one’s health can be perceived as empowering. Current direct-to-consumer services over the Internet, however, suffer from a

  8. Third party internet seals: reviewing the effects on online consumer trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, P.; van Noort, G.; Lee, I.

    2010-01-01

    Buying online is still perceived as risky. A key strategy of online marketers to increase consumer trust in online ordering is to display privacy and security seals on their web sites. Although research indicates that these Internet seals do not necessarily mean better safety for online consumers, f

  9. Internet Banking and E-commerce: A Consumer Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey E Jarrett

    2016-01-01

    No better news this past holiday season was the news about internet shopping and E-commerce. New information provided by such firms as MasterCard and Amazon produced evidence of the continued growth of orders by internet and the not so wonderful news from the “brick and mortar retail spaces. New jobs information summarized by increase job creation and reduced the U.S. Labor Department Unemployment Rate to levels not seen in recent decades. Except for unintelligent and politically motivated rh...

  10. Health care futures, Part 1. The emergence of the new health care consumer. Panel discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, M; Larkin, G N; LeTourneau, B; Reinhardt, U; Rippen, H E; Weatherup, T G

    1998-01-01

    In Part 1 of this second annual panel discussion, six experts examine the new health care consumer. The whole concept of the patient as consumer still makes people uneasy when it's applied to health care. Whether you prefer consumer, customer, purchaser, end-user, ultimate buyer, or beneficiary, one thing's for sure: Many of us are as different from the bygone patient as an HMO is from the general practitioner who made house calls. One of the reasons for many Americans' new interest, knowledge, attitudes, and expectations about health and health care is the Internet, the second topic in this discussion. In Part 2, physician executives from the three leading physician practice management companies (PPMCs) join Jeff Goldsmith, Barbara LeTourneau, and Uwe Reinhardt for a spirited exchange about this burgeoning new industry in the American health care sector. They will tackle questions such as: Are PPMCs delivering what they promise? What will separate successful PPMCs from the rest? Can PPMCs meet Wall Street's earnings expectations and also help physicians deliver better care? When PPMCs win, who loses? And, what roles will physician executives play in PPMCs?

  11. Consumer responses to advertising on the Internet: the effect of individual difference on ambivalence and avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chang Hyun; Villegas, Jorge

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the effect that individual characteristics have on consumer advertising processing under high- and low-interactivity circumstances on the Web. Tests on the relationship between individual differences and advertising responses form the basis of this empirical study on the Web. The results indicated that consumers have a higher tendency to avoid or experience ambivalence about Internet advertisements under low-interactivity circumstances, and attitudinal ambivalence lead to avoidance when responding to advertisements on the Internet. Personality variables are the main factors in consumer decision-making behaviors and Internet characteristics, such as levels of interactivity, can greatly influence the effectiveness of advertising in online environments. Advertising credibility could influence people's consumer attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors over time on the Web.

  12. Factors affecting consumer's continued use of internet banking: Empirical Evidence from Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujana Adapa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the factors that influence consumers continued use of internet banking in Australia. Patterns of continued use of internet banking have been neglected as most of the existing studies focus on either consumer adoption or acceptance of internet banking. However, in comparison to new customer acquisition, measures of continued use of internet banking are important as it is related to a cost-effective marketing strategy aimed at retaining customers. The present study is a response to a gap in existing literature which requires the application of more integrated theory testing and the identification of factors that influence the continued use of internet banking in order of importance to consumers. The study sets out to develop a conceptual framework based on theoretical models related to the acceptance of technology and diffusion of innovations theory. The conceptual model developed encompasses technology, channel, social and value for money factors as predictors in the identification of influential factors for consumers and their continued use of internet banking. Data were collected using a cross-sectional mall intercept survey in the Western Sydney region, comprising a sample of 372 internet banking users. After testing the data for accuracy, exploratory factor analysis was performed for factor clarification on five key scales related to the use of internet banking service delivery based on technology, channel, social, value for money and continued use factors. The final components that emerged were employed in hierarchical multiple regression analyses to test the proposed framework. Value for money, channel and technology factors was found, in that order, to be influential in predicting consumers’ continued and frequent use of internet banking.

  13. Internet-Based Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covolo, Loredana; Rubinelli, Sara; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Gelatti, Umberto

    2015-12-14

    Direct-to-consumer genetic tests (DTC-GT) are easily purchased through the Internet, independent of a physician referral or approval for testing, allowing the retrieval of genetic information outside the clinical context. There is a broad debate about the testing validity, their impact on individuals, and what people know and perceive about them. The aim of this review was to collect evidence on DTC-GT from a comprehensive perspective that unravels the complexity of the phenomenon. A systematic search was carried out through PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and Embase, in addition to Google Scholar according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist with the key term "Direct-to-consumer genetic test." In the final sample, 118 articles were identified. Articles were summarized in five categories according to their focus on (1) knowledge of, attitude toward use of, and perception of DTC-GT (n=37), (2) the impact of genetic risk information on users (n=37), (3) the opinion of health professionals (n=20), (4) the content of websites selling DTC-GT (n=16), and (5) the scientific evidence and clinical utility of the tests (n=14). Most of the articles analyzed the attitude, knowledge, and perception of DTC-GT, highlighting an interest in using DTC-GT, along with the need for a health care professional to help interpret the results. The articles investigating the content analysis of the websites selling these tests are in agreement that the information provided by the companies about genetic testing is not completely comprehensive for the consumer. Given that risk information can modify consumers' health behavior, there are surprisingly few studies carried out on actual consumers and they do not confirm the overall concerns on the possible impact of DTC-GT. Data from studies that investigate the quality of the tests offered confirm that they are not informative, have little predictive power, and do not measure genetic risk

  14. Internet as a new communication, retail and distribution channel for young consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatroslav Škare

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Marketing aspects of the Internet can be examined through a great number of researches on marketing practices conducted via the Internet. A number of authors consider the Internet as new marketplace (marketspace, where the exchange of both traditional and new values (i.e. digital products and services takes place. The Internet supports almost all aspects of a company’s business activities and can be applied with respect to all the elements of marketing mix. The subject of this paper is the role of adoption and use of the Internet as a new communication, retail and distribution channel for young consumers. The research was conducted in January 2006 and included 869 students from nine faculties at the University of Zagreb. Students represent an important marketing segment for Internet marketing activities since they are considered to be advanced users of the Internet. The relevance of students’ Internet adoption and use is determined by the following reasons: students are consumers; senior students will soon become young employed professionals with their own income (their spending will increase rapidly; in the near future, senior students will, to some extent, be decision makers on the implementation of business activities via the Internet. Research results show that students actively use the Internet, primarily as a communication channel. The student use of the Internet for purchasing tangible products is rare but their use of services via the Internet is considerable. Students find using the Internet to be a non-complex activity. There is no significant difference in the perception of complexity of the Internet usage among respondents with different computer and English language skills or with respect to their majoring fields (Arts, Biomedicine, Biotechnology, Engineering, Humanities, Natural and Social Sciences. A perception of the complexity of product purchase and service usage via the Internet is influenced by the experience that

  15. The COMsumer manifesto: Empowering communities of consumers through the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Henshall, Stuart

    2000-01-01

    The coming economic era and precepts are emerging as totally different from industrial capitalism. We're learning that e-businesses and their networks destroy many of our basic concepts of production, marketing and distribution. Jeremy Rifkin [1] notes that in this "Age of Access" we are entering an era in which lifelong customer relationships are the ultimate commodities market. This provides a different, more positive, and perhaps more likely view. The Internet is changing business mode...

  16. THE USAGE OF INTERNET BANKING SERVICES AMONG JORDANIAN CONSUMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed AL-Muala

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to examine factors that influence an individual’s intention to adopt internet banking service based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA. This theory consists of four factors; two exogenous variabl es are attitude, subjective norm, and two endogenous variables are behavior intention and Internet Banking Service Adoption (IBSA (actual behavior. This paper also aims to examine the validity of TRA model on IBSA setting in Jordan. This study uses a survey data of 700 Jordanian public university employees how used internet banking services. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA was performed to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement. The structural equation modeling techniques (Amos 6.0 were used to evaluate the casual model. Results of the study demonstrate the strong pr edictive power of the original TRA model to explain IBSA in Jordan. Finding this study indicates that the significant relationship between customers attitude, subjective norm and their intention to adopt IBS, moreover this study highlight that positive affecting of custo mers intentio n and IBSA

  17. Using Web sites on quality health care for teaching consumers in public libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Lesley, Marsha L; VanderWal, Jillon S

    2005-01-01

    More and more consumers are searching the Internet for health information. Health Web sites vary in quality, though, and not all consumers are aware of the need to evaluate the information they find on the Web. Nurses and other health providers involved in patient education can evaluate Web sites and suggest quality sites for patients to use. This article describes a project we implemented in 2 public libraries to educate consumers about quality health care and patient safety using Web sites that we had evaluated earlier. Participants (n = 103) completed resources on health care quality, questions patients should ask about their diagnoses and treatment options, changes in Medicare and Medicare options or ways to make their health benefits work for them, and tips to help prevent medical errors. Most consumers were highly satisfied with the Web sites and the information they learned on quality care from these resources. Many participants did not have Internet access at home or work and instead used the library to search the Web. Information about the Web sites used in this project and other sites on quality care can be made available in libraries and community settings and as part of patient education resources in hospitals. The Web provides easy access for consumers to information about patient safety initiatives and health care quality in general.

  18. Consumers' willingness to buy food through the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Ramus, Kim

    2005-01-01

    are sorted into the categories medium, product, consumer, firm, and environment. In order to draw the various results together and provide a coherent framework for future research, a model is proposed that combines the theory of planned behaviour and the lifestyle construct. Findings: While a lot...... of scattered evidence is available, there is a need for a coherent, operational, theory-based model that can summarize findings and guide future research. Research limitations/implications: The proposed model is operational and can be used in future empirical research on consumers' food shopping via...

  19. Development of an Internet Security Policy for health care establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilioudis, C; Pangalos, G

    2000-01-01

    The Internet provides unprecedented opportunities for interaction and data sharing among health care providers, patients and researchers. However, the advantages provided by the Internet come with a significantly greater element of risk to the confidentiality and integrity of information. This paper defines the basic security requirements that must be addressed in order to use the Internet to safely transmit patient and/or other sensitive Health Care information. It describes a suitable Internet Security Policy for Health Care Establishments and provides the set of technical measures that are needed for its implementation. The proposed security policy and technical approaches have been based on an extensive study of the related recommendations from the security and standard groups both in EU amid USA and our related work and experience. The results have been utilized in the framework of the Intranet Health Clinic project, where the use of the Internet for the transmission of sensitive Health Care information is of vital importance.

  20. Smoking cessation and the Internet: a qualitative method examining online consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Genevieve; Bessell, Tracey L; Borland, Ron; Anderson, Jeremy N

    2002-01-01

    Smoking is a major preventable cause of disease and disability around the world. Smoking cessation support-including information, discussion groups, cognitive behavioral treatment, and self-help materials-can be delivered via the Internet. There is limited information about the reasons and methods consumers access smoking cessation information on the Internet. This study aims to determine the feasibility of a method to examine the online behavior of consumers seeking smoking cessation resources. In particular, we sought to identify the reasons and methods consumers use to access and assess the quality of these resources. Thirteen participants were recruited via the state-based Quit smoking cessation campaign, operated by the Victorian Cancer Council, in December 2001. Online behavior was evaluated using semi-structured interviews and Internet simulations where participants sought smoking cessation information and addressed set-case scenarios. Online interaction was tracked through pervasive logging with specialist software. Thirteen semi-structured interviews and 4 Internet simulations were conducted in January 2002. Participants sought online smoking cessation resources for reasons of convenience, timeliness, and anonymity-and because their current information needs were unmet. They employed simple search strategies and could not always find information in an efficient manner. Participants employed several different strategies to assess the quality of online health resources. Consumer online behavior can be studied using a combination of survey, observation, and online surveillance. However, further qualitative and observational research is required to harness the full potential of the Internet to deliver public health resources.

  1. Internet-based health information consumer skills intervention for people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Charsey; Cain, Demetria; Pope, Howard; Kalichman, Moira; Eaton, Lisa; Weinhardt, Lance; Benotsch, Eric G

    2006-06-01

    Medical information can improve health, and there is an enormous amount of health information available on the Internet. A randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of an intervention based on social- cognitive theory to improve information use among people living with HIV/AIDS. Men and women (N = 448) were placed in either (a) an 8-session intervention that focused on Internet information consumer skills or (b) a time-matched support group and were followed to 9 months postintervention. The Internet skills group demonstrated greater Internet use for health, information coping, and social support compared with the control group. The authors conclude that people with HIV infection may benefit from increased access to health information on the Internet and that vulnerability to misinformation and fraud can be reduced through behavioral interventions. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Direct-to-consumer advertisements of prescription medications over the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; Novick, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This study sought data on the impact of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertisements and both intentions and frequency to seek more information about the drug being advertised. Data were collected from 498 college students regarding intention to seek and how frequently they obtained more information about prescription medications. For intentions, grocery or pharmacy and radio advertisements were associated with lesser intentions. For frequency, Internet advertisements were associated, while newspaper and spam e-mail advertisements were not. Types of sources associated with seeking additional information were doctor, Internet, and 1-800 information numbers. A significant interaction existed for seeing Internet advertisements for drugs and then seeking additional information from a doctor and not from the Internet. In conclusion, Internet advertising is associated with seeking additional information from a reliable source such as a doctor.

  3. Effective Factors on Iranian Consumers Behavior in Internet Shopping: A Soft Computing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghasemaghaei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Nowadays, the Internet is increasingly becoming the fastest growing shopping channel in these days. Moreover, it has been predicted that the city of Isfahan in Iran will experience a sharp increase in the Internet and the Web usage in the next decade. However, the factors affect the shopping of different products via the Internet have received a little direct research attention so far. Thus, there is an inherent need to investigate the nature and perceptions of consumers and the suitability of different types of products and services and also the role of each factor which impacts consumers’ behavior in choosing between buying from the Internet or traditional stores. Our case study is Isfahan Iran. Approach: The present study aimed to consider the influencing factors on consumer e-shopping behavior for different types of products. The data were obtained from 412 volunteers who had the Internet shopping experience and were analyzed using MLP neural networks and logistic regression for each types of product. Then, after comparing the accuracy of these methods, the most important factors which motivate the consumers to buy online were determined by the trained neural network. Results: Compared to the logistic regression, the neural network method showed a better performance in predicting the factors which affect on consumer online shopping behavior with the accuracy of at around 93% for all types of products included in this study. Conclusion: The results showed that companies should invest on different factors for different types of products to motivate consumers to shop online from them. Again, for each sort of products some factors are more important than the others. This study also suggested the merits of ANNs as non-linear predictors in commercial studies which can be used in reverse engineering as well.

  4. Models of consumer value cocreation in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, Priya; Nambisan, Satish

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, consumer participation in health care has gained critical importance as health care organizations (HCOs) seek varied avenues to enhance the quality and the value of their offerings. Many large HCOs have established online health communities where health care consumers (patients) can interact with one another to share knowledge and offer emotional support in disease management and care. Importantly, the focus of consumer participation in health care has moved beyond such personal health care management as the potential for consumers to participate in innovation and value creation in varied areas of the health care industry becomes increasingly evident. Realizing such potential, however, will require HCOs to develop a better understanding of the varied types of consumer value cocreation that are enabled by new information and communication technologies such as online health communities and Web 2.0 (social media) technologies. This article seeks to contribute toward such an understanding by offering a concise and coherent theoretical framework to analyze consumer value cocreation in health care. We identify four alternate models of consumer value cocreation-the partnership model, the open-source model, the support-group model, and the diffusion model-and discuss their implications for HCOs. We develop our theoretical framework by drawing on theories and concepts in knowledge creation, innovation management, and online communities. A set of propositions are developed by combining theoretical insights from these areas with real-world examples of consumer value cocreation in health care. The theoretical framework offered here informs on the potential impact of the different models of consumer value cocreation on important organizational variables such as innovation cost and time, service quality, and consumer perceptions of HCO. An understanding of the four models of consumer value cocreation can help HCOs adopt appropriate strategies and practices to

  5. Promoting the consumer voice in palliative care: exploring the possibility of using consumer impact statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConigley, Ruth; Shelby-James, Tania; Currow, David C

    2015-10-01

    It can be difficult to engage consumers in health decision making. This is particularly so in the area of palliative care, where consumers are very unwell and are unlikely to become involved in long-term programmes that promote consumer input. This paper explores the possibility of using 'Consumer Impact Statements' to facilitate the inclusion of the viewpoint of people at the end of life in the process of policy and decision making, particularly in the area of subsidy of pharmaceuticals used in palliative care. A broad search was conducted to find information about the use of impact statements in any health field. The health literature and grey literature were searched to explore the use of Consumer Impact Statements to date. No papers were found describing the use of Consumer Impact Statements in the palliative care setting. Health impact assessment is used in the areas of environmental health and community health. Impact statements are less commonly used in other areas of health, especially policy development, and no formal description of a Consumer Impact Statement was found. There is considerable scope for developing the use of Consumer Impact Statements to promote the consumer viewpoint in health decision making, because it will allow people who are otherwise unlikely to contribute to the public debate to have their views heard by decision makers. The use of Consumer Impact Statements is particularly suited to palliative care, given that consumers are often otherwise unable to contribute to the public debate. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Consumer-directed health care and the disadvantaged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloche, M Gregg

    2007-01-01

    Broad adoption of "consumer-directed health care" would probably widen socioeconomic disparities in care and redistribute wealth in "reverse Robin Hood" fashion, from the working poor and middle classes to the well-off. Racial and ethnic disparities in care would also probably worsen. These effects could be alleviated by adjustments to the consumer-directed paradigm. Possible fixes include more progressive tax subsidies, tiering of cost-sharing schemes to promote high-value care, and reduced cost sharing for the less well-off. These fixes, though, are unlikely to gain traction. If consumer-directed plans achieve market dominance, disparities in care by class and race will probably grow.

  7. Consumer directed health care: ethical limits to choice and responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axtell-Thompson, Linda M

    2005-04-01

    As health care costs continue to escalate, cost control measures will likely become unavoidable and painful. One approach is to engage external forces to allocate resources--for example, through managed care or outright rationing. Another approach is to engage consumers to make their own allocation decisions, through "self-rationing," wherein they are given greater awareness, control, and hence responsibility for their health care spending. Steadily gaining popularity in this context is the concept of "consumer directed health care" (CDHC), which is envisioned to both control cost and enhance choice, by combining financial incentives with information to help consumers make more informed health care decisions and to appreciate the economic trade-offs of those decisions. While CDHC is gaining attention in the popular press, business publications, and academic journals, it is not without controversy about its relative merits and demerits. CDHC raises questions regarding the ethical limits of consumer responsibility for their choices. While the emphasis on consumer choice implies that autonomy is the ruling ethical principle in CDHC, it must be tempered by justice and beneficence. Justice must temper autonomy to protect disadvantaged populations from further widening disparities in health care access and outcomes that could arise from health care reform efforts. Beneficence must temper autonomy to protect consumers from unintended consequences of uninformed decisions. Thoughtful paternalism suggests that CDHC plans offer choices that are comprehensible to lay consumers, limited in their range of options, and carefully structured with default rules that minimize potential error costs.

  8. Seek and ye shall find: consumer search for objective health care cost and quality information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, Brian; Abraham, Jean M

    2011-01-01

    Significant investments have been made in developing and disseminating health care provider cost and quality information on the Internet with the expectation that stronger consumer engagement will lead consumers to seek providers who deliver high-quality, low-cost care. However, prior research shows that the awareness and use of such information is low. This study investigates how the information search process may contribute to explaining this result. The analysis reveals that the Web sites most likely to be found by consumers are owned by private companies and provide information based on anecdotal patient experiences. Web sites less likely to be found have government or community-based ownership, are based on administrative data, and contain a mixture of quality, cost, and patient experience information. Searches for information on hospitals reveal more cost and quality information based on administrative data, whereas searches that focus on clinics or physicians are more likely to produce information based on patient narratives.

  9. Diffusion of Internet Banking amongst educated consumers in a high income non-OECD country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Awamleh,

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the internet banking channels and service preferences of educated banking consumers in the UAE and examines the factors influencing the intention to adopt or to continue the use of internet banking among both users and non users of internet banking.It is shown that although the banking sector in the UAE is a regional leader, internet banking in the UAE is yet to be properly utilized as a real added value tool to improve customer relationship and to attain cost advantages. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was used to identify factors influencing the intention to adopt and continued use of internet banking customers. Data was collected from internet banking users and potential users in the United Arab Emirates and factor analyses and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the data. Relative usefulness is introduced as one of the factors and is defined as the degree to which a new technology is better than exiting ones. There is a significant difference between users and non-users on six of the seven factors identified. Further, it was revealed that relative usefulness, perceived risk, computer efficacy and image had a significant impact on continued usage of internet banking for IB Users, while relative usefulness and result demonstrability were the only ones significant for Non-users of internet banking. The effects of age, gender, income, and e-commerce users also explored. Result demonstrability is significant for all categories of non-users except for those with income below AED 7,000. Implications of results were discussed, and future research directions outlined.

  10. [Direct-to-consumer genetic testing through Internet: marketing, ethical and social issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducournau, Pascal; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Bulle, Alexandre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    We probably did not anticipate all the consequences of the direct to consumer genetic tests on Internet, resulting from the combined skills of communication and genomic advances. What are the commercial strategies used by the companies offering direct-to-consumer genetic tests on Internet and what are the different social expectations on which they focus? Through a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the web sites offering such tests, it seems that these companies target a triple market based on: the "healthism" which raises health and hygiene to the top of the social values; the contemporary demands of the users to become actual actors of health decisions; and finally on the need for bio-social relationships. These three commercial strategies underlie various ethical and societal issues justifying a general analysis.

  11. Health care consumer reports: an evaluation of employer perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Daniel R

    2004-01-01

    The proliferation of health care consumer reports (also known as "consumer guides," "report cards," and "performance reports") designed to assist consumers in making more informed health care decisions makes it vital to understand the perspective of employers who provide the vast majority of health insurance to the working population regarding the use of these reports. There is little empirical evidence on how consumer reports are used by employers to make health care purchasing decisions. This study fills that gap by surveying 154 businesses in Boone County, Missouri, regarding their evaluation of a consumer guide. The majority of employers surveyed indicate that the report will not have a direct effect on their health care purchasing decisions. However, they indicate that the reports are "positive and worthwhile" and their responses reflect a favorable view of the health care organization that developed and disseminated the report. Additionally, findings indicate that employers generally prefer consumer reports as a means to compare local health care institutions, rather than reviewing national averages to locate the same information. Report developers should take precautions to determine the intent of such reports, as they may not achieve the objective of changing employers' health care purchasing behavior.

  12. Impact Of Online Advertising On Consumer Attitudes And Interests Buy Online Survey On Students Of Internet Users In Makassar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aqsa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The rapid development of technology today makes Internet users continues to increase. This is supported by the ease of internet users access the internet either through a PC laptop mobile phones tablets and other media. The increase in Internet users this makes the internet into a proper promotion using online advertising. With a wide reach and touch the various layers of the Internet media communities may be appropriate advice for company promotion. However an increasing number of Internet users especially in the city of Makassar is not accompanied by an increase in the number of online purchases. Based on that it is necessary to examine how the effect of online advertising on consumer buying behavior and online as well as how to control the behavior and subjective norms influence the attitudes and interests of consumers buy online. This study aims to analyze and test the effect of online advertising on consumer attitudes and purchase interest online a survey conducted on students of Internet users in the city of Makassar. The study was conducted on students of public and private universities in the city of Makassar. The method used was a quantitative analysis using the technique of purposive sampling method with a sample of 340 people. Testing this hypothesis using structural equation modeling SEM. The results showed that online advertising has an influence on consumer buying behavior and online. Dimensions interactivity of online advertising provides the highest influence on the attitudes and interests of consumers purchasing online.

  13. Moving towards balance: a study into duties of care on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.N.M. van Eijk; T.M. van Engers; C. Wiersma; C.A. Jasserand; W. Abel

    2010-01-01

    Commissioned by the WODC (Wetenschappelijk Onderzoeken Documentatiecentrum), research has been conducted on duties of care on the Internet, more specifically from the perspective of Internet service providers. Internet service providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national

  14. Moving towards balance: a study into duties of care on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.A.N.M.; van Engers, T.M.; Wiersma, C.; Jasserand, C.A.; Abel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Commissioned by the WODC (Wetenschappelijk Onderzoeken Documentatiecentrum), research has been conducted on duties of care on the Internet, more specifically from the perspective of Internet service providers. Internet service providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national

  15. Direct-to-consumer sales of genetic services on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollust, Sarah E; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Hull, Sara Chandros

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE The increasing use of the Internet to obtain genetics information and to order medical services without a prescription, combined with a rise in direct-to-consumer marketing for genetic testing, suggests the potential for the Internet to be used to sell genetic services. METHODS A systematic World Wide Web search was conducted in May 2002 to assess the availability of genetic services sold directly to consumers on the Internet. RESULTS Out of 105 sites that offered genetic services directly, most offered non-health-related services, including parentage confirmation testing (83%), identity testing (56%), and DNA banking (24%); however, health-related genetic tests were offered through 14 sites (13%). The health-related genetic tests available ranged from standard tests, such as hemochromatosis and cystic fibrosis, to more unconventional tests related to nutrition, behavior, and aging. Of these 14 sites, 5 described risks associated with the genetic services and 6 described the availability of counseling. CONCLUSIONS The availability of direct sales of health-related genetic tests creates the potential for inadequate pretest decision making, misunderstanding test results, and access to tests of questionable clinical value.

  16. Investigating consumers' and informal carers' views and preferences for consumer directed care: A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaambwa, Billingsley; Lancsar, Emily; McCaffrey, Nicola; Chen, Gang; Gill, Liz; Cameron, Ian D; Crotty, Maria; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2015-09-01

    Consumer directed care (CDC) is currently being embraced internationally as a means to promote autonomy and choice for consumers (people aged 65 and over) receiving community aged care services (CACSs). CDC involves giving CACS clients (consumers and informal carers of consumers) control over how CACSs are administered. However, CDC models have largely developed in the absence of evidence on clients' views and preferences. We explored CACS clients' preferences for a variety of CDC attributes and identified factors that may influence these preferences and potentially inform improved design of future CDC models. Study participants were clients of CACSs delivered by five Australian providers. Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) approach undertaken in a group setting between June and December 2013, we investigated the relative importance to CACS consumers and informal (family) carers of gradations relating to six salient features of CDC (choice of service provider(s), budget management, saving unused/unspent funds, choice of support/care worker(s), support-worker flexibility and level of contact with service coordinator). The DCE data were analysed using conditional, mixed and generalised logit regression models, accounting for preference and scale heterogeneity. Mean ages for 117 study participants were 80 years (87 consumers) and 74 years (30 informal carers). All participants preferred a CDC approach that allowed them to: save unused funds from a CACS package for future use; have support workers that were flexible in terms of changing activities within their CACS care plan and; choose the support workers that provide their day-to-day CACSs. The CDC attributes found to be important to both consumers and informal carers receiving CACSs will inform the design of future CDC models of service delivery. The DCE approach used in this study has the potential for wide applicability and facilitates the assessment of preferences for elements of potential future aged care

  17. Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Antibiotic Use Among Adult Consumers, Adult Hispanic Consumers, and Health Care Providers--United States, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois Watkins, Louise K; Sanchez, Guillermo V; Albert, Alison P; Roberts, Rebecca M; Hicks, Lauri A

    2015-07-24

    Appropriate antibiotic use, in particular avoidance of antibiotics for upper respiratory infections likely to be caused by viruses, is a key component of efforts to slow the increase in antibiotic-resistant infections. Studies suggest that Hispanic consumers might differ from non-Hispanic consumers in their knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic use (4). To better understand health care provider and consumer knowledge and attitudes that influence antibiotic use, CDC analyzed national internet survey data collected from participants living in the United States during 2012-2013. The participants represented three groups: 1) the total population of adult consumers (all ethnicities); 2) adult Hispanic consumers; and 3) health care providers. Hispanic consumers were more likely than all consumers to believe that if they have a cold, antibiotics would help them to get better more quickly (48% versus 25%), and more likely to obtain antibiotics not prescribed by a clinician, such as antibiotics left over from a previous illness (25% versus 9%), obtained from a neighborhood grocery store (23% versus 5%), or obtained from a friend or family member (17% versus 6%). Most providers surveyed (54%) reported that they believed their patients expect antibiotics during visits for a cough or cold, whereas 26% of all consumers reported this expectation. To maximize knowledge about appropriate antibiotic use among outpatients in the United States, public health initiatives should target Hispanic as well as general audiences.

  18. Developing internet-based health services in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskinen, Salme; Häyrinen, Kristiina; Saranto, Kaija; Ensio, Anneli

    2009-01-01

    It is often said that we are living in an information society and information technology (IT) is a normal part of life in many fields. But IT is not used effectively in health care. The purpose of this study was to survey what kind of Internet-based health services and related electronic services are offered to clients by the web-pages of health care organizations in Finland.

  19. Do consumer voices in health-care citizens' juries matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinks, Rachael; Kendall, Elizabeth; Whitty, Jennifer A; Scuffham, Paul A

    2016-10-01

    There is widespread agreement that the public should be engaged in health-care decision making. One method of engagement that is gaining prominence is the citizens' jury, which places citizens at the centre of the deliberative process. However, little is known about how the jury process works in a health-care context. There is even less clarity about how consumer perspectives are heard within citizens' juries and with what consequences. This paper focuses on what is known about the role of consumer voices within health-care citizens' juries, how these voices are heard by jurors and whether and in what ways the inclusion or exclusion of such voices may matter. Consumer voices are not always included in health-care citizens' juries. There is a dearth of research on the conditions under which consumer voices emerge (or not), from which sources and why. As a result, little is known about what stories are voiced or silenced, and how such stories are heard by jurors, with what consequences for jurors, deliberation, decision-makers, policy and practice. The potential role of consumer voices in influencing deliberations and recommendations of citizens' juries requires greater attention. Much needed knowledge about the nuances of deliberative processes will contribute to an assessment of the usefulness of citizens' juries as a public engagement mechanism. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Deciding on PSA-screening - Quality of current consumer information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfage, Ida J; van den Bergh, Roderick C N; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2010-11-01

    Given that screening for prostate cancer has the potential to reduce prostate cancer mortality at the expense of considerable overdiagnosis and overtreatment, the availability of core consumer information - correct, balanced and supportive of autonomous decision-making - is a must. We assessed the quality of consumer information available through the Internet per November 2009 and its possible contribution to informed decision-making by potential screenees. Consumer information on PSA-screening was sought through the Internet in November 2009. Materials had to be targeted at potential consumers, offered by not-for-profit organisations, released in 2005 or after, in English or Dutch. Per material 2 of the authors assessed independently from each other whether standardised pre-defined topics were addressed, whether the content was correct and which approach was taken towards the decision-making process about uptake. Twenty-three materials were included, of which 11 were released (shortly) after the results of 2 large randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effectiveness of screening for prostate cancer had been published in March 2009. That a PSA-test result can be abnormal because of non-cancerous conditions (false positive) and that it may miss prostate cancer (false negative) was not addressed in 2/23 and 8/23 materials, respectively. The risk of overdiagnosis and overtreatment was not mentioned in 6 out of 23. PSA-screening was presented as a usual thing to do in some materials, whereas other materials emphasised the voluntary nature of PSA-screening ('it is your decision'). The content of 19/23 materials was considered sufficiently informative according to the pre-defined criteria, 12/23 materials were considered supportive of informed decision-making by men. Most materials of not-for-profit organizations supplied adequate information about PSA-screening, whilst the degree of persuasion towards uptake reflected variations in opinions on men

  1. Health care consumers' experiences of information communication technology--a summary of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Kerstin M; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2007-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in reaching consumers directly through the Internet and different telecommunication systems. The most important contacts in health care will always be the face-to-face meetings, but the tools of health informatics can be seen as a means to an end, which is to provide the best possible health care. A variety of applications have been described in different references. To our knowledge there has been no review of a research-based state of the art in the field of consumers' experiences in using different applications in health informatics. According to the benefits in using information communication technology (ICT) as being cost-effective and timesaving it is of great importance to focus on and examine consumers' experiences. It is important that it is user friendly and regarded as valuable and useful. The aim of this study was to describe consumers' subjective experiences of using electronic resources with reference to health and illness. DESIGN AND/OR METHOD: A systematic literature search was performed in databases CINAHL, Medline and Cochrane, as well as a manual search. Retrieved references (n=14) were appraised according to their scientific structure and quality. A broad search was performed in order to find as many different applications as possible. Our primary intention was to identify existing references describing consumers' experiences with ICT. In spite of this broad search few references were found. Twelve references remained and three themes were identified: support and help, education and information, and telecommunication instead of on-site visiting. Consumers felt more confident and empowered, their knowledge increased and their health status improved due to the ICT resources. Lack of face-to-face meetings or privacy did not appear to be a problem. ICT can improve the nurse-patient relationship and augment well-being for consumers. More research is needed to measure consumers' experiences and factors that influence it

  2. [Development of Internet-based system to collect and provide drug information for patients/consumers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Fuki; Hori, Satoko; Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    For drug fostering and evolution, it is important to collect information directly from patients on the efficacy and safety of drugs as well as patient needs. At present, however, information gathered by healthcare professionals, pharmaceutical companies, or governments is not sufficient. There is concern that patients may fail to recognize the importance of providing information voluntarily. The present study was conducted to provide drug information to patients/consumers, to enlighten them on the importance of providing drug information by themselves, and to develop an Internet website, called "Minkusu," for collecting drug information from patients. This website is based on a registration system (free of charge). It is designed to provide information on proper drug use, and to collect opinions about drugs. As of May 31, 2012, a total of 1149 people had been registered. The male/female ratio of registered members was approximately 1:1, and patients/consumers accounted for 23%. According to the results of a questionnaire survey, several patient/consumer members appreciated the usefulness of the information service, and they took an opportunity to know of the concepts of drug development and evolution (Ikuyaku, in Japanese) through the information services provided by this site. In conclusion, the developed information system would contribute to the proper use of drugs by patients/consumers and to the promotion of drug development and evolution.

  3. Developing a consumer evaluation tool of weight control strategy advertisements on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevorasirikul, Kanokrat; Gray, Nicola J; Anderson, Claire W

    2008-06-01

    To develop two evaluation tools for weight loss and weight gain advertisements on the Internet in order to help consumers to evaluate the quality of information within these advertisements. One hundred websites identified by Internet search engines for weight loss and weight gain strategies (50 websites each) were evaluated using two specific scoring instruments, developed by adapting questions from the 'DISCERN' tool and reviewing all related weight control guidelines and advertising regulations. The validity and reliability of the adapted tools were tested. Our evaluation tools rated the information from most websites as poor quality (70%). In the case of weight loss strategies, statements about rapid (18%) and permanent (28%) weight loss caused concern as well as lack of sensible advice about dieting and a lack of product warnings (84%). Safety concerns relating to weight gain products were the lack of warnings about side effects in products containing steroids and creatine (92%). The adapted tools exhibited acceptable validity and reliability. Quality of information within weight control advertisements on the Internet was generally poor. Problems of false claims, little advice on healthy ways to modify weight and few warnings on side effects have been highlighted in this study.

  4. Role of the Internet in Care Initiation by People Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzo, Joseph; Haas, Stephen; Webel, Allison; Voss, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    People frequently use the internet to obtain information, including information about health, but we lack understanding of how people living with HIV (PLHIV) use the internet in their care and treatment decisions. In this secondary analysis, interviews with 23 individuals who initiated HIV care at an urban, Midwestern medical center and mentioned internet use were analyzed using qualitative content analysis to explore how they used the internet during the process of initiating HIV care. HIV care had been initiated by this sample from less than one month to three years post-diagnosis. Participants discussed the internet as a source of information about their diagnosis that influenced their care and treatment decisions. Five themes were predominant: (i) The internet alerted me to the possibility of HIV, (ii) the internet showed me a solution is available, (iii) the internet influenced my decisions about care, (iv) the internet empowered me to participate in my treatment decisions, and (v) the internet gave me hope for my future. The results suggest that the internet has the potential to provide information that can profoundly influence PLHIVs' acceptance of care and treatment decisions. Clinicians face a new reality in which patients use internet resources to obtain information and shape opinions about HIV treatment and care initiation decision-making. Guiding PLHIV in their selection of online resources is one approach to educating and empowering individuals as they cope with their diagnosis and contemplate decisions regarding HIV care and treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Consumer Perspective on Flexibility in Health Care: Priority Access Pricing and Customized Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Benning (Tim)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe rise of consumerism and the increasing availability of information through the Internet have increased patients’ demand for care that is more in line with their preferences. Because of this trend the expectation that hospitals act according to each individual patient’s preferences is

  6. Variables associated with seeking information from doctors and the internet after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertisements for prescription medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; Teichman, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    This study examines variables associated with seeking information from doctors, the Internet, and a combination of both doctors and Internet after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertisements. Data were analyzed from 462 college students. Younger age, women, and health insurance were associated with greater odds for doctor; women, subjective norms, intentions, and greater time since seen doctor were associated with greater odds for Internet; and African American, Hispanic, subjective norms, intentions, and health insurance were associated with greater odds for both doctor and Internet. Marketers of direct-to-consumer advertisements can use these findings for tailoring and targeting direct-to-consumer advertisements.

  7. Beer and Organic Labels: Do Belgian Consumers Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline Poelmans

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate whether beer drinkers are willing to pay a price premium for organic beer compared to conventional beer. Moreover, we identify subgroups of consumers with different preference patterns by investigating whether specific personal characteristics of the purchasers have an influence on this willingness-to-pay. Specifically, results are reported from a survey including a stated choice experiment of consumer decisions concerning beer purchases in Flanders (Belgium, focusing on organic labels. A non-probabilistic sampling method was used over the Internet and 334 responses were useable for the empirical analysis. Each respondent was asked to choose their preferred beer from a series of nine choice cards describing three different beer varieties. In this respect, we created a two-block design, each consisting of nine choice cards. Each respondent was randomly presented with one of the two blocks, so that an equal distribution of the blocks could be obtained. Overall, we find that our sample is statistically indifferent between a beer with an organic label and a similar beer without an organic label. This is in line with previous research that stated that consumers are unwilling to pay high price premiums for organic vice products, such as beer. We find no statistically different preferences for male or female respondents, or for members or non-members of nature protection organizations. However, we find a significant difference (p-value = 0.029 between primary beer shoppers who have a zero willingness-to-pay (WTP for organic beer compared to similar non-organic beer and the reference group that has a negative WTP of 14 Euro per 1.5 L for organic beer. In addition, the WTP for beer drinkers older than 40 (negative WTP of 22 Euro per 1.5 L and the WTP for frequent beer drinkers (zero WTP are statistically different from the reference group (p-value = 0.019 and 0.000 respectively.

  8. Factors influencing consumers' selection of a primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Teresa A; Butler, E Sonny; McGlone, Vernon L

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature regarding patient choice of health care plans, patient satisfaction, and patient evaluation of health care quality, but there is little information concerning the factors that influence the initial selection of a primary care physician (PCP). This exploratory study identifies and conceptualizes the physician selection dimensions which include: physician reputation/manner, physician record, physician search, consumer self-awareness, physician location, physician qualifications, physician demographics, office atmospherics, house calls/insurance, and valuing patient opinion. The study also develops and tests a scale for PCP selection using factor analysis which is demonstrated to be valid, and determines significant differences of variables, which include education level, gender, and age, using a summated scale. The study is of use to physicians in their targeting and communication strategies, and to researchers seeking to refine the scale.

  9. Consumer satisfaction with primary care provider choice and associated trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balkrishnan Rajesh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of managed care, characterized by limited provider choice, is believed to undermine trust. Provider choice has been identified as strongly associated with physician trust. Stakeholders in a competitive healthcare market have competing agendas related to choice. The purpose of this study is to analyze variables associated with consumer's satisfaction that they have enough choice when selecting their primary care provider (PCP, and to analyze the importance of these variables on provider trust. Methods A 1999 randomized national cross-sectional telephone survey conducted of United States residential households, who had a telephone, had seen a medical professional at least twice in the past two years, and aged ≥ 20 years was selected for secondary data analyses. Among 1,117 households interviewed, 564 were selected as the final sample. Subjects responded to a core set of questions related to provider trust, and a subset of questions related to trust in the insurer. A previously developed conceptual framework was adopted. Linear and logistic regressions were performed based on this framework. Results Results affirmed 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' was significantly (p Conclusion This study confirmed the association of 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' with provider trust. Results affirmed 'enough PCP choice' was a strong predictor of provider trust. 'Second opinion on PCP' may indicate distrust in the provider. Data such as 'trust in providers in general' and 'the role of provider performance information' in choice, though import in PCP choice, were not available for analysis and should be explored in future studies. Results have implications for rethinking the relationships among consumer choice, consumer behaviors in making trade-offs in PCP choice, and the role of healthcare experiences in 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' or 'provider trust.'

  10. Moving towards balance: a study into duties of care on the internet

    OpenAIRE

    van Eijk, N.A.N.M.; van Engers, T.M.; Wiersma, C.; Jasserand, C.A.; Abel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Commissioned by the WODC (Wetenschappelijk Onderzoeken Documentatiecentrum), research has been conducted on duties of care on the Internet, more specifically from the perspective of Internet service providers. Internet service providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national and international context, with regard to their relationship both with governments and other private parties, on for example questions of (civil) liability. This research focuses on duties of care ...

  11. Managing in the trenches of consumer care: the challenges of understanding and initiating the advance care planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Kristin R; Aultman, Julie; Hazelett, Susan; Palmisano, Barbara; O'Neill, Anne; Ludwick, Ruth; Sanders, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    To better understand how community-based long-term care providers define advance care planning and their role in the process, we conducted 8 focus groups with 62 care managers (social workers and registered nurses) providing care for Ohio's Medicaid waiver program. Care managers shared that most consumers had little understanding of advance care planning. The care managers defined it broadly, including legal documentation, social aspects, medical considerations, ongoing communication, and consumer education. Care managers saw their roles as information providers, healthcare team members, and educators/coaches. Better education, resources, and coordination are needed to ensure that consumer preferences are realized.

  12. Innovation and Consumer Directed Care: Identifying the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Liz; Cameron, Ian D

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to report clinician and researcher observations about the practical difficulties with achieving the articulated objectives of Consumer Directed Care (CDC). The methods used were as follows: identification of key client community services issues through analysis of qualitative data related to a PhD project; review of the summary of these issues by the supervising academic; presentation of the issues to five clinicians involved with a community service clinical trial; verification of the findings through discussions with a senior community service provider. There is anecdotal evidence that the current overlay of CDC in the existing community-based home services sector for people who are older will continue to prevent its effective implementation. The existing culture and underlying philosophies related to this sector maybe unable to support the level of innovative change required. Research is needed into how the stated objectives of CDC can be achieved in Australia and how this can best be managed.

  13. The effect of source credibility on consumers' perceptions of the quality of health information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Benjamin R; Romina, Sharon; Ahmed, Rukhsana; Hopson, Danielle

    2006-03-01

    Recent use of the Internet as a source of health information has raised concerns about consumers' ability to tell 'good' information from 'bad' information. Although consumers report that they use source credibility to judge information quality, several observational studies suggest that consumers make little use of source credibility. This study examines consumer evaluations of web pages attributed to a credible source as compared to generic web pages on measures of message quality. In spring 2005, a community-wide convenience survey was distributed in a regional hub city in Ohio, USA. 519 participants were randomly assigned one of six messages discussing lung cancer prevention: three messages each attributed to a highly credible national organization and three identical messages each attributed to a generic web page. Independent sample t-tests were conducted to compare each attributed message to its counterpart attributed to a generic web page on measures of trustworthiness, truthfulness, readability, and completeness. The results demonstrated that differences in attribution to a source did not have a significant effect on consumers' evaluations of the quality of the information.Conclusions. The authors offer suggestions for national organizations to promote credibility to consumers as a heuristic for choosing better online health information through the use of media co-channels to emphasize credibility.

  14. Dirt cheap and without prescription: how susceptible are young US consumers to purchasing drugs from rogue internet pharmacies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanitskaya, Lana; Brookins-Fisher, Jodi; O Boyle, Irene; Vibbert, Danielle; Erofeev, Dmitry; Fulton, Lawrence

    2010-04-26

    Websites of many rogue sellers of medications are accessible through links in email spam messages or via web search engines. This study examined how well students enrolled in a U.S. higher education institution could identify clearly unsafe pharmacies. The aim is to estimate these health consumers vulnerability to fraud by illegitimate Internet pharmacies. Two Internet pharmacy websites, created specifically for this study, displayed multiple untrustworthy features modeled after five actual Internet drug sellers which the authors considered to be potentially dangerous to consumers. The websites had none of the safe pharmacy signs and nearly all of the danger signs specified in the Food and Drug Administration s (FDA s) guide to consumers. Participants were told that a neighborhood pharmacy charged US$165 for a one-month supply of Beozine, a bogus drug to ensure no pre-existing knowledge. After checking its price at two Internet pharmacies-$37.99 in pharmacy A and $57.60 in pharmacy B-the respondents were asked to indicate if each seller was a good place to buy the drug. Responses came from 1,914 undergraduate students who completed an online eHealth literacy assessment in 2005-2008. Participation rate was 78%. In response to "On a scale from 0-10, how good is this pharmacy as a place for buying Beozine?" many respondents gave favorable ratings. Specifically, 50% of students who reviewed pharmacy A and 37% of students who reviewed pharmacy B chose a rating above the scale midpoint. When explaining a low drug cost, these raters related it to low operation costs, ad revenue, pressure to lower costs due to comparison shopping, and/or high sales volume. Those who said that pharmacy A or B was "a very bad place" for purchasing the drug (25%), as defined by a score of 1 or less, related low drug cost to lack of regulation, low drug quality, and/or customer information sales. About 16% of students thought that people should be advised to buy cheaper drugs at pharmacies

  15. Dirt Cheap and Without Prescription: How Susceptible are Young US Consumers to Purchasing Drugs From Rogue Internet Pharmacies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookins-Fisher, Jodi; O´Boyle, Irene; Vibbert, Danielle; Erofeev, Dmitry; Fulton, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Background Websites of many rogue sellers of medications are accessible through links in email spam messages or via web search engines. This study examined how well students enrolled in a U.S. higher education institution could identify clearly unsafe pharmacies. Objective The aim is to estimate these health consumers´ vulnerability to fraud by illegitimate Internet pharmacies. Methods Two Internet pharmacy websites, created specifically for this study, displayed multiple untrustworthy features modeled after five actual Internet drug sellers which the authors considered to be potentially dangerous to consumers. The websites had none of the safe pharmacy signs and nearly all of the danger signs specified in the Food and Drug Administration´s (FDA´s) guide to consumers. Participants were told that a neighborhood pharmacy charged US$165 for a one-month supply of Beozine, a bogus drug to ensure no pre-existing knowledge. After checking its price at two Internet pharmacies—$37.99 in pharmacy A and $57.60 in pharmacy B—the respondents were asked to indicate if each seller was a good place to buy the drug. Responses came from 1,914 undergraduate students who completed an online eHealth literacy assessment in 2005-2008. Participation rate was 78%. Results In response to "On a scale from 0-10, how good is this pharmacy as a place for buying Beozine?" many respondents gave favorable ratings. Specifically, 50% of students who reviewed pharmacy A and 37% of students who reviewed pharmacy B chose a rating above the scale midpoint. When explaining a low drug cost, these raters related it to low operation costs, ad revenue, pressure to lower costs due to comparison shopping, and/or high sales volume. Those who said that pharmacy A or B was "a very bad place" for purchasing the drug (25%), as defined by a score of 1 or less, related low drug cost to lack of regulation, low drug quality, and/or customer information sales. About 16% of students thought that people should be

  16. The Internet of Things for basic nursing care-A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieronkoski, Riitta; Azimi, Iman; Rahmani, Amir M; Aantaa, Riku; Terävä, Virpi; Liljeberg, Pasi; Salanterä, Sanna

    2017-04-01

    The novel technology of the Internet of Things (IoT) connects objects to the Internet and its most advanced applications refine obtained data for the user. We propose that Internet of Things technology can be used to promote basic nursing care in the hospital environment by improving the quality of care and patient safety. To introduce the concept of Internet of Things to nursing audience by exploring the state of the art of Internet of Things based technology for basic nursing care in the hospital environment. Scoping review methodology following Arksey & O'Malley's stages from one to five were used to explore the extent, range, and nature of current literature. We searched eight databases using predefined search terms. A total of 5030 retrievals were found which were screened for duplications and relevancy to the study topic. 265 papers were chosen for closer screening of the abstracts and 93 for full text evaluation. 62 papers were selected for the review. The constructs of the papers, the Internet of Things based innovations and the themes of basic nursing care in hospital environment were identified. Most of the papers included in the review were peer-reviewed proceedings of technological conferences or articles published in technological journals. The Internet of Things based innovations were presented in methodology papers or tested in case studies and usability assessments. Innovations were identified in several topics in four basic nursing care activities: comprehensive assessment, periodical clinical reassessment, activities of daily living and care management. Internet of Things technology is providing innovations for the use of basic nursing care although the innovations are emerging and still in early stages. Internet of things is yet vaguely adopted in nursing. The possibilities of the Internet of Things are not yet exploited as well as they could. Nursing science might benefit from deeper involvement in engineering research in the area of health

  17. Research on the cultivation path of smart home-based care service mode in Internet+ vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qingchao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Home-based care for the aged is an effective method to solve the problem of caring the aged in China. This thesis analyzes some problems existing in the development of current home-based care service for the aged in our country and the positive effects brought by Internet+ in home-based care service. It proposes a new service mode of care for the aged--Internet+ home-based care service, and explains the establishment of this system and the responsibilities of the participants. Also, it explores the path to realize the establishment of Internet+ home-based care service mode so as to promote the healthy development of home-based care service in China.

  18. Consumers Attitudes towards Internet and Brick and Mortar Store Channels Switching Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdolrazagh MADAHI; Inda SUKATI

    2014-01-01

    he purpose of this study is to examine the role of consumers’ behavioral attitude and intention toward channel switching behavior in regards to Internet and brick and mortar store channels in Malaysia...

  19. Consumer attitudes regarding internet health information and communication: Gender, locus of control, and stress implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Fogel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los estudiantes universitarios utilizan internet para comunicarse y obtener información sobre salud. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo mediante una encuesta a 227 estudiantes para determinar si había diferencias entre aquellos que utilizan internet y el correo electrónico para informarse sobre salud y aquellos que no. Las variables dependientes fueron la Escala de Estrés Percibido y las subescalas de la Escala Multidimensional de Locus de Control de la Salud. Las variables independientes incluyeron preguntas sobre la utilización de internet para informarse o comunicarse con otros sobre salud. Se realizaron análisis para el total de la muestra y por género. En los tres ítems de comunicación, los que utilizaban internet/correo electrónico mostraron un nivel de estrés percibido significativamente más alto. No hubo diferencias entre los que usaban internet para buscar información sobre salud. Estos resultados se mantuvieron para hombres y se acercaron a la significación para las mujeres. Los que utilizan internet para obtener información sobre salud puntuaron significativamente más alto en la subescala de locus de control interno. Estos resultados se mantuvieron en los varones, mientras que para las mujeres fue significativa la subescala de control por otros poderes. Los hombres con estrés percibido se comunican por correo electrónico o internet sobre salud, mientras que las mujeres no. Respecto al uso de información sobre salud en internet, los hombres utilizan un locus de control interno y las mujeres un locus de control por otros poderes. Estos resultados son útiles para los profesionales que asesoren a universitarios con problemas de salud.

  20. Rural Health Care Information Access and the Use of the Internet: Opportunity for University Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biswa R.; Leatherman, John C.; Bressers, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has potential for improving health information delivery and strengthening connections between rural populations and local health service providers. An exploratory case study six rural health care markets in Kansas showed that about 70% of adults use the Internet, with substantial use for accessing health information. While there are…

  1. The Internet and primary care physicians: coping with different expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The birth of the Internet is one of the most important developments in the past 2 decades. It is a new medium, especially in the sense that the initiative now rests on the information user, who is no longer just a receiver of information. In part, the use of the Internet to find answers to health-re

  2. Characteristics of genomic test consumers who spontaneously share results with their health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darst, Burcu F; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J; Topol, Eric J; Bloss, Cinnamon S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic test consumers who spontaneously shared their test results with their health care provider. Utilizing data from the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative, we compared demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics of DTC genomic test consumers who shared their results with their physician or health care provider versus those who did not share. We also compared genomic risk estimates between the two groups. Of 2,024 individuals assessed at approximately 6 months post testing, 540 individuals (26.5%) reported sharing their results with their physician or health care provider. Those who shared were older (p consumers.

  3. Health care encounters in Danish chiropractic practice from a consumer perspectives - a mixed methods investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    sequence and timing’ and ‘a consultation that adds value’. Discussion The Internet functions as a tool when choosing/confirming a clinic as appropriate, developing and initial image and managing appointments. The administrative hub appears integral to the shaping of positive consumer experiences outside...

  4. How Tolerable is Delay? Consumers' Evaluations of Internet Web Sites After Waiting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellaert, B.G.C.; Kahn, B.

    1998-01-01

    How consumers’ waiting times affect their retrospective evaluations of Internet Web Sites is investigated in four computer-based experiments. Results show that waiting can but does not always negatively affect evaluations of Web Sites. Results also show that the potential negative effects of waiting

  5. RECEPTIVENESS OF INTERNET BANKING BY MALAYSIAN CONSUMERS: THE CASE OF PENANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ramayah

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study about Internet banking acceptance in Malaysia. Due to the impending liberalization, Malaysian banks are desperately embracing this new distribution channel to prepare themselves for the competition which is looming in the near future. Although the awareness level is high, this has not translated into actual use as only 23% have had some Internet banking experience. Security, availability of infrastructure and complexity of technology were main concerns reported by the respondents which is hindering the migration from traditional banking to Internet banking. In terms of external variables only prior experience and external pressure has been found to influence the intention to use. Perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness has been found to be significantly related to intention and perceived usefulness has been found to be a better predictor of intention to use compared to ease of use. In short it can be concluded that perceived usefulness is the driver of the intention to use Internet banking. The implications of this research is further explored.

  6. Evidence that consumers are skeptical about evidence-based health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Kristin L; Maurer, Maureen; Yegian, Jill Mathews; Dardess, Pamela; McGee, Jeanne; Evers, Mark; Marlo, Karen O

    2010-07-01

    We undertook focus groups, interviews, and an online survey with health care consumers as part of a recent project to assist purchasers in communicating more effectively about health care evidence and quality. Most of the consumers were ages 18-64; had health insurance through a current employer; and had taken part in making decisions about health insurance coverage for themselves, their spouse, or someone else. We found many of these consumers' beliefs, values, and knowledge to be at odds with what policy makers prescribe as evidence-based health care. Few consumers understood terms such as "medical evidence" or "quality guidelines." Most believed that more care meant higher-quality, better care. The gaps in knowledge and misconceptions point to serious challenges in engaging consumers in evidence-based decision making.

  7. [Health care consumers about over-the-counter drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Dutch consumers can now purchase 'over-the-counter drugs' (OTCs) at three distribution channels: (a) the pharmacy; (b) the chemist; (c) other sales outlets such as supermarkets and petrol stations. However, little is known about whether consumers consider themselves and others to have adequate knowl

  8. Internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    微软想要统治Internet,Windows XP就是这个计划中的一个组成部分。微软已经努力争取提供连接Internet的最方便、最完整的方法。新的操作系统含有Internet Explorer 6(IE6)、新的保密功能以及防火墙保护。Windows XP甚至包含有一个Macromedia Flash播放器插件。但是对Sun微系统公司的打击就是

  9. Health care encounters in Danish chiropractic practice from a consumer perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Boyle, Eleanor; Larsen, Johanne Brinch

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perceived value is the key ingredient to carving and maintaining a competitive business niche. The opportunities to interact with consumers to understand and enhance perceived value are termed 'touch points'. Due to the out-of-pocket expense incurred by patients, Danish chiropractors...... patients and 36 follow-up patients and finally video recorded 11 new and 24 follow-up consultations. Categorization and analysis led to the emergence six consumer touch point themes: 'the internet', 'the physical environment', 'practice models', 'administrative staff', 'the consultation sequence and timing......' and 'a consultation that adds value'. The Internet functions as a tool when choosing/confirming a clinic as appropriate, developing and initial image and managing appointments. The administrative hub appears integral to the shaping of positive consumer experiences outside of the consultation. Clinic...

  10. Variations in lay health theories: implications for consumer health care decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw Hughner, Renée; Schultz Kleine, Susan

    2008-12-01

    Wide variations in how contemporary consumers think about health and make health care decisions often go unrecognized by health care marketers and public policy decision makers. In the current global environment, prevailing Western viewpoints on health and conventional biomedicine are being challenged by a countervailing belief system forming the basis for alternative health care practices. The ways American consumers once thought about health have changed and multiplied in this new era of competing health paradigms. Our study provides empirical evidence for this assertion in two ways. First, it demonstrates that in the current environment consumers think about health and health care in a multiplicity of very different ways, leading to the conclusion that we should not classify health care consumers as either conventional or alternative. Second, the results provide clues as to how individuals holding diverse health theories make health care decisions that impact health behaviors, treatment efficacy, and satisfaction judgments.

  11. The influence of older consumers' information search activities on their use of health care innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutton, H D; Pelton, L E

    1992-01-01

    Research has yet to consider the relationship between the older consumers' information search and their use of health care innovations, despite suggestions that such a characterization may prove useful to marketing practitioners. In this investigation of a national sample of autonomous elderly consumers, distinct patterns of information search behavior are observed which distinguish adopters from nonusers of a pair of health care innovations. Implications for marketing health care innovations are discussed.

  12. [Health care consumers about over-the-counter drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, David M

    2014-01-01

    Dutch consumers can now purchase 'over-the-counter drugs' (OTCs) at three distribution channels: (a) the pharmacy; (b) the chemist; (c) other sales outlets such as supermarkets and petrol stations. However, little is known about whether consumers consider themselves and others to have adequate knowledge to purchase OTCs in relative freedom. During a recent study, members of the Healthcare Consumer Panel of the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research completed a survey on freely available analgesics. These consumers were very confident of their personal skills in handling OTCs responsibly. However, they had less confidence in how others would deal with OTCs. Regarding the wider availability of OTCs, only 1-8% believed it would be preferable to have these drugs available in the supermarket or petrol station, depending on the type and frequency of side effects of the medication. The government would be wise in conducting this type of qualitative study before measures are taken for wider availability of medicines.

  13. Do consumers care about ethics? A cross-cultural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Malheiro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Discussion towards an understanding about ethical and social responsible corporate behaviours has increased over last two decades. Both marketers and academicians emphasize the interest of the topic. Developed research has been focusing the understanding of a few organizational practices, but consumer’s dyad of the problem calls for further investigation. This work presents some of the main theoretical contributions about consumer ethics, emphasizing the way how purchase attitude may be influenced by consumers’ perceptions about firms’ behaviour. The study aims to fill two important gaps in the burgeoning literature on marketing ethics: by looking at the consumer side of the marketing exchange dyad, and comparing consumer perspectives on ethics across cultures. As such, levels of consumer ethical awareness and expectations, and their impact on purchasing behaviours are measured in the contexts of Portugal and Cape Verde, one of its former colonies in Africa. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were developed.

  14. Consumer behavior towards green skin care cosmetic products in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Salo, Eftimiya

    2014-01-01

    The current study explores consumer behavior towards green cosmetic products in Finland. The goal of the study is to explore the various factors which influence the purchasing decisions of facial products. Moreover, the study aims to reveal consumers’ attitudes towards natural cosmetic products and the value of the natural ingredients. The theoretical part of the work consists of consumer behavior theories by different authors. In addition, motivational models and dimensions are closely expla...

  15. Consumer behavior towards green skin care cosmetic products in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Salo, Eftimiya

    2014-01-01

    The current study explores consumer behavior towards green cosmetic products in Finland. The goal of the study is to explore the various factors which influence the purchasing decisions of facial products. Moreover, the study aims to reveal consumers’ attitudes towards natural cosmetic products and the value of the natural ingredients. The theoretical part of the work consists of consumer behavior theories by different authors. In addition, motivational models and dimensions are closely expla...

  16. Self-pay markets in health care: consumer Nirvana or caveat emptor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ha T; May, Jessica H

    2007-01-01

    As consumers face more incentives to make cost-conscious medical care decisions, some policymakers cite self-pay markets as models for consumer shopping. An analysis of the LASIK market revealed limited shopping overall, despite the fact that patients pay the full cost. For other self-pay procedures, consumers shop even less, for reasons ranging from urgency, to costs of obtaining price quotes, to quality concerns that prompt many consumers to rely on word-of-mouth recommendations. Given that consumer shopping is not prevalent in most self-pay markets, we expect the extent of shopping to be even more limited for many services covered by insurance.

  17. The Effects of the Internet, Recommendation Quality and Decision Strategies on Consumer Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L.K. Vroomen (Björn)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBj¨orn Leon Kristian Vroomen (1976) obtained his masters’ degree in econometrics in 2000 from the Erasmus University Rotterdam. In that same year he joined ERIM as a Ph.D.-candidate in order to carry out his doctoral research on the subject of consumer decision making in relation to the

  18. Deciding on PSA-screening - Quality of current consumer information on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.J. Korfage; R.C.N. van den Bergh; M.L. Essink-Bot

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Given that screening for prostate cancer has the potential to reduce prostate cancer mortality at the expense of considerable overdiagnosis and overtreatment, the availability of core consumer information - correct, balanced and supportive of autonomous decision-making - is a m

  19. 互联网金融消费者权益保护问题研究%The Research on Internet Financial Consumer Rights and Interests Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵锋

    2015-01-01

    如何在支持互联网金融创新发展的同时,有效保护互联网金融消费者的合法权益,是一个亟待研究的重要课题。本文在总结互联网金融概念、模式的基础上,深入分析了互联网金融消费者权益受侵害的表现形式和当前互联网金融消费者权益保护面临的困境,提出了完善互联网金融消费者权益保护的政策建议。%It is an important subject to be studied how to support the development of Internet financial innovation, and at the same time, protect the lawful rights and interests of the Internet financial consumers effectively. The paper, on the basis of summarizing the concept and mode of the Internet finance, deeply analyzes the forms of the infraction of the Internet financial consumers’ rights and interests and the current plight of the Internet financial consumers' rights and interests protection. Finally, the paper proposes the policy suggestions on perfecting the protection of the rights and interests of the Internet financial consumers.

  20. Development and perceived utility and impact of a skin care Internet intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Hilgart

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers (PrUs in people with spinal cord injury (SCI are a common, mostly preventable, skin complication with serious health consequences. This paper presents the development, theoretical bases, and perceived usefulness and effectiveness data for iSHIFTup.org, a skin care Internet intervention to prevent pressure ulcers in adults with SCI. Participants (n = 7 were, on average, 36 years old (SD = 10.09, tetraplegic (71%, paraplegic (29%, and caucasian (86%, with an average time since injury of 10.43 years (SD = 9.64 years. During the six weeks of program access, participants' usage of the program was tracked and analyzed. Participants subsequently completed measures focused on usability, likeability, and usefulness (the Internet Evaluation and Utility Questionnaire; IEUQ, and on their perceptions of the impact of the program on targeted behaviors (using the Internet Impact and Effectiveness Questionnaire; IIEQ. Participants generally reported positive experiences using iSHIFTup, indicating it to be useful, effective, easy to use, and understandable. All participants reported that iSHIFTup helped them to manage their skin care, improved their skin care routine, and supported healthy skin care activities. A majority of users indicated that they were able to implement program recommendations, and all users believed the Internet was a good method for delivering pressure ulcer prevention programs. This is the first paper to focus on a skin care Internet intervention for adults with SCI.

  1. The development of an internet-based knowledge exchange platform for pediatric critical care clinicians worldwide*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbrink, Traci A; Kissoon, Niranjan; Burns, Jeffrey P

    2014-03-01

    Advances in Internet technology now enable unprecedented global collaboration and collective knowledge exchange. Up to this time, there have been limited efforts to use these technologies to actively promote knowledge exchange across the global pediatric critical care community. To develop an open-access, peer-reviewed, not-for-profit Internet-based learning application, OPENPediatrics, a collaborative effort with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies, was designed to promote postgraduate educational knowledge exchange for physicians, nurses, and others caring for critically ill children worldwide. Description of program development. International multicenter tertiary pediatric critical care units across six continents. Multidisciplinary pediatric critical care providers. A software application, providing information on demand, curricular pathways, and videoconferencing, downloaded to a local computer. In 2010, a survey assessing postgraduate educational needs was distributed through World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies to constituent societies. Four hundred and twenty-nine critical care providers from 49 countries responded to the single e-mail survey request. Respondents included 68% physicians and 28% nurses who care for critically ill children. Fifty-two percent of respondents reported accessing the Internet at least weekly to obtain professional educational information. The five highest requests were for educational content on respiratory care [mechanical ventilation] (48% [38%]), sepsis (28%), neurology (25%), cardiology (14%), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (10%), and ethics (8%). Based on these findings, and in collaboration with researchers in adult learning and online courseware, an application was developed and is currently being used by 770 registered users in 60 countries. We describe here the development and implementation of an Internet-based application which is among the first

  2. Trust in online prescription drug information among internet users: the impact on information search behavior after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ajit M; Deshpande, Aparna D; Perri, Matthew; Zinkhan, George M

    2002-01-01

    The proliferation of both manufacturer-controlled and independent medication-related websites has aroused concern among consumers and policy-makers concerning the trustworthiness of Web-based drug information. The authors examine consumers' trust in on-line prescription drug information and its influence on information search behavior. The study design involves a retrospective analysis of data from a 1998 national survey. The findings reveal that trust in drug information from traditional media sources such as television and newspapers transfers to the domain of the Internet. Furthermore, a greater trust in on-line prescription drug information stimulates utilization of the Internet for information search after exposure to prescription drug advertising.

  3. The nursing care and consumer satisfaction during postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Isaltina Gomes Correia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present analytical cross-sectional study had the aim to investigate the satisfaction of hospitalized post-partum women with the specialized care provided by nurses at the obstetrics service of a health unit in Portugal. The sample comprised 120 post-partum women who were selected as per the following inclusion criteria: being hospitalized due to the delivery and for a period not shorter than three days. Data were collected between February and April 2013. The collected data revealed that the women were very satisfied as for the care received in general (50% and satisfied with the care received toward bathing techniques (99%, breastfeeding (94% and self-care (89%. The evidence of the results allows to support the need for more efficacy from professionals in the care provided so that post-partum women become more autonomous and satisfied with their care.

  4. The creation of the health consumer: challenges on health sector regulation after managed care era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merhy Emerson E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We utilized our previous studies analyzing the reforms affecting the health sector developed in the 1990s by financial groups to frame the strategies implemented by the pharmaceutical industry to regain market positions and to understand the challenges that regulatory agencies are confronting. Methods We followed an analytical approach for analyzing the process generated by the disputes between the financial groups and the pharmaceutical corporations and the challenges created to governmental regulation. We analyzed primary and secondary sources using situational and discourse analyses. We introduced the concepts of biomedicalization and biopedagogy, which allowed us to analyze how medicalization was radicalized. Results In the 1990s, structural adjustment policies facilitated health reforms that allowed the entrance of multinational financial capital into publicly-financed and employer-based insurance. This model operated in contraposition to the interests of the medical industrial complex, which since the middle of the 1990s had developed silent reforms to regain authority in defining the health-ill-care model. These silent reforms radicalized the medicalization. Some reforms took place through deregulatory processes, such as allowing direct-to-consumer advertisements of prescription drugs in the United States. In other countries different strategies were facilitated by the lack of regulation of other media such as the internet. The pharmaceutical industry also has had a role in changing disease definitions, rebranding others, creating new ones, and pressuring for approval of treatments to be paid by public, employer, and private plans. In recent years in Brazil there has been a substantial increase in the number of judicial claims demanding that public administrations pay for new treatments. Conclusions We found that the dispute for the hegemony of the health sector between financial and pharmaceutical companies has deeply

  5. Mental Health Consumer Experiences and Strategies When Seeking Physical Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie B. Ewart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available People with mental illness have higher rates of physical health problems and consequently live significantly shorter lives. This issue is not yet viewed as a national health priority and research about mental health consumer views on accessing physical health care is lacking. The aim of this study is to explore the experience of mental health consumers in utilizing health services for physical health needs. Qualitative exploratory design was utilized. Semistructured focus groups were held with 31 consumer participants. Thematic analysis revealed that three main themes emerged: scarcity of physical health care, with problems accessing diagnosis, advice or treatment for physical health problems; disempowerment due to scarcity of physical health care; and tenuous empowerment describing survival resistance strategies utilized. Mental health consumers were concerned about physical health and the nonresponsive health system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant within mental health services should potentially redress this gap in health care provision.

  6. How corporate clients and consumers surf the Internet: A review and future directions for research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattiker, U.E.; Perlusz, S.; Bohmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    ) assessment of on-line information for different categories of products; (3) influence of people's technology resistance on beliefs and behaviours regarding on-line shopping; and (4), how these factors affect people's attempt to externalise costs (e.g., transaction costs) will be outlined. Few studies address...... the role of socialisation, cultural and situational factors in on-line shopping versus physical store shopping. Moreover, studies on how modifications in the sales channel affect the customer's processing and judgement of information are limited. The article analyses different decisional contexts for Web...... shopping, comparing commodity products to products that require engineering support; while the hype is generally on the first, customised and speciality products may be more attractive from a business perspective. Internet commerce of technical products, in the context of corporate purchasing, has been...

  7. Health Care and the Silent Language of Vietnamese Immigrant Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, H. Rika

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the cultural context and the silent language of health care delivery from the perspective of foreign-born, Vietnamese immigrants. Suggests that business communication instructors need to incorporate cultural health beliefs, time orientation, and the expected role of family members in the practice of health care as they prepare…

  8. Predictors of shared decision making and level of agreement between consumers and providers in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sadaaki; Salyers, Michelle P; Matthias, Marianne S; Collins, Linda; Thompson, John; Coffman, Melinda; Torrey, William C

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine elements of shared decision making (SDM), and to establish empirical evidence for factors correlated with SDM and the level of agreement between consumer and provider in psychiatric care. Transcripts containing 128 audio-recorded medication check-up visits with eight providers at three community mental health centers were rated using the Shared Decision Making scale, adapted from Braddock's Informed Decision Making Scale (Braddock et al. 1997, 1999, 2008). Multilevel regression analyses revealed that greater consumer activity in the session and greater decision complexity significantly predicted the SDM score. The best predictor of agreement between consumer and provider was "exploration of consumer preference," with a four-fold increase in full agreement when consumer preferences were discussed more completely. Enhancing active consumer participation, particularly by incorporating consumer preferences in the decision making process appears to be an important factor in SDM.

  9. Unravelling the concept of consumer preference: implications for health policy and optimal planning in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Michele M; Earl, Peter E; Haines, Terry P; Mitchell, Geoffrey K

    2010-10-01

    Accounting for consumer preference in health policy and delivery system design makes good economic sense since this is linked to outcomes, quality of care and cost control. Probability trade-off methods are commonly used in policy evaluation, marketing and economics. Increasingly applied to health matters, the trade-off preference model has indicated that consumers of health care discriminate between different attributes of care. However, the complexities of the health decision-making environment raise questions about the inherent assumptions concerning choice and decision-making behavior which frame this view of consumer preference. In this article, we use the example of primary care in Australia as a vehicle to examine the concept of 'consumer preference' from different perspectives within economics and discuss the significance of how we model preferences for health policy makers. In doing so, we question whether mainstream thinking, namely that consumers are capable of deliberating between rival strategies and are willing to make trade-offs, is a reliable way of thinking about preferences given the complexities of the health decision-making environment. Alternative perspectives on preference can assist health policy makers and health providers by generating more precise information about the important attributes of care that are likely to enhance consumer engagement and optimise acceptability of health care.

  10. Care as you like it: the construction of a consumer approach in home care in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Rostgaard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false NO-BOK X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Vanlig tabell"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Vanlig tabell"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The free choice of a home-care provider was introduced in Danish home care in 2001. This article discusses the overall premises for the introduction of free choice in home care and how it constitutes an overarching response to the crisis of the welfare state. The government at that time intended free choice to lead to more user-led services, more cost-efficient services, and the development of a care market, all in line with its ideology. The article argues that to achieve these ambitions, the

  11. Health care encounters in Danish chiropractic practice from a consumer perspectives - a mixed methods investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Boyle, Eleanor; Larsen, Johanne Brinch; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Perceived value is the key ingredient to carving and maintaining a competitive business niche. The opportunities to interact with consumers to understand and enhance perceived value are termed 'touch points'. Due to the out-of-pocket expense incurred by patients, Danish chiropractors are subject to consumer trends and behaviors. The purpose of this investigation was to explore and describe consumer touch points relevant to perceived value through healthcare journeys in chiropractic practices. We designed a convergent parallel, mixed methods study. Our purposive sampling framework identified 11 chiropractic clinics from which we collected observational field notes, video recordings and face-to-face interviews. Data was collected between April 14(th) and June 26(th) 2014. We described the exteriors and interiors of all participant clinics, interviewed 32 staff members, 12 new patients and 36 follow-up patients and finally video recorded 11 new and 24 follow-up consultations. Categorization and analysis led to the emergence six consumer touch point themes: 'the internet', 'the physical environment', 'practice models', 'administrative staff', 'the consultation sequence and timing' and 'a consultation that adds value'. The Internet functions as a tool when choosing/confirming a clinic as appropriate, developing and initial image and managing appointments. The administrative hub appears integral to the shaping of positive consumer experiences outside of the consultation. Clinic location, practice model and interior design may contribute to context effects and thus may influence value perception during the clinical encounter. The duration of hands-on treatment received from the chiropractor is not an apparent consumer focus point. Rather, through a seven stage clinical procedure patients value consultations with clinicians who demonstrate professional competence by effective communication diagnosis/management and facilitating satisfactory treatment outcomes. At least six

  12. A systematic narrative review of consumer-directed care for older people: implications for model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Goetz; Allen, Jacqui; Feldman, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Consumer-directed care is increasingly becoming a mainstream option in community-based aged care. However, a systematic review describing how the current evaluation research translates into practise has not been published to date. This review aimed to systematically establish an evidence base of user preferences for and satisfaction with services associated with consumer-directed care programmes for older people. Twelve databases were searched, including MedLine, BioMed Central, Cinahl, Expanded Academic ASAP, PsychInfo, ProQuest, Age Line, Science Direct, Social Citation Index, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. Google Scholar and Google were also searched. Eligible studies were those reporting on choice, user preferences and service satisfaction outcomes regarding a programme or model of home-based care in the United States or United Kingdom. This systematic narrative review retrieved literature published from January 1992 to August 2011. A total of 277 references were identified. Of these 17 met the selection criteria and were reviewed. Findings indicate that older people report varying preferences for consumer-directed care with some demonstrating limited interest. Clients and carers reported good service satisfaction. However, research comparing user preferences across countries or investigating how ecological factors shape user preferences has received limited attention. Policy-makers and practitioners need to carefully consider the diverse contexts, needs and preferences of older adults in adopting consumer-directed care approaches in community aged care. The review calls for the development of consumer-directed care programmes offering a broad range of options that allow for personalisation and greater control over services without necessarily transferring the responsibility for administrative responsibilities to service users. Review findings suggest that consumer-directed care approaches have the potential to empower older

  13. Framing choice: The origins and impact of consumer rhetoric in US health care debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy S

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the origins of consumerist discourse in health care from a communication perspective via a historical textual analysis of health writing in popular magazines from 1930 to 1949. The focus is on Consumers Union's Consumer Reports and the American Medical Association's lay health magazine, Hygeia. Findings from Consumer Reports show that the consumer movement of the 1930s-40s staunchly advocated for universal health insurance. Whereas consumer rights language nowadays tends towards individual choice and personal responsibility, consumerism in health care during that era articulated ideas about consumer citizenship, framing choice and responsibility in collectivist terms and health care as a social good. This paper also illuminates the limits and weaknesses of a central tenet in consumerism-freedom of choice-by analyzing stories in Hygeia about the doctor-patient relationship. A textual analysis finds that the AMA's justification in the 1930s-40s against socialized medicine, i.e., the freedom to choose a doctor, was in practice highly controlled by the medical profession. Findings show that long before the rhetoric of the "empowered consumer" became popular, some patients exercised some choice even in an era when physicians achieved total professional dominance. But these patients were few and tend to occupy the upper socioeconomic strata of US society. In reality choice was an illusion in a fee-for-service era when most American families could not afford the costs of medical care.

  14. Internet Use and eHealth Literacy of Low-Income Parents Whose Children Have Special Health Care Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, Caprice; Madden, Vanessa; Wang, Hua; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Background The Internet has revolutionized the way in which many Americans search for health care information. Unfortunately, being able to use the Internet for this purpose is predicated on having access to the Internet and being able to understand and comprehend online health information. This is especially important for parents of children with special health care needs who are forced to make many medical decisions throughout the lives of their children. Yet, no information is available ab...

  15. From Coverage to Care: Strengthening and Facilitating Consumer Connections to the Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laurie T; Luoto, Jill E

    2015-11-30

    To date, most Affordable Care Act implementation efforts have focused on getting individuals enrolled in health insurance coverage; indeed, millions of Americans, many of whom had never been insured, have since obtained health coverage, either through the health insurance marketplaces or through expanded Medicaid eligibility, if available in their state. Yet reducing the number of uninsured is only part of the law's goal. It also aims to improve population health and lower health care costs. Less attention has been paid to confirming that the newly insured obtain appropriate health care and maintain long-term relationships with their health care providers, which are critical steps to help achieve these latter goals. This article describes lessons learned from conversations with a variety of stakeholders in the health care industry. These conversations covered the gamut of steps consumers must undergo to become fully engaged with their health care, from applying for coverage and selecting a plan to finding a provider, accessing care, and engaging in care over time. In each phase of the process, consumers must take specific actions and overcome new challenges. Stakeholder efforts to help consumers often focus on just one of these phases, at the expense of the bigger picture, and often occur in isolation, with little coordination across stakeholder groups. Thinking more strategically and holistically can help provide the "connective tissue" that can help prevent consumers from becoming disengaged and falling through the system's cracks.

  16. Comparative health care information: consumer quality index (CQI) information on differences between providers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Stubbe, J.H.; Triemstra, A.H.M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Public reporting on health care performances has become an important quality-improvement instrument. In the Netherlands, consumer quality index (CQI) questionnaires are currently being used to assess patients’ experiences with various domains of the health care system. An important quest

  17. Patient's experiences with quality of hospital care: the Dutch Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Brouwer, W.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and the dimen

  18. Patients' experiences with quality of hospital care: The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Stubbe; W. Brouwer (Wendy); D.M.J. Delnoij (Diana)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability a

  19. Wearables and the Internet of Things for Health: Wearable, Interconnected Devices Promise More Efficient and Comprehensive Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, David; Milliard, Sharlin T J; Gomez, Melinda; Schwartz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In our recent book Health-e Everything: Wearables and the Internet of Things for Health, we capture in an interactive e-book format some global thought-leader perspectives as well as early examples of case studies and novel innovations that are driving this emerging technology domain. Here, we provide a brief snapshot of key findings related to these novel technologies and use cases, which are driving both health care practitioners and health consumers (patients). As technologists, having a firm understanding of customer-driven innovation and the actual user benefits of interconnective devices for health will help us engineer better solutions that are more targeted to the triple aim of better, faster, and cheaper health solutions.

  20. Web site review. Carolinas HealthCare recognized Internet marketing potential early.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    Since the early days of the Internet, administrators Carolinas HealthCare System in Charlotte, NC, have appreciated its potential as a marketing tool. This places a lot of expectations on the Web site, www.carolinashealthcare.org, which is managed by the marketing-public relations department. Find out how the well-established site fulfills its mission and more.

  1. Consumer behaviour towards organic, natural and conventional skin care products: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Alina-Aida Drăgan; Dacinia-Crina Petrescu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to outline consumers’ profile in terms of their interest in organic, natural and conventional skin care, their knowledge about these products and the differences between them, their opinion regarding the performance and price of organic skin care in relation to conventional skin care. The survey used a self-administered questionnaire and was conducted on a sample of 86 customers from Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The results indicate that consumers who pu...

  2. Identifying consumer segments in health services markets: an application of conjoint and cluster analyses to the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrol, N V; Gagon, J P

    1983-01-01

    Because of increasing competition, it is becoming more important that health care providers pursue consumer-based market segmentation strategies. This paper presents a methodology for identifying and describing consumer segments in health service markets, and demonstrates the use of the methodology by presenting a study of consumer segments in the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

  3. HEALTH CONSUMER DIVERSITY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lars EDGREN

    2006-01-01

    Health care consumers no longer want to be passive receivers of treatment and care, they want to be to health information, thanks largely to the Internet, and active health consumer organizations have provided consumers with enabling independent health information. Individual consumers are also more willing to enter into a dialogue, participate and influence decisions concerning their own care. At the same time the consumer role becomes more diverse. Populations in many countries today are culturally,socially, and demographically diverse. Understanding consumer diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing health care providers. There is a risk that the quality of health care provided to consumers can vary depending on the skills of the professionals to rune into the values and preferences of the individual consumer. Health care providers need to listen to and incorporate consumers'experiences into their health service offerings in new and creative ways. They need to engage in a dialogue with various consumer groups using multiple channels. There is a need for a new business logic, which would structurally help the providers, on an individual basis to deal with more sophisticated health care consumers. This is a review paper and provides a framework and a set of strategies for dealing with health consumer diversity. We draw on three interrelated theories - open systems theory, service management research and the concept of consumer segmentation to understand health care consumers' attitudes and behaviour, and their expectations.

  4. Transforming health care delivery through consumer engagement, health data transparency, and patient-generated health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, D Z; Wald, J S

    2014-08-15

    Address current topics in consumer health informatics. Literature review. Current health care delivery systems need to be more effective in the management of chronic conditions as the population turns older and experiences escalating chronic illness that threatens to consume more health care resources than countries can afford. Most health care systems are positioned poorly to accommodate this. Meanwhile, the availability of ever more powerful and cheaper information and communication technology, both for professionals and consumers, has raised the capacity to gather and process information, communicate more effectively, and monitor the quality of care processes. Adapting health care systems to serve current and future needs requires new streams of data to enable better self-management, improve shared decision making, and provide more virtual care. Changes in reimbursement for health care services, increased adoption of relevant technologies, patient engagement, and calls for data transparency raise the importance of patient-generated health information, remote monitoring, non-visit based care, and other innovative care approaches that foster more frequent contact with patients and better management of chronic conditions.

  5. AB064. Internet plus health care: review of the policies, consulting reports and advise for the urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Jin, Xunbo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The “internet plus health care” has become quite a hotspot for news and investors, by reviewing the relative policies and consulting reports, advice was provided for urologists. Methods Three open published policy paper on internet plus health care were reviewed. Opportunities and challenges for the urologists in this internet plus health care wave were presented, and suitable advice was provided for the urologists. Results The online diagnosis and recommending of the treatment were forbidden by the relative laws. The internet industry still has to be searching for the better breakthrough points to plus health care, the online services provided by relative websites or mobile applications has high legal risks for urologists. Conclusions The wave of internet plus health care brought a timely opportunity for the urologists to accumulate the academic credits and forge personal academic brands.

  6. 大学生网络消费行为指向及其引导%The Leading and Guiding for the College Students Internet Consuming Behavious

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭俊敏

    2012-01-01

    作为各种网络消费群体中最为活跃的、一个剧本,大学生网络消费行为指向主流是好的,但问题也不乏存在。引导大学生树立正确的网络消费观念,自觉践行网络消费文明,增强网络消费风险意识,是帮助大学生克服网络诱惑,走向成熟理性消费的必然之路。%Among the all kinds of intemet consumers, the college students consumers are the most active one. The mainstream of the consuming behavious is good, but there is still something wrong in it, for which we should guide our students to be with a right internet consuming view and guide them to pay attentions to the intemet consu- ming culture to wake their taking risks consciousness, which is helpful for the college students to resist the temptation of the intemet consuming induction, and which is a right way for college students to become mature internet consumers.

  7. The potential of the internet for alternative caring practices for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sarah; Ayers, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    The practices of health care in late modernity are informed by competing visions of the ideal human and the nature of care. Western societies typically characterise the ideal human as independent and self-reliant. The resultant welfare systems provide temporary havens away from the everyday, competitive spaces of capitalist societies, termed here the enclave model. Social scientists problematise this model on several grounds: the construction of pathologised and medicalised body forms; the neglect of caring practices that are gendered, invisible and primarily private; the de-politicisation of caring practices. Policy calls reject reference to care and its associations with dependency, make visible and value informal care work or invoke a caring citizenship as a policy goal not just a means. Into this field of contested notions of care enters a well-documented rise in access to, and consultation through, the internet in everyday lives for a vast range of issues. Health care encountered online reflects a similar range in form as that encountered offline and much that is innovative, whilst clearly of benefit, does nothing to challenge the existing dominance of the enclave model of social care. However, certain groups of sites create spaces through which participants can both express and extract caring relationships that are otherwise unforthcoming. The paper argues that these sites afford the potential to develop an alternative model of caring, to reframe questions of how to care about distant others and to demonstrate the centrality of caring relations to human life.

  8. 77 FR 11997 - Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau Seeks To Refresh the Record Regarding Misuse of Internet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Misuse of Internet Protocol Relay Service AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed... (Bureau) seeks comment to refresh the record regarding misuse of Internet Protocol relay service. Further... intended effect of reducing or eliminating misuse of Internet Protocol Relay. DATES: Submit comments on...

  9. Perceptions of Justice after Recovery Efforts in Internet Purchasing: the Impact on Consumer Trust and Loyalty toward Retailing Sites and Online Shopping in General

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pizzutti dos Santos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to extend the traditional theoretical model of service recovery to the online purchasing environment by investigating the impact of perceptions of justice after recovery efforts toward unsatisfactory Internet purchasing on customer trust and loyalty. The authors develop a theoretical model focusing on interrelationships among complaint handling evaluations, quality of prior experience, familiarity, trust, perceived value and loyalty. To test this model, 3,339 customers from all over Brazil who had been engaged in complaint processes about online purchases within the past 6 months answered an online questionnaire. Findings indicate that interpersonal treatment by the e-retailer improves consumer perceptions of the online recovery process. Consumer trust in the firm's website is strongly influenced by satisfaction with complaint handling, familiarity and the quality of prior experiences with the website, while consumer trust in Internet shopping is mainly affected by familiarity and the quality of prior experiences with Internet purchasing. These two dimensions of trust are distinct and represent discrete facets, as they do not impact each other. Moreover, repurchase intentions and word-of-mouth communication are influenced by consumer trust.

  10. Driving a more effective health care market by putting consumers behind the wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, T R

    2001-01-01

    In any other rational market, the consumer drives demand, and the provider responds with products and services aimed at meeting individual needs. This rational market does not exist in today's group health care system. The ramifications are significant: declining consumer and provider satisfaction, out-of-control costs, a rising uninsured population, and growing employer burdens. Turning this chaotic world around requires a more active and informed consumer. Transformation is under way with solutions like Sageo, a new e-business from Hewitt Associates that is revolutionizing the way health care benefits are offered, selected, and administered. For companies that offer Sageo's services, their employees and retirees gain direct access to health care coverage and content, enabling them to research, select, and enroll in the appropriate package based on their individual needs.

  11. Consumers' Valuation of Primary Care-Based Treatment Options for Mental and Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Andrew J; Barry, Colleen L; Fiellin, David A; Busch, Susan H

    2015-08-01

    Most individuals with substance use disorders and with mental disorders do not receive treatment. If treatment options were more attractive, treatment rates might increase. The advantages of novel approaches, including primary care-based treatment and collaborative care in a primary care setting, have been documented. However, less is known about consumers' valuation of these options. The authors assessed monetary valuation of these treatment types compared with usual care in a specialty treatment setting. Contingent valuation methods were used in a Web-based randomized vignette experiment that involved 2,146 individuals who screened positive for a drug or alcohol use disorder or a mental disorder. Participants valued a primary care-based treatment visit over usual care in a specialty treatment setting by $9.00 and a collaborative care visit over usual care in a specialty treatment setting by $5.85.

  12. Activating chronic kidney disease patients and family members through the Internet to promote integration of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Trisolini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the potential role of the Internet as a vehicle for improving integration of care through activating chronic kidney disease patients and their family members. Also, to describe how that potential is being developed through a website sponsored by the Medicare program in the United States. Background: The Internet is expanding at a rapid rate, and health-related websites are one of its most popular features. Efforts to promote integration of care have focused mainly on providers up to now, and more emphasis is needed on the potential roles of patients. Chronically ill patients have particular needs for improved education about their conditions and enhanced involvement in care planning and treatment decisions. Medicare developed the Dialysis Facility Compare website to serve those goals for people with chronic kidney disease. Methods: We conducted qualitative research with 140 chronic kidney disease patients and family members, and 130 renal care professionals to evaluate and improve the Dialysis Facility Compare website. A series of 19 focus groups, 13 triads (small focus groups, and 56 individual interviews were conducted in four regions of the United States and by telephone. Results: We found that the Dialysis Facility Compare website has the potential to improve integration of care for people with chronic kidney disease in at least three ways. First: by expanding the roles of patients as members of the multi-disciplinary team of caregivers treating their disease. Second: through better integration of the informal care provided in the home and community with the formal care provided by health professionals. Third: by improving coordination of between care provided in the pre-dialysis and dialysis phases of the disease. Discussion: We developed recommendations for revising and enhancing the Dialysis Facility Compare website in a number of ways to better promote patient activation and integration of care. The unique features

  13. The Effects of Advertising Strategies on Consumer Trust: A Case of Skin Care Products in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velly Anatasia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to develop advertising strategies in order to increase consumer trust. Four advertising elements, celebrity endorsement, branding, product attribute, and third party certification, were investigated in this study. Data were collected to answer two research questions: (1 To investigate the advertising strategies of skin care products leading to consumer trust, (2 To know the effects of advertising strategies in skin care products on consumer trust. A 5-point Likert scale survey was distributed to the female population in Taipei area. Via online and personal approaches, 266 questionnaires were returned. Targeting on 18-30 years old female skin care product users who stay in Taipei area more than six months, 240 qualified questionnaires were analyzed. The four independent variables are found having a significant relationship with trust in skin care advertising, in which branding has the greatest influence on increasing consumer trust. The control variable which is financial status is not found having statistically significant effect on consumer trust. To conclude, this study is dedicated to the communities in order to optimize their marketing strategies.

  14. Computer and internet access for long-term care residents: perceived benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Sunghee H; Beck, Cornelia; McMahon, Ed

    2007-05-01

    In this study, the authors examined residents' computer and Internet access, as well as benefits and barriers to access in nursing homes. Administrators of 64 nursing homes in a national chain completed surveys. Fourteen percent of the nursing homes provided computers for residents to use, and 11% had Internet access. Some residents owned personal computers in their rooms. Administrators perceived the benefits of computer and Internet use for residents as facilitating direct communication with family and providing mental exercise, education, and enjoyment. Perceived barriers included cost and space for computer equipment and residents' cognitive and physical impairments. Implications of residents' computer activities were discussed for nursing care. Further research is warranted to examine therapeutic effects of computerized activities and their cost effectiveness.

  15. Shared decision making in public mental health care: perspectives from consumers living with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltmann, Emily M; Whitley, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical and empirical work regarding decision making in mental health suggests that mental health consumers have better outcomes when their preferences are integrated into quality of life decisions. A wealth of research, however, indicates that providers have difficulty predicting what their clients' priorities are. This study investigates consumer decision-making preferences and understanding of construction of decisions in community mental health. People living with severe mental illness being treated in the public mental health care system (N=16) participated in qualitative interviews regarding case management decision making as a part of a larger study investigating a decision support system to facilitate shared decision making. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and cross-case thematic analyses were conducted. Mental health consumers generally endorse a "shared" style of decision making. When asked what "shared" means, however, consumers describe a two-step process which first prioritizes autonomy, and if that is not possible, defers to case managers' judgment. Consumers also primarily focused on the relationship and affective components of decision making, rather than information-gathering or deliberating on options. Finally, when disagreements arose, consumers primarily indicated they handled them. Mental health consumers may have a different view of decision making than the literature on shared decision making suggests. Mental health consumers may consciously decide to at least verbally defer to their case managers, and remain silent about their preferences or wishes.

  16. Health care consumption and consumer social class: a different look at the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, S

    1989-09-01

    Both the need and potential for market segmentation in the health care industry have grown substantially. Social class, a consumer behavior construct applied widely in other marketing contexts, may be useful as a basis for health care segmentation. Using a random sample of 997 households in the Pacific Northwest, the author investigates health care attitudes and behaviors across social class groups. Social class is found to be related positively and significantly to several aspects of health care, including personal health, interest, expenditures, satisfaction, and switching behavior.

  17. Privately Owned Public Spaces: the Internet and the Shaping of a New Breed of Consumers. From Participants to Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Poier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Computers in the 1980s were seen as a way to liberate people from the constraints of physicality, to expand the horizons of knowledge, and to enhance access to information. But after a few somersaults, we are back to a market that closes rather than opens our horizons, one that monopolizes, and even de facto owns, our very information. With the adoption of the term “user” - as opposed to “participant” for example – an asymmetry of power is underlined. This linguistic choice enables Internet platforms (such as Twitter, Facebook, iCloud, GoogleDrive to maintain shady property rights on what users might perceive as public spaces (precisely because they are built to project a public space dynamic but are in fact spaces in which the control over users' own data (e.g. pictures, texts is often impossible, transforming such data into a commodity and reducing users to (used consumers. En la década de 1980, los ordenadores se contemplaban como una forma de liberar a la gente de las limitaciones del mundo físico, ampliar los horizontes del conocimiento, y mejorar el acceso a la información. Pero después de diversos giros, volvemos a estar en un mercado que cierra nuestros horizontes en lugar de ampliarlos, que monopoliza, e incluso posee de facto, nuestra propia información. Con la adopción del término "usuario" - en lugar de "participante", por ejemplo - se pone de manifiesto la asimetría de poder existente. Esta opción lingüística permite a las plataformas de Internet (como Twitter, Facebook, iCloud, GoogleDrive mantener derechos de propiedad poco claros sobre plataformas que los usuarios pueden percibir como espacios públicos (precisamente porque están construidas para parecer un espacio público dinámico pero son en realidad espacios en los que es a menudo imposible controlar los propios datos de los usuarios (por ejemplo, imágenes, textos, transformando estos datos en una mercancía y convirtiendo a los usuarios en

  18. Client's Perspective on Quality of Audiology Care: development of the Consumer quality index (CQI) Audiology Care for measuring client experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.; Dahlhaus-Booij, J.; Plass, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Clients’ perspective on the quality of audiology care has not been investigated thoroughly. Research has focused primarily on satisfaction with, and limitations of hearing aids. We developed a Consumer Quality Index (CQI) questionnaire ‘Audiology Care’ to systematically assess client

  19. Patients as consumers of health care in South Africa: the ethical and legal implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Kirsten; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2013-03-21

    South Africa currently has a pluralistic health care system with separate public and private sectors. It is, however, moving towards a socialised model with the introduction of National Health Insurance. The South African legislative environment has changed recently with the promulgation of the Consumer Protection Act and proposed amendments to the National Health Act. Patients can now be viewed as consumers from a legal perspective. This has various implications for health care systems, health care providers and the doctor-patient relationship. Calling a recipient of health care a 'consumer' as opposed to a 'patient' has distinct connotations and may result in differential behaviour. Labels reflect the ideals of the context in which they are used. Various models of the doctor-patient relationship exist and different metaphors have been used to describe it. Increasingly there are third parties involved within the doctor-patient relationship making it more difficult for the doctor to play the fiduciary role. In certain parts of the world, there has been a shift from a traditional paternalistic model to a consumerist model. The ethical implications of the commodification of health care are complex. As health care becomes a 'product' supplied by the health care 'provider', there is the risk that doctors will replace professional ethics with those of the marketplace. Health care is a universal human need and cannot be considered a mere commodity. In modern medical ethics, great emphasis is placed on the principle of respect for patient autonomy. Patients are now the ultimate decision-makers. The new Consumer Protection Act in South Africa applies to consumers and patients alike. It enforces strict liability for harm caused by goods and services. Everyone in the supply chain, including the doctor, can be held jointly and severally liable. This may lead to enormous challenges in health care delivery. Viewing patients as consumers may be detrimental to the doctor

  20. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  1. Psychometric properties of the consumer quality index to assess shelter and community care services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M.D.; Asmoredjo, J.K.; Christians, M.G.M.; Wolf, J.R.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our aim was to design a valid and reliable consumer quality index (CQI) specifically suited to assess the experiences that homeless people, homeless youth, and abused women have with shelter and community care services. METHODS: A pilot CQI questionnaire was constructed on the basis of

  2. Engaging Consumer Voices in Health Care Policy: Lessons for Social Work Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kristi Lohmeier; Saunders, A

    2016-02-01

    Community health centers provide comprehensive public health care in some of the most disadvantaged communities in the United States. To ensure that health centers meet the needs of their consumers, they uniquely engage them in their organizational decision-making and policy-development processes by requiring that their boards of directors encompass a 51 percent consumer majority. To understand the quality of board members' experiences, a critical ethnography was conducted using Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation and the socioecological model as a framework. The analysis identified multiple influences on the quality of participation among consumer members. Findings also confirm other research that has found that knowledge of the economic, political, and cultural factors surrounding the context of the individual health center is important to understanding meaningful participation. The experience is important to understand given the shift driven by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 in health care, which emphasizes a patient-entered model of care. Social work practitioners and others in the public health arena interested in empowering consumers to have a role in the provision of services need to understand the impact of each of these areas'and the experience of this unique sample of health center board members.

  3. Applying social marketing in health care: communicating evidence to change consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; McCormack, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    Social marketing uses commercial marketing strategies to change individual and organizational behavior and policies. It has been effective on a population level across a wide range of public health and health care domains. There is limited evidence of the effectiveness of social marketing in changing health care consumer behavior through its impact on patient-provider interaction or provider behavior. Social marketers need to identify translatable strategies (e.g., competition analysis, branding, and tailored messages) that can be applied to health care provider and consumer behavior. Three case studies from social marketing illustrate potential strategies to change provider and consumer behavior. Countermarketing is a rapidly growing social marketing strategy that has been effective in tobacco control and may be effective in countering pharmaceutical marketing using specific message strategies. Informed decision making is a useful strategy when there is medical uncertainty, such as in prostate cancer screening and treatment. Pharmaceutical industry marketing practices offer valuable lessons for developing competing messages to reach providers and consumers. Social marketing is an effective population-based behavior change strategy that can be applied in individual clinical settings and as a complement to reinforce messages communicated on a population level. There is a need for more research on message strategies that work in health care and population-level effectiveness studies.

  4. An Internet-Based Intervention for Depression in Primary Care in Spain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Marín, Jesús; Araya, Ricardo; Mayoral, Fermín; Gili, Margalida; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa; Castro, Adoración; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Nogueira-Arjona, Raquel; Vives, Margarita; Riera, Antoni; García-Campayo, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is the most prevalent cause of illness-induced disability worldwide. Face-to-face psychotherapeutic interventions for depression can be challenging, so there is a need for other alternatives that allow these interventions to be offered. One feasible alternative is Internet-based psychological interventions. This is the first randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the effectiveness of an Internet-based intervention on depression in primary health care in Spain. Objective Our aim was to compare the effectiveness of a low-intensity therapist-guided (LITG) Internet-based program and a completely self-guided (CSG) Internet-based program with improved treatment as usual (iTAU) care for depression. Methods Multicenter, three-arm, parallel, RCT design, carried out between November 2012 and January 2014, with a follow-up of 15 months. In total, 296 adults from primary care settings in four Spanish regions, with mild or moderate major depression, were randomized to LITG (n=96), CSG (n=98), or iTAU (n=102). Research completers at follow-up were 63.5%. The intervention was Smiling is Fun, an Internet program based on cognitive behavioral therapy. All patients received iTAU by their general practitioners. Moreover, LITG received Smiling is Fun and the possibility of psychotherapeutic support on request by email, whereas CSG received only Smiling is Fun. The main outcome was the Beck Depression Inventory-II at 3 months from baseline. Mixed-effects multilevel analysis for repeated measures were undertaken. Results There was no benefit for either CSG [(B coefficient=-1.15; P=.444)] or LITG [(B=-0.71; P=.634)] compared to iTAU, at 3 months. There were differences at 6 months [iTAU vs CSG (B=-4.22; P=.007); iTAU vs LITG (B=-4.34; P=.005)] and 15 months [iTAU vs CSG (B=-5.10; P=.001); iTAU vs LITG (B=-4.62; P=.002)]. There were no differences between CSG and LITG at any time. Adjusted and intention-to-treat models confirmed these findings. Conclusions An Internet

  5. Consumer-Centered, Collaborative, and Comprehensive Care: The Core Essentials of Recovery-Oriented System of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiClemente, Carlo C; Norwood, Amber E Q; Gregory, W Henry; Travaglini, Letitia; Graydon, Meagan M; Corno, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Recovery from substance abuse and mental health disorders represents a journey through which individuals move beyond treatment of provider-identified problems toward a path of achieving wellness and productive lives. Overcoming obstacles and barriers encountered along the recovery process, individuals reveal their own strengths and resilience necessary to cope, survive, and thrive in the face of adversity. Recovery-oriented system of care (ROSC) is a framework designed to address the multidimensional nature of recovery by creating a system for coordinating multiple systems, services, and supports that are person centered and build on the strengths and resiliencies of individuals, families, and communities. As is common knowledge among substance abuse and mental health providers, consumers often present with high rates of comorbidity, which complicates care. In addition, behavioral health consumers engage in risky health behaviors (e.g., smoking) at a disproportionate rate, which places them at increased risk for developing noncommunicable diseases. ROSCs are ideal for addressing the complicated and varied needs of consumers as they progress toward wellness. The challenges of creating an ROSC framework that is effective, efficient, and acceptable to consumers is formidable. It requires change on the part of agencies, organizations, providers, and consumers. The importance of comprehensive, integrated screening is highlighted as a critical component of ROSC. Key suggestions for initiating ROSC are offered.

  6. Implementing strategies in consumer and community engagement in health care: results of a large-scale, scoping meta-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Pooria; Travaglia, Joanne; Debono, Deborah; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2014-09-18

    There is growing recognition of the importance of the active involvement of consumers and community members in health care. Despite the long history of consumer and community engagement (CCE) research and practice, there is no consensus on the best strategies for CCE. In this paper, we identify various dimensions of CCE-related strategies and offer a practical model to assist policy-makers, practitioners and researchers. We undertook a large-scale, scoping meta-review and searched six databases using a list of nine medical subject headings (MeSH) and a comprehensive list of 47 phrases. We identified and examined a total of 90 relevant systematic reviews. Identified reviews show that although there is a significant body of research on CCE, the development of the field is hindered by a lack of evidence relating to specific elements of CCE. They also indicate a diverse and growing enterprise, drawing on a wide range of disciplinary, political and philosophical perspectives and a mix of definitions, targets, approaches, strategies and mechanisms. CCE interventions and strategies aim to involve consumers, community members and the public in general, as well as specific sub-groups, including children and people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Strategies for CCE vary in terms of their aim and type of proposed activity, as do the methods and tools which have been developed to support them. Methods and tools include shared decision making, use of decision aids, consumer representation, application of electronic and internet-based facilities, and peer support. The success of CCE is dependent on both the approach taken and contextual factors, including structural facilitators such as governmental support, as well as barriers such as costs, organisational culture and population-specific limitations. The diversity of the field indicates the need to measure each component of CCE. This meta-review provides the basis for development of a new eight stage

  7. Variations in mature market consumer behavior within a health care product: implications for marketing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, J A; Busbin, J W

    1995-01-01

    America is undergoing a profound age shift in its demographic make-up with people 55 and over comprising an increasing proportion of the population. Marketers may need to increase their response rate to this shift, especially in refining the application of marketing theory and practice to older age consumers. To this end, a survey of older couple buying behavior for health insurance coverage is reported here. Results clarify evaluative criteria and the viability of multiple market segmentation for health care coverage among older consumers as couples. Commentary on the efficacy of present health coverage marketing programs is provided.

  8. The importance of quality, access and price to health care consumers in Bulgaria: A self-explicated approach'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, M.; Groot, W.J.N.; van Merode, F.

    2003-01-01

    One approach to the problem of low patient satisfaction in Bulgaria is to identify attributes of health care services that the consumers value most and to focus on their improvement. Based on data from a household survey, this paper examines the importance that health care consumers attach to qualit

  9. The importance of quality, access and price to health care consumers in Bulgaria: A self-explicated approach'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, M.; Groot, W.J.N.; van Merode, F.

    2003-01-01

    One approach to the problem of low patient satisfaction in Bulgaria is to identify attributes of health care services that the consumers value most and to focus on their improvement. Based on data from a household survey, this paper examines the importance that health care consumers attach to

  10. The Impact of the Internet Word-of-mouth on Consumers and the Shaping of the Internet Word-of-mouth%网络口碑对消费者的影响与网络口碑的塑造

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董琰

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of growing number of open consumer platforms makes consumers enjoy the convenience of shopping and the Internet word‐of‐mouth increasingly important in the position .With the popularization of the Internet consumption patterns ,Internet word‐of‐mouth is becoming a guiding force in consumers’ decision‐making as well as the key factor which determines the success of the In‐ternet platform marketing .More attention should be paid to the Internet word‐of‐mouth ,the full use of the network channels ,the positive guide to the Internet public opinions and Internet events to ef‐fectively promote the development of national consumption .Innovative thinking should be used for self -recommendation of fine products .Besides ,leaders’ opinions and hot topic creation can be em‐ployed to expand the impact and draw attention respectively .All these can play a leading role in at‐tracting consumers .%越来越多开放式消费平台的兴起,让我们享受了购物的便利,同时也让网络口碑居于越来越重要的地位。随着互联网消费模式的普及,网络口碑成为影响消费者决策的重要导向性力量,也成为决定互联网平台营销成败的关键因素之一。重视网络口碑,善用网络渠道,对网络舆论和网络事件做正向引导,才能更有效的促进国民消费的良性发展。运用创新思维对优良品质自发推荐,利用意见领袖扩大影响和适时的制造话题引发关注,起到引领消费意向的作用。

  11. What do consumers and healthcare providers in West Virginia think of long-term care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ashish; Smith, Lisa A; Paul, David P

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the media has portrayed long-term care in a negative light, with exposè news stories on skilled nursing facilities, personal care homes, and hospitals that provide long-term care. There have been few positive news stories to counter the negative ones, and there is concern that the public perception of long-term care is inaccurate. The authors conducted the following study to evaluate how the West Virginia consumer perceives and defines long-term care and if there is a difference in that perception as compared with healthcare workers' perceptions and definitions of long-term care. The results of the study indicate that the respondents' education level, not occupation, has the most significant influence on respondents' definitions and perceptions of long-term care. Respondents felt that although media articles are informative, they are not accurate, and that long-term care is a needed service they would consider both for themselves and for a loved one. The results of the study suggest that current marketing strategies employed by nursing homes are working, as respondents largely believe that long-term care is provided in nursing homes and that they would likely seek care there if needed.

  12. Consumers Intention to Use a Single Platform E-Payment System: A Study Among Malaysian Internet and Mobile Banking Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAI POEY CHIN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to explore Malaysian Internet and Mobile banking consumers’ in adopting a single platform E-payment system using TAM model. This research seeks to investigate whether convenience and design influence perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness. We also investigated the relationship between perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and perceived risk with consumers’ intention to use one single platform that integrates card, internet and mobile. Respondents who used both the Internet and Mobile banking were selected to participate in the survey. AMOS version 22.0 was used to analyze the data. The empirical results suggest that convenience, design, perceived risk, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use influence consumers’ intention to use single platform E-payment system. Therefore, convenience, design, perceived risk, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use should be taken into consideration when designing E-payment system in order to increase the Internet and Mobile banking consumers’ intention to use.

  13. Clients' perspective on quality of audiology care: Development of the Consumer Quality Index (CQI) 'Audiology Care' for measuring client experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Michelle; Dahlhaus-Booij, Judith; Plass, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    Clients' perspective on the quality of audiology care has not been investigated thoroughly. Research has focused primarily on satisfaction with, and limitations of hearing aids. We developed a Consumer Quality Index (CQI) questionnaire 'Audiology Care' to systematically assess client experiences with audiology care. The CQI Audiology Care was developed in three steps: (1) posing open-ended questions through e-mail (n = 14), (2) two small-scale surveys assessing psychometric properties of the questionnaire (n = 188) and importance of quality aspects (n = 118), and (3) a large-scale survey (n = 1793) assessing psychometric properties and discriminatory power of the questionnaire. People with complex hearing impairments and/or balance and communicative disorders who visited an audiology care centre during the past year. Important quality aspects were translated into seven reliable scales: accommodation and facilities, employees' conduct and expertise, arrangement of appointments, waiting times, client participation and effectiveness of treatment. Client experiences differed among the participating centres concerning accommodation and facilities, arrangement of appointments, waiting times and client participation. The CQI Audiology Care is a valid and reliable instrument to assess clients' experiences with audiology care. Future implementation will reveal whether results can be used to monitor and improve the quality of audiology care.

  14. Consumer Demand on Halal Cosmetics and Personal Care Products in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniaty Aisyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze the influential factors involved in Moslem consumers’ decision to purchase halal cosmetics and personal care products in Indonesia by using the Theory of Planned Behavior. 100 questionnaires were analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling, collected from respondents of female consumers who purchased Wardah cosmetics and personal care products in South Jakarta and South Tangerang. The findings show that attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and purchase intention are positively related to the consumers’ decision to purchase halal cosmetics and personal care products. By addressing the consumers’ traits that can predict halal cosmetics and personal care products necessity, marketers could generate proper marketing strategies to validate consumers’ demand which in turn will stimulate the growth of halal products industry in Indonesia.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v9i1.1867

  15. Experiences of disability consumer-directed care users in Australia: results from a longitudinal qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Goetz; Laragy, Carmel; Haddon, Michelle

    2009-09-01

    The rapidly growing body of literature suggests that Consumer-directed Care (CDC) has the potential to empower consumers and improve the flexibility and quality of care. However, reports highlighting quality and risk concerns associated with CDC focusing on a longer time frame have been few. This paper presents the findings from a qualitative longitudinal evaluation of an Australian CDC programme. Focusing on the period between 2003 and 2008, it reports on the experiences of 12 families caring for a dependent family member. It is based on two external evaluations completed 6 and 36 months after enrollment, and one internal evaluation completed 48 months after enrollment. The findings were triangulated with internal memos, reports and minutes of meetings, as well as with the theoretical literature. The study demonstrates that CDC harbours considerable benefits for people with disabilities and their carers. However, the study also suggests that, over time, carers may experience an increased sense of isolation and lack of support as a result of their involvement in the CDC programme. The paper argues that the development of safeguards addressing these weaknesses is crucial for the sustainability of CDC programmes in contexts where risk cannot be simply transferred onto consumers.

  16. Trends in Internet Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Panchanathan, Nitin

    2005-01-01

    Internet marketing involves the usage of the Internet to market and sell goods or services. In this thesis we wished to seek answers for the following questions with the help of web, email surveys taking into consideration consumer perspective, company perspective and 3rd party internet marketing agency perspective. Our survey sample was based on a small set of companies, consumers and internet marketing agencies. The survey results helped us in predicting the trends in internet marketing. We...

  17. Correlation of Internet Use for Health Care Engagement Purposes and HIV Clinical Outcomes Among HIV-Positive Individuals Using Online Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to describe cell phone and Internet use and assess the correlation of Internet use for health care engagement purposes and HIV clinical outcomes among HIV-positive individuals. The authors conducted a national survey using online social media to examine cell phone and Internet use, self-reported HIV viral load (detectable vs. undetectable), and antiretroviral adherence rating (excellent vs. less than excellent). Participants (N = 1,494) were asked about their Internet use for health care engagement purposes (including e-mailing health care providers, refilling medications online, and making medical appointments online). Approximately 95% of participants accessed the Internet nearly daily or daily in the past month (mean hours on Internet use per day = 5.2) and 55.5% used the Internet for health care engagement purposes. Those who used the Internet for any health care engagement purposes had a 1.52-fold odds of reporting an undetectable viral load (p = .009) and a 1.49-fold odds of reporting excellent adherence (p = .001). Although Internet access and use were similar across racial/ethnic, educational, and socioeconomic groups, disparities existed with the use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes among racial/ethnic minorities, those with low to moderate financial stability, lower education, and history of incarceration. The authors' data reveal that among HIV-positive users of online social media, use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes is associated with better self-reported virologic and adherence outcomes.

  18. The power of data--from data mining to consumer pricing and quality-of-care tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malof, Leah C

    2013-01-01

    Transparency tools, whether offered by carriers or third-party administrators, rely on adequate experience, by market and by service, to provide information to consumers about health care costs and quality of care. The opportunities for savings to individual consumers and to employer-sponsored health plans are clearly significant and possible if people will use the tools and act. This article reviews two studies showing a shift in consumer claims experience to less costly services afte the implementation of a transparency tool and when combined with a consumer-driven health plan. It also outlines best practices employers can implement to carefully craft interventions to engage and create value in the minds of health care consumers.

  19. Integrated Personal Health Records: Transformative Tools for Consumer-Centric Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Brian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrated personal health records (PHRs offer significant potential to stimulate transformational changes in health care delivery and self-care by patients. In 2006, an invitational roundtable sponsored by Kaiser Permanente Institute, the American Medical Informatics Association, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was held to identify the transformative potential of PHRs, as well as barriers to realizing this potential and a framework for action to move them closer to the health care mainstream. This paper highlights and builds on the insights shared during the roundtable. Discussion While there is a spectrum of dominant PHR models, (standalone, tethered, integrated, the authors state that only the integrated model has true transformative potential to strengthen consumers' ability to manage their own health care. Integrated PHRs improve the quality, completeness, depth, and accessibility of health information provided by patients; enable facile communication between patients and providers; provide access to health knowledge for patients; ensure portability of medical records and other personal health information; and incorporate auto-population of content. Numerous factors impede widespread adoption of integrated PHRs: obstacles in the health care system/culture; issues of consumer confidence and trust; lack of technical standards for interoperability; lack of HIT infrastructure; the digital divide; uncertain value realization/ROI; and uncertain market demand. Recent efforts have led to progress on standards for integrated PHRs, and government agencies and private companies are offering different models to consumers, but substantial obstacles remain to be addressed. Immediate steps to advance integrated PHRs should include sharing existing knowledge and expanding knowledge about them, building on existing efforts, and continuing dialogue among public and private sector stakeholders. Summary Integrated PHRs

  20. Information available on the internet about pain after orthognathic surgery: A careful review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Investigate the quality of data available on the internet with respect to pain after orthognathic surgery.METHODS: A careful search was conducted on the Internet in December, 2012. The most accessed websites browsers were employed for research using the terms: "pain" and "orthognathic surgery" together. The first 30 results of each portal were examined, and after applying the exclusion criteria, 29 sites remained. All remaining websites went through an evaluation process with online tools that investigated the quality, level of reading, accessibility, usability and reliability.RESULTS: Assessment criteria outcomes were considered unfavorable. Texts were considered difficult to read with inappropriate language for the general public. The mean global validation for the 29 websites of the LIDA instrument was 65.10, thereby indicating a structure of medium quality.CONCLUSION: Information about post-orthognathic surgery pain available on the internet is poorly written and unreliable. Therefore, candidates for orthognathic surgery must seek information from specialists who, in turn, should indicate reliable sources.

  1. Issues of quality and consumer rights in the health care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, C

    1998-04-01

    This Issue Brief describes how the structure of the health care market has changed in the recent years. It outlines the growth in managed care and the changes in the types of managed care plans available. In addition, it discusses the issue of quality in the health care market. It also includes an overview of the legislative topics and issues relating to quality and consumer rights that policymakers are currently considering. Growth in national health expenditures, the medical care price index, and employer health care costs has slowed significantly since 1990. This decreased growth has coincided with substantial increases in managed care plan enrollment. The percentage of employees enrolled in managed care plans increased from 48 percent to 85 percent from 1992 to 1997. Quality is a multidimensional concept. Although individuals may agree on its components, they may disagree on the relative importance of these components. Therefore, disagreement exists not only on how to measure quality but also on how it is defined. Consequently, policy decisions need to be based on an evaluation of a particular law's effect as opposed to its stated goal or intent. This distinction is important because a law that addresses access or consumer rights does not necessarily address the quality of care a consumer receives. Ultimately, whether an individual believes that a law truly addresses quality will depend in a large part on his or her subjective opinion of what quality entails. To date, comparison of the quality of managed care plans with that of fee-for-service plans has not produced results that uniformly differentiate between these two plan types in either a positive or a negative way. In addition, it is important to note that the current debate on the quality of care provided in the health care market is not new to the present managed care era. The regulations and mandates discussed in this report would not guarantee increased quality in the health care market, unless quality

  2. Exploring Consumer and Patient Knowledge, Behavior, and Attitude Toward Medicinal and Lifestyle Products Purchased From the Internet: A Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Sulaf; Thomas, Jordan; Haffar, Mohamed; Osselton, David

    2016-07-18

    In recent years, lifestyle products have emerged to help improve people's physical and mental performance. The Internet plays a major role in the spread of these products. However, the literature has reported issues regarding the authenticity of medicines purchased from the Internet and the impact of counterfeit medicines on public health. Little or no data are available on the authenticity of lifestyle products and actual toxicity associated with their use and misuse. Our aim was to investigate consumer and patient attitudes toward the purchase of lifestyle products from the Internet, their knowledge of product authenticity and toxicity, and their experiences with counterfeit lifestyle products. A Web-based study was performed between May 2014 and May 2015. Uniform collection of data was performed through an anonymous online questionnaire. Participants were invited worldwide via email, social media, or personal communication to complete the online questionnaire. A total of 320 participants completed the questionnaire. The results of the questionnaire showed that 208 (65.0%) participants purchased lifestyle products from the Internet mainly due to convenience and reduced cost. More than half (55.6%, 178/320) of participants purchased cosmetic products, whereas only a minority purchased medicinal products. Yet, 62.8% (201/320) of participants were aware of the presence of counterfeit lifestyle products from the Internet, and 11.9% (38/320) experienced counterfeit products. In only 0.9% (3/320) of those cases were counterfeit lifestyle products reported to authorities. Moreover, 7.2% (23/320) of the participants experienced adverse effects due to counterfeit lifestyle products. In summary, patients experienced counterfeit lifestyle products that resulted in adverse effects on their health. Although certain adverse effects were reported in this study, counterfeit products were underreported to authorities. Further public awareness campaigns and patient education are

  3. Are Parents Getting it Right? A Survey of Parents' Internet Use for Children's Health Care Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehora, Carolyne; Gajaria, Nisha; Stoute, Melyssa; Fracassa, Sonia; Serebale-O'Sullivan, Refilwe; Matava, Clyde T

    2015-06-22

    The use of the Internet to search for medical and health-related information is increasing and associated with concerns around quality and safety. We investigated the current use and perceptions on reliable websites for children's health information by parents. Following institutional ethics approval, we conducted a survey of parents/guardians of children presenting for day surgery. A 20-item survey instrument developed and tested by the investigators was administered. Ninety-eight percent of respondents reported that they used the Internet to search for information about their child's health. Many respondents reported beginning their search at public search engines (80%); less than 20% reported starting their search at university/hospital-based websites. Common conditions such as colds/flu, skin conditions and fever were the most frequently searched, and unique conditions directly affecting the child were second. Despite low usage levels of university/hospital-based websites for health information, the majority of respondents (74%) regarded these as providing safe, accurate, and reliable information. In contrast, only 24% of respondents regarded public search engines as providing safe and reliable information. Fifty percent of respondents reported that they cross-checked information found on the internet with a family physician. An unprecedented majority of parents and guardians are using the Internet for their child's health information. Of concern is that parents and guardians are currently not using reliable and safe sources of information. Health care providers should begin to focus on improving access to safe, accurate, and reliable information through various modalities including education, designing for multiplatform, and better search engine optimization.

  4. Can Consumers Trust Web-Based Information About Celiac Disease? Accuracy, Comprehensiveness, Transparency, and Readability of Information on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Shawna L; Donohue, Michael C; Newton, Kimberly P; Ogletree, Sandra P; Conner, Kristen K; Ingegneri, Sarah E

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects approximately 1% of the US population. Disease is characterized by damage to the small intestinal lining and malabsorption of nutrients. Celiac disease is activated in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary exposure to gluten in wheat and gluten-like proteins in rye and barley. Symptoms are diverse and include gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Treatment requires strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. The Internet is a major source of health information about celiac disease. Nonetheless, information about celiac disease that is available on various websites often is questioned by patients and other health care professionals regarding its reliability and content. Objectives To determine the accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and readability of information on 100 of the most widely accessed websites that provide information on celiac disease. Methods Using the search term celiac disease, we analyzed 100 of the top English-language websites published by academic, commercial, nonprofit, and other professional (nonacademic) sources for accuracy, comprehensiveness, transparency, and reading grade level. Each site was assessed independently by 3 reviewers. Website accuracy and comprehensiveness were probed independently using a set of objective core information about celiac disease. We used 19 general criteria to assess website transparency. Website readability was determined by the Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level. Results for each parameter were analyzed independently. In addition, we weighted and combined parameters to generate an overall score, termed website quality. Results We included 98 websites in the final analysis. Of these, 47 (48%) provided specific information about celiac disease that was less than 95% accurate (ie, the predetermined cut-off considered a minimum acceptable level of accuracy). Independent of whether the information posted was accurate, 51 of

  5. Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Consumer Health Care Spending and Risk of Catastrophic Health Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Sarah A; Eibner, Christine; Adamson, David M; Saltzman, Evan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the likely effects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on average annual consumer health care spending and the risk of catastrophic medical costs for the United States overall and in two large states that have decided not to expand their Medicaid programs (Texas and Florida). The ACA will have varied impacts on individuals' and families' spending on health care, depending on income level and on estimated 2016 insurance status without the ACA. The authors find that average out-of-pocket spending is expected to decrease for all groups considered in the analysis, although decreases in out-of-pocket spending will be largest for those who would otherwise be uninsured. People who would otherwise be uninsured who transition to the individual market under the ACA will have higher total health care spending on average after implementation of the ACA because they will now incur the cost of health insurance premiums. The authors also find that risk of catastrophic health care spending will decrease for individuals of all income levels for the insurance transitions considered; decreases will be greatest for those at the lowest income levels. Case studies found that in Texas and Florida, Medicaid expansion would substantially reduce out-of-pocket and total health care spending for those with incomes below 100 percent of the federal poverty level, compared with a scenario in which the ACA is implemented without Medicaid expansion. Expansion would reduce the risk of high medical spending for those covered under Medicaid who would remain uninsured without expansion.

  6. Helping consumers to select an appropriate long-term care insurance policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, J P

    1992-01-01

    Consumers who purchase long term care insurance policies can get good value for their money but there are several residual risks. Advisers have an important responsibility to make sure that their clients fully understand these risks. We recommend that consumers who are appropriate candidates for long term care insurance take into account the following guidelines: Make sure that a policy is bought from a well-known, financially secure company that has an A.M. Best Company rating of A or A+ or at least an A rating from Standard & Poor's. Avoid companies that have a history of consumer complaints, post-claims underwriting, high agent commissions, high lapse rates, or abuses in the Medigap market. Buy a policy with level premiums but understand that in the absence of explicit rate guarantees, premiums may be increased in the future. Seek policies that are guaranteed renewable, explicitly ensure fair access to policy upgrades, provide protection in case of late premium payments, and guarantee protection from potential changes in government benefits.

  7. Measuring consumer preference for models of diabetes care delivered by pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krass I

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of a community pharmacy disease management program for type 2 diabetes, ‘SugarCare’, was conducted. Compared with the standard care offered by pharmacists, this enhanced program offered patients closer monitoring of blood glucose levels, counselling about lifestyle, etc. The SugarCare study was funded by a grant but if the care is to continue some other method of financing must be found. Objectives: This study aimed to measure consumer preference for one of the two types of care offered in the SugarCare study, the control/standard and the intervention/enhanced service; the strength of that preference; and participants’ willingness to pay (WTP for their preferred care. Methods: SugarCare was a parallel groups, control versus intervention, repeated measures design conducted in three areas of NSW, Australia. Patients in the Intervention group (enhanced care had one initial visit to the pharmacy with six follow up visits over approximately 9 months. At these visits blood glucose was downloaded and patient care issues addressed. At the end of the service, a survey instrument was mailed to the intervention and control participants who were asked to read it and then expect a telephone call within 2 weeks of receipt. Responses were requested over the phone and the survey instrument completed by the researcher. WTP data were collected using a modified payment card method.Results: Overall, 44/75 (59%; 47%-70% 95%CI respondents expressed a preference for Scenario B (the enhanced care while 31/75 (41%; 31%-52% 95%CI preferred Scenario A (standard care however, the difference was not statistically significant. The median maximum WTP was AUD10 for the enhanced care and AUD3.50 for the standard care (p<0.03.Conclusions: While the WTP values expressed were significantly higher for the enhanced care they did not match with the cost providing that diabetes care. Discrete choice analysis has the potential to overcome some of the difficulties

  8. [The Second Health Care Market: Market Mapping Based upon Consumer Perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, T; Mühlbach, C

    2016-04-14

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to present a picture of consumers' views on the specific market of health and health products, the second German health market. Market analysis of the product categories was carried out. Methods: A large-scale representative survey (N=1 033) determined with an innovative adaptation of the repertory grid method the consumer's perspective on the specific market. Basic questions concerning attitudes to health as well as healthy behaviors completed the telephone survey. Results: In the saturated markets, market for health is growing, especially in the context of aging societies, and this is not limited to primary medical products. In this study, product categories such as "dental care", "fruit and vegetables" or "nuts" were classified as healthy products. Conclusion: The relevance of health also in the macroeconomic context has been long underestimated. Health has still a high priority for consumers. A disclosure of individual perceptions in the health context provides a significantly more relevant product design. The identification of healthy product dimensions from the consumer's perspective sheds light on the actually desired product properties and the available potential to meet these desires.

  9. Marketing of personalized cancer care on the web: an analysis of Internet websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stacy W; Cronin, Angel; Bair, Elizabeth; Lindeman, Neal; Viswanath, Vish; Janeway, Katherine A

    2015-05-01

    Internet marketing may accelerate the use of care based on genomic or tumor-derived data. However, online marketing may be detrimental if it endorses products of unproven benefit. We conducted an analysis of Internet websites to identify personalized cancer medicine (PCM) products and claims. A Delphi Panel categorized PCM as standard or nonstandard based on evidence of clinical utility. Fifty-five websites, sponsored by commercial entities, academic institutions, physicians, research institutes, and organizations, that marketed PCM included somatic (58%) and germline (20%) analysis, interpretive services (15%), and physicians/institutions offering personalized care (44%). Of 32 sites offering somatic analysis, 56% included specific test information (range 1-152 tests). All statistical tests were two-sided, and comparisons of website content were conducted using McNemar's test. More websites contained information about the benefits than limitations of PCM (85% vs 27%, P analysis were statistically significantly more likely to market one or more nonstandard tests as compared with standard tests (88% vs 44%, P = .04).

  10. Harnessing and supporting consumer involvement in the development and implementation of Models of Care for musculoskeletal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Louisa; Hill, Sophie; Wluka, Anita E; Brooks, Peter; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Cahill, Ainslie; Dans, Leonila F; Lowe, Dianne; Taylor, Michael; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Consumer involvement in the design and delivery of their healthcare is an integral strategy to ensure that health services and systems meet consumers' needs. This is also true for the design and delivery of Models of Care. This chapter presents the identified healthcare needs of people with musculoskeletal conditions and focuses on the current systematic review evidence for consumer involvement interventions in musculoskeletal Models of Care across the micro, meso and macro levels of healthcare. This chapter also presents three case studies of consumer involvement in different aspects of healthcare, offers a series of practice points to help translate the systematic review evidence into practice, and also provides direction to available resources, which support the implementation of consumer involvement within Models of Care.

  11. Anamneses-Based Internet Information Supply: Can a Combination of an Expert System and Meta-Search Engine Help Consumers find the Health Information they Require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honekamp, Wilfried; Ostermann, Herwig

    2010-04-09

    An increasing number of people search for health information online. During the last 10 years various researchers have determined the requirements for an ideal consumer health information system. The aim of this study was to figure out, whether medical laymen can find a more accurate diagnosis for a given anamnesis via the developed prototype health information system than via ordinary internet search.In a randomized controlled trial, the prototype information system was evaluated by the assessment of two sample cases. Participants had to determine the diagnosis of a patient with a headache via information found searching the web. A patient's history sheet and a computer with internet access were provided to the participants and they were guided through the study by an especially designed study website. The intervention group used the prototype information system; the control group used common search engines and portals. The numbers of correct diagnoses in each group were compared.A total of 140 (60/80) participants took part in two study sections. In the first case, which determined a common diagnosis, both groups did equally well. In the second section, which determined a less common and more complex case, the intervention group did significantly better (P=0.031) due to the tailored information supply.Using medical expert systems in combination with a portal searching meta-search engine represents a feasible strategy to provide reliable patient-tailored information and can ultimately contribute to patient safety with respect to information found via the internet.

  12. Research on Consumer Behavior in Mobile Internet%移动互联网环境下消费者行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖卫红

    2013-01-01

    The paper compares with consumer behavior characteristics,influence factors,decision making process and behavior mode in traditional market environment and internet.According to precise interaction,personalized features on e commerce,the paper sums up,summarizes and constructs consumer behavior characteristics,influence factors,decision making process model and behavior model on mobile internet.%比较传统市场环境和传统互联网环境下消费者行为特征、影响因素、决策过程与行为模式,根据移动互联网环境下电子商务精准互动、个性化超强等特征,归纳、总结、构建出移动互联网环境下消费者行为特点、影响因素、消费决策过程模型与消费行为模型.

  13. Using diffusion of innovation theory to understand the factors impacting patient acceptance and use of consumer e-health innovations: a case study in a primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Ping; Yan, Jun; Ton A M Spil, Ir

    2015-02-21

    Consumer e-Health is a potential solution to the problems of accessibility, quality and costs of delivering public healthcare services to patients. Although consumer e-Health has proliferated in recent years, it remains unclear if patients are willing and able to accept and use this new and rapidly developing technology. Therefore, the aim of this research is to study the factors influencing patients' acceptance and usage of consumer e-health innovations. A simple but typical consumer e-health innovation--an e-appointment scheduling service--was developed and implemented in a primary health care clinic in a regional town in Australia. A longitudinal case study was undertaken for 29 months after system implementation. The major factors influencing patients' acceptance and use of the e-appointment service were examined through the theoretical lens of Rogers' innovation diffusion theory. Data were collected from the computer log records of 25,616 patients who visited the medical centre in the entire study period, and from in-depth interviews with 125 patients. The study results show that the overall adoption rate of the e-appointment service increased slowly from 1.5% at 3 months after implementation, to 4% at 29 months, which means only the 'innovators' had used this new service. The majority of patients did not adopt this innovation. The factors contributing to the low the adoption rate were: (1) insufficient communication about the e-appointment service to the patients, (2) lack of value of the e-appointment service for the majority of patients who could easily make phone call-based appointment, and limitation of the functionality of the e-appointment service, (3) incompatibility of the new service with the patients' preference for oral communication with receptionists, and (4) the limitation of the characteristics of the patients, including their low level of Internet literacy, lack of access to a computer or the Internet at home, and a lack of experience with

  14. Context-Sensitive Spelling Correction of Consumer-Generated Content on Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofang; Zheng, An; Yin, Jiaheng; Chen, Rudan; Zhao, Xianyang; Xu, Wei; Cheng, Wenqing; Xia, Tian; Lin, Simon

    2015-07-31

    Consumer-generated content, such as postings on social media websites, can serve as an ideal source of information for studying health care from a consumer's perspective. However, consumer-generated content on health care topics often contains spelling errors, which, if not corrected, will be obstacles for downstream computer-based text analysis. In this study, we proposed a framework with a spelling correction system designed for consumer-generated content and a novel ontology-based evaluation system which was used to efficiently assess the correction quality. Additionally, we emphasized the importance of context sensitivity in the correction process, and demonstrated why correction methods designed for electronic medical records (EMRs) failed to perform well with consumer-generated content. First, we developed our spelling correction system based on Google Spell Checker. The system processed postings acquired from MedHelp, a biomedical bulletin board system (BBS), and saved misspelled words (eg, sertaline) and corresponding corrected words (eg, sertraline) into two separate sets. Second, to reduce the number of words needing manual examination in the evaluation process, we respectively matched the words in the two sets with terms in two biomedical ontologies: RxNorm and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine -- Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT). The ratio of words which could be matched and appropriately corrected was used to evaluate the correction system's overall performance. Third, we categorized the misspelled words according to the types of spelling errors. Finally, we calculated the ratio of abbreviations in the postings, which remarkably differed between EMRs and consumer-generated content and could largely influence the overall performance of spelling checkers. An uncorrected word and the corresponding corrected word was called a spelling pair, and the two words in the spelling pair were its members. In our study, there were 271 spelling pairs detected, among

  15. Closing the digital divide in HIV/AIDS care: development of a theory-based intervention to increase Internet access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, S C; Weinhardt, L; Benotsch, E; Cherry, C

    2002-08-01

    Advances in information technology are revolutionizing medical patient education and the Internet is becoming a major source of information for people with chronic medical conditions, including HIV/AIDS. However, many AIDS patients do not have equal access to the Internet and are therefore at an information disadvantage, particularly minorities, persons of low-income levels and individuals with limited education. This paper describes the development and pilot testing of a workshop-style intervention designed to close the digital divide in AIDS care. Grounded in the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model of health behaviour change, we developed an intervention for persons with no prior history of using the Internet. The intervention included instruction in using hardware and search engines, motivational enhancement to increase interest and perceived relevance of the Internet, and skills for critically evaluating and using health information accessed via the Internet. Participants were also introduced to communication and support functions of the Internet including e-mail, newsgroups and chat groups. Pilot testing demonstrated feasibility, acceptability and promise for closing the digital divide in HIV/AIDS care using a relatively brief and intensive theory-based intervention that could be implemented in community settings.

  16. The Association Between Internet Use and Ambulatory Care-Seeking Behaviors in Taiwan: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ronan Wenhan; Chen, Likwang; Chen, Tsung-Fu; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Lin, Tzu-Bin; Chen, Yen-Yuan; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-12-07

    Compared with the traditional ways of gaining health-related information from newspapers, magazines, radio, and television, the Internet is inexpensive, accessible, and conveys diverse opinions. Several studies on how increasing Internet use affected outpatient clinic visits were inconclusive. The objective of this study was to examine the role of Internet use on ambulatory care-seeking behaviors as indicated by the number of outpatient clinic visits after adjusting for confounding variables. We conducted this study using a sample randomly selected from the general population in Taiwan. To handle the missing data, we built a multivariate logistic regression model for propensity score matching using age and sex as the independent variables. The questionnaires with no missing data were then included in a multivariate linear regression model for examining the association between Internet use and outpatient clinic visits. We included a sample of 293 participants who answered the questionnaire with no missing data in the multivariate linear regression model. We found that Internet use was significantly associated with more outpatient clinic visits (P=.04). The participants with chronic diseases tended to make more outpatient clinic visits (PInternet may be associated with patients' increasing need for interpreting and discussing the information with health care professionals, thus resulting in an increasing number of outpatient clinic visits. In addition, the media literacy of Web-based health-related information seekers may also affect their ambulatory care-seeking behaviors, such as outpatient clinic visits.

  17. Price-transparency and cost accounting: challenges for health care organizations in the consumer-driven era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenrath, Peter; Eakin, Cynthia; Fischer, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Health care reform is directed toward improving access and quality while containing costs. An essential part of this is improvement of pricing models to more accurately reflect the costs of providing care. Transparent prices that reflect costs are necessary to signal information to consumers and producers. This information is central in a consumer-driven marketplace. The rapid increase in high deductible insurance and other forms of cost sharing incentivizes the search for price information. The organizational ability to measure costs across a cycle of care is an integral component of creating value, and will play a greater role as reimbursements transition to episode-based care, value-based purchasing, and accountable care organization models. This article discusses use of activity-based costing (ABC) to better measure the cost of health care. It describes examples of ABC in health care organizations and discusses impediments to adoption in the United States including cultural and institutional barriers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Primary health-care nurses and Internet health information-seeking: Access, barriers and quality checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Jean; Strong, Alison; Chan, Helen; Hanna, Sue; Huntington, Annette

    2016-02-01

    Online information is a critical resource for evidence-based practice and patient education. This study aimed to establish New Zealand nurses' access and evaluation of online health information in the primary care context using a postal questionnaire survey; there were 630 respondents from a random sample of 931 nurses. The majority of respondents were satisfied with work access to online information (84.5%, n = 501) and searched for online information at least several times a week (57.5%, n = 343). The major barrier to online information seeking was insufficient time, but 68 respondents had no work online information access. The level of nursing qualification was significantly correlated with computer confidence and information quality checking. A range of information evaluation approaches was used. Most nurses in study accessed and evaluated Internet information in contrast to the findings of earlier studies, but there were barriers preventing universal integration into practice.

  19. Consumers' willingness to buy food via the Internet: A review of the litterature and a model for future research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    , consumer, firm and environment are distinguished. In order to draw the various results together and provide a coherent framework for future research, we then propose a model which combines the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the lifestyle construct. The model can be used to analyse how beliefs affecting...

  20. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  1. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Jorge; Oliveira, Tiago

    2016-03-02

    The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today's user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals.

  2. The importance of quality, access and price to health care consumers in Bulgaria: a self-explicated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Milena; Groot, Wim; van Merode, Godefridus

    2003-01-01

    One approach to the problem of low patient satisfaction in Bulgaria is to identify attributes of health care services that the consumers value most and to focus on their improvement. Based on data from a household survey, this paper examines the importance that health care consumers attach to quality, access and price. The survey was conducted in 2000 among the population of the region of Varna (the third largest city in Bulgaria). The elicitation of attribute importance was based on a self-explicated method. To analyse the data, an ordered logit regression was performed. The analysis shows that clinical quality is the most valued characteristic by Bulgarian health care consumers compared with social quality, access and price. Given the poor quality of health care provision in Bulgaria, the allocation of revenues to its improvement appears to be essential in order to raise patient satisfaction and to enhance social efficiency.

  3. Affect the Development of Mobile Internet Consumer Market for Hospital Drugs%移动互联网的发展对医院药品消费市场的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    院江丽; 张寒娟; 相湘

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of the development of mobile Internet, the consumer market for hospital drugs.Methods Analyzed according to the literature, the current situation of China's pharmaceutical consumer market, mobile Internet medicine electricity supplier model, advantages, the development bottleneck.ResultsChina's mobile Internet medicine electricity supplier is stil in the pilot phase, the impact on hospital drug consumption market is stil smal, but the momentum of rapid development, with a bright future.Conclusion Expect countries to further support the pharmaceutical manufacturers in the mobile policy, open hospitals and health care system electronic prescription, online sales of prescription drugs ban, wil promote competition in the overal pharmaceutical market fuly promote medical separation, resolved to hold down prices, the people and expensive, drugs to support medical and other aspects of the problem.%目的:探讨移动互联网的发展对医院药品消费市场的影响。方法根据文献,对我国药品消费市场的现状,移动互联网医药电商的模式、优势、发展瓶颈进行分析。结果我国移动互联网医药电商目前还处于试点阶段,对医院药品消费市场的影响还很小,但发展势头迅猛,前景可期。结论期望国家在政策上进一步支持医药移动电商,开放医院电子处方和医保系统,解禁网上处方药的销售,必将促进整个医药市场的充分竞争,促进医药分开,解决药价虚高,百姓看病贵,以药养医等方面的问题。

  4. An Analysis on New Development Trend of Consumer Finance under the Background of Internet Finance%互联网金融背景下消费金融发展新趋势分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶湘榕

    2015-01-01

    Consumer finance is an important means of stimulating consumption and stabilizing economic growth. Un-der the background of internet finance, there is a new development trend for consumer finance, that is, the Internet companies represented by giant E-business companies are actively involved in consumer finance markets and the tra-ditional consumer financial institutions become internet-enabled. The impact of Internet consumer finance upon the consumer financial market mainly is to change market pattern, expand the scale of market and improve the efficiency of market. The proposal is as follows: to improve the law and credit environment, encourage companies to explore various Internet consumer finance patterns, and implement functional and differential regulation.%消费金融是刺激消费、稳定经济增长的一种重要手段。在互联网金融背景下,消费金融发展出现新趋势,以电商巨头为代表的互联网企业积极介入消费金融市场,传统消费金融机构纷纷“触网”。互联网消费金融对消费金融市场的影响主要是:改变市场格局,扩大市场规模,提高市场效率。建议完善法律及信用环境,鼓励探索各种互联网消费金融模式,实行功能化和差异化监管。

  5. Getting satisfaction: drivers of surgical Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health care Providers and Systems survey scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, James C; Kahn, Steven A; Zhang, Linlin; Gestring, Mark L; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T

    2015-07-01

    Hospital consumer assessment of health care providers and systems (HCAHPS) survey scores formally recognize that patients are central to health care, shifting quality metrics from the physician to patient perspective. This study describes clinical predictors of patient satisfaction in surgical patients. Analysis of a single institution's Surgical Department HCAHPS responses was performed from March 2011-October 2012. The end points were top box satisfaction on two global domains. Multivariable regression was used to determine satisfaction predictors including HCAHPS domains, demographics, and clinical variables such as comorbidities, intensive care unit stay, emergency case, discharge day, floor transfers, complications, and ancillary procedures. In total, 978 surveys were evaluated representing admissions to Acute care and/or Trauma (n = 177, 18.1%), Thoracic (n = 169, 17.3%), Colorectal (n = 107, 10.9%), Transplant (n = 95, 9.7%), Vascular (n = 92, 9.4%), Oncology (n = 88, 9.0%), Plastic (n = 49, 5.0%), and Cardiac (n = 201, 20.6%) divisions. Overall, 658 patients (67.3%) had high satisfaction and 733 (74.9%) gave definite hospital recommendations. Hospital satisfaction was positively associated with an intensive care unit admission (odds ratio [OR] = 1.64, confidence interval [CI]: 1.20-2.23, P = 0.002) and satisfaction with provider and pain domains. Factors associated with decreased satisfaction were race (non-black minority compared with whites; OR = 0.41, CI: 0.21-0.83, P = 0.012), self-reported poor health (OR = 0.43, CI: 0.27-0.68, P nurse-patient interactions. These results help inform future quality improvement and resource allocation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of the expanded Creme RIFM consumer exposure model to fragrance ingredients in cosmetic, personal care and air care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, B; Api, A M; Barratt, C; Comiskey, D; Ellis, G; McNamara, C; O'Mahony, C; Robison, S; Rose, J; Smith, B; Tozer, S

    2017-06-01

    As part of a joint project between the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials (RIFM) and Creme Global, a Monte Carlo model (here named the Creme RIFM model) has been developed to estimate consumer exposure to ingredients in personal care products. Details of the model produced in Phase 1 of the project have already been published. Further data on habits and practises have been collected which enable the model to estimate consumer exposure from dermal, oral and inhalation routes for 25 product types. . In addition, more accurate concentration data have been obtained which allow levels of fragrance ingredients in these product types to be modelled. Described is the use of this expanded model to estimate aggregate systemic exposure for eight fragrance ingredients. Results are shown for simulated systemic exposure (expressed as μg/kg bw/day) for each fragrance ingredient in each product type, along with simulated aggregate exposure. Highest fragrance exposure generally occurred from use of body lotions, body sprays and hydroalcoholic products. For the fragrances investigated, aggregate exposure calculated using this model was 11.5-25 fold lower than that calculated using deterministic methodology. The Creme RIFM model offers a very comprehensive and powerful tool for estimating aggregate exposure to fragrance ingredients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Smokers' attitudes and behaviors related to consumer demand for cessation counseling in the medical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Deanne; Wolff, Lisa S; Orleans, Tracy; Mockenhaupt, Robin E; Massett, Holly A; Vose, Kathryn Kahler

    2007-05-01

    This study describes a new segmentation strategy exploring smokers' interest levels in counseling in the medical care setting in order to understand how public health communications can be designed to increase consumer demand for cessation services within this population. A subsample of 431 smokers from a large, nationally representative mail survey was analyzed and categorized into three cessation-demand groups: Low demand (LD), medium demand (MD), and high demand (HD). HD smokers were most likely to be heavy smokers, to make quitting a high priority, and to have self-efficacy in quitting. MD and LD smokers were less likely than HD smokers to have been told to quit smoking by a health care provider in the past or to believe that counseling is effective. The first step in the regression analysis revealed that age, cigarettes smoked per month, whether smokers were currently trying to quit, and whether they were ever told to quit smoking by their health care provider accounted for 21% of the variance in smokers' interest in smoking cessation counseling, F(4, 234) = 16.49, pconsumer demand for cessation counseling.

  8. Health literacy in the urgent care setting: What factors impact consumer comprehension of health information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Traci L; Morris, Nancy J

    2017-05-01

    An increasing number of Americans are using urgent care (UC) clinics due to: improved health insurance coverage, the need to decrease cost, primary care offices with limited appointment availability, and a desire for convenient care. Patients are treated by providers they may not know for episodic illness or injuries while in pain or not feeling well. Treatment instructions and follow-up directions are provided quickly. To examine health literacy in the adult UC population and identify patient characteristics associated with health literacy risk. As part of a larger cross-sectional study, UC patients seen between October 2013 and January 2014 completed a demographic questionnaire and the Newest Vital Sign. Descriptive, nonparametric analyses, and a multinomial logistic regression were done to assess health literacy, associated and predictive factors. A total of 57.5% of 285 participants had adequate health literacy. The likelihood of limited health literacy was associated with increased age (p literacy is common in a suburban UC setting, increasing the risk that consumers may not understand vital health information. Clear provider communication and confirmation of comprehension of discharge instructions for self-management is essential to optimize outcomes for UC patients. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. The Association Between Internet Use and Ambulatory Care-Seeking Behaviors in Taiwan: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsung-Fu; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Lin, Tzu-Bin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Background Compared with the traditional ways of gaining health-related information from newspapers, magazines, radio, and television, the Internet is inexpensive, accessible, and conveys diverse opinions. Several studies on how increasing Internet use affected outpatient clinic visits were inconclusive. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the role of Internet use on ambulatory care-seeking behaviors as indicated by the number of outpatient clinic visits after adjusting for confounding variables. Methods We conducted this study using a sample randomly selected from the general population in Taiwan. To handle the missing data, we built a multivariate logistic regression model for propensity score matching using age and sex as the independent variables. The questionnaires with no missing data were then included in a multivariate linear regression model for examining the association between Internet use and outpatient clinic visits. Results We included a sample of 293 participants who answered the questionnaire with no missing data in the multivariate linear regression model. We found that Internet use was significantly associated with more outpatient clinic visits (P=.04). The participants with chronic diseases tended to make more outpatient clinic visits (P<.01). Conclusions The inconsistent quality of health-related information obtained from the Internet may be associated with patients’ increasing need for interpreting and discussing the information with health care professionals, thus resulting in an increasing number of outpatient clinic visits. In addition, the media literacy of Web-based health-related information seekers may also affect their ambulatory care-seeking behaviors, such as outpatient clinic visits. PMID:27927606

  10. Evaluation of Internet-Based Technology for Supporting Self-Care: Problems Encountered by Patients and Caregivers When Using Self-Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, N.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Boer, Hendrik; Steehouder, M.F.; Seydel, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Prior studies have shown that many patients are interested in Internet-based technology that enables them to control their own care. As a result, innovative eHealth services are evolving rapidly, including self-assessment tools and secure patient-caregiver email communication. It is

  11. Evaluation of Internet-Based Technology for Supporting Self-Care: Problems Encountered by Patients and Caregivers When Using Self-Care Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Nicol; Gemert-Pijnen, van Julia; Boer, Henk; Steehouder, Michael F.; Seydel, Erwin R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Prior studies have shown that many patients are interested in Internet-based technology that enables them to control their own care. As a result, innovative eHealth services are evolving rapidly, including self-assessment tools and secure patient-caregiver email communication. It is inte

  12. Reporting quality of nursing home care to consumers: the Maryland experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattke, Sören; Reilly, Karen; Martinez-Vidal, Enrique; McLean, Barbara; Gifford, David

    2003-04-01

    To design and implement a reporting system for quality of long-term care to empower consumers and to create incentives for quality improvement. To identify a model to approach this technically and politically difficult task. Establishment of a credible and transparent decision process using a public forum. Development of the system based on: (1) review of the literature and existing systems, and discussions with stakeholders about strengths and weaknesses; (2) focus on consumer preferences in the design; and (3) responsiveness to industry concerns in the implementation. None of the existing systems appeared to be a suitable model. We decided to develop an entirely new system based on three key design principles that allowed us to tailor the system to consumer needs: (1) designing a decision tool rather than a database; (2) summarizing rather than simplifying information; and (3) accounting for the target audience in the creative execution. Industry concerns focused on the burden of the system, the potential for errors, and the possible communication of a negative impression of the industry. As methodological and data limitations prevented us from resolving those concerns, we addressed them by using cautionary language in the presentation and by making a commitment to incorporate improvements in the future. All stakeholders regarded the final design as an acceptable compromise. Despite its potentially controversial nature and many methodological challenges, the system has been well received by both the public and the industry. We attribute this success to two key factors: a collaborative decision process, in which all critical design and execution choices were laid out explicitly and debated with stakeholders in a public forum, and realism and honesty regarding the limitations of the system.

  13. A Ubiquitous Chronic Disease Care system using cellular phones and the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, H J; Park, M S; Kim, T N; Yang, S J; Cho, G J; Hwang, T G; Baik, S H; Choi, D S; Park, G H; Choi, K M

    2009-06-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of chronic diseases is an important challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. To improve the quality and efficiency of chronic disease care, we investigated the effectiveness and applicability of the Ubiquitous Chronic Disease Care (UCDC) system using cellular phones and the internet for overweight patients with both Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial over 3 months that included 123 patients at a university hospital and a community public health centre. After 12 weeks, there were significant improvements in HbA(1c) in the intervention group (7.6 +/- 0.9% to 7.1 +/- 0.8%, P < 0.001) compared with the control group (7.4 +/- 0.9% to 7.6 +/- 1.0%, P = 0.03). Furthermore, we observed a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as improvements in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the intervention group. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in adiponectin levels in the intervention group compared with the control group, although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels did not change in either group. The novel UCDC system presented in this paper improved multiple metabolic parameters simultaneously in overweight patients with both Type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

  14. Early experience with digital advance care planning and directives, a novel consumer-driven program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Robert L; Yang, Zhiyong; Spivey, Christy; Boardman, Bonnie; Courtney, Maureen

    2016-07-01

    Barriers to traditional advance care planning (ACP) and advance directive (AD) creation have limited the promise of ACP/AD for individuals and families, the healthcare team, and society. Our objectives were to determine the results of a digital ACP/AD through which consumers create, store, locate, and retrieve their ACP/AD at no charge and with minimal physician involvement, and the ACP/AD can be integrated into the electronic health record. The authors chose 900 users of MyDirectives, a digital ACP/AD tool, to achieve proportional representation of all 50 states by population size and then reviewed their responses. The 900 participants had an average age of 50.8 years (SD = 16.6); 84% of the men and 91% of the women were in self-reported good health when signing their ADs. Among the respondents, 94% wanted their physicians to consult a supportive and palliative care team if they were seriously ill; nearly 85% preferred cessation of life-sustaining treatments during their final days; 76% preferred to spend their final days at home or in a hospice; and 70% would accept attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in limited circumstances. Most respondents wanted an autopsy under certain conditions, and 62% wished to donate their organs. In conclusion, analysis of early experience with this ACP/AD platform demonstrates that individuals of different ages and conditions can engage in an interrogatory process about values, develop ADs that are more nuanced than traditional paper-based ADs in reflecting those values, and easily make changes to their ADs. Online ADs have the potential to remove barriers to ACP/AD and thus further improve patient-centered end-of-life care.

  15. Consumer inhalation exposure to formaldehyde from the use of personal care products/cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Marc-André; Meuling, Wim J A; Engel, Roel; Coroama, Manuela C; Renner, Gerald; Pape, Wolfgang; Nohynek, Gerhard J

    2012-06-01

    We measured consumer exposure to formaldehyde (FA) from personal care products (PCP) containing FA-releasing preservatives. Six study subjects applied facial moisturiser, foundation, shower gel, shampoo, deodorant, hair conditioner, hair styling gel or body lotion at the 90th percentile amount of EU PCP consumer use. FA air concentrations were measured in the empty room, in the presence of study subjects prior to PCP use, and for one hour (breathing zone, area monitoring) after PCP use. The mean FA air concentration in the empty bathroom was 1.32 ± 0.67 μg/m³, in the presence of subjects it was 2.33 ± 0.86 μg/m³). Except for body lotion and hair conditioner (6.2 ± 0.1.9 or 4.5 ± 0.1.5 μg/m³, respectively), mean 1-h FA air concentrations after PCP use were similar to background. Peak FA air concentrations, ranging from baseline values (2.2 μg/m³; shower gel) to 11.5 μg/m³ (body lotion), occurred during 0-5 to 5-10 min after PCP use. Despite of exaggerated exposure conditions, FA air levels were a fraction of those considered to be safe (120 μg/m³), occurring in indoor air (22-124 μg/m³) or expired human breath (1.4-87 μg/m³). Overall, our data yielded evidence that inhalation of FA from the use of PCP containing FA-releasers poses no risk to human health.

  16. The Affordable Care Act's plan for consumer assistance with insurance moves states forward but remains a work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Rachel; Schlesinger, Mark; Davis, Sarah; Cohen, Deborah; Lapps, Joshua

    2013-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides support for state-run consumer assistance programs to help privately insured consumers who experience problems with their coverage. Its provisions signify the first national commitment to such assistance and to using cases aggregated by these state programs to inform policy. We interviewed state-level administrators and analyzed program documents to assess whether federal support for state-run consumer assistance programs achieved certain goals. We found that some federally supported programs made substantial progress in supporting and empowering patients by reorienting state agencies to become active advocates for their citizens. Yet progress across the country was inconsistent, and there was little evidence that programs addressed systemic problems experienced by consumers. On balance, the consumer assistance provisions of health care reform do not yet ensure protection for all privately insured Americans because of uneven implementation-a problem likely to be of further concern as coverage is expanded and health insurance exchanges come on line in 2014. At the same time, the demonstrated impact of consumer assistance programs in the most innovative states is arguably a useful "proof of concept" for this young federal program.

  17. The Pastoral Care of International Students in New Zealand: Is It More Than a Consumer Protection Regime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawir, Erlenawati; Marginson, Simon; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby; Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity

    2009-01-01

    Student security is a composite social practice that includes the domains of consumer rights, entitlement to a range of welfare supports and pastoral care, and freedom from exploitation and discrimination. Three traditions shape the systems used for managing and regulating international student security in the nations that export education:…

  18. The Links among Perceived Adherence to the System of Care Philosophy, Consumer Satisfaction, and Improvements in Child Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Kelly N.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the associations among perceived adherence to the system of care philosophy, changes in internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and consumer satisfaction with services. Participants included 98 families, interviewed at two time points across a one-year period. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that the…

  19. Evaluation of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals : Effects on mental health consumer outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilrycx, G.K.M.L.; Croon, M.A.; van den Broek, A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effects of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals on mental health consumer outcomes. Methods: The Mental Health Recovery Measure (MHRM) and the Recovery-Promoting Relationship Scale (RPRS) were administered to a sample of 142

  20. Primary care physicians’ experiences of carrying out consultations on the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran Umefjord

    2004-05-01

    Conclusions We conclude that the GPs studied experienced their new role as internet doctors mainly in a positive way, with some limitations. With the increase in consultations on the internet, training in this technique should be integrated into the curricula of medical schools and of continuous professional development (CPD.

  1. Parental use of the Internet to seek health information and primary care utilisation for their child: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migeot Virginie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using the Internet to seek health information is becoming more common. Its consequences on health care utilisation are hardly known in the general population, in particular among children whose parents seek health information on the Internet. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between parental use of the Internet to seek health information and primary care utilisation for their child. Methods This cross-sectional survey has been carried out in a population of parents of pre-school children in France. The main outcome measure was the self-reported number of primary care consultations for the child, according to parental use of the Internet to seek health information, adjusted for the characteristics of the parents and their child respectively, and parental use of other health information sources. Results A total of 1 068 out of 2 197 questionnaires were returned (response rate of 49%. No association was found between parental use of the Internet to seek health information and the number of consultations within the last 12 months for their child. Variables related to the number of primary care consultations were characteristics of the child (age, medical conditions, homeopathic treatment, parental characteristics (occupation, income, stress level and consultation of other health information sources (advice from pharmacist, relatives. Conclusion We did not find any relationship between parental use of the Internet to seek health information and primary care utilisation for children. The Internet seems to be used as a supplement to health services rather than as a replacement.

  2. Internet and social media for health-related information and communication in health care: preferences of the Dutch general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Belt, Tom H; Engelen, Lucien J L P G; Berben, Sivera A A; Teerenstra, Steven; Samsom, Melvin; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2013-10-02

    Health care is increasingly featured by the use of Web 2.0 communication and collaborative technologies that are reshaping the way patients and professionals interact. These technologies or tools can be used for a variety of purposes: to instantly debate issues, discover news, analyze research, network with peers, crowd-source information, seek support, and provide advice. Not all tools are implemented successfully; in many cases, the nonusage attrition rates are high. Little is known about the preferences of the Dutch general population regarding the use of the Internet and social media in health care. To determine the preferences of the general population in the Netherlands regarding the use of the Internet and social media in health care. A cross-sectional survey was disseminated via a popular Dutch online social network. Respondents were asked where they searched for health-related information, how they qualified the value of different sources, and their preferences regarding online communication with health care providers. Results were weighed for the Dutch population based on gender, age, and level of education using official statistics. Numbers and percentages or means and standard deviations were presented for different subgroups. One-way ANOVA was used to test for statistical differences. The survey was completed by 635 respondents. The Internet was found to be the number one source for health-related information (82.7%), closely followed by information provided by health care professionals (71.1%). Approximately one-third (32.3%) of the Dutch population search for ratings of health care providers. The most popular information topics were side effects of medication (62.5%) and symptoms (59.7%). Approximately one-quarter of the Dutch population prefer to communicate with a health care provider via social media (25.4%), and 21.2% would like to communicate via a webcam. The Internet is the main source of health-related information for the Dutch population

  3. Keep in Touch (KIT): feasibility of using internet-based communication and information technology in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaohong; Cann, Beverley; McClement, Susan; Thompson, Genevieve; Chochinov, Harvey Max

    2017-05-06

    Confinement to an in-patient hospital ward impairs patients' sense of social support and connectedness. Providing the means, through communication technology, for patients to maintain contact with friends and family can potentially improve well-being at the end of life by minimizing social isolation and facilitating social connection. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of introducing internet-based communication and information technologies for in-patients and their families and to describe their experience in using this technology. A cross-sectional survey design was used to describe patient and family member experiences in using internet-based communication technology and health care provider views of using such technology in palliative care. Participants included 13 palliative in-patients, 38 family members, and 14 health care providers. An iPad or a laptop computer with password-protected internet access was loaned to each patient and family member for about two weeks or they used their own electronic devices for the duration of the patient's stay. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from patients, families, and health care providers to discern how patients and families used the technology, its ease of use and its impact. Descriptive statistics and paired sample t-tests were used to analyze quantitative data; qualitative data were analyzed using constant comparative techniques. Palliative patients and family members used the technology to keep in touch with family and friends, entertain themselves, look up information, or accomplish tasks. Most participants found the technology easy to use and reported that it helped them feel better overall, connected to others and calm. The availability of competent, respectful, and caring technical support personnel was highly valued by patients and families. Health care providers identified that computer technology helped patients and families keep others informed about the patient's condition, enabled

  4. Keep in touch (KIT): perspectives on introducing internet-based communication and information technologies in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaohong; Cann, Beverley; McClement, Susan; Thompson, Genevieve; Chochinov, Harvey Max

    2016-08-02

    Hospitalized palliative patients need to keep in touch with their loved ones. Regular social contact may be especially difficult for individuals on palliative care in-patient units due to the isolating nature of hospital settings. Technology can help mitigate isolation by facilitating social connection. This study aimed to explore the acceptability of introducing internet-based communication and information technologies for patients on a palliative care in-patient unit. In the first phase of the Keep in Touch (KIT) project, a diverse group of key informants were consulted regarding their perspectives on web-based communication on in-patient palliative care units. Participants included palliative patients, family members, direct care providers, communication and information technology experts, and institutional administrators. Data was collected through focus groups, interviews and drop-in consultations, and was analyzed for themes, consensus, and major differences across participant groups. Hospitalized palliative patients and their family members described the challenges of keeping in touch with family and friends. Participants identified numerous examples of ways that communication and information technologies could benefit patients' quality of life and care. Patients and family members saw few drawbacks associated with the use of such technology. While generally supportive, direct care providers were concerned that patient requests for assistance in using the technology would place increased demands on their time. Administrators and IT experts recognized issues such as privacy and costs related to offering these technologies throughout an organization and in the larger health care system. This study affirmed the acceptability of offering internet-based communication and information technologies on palliative care in-patient units. It provides the foundation for trialing these technologies on a palliative in-patient unit. Further study is needed to confirm the

  5. Linking Internet strategy to high-quality, cost-effective managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, T R

    2000-01-01

    This article describes an experimental pilot project incorporating e-commerce and the Internet into the traditional process of health benefit negotiations through the utilization of an HMO Internet auction. The timeline and process of the auction are described, with the final auction taking place during the last week of negotiations. The results reveal an efficient and effective system to augment the traditional benefit negotiation process.

  6. Consumer-oriented innovation in the food and personal care products sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Sonne, Anne-Mette

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we clarify the concept of consumer-oriented innovation in the food and personal products sectors and define it as a process towards the development of a new product or service in which an integrated analysis and understanding of consumers wants, needs and preference formation play...

  7. Tailor-made finance versus tailor-made care. Can the state strengthen consumer choice in healthcare by reforming the financial structure of long-term care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grit, K; de Bont, A

    2010-02-01

    Policy instruments based on the working of markets have been introduced to empower consumers of healthcare. However, it is still not easy to become a critical consumer of healthcare. The aim of this study is to analyse the possibilities of the state to strengthen the position of patients with the aid of a new financial regime, such as personal health budgets. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with executives, managers, professionals and client representatives of six long-term care institutions. With the introduction of individual budgets the responsibility for budgetary control has shifted from the organisational level to the individual level in the caregiver-client relationship. Having more luxurious care on offer necessitates a stronger demarcation of regular care because organisations cannot simultaneously offer extra care as part of the standard care package. New financial instruments have an impact on the culture of receiving and giving care. Distributive justice takes on new meaning with the introduction of financial market mechanisms in healthcare; the distributing principle of 'need' is transformed into the principle of 'economic demand'. Financial instruments not only act as a countervailing power against providers insufficiently client-oriented, but are also used by providers to reinforce their own positions vis-à-vis demanding clients. Tailor-made finance is not the same as tailor-made care.

  8. Influence of non-economic factors in the use of personal care products: the case of male Peruvian consumer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Regalado Pezúa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the supply of male personal care products and services has increased considerably on a global scale. In the case of the Peruvian market, this phenomenon is still incipient despite a favorable economic outlook that has boosted the consumption in different categories. This research identifies factors that influence the consumption decision of this kind of products for the male segment. To do this, the authors used the Theory of Planned Behavior of Ajzen. The results show that male consumers´ perception of his environment (subjective norm restrains the intention of consumption of personal care products, even though the male consumer has a positive attitude toward using of these products. These factors would reflect the existence of deeply rooted taboos in Peruvian culture, based on a traditional view of man.

  9. Targeting Medicare consumers. Managed care providers can make inroads by understanding preference and cost-sensitivity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensrud, J; Sylvestre, E; Sivadas, E

    1997-01-01

    The authors' conjoint study provided valuable information on the preferences of the hugh Medicare-eligible and soon-to-be-eligible markets. Leading the list were hospitalization coverage, skilled nursing facilities, and out-of-area coverage. The task of defining choice sets was made easier and more meaningful by selecting the top six attributes for each respondent. Asking respondents to rank levels within each attribute and assessing the importance of the various levels provided a more robust estimate of consumer preferences. Using an innovative price-sensitivity method preserved the integrity of the data. The method minimized respondent fatigue and enabled the authors to gather price-sensitivity data from respondents who were not actually paying for their health services. Respondents preferred Supplemental F and Medicare products even though they placed more value on the qualities of alternative health care products. This suggests that managed care providers need to change consumer perceptions about their products.

  10. A feasibility open trial of internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (iCBT among consumers of a non-governmental mental health organisation with anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Kirkpatrick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. To date the efficacy and acceptability of internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatments (iCBT has been examined in clinical trials and specialist facilities. The present study reports the acceptability, feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an established iCBT treatment course (the Wellbeing Course administered by a not-for-profit non-governmental organisation, the Mental Health Association (MHA of New South Wales, to consumers with symptoms of anxiety.Methods. Ten individuals who contacted the MHA’s telephone support line or visited the MHA’s website and reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety (GAD-7 total scores ≥5 were admitted to the study. Participants were provided access to the Wellbeing Course, which comprises five online lessons and homework assignments, and brief weekly support from an MHA staff member via telephone and email. The MHA staff member was an experienced mental health professional and received minimal training in administering the intervention.Results. All 10 participants completed the course within the 8 weeks. Post-treatment and two month follow-up questionnaires were completed by all participants. Mean within-group effect sizes (Cohen’s d for the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 Item (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 Item (PHQ-9 were large (i.e., > .80 and consistent with previous controlled research. The Course was also rated as highly acceptable with all 10 participants reporting it was worth their time and they would recommend it to a friend.Conclusions. These results provide support for the potential clinical utility of iCBT interventions and the acceptability and feasibility of employing non-governmental mental health organisations to deliver these treatments. However, further research is needed to examine the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering iCBT via such organisations.

  11. Under scrutiny. As public anxiety grows over health care horror stories, consumers are starting to fight back. Guess who's winning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchik, G S

    1996-05-01

    "We're getting dozens of calls every day from people who are frustrated and fed up," says one health care consumer rights advocate. The scenario is familiar: first come the horror stories, then trailblazing, media-engaging lawsuits, and finally the public learning curve starts to accelerate. Then the heat gets turned up on the government to act. That's where we're at right now. Where will we be tomorrow?

  12. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services exploration of positive patient care synergies fueled by consumer demand: care coordination, advanced clinic access, and patient self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Yerardi, Ruth; Drake, Audrey C; Parlier, Renee

    2006-01-01

    The consumers who utilize the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system are older, and most are learning to live with chronic diseases. Their desires and needs have driven changes within the Veterans Health Administration. Through patient satisfaction initiatives and other feedback sources, consumers have made it clear that they do not want to wait for their care, they want a say in what care is provided to them, and they want to remain as independent as possible. Two interdisciplinary processes/models of healthcare are being implemented on the national level to address these issues: advanced clinic access and care coordination. These programs have a synergistic relationship and are integrated with patient self-management initiatives. Positive outcomes of these programs also meet the needs of our staff. As these new processes and programs are implemented nationwide, skills of both patients and nursing staff who provide their care need to be enhanced to meet the challenges of providing nursing care now and into the 21st century. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services Strategic Planning Work Group is defining and implementing processes/programs to ensure nurses have the knowledge, information, and skills to meet these patient care demands at all levels within the organization.

  13. Ready for the empowered consumer? Providers need retailer's attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The aging of baby boomers and the rise in popularity of the internet are creating a new kind of consumer who demands quality, service, and convenience from health care. To find out how to meet those demands, providers are beginning to benchmark with retail companies experienced in catering to consumers. Retailers can offer help for such processes as inpatient admitting, marketing, billing, sales, product development, and recruiting and retaining employees.

  14. The evolution of public relations and the use of the internet: the implications for health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Eric N

    2007-01-01

    Over the past several years the discipline and practice of public relations has evolved. Historically, this field within health care organizations was a one-way management of communications and often was reactive in nature dealing with a crisis situation with an organization. Recent theoretical development within the discipline suggests that public relations involves more relationship building with key constituencies and on-going-dialogue. Concomitant with this evolution is the technological development of the internet. Most particularly is the use of podcasting and blogging as key tools which have been underutilized by health car providers but have significant potential in both communication and relationship opportunities as discussed in this article.

  15. Patients' experiences with continuum of care across hospitals. A multilevel analysis of Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Communication between professionals is essential because it contributes to an optimal continuum of care. Whether patients experience adequate continuum of care is uncertain. To address this, a questionnaire was developed to elucidate this care process from a patients' perspective. In this

  16. "La Comunidad Habla": Using Internet Community-Based Information Interventions to Increase Empowerment and Access to Health Care of Low Income Latino/a Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Nelson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    The innovative educational communication interventions described in this paper include the use of bi-lingual, low literacy level websites and training created by low income Latina women to increase access to health care, health information, and the internet. We focus on one grassroots intervention, aimed at increasing access to health care for…

  17. "La Comunidad Habla": Using Internet Community-Based Information Interventions to Increase Empowerment and Access to Health Care of Low Income Latino/a Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Nelson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    The innovative educational communication interventions described in this paper include the use of bi-lingual, low literacy level websites and training created by low income Latina women to increase access to health care, health information, and the internet. We focus on one grassroots intervention, aimed at increasing access to health care for…

  18. What Otaku consumers care about: The factors influential to online purchase intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Chang

    2013-10-01

    Chinese customers and those in the rest of world share the same two principal concerns about e-commerce: inadequate information from website and inadequate legal protection for Internet purchases. This study shows that trust, information adequacy and Otakus' characteristics have a significant effect on online purchase intention. Moreover, Otakus' characteristics demonstrate an interference effect on purchasing intention online for the influential factors: information provision and trust in the website.

  19. Health care policies and resisting consumers in a prototypical welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hindhede, Anette

    2011-01-01

    policies. The paper is based on qualitative methods comprising observations and interviews in two hearing clinics. The paper shows that rather than a „withdrawal‟ of the state there has been a process of reform with governing at distance. The data suggests that a distinguishing mark of the consumer role......It has been argued by researchers from the Anglo-Saxon nations that the rationality of the market has increasingly infiltrated the medical field. This paper enquires via policy analysis how these principles have affected the prototypical welfare state of Denmark in relation to Danish hearing health...... on offer in Denmark is, that along with a free hearing aid, the Danish health consumer enjoys a range of rights and reciprocal responsibilities. The paper concludes that few of the hearing impaired patients were able to embrace the consumer ethos, and those who chose not to wear their prescribed hearing...

  20. Health care policies and resisting consumers in a prototypical welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hindhede, Anette

    2011-01-01

    It has been argued by researchers from the Anglo-Saxon nations that the rationality of the market has increasingly infiltrated the medical field. This paper enquires via policy analysis how these principles have affected the prototypical welfare state of Denmark in relation to Danish hearing health...... policies. The paper is based on qualitative methods comprising observations and interviews in two hearing clinics. The paper shows that rather than a „withdrawal‟ of the state there has been a process of reform with governing at distance. The data suggests that a distinguishing mark of the consumer role...... on offer in Denmark is, that along with a free hearing aid, the Danish health consumer enjoys a range of rights and reciprocal responsibilities. The paper concludes that few of the hearing impaired patients were able to embrace the consumer ethos, and those who chose not to wear their prescribed hearing...

  1. Efforts to Support Consumer Enrollment Decisions Using Total Cost Estimators: Lessons from the Affordable Care Act’s Marketplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Justin; Curran, Emily

    2017-02-01

    Issue: Policymakers have sought to improve the shopping experience on the Affordable Care Act’s marketplaces by offering decision support tools that help consumers better understand and compare their health plan options. Cost estimators are one such tool. They are designed to provide consumers a personalized estimate of the total cost--premium, minus subsidy, plus cost-sharing--of their coverage options. Cost estimators were available in most states by the start of the fourth open enrollment period. Goal: To understand the experiences of marketplaces that offer a total cost estimator and the interests and concerns of policymakers from states that are not using them. Methods: Structured interviews with marketplace officials, consumer enrollment assisters, technology vendors, and subject matter experts; analysis of the total cost estimators available on the marketplaces as of October 2016. Key findings and conclusions: Informants strongly supported marketplace adoption of a total cost estimator. Marketplaces that offer an estimator faced a range of design choices and varied significantly in their approaches to resolving them. Interviews suggested a clear need for additional consumer testing and data analysis of tool usage and for sustained outreach to enrollment assisters to encourage greater use of the estimators.

  2. The role of health care experience and consumer information efficacy in shaping privacy and security perceptions of medical records: national consumer survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vaishali; Beckjord, Ellen; Moser, Richard P; Hughes, Penelope; Hesse, Bradford W

    2015-04-02

    Providers' adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is increasing and consumers have expressed concerns about the potential effects of EHRs on privacy and security. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding regarding factors that affect individuals' perceptions regarding the privacy and security of their medical information. The aim of this study was to describe national perceptions regarding the privacy and security of medical records and identify a comprehensive set of factors associated with these perceptions. Using a nationally representative 2011-2012 survey, we reported on adults' perceptions regarding privacy and security of medical records and sharing of health information between providers, and whether adults withheld information from a health care provider due to privacy or security concerns. We used multivariable models to examine the association between these outcomes and sociodemographic characteristics, health and health care experience, information efficacy, and technology-related variables. Approximately one-quarter of American adults (weighted n=235,217,323; unweighted n=3959) indicated they were very confident (n=989) and approximately half indicated they were somewhat confident (n=1597) in the privacy of their medical records; we found similar results regarding adults' confidence in the security of medical records (very confident: n=828; somewhat confident: n=1742). In all, 12.33% (520/3904) withheld information from a health care provider and 59.06% (2100/3459) expressed concerns about the security of both faxed and electronic health information. Adjusting for other characteristics, adults who reported higher quality of care had significantly greater confidence in the privacy and security of their medical records and were less likely to withhold information from their health care provider due to privacy or security concerns. Adults with higher information efficacy had significantly greater confidence in the privacy and security of medical

  3. Measuring client experiences in long-term care in the Netherlands: a pilot study with the Consumer Quality Index Long-term Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kool Rudolf B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to describe the development, testing and optimization of a new standard instrument, the Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index® Long-term Care, for measuring client experiences with long-term care in the Netherlands. Methods Three versions of the CQ-index questionnaires and protocols for study sampling and data collection were developed, designed for interviews with residents of nursing or residential care homes and postal surveys among representatives of psychogeriatric residents and homecare clients. From July to November 2006 a pilot study was conducted among 2,697 clients of 68 nursing or residential care homes, 2,164 representatives of clients in 57 psychogeriatric care institutions, and 1,462 clients of 19 homecare organizations. We performed psychometric analyses and descriptive analyses, and evaluated the pilot study. Results The pilot study showed the feasibility and usability of the instruments, supported the multidimensionality of the questionnaires and showed first findings on client experiences and possibilities for quality improvement. Nine scales applied to all care settings: shared decision making, attitude and courtesy, information, body care, competence and safety of care, activities, autonomy, mental well-being, and availability of personnel. The pilot resulted in three optimized questionnaires and recommendations for nationwide implementation. Conclusions The CQ-index® Long-term Care provides a good basis to investigate the quality of nursing homes, residential care homes and homecare from the clients' perspective. This standardized instrument enables a nationwide comparison of the quality of long-term care for the purpose of transparency and quality assurance.

  4. Health care provider and consumer understandings of cultural safety and cultural competency in health care: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing recognition in Australia that racial and ethnic minority groups experience significant disparities in health and health care compared with the average population and that the Australian health care system needs to be more responsive to the health and care needs of these groups. The paper presents the findings of a year long study that explored what providers and recipients of health care know and understand about the nature and implications of providing culturally safe and competent health care to minority racial and ethnic groups in Victoria, Australia. Analysis of the data obtained from interviewing 145 participants recruited from over 17 different organizational sites revealed a paucity of knowledge and understanding of this issue and the need for a new approach to redress the status quo.

  5. Toward an Educated Health Consumer: Mass Communication and Quality in Medical Care. Fogarty International Series on the Teaching of Preventive Medicine. Volume 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Carter L.

    Focus in this preventive medicine monograph for health professionals is on consumer health education and the current and potential effects of mass communication on the quality of medical care. Following an introduction, the content is presented in four chapters. Chapter 1 covers the state of the art in consumer health education and discusses three…

  6. 互联网环境下消费金融的商业模式、发展趋势与价值创造%The Business Model, Development Trend and Value Creation of Internet Consumer Finance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康远志; 胡朝举

    2016-01-01

    家庭财富的积累、移动互联网及智能终端的普及等消费环境的改善,使得消费金融日益互联网化。传统商业银行、消费金融公司、电商平台以及行业龙头公司依托资金、技术、数据、交易优势,不断从各自领域向外扩展,通过贴近消费场景和数据积累,推广消费金融服务,形成了各具特色的消费金融模式。消费金融呈现出大数据化、场景化和垂直化趋势,并推动中国消费金融向更快捷、更低息、更普惠的方向前进,提升了消费者的效用及话语权,创造了新的社会价值。%Internet consumer finance is becoming increasingly popular due to the accumulation of household wealth, popularity of mobile internet smart terminals and improvement of consumption environment. By utilizing advantages in capital, technology, data and transaction, traditional commercial banks, consumer finance companies, e-commerce platforms and leading companies are expanding their business scope from almost every field and establishing consumer finance models with various characteristics. Consumer finance displays the tendency of big data, scene and verticality and is becoming more convenient, lowering down interest rate and consumer-friendly so as to improve consumers’ efficacy and right of speech and create new social values.

  7. Client expectations and satisfaction of quality in home care services. A consumer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, G; Wister, A

    2000-12-01

    This study examines clients' expectations of quality in home care services and their perceived satisfaction with services among a random sample of 76 home care recipients in Vancouver, Canada. The researchers conducted face-to-face interviews that applied Multiattribute Utility Technology, a procedure that organizes several quality attributes of "ideal" home care into a tree structure to compare their relative importance and ranking from the clients' perspective. Participants also were asked to state their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the services received in these domains. Among the five main quality attributes identified, the subjects ranked suitability of the home helper and its subset, personal competence, as the most important indicators of quality, followed by continuity in service. In addition, clients tended to have a high level of satisfaction with regard to the attributes of overall home care services. The highest level of satisfaction was reported for elements of personal dispositions of home care staff. The lowest level of satisfaction involved the time/availability components of the service. Finally, comparisons between client expectations and satisfaction of received home care services showed the highest discrepancy for the attributes of influence and time/availability and the greatest congruence for personal attributes of the staff. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the delivery of home care services.

  8. Quality of care in the intensive care unit from the perspective of patient's relatives: development and psychometric evaluation of the consumer quality index 'R-ICU'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensen, Ans; van Mol, Margo M; Menheere, Ilse; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Verhoogt, Ellen; Maris, Bea; Manders, Willeke; Vloet, Lilian; Verharen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-24

    The quality standards of the Dutch Society of Intensive Care require monitoring of the satisfaction of patient's relatives with respect to care. Currently, no suitable instrument is available in the Netherlands to measure this. This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the questionnaire-based Consumer Quality Index 'Relatives in Intensive Care Unit' (CQI 'R-ICU'). The CQI 'R-ICU' measures the perceived quality of care from the perspective of patients' relatives, and identifies aspects of care that need improvement. The CQI 'R-ICU' was developed using a mixed method design. Items were based on quality of care aspects from earlier studies and from focus group interviews with patients' relatives. The time period for the data collection of the psychometric evaluation was from October 2011 until July 2012. Relatives of adult intensive care patients in one university hospital and five general hospitals in the Netherlands were approached to participate. Psychometric evaluation included item analysis, inter-item analysis, and factor analysis. Twelve aspects were noted as being indicators of quality of care, and were subsequently selected for the questionnaire's vocabulary. The response rate of patients' relatives was 81% (n = 455). Quality of care was represented by two clusters, each showing a high reliability: 'Communication' (α = .80) and 'Participation' (α = .84). Relatives ranked the following aspects for quality of care as most important: no conflicting information, information from doctors and nurses is comprehensive, and health professionals take patients' relatives seriously. The least important care aspects were: need for contact with peers, nuisance, and contact with a spiritual counsellor. Aspects that needed the most urgent improvement (highest quality improvement scores) were: information about how relatives can contribute to the care of the patient, information about the use of meal-facilities in the hospital, and

  9. Interactive internet-based clinical education: an efficient and cost-savings approach to point-of-care test training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Herschel; Chan, Kee; Anaya, Henry D; Goetz, Matthew B

    2011-06-01

    We successfully created and implemented an effective HIV rapid testing training and certification curriculum using traditional in-person training at multiple sites within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. Considering the multitude of geographically remote facilities in the nationwide VA system, coupled with the expansion of HIV diagnostics, we developed an alternate training method that is affordable, efficient, and effective. Using materials initially developed for in-person HIV rapid test in-services, we used a distance learning model to offer this training via live audiovisual online technology to educate clinicians at a remote outpatient primary care VA facility. Participants' evaluation metrics showed that this form of remote education is equivalent to in-person training; additionally, HIV testing rates increased considerably in the months following this intervention. Although there is a one-time setup cost associated with this remote training protocol, there is potential cost savings associated with the point-of-care nurse manager's time productivity by using the Internet in-service learning module for teaching HIV rapid testing. If additional in-service training modules are developed into Internet-based format, there is the potential for additional cost savings. Our cost analysis demonstrates that the remote in-service method provides a more affordable and efficient alternative compared with in-person training. The online in-service provided training that was equivalent to in-person sessions based on first-hand supervisor observation, participant satisfaction surveys, and follow-up results. This method saves time and money, requires fewer personnel, and affords access to expert trainers regardless of geographic location. Further, it is generalizable to training beyond HIV rapid testing. Based on these consistent implementation successes, we plan to expand use of online training to include remote VA satellite facilities spanning

  10. E-business in health care: does it contribute to strengthen consumer interest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzman, Ed; Janssen, Richard; Ruster, Marijn

    2003-04-01

    One of the goals of the reforms in the European health-care systems over the last two decades has been to make the health-care system more demand-oriented. There is not much known about the possible impact of E-business like approaches on this goal. This paper describes the concept of E-business. Two cases are introduced to illustrate the use of a simple E-business approach in a health-care setting. On the basis of these case studies, we aspect a reduction of the information disadvantages of patients. In our analysis, we also apply new institutional economy concepts, namely agency theory and transaction costs economics to focus on the position of the patient. Concluded is that it is more probable that preferences of demanders are answered by the suppliers of health care.

  11. Willingness to use the Internet to seek information on HIV prevention and care among men who have sex with men in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Justumus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Vietnam, men who have sex with men (MSM are highly affected by HIV and need new targeted HIV prevention strategies. OBJECTIVES: To assess the willingness to use the Internet to seek information on HIV prevention and care and associated factors among MSM in Ho Chi Minh City. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012. Participants were recruited using a convenience sampling method in venues most frequented by MSM and completed a self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression models were performed to estimate factors associated with the willingness to use the Internet to seek information on HIV prevention and care. RESULTS: A total of 358 MSM were approached for the survey and 222 questionnaires (62.0% were eligible for analyses. Overall, 76.1% of the respondents reported that they were willing to use the Internet to seek information on HIV prevention and care. A number of male partners in last year less than or equal to 3 (Adjusted Odds Ratio: 3.07, 95% Confidence interval: 1.40-6.73, a history of STI screening (4.10, 1.02-16.48 and HIV testing (3.23, 1.20-8.64 and having ever sought a male sexual partner through the Internet (3.56, 1.55-8.18 were significantly positively associated with the willingness to use the Internet to seek information on HIV prevention and care. CONCLUSION: The MSM interviewed in Ho Chi Minh City reported a high willingness to use the Internet to seek information on HIV prevention and care. In a context where new media are increasingly considered as promising options for reaching this HIV risk group, further research should be conducted on developing and testing tailored online tools adapted to the needs of Vietnamese MSM.

  12. Anomaly detection for internet surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Raaijmakers, S.A.; Halma, A.H.R.; Wedemeijer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming

  13. Anomaly detection for internet surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Raaijmakers, S.A.; Halma, A.H.R.; Wedemeijer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming

  14. LIS–lnterlink—connecting laboratory information systems to remote primary health–care centres via the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Barry; Wachowiak, Bartosz; Crawford, Ewan W.; Jakubowski, Zenon; Kabata, Janusz

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using the Internet to securely deliver patient laboratory results, and the system has subsequently gone into routine use in Poland. The system went from design to pilot and then to live implementation within a four-month period, resulting in the LIS-Interlink software product. Test results are retrieved at regular intervals from the BioLinkTM LIS (Laboratory Information System), encrypted and transferred to a secure area on the Web server. The primary health-care centres dial into the Internet using a local-cell service provided by Polish Telecom (TP), obtain a TCP/IP address using the TP DHCP server, and perform HTTP ‘get’ and ‘post’ operations to obtain the files by secure handshaking. The data are then automatically inserted into a local SQL database (with optional printing of incoming reports)for cumulative reporting and searching functions. The local database is fully multi-user and can be accessed from different clinics within the centres by a variety of networking protocols. PMID:18924820

  15. LIS-lnterlink-connecting laboratory information systems to remote primary health-care centres via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B; Wachowiak, B; Crawford, E W; Jakubowski, Z; Kabata, J

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using the Internet to securely deliver patient laboratory results, and the system has subsequently gone into routine use in Poland. The system went from design to pilot and then to live implementation within a four-month period, resulting in the LIS-Interlink software product. Test results are retrieved at regular intervals from the BioLink(TM) LIS (Laboratory Information System), encrypted and transferred to a secure area on the Web server. The primary health-care centres dial into the Internet using a local-cell service provided by Polish Telecom (TP), obtain a TCP/IP address using the TP DHCP server, and perform HTTP 'get' and 'post' operations to obtain the files by secure handshaking. The data are then automatically inserted into a local SQL database (with optional printing of incoming reports)for cumulative reporting and searching functions. The local database is fully multi-user and can be accessed from different clinics within the centres by a variety of networking protocols.

  16. Promoting employee acceptance of a consumer bill of rights in a complex medical care organization: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, P D; Leifer, B H

    1982-01-01

    To develop strong health education programs, health educators working in complex medical care organizations must often secure professional cooperation across disciplines, coordination of services, and orientation of policies, procedures, and personnel toward patient preferences and needs. Frequently, they undertake these tasks against the tide, within a problematic organizational structure. The present case study illustrates the difficulties posed by introducing change in medical care organizations in the context of an education program to acquaint employees of a large HMO with a consumer bill of rights mandated by the consumer Board of Trustees. The underlying assumption was that in a bureaucratic institution, an employee-centered and modest system reform strategy would be effective in bringing about client-centered outcomes-in this case, increased recognition of client rights. The case analysis and results of a post-intervention, cross-sectional survey suggest that in units where a threshold level of participation was reached, there were improvements in knowledge about the Bill and employee attitudes. The program was less successful with hospital nurses whose feelings about physicians were not taken into account fully, and with physicians whose relative lack of integration into the policy and managerial domains made them harder to reach.

  17. Are fish eaters healthier and do they consume less health-care resources?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela; Sørensen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Regular dietary intake of fish is associated with reduced risk of developing cardiovascular and other chronic diseases, and may improve general well-being. If fish eaters are healthier, they may use fewer health-care resources. The present study aimed to describe the reported intake...... reported eating fish twice monthly or once weekly had significantly better overall self-reported health than those who rarely eat fish, even after adjustment for age, gender, social characteristics and lifestyle factors. Fish eaters did not have significantly lower aggregated health-care costs, although...... of fish and fish products in a Danish general population, and to investigate whether fish consumption is associated with generic measures of self-reported health and consumption of health-care resources. Design: Data on eating patterns and health status for 3422 Danish adults were obtained by telephone...

  18. Pay less, consume more? The price elasticity of home care for the disabled elderly in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquebert, Quitterie; Tenand, Marianne

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the price sensitivity of demand for home care of the disabled elderly. We partially fill this knowledge gap by using administrative data on the beneficiaries of the main French home care subsidy program in a department and exploiting interindividual variation in provider prices. We address the potential endogeneity of prices by taking advantage of the unequal spatial coverage of providers and instrumenting price by the number of municipalities served by a provider. We estimate a price elasticity of around -0.4 that is significantly different from both 0 and -1. This less than proportionate response of consumption to price has implications for the efficiency and redistributive impact of variation in the level of copayments in home care subsidy schemes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The impact of health-care service guarantees on consumer decision-making: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett-Hensel, Pamela A; Min, Kyeong Sam; Totten, Jeff W

    2012-01-01

    While examples of the successful use of service guarantees in health-care do exist, to-date, researchers have yet to examine this industry-specific application beyond a case study perspective. The results of this experiment begin to shed light on whether or not guarantees should be used, and if so, under what conditions are they appropriate. Respondents indicate that the thoughtful use of service guarantees can positively impact their perceptions of the health-care provider's reputation and, ultimately, their behavioral intentions towards the same provider. However, consideration must be given to the type of guarantee being offered and to whom the guarantee is targeted.

  20. Learning the moral economy of commodified health care: "community education," failed consumers, and the shaping of ethical clinician-citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin-Fish, Michele

    2011-06-01

    Leaders of health professional schools often support community-based education as a means of promoting emerging practitioners' awareness of health disparities and commitment to serving the poor. Yet, most programs do not teach about the causes of health disparities, raising questions regarding what social and political lessons students learn from these experiences. This article examines the ways in which community-based clinical education programs help shape the subjectivities of new dentists as ethical clinician-citizens within the US commodified health care system. Drawing on ethnographic research during volunteer and required community-based programs and interviews with participants, I demonstrate three implicit logics that students learned: (1) dialectical ideologies of volunteer entitlement and recipient debt; (2) forms of justification for the often inferior care provided to "failed" consumers (patients with Medicaid or uninsured); and (3) specific forms of obligations characterizing the ethical clinician-citizen. I explore the ways these messages reflected the structured relations of both student encounters and the overarching health care system, and examine the strategies faculty supervisors undertook to challenge these messages and relations. Finally, I argue that promoting commitments to social justice in health care should not rely on cultivating altruism, but should instead be pursued through educating new practitioners about the lives of poor people, the causal relationships between poverty and poor health, and attention to the structure of health care and provider-patient interactions. This approach involves shining a critical light on America's commodified health care system as an arena based in relations of power and inequality.

  1. Interaction Behaviors betw een Producers and Consumers Reshaped by the Internet%互联网重塑生产者和消费者互动行为分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海峰

    2014-01-01

    T his paper analyzes the Internet's role in information dissemination ,human relations ,net-work impact and so on .It is pointed out that the online group behavior will make some fixed patterns fundamentally changed and have a major influence on the behaviors between producers and consumers . The Internet will also deeply change the traditional relationship between producers and consumers from the perspectives of information symmetry ,consumer expertization ,prosumerization ,integration of production and marketing .At the same time ,the purposiveness of the interpersonal behaviors on networks may promote the emergence of consumers alliance and make more users communicate with producers directly .This is very important for the producers'future innovations .%文章分析了互联网在信息传播、人际关系、网络影响力等方面的作用和影响,指出群体网上行为让一些原本固定的模式或事项发生根本的改变,也必然对生产者和消费者之间的行为产生重大作用,在信息对称、消费者专家化、生产消费者化、产销合一等方面改变生产者和消费者的传统关系。同时,网络人际群体行为的目的性,促使消费者联盟的出现,促使生产者和消费者的关系更加直接。这对于生产者未来创新有重要意义。

  2. Developing consumer-directed care for people with a disability: 10 lessons for user participation in health and community care policy and program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Goetz F; Laragy, Carmel

    2010-11-01

    This paper outlines 10 lessons derived from the development of a consumer-directed care program for families with disabled children in Melbourne, Australia. The following program elements proved to be of importance over the course of the development process: (1) research participants should be involved as early as possible; (2) an open, inclusive communication style in conjunction with a good understanding of potential concerns and a careful framing of the policy issue is required to build trust and allow meaningful collaboration; (3) various strands of evidence have to be woven together; (4) ongoing commitment and support from management and key stakeholders; (5) effective knowledge transfer and cultural change processes; (6) capacity building; (7) mediation of power differentials; (8) community building; (9) participant re-engagement strategies; and (10) solid project management skills.

  3. Consumer bill of rights and responsibilities: report to the President of the United States. Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    President Clinton appointed a 34-member Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Healthcare Industry in 1997, and the group has adopted a statement of consumers' rights and responsibilities. The document addresses eight areas, including information disclosure on health plans, benefits, and qualifications of healthcare providers, choice of providers and plans, access to emergency services, patients' rights to participate in treatment decisions, mutual respect and nondiscrimination, confidentiality of health and personal information, complaints and the appeals process, and the responsibilities of consumers.

  4. The do-it-yourself health care consumer: preliminary identification and marketing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, M B; Gehrt, K C

    1991-01-01

    Although the presence of do-it-yourself (DIY) segments in some service-markets have long been taken for granted (e.g., home improvement and auto repair), the recent emergence of DIY segments in law, health, and other service-markets has been surprising to many observers. This paper examines the DIY segment in the health service market. The emergence of a DIY segment may be misconstrued by some service-marketers as being synonymous with lost clientele. This paper (1) explains some of the marketing implications of a DIY health services segment and (2) provides a brief profile of the DIY health services consumer. The paper concludes that the DIY segment represents new opportunity rather than lost clientele to service-marketers.

  5. Emergence of a new consumer health informatics framework: introducing the healthcare organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Paulette; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare consumers are increasingly seeking reliable forms of health information on the Internet that can be used to support health related decision-making. Frameworks that have been developed and tested in the field of health informatics have attempted to describe the effects of the Internet upon the health care consumer and physician relationship. More recently, health care organizations are responding by providing information such as hospital wait lists or strategies for self-managing disease, and this information is being provided on organizational web-sites. The authors of this paper propose that current conceptualizations of the relationship between the Internet, physicians and patients are limited from a consumer informatics perspective and may need to be extended to include healthcare organizations.

  6. Consumers with high complex needs co-create a relationship-based approach to care

    OpenAIRE

    Sheridan,Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: People in all countries experience different social circumstances that result in avoidable differences in health. The health care system has an important role to play in creating opportunities for all populations to be as healthy as possible, especially those with high complex health and social needs. In New Zealand, Māori, Pacific peoples, and those with lower socioeconomic status experience higher levels of chronic illness, which is the leading cause of mortality, morbidity an...

  7. Internet marketing environment analysis of the consumer behavior%网络营销环境下的消费者行为分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄淑贞

    2013-01-01

    In the network marketing environment, the correct analysis of the network changes in consumer behavior, is the enterprise network marketing priorities. Through analysis of the article is not only able to give consumers a better consumer experience, but also allow enterprise to win their own development space,access to greater benefit ,to gain more market share in consumer.%在网络营销环境下,正确分析网络消费者的行为变化,是企业进行网络营销的首要任务。通过文章的分析不仅能够给消费者带来更好的消费体验,而且也能让企业赢得自身发展的空间,获得更大的利益,获得更多的消费市场份额。

  8. Consumer Empowerment in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Heather E.; Busse, Kristine L.; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Health care consumers increasingly confront and collaborate with their medical providers. We describe consumer success in other medical fields and in dermatology, especially dermatologic disease advocacy and improving dermatologist-patient interactions. PMID:19254661

  9. A role for mental health nursing in the physical health care of consumers with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, B; Platania-Phung, C; Gray, R; Hardy, S; Lambert, T; McAllister, M; Davies, C

    2011-10-01

    There is extensive international evidence that people with severe mental illness have a lower standard of physical health than the general population. This leads to higher morbidity and mortality rates. Many of the causes for this poor physical health are modifiable. Yet the physical needs of this consumer group are neglected by healthcare systems in Australia, and elsewhere. While medical specialists are clearly integral to remedying this, nurses are well placed to play a key role in focused prevention and early intervention in the physical well-being of consumers with mental health problems. This paper outlines the specifics on how mental health nurses can be sensitized, prepared and empowered to help turn this serious health issue around. In particular, mental health nurses could be trained in and then utilize a new physical health check and response system in the UK (called the Health Improvement Profile) if adapted for use within Australia. This profile will be briefly introduced, and then its value to improving health care discussed.

  10. 使用情景对移动互联网用户采纳行为影响的实证研究%The Effects of Use Context on Consumer's Intention to Adopt Mobile Internet Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨水清; 鲁耀斌; 曹玉枝

    2012-01-01

      顾客感知价值是决定用户采纳行为的关键因素,而行为科学认为顾客感知价值依赖于用户的使用情景,不同的使用情景会形成不同的顾客感知价值。构建了一个基于使用情景的移动互联网用户采纳模型,研究了使用情景对用户感知实利价值、享乐价值和采纳意向的影响。对收集的491份有效样本数据的结构方程分析,结果表明,使用情景不仅对采纳意向存在直接影响,且还通过感知移动性、感知愉悦和沉浸体验对采纳意向有间接影响。%  The most important factor in determining consumer's adoption or use behavior is perceived value. Behavioral literature found that use context has influence on consumer's value perceptions and therefore affects adoption. This paper develops a model of mobile inter-net adoption by focusing on the impact of use context on consumer's value perceptions and adoption behavior. Using data collected from 491 mobile internet users,the structural equation analysis results demonstrated that use context not only directly affects adoption behavior, but also indirectly influences adoption from perceived mobility,perceived enjoyment,and flow experience.

  11. Uncovering patterns of technology use in consumer health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man; Conrad, Jillian; Hon, Shirley D; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Tang, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Internet usage and accessibility has grown at a staggering rate, influencing technology use for healthcare purposes. The amount of health information technology (Health IT) available through the Internet is immeasurable and growing daily. Health IT is now seen as a fundamental aspect of patient care as it stimulates patient engagement and encourages personal health management. It is increasingly important to understand consumer health IT patterns including who is using specific technologies, how technologies are accessed, factors associated with use, and perceived benefits. To fully uncover consumer patterns it is imperative to recognize common barriers and which groups they disproportionately affect. Finally, exploring future demand and predictions will expose significant opportunities for health IT. The most frequently used health information technologies by consumers are gathering information online, mobile health (mHealth) technologies, and personal health records (PHRs). Gathering health information online is the favored pathway for healthcare consumers as it is used by more consumers and more frequently than any other technology. In regard to mHealth technologies, minority Americans, compared with White Americans utilize social media, mobile Internet, and mobile applications more frequently. Consumers believe PHRs are the most beneficial health IT. PHR usage is increasing rapidly due to PHR integration with provider health systems and health insurance plans. Key issues that have to be explicitly addressed in health IT are privacy and security concerns, health literacy, unawareness, and usability. Privacy and security concerns are rated the number one reason for the slow rate of health IT adoption.

  12. Modified eCDP model on Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Loginova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In article analysis of consumer behavior model, considering specificity of Internet trade is carried out. Price effects influencing behavior of consumers are considered. Effect of ecash is described. New model of Internet consumers behavior taking into account effect of ecash non-uniform value is resulted.

  13. Social efficiency of hospital care delivery: frontier analysis from the consumer's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Patrick M; Moises, James; Valdmanis, Vivian Grace

    2011-02-01

    The efficiency of hospital services and patients' access to hospitals are both important health care policy issues. In the past, research has relied on studying these topics separately. In this article, we measure both efficiency and access at the same time using data envelopment analysis (DEA). By including both the technically efficient use of resources, as well as the patients' travel distances, we found increases in social efficiency when patients' travel distances were taken into account. When compared with patients with nonurgent conditions, we found that patients suffering from conditions requiring urgent attention were treated at closer hospitals, increasing the social efficiency. Insurance coverage and hospital ownership were also examined. Our findings corroborated past literature in the hospital and travel distance literature and set out a framework for future research. Perhaps most important, we demonstrate the techniques needed to incorporate broader measures of social costs into studies of hospital efficiency.

  14. Can consumers make affordable care affordable? The value of choice architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Johnson

    Full Text Available Tens of millions of people are currently choosing health coverage on a state or federal health insurance exchange as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. We examine how well people make these choices, how well they think they do, and what can be done to improve these choices. We conducted 6 experiments asking people to choose the most cost-effective policy using websites modeled on current exchanges. Our results suggest there is significant room for improvement. Without interventions, respondents perform at near chance levels and show a significant bias, overweighting out-of-pocket expenses and deductibles. Financial incentives do not improve performance, and decision-makers do not realize that they are performing poorly. However, performance can be improved quite markedly by providing calculation aids, and by choosing a "smart" default. Implementing these psychologically based principles could save purchasers of policies and taxpayers approximately 10 billion dollars every year.

  15. Transdiagnostic versus disorder-specific internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety and depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Jill M; Mewton, Louise; Andrews, Gavin

    2017-03-01

    Disorder-specific and transdiagnostic internet cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) programs are effective for anxiety and depression, but no studies have compared their effectiveness in primary care. Patient characteristics, adherence and effectiveness of Transdiagnostic iCBT (n=1005) were compared to disorder-specific programs for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (n=738) and depression (n=366) in a naturalistic non-randomised comparison study. Patients completed their iCBT program in primary care. The PHQ-9 (depression), GAD-7 (generalized anxiety), K-10 (distress), and the WHODAS-II (disability) were measured at pre- and post-treatment. Patients in the Transdiagnostic program had higher comorbidity rates and baseline distress. All programs were associated with medium to large within-group effect sizes for improving anxiety, depression and distress between pre- and post-treatment (d's=0.64-1.39). Controlling for baseline group differences in severity, we found small effect sizes favoring the Transdiagnostic program over the GAD program in reducing PHQ-9 (d=0.44, 95%CI: 0.34-0.53), K-10 (d=0.21, 95%CI: 0.16-0.35) and WHODAS scores (d=0.20, 95%CI: 0.10-0.29), and small effect sizes favoring the Transdiagnostic program over the Depression program in reducing GAD-7 scores (d=0.48, 95%CI: 0.36-0.60). A smaller proportion of patients completed the Transdiagnostic program (44.9%) compared to the depression (51.6%) and GAD (49.2%) programs, which was attributable to baseline differences in age and symptom severity. Both Transdiagnostic iCBT and disorder-specific iCBT programs are effective in primary care, but there appears to be small effects favoring Transdiagnostic iCBT. Methods to increase adherence are needed to optimize the benefits to patients, and these findings await replication in a RCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding reactions to an internet-delivered health-care intervention: accommodating user preferences for information provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardley Lucy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recognised as good practice to use qualitative methods to elicit users' views of internet-delivered health-care interventions during their development. This paper seeks to illustrate the advantages of combining usability testing with 'theoretical modelling', i.e. analyses that relate the findings of qualitative studies during intervention development to social science theory, in order to gain deeper insights into the reasons and context for how people respond to the intervention. This paper illustrates how usability testing may be enriched by theoretical modelling by means of two qualitative studies of users' views of the delivery of information in an internet-delivered intervention to help users decide whether they needed to seek medical care for their cold or flu symptoms. Methods In Study 1, 21 participants recruited from a city in southern England were asked to 'think aloud' while viewing draft web-pages presented in paper format. In Study 2, views of our prototype website were elicited, again using think aloud methods, in a sample of 26 participants purposively sampled for diversity in education levels. Both data-sets were analysed by thematic analysis. Results Study 1 revealed that although the information provided by the draft web-pages had many of the intended empowering benefits, users often felt overwhelmed by the quantity of information. Relating these findings to theory and research on factors influencing preferences for information-seeking we hypothesised that to meet the needs of different users (especially those with lower literacy levels our website should be designed to provide only essential personalised advice, but with options to access further information. Study 2 showed that our website design did prove accessible to users with different literacy levels. However, some users seemed to want still greater control over how information was accessed. Conclusions Educational level need not be an

  17. The Application of the Internet of Things in the Management of High Value Consumables in the Catheter Room%物联网在导管室高值耗材管理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩敏; 任秋凤; 郭航远

    2014-01-01

    为了提高对医院高值耗材的管理,优化管理流程,确保医用高值耗材在医疗服务中的安全性、可靠性和有效性,保证材料收费的合理、合法,我院运用新的物联网系统对医院导管室的高值耗材进行管理。本文对原有模式的弊端和新模式的优势进行了对比阐述。%In order to improve the management of the hospital high value consumables, optimize the management process, and ensure that high value medical consumables are safe, reliable, valid and charged reasonably and legal in the medical service, the management system of the internet of things was used to manage high value consumables in DSA in our hospital. The disadvantages of the original model and advantages of the new model were compared in this paper.

  18. AUSTRALIAN COMPETITION AND CONSUMER COMMISSION v ACN 117 372 915: SHOULD CONSUMER LAW REGULATE DOCTOR-PATIENT RELATIONS IN A CORPORATISED HEALTH CARE SYSTEM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jessica; Pyman, Ella; Faunce, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    In April 2015, North J of the Federal Court of Australia made a finding of unconscionable conduct against Advanced Medical Institute, a promoter and provider of erectile dysfunction treatment, in a case concerning unfair contract terms (Australian Competition and Consumer Commission vACN 117 372 915 Pty Ltd (in liq) (formerly Advanced Medical Institute Pty Ltd) [2015] FCA 368). The contract required a minimum 12-month commitment, with costs exceeding treatments available from general practitioners, and made refunds available only after all possible treatment plans were exhausted which included penile injections. This column analyses that case, particularly in respect to the consumer law standards of practice under which it was litigated. Those standards refer to patients as "consumers" yet North J made extensive reference to the Good Medical Practice: A Code of Conduct for Doctors in Australia, a text which refers to "patients", as evidence of what constitutes appropriate professional conduct or practice for the health profession. This column considers whether legislative and judicial categorisation of patients (a class of people presumptively suffering, sick and vulnerable) as "consumers" undermines the formal and informal protections accorded to patients under normative systems of medical ethics such as those represented by the Code. The case, it is argued, also illuminates the contemporary tensions between the ethical, legal and human rights standards required of doctors in their treatment of patients and the commercial interests of businesses.

  19. New methods of seafarer's training: an internet "refresher course on first-aid and medical care on board".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, M L

    1999-01-01

    Our objective is to facilitate seamen's health education, according to the recommendations of international organisations like IMO (STCW 1995) and EC (Directive 92/29): They recommend a refresher course on first-aid at least every 5 years for persons in charge of medical care on board. In Spain the transposition of this Directive was published (RD 258/99). So, we thought that in order to help seafarers and officers in their training in prevention and in solving health problems derived from their occupational risks on board, continuing education could be implemented using an innovative and adaptable tool. No first-aid course can be useful without practical exercises. The term "refresher" (in this paper) is a way of reminding what people have learnt and practised in a previous practical course. In 1998, the Spanish Society of Maritime Medicine promoted a pilot internet refresher course for seafarers in its web, URL: "http://www.semm.org/curso/pauxm.html++ +". There are 10 didactic units (resources for medical assistance on board, radio-medical advice, environmental problems, travel medicine, cardio-respiratory resuscitation, prevention of problems in diving, death on board, occupational risk prevention ... etc.). Hypertext linked keywords help the student to revise the subject, a teacher can counsel him by e-mail and a multiple choice test, and clinical cases are included to check the comprehension of the didactic units. A CD and an English version of the course is being prepared.

  20. The Power to drive change: Working together for excellence. Creating a continuously improving consumer engagement framework for excellence in patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization has acknowledged Patient Safety while receiving hospital care as a serious global public health issue, with patient empowerment and community engagement key to continuously improving safety and quality of care for the best possible clinical and patient outcomes. In Australia, the introduction of ten mandatory National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards in 2011 provided the catalyst for all Australian health facilities to review their systems. Standard 2: Partnering with Consumers required health facilities across Australia to assess commitment to, and capacity for consumer and community engagement and participation. At this time, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital did not have a strategic perspective and understanding, or an organizational structure for engaging with consumers (patients, families, care givers and community members). The concept required a new model to replace the clinician-led model of healthcare historically featured in Australia, with a change in culture and core business. processes to partner with consumers at all levels of the system, from individual patient care through to participating in policy development, health service planning and delivery, and evaluation and measurement processes. The challenge for the hospital was to build a sustainable framework of engagement for a genuine patient-centered model of care informed by best practice, and provide leadership and commitment to developing as an area of excellence in patient engagement and experience. A successful and sustainable framework for consumer and community engagement has been embedded in the hospital, with resultant culture change, achieving accreditation across all core and developmental criteria for the partnering with consumer standards including several Met with Merit ratings.

  1. Workplace health and safety issues among community nurses: a study regarding the impact on providing care to rural consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Daniel; Lê, Quynh; Nguyen, Uyen; Hoang, Ha

    2015-08-12

    The objective of the study was to investigate the types of workplace health and safety issues rural community nurses encounter and the impact these issues have on providing care to rural consumers. The study undertook a narrative inquiry underpinned by a phenomenological approach. Community nursing staff who worked exclusively in rural areas and employed in a permanent capacity were contacted among 13 of the 16 consenting healthcare services. All community nurses who expressed a desire to participate were interviewed. Data were collected using semistructured interviews with 15 community nurses in rural and remote communities. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview data. The role, function and structures of community nursing services varied greatly from site to site and were developed and centred on meeting the needs of individual communities. In addition, a number of workplace health and safety challenges were identified and were centred on the geographical, physical and organisational environment that community nurses work across. The workplace health and safety challenges within these environments included driving large distances between client's homes and their office which lead to working in isolation for long periods and without adequate communication. In addition, other issues included encountering, managing and developing strategies to deal with poor client and carer behaviour; working within and negotiating working environments such as the poor condition of patient homes and clients smoking; navigating animals in the workplace; vertical and horizontal violence; and issues around workload, burnout and work-related stress. Many nurses achieved good outcomes to meet the needs of rural community health consumers. Managers were vital to ensure that service objectives were met. Despite the positive outcomes, many processes were considered unsafe by community nurses. It was identified that greater training and capacity building are required to meet the

  2. Workplace health and safety issues among community nurses: a study regarding the impact on providing care to rural consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Daniel; Lê, Quynh; Nguyen, Uyen; Hoang, Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the study was to investigate the types of workplace health and safety issues rural community nurses encounter and the impact these issues have on providing care to rural consumers. Methods The study undertook a narrative inquiry underpinned by a phenomenological approach. Community nursing staff who worked exclusively in rural areas and employed in a permanent capacity were contacted among 13 of the 16 consenting healthcare services. All community nurses who expressed a desire to participate were interviewed. Data were collected using semistructured interviews with 15 community nurses in rural and remote communities. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview data. Results The role, function and structures of community nursing services varied greatly from site to site and were developed and centred on meeting the needs of individual communities. In addition, a number of workplace health and safety challenges were identified and were centred on the geographical, physical and organisational environment that community nurses work across. The workplace health and safety challenges within these environments included driving large distances between client’s homes and their office which lead to working in isolation for long periods and without adequate communication. In addition, other issues included encountering, managing and developing strategies to deal with poor client and carer behaviour; working within and negotiating working environments such as the poor condition of patient homes and clients smoking; navigating animals in the workplace; vertical and horizontal violence; and issues around workload, burnout and work-related stress. Conclusions Many nurses achieved good outcomes to meet the needs of rural community health consumers. Managers were vital to ensure that service objectives were met. Despite the positive outcomes, many processes were considered unsafe by community nurses. It was identified that greater training and

  3. 物联网模式下如何实现智能医疗%How to Realize Intelligence Health Care under the Internet of Things Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马淼

    2012-01-01

    对物联网技术实现智能医疗的背景、研究基础、核心技术进行探讨,概述国外物联网模式下智能医疗服务的应用,具体阐述国内应用情况,包括远程医疗监护、虚拟会诊等方面,并对其未来发展予以展望。%The paper discusses the background,research basis,key techniques of how to use internet of things in intelligence health care,overviews the application of intelligence health care under the mode of internet of things in foreign countries,concretely elaborates the application status in China,including the aspects of remote medical monitoring,virtual consultation,etc.It also forecasts the future research development.

  4. 实体和网络零售下消费者的信任转移与渠道迁徙%On the consumer trust transfer and channel migration behavior based on physical and internet retail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国顺; 杨晨

    2014-01-01

    The development of network economy makes consumer channels gradually present diversification trend, and the channel migration about the offline channel to online channel becomes inevitable. The coordination of physical retail and internet retail will be the future model of retail enterprises. In the process of multi-channel choice and migration, the consumer trust transfer has been a hot topic recently. Based on multi-channel environment, this paper attempts to employ Nicosia model and TRA theory to analyze the factors of the formation of consumer online trust, the relationship between the consumer trust transfer and channel migration, as well as a set of guidelines for retail enterprises to achieve the channel coordination.%网络经济的发展导致了消费渠道的多样化,线下消费和线上消费相互转化,实体零售和网络零售的协同成为零售企业未来发展的趋势。从多渠道背景出发,结合Nicosia模型和TRA理论,分析了消费者在线信任的构成要素,提出了消费者信任转移路径模型和消费者渠道迁徙路径模型,通过分析消费者信任转移和渠道迁徙行为之间存在相关关系,提出了零售企业实现渠道协同的建议。

  5. Discussion on Consumer Rights and Interests Protection in the Era of Internet Finance%互联网金融领域消费者权益保护问题探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝平

    2015-01-01

    互联网金融领域消费者权益保护方面的挑战,主要集中于信息安全隐患大、资金安全难保障、消费者维权意识淡薄且维权成本高三方面。为不断加大互联网金融领域消费者权益保护力度,需加强信息安全立法,规范准入门槛,在提升风控要求基础上充分发挥市场力量提升市场主体保护消费者权益的自觉性和主动性,唤醒消费者维权意识并降低消费者维权成本。%The challenges for these problems mainly focus on huge hidden risk from information security, the safety of funds hardly to be guaranteed, weak awareness of consumer rights and high cost of rights protection. It’ s neces-sary for constantly enhancing the strength for protecting Internet financial consumer rights and interests to highlight information security legislation, to regulate access thresholds, to exert the role of market forces into full play based on promoting risk control requirement, so as to enhance the consciousness and initiative of market participants in terms of protecting consumer interests and awaken the awareness of consumers to protect their rights and reduce the cost of rights protection.

  6. Primary care randomised controlled trial of a tailored interactive website for the self-management of respiratory infections (Internet Doctor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Andreou, Panayiota; McDermott, Lisa; Joseph, Judith; Mullee, Mark; Moore, Mike; Broomfield, Sue; Thomas, Tammy; Yardley, Lucy

    2016-04-20

    To assess an internet-delivered intervention providing advice to manage respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Open pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Primary care in UK. Adults (aged ≥18) registered with general practitioners, recruited by postal invitation. Patients were randomised with computer-generated random numbers to access the intervention website (intervention) or not (control). The intervention tailored advice about the diagnosis, natural history, symptom management (particularly paracetamol/ibuprofen use) and when to seek further help. Primary: National Health Service (NHS) contacts for those reporting RTIs from monthly online questionnaires for 20 weeks. Secondary: hospitalisations; symptom duration/severity. 3044 participants were recruited. 852 in the intervention group and 920 in the control group reported 1 or more RTIs, among whom there was a modest increase in NHS direct contacts in the intervention group (intervention 37/1574 (2.4%) versus control 20/1661 (1.2%); multivariate risk ratio (RR) 2.25 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.07, p=0.048)). Conversely, reduced contact with doctors occurred (239/1574 (15.2%) vs 304/1664 (18.3%); RR 0.71, 0.52 to 0.98, p=0.037). Reduction in contacts occurred despite slightly longer illness duration (11.3 days vs 10.7 days, respectively; multivariate estimate 0.60 days longer (-0.15 to 1.36, p=0.118) and more days of illness rated moderately bad or worse illness (0.52 days; 0.06 to 0.97, p=0.026). The estimate of slower symptom resolution in the intervention group was attenuated when controlling for whether individuals had used web pages which advocated ibuprofen use (length of illness 0.22 days, -0.51 to 0.95, p=0.551; moderately bad or worse symptoms 0.36 days, -0.08 to 0.80, p=0.105). There was no evidence of increased hospitalisations (risk ratio 0.25; 0.05 to 1.12; p=0.069). An internet-delivered intervention for the self-management of RTIs modifies help-seeking behaviour, and does not

  7. The authority and utility of Internet information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Ronald C; Cone, Stephen W; Rafiq, Azhar

    2008-01-01

    Internet use for health information by both practitioners and consumers continues to expand geometrically. The impact of Internet on practice, access and health decisions is considerable and will probably grow to the predominant mode of health information delivery in the coming years. As the growth of this unregulated global bulletin board continues, how do we assure the quality of the information retrieved by professionals and patients? What are the indicators of quality? How should we measure impact? How do authoritative sources get the attention and who should decide? What should practitioners recommend? What should medical teachers advise trainees? This review of Internet content, access and application considers the history, patterns of use, evaluation studies and specialty examples. A few authoritative sources are recommended and that recommendation is justified. Changes in health care delivery must take best advantage of the Internet with least disruption to the important principles of practice and patient relationships. The health community needs effective interaction with medicine's inevitable partner, the Internet.

  8. Exploring the relationship between frequent internet use and health and social care resource use in a community-based cohort of older adults: an observational study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Caroline S; Round, Jeff; Morris, Stephen; Kharicha, Kalpa; Ford, John; Manthorpe, Jill; Iliffe, Steve; Goodman, Claire; Walters, Kate

    2017-07-21

    Given many countries' ageing populations, policymakers must consider how to mitigate or reduce health problems associated with old age, within budgetary constraints. Evidence of use of digital technology in delaying the onset of illness and reducing healthcare service use is mixed, with no clear consensus as yet. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between frequent internet use and patterns of health or social care resource use in primary care attendees who took part in a study seeking to improve the health of older adults. Participants recruited from primary care, aged >65 and living in semirural or urban areas in the south of England, were followed up at 3 and 6 months after completing a comprehensive questionnaire with personalised feedback on their health and well-being. We performed logistic regression analyses to investigate relationships between frequent internet use and patterns of service use, controlling for confounding factors, and clustering by general practitioner practice. Four categories of service use data were gathered: use of primary National Health Service (NHS) care; secondary NHS care; other community health and social care services; and assistance with washing, shopping and meals. Our results show, in this relatively healthy population, a positive relationship (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.23) between frequent internet use and use of any other community-based health services (physiotherapist, osteopath/chiropractor, dentist, optician/optometrist, counselling service, smoking cessation service, chiropodist/podiatrist, emergency services, other non-specific health services) and no relationship with the other types of care. No causal relationship can be postulated due to the study's design. No observed relationship between frequent internet use and primary or secondary care use was found, suggesting that older adults without internet access are not disadvantaged regarding healthcare use. Further research should explore how older people use

  9. Sustainability in health care by allocating resources effectively (SHARE) 4: exploring opportunities and methods for consumer engagement in resource allocation in a local healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Claire; Ko, Henry; Waller, Cara; Sloss, Pamela; Williams, Pamela

    2017-05-05

    This is the fourth in a series of papers reporting a program of Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) in a local healthcare setting. Healthcare decision-makers have sought to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of services through removal or restriction of practices that are unsafe or of little benefit, often referred to as 'disinvestment'. A systematic, integrated, evidence-based program for disinvestment was being established within a large Australian health service network. Consumer engagement was acknowledged as integral to this process. This paper reports the process of developing a model to integrate consumer views and preferences into an organisation-wide approach to resource allocation. A literature search was conducted and interviews and workshops were undertaken with health service consumers and staff. Findings were drafted into a model for consumer engagement in resource allocation which was workshopped and refined. Although consumer engagement is increasingly becoming a requirement of publicly-funded health services and documented in standards and policies, participation in organisational decision-making is not widespread. Several consistent messages for consumer engagement in this context emerged from the literature and consumer responses. Opportunities, settings and activities for consumer engagement through communication, consultation and participation were identified within the resource allocation process. Sources of information regarding consumer values and perspectives in publications and locally-collected data, and methods to use them in health service decision-making, were identified. A model bringing these elements together was developed. The proposed model presents potential opportunities and activities for consumer engagement in the context of resource allocation.

  10. Relative quality of internet-derived gastrointestinal cancer information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David S Y; Willicombe, Anita; Reid, Thomas D; Beaton, Ceri; Arnold, David; Ward, James; Davies, I Llion; Lewis, Wyn G

    2012-12-01

    Internet-derived health care information is increasingly accessed by patients, yet its quality and accuracy is variable and unregulated. The aim of this study was to assess the information available regarding common gastrointestinal cancers via three internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and Bing). The top 30 websites for each of the terms: oesophageal, gastric, pancreatic, colon and rectal cancer were evaluated (University of Michigan Consumer Health Website Checklist) and scored [-80 (poor) to 90 (excellent)]. The median score was 53 (-7 to 81) and was significantly higher for oesophageal (61) and pancreatic (65) cancer websites, compared with gastric (49), colon (48) and rectal cancer (50) (p = 0.014). Median scores related to charitable organisations were significantly better than academic, commercial, news agency, care provider, layperson and medical information websites collectively (79 vs. 42, p internet-derived gastrointestinal cancer information remains poor and patients and clinicians should be aware.

  11. Caring for Others: Internet Video-Conferencing Group Intervention for Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Elsa; Donahue, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to evaluate the effects of an innovative, Internet-based psychosocial intervention for family caregivers of older adults with neurodegenerative disease. Design and Methods: After receiving signed informed consent from each participant, we randomly assigned 66 caregivers to an Internet-based…

  12. [Internet: a fundamental tool for the retrieval of the information useful for medical research and health care in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, L; D'Agata, A

    2002-02-01

    Internet represents an essential aid for the professional updating of physicians and researches. Also for the research and therapy in oncology, Internet provides important such as bibliographic data, trials and guidelines with full text, as well as epidemiologic and statistical data. Some of the most authoritative sites are indicated.

  13. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-10-15

    Numerous Internet sites are given in relation with radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and ionizing radiation, nuclear activity, radiation protection for populations, radioactive waste management in France and Europe. (N.C.)

  14. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-07-15

    Numerous Internet sites are given in relation with radiotherapy, nuclear activity, radiation protection, and environment shared by sites in France, Europe, big agencies and non-ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  15. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-01-15

    This part of the issue gives Internet addresses in relation with nuclear energy, safety, radiation protection, legislation, at the national level and European and international level. A special part is devoted to non ionizing radiation. (N.C.)

  16. Mental Health Care Providers' Views of Their Work with Consumers and Their Reports of Recovery-Orientation, Job Satisfaction, and Personal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Stein, Catherine H

    2016-10-01

    The research examined the role of mental health care providers' perceptions of their professional relationships with consumers in understanding their reports of agency recovery-oriented services and their own sense of job satisfaction and personal growth. Multidisciplinary community mental health care providers (N = 105) responded to an online self-report questionnaire. Providers' reports of higher levels of working alliance and greater provider directiveness in working with consumers was significantly related to providers' reports of higher levels of agency recovery-orientation and higher levels of personal growth. Providers' reports of working alliance accounted for the largest proportion of variance in providers' reports of job satisfaction. Mental health providers' perceptions of relationships with consumers are central to understanding providers' views of agency recovery-orientation and sense of professional and personal well-being.

  17. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experience with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Gelsema, T.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee) was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal consi

  18. Making Sense of “Consumer Engagement” Initiatives to Improve Health and Health Care: A Conceptual Framework to Guide Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittler, Jessica N; Martsolf, Grant R; Telenko, Shannon J; Scanlon, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    Context Policymakers and practitioners continue to pursue initiatives designed to engage individuals in their health and health care despite discordant views and mixed evidence regarding the ability to cultivate greater individual engagement that improves Americans’ health and well-being and helps manage health care costs. There is limited and mixed evidence regarding the value of different interventions. Methods Based on our involvement in evaluating various community-based consumer engagement initiatives and a targeted literature review of models of behavior change, we identified the need for a framework to classify the universe of consumer engagement initiatives toward advancing policymakers' and practitioners' knowledge of their value and fit in various contexts. We developed a framework that expanded our conceptualization of consumer engagement, building on elements of two common models, the individually focused transtheoretical model of behavior and the broader, multilevel social ecological model. Finally, we applied this framework to one community's existing consumer engagement program. Findings Consumer engagement in health and health care refers to the performance of specific behaviors (“engaged behaviors”) and/or an individual's capacity and motivation to perform these behaviors (“activation”). These two dimensions are related but distinct and thus should be differentiated. The framework creates four classification schemas, by (1) targeted behavior types (self-management, health care encounter, shopping, and health behaviors) and by (2) individual, (3) group, and (4) community dimensions. Our example illustrates that the framework can systematically classify a variety of consumer engagement programs, and that this exercise and resulting characterization can provide a structured way to consider the program and how its components fit program goals both individually and collectively. Conclusions Applying the framework could help advance the field

  19. Is the Internet a useful and relevant source for health and health care information retrieval for German cardiothoracic patients? First results from a prospective survey among 255 Patients at a German cardiothoracic surgical clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diez Claudius

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not clear how prevalent Internet use among cardiopathic patients in Germany is and what impact it has on the health care utilisation. We measured the extent of Internet use among cardiopathic patients and examined the effects that Internet use has on users' knowledge about their cardiac disease, health care matters and their use of the health care system. Methods We conducted a prospective survey among 255 cardiopathic patients at a German university hospital. Results Forty seven respondents (18 % used the internet and 8,8 % (n = 23 went online more than 20 hours per month. The most frequent reason for not using the internet was disinterest (52,3 %. Fourteen patients (5,4 % searched for specific disease-related information and valued the retrieved information on an analogous scale (1 = not relevant, 5 = very relevant on median with 4,0. Internet use is age and education dependent. Only 36 (14,1 % respondents found the internet useful, whereas the vast majority would not use it. Electronic scheduling for ambulatory visits or postoperative telemedical monitoring were rather disapproved. Conclusion We conclude that Internet use is infrequent among our study population and the search for relevant health and disease related information is not well established.

  20. Migration of consumers to internet shopping in São Paulo: an exploratory study La adhesión del consumidor de São Paulo a las compras por la internet: un estudio exploratorio A adesão do consumidor paulistano às compras pela internet: um estudo exploratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Lara de Siqueira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although of increasing importance, electronic commerce is relatively new and little is known about consumer behavior and opinion. Internet shopping in Sao Paulo was examined to identify variables of influence including dissatisfaction with traditional options and other reasons that may affect this choice. During field interviews conducted with 408 people of high, medium and low incomes, most said they were not accustomed to electronic commerce. The major attraction was convenience while low Internet prices were not important. The interviews provided the basis for a proposal to determine individual interest in electronic commerce as a function of opinions expressed.Aunque sea una actividad en expansión, el comercio electrónico es una práctica relativamente nueva y el comportamiento y las opiniones de los consumidores con relación a él son relativamente poco conocidos. El objetivo de este estudio fue examinar la adhesión al comercio electrónico por los consumidores en la ciudad de Sao Paulo e identificar qué variables pueden intervenir en ese fenómeno, incluida entre ellas una posible insatisfacción con el comercio tradicional. También se estudiaron los posibles factores que pueden contribuir para que un individuo adopte ese procedimiento para hacer sus compras. Así, hemos desarrollado un estudio de campo basado en 408 entrevistas a personas de niveles de ingresos altos, medios y bajos, y los resultados, en resumen, muestran que la mayoría de las personas todavía está lejos del comercio electrónico, que el factor más importante para los consumidores que utilizan ese canal de compra es su sentido práctico y que, para los no adoptadores, no fueron identificados factores que parezcan contribuir decisivamente a una adhesión efectiva. El estudio sugiere que los bajos precios que se encuentran en Internet no son la principal motivación de los consumidores para elegir ese canal. Basado en la investigación de campo fue presentada una

  1. High mobile phone ownership, but low Internet and email usage among pregnant, HIV-infected women attending antenatal care in Johannesburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Kate; Schwartz, Sheree R; Van Rie, Annelies; Bassett, Jean; Vermund, Sten H; Pettifor, Audrey E

    2015-03-01

    We investigated mobile phone usage amongst HIV-positive pregnant women attending antenatal services in a primary care clinic in Johannesburg (n = 50). We conducted a semi-structured interview and asked them about their mobile phone, Internet and email use. The median age of the women was 28 years, 36% had moved one or more times in the past year, and most were employed or recently employed, albeit earning low wages. Nearly all women (94%) reported that they did not share their phone and 76% of the SIM cards were registered to the woman herself. The median time with the current phone was one year (range 1 month-6 years) and the median time with the current phone number was three years (range 1 month-13 years). Even though 42% of the participants were from outside South Africa, they all had mobile phone numbers local to South Africa. About one-third of respondents reported Internet use (30%) and about one-fifth reported using email (18%). Overall, 20% accessed the Internet and 10% accessed email on their mobile phone. Mobile phone interventions are feasible amongst HIV-positive pregnant women and may be useful in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Email and Internet-based interventions may not yet be appropriate. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Offering an American graduate medical HIV course to health care workers in resource-limited settings via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Michael H; Severynen, Anneleen O; Hals, Matthew P; Harrington, Robert D; Spach, David H; Kim, H Nina

    2012-01-01

    Western accredited medical universities can offer graduate-level academic courses to health care workers (HCWs) in resource-limited settings through the Internet. It is not known whether HCWs are interested in these online courses, whether they can perform as well as matriculated students, or whether such courses are educationally or practically relevant. In 2011, the University of Washington (UW) Schools of Medicine and Nursing offered the graduate course, "Clinical Management of HIV", to HCWs that included a demographic survey, knowledge assessment, and course evaluation. UW faculty delivered HIV clinical topics through ten 2-hour weekly sessions from the perspectives of practicing HIV medicine in developed and developing settings. HCWs viewed lectures through Adobe Acrobat Connect Pro (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA), and completed online homework on HIV Web Study (http://depts.washington.edu/hivaids/) and online quizzes. HCWs, who met the same passing requirements as UW students by attending 80% lectures, completing ≥90% homework, and achieving a cumulative ≥70% grade on quizzes, were awarded a certificate. 369 HCWs at 33 sites in 21 countries joined the course in 2011, a >15-fold increase since the course was first offered in 2007. The majority of HCWs came from Africa (72%), and most were physicians (41%), nurses (22%), or midlevel practitioners (20%). 298 HCWs (81%) passed all requirements and earned a certificate. In a paired analysis of pre- and post-course HIV knowledge assessments, 56% of HCWs improved their post-course score (p<0.0001) with 27% improving by at least 30%. In the course evaluation, most HCWs rated the course as excellent (53%) or very good (39%). This online HIV course demonstrated that opening a Western graduate medical and nursing curriculum to HCWs in resource-limited settings is feasible, popular, and valuable, and may address logistic and economic barriers to the provision of high quality education in these settings.

  3. Being an Informed Consumer of Health Information and Assessment of Electronic Health Literacy in a National Sample of Internet Users: Validity and Reliability of the e-HLS Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçkin, Gül; Yeatts, Dale; Hughes, Susan; Hudson, Cassie; Bell, Valarie

    2016-07-11

    The Internet, with its capacity to provide information that transcends time and space barriers, continues to transform how people find and apply information to their own lives. With the current explosion in electronic sources of health information, including thousands of websites and hundreds of mobile phone health apps, electronic health literacy is gaining an increasing prominence in health and medical research. An important dimension of electronic health literacy is the ability to appraise the quality of information that will facilitate everyday health care decisions. Health information seekers explore their care options by gathering information from health websites, blogs, Web-based forums, social networking websites, and advertisements, despite the fact that information quality on the Internet varies greatly. Nonetheless, research has lagged behind in establishing multidimensional instruments, in part due to the evolving construct of health literacy itself. The purpose of this study was to examine psychometric properties of a new electronic health literacy (ehealth literacy) measure in a national sample of Internet users with specific attention to older users. Our paper is motivated by the fact that ehealth literacy is an underinvestigated area of inquiry. Our sample was drawn from a panel of more than 55,000 participants maintained by Knowledge Networks, the largest national probability-based research panel for Web-based surveys. We examined the factor structure of a 19-item electronic Health Literacy Scale (e-HLS) through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency reliability, and construct validity on sample of adults (n=710) and a subsample of older adults (n=194). The AMOS graphics program 21.0 was used to construct a measurement model, linking latent factors obtained from EFA with 19 indicators to determine whether this factor structure achieved a good fit with our entire sample and the subsample (age ≥ 60

  4. The Relationship between Chinese Consumer Interaction and Brand Origin Image in the Internet Environment%互联网环境下的消费者互动与品牌原产地形象关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李东; 张耘堂; 唐桂

    2015-01-01

    本文对互联网环境下消费者互动以及品牌原产地形象的形成进行新的思考、界定并考虑新的影响因素,探讨消费者互动对品牌原产地形象在消费者心目中形成的难易程度所产生的影响。通过网络在线调查,应用相关分析和回归分析验证变量间的关系假设,结果表明:对原产地形象形成起重要作用的原产地认知影响变弱;对原产地形象形成起反作用的产品认知影响变强;消费者对原产地刻板印象的形成变得更加困难。%In the Internet environment, after the new thinking, new definitions and giving new affecting factors on Chi-nese consumer interaction and brand origin image, the paper studies the impact of the consumer interaction on the forma-tion of brand origin image.By online survey, correlation analysis and regression analysis, the hypotheses are verified. The research results show that the effect of origin cognition becomes weaker, which plays an important role in the forma-tion of origin image;the effect of product cognition becomes stronger, which has a counteractive effect on the formation of origin image;the formation of consumer inherent impression of brand origin is more difficult.

  5. Attitudes towards Social Networking and Sharing Behaviors among Consumers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin; Vernez, Simone L; Ormond, K E; Granovetter, Mark

    2013-10-14

    Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the development of appropriate and effective policies. This exploratory study investigates how consumers share personal genetic information and attitudes towards social networking behaviors. Adult participants aged 23 to 72 years old who purchased direct-to-consumer genetic testing from a personal genomics company were administered a web-based survey regarding their sharing activities and social networking behaviors related to their personal genetic test results. 80 participants completed the survey; of those, 45% shared results on Facebook and 50.9% reported meeting or reconnecting with more than 10 other individuals through the sharing of their personal genetic information. For help interpreting test results, 70.4% turned to Internet websites and online sources, compared to 22.7% who consulted their healthcare providers. Amongst participants, 51.8% reported that they believe the privacy of their personal genetic information would be breached in the future. Consumers actively utilize online social networking tools to help them share and interpret their personal genetic information. These findings suggest a need for careful consideration of policy recommendations in light of the current ambiguity of regulation and oversight of consumer initiated sharing activities.

  6. Attitudes towards Social Networking and Sharing Behaviors among Consumers of Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Granovetter

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how consumers of direct-to-consumer personal genetic services share personal genetic risk information. In an age of ubiquitous online networking and rapid development of social networking tools, understanding how consumers share personal genetic risk assessments is critical in the development of appropriate and effective policies. This exploratory study investigates how consumers share personal genetic information and attitudes towards social networking behaviors. Methods: Adult participants aged 23 to 72 years old who purchased direct-to-consumer genetic testing from a personal genomics company were administered a web-based survey regarding their sharing activities and social networking behaviors related to their personal genetic test results. Results: 80 participants completed the survey; of those, 45% shared results on Facebook and 50.9% reported meeting or reconnecting with more than 10 other individuals through the sharing of their personal genetic information. For help interpreting test results, 70.4% turned to Internet websites and online sources, compared to 22.7% who consulted their healthcare providers. Amongst participants, 51.8% reported that they believe the privacy of their personal genetic information would be breached in the future. Conclusion: Consumers actively utilize online social networking tools to help them share and interpret their personal genetic information. These findings suggest a need for careful consideration of policy recommendations in light of the current ambiguity of regulation and oversight of consumer initiated sharing activities.

  7. Validation of an aggregate exposure model for substances in consumer products: a case study of diethyl phthalate in personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmaar, Christiaan; Bokkers, Bas; ter Burg, Wouter; Schuur, Gerlienke

    2015-05-01

    As personal care products (PCPs) are used in close contact with a person, they are a major source of consumer exposure to chemical substances contained in these products. The estimation of realistic consumer exposure to substances in PCPs is currently hampered by the lack of appropriate data and methods. To estimate aggregate exposure of consumers to substances contained in PCPs, a person-oriented consumer exposure model has been developed (the Probabilistic Aggregate Consumer Exposure Model, PACEM). The model simulates daily exposure in a population based on product use data collected from a survey among the Dutch population. The model is validated by comparing diethyl phthalate (DEP) dose estimates to dose estimates based on biomonitoring data. It was found that the model's estimates compared well with the estimates based on biomonitoring data. This suggests that the person-oriented PACEM model is a practical tool for assessing realistic aggregate exposures to substances in PCPs. In the future, PACEM will be extended with use pattern data on other product groups. This will allow for assessing aggregate exposure to substances in consumer products across different product groups.

  8. The secret to a health benefits self-service model: a more informed consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, T R

    2001-01-01

    Sageo is the first full-service e-business to deliver health, dental, vision and welfare benefits via the Internet. The author describes the health care system's problems that have led to the need for participant-driven, self-service systems; describes Sageo's genesis and inaugural online enrollment; and explains how services like those offered by Sageo allow employers to "match, pace and lead" to a more informed health care consumer.

  9. Study on the Application of Internet of Things in Children's Health Care Center%物联网在儿童保健所的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 杨博源

    2013-01-01

    Internet of things is a new communication technology,which can be widely used in commercial areas,industrial areas and military area.This paper explains the principle of Internet of things,and studies on the techniques and designs in the application of children's health care center.%  物联网作为新兴的通信应用技术,不论在商业领域、工业领域还是军工领域上都有着广阔的应用空间。文中阐述物联网中相关的原理概念,并通过物联网在儿童保健院的设计应用范例,对物联网的应用技术及设计方案进行了研究。

  10. Influencing the online consumer's behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios

    2004-01-01

    Addresses one of the fundamental issues of e-marketing: how to attract and win over the consumer in the highly competitive Internet marketplace. Analyses the factors affecting the online consumer's behavior and examines how e-marketers can influence the outcome of the virtual interaction and buying

  11. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [IRSN, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2010-04-15

    This part of the issue gives Internet addresses in relation with nuclear energy, safety, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, legislation, at the national level and European and international level. A special part is devoted to non ionizing radiation. (N.C.)

  12. Internet Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet Banking (known also as online banking allows performing transactions and payments over the internet through a bank's secure website. This can be very useful, especially for banking outside bank hours (which tend to be very short and banking from anywhere where internet access is available. In most cases a web browser such as Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox is utilized and any normal internet connection is suitable. No special software or hardware is usually needed.

  13. Development and testing of a multimedia internet-based system for fidelity and monitoring of multidimensional treatment foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Edward G; Sprengelmeyer, Peter G; Davis, Betsy; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2012-10-16

    The fields of mental health, child welfare, and juvenile justice are jointly faced with the challenge of reducing the prevalence of antisocial behavior among adolescents. In the last 20 years, conduct disorders have moved from being considered intractable difficulties to having complex but available solutions. The treatments for even long-standing offending behavior among adolescents are now well documented and supported by a growing and compelling body of evidence. These empirically validated interventions are being widely disseminated, but the replication of the results from clinical trials in community settings has yet to be documented. The treatments, which produced impressive effects in a research context, are difficult to replicate without intensive monitoring of fidelity by the developers. Such monitoring is a barrier toward adoption; as the distance between the adopter and developer increases, so does cost. At the same time, states, communities, and agencies are under increasing pressure to implement those intervention services that have been shown to be most effective. The use of the Internet offers a potential solution in that existing reporting and data collection by clinicians can be subject to remote supervision. Such a system would have the potential to provide dissemination teams with more direct access to higher-quality data and would make adopters more likely to be able to implement services at the highest possible conformity to research protocols. To create and test such an innovative system for use with the Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) program, which is an in-home treatment (alternative to a residential- or group-home setting) for antisocial youths. This research could advance the knowledge base about developing innovative infrastructures in community settings to disseminate empirically validated treatments. The fidelity system was used and reviewed by parent and professional users: 20 foster parent users of the Parent Daily

  14. Managing people with mental health presentations in emergency departments--a service exploration of the issues surrounding responsiveness from a mental health care consumer and carer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphet, Julia; Innes, Kelli; Munro, Ian; O'Brien, Anthony; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Reed, Fiona; Kudinoff, Teresa

    2012-08-01

    Mainstreaming of mental health services (MHS) within the Australian medical system has generated a fundamental transformation in the way consumers and carers access emergency MHS. People present to the Emergency Department (ED) with many health issues which can often include the management of their mental illness, physical co morbidity, or substance use. This paper discusses the issues surrounding access to EDs for clients, families and staff in the context of presentations for mental health problems at a southern metropolitan hospital in Victoria. The pilot project utilised focus groups with mental health care consumers and carers to collaboratively focus on and document the mental health client's 'journey of care' in the ED. There is evidence to suggest from this project that the ED mental health client journey needs continuous improvement and evaluation.

  15. Developing consumer involvement in primary dental care. Report of a half-day seminar held at the Royal College of Surgeons of England on 15th September 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Batchelor, Paul; Johns, David J

    2009-01-01

    The seminar on developing consumer involvement in primary dental care, held during the morning of 15th September 2008, was a collaboration between the Lay Advisory Group and Research Committee of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) (FGDP[UK]). As Professor Mike Mulcahy (immediate past Dean of the Faculty) remarked during his address of welcome, it marked a new and exciting development in the Faculty's role in setting and maintaining professional standards for the benefit of patients. It brought together nearly 50 representatives of national bodies, such as the National Audit Office, consumer groups, the Faculty's Lay Advisory Group and Research Committee, the media and others. Many of the national bodies represented at the seminar had published reports on primary dental care during the last five years.

  16. Hybrid internet access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vivek; Baras, John S.; Dillon, Douglas; Falk, Aaron; Suphasindhu, Narin

    1995-01-01

    Access to the Internet is either too slow (dial-up SLIP) or too expensive (switched 56 kbps, frame relay) for the home user or small enterprise. The Center for Satellite and Hybrid Communication Networks and Hughes Network Systems have collaborated using systems integration principles to develop a prototype of a low-cost hybrid (dial-up and satellite) newtork terminal which can deliver data from the Internet to the user at rates up to 160 kbps. An asymmetric TCP/IP connection is used breaking the network link into two physical channels: a terrestrial dial-up for carrying data from the terminal into the Internet and a receive-only satellite link carrying IP packets from the Internet to the user. With a goal of supporting bandwidth hungry Internet applications such as Mosaic, Gopher, and FTP, this system has been designed to support any Intel 80386/486 PC, any commercial TCP/IP package, any unmodified host on the Internet, and any of the routers, etc., within the Internet. The design exploits the following three observations: 1) satellites are able to offer high bandwidth connections to a large geographical area, 2) a receive-only VSAT is cheap to manufacture and easier to install than one which can also transmit, and 3) most computer users, especially those in a home environment, will want to consume much more information than they generate. IP encapsulation, or tunneling, issued to manipulate the TCP/IP protocols to route packets asymmetrically.

  17. Consumer protection in electronic commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Andreea NEACŞU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Electronic commerce is one of the most important aspects of the Internet and allows people to buy instant. Fast and easy development of e-commerce has led to the necessity of consumer protection in cyberspace, where trade takes place, so as to ensure consumer safety and security matters. This article examines e-commerce in terms of consumer protection and data security, which concerns equally all stakeholders in the electronic market: buyers, sellers, banks, courier cargo and other participants.

  18. Consumer Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Melissa Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to prove that despite consumers' impression that they are alone in deciding their consumption decision they are wrong. Consumers are manipulated on various levels by marketers. It is the marketer who decides what consumer identities should be created. Consumers are persuaded by marketers on different levels beginning with consumers' needs. Marketers begin by appealing to consumer drives, motivations and emotions to persuade their consumers to purchase their brand...

  19. Physician Rating Websites: What Aspects Are Important to Identify a Good Doctor, and Are Patients Capable of Assessing Them? A Mixed-Methods Approach Including Physicians' and Health Care Consumers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenfluh, Fabia; Schulz, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Physician rating websites (PRWs) offer health care consumers the opportunity to evaluate their doctor anonymously. However, physicians' professional training and experience create a vast knowledge gap in medical matters between physicians and patients. This raises ethical concerns about the relevance and significance of health care consumers' evaluation of physicians' performance. To identify the aspects physician rating websites should offer for evaluation, this study investigated the aspects of physicians and their practice relevant for identifying a good doctor, and whether health care consumers are capable of evaluating these aspects. In a first step, a Delphi study with physicians from 4 specializations was conducted, testing various indicators to identify a good physician. These indicators were theoretically derived from Donabedian, who classifies quality in health care into pillars of structure, process, and outcome. In a second step, a cross-sectional survey with health care consumers in Switzerland (N=211) was launched based on the indicators developed in the Delphi study. Participants were asked to rate the importance of these indicators to identify a good physician and whether they would feel capable to evaluate those aspects after the first visit to a physician. All indicators were ordered into a 4×4 grid based on evaluation and importance, as judged by the physicians and health care consumers. Agreement between the physicians and health care consumers was calculated applying Holsti's method. In the majority of aspects, physicians and health care consumers agreed on what facets of care were important and not important to identify a good physician and whether patients were able to evaluate them, yielding a level of agreement of 74.3%. The two parties agreed that the infrastructure, staff, organization, and interpersonal skills are both important for a good physician and can be evaluated by health care consumers. Technical skills of a doctor and outcomes

  20. Application of a novel transdisciplinary communication technique to develop an Internet-based psychoeducational program: CaringGuidance™ After Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Robin M; McNees, Patrick; Meneses, Karen

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was is to create CaringGuidance™ After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, an Internet-based, self-guided psychoeducational program to facilitate adjustment among women in the first months after breast cancer diagnosis. Use of Internet technology addresses a gap in the delivery of psychoeducational clinical interventions immediately after breast cancer diagnosis; providing rapid access to information and guidance during a highly distressing and vital period of adjustment. A multi-step transdisciplinary communication process of Personae Creation, Layered Project Mapping©, and Rapid Iterative Prototyping (RIP) was applied to facilitate communication between researcher, technology team and content reviewers during clinical program development. Through three rounds of content review and two focus groups guided by this process, the reviewers, researcher and technology team communicated effectively; completing the project on-time and within budget. Application of a multi-step transdisciplinary communication process is feasible and essential to development of an Internet-based psychoeducational program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The health care burden and societal impact of acute otitis media in seven European countries: results of an Internet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Wolleswinkel-van den Bosch (Judith); E.A. Stolk (Elly); M. Francois (Martine); R. Gasparini (Roberto); M. Brosa (Max)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis paper estimates medical resource use, direct costs, and productivity losses and costs (indirect costs) during episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) in young children. A 24-item Internet questionnaire was developed for parents in Belgium (Flanders), France, Germany, Italy, The Netherl

  2. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular. Design/methodology/approach: Seven focus group interviews, four in the United...... Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework...... beliefs in predicting internet shopping behavior. Practical implications: The findings could be used to direct attention to consumer beliefs about internet grocery shopping which have the potential of acting as barriers to this line of e-commerce. Originality/value: To shed some light on the role...

  3. Internet economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1997-01-01

    A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect.......A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect....

  4. Internet Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1998-01-01

    Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing.......Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing....

  5. Internet factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  6. Internet Factories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkers, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis contributes a novel concept for introducing new network technologies in network infrastructures. The concept, called Internet factories, describes the methodical process to create and manage application-specific networks from application programs, referred to as Netapps. An Internet

  7. Internet Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1998-01-01

    Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing.......Article descibing and analysing the influence of the commercialisation of Internet on end-user and interconnect pricing....

  8. Internet economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik; Øst, Alexander Gorm

    1997-01-01

    A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect.......A paper on the economics of the Internet with respect to end user pricing and pricing og interconnect....

  9. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilie BUDICA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of consumers helps firms and organizations improve their marketing strategies by understanding issues such as: the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives; the psychology of how the consumer is influenced by his or her environment; the behavior of consumers while shopping or making other marketing decisions; limitations in consumer knowledge or information processing abilities influence decisions and marketing outcome; how consumer motivation and decision strategies differ between products that differ in their level of importance or interest that they entail for the consumer; and how marketers can adapt and improve their marketing campaigns and marketing strategies to more effectively reach the consumer.

  10. Internet marketing

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In the bachelor thesis are introduced theoretical concepts of the Internet and marketing, accented the need of marketing mix along with its specifics of the internet environment. Next is interpreted which tools can be used for marketing of firms and which marketing instruments are to be deployed. Final chapter illustrates socio-demographics of Czech internet users along with media market allocation from the perspective of all media as well as in the segment of the Internet.

  11. Development and pilot study of a marketing strategy for primary care/internet-based depression prevention intervention for adolescents (the CATCH-IT intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Benjamin W; Watson, Natalie; Bridges, John F P; Fogel, Joshua; Galas, Jill; Kramer, Clarke; Connery, Marc; McGill, Ann; Marko, Monika; Cardenas, Alonso; Landsback, Josephine; Dmochowska, Karoline; Kuwabara, Sachiko A; Ellis, Justin; Prochaska, Micah; Bell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent depression is both common and burdensome, and while evidence-based strategies have been developed to prevent adolescent depression, participation in such interventions remains extremely low, with less than 3% of at-risk individuals participating. To promote participation in evidence-based preventive strategies, a rigorous marketing strategy is needed to translate research into practice. To develop and pilot a rigorous marketing strategy for engaging at-risk individuals with an Internet-based depression prevention intervention in primary care targeting key attitudes and beliefs. A marketing design group was constituted to develop a marketing strategy based on the principles of targeting, positioning/competitor analysis, decision analysis, and promotion/distribution and incorporating contemporary models of behavior change. We evaluated the formative quality of the intervention and observed the fielding experience for prevention using a pilot study (observational) design. The marketing plan focused on "resiliency building" rather than "depression intervention" and was relayed by office staff and the Internet site. Twelve practices successfully implemented the intervention and recruited a diverse sample of adolescents with > 30% of all those with positive screens and > 80% of those eligible after phone assessment enrolling in the study with a cost of $58 per enrollee. Adolescent motivation for depression prevention (1-10 scale) increased from a baseline mean value of 7.45 (SD = 2.05) to 8.07 poststudy (SD = 1.33) (P = .048). Marketing strategies for preventive interventions for mental disorders can be developed and successfully introduced and marketed in primary care.

  12. The relationship between consumer insight and provider-consumer agreement regarding consumer's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Roe, David; Kravetz, Shlomo; Levy-Frank, Itamar; Meir, Taly

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between insight and mental health consumers and providers agreement regarding consumers rated quality of life (QoL). Seventy mental health consumers and their 23 care providers filled-out parallel questionnaires designed to measure consumer QoL. Consumers' insight was also assessed. For most QoL domains, agreement between consumers and providers was higher for persons with high insight. For the Psychological well being dimension a negative correlation was uncovered for persons with low insight indicating disagreement between consumer and provider. These findings are discussed within the context of the literature on insight and agreement between consumer and provider as related to the therapeutic alliance.

  13. Cultural dilemmas of choice: Deconstructing consumer choice in health communication between maternity-care providers and ethnic Chinese mothers in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shujie Phoebe; Munshi, Debashish; Cockburn-Wootten, Cheryl; Simpson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This article critically analyses the discourse of consumer choice embedded in health communication interactions between maternity-care providers and migrant ethnic Chinese mothers in New Zealand. Findings indicate that Chinese mothers, as the customers of the New Zealand maternity and health care services, are encouraged to "fit in" with the Western discourse of choice. However, the mothers' cultural predispositions for childbirth and communication have a significant impact on the ways in which they respond to and resist this discourse. Drawing on theoretical insights from postcolonialism and Third World feminism, this article contributes to the study of intercultural health communication by examining cultural dilemmas in the discourse of choice that is often taken for granted in Western health contexts. In doing so, it builds a platform for an inclusive maternity care and health environment in multicultural societies.

  14. The New York City eClinician Project: using Personal Digital Assistants and wireless internet access to support emergency preparedness and enhance clinical care in community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusumilli, Sri Raj; Tobin, Jonathan N; Younge, Richard G; Kendall, Mat; Kukafka, Rita; Khan, Sharib; Chang, Otto; Mahabir, Kasandra

    2006-01-01

    The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, The Community Health Care Association of New York State and Clinical Directors Network are collaborating on the "eClinician Project," which has distributed seven hundred public health-friendly, wireless (WiFi) enabled Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) to primary care clinicians working in New York City, federally funded, Community Health Centers (CHC) which serve minority underserved communities that suffer a disproportionate burden of chronic disease and lack access to health promotion disease prevention services. Each participating health center also received a wireless router to create an onsite internet hot spot to enable clinicians to have internet access. The goals of the eClinician Project are to: 1) To encourage adoption of information technology among providers in Community Health Centers in New York City by providing PDAs as a first line strategy towards achieving this goal, 2) enhance access to information on emergency preparedness, 3) improve patient outcomes by providing PDA-based clinical decision-support tools that support evidence-based care, 4) encourage chronic care management and health promotion/disease prevention activities, and 5) increase productivity and efficiency. CHC clinicians have received a hands-on, on-site orientation to PDAs. Ongoing training has continued via online CME-accredited webcasts (see www.CDNetwork.org). Clinical decision-support tools are available for download via the eClinician project web portal (see www.eClinician.org ). Public health alerts can be delivered to the PDAs or to the clinicians' desktop computers. Pre and post training surveys, in addition to a case study, have been used to evaluate the population demographics, PDA adoption by the clinicians, clinician attitudes towards using PDAs, PDA influence on clinical-decision making and barriers to adoption of PDAs and information technology in general.

  15. Wireless Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Zarki, M.; Heijenk, Geert; Lee, Kenneth S.; Bidgoli, H.

    This chapter addresses the topic of wireless Internet, the extension of the wireline Internet architecture to the wireless domain. As such the chapter introduces the reader to the dominant characteristics of the Internet, from its structure to the protocols that control the forwarding of data and

  16. Internet Accounting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pras, Aiko; Beijnum, van Bert-Jan; Sprenkels, Ron; Párhonyi, Robert

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Internet accounting and discusses the status of related work within the IETF and IRTF, as well as certain research projects. Internet accounting is different from accounting in POTS. To understand Internet accounting, it is important to answer questions like

  17. INTERNET CONSUMPTION FACTOR AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF INDICATORS SYSTEM ON THE INTERNET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria V. Aleshkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a studyonline consumer groups on the Internet,with the help of the developed systemperformance. Focuses on trends in thedevelopment of the Internet age segmentsand identify the factors of development.Tested results of the internet consumption coefficient.

  18. Effects of using consumer and expert ratings of an activities of daily living scale on predicting functional outcomes of postacute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q; Kane, R L

    2001-04-01

    To test the effects of using preference weights for activities of daily living (ADL) outcome measures derived from different sources, data from a large study of the outcomes of postacute care (PAC study) were analyzed using two different weightings for the ADL measures. Both were developed using the same magnitude estimation technique; one from a panel of long-term care experts (the expert rating system); the other from a group of elderly Medicare beneficiaries (the consumer rating system). Neither group was directly involved in the PAC study. Although ADL scores generated by both rating systems were highly correlated prior to hospitalization and at hospital discharge, the consumer and expert rating systems generated significantly different functional outcomes measured by the change of ADL scores with a few exceptions. Compared to the consumer rating system, the expert rating system generated a greater change in functional outcomes at each of three follow-up time points after hospital discharge. This study suggests that the choice of weights for ADL items is important.

  19. Online grocery retailing: What do consumers think?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Kim Bjarne; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework...... of consumers in an underperforming and understudied branch of internet retailing. Barriers in the consumers' minds to shop for groceries online are identified using an established theoretical framework.......Purpose: To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular. Design/methodology/approach: Seven focus group interviews, four in the United...

  20. PENGGUNAAN TEKNOLOGI INTERNET DALAM BISNIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oviliani Yuliana

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The uses of internet in business are for information exchange, product catalog, promotion media, electronic mail, bulletin boards, electronic questioner, and mailing list. Internet can also be used for dialog, discussion, and consultation with customer online, therefore consumer can be proactively and interactively involved in designing, developing, marketing, and selling products. There are 2 methods for marketing products via internet, which are push and pull marketing. The advantages of internet in business strategy are global and interactive communication, information supply; consumer based service; increased cooperation; possibility to open new marketplace, product or services; and integrated the activity on-line. There are 2 applications in electronic commerce, which are business-to-business and business-to-consumer commerce. Electronic commerce payment transaction is arranged by Electronic Funds Transfer system, whereas the data security is governed by Secure Socket Layer, which then be developed to Secure Electronic Transaction. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Internet dalam bisnis digunakan untuk pertukaran informasi, katalog produk, media promosi, surat elektronik, bulletin boards, kuesioner elektronik, dan mailing list. Internet juga bisa digunakan untuk berdialog, berdiskusi, dan konsultasi dengan konsumen secara on-line, sehingga konsumen dapat dilibatkan secara proaktif dan interaktif dalam perancangan, pengembangan, pemasaran, dan penjualan produk. Pemasaran lewat internet ada 2 metode, yaitu push dan pull marketing. Keunggulan strategi bisnis yang dapat diperoleh dari internet adalah komunikasi global dan interaktif; menyediakan informasi dan pelayanan sesuai dengan kebutuhan konsumen; meningkatkan kerja sama; memungkinkan untuk membuka pasar, produk, atau pelayanan baru; serta mengintegrasikan aktivitas secara on-line. Aplikasi Electronic Commerce ada 2, yaitu: Business-to-Consumer dan Business-to-Business Commerce. Pembayaran

  1. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experiences with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delnoij Diana MJ

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA or total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of this new instrument and to assess its ability to measure differences in quality of care between hospitals. Methods Survey data of 1,675 subjects who underwent a THA or TKA were used to evaluate the psychometric properties. Exploratory factor analyses were performed and item-total correlations and inter-factor correlations were calculated to assess the construct validity of the instrument. Reliability analyses included tests of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Finally, multilevel analyses were performed to assess the ability of the instrument to discriminate between hospitals in quality of care. Results Exploratory factor analyses indicated that the survey consisted of 21 items measuring five aspects of care (i.e. communication with nurses, communication with doctors, communication with general practitioner, communication about new medication, and pain control. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.76 to 0.90 indicating good internal consistency. The survey's ability to discriminate between hospitals was partly supported by multilevel analysis. Two scales (i.e. communication with nurses and communication with doctors were able to measure differences between hospitals with respect to patients' experiences with quality of care. Logistic multilevel analyses indicated that hospitals explained part of the variation between patients in receiving information. Conclusion These findings suggest that the CQI Hip Knee is reliable and valid for use in Dutch health care. Health care providers or health plans can use this survey to measure patients' experiences with hospital care and to identify variations in care

  2. Adolescent and parent experiences with a primary care/Internet-based depression prevention intervention (CATCH-IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iloabachie, Chidubem; Wells, Corrie; Goodwin, Brady; Baldwin, Melinda; Vanderplough-Booth, Karen; Gladstone, Tracy; Murray, Michael; Fogel, Joshua; Van Voorhees, Benjamin W

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a mixed-methods approach to understand the experience of adolescents involved in the Internet-based intervention for depression, Competent Adulthood Transition with Cognitive Behavioral Humanistic and Interpersonal Training (CATCH-IT), as well as the experiences of their parents while they were involved. Qualitative analysis was done with grounded theory-based categorization of interview comments and typed program responses (adolescents only) into themes. Quantitative analysis was done with self-report surveys. The article describes the nine themes reflecting the adolescent experience and the three themes reflecting the parent experience. The article also describes the results of the quantitative surveys of helpfulness and attitudes change, which were favorable of the Internet-based intervention. Separate models explaining the psychological transformation of the adolescents and the experience of the parents are proposed. The positive experience of the adolescents and parents involved in CATCH-IT is discussed in the context of growing interest in how best to utilize Internet-based interventions for mental illness, and suggestions are made for future investigation.

  3. Thumbnail Sketches: EDTA-Type Chelating Agents in Everyday Consumer Products: Some Medicinal and Personal Care Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J. Roger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)-type chelating agents found in ophthalmic products, personal care products, and disinfectants. Also discusses the properties and action of these EDTA agents. (JN)

  4. Analysis Components of the Digital Consumer Behavior in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Bogdan Onete

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is investigating the Romanian consumer behavior in the context of the evolution of the online shopping. Given that online stores are a profitable business model in the area of electronic commerce and because the relationship between consumer digital Romania and its decision to purchase products or services on the Internet has not been sufficiently explored, this study aims to identify specific features of the new type of consumer and to examine the level of online shopping in Romania. Therefore a documentary study was carried out with statistic data regarding the volume and the number of transactions of the online shopping in Romania during 2010-2014, the type of products and services that Romanians are searching the Internet for and demographics of these people. In addition, to study more closely the online consumer behavior, and to interpret the detailed secondary data provided, an exploratory research was performed as a structured questionnaire with five closed questions on the distribution of individuals according to the gender category they belong (male or female; decision to purchase products / services in the virtual environment in the past year; the source of the goods / services purchased (Romanian or foreign sites; factors that have determined the consumers to buy products from foreign sites; categories of products purchased through online transactions from foreign merchants. The questionnaire was distributed electronically via Facebook social network users and the data collected was processed directly in the Facebook official app to create and interpret responses to surveys. The results of this research correlated with the official data reveals the following characteristics of the digital consumer in Romania: atypical European consumer, interested more in online purchases from abroad, influenced by the quality and price of the purchase. This paper assumed a careful analysis of the online acquisitions phenomenon and also

  5. Saving the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    The Internet goose has laid countless golden eggs, along with a growing number of rotten ones. But it's the rotten ones that now tempt commercial, governmental, and consumer interests to threaten the Internet's uniquely creative power. The expediently selected, almost accidentally generative properties of the Internet - its technical openness, ease of access and mastery, and adaptability - have combined, especially when coupled with those of the PC, to produce an unsurpassed environment for innovative experiment. Those same properties, however, also make the Internet hospitable to various forms of wickedness: hacking, porn, spam, fraud, theft, predation, and attacks on the network itself. As these undesirable phenomena proliferate, business, government, and many users find common cause for locking down Internet and PC architecture in the interests of security and order. PC and Internet security vulnerabilities are a legitimate menace. However, the most likely reactions - if they are not forestalled - will be at least as unfortunate as the security problems themselves. Consider the growing profusion of "tethered appliances" - devices whose functions cannot readily be altered by their owners (think TiVo). Such appliances take Internet innovations and wrap them up in a neat, easy-to-use package, which is good - but only if the Internet and PC can remain sufficiently in the center of the digital ecosystem to produce the next round of innovations and to generate competition. People buy these devices for their convenience or functionality and may appreciate the fact that they are safer to use (they limit the damage users can do through ignorance or carelessness). But the risk is that users, by migrating to such appliances, will unwittingly trade away the future benefits of generativity - a loss that will go unappreciated even as innovation tapers off.

  6. Cultural Activation of Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Carole E; Reid-Rose, Lenora; Joseph, Adriana M; Hernandez, Jennifer C; Haugland, Gary

    2016-02-01

    This column discusses "cultural activation," defined as a consumer's recognition of the importance of providing cultural information to providers about cultural affiliations, challenges, views about, and attitudes toward behavioral health and general medical health care, as well as the consumer's confidence in his or her ability to provide this information. An aid to activation, "Cultural Activation Prompts," and a scale that measures a consumer's level of activation, the Cultural Activation Measurement Scale, are described. Suggestions are made about ways to introduce cultural activation as a component of usual care.

  7. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ilie BUDICA; Silvia PUIU; Bogdan Andrei BUDICA

    2010-01-01

    The study of consumers helps firms and organizations improve their marketing strategies by understanding issues such as: the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives; the psychology of how the consumer is influenced by his or her environment; the behavior of consumers while shopping or making other marketing decisions; limitations in consumer knowledge or information processing abilities influence decisions and marke...

  8. Consumer satisfaction among patients and their general practitioners about involving nurse specialists in primary care for patients with urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P. Albers-Heitner (C. P.); R.A.G. Winkens (R. A G); B. Berghmans; M.A. Joore (Manuela); F.H. Nieman (Fred); J.L. Severens (Hans); T. Lagro-Janssen (Toine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUrinary incontinence (UI) is a very common problem, but existing guidelines on UI are not followed. To bring care in line with guidelines, we planned an intervention to involve nurse specialists on UI in primary care and assessed this in a randomised controlled trial. Alongside this inte

  9. Design of a terminal solution for integration of in-home health care devices and services towards the Internet-of-Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhibo; Zheng, Lirong; Tian, Junzhe; Kao-Walter, Sharon; Dubrova, Elena; Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    In-home health care services based on the Internet-of-Things are promising to resolve the challenges caused by the ageing of population. But the existing research is rather scattered and shows lack of interoperability. In this article, a business-technology co-design methodology is proposed for cross-boundary integration of in-home health care devices and services. In this framework, three key elements of a solution (business model, device and service integration architecture and information system integration architecture) are organically integrated and aligned. In particular, a cooperative Health-IoT ecosystem is formulated, and information systems of all stakeholders are integrated in a cooperative health cloud as well as extended to patients' home through the in-home health care station (IHHS). Design principles of the IHHS includes the reuse of 3C platform, certification of the Health Extension, interoperability and extendibility, convenient and trusted software distribution, standardised and secured electrical health care record handling, effective service composition and efficient data fusion. These principles are applied to the design of an IHHS solution called iMedBox. Detailed device and service integration architecture and hardware and software architecture are presented and verified by an implemented prototype. The quantitative performance analysis and field trials have confirmed the feasibility of the proposed design methodology and solution.

  10. Enterprises Marketing Strategy Research Based on Internet Survey of E generation Consumer Characteristics%基于网络调查E世代消费特征的营销策略探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马琴琴; 卢东宁

    2013-01-01

    Expanding domestic demand is the hotspot and difficulty of economic development in China. Enterprises should be the main force of expanding domestic demand.The E generation who grows up under the background of the new economy and the new electronic communication technologies has been flooded with numerous media information,forming a huge consumption potentiality and specific concept of consumption, should be paid high attention by the enterprises as a market consumption leader.Using the Internet and other media information,it can provide necessary basis for enterprise developing marketing strategy to understand the consumer's consumption behavior characteristics and consumption hot spots. And it can also help to attract more customers,to get more market shares and gain more competitive advantages.%扩大内需是我国经济发展的热点和难点。企业则是扩大内需的主力军。在新经济和新电子通讯技术下成长和成熟起来的E世代受众多媒体信息的充斥,形成了巨大的消费潜力和特殊的消费观念,成为市场消费的引领者,应受到企业的高度关注。利用网络等媒体信息,了解E世代的消费行为特征及消费热点,据此制定有针对性的营销策略,是企业赢得顾客、赢得市场份额、赢得竞争优势的主要手段。

  11. An Investigation of Internet Users’ Attitudes to Targeted Internet Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Luke PC

    2009-01-01

    New technologies, especially in relation to web marketing, have created a marketing watershed in terms of opportunities for marketers to target and personalise advertising to internet users. The purpose of this project is to explore to what extent this type of marketing has, in some cases, led to psychological concerns amongst consumers. The attitudinal dimensions of control, privacy and trust are emphasised within the literature and a comparative survey of 64 internet users is conducted and ...

  12. The digital transformation of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coile, R C

    2000-01-01

    The arrival of the Internet offers the opportunity to fundamentally reinvent medicine and health care delivery. The "e-health" era is nothing less than the digital transformation of the practice of medicine, as well as the business side of the health industry. Health care is only now arriving in the "Information Economy." The Internet is the next frontier of health care. Health care consumers are flooding into cyberspace, and an Internet-based industry of health information providers is springing up to serve them. Internet technology may rank with antibiotics, genetics, and computers as among the most important changes for medical care delivery. Utilizing e-health strategies will expand exponentially in the next five years, as America's health care executives shift to applying IS/IT (information systems/information technology) to the fundamental business and clinical processes of the health care enterprise. Internet-savvy physician executives will provide a bridge between medicine and management in the adoption of e-health technology.

  13. Supporting Client and Family Engagement in Care Through the Planning and Implementation of an Online Consumer Health Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Maxwell BScOT, MSc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Web-based portals and electronic health records are making it easier for clients and families to access health information. This improved transparency and access to information has the potential to promote activation and improve outcomes, but to realize these benefits, the information needs to be valuable, meaningful, and understandable. Engagement of the end users in the planning and implementation will ensure that the product meets the needs of the consumers. The purpose of this case study is to describe the client and family engagement strategies that were employed to support the process of planning and implementing an online consumer health portal at a pediatric rehabilitation hospital to support the successful launch of this new information-sharing technology platform.

  14. Information superhighway or information traffic jam for healthcare consumers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, I

    1997-01-01

    The phenomenal development and growth of the information superhighway over the past few years has brought with an ever-increasing number of sites associated with health care. At the same time, community access to the Internet and multimedia technology has allowed greater access to healthcare sites by consumers wishing to find healthcare information relevant to their needs. The Internet has greater potential for improving the healthcare knowledge of the community, especially in remote areas or in parts of the community that have limited access to community health infrastructure. However, most of the current development of healthcare sites has focused on the needs of healthcare professionals rather than consumers. Indeed, with the volume of information available over the Internet, it is easy to spend hours browsing through a maze of sites with information that often is fragmented, incomplete, or only accessible with a password. Once a relevant site is located, the information often is presented as vast amounts of text with possibly some graphics. It appears little consideration is given during the development of web sites to the actual presentation of the information. For the full potential of the information superhighway to be realized in relation to health care, more consideration should be given during the development stages of web sites to how the information is presented and how to make access more streamlined.

  15. Information searches by consumers of miniature automobiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dao-ping; LIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the information search behaviors of Chinese consumers of miniature automobiles. First, we identified the main sources where consumers acquire or seek information about miniature automobiles and discussed their extent of information search. Then, based on logistic regression and optimal scaling regression of statistics, we studied the influences of characteristics of consumers of miniature automobiles on the extent of information search and on Internet usage. The results indicate that consumers often utilize four sources to obtain information about miniature automobiles. The dominant information source for consumers is their friends/family, followed by dealers, newspapers, and TV. Age, occupation, education and income significantly affect the extent of information search, but gender and city of residence do not have significant impacts. Age, city of residence, occupation, education and income produce significant influences on Internet usage. Gender has an insignificant influence on whether a consumer uses the Internet to search for information.

  16. A systematic review of recent smartphone, Internet and Web 2.0 interventions to address the HIV continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Nekkanti, Manali; Bauermeister, Jose; Bull, Sheana; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2015-03-01

    eHealth, mHealth and "Web 2.0" social media strategies can effectively reach and engage key populations in HIV prevention across the testing, treatment, and care continuum. To assess how these tools are currently being used within the field of HIV prevention and care, we systematically reviewed recent (2013-2014) published literature, conference abstracts, and funded research. Our searches identified 23 published intervention studies and 32 funded projects underway. In this synthesis we describe the technology modes applied and the stages of the HIV care cascade addressed, including both primary and secondary prevention activities. Overall trends include use of new tools including social networking sites, provision of real-time assessment and feedback, gamification and virtual reality. While there has been increasing attention to use of technology to address the care continuum, gaps remain around linkage to care, retention in care, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

  17. Google It!: Urban Community College Students' Use of the Internet to Obtain Self-Care and Personal Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennis, Lesley; McNamara, Gloria; Seidel, Erica; Shneyderman, Yuliya

    2015-01-01

    Background: As electronic resources increasingly play a major role in consumer health, eHealth literacy has emerged as a valuable tool to improve and enhance health knowledge and behavior. Yet for some populations, access to health information alone does not lead to better health practices or outcomes. Low income populations increasingly rely on…

  18. Medical Underwriting In Long-Term Care Insurance: Market Conditions Limit Options For Higher-Risk Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Portia Y; Grabowski, David C; Cohen, Marc; Shi, Xiaomei; Stevenson, David G

    2016-08-01

    A key feature of private long-term care insurance is that medical underwriters screen out would-be buyers who have health conditions that portend near-term physical or cognitive disability. We applied common underwriting criteria based on data from two long-term care insurers to a nationally representative sample of individuals in the target age range (50-71 years) for long-term care insurance. The screening criteria put upper bounds on the current proportion of Americans who could gain coverage in the individual market without changes to medical underwriting practice. Specifically, our simulations show that in the target age range, approximately 30 percent of those whose wealth meets minimum industry standards for suitability for long-term care insurance would have their application for such insurance rejected at the underwriting stage. Among the general population-without considering financial suitability-we estimated that 40 percent would have their applications rejected. The predicted rejection rates are substantially higher than the rejection rates of about 20-25 percent of applicants in the actual market. In evaluating reforms for long-term care financing and their potential to increase private insurance rates, as well as to reduce financial pressure on public safety-net programs, policy makers need to consider the role of underwriting in the market for long-term care insurance.

  19. Internet Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  20. [Internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkeila, Jyrki

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction is defined as uncontrolled and harmful use of Internet, which manifests in three forms: gaming, various sexual activities and excessive use of emails, chats or SMS messaging. Several studies have found that abuse of alcohol and other substances, depression and other health problems are associated with Internet addiction. In boys and men depression may be more a consequence of the addiction than a cause for it. ADHD seems to be a significant background factor for developing the condition. Because it is almost impossible to lead a life without Internet and computers nowadays, it is unrealistic to aim towards full abstinence. Treatment has generally followed the guidelines adapted for pathological gambling.

  1. 基于物联网的智能居家养老系统设计%Intelligent Home Care System Design Based on Internet of Things

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈静桥; 刘怡; 赵爽

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent home care system based on Internet of things is composed of the environment subsystem,security subsystem and accident prevention system.The accident prevention system provides the psychological needs of respecting the elderly and their children, and can send out ifrst aid information in time. Experiments show that the system has low cost and simple structure.%基于物联网的智能居家养老系统由环境子系统、安防子系统和意外防范子系统组成,其中意外防范子系统提供了尊重老年人隐私和老年人与子女联系的心理需求,并能及时发出急救信息。通过文章的实验显示,本系统成本低,结构简单。

  2. Human health risk assessment of chloroxylenol in liquid hand soap and dishwashing soap used by consumers and health-care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Lisa J; Rodricks, Joseph D; Turnbull, Duncan; DeLeo, Paul C; Nash, J Frank; Quiñones-Rivera, Antonio; Carlson, Pete A

    2016-10-01

    A quantitative human risk assessment of chloroxylenol was conducted for liquid hand and dishwashing soap products used by consumers and health-care workers. The toxicological data for chloroxylenol indicate lack of genotoxicity, no evidence of carcinogenicity, and minimal systemic toxicity. No observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) were established from chronic toxicity studies, specifically a carcinogenicity study that found no cancer excess (18 mg/kg-day) and studies of developmental and reproductive toxicity (100 mg/kg-day). Exposure to chloroxylenol for adults and children was estimated for two types of rinse-off cleaning products, one liquid hand soap, and two dishwashing products. The identified NOAELs were used together with exposure estimates to derive margin of exposure (MOE) estimates for chloroxylenol (i.e., estimates of exposure over NOAELs). These estimates were designed with conservative assumptions and likely overestimate exposure and risk (i.e., highest frequency, 100% dermal penetration). The resulting MOEs ranged from 178 to over 100, 000, 000 indicating negligibly small potential for harm related to consumer or health-care worker exposure to chloroxylenol in liquid soaps used in dish washing and hand washing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Consumer Behaviour in Online Shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Hasslinger, Anders; Hodzic, Selma; Opazo, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    The Internet has developed into a new distribution channel and online transactions are rapidly increasing. This has created a need to understand how the consumer perceives online purchases. The purpose of this dissertation was to examine if there are any particular factors that influence the online consumer. Primary data was collected through a survey that was conducted on students at the University of Kristianstad. Price, Trust and Convenience were identified as important factors. Price was ...

  4. SPORT CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftime Dragoș Adrian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Without any doubt, sport has become a major consumer market, either we discuss about practicing any kind of sport at professional or amateur level, or we are just interested by a competition, sport organization or an athlete as a regular consumer. From this last perspective, we can distinguish between two types of behaviors, respectively the spectator and the supporter or fan. Each of these two typologies has its own characteristics which define, in a significant manner, the consumer behavior. A correct understanding and management of this phenomenon, of the factors that influence the attitudes and the decisions taken by the respective consumer, of the display manner for the consumer behavior have a major importance from the management and marketing point of view. This paper focuses on the football consumer and describes, first of all, the main characteristics of each of the typologies mentioned above from this perspective, presenting also the reasons for their transition from passive supporter to fan. Another issue we approach in the current paper refers to the changes appeared in the consumer behavior when the market segment is represented by those supporters whose teams are either relegated or liquidated, which is a global phenomenon in the football area. Having in mind this aspect and taking into consideration the influence of media (TV, press, Internet, social media etc, some individual benchmarks that influence those consumer’s behavior are identified within the context of the general typologies previously mentioned. These influences help the consumer to obtain benefits or satisfaction similar to those already lost. The findings may be used in further research focused on that particular market segment and could provide the necessary support data for further development of proper techniques and tools for reshaping and changing the respective consumer behavior.

  5. Quality of care in a low-income consumer-driven health plan: assessment of healthcare effectiveness data information set (HEDIS) scores for secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westover, Chad; Arredondo, Patricia H; Chapa, Griselda; Cole, Evan; Campbell, Claudia R

    2014-01-01

    The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) may create an estimated 16 million new Medicaid enrollees. This underscores the need to develop innovative strategies to provide efficient care to this population without compromising quality. To address concerns that consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs) and cost sharing discourage individuals from seeking needed care, we examined the Healthcare Effectiveness Data Information Set (HEDIS) measures of secondary prevention for a CDHP offered to uninsured, non-Medicaid eligible adults with incomes under 200% of the federal poverty level and compared them to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) benchmarks achieved by national Medicaid and commercially insured health plans. Results suggest that the cost-sharing component in the CDHP plan did not deter these low-income enrollees from pursuing or receiving appropriate care when compared to either Medicaid or commercially insured populations. As these results are only descriptive and not statistical measures, further research is needed with comparable populations and more detailed data for hypothesis testing.

  6. There is no health without mental health: are we educating Australian nurses to care for the health consumer of the 21st century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynaden, Dianne

    2010-06-01

    One in five Australians has a diagnosable mental illness and the impact of the illness on the individual, their family, and the community is significant. Since comprehensive nursing was introduced in the 1980s there have been repeated concerns raised regarding the preparedness of graduates from Australian undergraduate nursing programs to care for people who have a mental illness. In 2009, despite a recent comprehensive national review of the mental health/illness content in pre-registration curricula, these concerns remain. The nursing profession must have a responsibility to the global community to ensure that registered nurses are educated to meet evolving health challenges and the needs of the health consumer in the 21st Century. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the prevalence and impact of mental illness on health care outcomes in all settings and to challenge the profession to acknowledge that mental health nursing content must be a core area of all undergraduate curricula. A nationally coordinated response to address the long standing identified deficits in the educational preparation of comprehensive nurses is now a priority to ensure that nurses remain a major stakeholder group in the delivery of health care and key health informants and decision makers within the global health care arena.

  7. An affordable physician- and consumer-friendly health care system: 2008 democratic and republican presidential candidates' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzlinger, Regina E

    2008-01-01

    Winter issues of The American Heart Hospital Journal traditionally focus on health care policy issues. As health care reform in the United States is a topic of major importance in the upcoming presidential election, we invited Dr Regina E. Herzlinger, the Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard University and a noted expert in the field, to provide an analysis of the major proposals currently under debate by the candidates. We invite your comments in the coming months as the field of candidates narrows and the focus on reform sharpens.-Sylvan Lee Weinberg, Editor in Chief.

  8. Role of social media and the Internet in pathways to care for adolescents and young adults with psychotic disorders and non-psychotic mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael L; Rizvi, Asra F; Correll, Christoph U; Kane, John M; Confino, Jamie

    2017-08-01

    Although psychosis often occurs during adolescence, there has been little research on how the ubiquitously used Internet and social media could impact pathways to care. We examined how youth with psychotic spectrum disorders (PSD) versus non-psychotic mood disorders (NPMD) use online resources in the early illness stages. Social media use and pathways to care data were collected using a semi-structured interview from 80 youth (PSD = 40 and NPMD = 40) aged 12-21 years within 2 years of symptom onset. A total of 97.5% of participants (mean age = 18.3 years) regularly used social media, spending approximately 2.6 ± 2.5 h per day online. There were 22.4% of our sample (PSD = 19.4%, NPMD = 25.0%, P = 0.56) who reported waiting to reach out for help believing that symptoms would disappear. A total of 76.5% (PSD = 67.5%, NPMD = 85.0%, P = 0.06) noticed social media habit changes during symptom emergence. Thirty per cent reported discussing their symptoms on social media (PSD = 22.5%, NPMD = 37.5%, P = 0.14). NPMD patients sought information most on how to stop symptoms (40.0% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.01), while PSD youth were more commonly interested in what caused their symptoms (21.6% vs. 15.0%, P = 0.45). More PSD patients (42.9% vs. 25.0%, P = 0.10) would prefer to receive mental health information via the Internet. Altogether, 63.6% (PSD = 64.9%, NPMD = 62.5%, P = 0.83) were amenable to clinicians proactively approaching them via social media during symptom emergence. A total of 74.3% (PSD = 78.4%, NPMD = 70.0%, P = 0.40) liked the idea of obtaining help/advice from professionals via social media. The Internet and social media provide an unparalleled opportunity to supplement and potentially transform early intervention services, and acceptance of this approach appears to be high. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. The effectiveness of mobile-health technology-based health behaviour change or disease management interventions for health care consumers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, Caroline; Phillips, Gemma; Galli, Leandro; Watson, Louise; Felix, Lambert; Edwards, Phil; Patel, Vikram; Haines, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies could be a powerful media for providing individual level support to health care consumers. We conducted a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions delivered to health care consumers. We searched for all controlled trials of mobile technology-based health interventions delivered to health care consumers using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Global Health, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, UK NHS HTA (Jan 1990-Sept 2010). Two authors extracted data on allocation concealment, allocation sequence, blinding, completeness of follow-up, and measures of effect. We calculated effect estimates and used random effects meta-analysis. We identified 75 trials. Fifty-nine trials investigated the use of mobile technologies to improve disease management and 26 trials investigated their use to change health behaviours. Nearly all trials were conducted in high-income countries. Four trials had a low risk of bias. Two trials of disease management had low risk of bias; in one, antiretroviral (ART) adherence, use of text messages reduced high viral load (>400 copies), with a relative risk (RR) of 0.85 (95% CI 0.72-0.99), but no statistically significant benefit on mortality (RR 0.79 [95% CI 0.47-1.32]). In a second, a PDA based intervention increased scores for perceived self care agency in lung transplant patients. Two trials of health behaviour management had low risk of bias. The pooled effect of text messaging smoking cessation support on biochemically verified smoking cessation was (RR 2.16 [95% CI 1.77-2.62]). Interventions for other conditions showed suggestive benefits in some cases, but the results were not consistent. No evidence of publication bias was demonstrated on visual or statistical examination of the funnel plots for either disease management or health behaviours. To address the limitation of the older search, we also reviewed more recent literature. Text messaging interventions increased adherence to ART and

  10. The effectiveness of mobile-health technology-based health behaviour change or disease management interventions for health care consumers: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Free

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mobile technologies could be a powerful media for providing individual level support to health care consumers. We conducted a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions delivered to health care consumers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched for all controlled trials of mobile technology-based health interventions delivered to health care consumers using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Global Health, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, UK NHS HTA (Jan 1990-Sept 2010. Two authors extracted data on allocation concealment, allocation sequence, blinding, completeness of follow-up, and measures of effect. We calculated effect estimates and used random effects meta-analysis. We identified 75 trials. Fifty-nine trials investigated the use of mobile technologies to improve disease management and 26 trials investigated their use to change health behaviours. Nearly all trials were conducted in high-income countries. Four trials had a low risk of bias. Two trials of disease management had low risk of bias; in one, antiretroviral (ART adherence, use of text messages reduced high viral load (>400 copies, with a relative risk (RR of 0.85 (95% CI 0.72-0.99, but no statistically significant benefit on mortality (RR 0.79 [95% CI 0.47-1.32]. In a second, a PDA based intervention increased scores for perceived self care agency in lung transplant patients. Two trials of health behaviour management had low risk of bias. The pooled effect of text messaging smoking cessation support on biochemically verified smoking cessation was (RR 2.16 [95% CI 1.77-2.62]. Interventions for other conditions showed suggestive benefits in some cases, but the results were not consistent. No evidence of publication bias was demonstrated on visual or statistical examination of the funnel plots for either disease management or health behaviours. To address the limitation of the older search, we also reviewed more recent literature. CONCLUSIONS: Text

  11. Home Health Care System Based on The Internet of Things%物联网家庭健康监护系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄永健; 王伟; 谢广明; 罗文广

    2013-01-01

    针对现有的医疗模式已无法满足人们需求的问题,提出一种基于物联网的家庭医疗监护系统的技术架构。设计了物联网家庭健康监护系统,并详细介绍可移动智能终端的硬、软件设计。实现了血压、脉搏、体温、体重生理参数的采取、传输、存储和查询等功能,通过可移动智能终端和We b远程访问的方式向用户和医护人员提供生理数据访问。分析结果表明:该系统对提高医疗监护设备的智能化、实现健康监护面向大众化都有着积极的意义。%Aim at the problem that current medical model has no longer met people’s growing need a technical framework of medical care system base on internet of things (IOT) is proposed in this paper. The IOT home health care system is designed base on this technical framework. The software and hardware of removable smart terminal of the system is referred in detail. The system can collect four type of physiological information which include blood pressure, pulse condition, temperature and body weight and then transfers them to the database through wireless sensor network and TCP/IP network. Doctor and users can access the users’ health information through the smart terminal or the internet (web). The analysis result shows that the system has a positive significance to improve intellectualization of health care equipment and realize family-oriented and popular health care.

  12. Internet effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.; Levesque, R.J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents’ extensive use of Internet communication and the uncertainty about its consequences call for an integrative perspective that helps to understand both the appeal of Internet communication and its risks and opportunities. The aim of this essay is to theorize, and if possible, substantiate

  13. Internet Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Estrin, Deborah; Chandy, K. Mani; Young, R. Michael; Smarr, Larry; Odlyzko, Andrew; Clark, David; Reding, Viviane; Ishida, Toru; Sharma, Sharad; Cerf, Vinton G.; Hölzle, Urs; Barroso, Luiz André; Mulligan, Geoff; Hooke, Adrian; Elliott, Chip

    2010-01-01

    More than a dozen leading experts give their opinions on where the Internet is headed and where it will be in the next decade in terms of technology, policy, and applications. They cover topics ranging from the Internet of Things to climate change to the digital storage of the future. A summary of the articles is available in the Web extras section.

  14. Internet effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.; Levesque, R.J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents’ extensive use of Internet communication and the uncertainty about its consequences call for an integrative perspective that helps to understand both the appeal of Internet communication and its risks and opportunities. The aim of this essay is to theorize, and if possible, substantiate

  15. Are Marketplace Plans Affordable? Consumer Perspectives from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March-May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Gunja, Munira; Rasmussen, Petra W; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    Most employers who provide health insurance to employees subsidize their premiums and provide a comprehensive benefit package. Before the Affordable Care Act, people who lacked health insurance through a job and purchased it on their own paid the full cost of their plans, which often came with skimpy benefit packages and high deductibles. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March--May 2015, indicate that the law's tax credits have made premium costs in health plans sold through the marketplaces roughly comparable to employer plans, at least for people with low and moderate incomes. At higher incomes, the phase-out of the subsidies means that adults in marketplace plans have higher premium costs than those in employer plans. Overall, larger shares of adults in marketplace plans reported deductibles of $1,000 or more, compared with those in employer plans, though these differences were narrower among low-and moderate-income adults.

  16. Measuring satisfaction: factors that drive hospital consumer assessment of healthcare providers and systems survey responses in a trauma and acute care surgery population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Steven A; Iannuzzi, James C; Stassen, Nicole A; Bankey, Paul E; Gestring, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Hospital quality metrics now reflect patient satisfaction and are measured by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Understanding these metrics and drivers will be integral in providing quality care as this process evolves. This study identifies factors associated with patient satisfaction as determined by HCAHPS survey responses in trauma and acute care surgery patients. HCAHPS survey responses from acute care surgery and trauma patients at a single institution between 3/11 and 10/12 were analyzed. Logistic regression determined which responses to individual HCAHPS questions predicted highest hospital score (a rating of 9-10/10). Demographic and clinical variables were also analyzed as predictors of satisfaction. Subgroup analysis for trauma patients was performed. In 70.3 per cent of 182 total survey responses, a 9-10/10 score was given. The strongest predictors of highest hospital ranking were respect from doctors (odds ratio [OR] = 24.5, confidence interval [CI]: 5.44-110.4), doctors listening (OR: 9.33, CI: 3.7-23.5), nurses' listening (OR = 8.65, CI: 3.62-20.64), doctors' explanations (OR = 8.21, CI: 3.5-19.2), and attempts to control pain (OR = 7.71, CI: 3.22-18.46). Clinical factors and outcomes (complications, intensive care unit/hospital length of stay, mechanism of injury, and having an operation) were nonsignificant variables. For trauma patients, Injury Severity Score was inversely related to score (OR = 0.93, CI: 0.87-0.98). Insurance, education, and disposition were also tied to satisfaction, whereas age, gender, and ethnicity were nonsignificant. In conclusion, patient perception of interactions with the healthcare team was most strongly associated with satisfaction. Complications did not negatively influence satisfaction. Insurance status might potentially identify patients at risk of dissatisfaction. Listening to patients, treating them with respect, and explaining the care plan are integral to a

  17. Internet enlightens; Internet eclaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, S. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2011-01-15

    This section gathers a selection of Internet links to online articles dealing with radiation protection issues. Below are the titles of the papers with their web site source: 1 - A mission of the European Commission verifies the proper enforcement by France of the EURATOM treaty dispositions relative to the control of radioactivity in the vicinity of uranium mines (http://www.asn.fr); 2 - tritium contamination at Saint-Maur-des-Fosses: new results from measurements performed by IRSN in the environment; 3 - status of radioactivity monitoring in French Polynesia in 2009 (http://www.irsn.fr); 4 - study of mortality and cancers impact near the Aube facility for low- and medium-activity waste storage (http://www.invs.sante.fr); 5 - Marcel Jurien de la Graviere appointed president of the guidance committee of the defense nuclear expertise of the Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) (http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr); 6 - radiation protection 163: 'Childhood Leukaemia - Mechanisms and Causes'; 7- Radiation Protection 164: Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing sites in the European Union, 2004-08; 8 - Radiation Protection 165: Medical Effectiveness of Iodine Prophylaxis in a Nuclear Reactor Emergency Situation and Overview of European Practices Protection (http://ec.europa.eu); 9 - Report RIFE 15: Radioactivity in Food and the Environment - RIFE (SEPA - Scottish Environment Protection Agency, http://www.sepa.org.uk); 10 - HPA response statement: Advisory Group on Ionising Radiation's report on circulatory disease risk (HPA - Health Protection Agency, http://www.hpa.org.uk); 11 - launching of the national database for the voluntary registering of (quasi) incidents (AFCN - Federal agency of nuclear control, http://www.fanc.fgov.be); 12 - Radiation dose optimization in nuclear medicine (IAEA RPOP - Radiation Protection Of Patients, http://rpop.iaea.org); 13 - The government of Canada finances

  18. Browsing for the Best Internet Access Provider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Marty

    1996-01-01

    Highlights points to consider when choosing an Internet Service Provider. Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) and Point to Point Protocol (PPP) are compared regarding price, performance, bandwidth, speed, and technical support. Obtaining access via local, national, consumer online, and telephone-company providers is discussed. A pricing chart and…

  19. Consumer formity in virtual society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bahram ranjbarian

    2013-08-01

    In this research, consumer Internet conformity (normative and informational conformity has been investigated. The study sample included 384 students of shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz. For data analysis software spss 16 and lisrel8.5 was used. The results indicates that sense of belongingness and Community expertise on Community trustworthiness and Community trustworthiness on Informational consumer conformity Positive and significant impact, and also Self esteem on Conformity motivation No significant effect, but variable Involvement on Conformity motivation Positive and Conformity motivation on Normative consumer conformity has Positive significant impact.

  20. Using the Consumer Experience with Pharmacy Services Survey as a quality metric for ambulatory care pharmacies: older adults' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyanbola, Olayinka O; Mott, David A; Croes, Kenneth D

    2016-05-26

    To describe older adults' perceptions of evaluating and comparing pharmacies based on the Consumer Experience with Pharmacy Services Survey (CEPSS), describe older adults' perceived importance of the CEPSS and its specific domains, and explore older adults' perceptions of the influence of specific CEPSS domains in choosing/switching pharmacies. Focus group methodology was combined with the administration of a questionnaire. The focus groups explored participants' perceived importance of the CEPSS and their perception of using the CEPSS to choose and/or switch pharmacies. Then, using the questionnaire, participants rated their perceived importance of each CEPSS domain in evaluating a pharmacy, and the likelihood of using CEPSS to switch pharmacies if their current pharmacy had low ratings. Descriptive and thematic analyses were done. 6 semistructured focus groups were conducted in a private meeting room in a Mid-Western state in the USA. 60 English-speaking adults who were at least 65 years, and had filled a prescription at a retail pharmacy within 90 days. During the focus groups, the older adults perceived the CEPSS to have advantages and disadvantages in evaluating and comparing pharmacies. Older adults thought the CEPSS was important in choosing the best pharmacies and avoiding the worst pharmacies. The perceived influence of the CEPSS in switching pharmacies varied depending on the older adult's personal experience or trust of other consumers' experience. Questionnaire results showed that participants perceived health/medication-focused communication as very important or extremely important (n=47, 82.5%) in evaluating pharmacies and would be extremely likely (n=21, 36.8%) to switch pharmacies if their pharmacy had low ratings in this domain. The older adults in this study are interested in using patient experiences as a quality metric for avoiding the worst pharmacies. Pharmacists' communication about health and medicines is perceived important and likely

  1. Treatment acceptability and preferences for managing severe health anxiety: Perceptions of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy among primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Joelle N; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D

    2017-12-01

    While cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is an established treatment for health anxiety, there are barriers to service access. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) has demonstrated effectiveness and has the potential to improve access to treatment. Nevertheless, it is unknown how patients perceive ICBT relative to other interventions for health anxiety and what factors predict ICBT acceptability. This study investigated these questions. Primary care patients (N = 116) who reported elevated levels of health anxiety were presented three treatment vignettes that each described a different protocol for health anxiety (i.e., medication, CBT, ICBT). Acceptability and credibility of the treatments were assessed following the presentation of each vignette. Participants then ranked the three treatments and provided a rational for their preferences. The treatments were similarly rated as moderately acceptable. Relative to medication and ICBT, CBT was perceived as the most credible treatment for health anxiety. The highest preference ranks were for CBT and medication. Regression analyses indicated that lower computer anxiety, past medication use, and lower ratings of negative cognitions about difficulty coping with an illness significantly predicted greater ICBT acceptability. Health anxiety was not assessed with a diagnostic interview. Primary care patients were recruited through a Qualtrics panel. Patients did not have direct experience with treatment but learned about treatment options through vignettes. Medication and CBT are preferred over ICBT. If ICBT is to increase treatment access, methods of improving perceptions of this treatment option are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Professional use of the internet among Saudi Arabian dermatologists: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlGhamdi Khalid M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is an increasingly important tool for physicians, but the extent to which it is used by dermatologists is unknown. We aimed to investigate the utilization of the internet by dermatologists in Saudi Arabia for medical purposes during their daily practice and to clarify the reasons for its use and non-use. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all 160 dermatologists attending the National Dermatology conference in 2007. Results A total of 107 questionnaires were completed. Sixty-two percent of respondents had access to the internet in the workplace. The use of the internet to update medical knowledge was reported by 91%. Only 27% had internet access in consultation rooms. The majority of information retrieval occurred outside patient consultation hours (91%. Only 13% reported using the internet during patient consultation. Possible reasons included: lack of access (54%, time pressure (37%, possible interference with the physician-patient relationship (30%, and that use of the internet was too time-consuming (10%. The mean searching time used to solve a clinical problem was 34 ± 3 minutes. Fifty-eight percent used Pubmed; however, 77% of the dermatologists had no training at all in how to use this tool. Conclusion Professional medical use of the internet is widespread among dermatologists in Saudi Arabia. Providing access to the internet in the workplace and training of dermatologists to perform effective electronic searches are badly needed to improve the professional medical use of internet, which is expected to lead to better delivery of patient care.

  3. Internet and Social Media For Health-Related Information and Communication in Health Care: Preferences of the Dutch General Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, T.H. van de; Engelen, L.J.; Berben, S.A.A.; Teerenstra, S.; Samsom, M.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care is increasingly featured by the use of Web 2.0 communication and collaborative technologies that are reshaping the way patients and professionals interact. These technologies or tools can be used for a variety of purposes: to instantly debate issues, discover news, analyze re

  4. Internet and Social Media For Health-Related Information and Communication in Health Care: Preferences of the Dutch General Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, T.H. van de; Engelen, L.J.; Berben, S.A.A.; Teerenstra, S.; Samsom, M.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care is increasingly featured by the use of Web 2.0 communication and collaborative technologies that are reshaping the way patients and professionals interact. These technologies or tools can be used for a variety of purposes: to instantly debate issues, discover news, analyze

  5. Consumer Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Tufano

    2009-01-01

    Although consumer finance is a substantial element of the economy, it has had a smaller footprint within financial economics. In this review, I suggest a functional definition of the subfield of consumer finance, focusing on four key functions: payments, risk management, moving funds from today to tomorrow (saving/investing), and from tomorrow to today (borrowing). I provide data showing the economic importance of consumer finance in the American economy. I propose a historical explanation fo...

  6. Internet Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection of dialogues is the only textbook of its kind. Internet Inquiry: Conversations About Method takes students into the minds of top internet researchers as they discuss how they have worked through critical challenges as they research online social environments. Editors Annette N....... Markham and Nancy K. Baym illustrate that good research choices are not random but are deliberate, studied, and internally consistent. Rather than providing single "how to" answers, this book presents distinctive and divergent viewpoints on how to think about and conduct qualitative internet studies....

  7. Internet Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection of dialogues is the only textbook of its kind. Internet Inquiry: Conversations About Method takes students into the minds of top internet researchers as they discuss how they have worked through critical challenges as they research online social environments. Editors Annette N....... Markham and Nancy K. Baym illustrate that good research choices are not random but are deliberate, studied, and internally consistent. Rather than providing single "how to" answers, this book presents distinctive and divergent viewpoints on how to think about and conduct qualitative internet studies....

  8. Towards developing new partnerships in public services: users as consumers, citizens and/or co-producers in health and social care in England and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2011-01-01

    The causes and effects of marketization of public services have been analysed extensively in the literature, but there is relatively little research on how those policies impact on the development of new forms of governance, and the role of users in these new arrangements. This study reviews examples of competition, freedom of choice and personalized care in health and social services in England and Sweden, in order to examine the type of relationships emerging between the user/consumer vis-à-vis market driven providers and various agencies of the state under the marketized welfare. The article focuses on the possible roles users might assume in new hybrid arrangements between markets, collaborations and steering. A user typology: namely, that of a consumer, citizen, co-producer and responsibilized agent in various governance arrangements, is then suggested. The article concludes by arguing that pro-market policies instead of meeting the alleged needs of post-modern users for individualized public services are likely to promote a new type of highly volatile and fragile partnerships, and create a new subordinated user who has no choice but to ‘choose’ services they have little control over.

  9. Spectrum Allocation and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Bruce M.; Rosston, Gregory L.

    The Internet is transforming communications around the world, even with the downturn in the technology market that we saw at the start of this century. This transformation permeates all forms of communications, but its success at realizing maximum consumer benefits depends, at least in part, on the flexibility of communications regulation. Regulation must not constrain firms responding to competitive incentives.

  10. A qualitative assessment of factors influencing acceptance of a new rotavirus vaccine among health care providers and consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herring Mark

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, a new rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq was licensed in the US and recommended for routine immunization of all US infants. Because a previously licensed vaccine (Rotashield was withdrawn from the US for safety concerns, identifying barriers to uptake of RotaTeq will help develop strategies to broaden vaccine coverage. Methods We explored beliefs and attitudes of parents (n = 57 and providers (n = 10 towards rotavirus disease and vaccines through a qualitative assessment using focus groups and in-depth interviews. Results All physicians were familiar with safety concerns about rotavirus vaccines, but felt reassured by RotaTeq's safety profile. When asked about likelihood of using RotaTeq on a scale of one to seven (1 = "absolutely not;" 7 = "absolutely yes" the mean score was 5 (range = 3–6. Physicians expressed a high likelihood of adopting RotaTeq, particularly if recommended by their professional organizations and expressed specific interest in post-marketing safety data. Similarly, consumers found the RotaTeq safety profile to be favorable and would rely on their physician's recommendation for vaccination. However, when asked to rank likelihood of having their child vaccinated against rotavirus (1 = "definitely not get;" 7 = "definitely get", 29% ranked 1 or 2, 36% 3 or 4, and 35% 5 to 7. Conclusion Our qualitative assessment provides complementary data to recent quantitative surveys and suggests that physicians and parents are likely to adopt the newly licensed rotavirus vaccine. Increasing parental awareness of the rotavirus disease burden and providing physicians with timely post-marketing surveillance data will be integral to a successful vaccination program.

  11. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of individually tailored Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders in a primary care population: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Lise Bergman; Hedman, Erik; Etienne, Julie; Bodin, Jessica; Kadowaki, Asa; Eriksson, Stina; Lindkvist, Emelie; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2014-08-01

    A significant proportion of the general population suffers from anxiety disorders, often with comorbid psychiatric conditions. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been found to be a potent treatment for patients with specific psychiatric conditions. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ICBT when tailoring the treatment to address comorbidities and preferences for primary-care patients with a principal anxiety disorder. One hundred participants were recruited through their primary-care contact and randomized to either treatment or an active control group. The treatment consisted of 7-10 weekly individually assigned modules guided by online therapists. At post-treatment, 46% of the treatment group had achieved clinically significant improvement on the primary outcome measure (CORE-OM) and between-group effect sizes ranged from d = 0.20 to 0.86, with a mean effect of d = 0.59. At one-year follow-up, within-group effect sizes varied between d = 0.53 to 1.00. Cost analysis showed significant reduction of total costs for the ICBT group, the results were maintained at one-year follow-up and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio favored ICBT compared to control group. Individually tailored ICBT is an effective and cost-effective treatment for primary-care patients with anxiety disorders with or without comorbidities. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01390168. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Internet health information in the patient-provider dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Traci

    2008-10-01

    A patient discussing Internet health information with a health care provider (referred to as "patient-provider communication about Internet health information") can contribute positively to health outcomes. Although research has found that once Internet access is achieved, there are no ethnic differences in Internet health information seeking, it is unclear if there are ethnic differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information. To help fill this gap in the literature, the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey 2005 was analyzed with Stata 9. Two sets of logistic regression analyses were conducted, one for a subsample of Internet users (n = 3,244) and one for a subsample of Internet users who are first-generation immigrants (n = 563). The dependent variable was patient-provider communication about Internet health information, which assessed whether survey participants had discussed online health information with a health care provider. The predictor variables included trust of health care provider, trust of online health information, Internet use, health care coverage, frequency of visits to health care provider, health status, and demographics. Among all Internet users, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. Similarly, among Internet users who are immigrants, Whites had higher levels of patient-provider communication about Internet health information than Blacks and Asians. While the digital divide is narrowing in terms of Internet access, racial differences in patient-provider communication about Internet health information may undermine the potential benefits of the information age.

  13. INTERNET ETHICS

    OpenAIRE

    Laurentiu Fratila

    2008-01-01

    In our age, Internet is the biggest information network in the world; it consists of a set of heterogeneous networks from over 100 countries displaying huge amounts of virtual resources; it provides facilities such as email, file transmission protocol (ftp), workgroups discussion or chat, information and dissemination of information (www – world wide web). Internet has a major impact over all activity fields: political, social, economic and private life of users, as well. Newly developed, mod...

  14. Education – Determinant of Consumer`s Conditions in an Era of Technological Change

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Burghelea; Mirela Ionela Aceleanu

    2014-01-01

    In the era of technological change, consumers face an environment increasingly complex, leading to significant challenges regarding buying and consuming choices and consumer protection. The most important and most influential technological changes in terms of the impact on the consumer, are iduced by internet, digitization and globalization. However, the era of technological change also means developing biotechnologies, nanotechnologies, new materials and new energy sources, all these changin...

  15. Consumer Insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANKOT

    2004-01-01

    Fang Jun, the head of consumer and market insights of Unilever Shanghai, has summarized his early life as a market in two sentences: rush about to study market changes;act all day to observe consumer behavior. And now?"Tell stories, conduct interviews and piece together different data; calculate numbers,build models and write reports."

  16. New research in multimedia and internet systems

    CERN Document Server

    Choroś, Kazimierz; Siemiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of Multimedia and Network Information Systems is one of the key features of our times. What is also important is that the pace of change is ever increasing. University projects of today will form the core of consumer products of tomorrow. Therefore, it is very important to have a broad view of the recent scientific investigation in that area. This was the primary reason for gathering this collection of carefully selected and hopefully representative research projects, found solutions, and finally applications. They are the achievements of scientific teams from several countries. The contents of the monograph has been divided into four parts: 1)  Multimedia Information Technology, 2)  Information Systems Specification, 3)  Information Systems Applications, 4)  Web Systems and Network Technologies. The book presents up to date research from the diverse fields of multimedia and Internet data processing.

  17. Internet and Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The Internet has been transformed in the past years from a system primarily oriented on information provision into a medium for communication and community-building. The notion of “Web 2.0”, social software, and social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and MySpace have emerged...... institutions have a growing interest in accessing this personal data. Here, contributors explore this changing landscape by addressing topics such as commercial data collection by advertising, consumer sites and interactive media; self-disclosure in the social web; surveillance of file-sharers; privacy...... in the age of the internet; civil watch-surveillance on social networking sites; and networked interactive surveillance in transnational space. This book is a result of a research action launched by the intergovernmental network COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology)....

  18. From generic pathways to ICT-supported horizontally integrated care: the SmartCare approach and convergence with future Internet assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urošević, Vladimir; Mitić, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Successful service integration in policy and practice requires both technology innovation and service process innovation being pursued and implemented at the same time. The SmartCare project (partially EC-funded under CIP ICT PSP Program) aims to achieve this through development, piloting and evaluation of ICT-based services, horizontally integrating health and social care in ten pilot regions, including Kraljevo region in Serbia. The project has identified and adopted two generic highest-level common thematic pathways in joint consolidation phase - integrated support for long-term care and integrated support after hospital discharge. A common set of standard functional specifications for an open ICT platform enabling the delivery of integrated care is being defined, around the challenges of data sharing, coordination and communication in these two formalized pathways. Implementation and system integration on technology and architecture level are to be based on open standards, multivendor interoperability, and leveraging on the current evolving open specification technology foundations developed in relevant projects across the European Research Area.

  19. Internet-based cognitive–behavioural writing therapy for reducing post-traumatic stress after intensive care for sepsis in patients and their spouses (REPAIR): study protocol for a randomised-controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlytta, Romina; Niemeyer, Helen; Böttche, Maria; Scherag, André; Knaevelsrud, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Introduction As a consequence of sepsis and intensive care, considerable proportions of patients but also of their spouses develop a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, only a very small number receive psychotherapeutic treatment. Internet-based cognitive–behavioural writing therapy (IB-CBWT) has proven to be an effective treatment option for PTSD. It seems to fit the specific needs of this cohort and to overcome treatment barriers. Aim of the REPAIR trial is to examine the efficacy, safety and applicability of IB-CBWT for PTSD in patients and their spouses after intensive care for sepsis. Methods and analysis Participants will be assigned randomly either to a treatment or a wait-list (WL) control group. The treatment group receives IB-CBWT for PTSD, actively involving the partners of the participants. IB-CBWT will be guided by a therapist and comprises two written assignments per week over a 5 week period. After completing the assignments, the participants obtain individual responses from the therapist. Participants of the WL control group will receive treatment after a waiting period of 5 weeks. The primary outcome is PTSD symptom severity in self-rated PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fifth Edition at the end of treatment and waiting time, respectively. Secondary outcomes are remission of PTSD, depression, anxiety, and somatisation measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory-18, marital satisfaction measured by the Relationship Assessment Scale, health-related quality of life measured by the EQ-5D-5L, and the feasibility of IB-CBWT for this cohort (ie, dropout rate). Statistical analysis will be performed according to the intent-to-treat principle. Ethics and dissemination The study is conducted according to the principles of Good Clinical Practice and has been approved by the ethics committee of the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Germany. Results will be disseminated at scientific conferences, published in peer

  20. Can consumer choice replace trust in the National Health Service in England? Towards developing an affective psychosocial conception of trust in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2014-11-01

    Trust has long been regarded as a vitally important aspect of the relationship between health service providers and patients. Recently, consumer choice has been increasingly advocated as a means of improving the quality and effectiveness of health service provision. However, it is uncertain how the increase of information necessary to allow users of health services to exercise choice, and the simultaneous introduction of markets in public health systems, will affect various dimensions of trust, and how changing relations of trust will impact upon patients and services. This article employs a theory-driven approach to investigate conceptual and material links between choice, trust and markets in health care in the context of the National Health Service in England. It also examines the implications of patient choice on systemic, organisational and interpersonal trust. The article is divided into two parts. The first argues that the shift to marketisation in public health services might lead to an over-reliance on rational-calculative aspects of trust at the expense of embodied, relational and social attributes. The second develops an alternative psychosocial conception of trust: it focuses on the central role of affect and accounts for the material and symbolic links between choice, trust and markets in health care.

  1. Patient Experience Assessment is a Requisite for Quality Evaluation: A Discussion of the In-Center Hemodialysis Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (ICH CAHPS) Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2016-01-01

    Patient experience surveys provide a critical and unique perspective on the quality of patient-centered healthcare delivery. These surveys provide a mechanism to systematically express patients' voice on topics valued by patients to make decisions about choices in care. They also provide an assessment to healthcare organizations about their service that cannot be obtained from any other source. Regulatory agencies have mandated the assessment of patients' experience as part of healthcare value based purchasing programs and weighted the results to account for up to 30% of the total scoring. This is a testimony to the accepted importance of this metric as a fundamental assessment of quality. After more than a decade of rigorous research, there is a significant body of growing evidence supporting specifically the validity and use of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) surveys, including a version specific to in-center hemodialysis (ICH CAHPS). This review will focus on the ICH CAHPS survey including a review of its development, content, administration, and also a discussion of common criticisms. Although it is suggested that the survey assesses activities and experiences that are not modifiable by the healthcare organization (or the dialysis facility in our case) emerging evidence suggests otherwise. Dialysis providers have an exclusive opportunity to lead the advancement of understanding the implications and serviceability of the evaluation of the patient experience in health care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Isolation and Identification Enterobacter asburiae from Consumed Powdered Infant Formula Milk (PIF) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardaneh, Jalal; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a facultative anaerobic, non-spore-forming gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. It is an opportunistic pathogen that its strains are isolated from a variety of clinical and environmental specimens. Since powdered infant formula milk (PIF) is not a sterile product, it is an excellent medium for bacterial growth. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify E. asburiae from PIF in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of this bacterium. A total 125 PIF samples were purchased from drug stores between June 2011 to March 2012. E. asburiae was isolated according to FDA method. For final confirmation, biochemical tests embedded in the API-20E system were used. The drug susceptibility test was performed using the disc diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. Out of the 125 PIF samples investigated, 2 (1.6%) samples were positive for E. asburiae. All isolated strains were uniformly susceptible to aztreonam, cefotaxim, amikacin, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, meropenem, tetracycline, ceftazidime, and colistin. Variable susceptibility was seen to the some antimicrobial agents tested. Each country should categorize its own designed guidelines for the preparation and handling of PIF adapted to the local environment. Moreover, the pathogenesis of the E. asburiae in infants hospitalized in NICU and other groups such as immunosuppressed patients and HIV infected individuals is uncertain and requires further study.

  3. Consumer protection

    OpenAIRE

    Štěrbová, Alena

    2010-01-01

    77 Resumé This thesis is dedicated to the consumer protection. My reason for the choice of this topic was following. A field of consumer protection is being continually developed. It is complicated for a layman to be well informed about all his rights and duties not only because the Czech legal regulation suffers from a immense fragmentation. Moreover, the implementation of EC directives ( as a source of many provisions protecting a consumer in the Civil Code) into our legal system was carrie...

  4. Evaluation of Promotional Materials To Promote Low-Dose Computed Tomography (LDCT) Screening to High-Risk Consumers and Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Janella N; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Wilson, Lauren E; Simmons, Vani N

    2017-03-11

    Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening is a promising screening modality for increasing the detection rate of early stage lung cancers among high-risk individuals. Despite being recommended by the US Preventative Services Task Force, uptake of LDCT remains low. The objective of the current study was to gather feedback from high-risk consumers and health care providers on LDCT promotional materials. Focus group discussions were conducted with high-risk individuals (8 focus groups; N = 38) and primary care providers (9 focus groups; N = 23). Participants reviewed existing LDCT promotional materials to assess their perceptions of media materials created to publicize LDCT. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Several key themes emerged from focus groups that can be used to inform development of future LDCT promotional materials. High-risk (HR) participants expressed greater receptivity for promotional materials that did not further stigmatize lung cancer and/or smoking and expressed preferences for materials that clearly outlined the risks/benefits of screening. Primary care providers (PCPs) offered suggestions to facilitate the referral process such as diagnostic codes and requested a design that clearly outlined eligibility criteria. A clear and thorough explanation of LDCT eligibility, cost, harms, and benefits was of chief importance for both PCP and HR audiences. Given that PCPs and HR audiences are not well informed on the specifics of LDCT screening eligibility and insurance coverage, creating provider and patient education opportunities will aid in shared decision-making opportunities. Promotional materials that meet the needs of the target audience are needed to facilitate discussions of risks/benefits of screening with HR individuals.

  5. Internet-delivered treatment for older adults with anxiety and depression: implementation of the Wellbeing Plus Course in routine clinical care and comparison with research trial outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Lauren G.; Fogliati, Vincent J.; Dear, Blake F.; Nielssen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Background The Wellbeing Plus Course is an internet-delivered psychological intervention for older adults with anxiety or depression. Aims To compare the effectiveness of the Wellbeing Plus Course in a public health setting (clinic group) with its efficacy in a randomised controlled trial (research group). Method Participants (n=949) were Australian adults aged 60 and above. Primary outcome measures were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7). Results Initial symptom severity was higher in the clinic group and course completion was lower. Both groups showed significant symptom reductions at post-treatment and were satisfied with the treatment. Results were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Within-group symptom changes were comparable between settings; there were no between-group differences on primary outcomes or satisfaction. Conclusions The Wellbeing Plus Course is as effective and acceptable in routine clinical care, as it is in controlled research trials. Declaration of interest N.T. and B.F.D developed the Wellbeing Plus Course but derived no financial benefit from it. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703794

  6. 45 CFR 98.33 - Consumer education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consumer education. 98.33 Section 98.33 Public... Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Parental Rights and Responsibilities § 98.33 Consumer education... public consumer education information that will promote informed child care choices including, at a...

  7. Consumer perceptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngapo, T. M.; Dransfield, E.; Martin, J. F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer focus groups in France, England, Sweden and Denmark were used to obtain insights into the decision-making involved in the choice of fresh pork and attitudes towards today's pig production systems. Many positive perceptions of pork meat were evoked. Negative images of the production syste...... ethnocentrism, to assure that such information is targeted to enhance consumer confidence.......Consumer focus groups in France, England, Sweden and Denmark were used to obtain insights into the decision-making involved in the choice of fresh pork and attitudes towards today's pig production systems. Many positive perceptions of pork meat were evoked. Negative images of the production systems...... in use today were expressed, but rationalised in terms of consumer demands, market competition and by comparisons to previous systems of production. Knowledge of production systems appeared of little consequence in terms of any meat market potential as several groups freely remarked...

  8. Op weg naar evenwicht: een onderzoek naar zorgplichten op het internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.N.M. van Eijk; T.M. van Engers; C. Wiersma; C.A. Jasserand; W. Abel

    2010-01-01

    Commissioned by the WODC (Wetenschappelijk Onderzoeken Documentatiecentrum), research has been conducted on duties of care on the Internet, more specifically from the perspective of Internet service providers. Internet service providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national

  9. Op weg naar evenwicht: een onderzoek naar zorgplichten op het internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.A.N.M.; van Engers, T.M.; Wiersma, C.; Jasserand, C.A.; Abel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Commissioned by the WODC (Wetenschappelijk Onderzoeken Documentatiecentrum), research has been conducted on duties of care on the Internet, more specifically from the perspective of Internet service providers. Internet service providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national

  10. Consumer perceptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngapo, T. M.; Dransfield, E.; Martin, J. F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer focus groups in France, England, Sweden and Denmark were used to obtain insights into the decision-making involved in the choice of fresh pork and attitudes towards today's pig production systems. Many positive perceptions of pork meat were evoked. Negative images of the production syste...... ethnocentrism, to assure that such information is targeted to enhance consumer confidence. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Consumer Neoteny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Alemany Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research explores childlike consumer behavior from an evolutionary perspective. More specifically, it uses the concept of neoteny to show that the retention of ancestors’ juvenile characteristics is related to specific behaviors. The results of factor analyses conducted on a UK sample (n = 499 and a French sample (n = 292 7 years later indicate four dimensions of childlike consumer behavior, namely, stimulus seeking, reality conflict, escapism, and control of aggression.

  12. Gender (in)equality in internet pornography: a content analysis of popular pornographic internet videos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.J.E.; Peter, J.

    2015-01-01

    Although Internet pornography is widely consumed and researchers have started to investigate its effects, we still know little about its content. This has resulted in contrasting claims about whether Internet pornography depicts gender (in)equality and whether this depiction differs between amateur

  13. Gender (in)equality in internet pornography: a content analysis of popular pornographic internet videos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.J.E.; Peter, J.

    2015-01-01

    Although Internet pornography is widely consumed and researchers have started to investigate its effects, we still know little about its content. This has resulted in contrasting claims about whether Internet pornography depicts gender (in)equality and whether this depiction differs between amateur

  14. Everyone's Internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO BIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ After more than 20 years, the Internet in China has become a big success. The country has the world's largest Intemet population that topped 420 million at the end of June. In the first six months of this year, China's Internet market reached 74.3 billion yuan ($10.9 billion), the equivalent of 2009's total. Local businesses have risen to leaders on the Chinese market, as Chinese language search, instant messaging and online auction service providers have overwhelming advantages over foreign rivals.

  15. Internet Sexualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  16. Consumer Fetish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnould, Eric; Cayla, Julien

    2015-01-01

    What is the sovereign consumer that occupies such a central role in organizational discourse whose satisfaction has become an organizational imperative? Our research draws from extended fieldwork in the world of commercial ethnography. Our analysis shows how ethnography is implicated in the organ......What is the sovereign consumer that occupies such a central role in organizational discourse whose satisfaction has become an organizational imperative? Our research draws from extended fieldwork in the world of commercial ethnography. Our analysis shows how ethnography is implicated...... in the organizational fetishization of consumers, that is, how in the process of understanding and managing markets, a quasimagical fascination with amalgams of consumer voices, images, and artefacts comes about. We offer several contributions. First, we demonstrate the pertinence of (primarily anthropological......) theories of the fetish to organizational sensemaking. Second, we describe a distinctive process of organizational market sensemaking that is sensuous, magical, and analogical. Third, we offer a subtle critique of commercial ethnography, a popular research practice that aims to bring ‘real’ consumers...

  17. [Internet addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    Internet technologies have made a rapid progress, bringing convenience to daily life. On the other hand, internet use disorder and internet addiction (IA) have become reportedly serious health and social problems. In 2013, internet gaming disorder criteria have been proposed in the section of Conditions for Further Study of DSM-5. Existing epidemiological studies by questionnaire methods have reported that the prevalence of IA ranges between 2.8% and 9.9% among youths in Japan. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), sleeping disorders, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and phobic anxiety disorder are extremely common comorbid mental disorders with IA. Some psychotherapies (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing) and medical treatments (e.g., antidepressant drugs, methylphenidate) for comorbid mental disorders as well as rehabilitation (e.g., treatment camp) are effective for IA remission. However, some serious cases of IA may be difficult to treat, and prevention is very important. In future, the prevention, rehabilitations and treatments for IA will be more required in Japan.

  18. Internet Shopping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays you no longer need to walk round hundreds of shops looking for the items you need. You can shop for just about anything from your armchair. All you need is a computer and access(进入) to the Internet.

  19. Internet India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews a number of Internet sites containing information on every aspect of life in Modern India. The various sites provide information on such diverse topics as the Indian film industry, politics, the booming Indian computer industry, changing status of women, and financial and political issues. (MJP)

  20. Summary of Consumer Assistance Program Grant Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — To help consumers with a wide range of private health insurance questions and complaints, the Affordable Care Act created the Consumer Assistance Program Grants...

  1. Summary of Consumer Assistance Program Grant Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — To help consumers with a wide range of private health insurance questions and complaints, the Affordable Care Act created the Consumer Assistance Program Grants...

  2. A Consumer Way of Thinking: Linking Consumer Socialization and Consumption Motivation Perspectives to Adolescent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Soyeon; Serido, Joyce; Barber, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of Internet technology and rapidly changing consumer environments, the societal role played by today's adolescents is significantly increasing. They are becoming more influential, not merely as consumers of products and services but also as coproducers in the marketplace. In this paper, we contend that consumption is central to the…

  3. A Consumer Way of Thinking: Linking Consumer Socialization and Consumption Motivation Perspectives to Adolescent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Soyeon; Serido, Joyce; Barber, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of Internet technology and rapidly changing consumer environments, the societal role played by today's adolescents is significantly increasing. They are becoming more influential, not merely as consumers of products and services but also as coproducers in the marketplace. In this paper, we contend that consumption is central to the…

  4. Dimensions of Consumer's Perceived Risk in Online Shopping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Naiyi

    2004-01-01

    Perceived risk is an important concept in consumer behavior in online shopping. It impedes the adopting online shopping. A structure model with seven factors of consumer's perceived risk in online shopping is developed in this paper. The results have the descriptive power about Chinese consumers' perceived risk in Internet shopping and provide framework for managerial use in China's e-commerce market environment.

  5. Economic evaluation of a guided and unguided internet-based CBT intervention for major depression: Results from a multi-center, three-armed randomized controlled trial conducted in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Antonio; Luciano, Juan V.; García Campayo, Javier; Gili, Margalida; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa; Castro, Adoración; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Pérez Ara, Mª Ángeles; Modrego-Alarcón, Marta; Mayoral Cleríes, Fermín

    2017-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common mental disorders and will become one of the leading causes of disability in the world. Internet-based CBT programs for depression have been classified as “well established” following the American Psychological Association criteria for empirically supported treatments. The aim of this study is to analyze the cost effectiveness at 12-month follow-up of the Internet-based CBT program “Smiling is fun” with (LITG) and without psychotherapist support (TSG) compared to usual care. The perspective used in our analysis is societal. A sample of 296 depressed patients (mean age of 43.04 years; 76% female; BDI-II mean score = 22.37) from primary care services in four Spanish regions were randomized in the RCT. The complete case and intention-to-treat (ITT) perspectives were used for the analyses. The results demonstrated that both Internet-based CBT interventions exhibited cost utility and cost effectiveness compared with a control group. The complete case analyses revealed an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €-169.50 and an incremental cost-utility ratio (ICUR) of €-11389.66 for the TSG group and an ICER of €-104.63 and an ICUR of €-6380.86 for the LITG group. The ITT analyses found an ICER of €-98.37 and an ICUR of €-5160.40 for the TSG group and an ICER of €-9.91 and an ICUR of €496.72 for the LITG group. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the two Internet-based CBT interventions are appropriate from both economic and clinical perspectives for depressed patients in the Spanish primary care system. These interventions not only help patients to improve clinically but also generate societal savings. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov NCT01611818 PMID:28241025

  6. Choosing a hospital: analysis of consumer tradeoffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javalgi, R G; Rao, S R; Thomas, E G

    1991-03-01

    In today's competitive health care industry, hospital administrators and marketers must determine how important various product/service attributes are to potential consumers and how those attributes influence consumer choice decisions. The authors outline an approach (the analytic hierarchy process) that can be used to assess or predict health care choice decisions by consumers. The analytic hierarchy process is a method for analyzing consumer choice behavior whereby a hierarchical structure is used to determine the relative preferences of consumers for health care alternatives. Marketing strategies based on the study findings are suggested.

  7. [Panaceas disseminated over the Internet and vulnerable patients: how to check a market of illusions?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo R; Castiel, Luis David; Bagrichevsky, Marcos; Griep, Rosane Harter

    2011-06-01

    This article discusses the proliferation of medical quackery and fraud appearing and disappearing daily on the Internet. The customers of these scams, made vulnerable by disease or the prospect of death, use the Internet to buy products that would probably be ignored in other contexts. This vulnerability is linked to strenuous physical demands that compromise the ability to make decisions. The attempt to control the phenomenon of fraud as strictly rational, without taking into account the vulnerability of consumers who have little to lose and not considering their demands for comprehensive care, can lead to disappointing results, since these nostrums seem to be filling the gaps left by health care structures that have been insensitive to the immaterial nature of human fears.

  8. An Overview of Internet biosurveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, David M.; Nelson, Noele P.; Arthur, Ray; Barboza, P.; Collier, Nigel; Lightfoot, Nigel; Linge, J. P.; van der Goot, E.; Mawudeku, A.; Madoff, Lawrence; Vaillant, L.; Walters, Ronald A.; Yangarber, Roman; Mantero, Jas; Corley, Courtney D.; Brownstein, John S.

    2013-06-21

    Internet biosurveillance utilizes unstructured data from diverse Web-based sources to provide early warning and situational awareness of public health threats. The scope of source coverage ranges from local based media in the vernacular to international media in widely read languages. Internet biosurveillance is a timely modality available to government and public health officials, health care workers, and the public and private sector, serving as a real-time complementary approach to traditional indicator-based public health disease surveillance methods. Internet biosurveillance also supports the broader activity of epidemic intelligence. This review covers the current state of the field of Internet biosurveillance and provides a perspective on the future of the field.

  9. Internet censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-27

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review a lower court ruling that found the Communications Decency Act to be an unconstitutional infringement on free speech. The judges from the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia said that parents should monitor material that children are exposed to on the Internet. AIDS groups that publish information on safer sex, HIV prevention and AIDS treatments are not responsible for censoring content.

  10. Internet Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Veiga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has now become quite obvious that the Internet has brought significant changes to our society and a break on how we lived before its emergence. It is still too early to assess the impact on society of the new services at our disposal, such as the capacity to communicate faster and cheaper on a global scale, access information and, perhaps more importantly, to produce and disseminate information in a way that is accessible to all.It is clear that the advent of the Information Society implies changes in our society that constitute a point of no return. However, contrary to what happened when we entered the Industrial Age about three centuries ago, when the changing process was slow and led by older individuals, these days the entrance into the Information Society is taking place rapidly and the decisive players are younger people. The global nature of the Internet, the possibility of producing and distributing any type of content in digital form at almost zero cost, as well as the vast number of people who use the web, have highlighted the need for new forms of intervention in a sector where there are many types of players. It is in this context that the problem of Internet Governance becomes a very current issue, inasmuch as one feels the need to guarantee a diversity of rights and duties, which may appear difficult to reconcile.This paper presents a brief overview of the main players and initiatives which, in the field of Internet Governance, have tried to contribute to turning this network into a factor for social development and democraticity on a global scale.

  11. THE CONSUMER AS A SOURCE OF MARKETING INFORMATION IN THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Peszko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of IT technology has provided people with free access to the Internet, which is now a place for consumers to look for opportunities to share their observations with others. The Internet user wants to be more aware, and willingly participates in the development of emerging brands. Companies have also found their place on the Internet, where they source information from Internet users. They realize the power of the consumer as a source of marketing information, and "take advantage" of consumer behavior to promote their brands. They analyze information about consumers, especially consumer preferences, and then publish this via social media in ways that might appeal to users and lead them to share it with others. This study describes this relationship between consumers and marketing via the Internet, and how the consumer is a source of marketing information, because of the possibilities created for entrepreneurs in the information society.

  12. APPLICABILITY OF UNIFIED THEORY OF ACCEPTANCE AND USE OF TECHNOLOGY EXTENDED TO THE CONSUMER USE CONTEXT (UTAUT2 IN BRAZIL: AN EVALUATION OF THE MODEL USING A SAMPLE OF INTERNET USERS ON SMARTPHONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Lima Faria

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study, using a sample of internet users on smartphones, analyzed through UTAUT2 model in order to test the validity of their constructs in Brazil. We sought to thereby expand the understanding of individual acceptance and use of technology in the context of consumption, evaluating a new model in Brazil. The results of this study revealed the impossibility of using some constructs the original model as predictors of intention and consumption behavior. Future studies that include a larger sample, analysis of other technologies and inclusion of moderating variables were suggested.

  13. The consumer competence of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The consumer competence concept is loaded with ambiguity in the academic as well as in the public use of the term. The purpose of this paper was to examine the concept theoretically and empirically. Methodology/Approach Consumer socialization theories were compared and combined...... of 'desirable consumer socialization', but also added a fundamental consumer competence to the list: to carefully consider one's need to make a purchase. Research limitations/implications The study included only a certain segment of young consumers. Future studies of consumer competence may include consumers...

  14. Health information-seeking behavior of seniors who use the Internet: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlock, Stephanie; Eslami, Saeid; Askari, Marjan; Arts, Derk L; Sent, Danielle; de Rooij, Sophia E; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2015-01-08

    The Internet is viewed as an important source for health information and a medium for patient empowerment. However, little is known about how seniors use the Internet in relation to other sources for health information. The aim was to determine which information resources seniors who use the Internet use and trust for health information, which sources are preferred, and which sources are used by seniors for different information needs. Questions from published surveys were selected based on their relevance to the study objectives. The Autonomy Preference Index was used to assess information needs and preferences for involvement in health decisions. Invitation to participate in this online survey was sent to the email list of a local senior organization (298 addresses) in the Netherlands. There were 118 respondents with a median age of 72 years (IQR 67-78 years). Health professionals, pharmacists, and the Internet were the most commonly used and trusted sources of health information. Leaflets, television, newspapers, and health magazines were also important sources. Respondents who reported higher use of the Internet also reported higher use of other sources (Pinformation, preferred sources were the Internet (46/105, 43.8%), other sources (eg, magazines 38/105, 36.2%), health professionals (18/105, 17.1%), and no information seeking (3/105, 2.8%). Of the 51/107 respondents who indicated that they had sought health information in the last 12 months, 43 sought it after an appointment, 23 were preparing for an appointment, and 20 were deciding if an appointment was needed. The source used varied by the type of information sought. The Internet was used most often for symptoms (27/42, 64%), prognosis (21/31, 68%), and treatment options (23/41, 62%), whereas health professionals were asked for additional information on medications (20/36, 56%), side effects (17/36, 47%), coping (17/31, 55%), practical care (12/14, 86%), and nutrition/exercise (18/30, 60%). For these

  15. Ethical Challenges of Medicine and Health on the Internet: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge and capabilities, particularly of a new technology or in a new area of study, frequently develop faster than the guidelines and principles needed for practitioners to practice ethically in the new arena; this is particularly true in medicine. The blending of medicine and healthcare with e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions involving what sort of ethical conduct should be expected by practitioners and developers of the medical Internet. Some of the early pioneers in medical and healthcare Web sites pushed the ethical boundaries with questionable, even unethical, practices. Many involved with the medical Internet are now working to reestablish patient and consumer trust by establishing guidelines to determine how the fundamentals of the medical code of ethical conduct can best be adapted for the medical/healthcare Internet. Ultimately, all those involved in the creation, maintenance, and marketing of medical and healthcare Web sites should be required to adhere to a strict code of ethical conduct, one that has been fairly determined by an impartial international organization with reasonable power to regulate the code. This code could also serve as a desirable, recognizable label-of-distinction for ethical Web sites within the medical and healthcare Internet community. One challenge for those involved with the medical and healthcare Internet will be to determine what constitutes "Medical Internet Ethics" or "Healthcare Internet Ethics," since the definition of medical ethics can vary from country to country. Therefore, the emerging field of Medical/ Healthcare Internet Ethics will require careful thought and insights from an international collection of ethicists in many contributing areas. This paper is a review of the current status of the evolving field of Medical/Healthcare Internet Ethics, including proposed definitions and identification of many diverse areas that may ultimately contribute to this multidisciplinary field. The current role

  16. Ethical challenges of medicine and health on the Internet: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, K A

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge and capabilities, particularly of a new technology or in a new area of study, frequently develop faster than the guidelines and principles needed for practitioners to practice ethically in the new arena; this is particularly true in medicine. The blending of medicine and healthcare with e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions involving what sort of ethical conduct should be expected by practitioners and developers of the medical Internet. Some of the early pioneers in medical and healthcare Web sites pushed the ethical boundaries with questionable, even unethical, practices. Many involved with the medical Internet are now working to reestablish patient and consumer trust by establishing guidelines to determine how the fundamentals of the medical code of ethical conduct can best be adapted for the medical/healthcare Internet. Ultimately, all those involved in the creation, maintenance, and marketing of medical and healthcare Web sites should be required to adhere to a strict code of ethical conduct, one that has been fairly determined by an impartial international organization with reasonable power to regulate the code. This code could also serve as a desirable, recognizable label-of-distinction for ethical Web sites within the medical and healthcare Internet community. One challenge for those involved with the medical and healthcare Internet will be to determine what constitutes "Medical Internet Ethics" or "Healthcare Internet Ethics," since the definition of medical ethics can vary from country to country. Therefore, the emerging field of Medical/ Healthcare Internet Ethics will require careful thought and insights from an international collection of ethicists in many contributing areas. This paper is a review of the current status of the evolving field of Medical/Healthcare Internet Ethics, including proposed definitions and identification of many diverse areas that may ultimately contribute to this multidisciplinary field. The current role

  17. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual’s context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  18. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual's context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  19. Innovation in sexually transmitted disease and HIV prevention: internet and mobile phone delivery vehicles for global diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2010-03-01

    Efficacious behavioral interventions and practices have not been universally accepted, adopted, or diffused by policy makers, administrators, providers, advocates, or consumers. Biomedical innovations for sexually transmitted disease (STD) and HIV prevention have been embraced but their effectiveness is hindered by behavioral factors. Behavioral interventions are required to support providers and consumers for adoption and diffusion of biomedical innovations, protocol adherence, and sustained prevention for other STDs. Information and communication technology such as the Internet and mobile phones can deliver behavioral components for STD/HIV prevention and care to more people at less cost. Recent innovations in STD/HIV prevention with information and communication technology-mediated behavioral supports include STD/HIV testing and partner interventions, behavioral interventions, self-management, and provider care. Computer-based and Internet-based behavioral STD/HIV interventions have demonstrated efficacy comparable to face-to-face interventions. Mobile phone STD/HIV interventions using text-messaging are being broadly utilized but more work is needed to demonstrate efficacy. Electronic health records and care management systems can improve care, but interventions are needed to support adoption. Information and communication technology is rapidly diffusing globally. Over the next 5-10 years smart-phones will be broadly disseminated, connecting billions of people to the Internet and enabling lower cost, highly engaging, and ubiquitous STD/HIV prevention and treatment support interventions.

  20. Taking the pulse of Internet pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z; Peterson, R T; Huang, L

    2001-01-01

    Like most businesses, online pharmacy companies will only be successful if they make sure customers are satisfied with the service they receive. But what attributes of service quality lead to satisfaction and dissatisfaction? This study identified 19 Internet pharmacy service quality dimensions in three categories: (1) product cost and availability, (2) customer service, and (3) the online information system. Our analysis uncovered attributes that tend to determine consumer satisfaction and points out ways to improve overall service quality in the Internet pharmacy arena.

  1. THE IMPACT OF ONLINE ENVIRONMENT ON THE DECISION OF THE CONSUMER OF HEALTH SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodog Simona-Aurelia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The online environment has opened new opportunities for consumers of health services, both in terms of the need for information on identified health problem and the possibilities of solving them and choosing the desired health service, resulting in a significant impact on decision of the consumer of health services. The consumers of health services use the internet to get information on identified health problems both before consulting a health service or its buying decision, because of their desire to be informed when acquiring health service, and its subsequent purchase to verify the correctness of service received. In this context, the health care provider cannot create and promote his own desires and beliefs if he wants to be the top choice of the consumers of health services. This paper aims to analyze the impact of the online environment on the decisions of the consumer of health services. The study was conducted on a sample of 223 patients admitted to two public hospitals in Oradea. The patients were given a questionnaire with 20 items, which mainly focused on: information sources, accessing sites with medical content, the moment of accessing the site, verification of information and information from the online influence on their behavior. From the analysis it appears that the information sought by patients online are general, fewer patients frequently access sites of medical institutions, health care facilities or health blogs and forums. The decisions of the Consumers of health care services are influenced to a lesser extent by the information from the online environment, the decisive role in terms of making a decision represent the information received from the doctor. Finally, for the consumer of health care services is difficult to choose because, to some extent even if the needs are becoming increasingly difficult to satisfy a substrate remains related to the personality and mentality of each, of the personal factors regarding

  2. Using diffusion of innovation theory to understand the factors impacting patient acceptance and use of consumer e-health innovations: a case study in a primary care clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Ping; Yan, Jun; Spil, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Background Consumer e-Health is a potential solution to the problems of accessibility, quality and costs of delivering public healthcare services to patients. Although consumer e-Health has proliferated in recent years, it remains unclear if patients are willing and able to accept and use this new

  3. Internet Use for Health-Related Information via Personal Computers and Cell Phones in Japan: A Cross-Sectional Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Ohura, Tomoko; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Okamoto, Shigeru; Miki, Kenji; Naito, Mariko; Akamatsu, Rie; Sugimori, Hiroki; Yoshiike, Nobuo; Miyaki, Koichi; Shimbo, Takuro

    2011-01-01

    Background The Internet is known to be used for health purposes by the general public all over the world. However, little is known about the use of, attitudes toward, and activities regarding eHealth among the Japanese population. Objectives This study aimed to measure the prevalence of Internet use for health-related information compared with other sources, and to examine the effects on user knowledge, attitudes, and activities with regard to Internet use for health-related information in Japan. We examined the extent of use via personal computers and cell phones. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a quasi-representative sample (N = 1200) of the Japanese general population aged 15–79 years in September 2007. The main outcome measures were (1) self-reported rates of Internet use in the past year to acquire health-related information and to contact health professionals, family, friends, and peers specifically for health-related purposes, and (2) perceived effects of Internet use on health care. Results The prevalence of Internet use via personal computer for acquiring health-related information was 23.8% (286/1200) among those surveyed, whereas the prevalence via cell phone was 6% (77). Internet use via both personal computer and cell phone for communicating with health professionals, family, friends, or peers was not common. The Internet was used via personal computer for acquiring health-related information primarily by younger people, people with higher education levels, and people with higher household incomes. The majority of those who used the Internet for health care purposes responded that the Internet improved their knowledge or affected their lifestyle attitude, and that they felt confident in the health-related information they obtained from the Internet. However, less than one-quarter thought it improved their ability to manage their health or affected their health-related activities. Conclusions Japanese moderately used the Internet via

  4. Tutorial on technology transfer and survey design and data collection for measuring Internet and Intranet existence, usage, and impact (survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-02-01

    This paper provides a tutorial of technology transfer for management information systems in health care. Additionally it describes the process for a national survey of acute care hospitals using a random sample of 813 hospitals. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and with customers. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, user satisfaction and decision-making will be studied. Changes with results of a prior survey conducted in 1997 can be studied and enabling and inhabiting factors identified. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals.

  5. Implementation strategies of internet-based asthma self-management support in usual care. Study protocol for the IMPASSE cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Gaalen Johanna L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet-based self-management (IBSM support cost-effectively improves asthma control, asthma related quality of life, number of symptom-free days, and lung function in patients with mild to moderate persistent asthma. The current challenge is to implement IBSM in clinical practice. Methods/design This study is a three-arm cluster randomized trial with a cluster pre-randomisation design and 12 months follow-up per practice comparing the following three IBSM implementation strategies: minimum strategy (MS: dissemination of the IBSM program; intermediate strategy (IS: MS + start-up support for professionals (i.e., support in selection of the appropriate population and training of professionals; and extended strategy (ES: IS + additional training and ongoing support for professionals. Because the implementation strategies (interventions are primarily targeted at general practices, randomisation will occur at practice level. In this study, we aim to evaluate 14 primary care practices per strategy in the Leiden-The Hague region, involving 140 patients per arm. Patients aged 18 to 50 years, with a physician diagnosis of asthma, prescription of inhaled corticosteroids, and/or montelukast for ≥3 months in the previous year are eligible to participate. Primary outcome measures are the proportion of referred patients that participate in IBSM, and the proportion of patients that have clinically relevant improvement in the asthma-related quality of life. The secondary effect measures are clinical outcomes (asthma control, lung function, usage of airway treatment, and presence of exacerbations; self-management related outcomes (health education impact, medication adherence, and illness perceptions; and patient utilities. Process measures are the proportion of practices that participate in IBSM and adherence of professionals to implementation strategies. Cost-effective measurements are medical costs and healthcare consumption

  6. Internet-Based Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  7. Internet-Based Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  8. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitive study using cognitive interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  9. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  10. Young adult consumers' media usage and online purchase likelihood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Young adult consumers' media usage and online purchase likelihood. ... in new media applications such as the internet, email, blogging, twitter and social networks. ... Convenience sampling resulted in 1 298 completed questionnaires.

  11. south african metropolitan consumers' response to health- related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    such as health magazines, internet, television and social ... Marketing messages pertaining to health may also be visually presented to consumers through a ...... However, cross-tabulations .... vegetables, adhering to some traditional/cultural.

  12. CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR TOWARDS ONLINE SHOPPING

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi S

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing internet literacy, the prospect of online marketing is increasing. There are millions of people online any time and they all are a potential consumer in the online market. Since there are so many providers, the most important thing for organizations is to understand what are consumer wants and needs in this competitive business environment. Customer buying behaviors are influenced by different factors such as culture, social class, references group relation, family, salary...

  13. Handling Internet-Based Health Information: Improving Health Information Web Site Literacy Among Undergraduate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwen; Sun, Ran; Mulvehill, Alice M; Gilson, Courtney C; Huang, Linda L

    2017-02-01

    Patient care problems arise when health care consumers and professionals find health information on the Internet because that information is often inaccurate. To mitigate this problem, nurses can develop Web literacy and share that skill with health care consumers. This study evaluated a Web-literacy intervention for undergraduate nursing students to find reliable Web-based health information. A pre- and postsurvey queried undergraduate nursing students in an informatics course; the intervention comprised lecture, in-class practice, and assignments about health Web site evaluation tools. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and ANOVA signed-rank tests. Pre-intervention, 75.9% of participants reported using Web sites to obtain health information. Postintervention, 87.9% displayed confidence in using an evaluation tool. Both the ability to critique health Web sites (p = .005) and confidence in finding reliable Internet-based health information (p = .058) increased. Web-literacy education guides nursing students to find, evaluate, and use reliable Web sites, which improves their ability to deliver safer patient care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(2):110-114.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Internet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  15. Realia: Tools for Consumer Education Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D. Hayden

    1974-01-01

    These suggestions on using realia in the classroom should augment carefully conceived strategies for teaching concepts concerning the consumer in the economy, the consumer in the marketplace, and the consumer's decision-making processes. Realia can bridge the gap between abstract subject matter and functional applications. (BP)

  16. A tailored-guided internet-based cognitive-behavioral intervention for patients with rheumatoid arthritis as an adjunct to standard rheumatological care: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferwerda, Maaike; van Beugen, Sylvia; van Middendorp, Henriët; Spillekom-van Koulil, Saskia; Donders, A Rogier T; Visser, Henk; Taal, Erik; Creemers, Marjonne C W; van Riel, Piet C L M; Evers, Andrea W M

    2017-05-01

    For patients with chronic pain conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who experience elevated levels of distress, tailored-guided internet-based cognitive-behavioral treatment may be effective in improving psychological and physical functioning, and reducing the impact of RA on daily life. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial was conducted for RA patients with elevated levels of distress as assessed by a disease-specific measure. The control group (n = 71) received standard care and the intervention group (n = 62) additionally received an internet-based tailored cognitive-behavioral intervention. Main analyses were performed using a linear mixed model estimating differences between the intervention and control groups in scores of psychological functioning, physical functioning, and impact of RA on daily life at preassesment and postassessment, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Patients who received the internet-based intervention reported a larger improvement in psychological functioning compared with the control group, indicating less depressed mood (P physical functioning, a trend was found for the intervention group reporting less fatigue than the control group (P = 0.06, d = 0.24), whereas no effect was found on pain. No effects were found for the impact of RA on daily life, except for the intervention group experiencing fewer role limitations due to emotional problems (P therapy is a promising development to aid patients with psychological distress particularly in improving psychological functioning. Further research on adherence and specific intervention ingredients is warranted.

  17. Consumer Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an annotated bibliography of 19 titles that focus on cancer and health-care reform. These include: (1) Anderson, John W. "Stand by Her: A Breast Cancer Guide for Men." AMACOM: American Management Assn.; (2) Carstensen, Laura L. "A Long Bright Future: An Action Plan for a Lifetime of Happiness, Health, and Financial Security."…

  18. The interplay of internet addiction and compulsive shopping behaviors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Jungkun; Lee, Seungsin; Lee, Sukhyung Bryan

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationship between Internet addiction and compulsive shopping in offline versus online settings, and the role of consumers' self-esteem on their offline behavior and compulsive e-buying tendencies...

  19. Mental health related Internet use among psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Internet is of great importance in today’s health sector, as most Internet users utilize online functions for health related purposes. Concerning the mental health care sector, little data exist about the Internet use of psychiatric patients. It is the scope of this current study to analyze the quantity and pattern of Internet usage among mental health patients. Methods: Patients from all services of the Department of Psychiatry at a university hospital were surveyed by comple...

  20. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuss DJ

    2013-11-01

    for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that evidences neurobiologic correlates of Internet gaming addiction and the establishment of a preliminary diagnosis, but also emphasizes the necessity of an indepth understanding of the meaning, context, and practices associated with gaming.Keywords: Internet gaming, Internet gaming addiction, current perspectives, context, neuroimaging, diagnosis

  1. A Model for Usability Evaluation for the Development and Implementation of Consumer eHealth Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, David; Carter, Philip; Koziol-McLain, Jane; Feather, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Consumer eHealth products are often used by people in their own homes or other settings without dedicated clinical supervision, and often with minimal training and limited support--much as eCommerce and eGovernment applications are currently deployed. Internet based self-care systems have been advocated for over a decade as a way to reduce costs and allow more convenient care, and--because of the expectation that they will be used to reduced health cost--, by increasing self-care and avoiding hospitalization. However, the history of consumer eHealth interventions is mixed, with many unsuccessful implementations. Many consumer eHealth products will form part of a broader complex intervention, with many possible benefits and effects on both individuals and society. This poster describes a model of consumer eHealth assessment based on multiple methods of usability evaluation at different stages in the design and fielding of eHealth systems. We argue that different methods of usability evaluation are able to give valuable insights into the likely effects of an intervention in a way that is congruent with software development processes.

  2. Delivering Extension to the Living Room Using Internet TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Grant G., III

    2014-01-01

    Television is a widely adopted source for viewing educational information. Unfortunately, producing a television show on network television can be costly and time consuming. Internet TV offers Extension video content producers the opportunity to create a niche topic channel quickly and at low cost. Internet TV offers viewers a low-cost and…

  3. Customer perceptions on Internet banking information protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Redlinghuis

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa has a well-developed and established banking system which compares favourably with those in many developed countries (e.g. USA, but also sets South Africa apart from many other emerging market countries like Egypt and Brazil. Four dominant banks, namely the Amalgamated Banks of South Africa (ABSA, Standard Bank, Nedcor and First National Bank (FNB influence the South African banking environment. Internet banking has slowly been taking off in South Africa since 1996 as consumers are attracted to the convenience, safety and lower costs of doing banking online. Trust is a significant component of Internet banking and online services and products.Objectives: This article has reported on the results of a survey (a close-ended questionnaire that was conducted by alumni of the University of Johannesburg (UJ. The research problem for this study has been formulated as ‘what are Internet banking customers’ perception on information protection when using Internet banking services and products?’Method: The methodology for this study falls on quantitative research. The research study consisted of a detailed literature review, followed by an empirical component which consisted of a quantitative questionnaire. The questionnaire used in this study consisted of eight sections covering biographical information, financial institution and Internet banking, Internet banking service quality and delivery, Internet banking functionality, Internet banking costs, Internet banking convenience and relationships, Internet banking trust and Internet banking security and information technology (IT.Results: It was established that the findings of this research could assist financial institutions with fostering and building greater value adding relationships with their customers. These value-adding endeavours will ensure that customers experience and perceive their Internet banking experience to be enriching. Education and awareness campaigns are

  4. Guided and unguided internet-based vestibular rehabilitation versus usual care for dizzy adults of 50 years and older: a protocol for a three-armed randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wouden, Johannes C; Bosmans, Judith E; Smalbrugge, Martin; van Diest, Willianne; Essery, Rosie; Yardley, Lucy; van der Horst, Henriëtte E; Maarsingh, Otto R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dizziness is a common symptom in general practice with a high prevalence among older adults. The most common cause of dizziness in general practice is peripheral vestibular disease. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is a safe and effective treatment for peripheral vestibular disease that entails specific exercises to maximise the central nervous system compensation for the effects of vestibular pathology. An internet-based VR intervention has recently been shown to be safe and effective. Online interventions are low cost and easily accessible, but prone to attrition and non-adherence. A combination of online and face-to-face therapy, known as blended care, may balance these advantages and disadvantages. Methods and analysis A single-blind, three-arm, randomised controlled trial among patients aged 50 years and over presenting with dizziness of vestibular origin in general practice will be performed. In this study, we will compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of stand-alone internet-based VR and internet-based VR with physiotherapeutic support (‘blended care’) with usual care during 6 months of follow-up. We will use a translated Dutch version of a British online VR intervention. Randomisation will be stratified by dizziness severity. The primary outcome measure is the Vertigo Symptoms Scale—Short Form. Intention-to-treat analysis will be performed, adjusting for confounders. The economic evaluation will be conducted from a societal perspective. We will perform an additional analysis on the data to identify predictors of successful treatment in the same population to develop a clinical decision rule for general practitioners. Ethics and dissemination The ethical committee of the VU University Medical Center approved ethics and dissemination of the study protocol. The insights and results of this study will be widely disseminated through international peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. Trial registration number Pre

  5. 高校医疗保健管理体系的发展策略与INTERNET技术应用%The Development Strategies of University Health Care Management System with the Internet Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧颖; 肖海嵘; 来珠

    2001-01-01

    The health care resource management is a less developed university information management item. In this paper, we put forward constructing a mixed-mode to achieve a university health care system(UHCS) with internet technology to enable the staff to share their health information, and discuss the key technology and reality scheme.%高等学校的医疗保健资源管理和使用是高校信息管理中的弱项,针对现有的医院信息管理的状态,提出利用Internet技术,构建B/S与C/S混合模式的高校医疗保健管理系统(UHCS),实现保健信息的人群化共享,并讨论了其中的关键技术和实现方案。

  6. O Impacto da Destruição Criadora da Internet na Lealdade às Marcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Santille

    2009-01-01

    Therefore it was concluded that though the Internet may weaken consumers’ brand loyalty in the web context, it also provides a valuable tool to revert this situation. Key-words: consumer behavior, internet, loyalty, brands.

  7. “一次性耗材伤口护理专项培训考核”效果的评价研究%Statistical evaluation and research on effect of training assessment for specialized disposable consumables wound care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于春华; 蒋琪霞; 仲继红; 祁静; 刘亚红; 程秀红; 钟添萍; 朱兴喜

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of training assessment for wound care group using disposable consumables safely through specialized disposable consumables in wound care. Methods: Consumables suppliers and experts of wound care group co-formulated and co-implemented the training plan. The wound care effect with the methods of combination of theory examination, practice, and safety management was statistically evaluated. Results: After training, the effect of wound care of 35 nurses training was significant, in which the nurses with less than 5 years in working experience had more progress in theoretical basis and practical capability. Conclusion: Implementing wound care training had enhanced the nurses' knowledge and ability of disposable use and safety management of medical consumables. It will help the hospital to promote itself..%目的:通过"一次性耗材伤口护理专项培训考核",研究伤口护理学组护士安全使用医用一次性耗材的效果。方法:由耗材供应商和医院伤口护理组专家共同制订和实施培训计划,采用理论考核、实际操作和安全管理相结合进行伤口护理效果的统计评价。结果:通过对全院35名护士培训前后的考评对比,伤口护理效果明显,尤其是护龄〈5年的护士其理论基础和实际操作能力的进步更显著。结论:进行"一次性耗材伤口护理专项培训考核",提高了护士对医用一次性耗材的安全使用认识和管理效能,有利于在医院全面推广。

  8. Education – Determinant of Consumer`s Conditions in an Era of Technological Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Burghelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the era of technological change, consumers face an environment increasingly complex, leading to significant challenges regarding buying and consuming choices and consumer protection. The most important and most influential technological changes in terms of the impact on the consumer, are iduced by internet, digitization and globalization. However, the era of technological change also means developing biotechnologies, nanotechnologies, new materials and new energy sources, all these changing people`s lives, living conditions, their needs and their behaviour as consumers. The literature highlights the factors that influence purchasing behaviour and changes manifested in terms of values, stressing the importance of promoting and protecting consumer`s rights and interests, The new responsible consumer can become a key driving force of sustainable development only if it is able to capitalize on new opportunities and to counter new risks of modern marketing technologies based on the Internet and mobile communications. This involves the assimilation of new knowledge throughout life to keep up with the accelerating pace of technological innovation and diffusion of e-commerce solutions and mobile commerce. We study the correlation between the composite index of consumer conditions and the level of participation in lifelong learning programmes in some Member States, based on secondary analysis of the data available at EU level,. The results confirm that the consumer`s situation is better in countries where the level of participation in lifelong learning programmes is higher. At the same time, however, the correlation is not linear. This shows that the consumer`s situation does not depend exclusively on formal continuing education but also other factors such as timeliness and severity of legal and institutional framework of consumer protection, the acquisition of knowledge through informal means, the requirement of different customers in different

  9. A survey of consumers' attitudes towards online purchase of contact lenses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tatsuya; Hirayama, Yoshito; Iwashima, Hiroki; Sakaguchi, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    A survey with 324 respondents was conducted to explore factors influencing Japanese consumers' intentions to use the internet for the purchase of contact lenses. Analysis of the results revealed four types of consumers: (a) those who were strongly against using contact lenses and as a result did not intend to use the internet for their purchase, (b) those who had positive attitudes towards use of the internet for purchasing contact lenses, (c) those who preferred the current situation of purchasing contact lenses without using the internet and (d) those who were not unfavourable to purchase contact lenses via the internet.

  10. Remodelling Marketing Communications in an Internet Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the Internet demands a significant review of approaches to marketing communications, or promotion, as both the strategic and tactical levels. Highlights include electronic business and electronic commerce; comparing organizational and consumer markets; service development; objectives of marketing communications; and questions for…

  11. The Internet: A New Responsibility for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Byron

    1995-01-01

    Educators will be challenged to teach students to use the Internet as critical consumers. There are numerous issues, including equity (due to income, educational level, gender, urban-rural setting, and age differences), connectivity, staff training, curriculum integration, and evaluation, that have profound implications for sustaining democratic…

  12. Remodelling Marketing Communications in an Internet Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the Internet demands a significant review of approaches to marketing communications, or promotion, as both the strategic and tactical levels. Highlights include electronic business and electronic commerce; comparing organizational and consumer markets; service development; objectives of marketing communications; and questions for…

  13. Measuring Consumer Innovativeness: Identifying Innovators among Consumers of Modern Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Filová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The methods currently used in innovation marketing research are focused on the late phases of the innovation process and are usually methodologically complex. This limits their practical impact. The presented work aims to create a simple self-report scale applicable in the initial and late phases of the innovation process, highly modular and suitable for a wide range of research. The main battery of questions was inspired by the adopter categorization by Rogers. The questions determine both (1 general characteristics of innovation adopters and (2 their relationship to a specific innovation. The scale was tested during robust longitudinal online research, thematically focused on users of modern technologies. A representative sample of 4,000 Internet users in the Czech Republic took part in the survey from 2013 to 2015. The result is a new self-report scale measuring consumer innovativeness applicable for prototyping, strategic decisions and effective communication of innovations to consumers.

  14. CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR DURING ONLINE GROCERY SHOPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hanus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today consumers can buy almost any product using the Internet. Online nutritional and grocery shopping is becoming increasingly popular. The aim of this paper is to present the conditions of online grocery shopping and consumers’ attitude towards buying food via the Internet based. The assessment is based on secondary information sources. With online grocery supermarkets there are no limitations connected with localization and opening hours, and consumers have access to a large range of stores and products online across the world. The most important advantages of online shopping are convenience and time saving, while the most significant disadvantages for consumers involve the risk of incorrectly valuating some products and apprehension about the selection and handling of perishables, such as vegetables, eggs, and meat products.

  15. The Internet and tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Verner, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    This work concentrates on Internet and its influence on tourism. It describes history of Internet, tourism and interactions among them. Next this work deals with the newest trends of Internet and their influence on tourism. Last but not least, it analyzes the influence of Internet on demand in tourism in Czech Republic.

  16. Internet Addiction among Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargin, Nurten

    2012-01-01

    Each innovation brings along many risks. One of the risks related with the Internet use is Internet addiction. The aim of this study is to examine Internet addiction in adolescence in terms of gender, Internet access at home and grades. The research design used was survey method. The study population consisted of second stage students attending…

  17. The Internet and tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Verner, Zbyněk

    2010-01-01

    This work concentrates on Internet and its influence on tourism. It describes history of Internet, tourism and interactions among them. Next this work deals with the newest trends of Internet and their influence on tourism. Last but not least, it analyzes the influence of Internet on demand in tourism in Czech Republic.

  18. Internet: um meio desmassificado

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Ivo Dias de

    2016-01-01

    Objetivos Identificar as diferentes fases de evolução da Internet. Perceber a Internet como um meio desmassificado. Entender o conceito de hipertexto e a sua evolução. Saber os diferentes tipos de utilização da Internet. Compreender as diferentes dimensões da presença na Internet. N/A

  19. Internet Addiction among Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargin, Nurten

    2012-01-01

    Each innovation brings along many risks. One of the risks related with the Internet use is Internet addiction. The aim of this study is to examine Internet addiction in adolescence in terms of gender, Internet access at home and grades. The research design used was survey method. The study population consisted of second stage students attending…

  20. “互联网+”背景下居家养老的发展方向及创新模式研究%Development direction and innovation model of home-based care for the aged under the background of“Internet+”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹力; 马丽丽; 汤少梁; 陈娜

    2016-01-01

    With the accelerated aging of the population, the development of medical information, mHealth (mo-bile health), telemedicine, cloud intelligence processing centers and Medical Internet of Things has brought new opportu-nities for home-based care for the aged. Under“Internet+”era, the development direction of home-based care for the aged is“Internet+”intelligent home-based care. This paper tries to explore the establishment of a comprehensive O2O pension services based on the Internet platform and the innovation model for home-based care for the aged under the background of“Internet+”.%随着人口老龄化加速,医疗信息化、移动医疗、远程医疗、云智慧处理中心和医疗物联网等异军突起,给居家养老的发展带来了新的机遇。”互联网+”时代下,居家养老的发展方向是:“互联网+”智能居家养老;利用互联网平台,建立养老O2O模式的综合性养老服务。探索“互联网+”背景下,居家养老创新模式。

  1. Internet-kulttuuri nykytaiteessa

    OpenAIRE

    Höyssä, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Internet-kulttuuri nykytaiteessa Tutkimuksessa tarkastellaan internet-taiteen historiaa ja nykyisiä esityskäytäntöjä sekä sitä miten globaali internet-kulttuuri on muokannut nykytaidetta sekä galleriassa että webissä. Tutkimuksessa kysytään miten internetin kehitys on vaikuttanut internet-taiteeseen sekä post-internet-taiteen syntyyn? Mikä on internetin paikka nykytaiteessa sekä populaarikulttuurissa? Internet culture in contemporary art A study on the history of Internet art and it’...

  2. Influencing the online consumer's behavior: the Web experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios

    2004-01-01

    Addresses one of the fundamental issues of e-marketing: how to attract and win over the consumer in the highly competitive Internet marketplace. Analyses the factors affecting the online consumer's behavior and examines how e-marketers can influence the outcome of the virtual interaction and buying

  3. Consumers want safer meat - but not at all costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkbak, Morten Raun; Christensen, Tove; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    different packages of minced pork that differed with respect to Salmonella risks, risk reduction method, and price. The sample consisted of 844 Danish consumers, who answered a questionnaire over the internet. Our results indicate that consumers demand safer meat, but not at all costs - there is a limit...

  4. Absolute risk representation in cardiovascular disease prevention: comprehension and preferences of health care consumers and general practitioners involved in a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Rebecca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communicating risk is part of primary prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke, collectively referred to as cardiovascular disease (CVD. In Australia, health organisations have promoted an absolute risk approach, thereby raising the question of suitable standardised formats for risk communication. Methods Sixteen formats of risk representation were prepared including statements, icons, graphical formats, alone or in combination, and with variable use of colours. All presented the same risk, i.e., the absolute risk for a 55 year old woman, 16% risk of CVD in five years. Preferences for a five or ten-year timeframe were explored. Australian GPs and consumers were recruited for participation in focus groups, with the data analysed thematically and preferred formats tallied. Results Three focus groups with health consumers and three with GPs were held, involving 19 consumers and 18 GPs. Consumers and GPs had similar views on which formats were more easily comprehended and which conveyed 16% risk as a high risk. A simple summation of preferences resulted in three graphical formats (thermometers, vertical bar chart and one statement format as the top choices. The use of colour to distinguish risk (red, yellow, green and comparative information (age, sex, smoking status were important ingredients. Consumers found formats which combined information helpful, such as colour, effect of changing behaviour on risk, or comparison with a healthy older person. GPs preferred formats that helped them relate the information about risk of CVD to their patients, and could be used to motivate patients to change behaviour. Several formats were reported as confusing, such as a percentage risk with no contextual information, line graphs, and icons, particularly those with larger numbers. Whilst consumers and GPs shared preferences, the use of one format for all situations was not recommended. Overall, people across groups felt that risk

  5. Analytical Study on Internet Banking System

    CERN Document Server

    AlAbdullah, Fadhel S; Alnaqeib, Rami; Jalab, Hamid A; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B

    2010-01-01

    The Internet era is a period in the information age in which communication and commerce via the Internet became a central focus for businesses, consumers, government, and the media. The Internet era also marks the convergence of the computer and communications industries and their associated services and products. Nowadays, the availability of the Internet make it widely used for everyday life. In order to led business to success, the business and specially the services should provide comfort use to its costumer. The bank system is one of the most important businesses who may use the website. The using for the web-based systems should contain special requirements to achieve the business goal. Since that the paper will present the functional and non-functional for the web-based banking system.

  6. Internet and Audiology: A Review of the First International Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gerhard; Lunner, Thomas; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Preminger, Jill E

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this research forum article is to describe the impetus for holding the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology (October 2014) and to introduce the special research forum that arose from the meeting. The rationale for the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology is described. This is followed by a short description of the research sections and articles appearing in the special issue. Six articles consider the process of health care delivery over the Internet; this includes health care specific to hearing, tinnitus, and balance. Four articles discuss the development of effective Internet-based treatment programs. Six articles describe and evaluate Internet-based interventions specific to adult hearing aid users. The fledgling field of Internet and audiology is remarkably broad. The Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology ocurred in September 2015.

  7. Evaluating the process of online health information searching: a qualitative approach to exploring consumer perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksdal, Alexander S; Kumbamu, Ashok; Jadhav, Ashutosh S; Cocos, Cristian; Nelsen, Laurie A; Pathak, Jyotishman; McCormick, Jennifer B

    2014-10-07

    The Internet is a common resource that patients and consumers use to access health-related information. Multiple practical, cultural, and socioeconomic factors influence why, when, and how people utilize this tool. Improving the delivery of health-related information necessitates a thorough understanding of users' searching-related needs, preferences, and experiences. Although a wide body of quantitative research examining search behavior exists, qualitative approaches have been under-utilized and provide unique perspectives that may prove useful in improving the delivery of health information over the Internet. We conducted this study to gain a deeper understanding of online health-searching behavior in order to inform future developments of personalizing information searching and content delivery. We completed three focus groups with adult residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, which explored perceptions of online health information searching. Participants were recruited through flyers and classifieds advertisements posted throughout the community. We audio-recorded and transcribed all focus groups, and analyzed data using standard qualitative methods. Almost all participants reported using the Internet to gather health information. They described a common experience of searching, filtering, and comparing results in order to obtain information relevant to their intended search target. Information saturation and fatigue were cited as main reasons for terminating searching. This information was often used as a resource to enhance their interactions with health care providers. Many participants viewed the Internet as a valuable tool for finding health information in order to support their existing health care resources. Although the Internet is a preferred source of health information, challenges persist in streamlining the search process. Content providers should continue to develop new strategies and technologies aimed at accommodating diverse populations

  8. Book Review: Digital consumers reshaping the information profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Fourie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The introductory paragraph to Digital consumers reshaping the information profession (p.1, explaining the choice of the title as "Digital consumers …" and not "Digital information consumers …", set the tone for a thought provoking outlook on the challenges faced. Although the book focuses on the behaviour of people visiting the virtual space of information, the Internet has redefined and widened the information domain, and since people use the Internet like a superstore for many things and many purposes, "it is almost impossible to say what information is and what it is not …".

  9. Effect of direct-to-consumer genetic tests on health behaviour and anxiety: a survey of consumers and potential consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egglestone, Corin; Morris, Anne; O'Brien, Ann

    2013-10-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests can be purchased over the internet. Some companies claim to provide relative genetic risks for various diseases and thus encourage healthy behaviour. There are concerns that exposure to such information may actually discourage healthy behaviour or increase health anxiety. An online survey was conducted (n = 275). Respondents were composed of individuals who had purchased a DTC genetic test and received their results (consumers, n = 189), as well as individuals who were either awaiting test results or considering purchasing a test (potential consumers, n = 86). Consumers were asked if their health behaviour or health anxiety had changed after receiving their results. Respondents' current health behaviour and health anxiety were queried and compared. In total, 27.3 % of consumers claimed a change in health behaviour, all either positive or neutral, with no reported cessation of any existing health behaviour. A change in health anxiety was claimed by 24.6 % of consumers, 85.3 % of which were a reduction. Consumers had significantly better health behaviour scores than potential consumers (p = 0.02), with no significant difference in health anxiety. This study points towards an association between receipt of DTC genetic test results and increased adoption of healthy behaviours for a minority of consumers based on self-report, with more mixed results in relation to health anxiety.

  10. Internet pharmacy: issues of access, quality, costs, and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stephanie Y

    2003-02-01

    Internet pharmacy has been the focus of heightened interest over the past 3 years since the first major Web site was introduced in the United States. This paper addresses issues pertaining to Internet pharmacies that sell prescriptions and other products to consumers at the retail level. The Internet pharmacy industry has shifted rapidly in the short time span. This paper begins with a summary of historical considerations and the shifting organization of Internet pharmacy. The advantages and disadvantages of online pharmacy practice are listed. Issues of access, quality, and cost are described. The challenges in regulation at the state and federal levels are presented. Advice to consumers is offered regarding the use of Internet pharmacy sites for purchasing prescription drug products.

  11. Sustainability of Marketing Food Crops through the Internet in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abdulaphyz

    ii. what are the push and pull factors towards the sustainability of marketing and ... consumers from buying their preferred food crops through the medium, while pull was seen as ... The internet is perceived to be a fast medium and a ... consumers have had the opportunity of making choice from different available products.

  12. Health Social Media and Patient-Centered Care: Buzz or Evidence? Findings from the Section "Education and Consumer Health Informatics" of the 2015 Edition of the IMIA Yearbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staccini, P; Fernandez-Luque, L

    2015-08-13

    To summarize the 2014 state of the art in the areas related to consumer health informatics and social media. We conducted a systematic review of articles published in 2014 in PubMed with a predefined set of queries. We identified 439 articles relevant for the review. The two section editors independently screened those papers taking into account their relevance to the topics covered by the section. In a second step, they jointly selected the 20 most representative papers as candidate best papers. Candidate best papers were then submitted for full review and scoring by external reviewers. Based on the scoring, section editors together with the IMIA Yearbook editorial board selected the four best papers published in 2014 in consumer health informatics. Helping patients acquire a healthier lifestyle is a crucial part of patient empowerment. In this line of work, new studies are exploring the efficacy of online health interventions for patient behavioral change. The special case of smoking cessation for consumers with low socio-economic status is particularly noticeable. Another study has explored how an online intervention can reduce the anxiety of women who experience an abnormal mammography. The team of PatientsLikeMe has studied how online support groups could play a role in the quality of life of organ transplant recipients. The patient perspective of online forums' users is also analyzed in the domain of anticoagulation therapy. Online health interventions, many of them using social media, have confirmed their potential to impact consumer behavioral change. However, there are still many methodological issues that need to be addressed in order to prove cost-effectiveness.

  13. CONSUMER BETWEEN OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Dina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We live in a society where the consumer, due to the diversity and abundance of products and services whose characteristics are becoming more similar, has to make choices that are increasingly difficult. Another aspect that has led to a profound transformation of the consumer behavior is due to the large volume of information, supplied by the Internet, information which in some cases is not accurate, but is decisively influencing the consumer. In equal measure, the difficulty of making a purchasing decision is caused by the fact that with the opening to the global market, where the products and services were depersonalized, gaining common features, and where the concept of quality tends to no longer relate to the same standards as a few decades ago, having suffered major changes. The quality of products is a fundamental requirement of competitiveness, and quality assessment is a personal right of the consumer, because this is a direct effect of quality of life. (“Fundamentele ştiinţei mărfurilor” Dinu Vasile, 2008

  14. Analysis Components of the Digital Consumer Behavior in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian Bogdan Onete; Ioana Teodorescu; Viorel Vasile

    2016-01-01

    This article is investigating the Romanian consumer behavior in the context of the evolution of the online shopping. Given that online stores are a profitable business model in the area of electronic commerce and because the relationship between consumer digital Romania and its decision to purchase products or services on the Internet has not been sufficiently explored, this study aims to identify specific features of the new type of consumer and to examine the level of online shopping in Rom...

  15. [Differences in access to Internet and Internet-based information seeking according to the type of psychiatric disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunault, P; Bray, A; Rerolle, C; Cognet, S; Gaillard, P; El-Hage, W

    2017-04-01

    Internet has become a major tool for patients to search for health-related information and to communicate on health. We currently lack data on how patients with psychiatric disorders access and use Internet to search for information on their mental health. This study aimed to assess, in patients followed for a psychiatric disorder (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, mood and anxiety disorder, substance-related and addictive disorders and eating disorders), prevalence of Internet access and use, and patient expectations and needs regarding the use of Internet to search for mental-health information depending on the psychiatric disorder. We conducted this cross-sectional study between May 2013 and July 2013 in 648 patients receiving psychiatric care in 8 hospitals from the Region Centre, France. We used multivariate logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, socio-educational level and professional status to compare use, expectations and needs regarding Internet-based information about the patient's psychiatric disorder (65-items self-administered questionnaires) as a function of the psychiatric disorders. We identified patients clusters with multiple correspondence analysis and ascending hierarchical classification. Although 65.6% of our population accessed Internet at home, prevalence for Internet access varied depending on the type of psychiatric disorder and was much more related to limited access to a computer and low income than to a lack of interest in the Internet. Most of the patients who used Internet were interested in having access to reliable Internet-based information on their health (76.8%), and most used Internet to search for Internet based health-information about their psychiatric disorder (58.8%). We found important differences in terms of expectations and needs depending on the patient's psychiatric disorder (e.g., higher interest in Internet-based information among patients with bipolar disorder, substance-related and addictive disorders

  16. Consumer-generated versus marketer-generated websites in consumer decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, F.; de Hoog, R.

    2010-01-01

    Internet users are encouraged to rate and review all kinds of services and products. These kinds of reviews are described as eWOM (electronic wordof- mouth). Our central question is ‘Are consumers using these reviews, and what is the role of eWOM as compared with commercial-marketer-generated inform

  17. Consumer-generated versus marketer-generated websites in consumer decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, F.; de Hoog, R.

    2010-01-01

    Internet users are encouraged to rate and review all kinds of services and products. These kinds of reviews are described as eWOM (electronic wordof- mouth). Our central question is ‘Are consumers using these reviews, and what is the role of eWOM as compared with commercial-marketer-generated

  18. Multichannel e-commerce : consumer behavior across e-channels and e-channel touchpoints

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has become a significant part of the retail landscape and altered the way consumers search for information and conduct purchases. This dissertation incorporates that through the increasing multiplicity of Internet-enabled devices, which consumers now use for online shopping activities, the online retailing environment itself changes fundamentally. Accordingly, it is relevant for marketing research and practice to consider which connected devices consumers use for online shopping ...

  19. Internet's influence on the marketing activities of South African companies / Kristy-Lee Sharp

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Kristy-Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Internet is one of the most advanced technologies of modern times and it is diffusing at an exponential rate amongst business-to-consumer and business-to-business organisations. This has resulted in it becoming an irrevocable and an unstoppable trend, thereby making it vital for companies to incorporate it into their businesses. The Internet, Internet technologies and Internet services, particularly the Web, are widely acknowledged to have had and to continue to have a considerable impact...

  20. Development of a health information technology acceptance model using consumers' health behavior intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongeun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2012-10-01

    For effective health promotion using health information technology (HIT), it is mandatory that health consumers have the behavioral intention to measure, store, and manage their own health data. Understanding health consumers' intention and behavior is needed to develop and implement effective and efficient strategies. To develop and verify the extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in health care by describing health consumers' behavioral intention of using HIT. This study used a cross-sectional descriptive correlational design. We extended TAM by adding more antecedents and mediating variables to enhance the model's explanatory power and to make it more applicable to health consumers' behavioral intention. Additional antecedents and mediating variables were added to the hypothetical model, based on their theoretical relevance, from the Health Belief Model and theory of planned behavior, along with the TAM. We undertook structural equation analysis to examine the specific nature of the relationship involved in understanding consumers' use of HIT. Study participants were 728 members recruited from three Internet health portals in Korea. Data were collected by a Web-based survey using a structured self-administered questionnaire. The overall fitness indices for the model developed in this study indicated an acceptable fit of the model. All path coefficients were statistically significant. This study showed that perceived threat, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use significantly affected health consumers' attitude and behavioral intention. Health consumers' health status, health belief and concerns, subjective norm, HIT characteristics, and HIT self-efficacy had a strong indirect impact on attitude and behavioral intention through the mediators of perceived threat, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. An extended TAM in the HIT arena was found to be valid to describe health consumers' behavioral intention. We categorized the concepts in

  1. Consumers' and workers' perspectives about consumer-directed services in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaine, Jamie G; Parish, Susan L; Igdalsky, Leah; Powell, Robyn M

    2016-07-01

    Consumer direction is a service delivery model that shifts decision-making from agencies to the individuals they serve. Using government funding, consumers hire, supervise, and schedule their own staff and maintain control over the delivery of their services. This study sought to understand the process of consumer direction as well as the experiences and perspectives of both the consumers and employees. The study also sought to better understand if and how consumer direction allows the consumer to direct his or her life, the impact consumer direction may have on the individual's health and health care, and how employment in consumer directed programs impacts the workers providing direct care services. This qualitative study included interviews with consumers (N = 20) and workers (N = 15) in Virginia, a southern state in the US. Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted by one member of the research team and transcribed and coded for themes by the research team using grounded theory methodology. Consumers reported greater control over their services and increased access to health care, compared to what they previously received with traditional services. Conversely, consumers reported challenges in managing their staff and fulfilling the role of an employer. Employees reported a lack of training prior to starting their jobs, as well as an inability to live off on low hourly wages. Still, the majority of employees reported job satisfaction and fulfillment. Policymakers should expand and strengthen the consumer directed program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel van Dijk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programs (DMP aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs. Research design and methods: Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (N=316 and data from electronic medical records (EMR (N=9023, and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard. Results: On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. 96% contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs. Conclusion: Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  3. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E.; Verheij, Robert A.; Swinkels, Ilse C.S.; Rijken, Mieke; Schellevis, François G.; Groenewegen, Peter P.; de Bakker, Dinny H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Disease management programs (DMP) aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs. Research design and methods Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (n=316) and data from electronic medical records (EMR) (n=9023), and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard. Results On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. Ninety-six percent contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs. Conclusion Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care. PMID:22359520

  4. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel van Dijk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programs (DMP aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs.Research design and methods: Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (N=316 and data from electronic medical records (EMR (N=9023, and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard.Results: On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. 96% contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs.Conclusion: Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  5. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E; Verheij, Robert A; Swinkels, Ilse C S; Rijken, Mieke; Schellevis, François G; Groenewegen, Peter P; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2011-10-01

    Disease management programs (DMP) aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs. Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (n=316) and data from electronic medical records (EMR) (n=9023), and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard. On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. Ninety-six percent contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs. Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  6. The Use of Data Analytics to Build an Australian Context-Sensitive Health Informatics Framework for Consumer-Directed Community Aged Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andrew; Jorgensen, Mikaela; Siette, Joyce; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2017-01-01

    The challenge of providing services that meet the growing needs of an ageing population is one confronted by communities across Australia and internationally. The aim of this study was to: a) undertake semi-structured interviews and focus groups across a sample of service and technical staff to identify the interconnection between communication, information, work practices and performance; and b) carry out a comprehensive review of existing data sources to identify the data linkages required to identify and monitor performance across different dimensions of the quality of aged care spectrum. The results from this study provided empirical evidence of the interconnection between communication, information, work practices and performance; and highlighted numerous potential data linkages which can be used to monitor performance across different dimensions of aged care. These included: the uptake and utilisation of community care services, community aged care client interactions and transitions (with hospitals and other health care providers), and quality of life measures (e.g., health and safety status, symptoms of depression and anxiety, social integration and mortality rates).

  7. Internet Commerce Managing Financial on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Wibowo Widhianto

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Article explain how to business through internet which are web business clarification, strategy effect, how to make profit, and business electronic changes consist of criptografy, EDI, signature, digital notarisation, file, payment, and how to get succes in internet business.

  8. Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the development and issues of internet and internet use. The study has a descriptive survey design and 185 randomly selected teacher trainees at Marmara University, Ataturk Education Faculty in the 2001-2002 academic year constitute the sample. Data were collected via a questionnaire prepared by the researcher…

  9. Can consumers learn to ask three questions to improve shared decision making? A feasibility study of the ASK (AskShareKnow) Patient-Clinician Communication Model(®) intervention in a primary health-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Heather L; Barratt, Alexandra; Jones, Anna; Bateson, Deborah; Carey, Karen; Trevena, Lyndal J; McGeechan, Kevin; Del Mar, Chris B; Butow, Phyllis N; Epstein, Ronald M; Entwistle, Vikki; Weisberg, Edith

    2016-10-01

    To test the feasibility and assess the uptake and acceptability of implementing a consumer questions programme, AskShareKnow, to encourage consumers to use the questions '1. What are my options; 2. What are the possible benefits and harms of those options; 3. How likely are each of those benefits and harms to happen to me?' These three questions have previously shown important effects in improving the quality of information provided during consultations and in facilitating patient involvement. This single-arm intervention study invited participants attending a reproductive and sexual health-care clinic to view a 4-min video-clip in the waiting room. Participants completed three questionnaires: (T1) prior to viewing the intervention; (T2) immediately after their consultation; and (T3) two weeks later. A total of 121 (78%) participants viewed the video-clip before their consultation. Eighty-four (69%) participants asked one or more questions, and 35 (29%) participants asked all three questions. For those making a decision, 55 (87%) participants asked one or more questions, while 27 (43%) participants asked all three questions. Eighty-seven (72%) participants recommended the questions. After two weeks, 47 (49%) of the participants recalled the questions. Enabling patients to view a short video-clip before an appointment to improve information and involvement in health-care consultations is feasible and led to a high uptake of question asking in consultations. This AskShareKnow programme is a simple and feasible method of training patients to use a brief consumer-targeted intervention that has previously shown important effects in improving the quality of information provided during consultations and in facilitating patient involvement and use of evidence-based questions. ©2015 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Commercialisation of Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik

    An anthology dealing with the commercialisation of Internet and the development of new services.......An anthology dealing with the commercialisation of Internet and the development of new services....

  11. Internet user behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radbâță, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet is a useful tool for everybody in a technologically advanced world. As Internet appears and develops, it creates a totally new network environment. The development of commerce on the Internet based on virtual communities has become one of the most successful business models in the world. After analyzing the concept of internet, the e-commerce market and its marketing mix and the benefits and limitations of the Internet, we have presented a few studies on Internet user behaviour. Furthermore, the paper looks at a representative sample of Romanian internet users. The results reveal that the Romanians are using the Internet especially for information gathering, e-mail, entertainment and social networking.

  12. Commercialisation of Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Skouby, Knud Erik

    An anthology dealing with the commercialisation of Internet and the development of new services.......An anthology dealing with the commercialisation of Internet and the development of new services....

  13. Consumer Attention, Engagement, and Market Shares: Evidence from the Carbonated Soft Drinks Market

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yizao; Rui, Huaxia

    2014-01-01

    among consumers and between consumers and brands. Social media users can now interact with brands directly through Facebook and Twitter. These new features make social media a very distinctive class of online WOM. In this paper, we formulate a random coefficient discrete choice model of consumer demand to study whether and how consumer engagement and attention on the Internet affect the consumption of carbonated soft drinks (CSDs). We model consumer attention and engagement on social media as...

  14. A Preliminary Study of Internet Based Ticketing System Impacts on Selected Travel Agencies in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Saleh Khuja; Abdul Manaf Bohari

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the Internet based ticketing systems has made information easily accessible to consumers and has therefore established a direct link between consumers and suppliers. This study focuses on the impact of the Internet based ticketing systems on the travel agency in Langkawi, Malaysia. The major method was included in-depth interviews with travel agents to explore and refine the major issues that faced by the industry. Interviews with consumers were also carried out to ascertain the...

  15. Corporate Consumer Contact API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The data in the Corporate Consumer Contact API is based on the content you can find in the Corporate Consumer Contact listing in the Consumer Action Handbook (PDF)....

  16. Internet promotion tools and techniques: analytical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Illiashenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is an analysis and systematization of modern communication Internet marketing tools, development of recommendations for their management to promote products in a virtual environment and maintaining the highest level of communication with their economic partners and contact groups. The results of the analysis. The systematic analysis and systematization of the known Internet marketing tools were made. Authors divide them into 8 categories of the use functionality: Search Engine Marketing, Internet advertising, Social Relationship Marketing, Viral Marketing, Video Marketing, E-mail Marketing, Innovative Marketing and Analytical Marketing. The recommendations for this tools use by various size companies were proposed and the most popular Internet-instruments for products promotion were noted. By the results of analysis, the communication instruments of Internet-marketing are divided into 4 groups, which are closely interrelated. Their complex use leads to synergistic effect that appears at profit growth, consumer interest and creating of company’s positive image. Today the forgotten method of communication – E-mail Marketing, interactive infographics, communications in the form of stories, Marketing in social networks and Analytical Marketing have acquired unexpected development. These instruments satisfy needs of companies (the possibility of solid presentation, active communication link and its precise measurements and consumers (interesting content, supported by visual image and information on request. Conclusions and directions for future research. The results can be used as methodological assistance in choosing rational sets of Internet marketing instruments that would take into account the specificity of a production company (seller and its products, market, target audience. The future research must be directed to detection of inexpensive but effective Internet-communication tools, detection

  17. The Research on Distribution Mode of Internet+ Public Elder Care Beds-- The Analysis Based on Data of Public Elder Care Beds Assignment in Guangzhou%“互联网+”公办养老机构床位分配模式研究--基于广州市公办养老机构床位轮候数据的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓庆

    2015-01-01

    Guangzhou City is the first to establish Internet+ public elder care beds assignment mode in China. Through the analysis of public elder care beds assignment data and the evaluation of the effect of policy implementation, the paper points out the defects of system implementation, and makes corresponding suggestion to improve Internet+ public elder care beds distribution model.%广州市率先在全国建立起“互联网+”公办养老机构床位分配模式。通过对广州市公办养老机构床位轮候数据的分析,初步评估轮候政策的实施效果,发现制度实施过程中存在的不足,并提出相应建议,旨在完善“互联网+”公办养老机构床位分配模式。

  18. Bringing Internet-based education and intervention into mental health practice: afterdeployment.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef I. Ruzek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Internet-facilitated interventions may offer numerous advantages in reaching the large numbers of military service men and women exposed to traumatic events. The Internet is now a primary source of health-related information for consumers and research has shown the effectiveness of web-based interventions in addressing a range of mental health problems.Clinicians can learn how to bring Internet education and intervention into routine care, to help clients better understand mental health issues and learn skills for self-management of problems.The Afterdeployment.org (AD Internet site can be used by health care professionals serving U.S. military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, and their families. The site currently addresses 18 key domains of functioning, including post-traumatic stress, sleep, anger, alcohol and drugs, and military sexual trauma. It provides an extensive amount of client and family education that is suitable for immediate use by clients and providers, as well as the kinds of interactive workshop content and self-assessment tools that have been shown to be helpful in other treatment contexts. AD can be utilized in clinical practice in a variety of ways: as an adjunct to treatment for PTSD, to supplement existing treatments for a range of post-deployment problems, or as the primary focus of treatment for a client.AD represents a kind of service that is likely to become increasingly available in coming years and that is important for mental health providers to actively explore as a tool for extending their reach, improving their efficiency, and improving quality of care.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  19. Orthognathic surgery: is patient information on the Internet valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldairy, T; Laverick, S; McIntyre, G T

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality and reliability of UK websites providing information on orthognathic and jaw surgery to patients. An Internet search engine (www.google.com) was used to identify websites containing medical information on 'orthognathic surgery' and 'jaw surgery'. Of over 144,000 links for orthognathic surgery and 700,000 for jaw surgery, the first 100 were examined in detail. After excluding discussion groups, news and video feeds, and removing duplicate sites, only 25 relevant websites remained which were then evaluated using the DISCERN instrument (www.discern.org.uk/discern_instrument.php). Through the 16 questions assessing the reliability and quality of the consumer information which are scored from 1 to 5, a relative index of the quality of the information is produced. The maximum score attainable for an excellent website is 80. Of the 25 websites that were scored, DISCERN indicated the majority of websites fell well below the maximum score. The highest score achieved by one of the websites according to the DISCERN tool was 64 of 80 and the lowest score achieved was 21 of 80. The websites achieving maximum and minimum score were Wikipedia and qualitydentistry.com, respectively. By directing patients to validated websites, clinicians can ensure patients find appropriate information; however, further development of websites relating to orthognathic surgery is required. Internet information should be updated on a regular basis to account for improvements in orthodontic and surgical care.

  20. 平台理论视角下的互联网与“分级诊疗”%Internet and “tiered health care system” in China:A platform theory perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜创

    2016-01-01

    本文运用产业经济学中的平台理论对当前我国推进分级诊疗的难点、互联网促进分级诊疗的可能性及其可行模式进行了分析,得出结论:分级诊疗的主要障碍为事业单位体制下医生对医院的依附关系、医院分级管理制度与医院平台正外部性三者的相互作用,使三甲医院“强者愈强”、基层“弱者愈弱”;互联网医疗平台促进医生走出体制自由执业,有助于破除传统医院平台的正外部性,实现分级诊疗;互联网医疗平台采取双层结构,“大平台套小平台”,是推动分级诊疗的可行模式。%We explore the difficulty of the possibility of the way to a “tiered health care system” in China. This means that high-end hospitals treat “serious” diseases and community ones and/or individual clinics focus on“non-serious” diseases. The exploration is done using a new theoretical framework in industrial economics, the plat-forms theory. The research achieved three main results which are as follows:Firstly, it shows that three main obsta-cles to build a“tiered health care system” comprise the employment relationship between doctors and hospitals, hier-archical hospital system, and positive hospital platform externalities, whose interaction enhance the high-end hospitals to be stronger and community ones to become weaker. Secondly, internet medical platforms will help doctors to leave the high-end public hospitals, build individual clinics, and thus achieve a“tiered health care system”. Finally, the“two-tier structure”, adopted by some internet medical platforms, is a possible way to build the “tiered health care system”, and means a large platform including many small professional platforms on one hand and patients on the other hand.