WorldWideScience

Sample records for care clinic patients

  1. Introducing Optometry Students to Clinical Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Eileen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the innovative content and structure of an introductory course on clinical patient care at the Illinois College of Optometry. Critiques its success based on student grades and feedback, concluding that it was successful in imparting skills of data analysis but had minimal impact on students' ability to empathize with patients. (EV)

  2. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  3. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Adams Jill C; Majeres Sharon; Batal Holly A; Scott David R; Dale Rita; Mehler Philip S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access hea...

  4. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods: Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results: Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion: A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. Keywords: patient engagement, health outcomes, communication, provider effectiveness, patient incentive

  5. Chronic patient care at North West Province clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire van Deventer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic illnesses are a significant burden to the health services in South Africa. There is a specific national health plan whereby chronically ill patients who are acceptably controlled should be managed at clinic level. The perception has emerged that the management of primary care has not been optimal in the Southern District of the North West Province. This provided the motivation to initiate this research, namely consideration of chronic patient care at clinics in the North West Province of South Africa.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out at four randomly selected clinics covering four sub-districts in the Southern District (North West Province. This was done using charts and registers at the clinics. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18, and presenting with the following chronic illnesses: asthma/chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD, hypertension, diabetes and epilepsy. The major focus areas were the regular assessment of the patients, the level of control of the illness and the use of the Essential Drugs List and Standard Treatment Guidelines (EDL/STG.Results: In the cases of all the chronic illnesses it was found that regular assessments were poorly done, with asthma (peak flow measurements being the most poorly done. Control was generally less than 50% for all the illnesses, although the EDL was followed fairly well by the personnel at the clinics.Conclusion: In the light of the burden of chronic illness the results give cause for great concern about the quality of care for chronically ill patients, and reasons were sought for some of the poor results. A subsequent decision was taken to carry out comprehensive quality improvement projects on each of the illnesses over the following five years.

  6. Clinical nursing care for transgender patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    Transgender people often face barriers in their pursuit of receiving sensitive and informed health care, and many avoid preventive care and care for life threatening conditions because of those obstacles. This article focuses on cancer care of the transgender patient, as well as ways that nurses and other providers can help to create a transgender-sensitive healthcare environment. PMID:26000586

  7. Missing Clinical Information in NHS hospital outpatient clinics: prevalence, causes and effects on patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthy Krishna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Britain over 39,000 reports were received by the National Patient Safety Agency relating to failures in documentation in 2007 and the UK Health Services Journal estimated in 2008 that over a million hospital outpatient visits each year might take place without the full record available. Despite these high numbers, the impact of missing clinical information has not been investigated for hospital outpatients in the UK. Studies in primary care in the USA have found 13.6% of patient consultations have missing clinical information, with this adversely affecting care in about half of cases, and in Australia 1.8% of medical errors were found to be due to the unavailability of clinical information. Our objectives were to assess the frequency, nature and potential impact on patient care of missing clinical information in NHS hospital outpatients and to assess the principal causes. This is the first study to present such figures for the UK and the first to look at how clinicians respond, including the associated impact on patient care. Methods Prospective descriptive study of missing information reported by surgeons, supplemented by interviews on the causes. Data were collected by surgeons in general, gastrointestinal, colorectal and vascular surgical clinics in three teaching hospitals across the UK for over a thousand outpatient appointments. Fifteen interviews were conducted with those involved in collating clinical information for these clinics. The study had ethics approval (Hammersmith and Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Research Ethics Committee, reference number (09/H0707/27. Participants involved in the interviews signed a consent form and were offered the opportunity to review and agree the transcript of their interview before analysis. No patients were involved in this research. Results In 15% of outpatient consultations key items of clinical information were missing. Of these patients, 32% experienced a delay or disruption

  8. Improving COPD Care in a Medically Underserved Primary Care Clinic: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Irene; Wang, Fei; Reardon, Jane; Vergara, Cunegundo D; Salvietti, Ralph; Acevedo, Myrtha; Santana, Blanca; Fortunato, Gil

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a focus group study in an urban hospital-based primary care teaching clinic serving an indigent and Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) population in New England in order to learn how patients with Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD) perceive their disease, how they experience their medical care, and the barriers they face managing their disease and following medical recommendations. The research team included medical doctors, nurses, a medical anthropologist, a clinical pharmacist, a hospital interpreter, and a systems analyst. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish and English in April and May 2014. The demographic characteristics of the 25 focus group participants closely reflected the demographics of the total COPD clinic patients. The participants were predominantly female (72%) and Hispanic (72%) and had a median age of 63. The major themes expressed in the focus groups included: problems living with COPD; coping with complexities of comorbid illnesses; challenges of quitting smoking and maintaining cessation; dealing with second-hand smoke; beliefs and myths about quitting smoking; difficulty paying for and obtaining medications; positive experiences obtaining and managing medications; difficulties in using sleep machines at home; expressions of disappointment with the departure of their doctors; and overall satisfaction with the clinic health care providers. The study led to the creation of an action plan that addresses the concerns expressed by the focus study participants. The action plan is spearheaded by a designated bilingual and bicultural nurse and is now in operation. PMID:26807853

  9. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, Lori J; van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequent...

  10. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  11. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  12. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Fermo JD; Whitley HP; Thompson AM; Ragucci KR

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR) measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed an...

  13. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients with...... validated method which in less time and with fewer patients than x-ray can discriminate between different therapies regarding structural damage progression, and which on top of this offers detailed assessment of upstream inflammatory drivers of damage. In routine clinical care, MRI can contribute to an...... benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor...

  14. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Gayle, Krystal A.T.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K.; Shelly R. McFarlane; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A.; Boyne, Michael S.; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates ...

  15. Radiographer's impact on improving clinical decision-making, patient care and patient diagnosis: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pilot study attempts to quantify the benefits of a documented radiographic clinical history through the use of the clinical history template form designed by Egan and Baird. Six radiographers completed the clinical history template for 40 patients and four radiologists included the recorded information as part of their reporting process. A focus discussion group was held between the radiographers to ascertain the level of satisfaction and benefits encountered with the use of the template form. A questionnaire was designed for the radiologists to complete regarding the usefulness of the template form with respect to the radiological reporting process. Results/Discussion: 15 cases for which the form was used demonstrated a direct benefit in respect to improved radiographic clinical decision-making. Radiographers agreed the template form aided the establishment of a stronger radiographer-patient relationship during the radiographic examination. Two radiologists agreed the form aided in establishing a radiological diagnosis and suggested the form be implemented as part of the standard departmental protocol. Despite the small sample size, there is evidence the form aided radiographic decision-making and assisted in the establishment of an accurate radiological diagnosis. The overall consensus amongst radiographers was that it enhanced radiographer-patient communication and improved the level of patient care. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  16. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermo JD

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic using point-of-care testing (POCT device versus venipuncture within ambulatory care clinics at our institution. Methods: All patients currently treated with warfarin therapy who were managed by clinical pharmacists for anticoagulation monitoring at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Family Medicine Center and University Diagnostic Center, were enrolled. Patients were asked to complete a satisfaction survey regarding their anticoagulation monitoring. In addition, data related to emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations and percent of time in the INR therapeutic range for 6 months pre- and post-implementation of POCT device was collected. This information was obtained through an electronic patient information database, Oacis. Results: A total of 145 patients were included in the data collection from the two clinics. The majority (41% of these patients were taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation. Satisfaction surveys were completed by 86 (59 % of patients. The surveys revealed that POCT device was preferred over venipuncture in 95% of patients. Reasons for the preference included more face-to-face interaction, less wait time, less pain, less blood needed, and quicker results. Of the 145 patients who were included in the objective data analysis, no significant differences were found in the number of hospitalizations, ED visits, or percent of time in the INR therapeutic range pre- and post- implementation of POCT device

  17. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Lori J; Van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequently cited in both subjective and objective studies. As a result, interventions are targeted towards modifiable factors to ameliorate their impact. This paper reviews normal sleep physiology and the impact that sleep disturbance has on patient psychophysiological recovery, and the contribution that the clinical environment has on intensive care patients' sleep. PMID:25852963

  18. Impact of Pharmaceutical Home Care on Compliances and Clinical Outcomes of Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luh P. F Larasanty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Indonesian health universal coverage system the hypertensive patients that grouped into the refer back patient treatment category, is one target of pharmaceutical home care. The aim of this study was to carried out the impact of pharmaceutical home care on patient compliances and clinical outcomes of hypertension without compeling indication out-patient on Wangaya General Hospital in the municipality of Denpasar Bali. Design research is an experimental study with one group pre-post test design. The thirteen patients who met the inclusion criteria will be given pharmaceutical home care services for 16 visits over three months period. The complianced levels were scored and statistical analyzed using linear regression and wilcoxon test. The pharmaceutical home care visit could increase the patients adherence to antihypertensive drug administration, increasing diet compliance, and adherence of physical exercise from good adherence to excellent adherence (p value=0,001, Pharmaceutical home care visit could increase patient compliance to restrictions of smoking and alcohol consumption from good adherence to very good adherence. The decreasing of the patient’s systolic blood pressure correlated to the pharmacist home visit (p value=0,000. The pharmaceutical home care has influenced on health behavior of hypertensive patients and the patients concordance to take their medication and introduced better clinical outcome.

  19. A mixed methods evaluation of a patient care clinic located within a pharmacy school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Derek J; Landry, Eric J L; Lysak, Katherine J

    2016-08-01

    Background The Medication Assessment Center is a faculty and student run patient care clinic located within the pharmacy school at the University of Saskatchewan (Canada). It was created as a novel experiential education site for pharmacy students and to provide clinical pharmacist services for complex patients who have trouble accessing services elsewhere. Objective To determine if the clinical services provided by faculty and students at the Medication Assessment Center are valuable to patients who are referred to the program. Setting The Medication Assessment Center, which is faculty and student run patient care clinic. Method Convergent mixed methods design comprised of a retrospective patient chart audit and a paper based patient experience survey. All patients who attended at least one appointment at the Medication Assessment Center between March 1, 2014 and July 31, 2015 were included in the chart audit. All new patients who were referred between April 1, 2015 and October 26, 2015 were included in the survey. Main outcome measures Recommendations made by the pharmacist and patient experience survey indicators. Results 173 patients were included in the chart audit, which found that patients were elderly (64.8 years), highly medically complex (13.8 medications and 6.5 diagnoses each), and had a large number of recommendations made by the pharmacist to adjust drug therapy (6.2 per patient). 121 questionnaires were mailed to patients with a response rate of 66.9 % (n = 81). The survey found high levels of support and satisfaction for the program, including more than half of patients (59.2 %) who reported that their health had improved as a result of the Medication Assessment Center. Conclusion The patient care and experiential education program offered by the Medication Assessment Center provides a valuable service to patients who are referred to the clinic. PMID:27166829

  20. Clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Fawad; Shafi, Azhar; Ali, Sheeraz; Siddiqui, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 patients undergoing first line chemotherapy with minimum of two cycles at inpatient department and chemotherapy bay of Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre Pakistan. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting develops before administration of chemotherapy. Clinical signs and symp...

  1. Clinical care of two patients with Ebola virus disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, G Marshall; Mehta, Aneesh K; Varkey, Jay B; Brantly, Kent; Plyler, Lance; McElroy, Anita K; Kraft, Colleen S; Towner, Jonathan S; Spiropoulou, Christina; Ströher, Ute; Uyeki, Timothy M; Ribner, Bruce S

    2014-12-18

    West Africa is currently experiencing the largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history. Two patients with EVD were transferred from Liberia to our hospital in the United States for ongoing care. Malaria had also been diagnosed in one patient, who was treated for it early in the course of EVD. The two patients had substantial intravascular volume depletion and marked electrolyte abnormalities. We undertook aggressive supportive measures of hydration (typically, 3 to 5 liters of intravenous fluids per day early in the course of care) and electrolyte correction. As the patients' condition improved clinically, there was a concomitant decline in the amount of virus detected in plasma. PMID:25390460

  2. Patient Satisfaction with Health Care Services Provided at HIV Clinics at Amana and Muhimbili Hospitals in Dar es Salaam.

    OpenAIRE

    Kagashe, G A B; Rwebangila, F

    2011-01-01

    Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided. To determine satisfaction of HIV patients with health care services provided at the HIV clinics and specifically, to determine patients' satisfaction with the general physical environment o...

  3. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic: Improving patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Bungard, Tammy J; Gardner, Leslie; Archer, Stephen L.; Hamilton, Peter; Ritchie, Bruce; Tymchak, Wayne; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation management services (AMSs) are widely used for anticoagulation management in many countries. Our AMS is a pharmacist-run ambulatory clinic with a physician advisory committee that manages patients referred with complicated anticoagulation histories. This paper assesses the adequacy of anticoagulation, rates of anticoagulant-related events and associated health care resource utilization for patients before and after referral to our AMS. Methods Consecutive patients r...

  4. Clinical risk factors and bronchoscopic features of invasive aspergillosis in Intensive Care Unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    ALIYALI, M.; HEDAYATI, M.T.; HABIBI, M.R.; KHODAVAISY, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. During recent years, a rising incidence of IA in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients has been reported. The patterns of IA related infection may differ according to the type of underlying disease. Unfortunately little is known about the characteristics of IA in ICU patients. In the present study we assessed IA related clinical and bronchoscopy findings in ICU patien...

  5. Clinical events classification for using the EHR to provide better patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovkina, Tatyana; Richards, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The Healthcare Record has been used in a "Before and After" situation to improve patient care. The main paradigm of the modern Health Care is changing towards pervasive person-centric care including prevention and home care. Medical compunetics is a very important applicative field for improving the interoperability and the quality of the healthcare information system, especially in the current climate with the empowerment patients. The success depends on the choice of the Clinical Events Classification for structuring the span of clinical information. For the purposes of universalizing medical electronic data-bases, it is very important to organize the data regarding Clinical Events in such manner that it would be possible to use this information-structure in different fields of Clinical Practice: e.g., for the creation of the diagnostic and drug-assistance protocols, for the evaluation of the quality of drug prescribing, and for communication with patients as well. For this purpose all Clinical Events were divided to 5 classes. This Paper will describe a "Before and After" situation consequent upon the introduction of the Clinical Events Classification and the introduction of Protocols for drug-prescribing. Use of the Protocol brought about a 50% reduction in mortality. PMID:20543351

  6. Improving the quality of nurse clinical documentation for chronic patients at primary care clinics: A multifaceted intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiencies in record keeping practices have been reported at primary care level in the public health sector in South Africa. These deficiencies have the potential to negatively impact patient health outcomes as the break in information may hinder continuity of care. This disruption in information management has particular relevance for patients with chronic diseases.Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish if the implementation of a structured clinical record (SCR as an adjunct tool to the algorithmic guidelines for chronic disease management improved the quality of clinical records at primary care level.Method: A quasi-experimental study (before and after study with a comparison group was conducted across 30 primary health care clinics (PHCs located in three districts in South Africa. Twenty PHCs that received the intervention were selected as intervention clinics and 10 facilities were selected as comparison facilities. The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS method was used to determine the number of records required to be reviewed per diagnostic condition per facility.Results: There was a a statistically significant increase in the percentage of clinical records achieving compliance to the minimum criteria from the baseline to six months post-intervention for both HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment and patients with non-communicable diseases (hypertension and diabetes.Conclusions: A multifaceted intervention using a SCR to supplement the educational outreach component (PC 101 training has demonstrated the potential for improving the quality of clinical records for patients with chronic diseases at primary care clinics in South Africa.

  7. Clinical Features Of Acute Febrile Thrombocytopaenia Among Patients Attending Primary Care Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Fah, Tong Seng; MMed, Noorazah Abdul Aziz; Liew, Chin Gek; Omar, Khairani

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Identifying clinical features that differentiate acute febrile thrombocytopaenia from acute febrile illness without thrombocytopaenia can help primary care physician to decide whether to order a full blood count (FBC). This is important because thrombocytopaenia in viral fever may signify more serious underlying aetiology like dengue infection.

  8. A clinical approach to the nutritional care process in protein-energy wasting hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mar Ruperto; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J; Guillermina Barril

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Malnutrition/wasting/cachexia are complex-disease conditions that frequently remain undiagnosed and/or untreated in up to 75% of prevalent hemodialysis (HD) patients. The nutrition care process (NCP) based on assessment, diagnosis, intervention and monitoring of nutritional status is a systematic method that nutrition professionals use to make decisions in clinical practice. Objective: This review examines from a clinical-nutritional practice point of view: a) nutritional status...

  9. Clinical Care Pathways for Patients With Hepatitis C: Reducing Critical Barriers to Effective Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Nik; Lattimore, Sam; Irving, William Lucien; Thomson, Brian James

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Engagement of individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with care pathways remains a major barrier to realizing the benefits of new and more effective antiviral therapies. After an exploratory study, we have undertaken an evidence-based redesign of care pathways for HCV, including the following: (1) reflex testing of anti-HCV-positive samples for HCV RNA; (2) annotation of laboratory results to recommend referral of actively infected patients to specialist clinics; (3) educational programs for primary care physicians and nurses; and (4) the establishment of needs-driven community clinics in substance misuse services. Methods.  In this study, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of progression through care pathways of individuals with a new diagnosis of HCV infection made between January 2010 and January 2012. We also analyzed patient flow through new care pathways and compared this with our baseline study of identical design. Results.  A total of 28 980 samples were tested for anti-HCV antibody during the study period and yielded 273 unique patients with a new diagnosis of HCV infection. Of these, 38% were tested in general practice, 21% were tested in substance misuse services, 23% were tested in secondary care, and 18% were tested in local prisons. Overall, 80% of patients were referred to specialist clinics, 70% attended for assessment, and 38% commenced treatment, in comparison to 49%, 27%, and 10%, respectively, in the baseline study. Referral rates from all testing sources improved. Conclusions.  This study provides timely evidence that progression through care pathways can be enhanced, and it demonstrates reduction of key barriers to eradication of HCV. PMID:26900576

  10. Patient safety and quality of care: How may clinical simulation contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Jensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The usability of health information technology (IT is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector influences the development and application of health IT. When health IT is introduced in local clinical work practices, potential patient safety hazards and insufficient support of work practices need to be examined. Qualitative methods, such as clinical simulation, may be used to evaluate new technology in correlation with the clinical context and to study the interaction between users, technology and work practice. Compared with the “classic” methods, such as heuristic inspection and usability testing, clinical simulation takes the clinical context into account. Clinical simulation can be useful in many processes in the human-centred design cycle. In the requirement specification, clinical simulation can be useful to analyze user requirements and work practice as well to evaluate requirements. In the design of health IT, clinical simulation can be used to evaluate clinical information systems and serve as common ground to help to achieve a shared understanding between various communities of practice. In a public procurement process, a clinical simulation-based assessment can help give insight into different solutions and how they support work practice. Before organizational implementation, clinical simulation is a very suitable means, by which to assess an application in connection with work practice.

  11. Justification for conducting neurological clinical trials as part of patient care within private practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, R G; Stepanova, D; Beran, M E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the benefits and drawbacks of conducting neurological clinical trials and research in private practice for the patients, clinician, Practice Manager, sponsors/Clinical Research Organisations (CROs) and Clinical Trial Coordinator (CTC) to determine if this is justified for all involved. A combination of literature reviews, original research articles and books were selected from 2005 to 2015. Provided that the practice has sufficient number of active trials to prevent financial loss, support staff, adequate facilities and equipment and time, the benefits outweigh the drawbacks. Clinical trials provide patients with more thorough monitoring, re-imbursement of trial-related expenses and the opportunity to try an innovative treatment at no charge when other options have failed. For the clinician, clinical trials provide more information to ensure better care for their patients and improved treatment methods, technical experience and global recognition. Trials collect detailed and up-to-date information on the benefits and risks of drugs, improving society's confidence in clinical research and pharmaceuticals, allow trial sponsors to explore new scientific questions and accelerate innovation. For the CTC, industry-sponsored clinical trials allow potential entry for a career in clinical research giving CTCs the opportunity to become Clinical Research Associates (CRAs), Study Start-Up Managers or Drug Safety Associates. PMID:27040457

  12. Characteristics of Patients Who Report Confusion After Reading Their Primary Care Clinic Notes Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Joseph; Oster, Natalia V; Jackson, Sara L; Mejilla, Roanne; Walker, Jan; Elmore, Joann G

    2016-01-01

    Patient access to online electronic medical records (EMRs) is increasing and may offer benefits to patients. However, the inherent complexity of medicine may cause confusion. We elucidate characteristics and health behaviors of patients who report confusion after reading their doctors' notes online. We analyzed data from 4,528 patients in Boston, MA, central Pennsylvania, and Seattle, WA, who were granted online access to their primary care doctors' clinic notes and who viewed at least one note during the 1-year intervention. Three percent of patients reported confusion after reading their visit notes. These patients were more likely to be at least 70 years of age (p reading visit notes (relative risk [RR] 4.83; confidence interval [CI] 3.17, 7.36) compared to patients who were not confused. In adjusted analyses, they were less likely to report feeling more in control of their health (RR 0.42; CI 0.25, 0.71), remembering their care plan (RR 0.26; CI 0.17, 0.42), and understanding their medical conditions (RR 0.32; CI 0.19, 0.54) as a result of reading their doctors' notes compared to patients who were not confused. Patients who were confused by reading their doctors' notes were less likely to report benefits in health behaviors. Understanding this small subset of patients is a critical step in reducing gaps in provider-patient communication and in efforts to tailor educational approaches for patients. PMID:26529325

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement: opportunities in the patient protection and affordable care act to reduce cancer care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Beverly; Polite, Blase N; Halpern, Michael T; Stranne, Steven K; Winer, Eric P; Wollins, Dana S; Newman, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Patients in specific vulnerable population groups suffer disproportionately from cancer. The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of cancer. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides both opportunities and challenges for addressing cancer care disparities and access to care. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates for policies that ensure access to cancer care for the underserved. Such policies include insurance reform and the reduction of economic barriers to quality health care. Building on ASCO's prior statement on disparities in cancer care (2009), this article summarizes elements of the health care law that are relevant to cancer disparities and provides recommendations for addressing major provisions in the law. It outlines specific strategies to address insurance reform, access to care, quality of care, prevention and wellness, research on health care disparities, and diversity in the health care workforce. ASCO is committed to leading efforts toward the improvement of cancer care among the most vulnerable patients. PMID:21810680

  14. Glycaemic Control among Patients with Diabetes in Primary Care Clinics in Jamaica, 1995 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Harris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the quality of care received by patients with diabetes in public primary care clinics in 2012 with that reported in 1995. Methods: Patient records were audited at six randomly selected Type III health centres in the South East Health Region of Jamaica. The 2012 audit data were compared with published data from a similar audit conducted in 1995. Quality of care measures included timely screening tests and counselling of the patients. Fasting and postprandial glucose tests were used to assess glycaemic control. Results: Two hundred and forty-two patient records were analysed in 2012, and 185 in 1995. In 2012, 88% of patients were weighed within the last year compared with 43% in 1995. Advice on physical activity increased from 1% to 60% and on dietary practices from 6% to 79%. No patient had done the HBA1C in 1995 compared to 38% in 2012. In 1995, 66% had blood glucose measured at a laboratory during the last year while in 2012, 60% had a laboratory test and 90% were tested at the clinic by glucometer. Blood pressure control increased from 19% in 1995 to 41% in 2012 (p < 0.001. Poor glucose control was recorded among 61% of patients in 1995 compared with 68% in 2012. Conclusions: There was no improvement in glycaemic control. Health providers and patients must work together to improve patient outcomes. This will involve closer patient monitoring, treatment intensification where indicated, and the adoption of lifestyle practices that can lead to better control.

  15. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures. PMID:26903784

  16. Adjunctive naturopathic care for type 2 diabetes: patient-reported and clinical outcomes after one year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Ryan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several small, uncontrolled studies have found improvements in self-care behaviors and reductions in clinical risk in persons with type 2 diabetes who received care from licensed naturopathic physicians. To extend these findings and determine the feasibility and promise of a randomized clinical trial, we conducted a prospective study to measure the effects of adjunctive naturopathic care (ANC in primary care patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods Forty patients with type 2 diabetes were invited from a large integrated health care system to receive up to eight ANC visits for up to one year. Participants were required to have hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c values between 7.5-9.5 % and at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia or overweight. Standardized instruments were administered by telephone to collect outcome data on self-care, self-efficacy, diabetes problem areas, perceived stress, motivation, and mood. Changes from baseline scores were calculated at 6- and 12-months after entry into the study. Six and 12-month changes in clinical risk factors (i.e., HbA1c, lipid and blood pressure were calculated for the ANC cohort, and compared to changes in a cohort of 329 eligible, non-participating patients constructed using electronic medical records data. Between-cohort comparisons were adjusted for age, gender, baseline HbA1c, and diabetes medications. Six months was pre-specified as the primary endpoint for outcome assessment. Results Participants made 3.9 ANC visits on average during the year, 78 % of which occurred within six months of entry into the study. At 6-months, significant improvements were found in most patient-reported measures, including glucose testing (P = 0.001, diet (P = 0.001, physical activity (P = 0.02, mood (P = 0.001, self-efficacy (P = 0.0001 and motivation to change lifestyle (P = 0.003. Improvements in glucose testing, mood, self-efficacy and

  17. Qualitative inquiry: a method for validating patient perceptions of palliative care while enrolled on a cancer clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Slota, Christina; Ulrich, Connie M.; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Baker, Karen; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Palliative care is a vital component of patient-centered care. It has increasingly become central to the management and care of seriously ill patients by integrating physical, psychosocial, and spiritual supportive services. Through qualitative inquiry, this paper examines cancer patients’ perceptions of the process and outcomes of the pain and palliative care consultative services they received while enrolled in a clinical trial. Methods A qualitative analysis of open-ended questi...

  18. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Krystal A T; Tulloch Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K; McFarlane, Shelly R; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A; Boyne, Michael S; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-10-12

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90%) reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. Approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82%) or leather shoes (64%), fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%), and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. In conclusion, approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided. PMID:24765484

  19. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal A.T. Gayle

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90% reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. In conclusion, approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82% or leather shoes (64%, fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%, and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. Approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  20. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with uveitis in an emergency eye care center in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nery Rossi Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with uveitis in an emergency eye care center. Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients with active uveitis admitted between May 2012 and July 2012 to an emergency eye care center. Results: The majority of patients were male (63.2%, with a mean age of 43.2 years; 66.2% patients were of mixed ethnicity, 22.5% were Caucasian, and 11.3% were black. Anterior uveitis was observed in 70.1% patients, posterior uveitis in 26.5%, and panuveitis in 3.4%; no patient was diagnosed with intermediate uveitis. All patients had a sudden and acute presentation. The most frequent symptoms were ocular pain (76.9%, redness (59.8%, and visual blurring (46.2%. The majority of patients had unilateral disease (94.9% with a mean symptom duration of 6.2 days. Diffuse and anterior uveitis were associated with ocular pain (p<0.001. Scotomata and floaters were more frequent in patients with posterior uveitis (p=0.003 and p=0.016, respectively. Patients with anterior uveitis presented with better visual acuity (p=0.025. Granulomatous keratotic precipitates were more frequent in patients with posterior uveitis (p=0.038. An etiological diagnosis based on the evaluation at the emergency center was made in 45 patients (38.5%. Conclusions: Acute anterior uveitis was the most frequent form of uveitis. Initial patient evaluation provided sufficient information for deciding primary therapy and aided in arriving at an etiological diagnosis in a considerable number of patients.

  1. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J;

    2003-01-01

    among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical...... services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics....... Although only a minority of the participants perceived professional psychosocial services as important, they should be available for patients whose infertility causes them much strain, especially for patients whose marital relationship suffered much because of infertility....

  2. The “CROMa” Project: A Care Pathway for Clinical Management of Patients with Bisphosphonate Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Capocci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe 7 years of activity of “CROMa” (Coordination of Research on Osteonecrosis of the Jaws project of “Sapienza” University of Rome. Materials and Methods. A preventive and therapeutic care pathway was created for patients with bisphosphonates (BPs exposure. Demographic, social, behavioural, pharmacological, and clinical variables were registered in a dedicated database. Results. In the project, 502 patients, 403 females and 99 males, were observed. Bone pathologies were 79% osteometabolic diseases (OMD and 21% metastatic cancer (CA. Females were 90% in OMD group and 41% in CA. BP administration was 54% oral, 31% IV, and 11% IM; 89% of BPs were amino-BP and 11% non-amino-BP. Consistently with bone pathology (OMD/CA, alendronate appears to be prevalent for OMD (40% relative, while zoledronate was indicated in 92% of CA patients. Out of 502 cases collected, 28 BRONJ were detected: 17 of them were related to IV BP treatment. Preventive oral assessment was required for 50% of CA patients and by 4% of OMD patients. Conclusions. The proposed care pathway protocols for BP exposed patients appeared to be useful to meet treatment and preventive needs, in both oncological and osteometabolic diseases patients. Patients’ and physicians’ prevention awareness can be the starting point of a multilevel prevention system.

  3. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wook Jin; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of complications (e.g., wound/infectious complications) compared to well-nourished patients. Malnutrition is commonly found in advanced gastric cancer patients due to poor absorption of essential nutrients after surgery. Therefore, nutritional support protocols, such as early oral and enternal feeding, have been proposed in many studies, to improve unfavorable clinical outcomes and to reduce complications due to delayed application of oral nutritional support or parental feeding. Also, the supplied with enternal immune-enriched diet had more benefits in improving clinical outcomes and fewer complications compared to a group supplied with control formula. Using nutritional screening tools, such as nutritional risk index (NRI) and nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002), malnourished patients showed higher incidence of complications and lower survival rates than non-malnourished patients. However, a long-term nutritional intervention, such as nutritional counseling, was not effective in the patients. Therefore, early assessment of nutritional status in patients using a proper nutritional screening tool is suggested to prevent malnutrition and adverse health outcomes. Further studies with numerous ethnic groups may provide stronger scientific evidences in association between nutritional care and recovery from surgery in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27152296

  4. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wook Jin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of complications (e.g., wound/infectious complications) compared to well-nourished patients. Malnutrition is commonly found in advanced gastric cancer patients due to poor absorption of essential nutrients after surgery. Therefore, nutritional support protocols, such as early oral and enternal feeding, have been proposed in many studies, to improve unfavorable clinical outcomes and to reduce complications due to delayed application of oral nutritional support or parental feeding. Also, the supplied with enternal immune-enriched diet had more benefits in improving clinical outcomes and fewer complications compared to a group supplied with control formula. Using nutritional screening tools, such as nutritional risk index (NRI) and nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002), malnourished patients showed higher incidence of complications and lower survival rates than non-malnourished patients. However, a long-term nutritional intervention, such as nutritional counseling, was not effective in the patients. Therefore, early assessment of nutritional status in patients using a proper nutritional screening tool is suggested to prevent malnutrition and adverse health outcomes. Further studies with numerous ethnic groups may provide stronger scientific evidences in association between nutritional care and recovery from surgery in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27152296

  5. Cohorting Dengue Patients Improves the Quality of Care and Clinical Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy C S Lum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of dengue among adults in Malaysia and other countries has important implications for health services. Before 2004, in order to cope with the surge in adult dengue admissions, each of the six medical wards in a university hospital took turns daily to admit and manage patients with dengue. Despite regular in-house training, the implementation of the WHO 1997 dengue case management guidelines by the multiple medical teams was piecemeal and resulted in high variability of care. A restructuring of adult dengue inpatient service in 2004 resulted in all patients being admitted to one ward under the care of the infectious disease unit. Hospital and Intensive Care Unit admission criteria, discharge criteria and clinical laboratory testing were maintained unchanged throughout the study period.To evaluate the impact of cohorting adult dengue patients on the quality of care and the clinical outcome in a university hospital in Malaysia.A pre (2003 and post-intervention (2005-6 retrospective study was undertaken.Cohorting all dengue patients under the care of the Infectious Disease team in a designated ward in 2004.The number of patients enrolled was 352 in 2003, 785 in 2005 and 1158 in 2006. The evaluation and detection of haemorrhage remained high (>90% and unchanged throughout the study period. The evaluation of plasma leakage increased from 35.4% pre-intervention to 78.8% post-intervention (p = <0.001 while its detection increased from 11.4% to 41.6% (p = <0.001. Examination for peripheral perfusion was undertaken in only 13.1% of patients pre-intervention, with a significant increase post-intervention, 18.6% and 34.2% respectively, p = <0.001. Pre-intervention, more patients had hypotension (21.5% than detected peripheral hypoperfusion (11.4%, indicating that clinicians recognised shock only when patients developed hypotension. In contrast, post-intervention, clinicians recognised peripheral hypoperfusion as an early sign of

  6. Tooth agenesis in patients referred to an Irish tertiary care clinic for the developmental dental disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hashem, Atef A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence, severity and pattern of hypodontia in Irish patients referred to a tertiary care clinic for developmental dental disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Details of 168 patients with hypodontia referred during the period 2002-2006 were entered in a database designed as a national record. Tooth charting was completed using clinical and radiographic examinations. The age of patients ranged from 7-50 years, with a median age of 20 years (Mean: 21.79; SD: 8.005). RESULTS: Hypodontia referrals constituted 65.5% of the total referrals. Females were more commonly affected than males with a ratio of 1.3:1. The number of referrals reflected the population density in this area; the majority were referrals from the public dental service. Mandibular second premolars were the most commonly missing teeth, followed by maxillary second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors; maxillary central incisors were the least affected. Symmetry of tooth agenesis between the right and left sides was an evident feature. Slightly more teeth were missing on the left side (n = 725) than on the right side (n = 706) and in the maxillary arch (n = 768) as compared to the mandibular arch (n = 663). Some 54% of patients had severe hypodontia with more than six teeth missing; 32% had moderate hypodontia, with four to six teeth missing. The most common pattern of tooth agenesis was four missing teeth. CONCLUSION: Hypodontia was a common presentation in a population referred to this tertiary care clinic. The pattern and distribution of tooth agenesis in Irish patients appears to follow the patterns reported in the literature.

  7. STUDY OF SEVERITY OF HYPONATRAEMIA AND ITS CLINICAL OUTCOME IN PATIENTS ADMITTED TO TERTIARY CARE ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hareesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY Hyponatraemia is a commonly encountered plasma electrolyte abnormality noticed in the patients admitted to ICU, which has a diverse variety of manifestations. It can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms, from subtle to severe or even life-threatening and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. OBJECTIVES To study the clinical profile at different levels of hyponatraemia in ICU patients and its clinical outcome at different levels. METHODOLOGY A retrospective descriptional study was done at Intensive Care Unit of Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Medical College and Hospital during the period from April 2015 to March 2016 among the patients having serum sodium levels less than 135 mEq/L. RESULTS Commonly involved age group is between 50 to 70 years. Severe form of Hyponatraemia is seen in elderly males. The most common underlying predisposing factor for hyponatraemia in our case series was sepsis (26% followed by gastrointestinal fluid loss (15.5%, diabetic ketoacidosis (10% and cirrhosis of liver (10%. Mortality was highest with severe hyponatraemia (10.5% who had pulmonary sepsis, metabolic encephalopathy, diabetic ketoacidosis and cirrhosis of liver. CONCLUSIONS Hyponatraemia is one of the good predictor of ICU mortality in association with wide variety of systemic diseases and wide spectrum of clinical profile.

  8. Patient characteristics and clinical management of patients with shoulder pain in U.S. primary care settings: Secondary data analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansfield Richard J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although shoulder pain is a commonly encountered problem in primary care, there are few studies examining its presenting characteristics and clinical management in this setting. Methods We performed secondary data analysis of 692 office visits for shoulder pain collected through the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (Survey years 1993–2000. Information on demographic characteristics, history and place of injury, and clinical management (physician order of imaging, physiotherapy, and steroid intraarticular injection were examined. Results Shoulder pain was associated with an injury in one third (33.2% (230/692 of office visits in this population of US primary care physicians. Males, and younger adults (age ≤ 52 more often associated their shoulder pain with previous injury, but there were no racial differences in injury status. Injury-related shoulder pain was related to work in over one-fifth (21.3% (43/202 of visits. An x-ray was performed in 29.0% (164/566 of office visits, a finding that did not differ by gender, race, or by age status. Other imaging (CT scan, MRI, or ultrasound was infrequently performed (6.5%, 37/566. Physiotherapy was ordered in 23.9% (135/566 of visits for shoulder pain. Younger adults and patients with a history of injury more often had physiotherapy ordered, but there was no significant difference in the ordering of physiotherapy by gender or race. Examination of the use of intraarticular injection was not possible with this data set. Conclusion These data from the largest sample of patients with shoulder pain presenting to primary care settings offer insights into the presenting characteristics and clinical management of shoulder pain at the primary care level. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey is a useful resource for examining the clinical management of specific symptoms in U.S. primary care offices.

  9. A clinical approach to the nutritional care process in protein-energy wasting hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Ruperto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malnutrition/wasting/cachexia are complex-disease conditions that frequently remain undiagnosed and/or untreated in up to 75% of prevalent hemodialysis (HD patients. The nutrition care process (NCP based on assessment, diagnosis, intervention and monitoring of nutritional status is a systematic method that nutrition professionals use to make decisions in clinical practice. Objective: This review examines from a clinical-nutritional practice point of view: a nutritional status as a mortality causative factor; b phenotypic characteristics of malnutri-tion/wasting/cachexia, and c current trends of NCP with special emphasis on nutritional support and novel nutrient and pharmacologic adjunctive therapies in HD patients. Method: A literature review was conducted using the Pubmed, Science Direct, Scielo, Scopus, and Medline electronic scientific basis. Studies which assessing nutritional status and nutritional support published from 1990 to 2013 in HD patients were included and discussed. Results: From all the epidemiological data analyzed, NCP was the suggested method for identifying malnut rition/ wasting or cachexia in clinical practice. Nutrition support as an unimodal therapy was not completely able to reverse wasting in HD patients. Novel experimental therapeutic strategies including the use of appetite stimulants, ghrelin agonist, MC4-R antagonists, anabolic steroids, anti-inflammatory drugs, cholecalciferol, and other components are still under clinical evaluation. Conclusion: Nutritional status is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in HD patients. The terms called malnutrition, wasting and cachexia have different nutritional therapeutics implications. The NCP is a necessary tool for assessing and monitoring nutritional status in the current clinical practice. Novel pharmacological therapies or specific nutrient supplementation interventions studies are required.

  10. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  11. [Affection, proximity, frequency and hesitant clinical practice: basis of the "bond" between Down syndrome patients and primary health care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, Bruno José Barcellos; Setoue, Cesar Seiji; Melo, Débora Gusmão

    2013-07-01

    The national policy of comprehensive care in clinical genetics propounds that families and individuals with genetic disorders should receive ongoing assistance at primary health care (PHC) level. In this study, the social representation of professionals working in family health care units (FHCU) is investigated based on their "bond" with Down syndrome patients, bearing in mind that this expression currently contains relevant meanings in the clinical practice and service management routine. Sixteen practitioners were interviewed, and the sample was defined by theoretical saturation. The statements given by the participants expressed knowledge based mainly on affective skills, physical proximity and patients' frequency of attendance at the family health care unit (FHCU). Clinical skills of other kinds, especially cognitive skills, do not appear to justify the notion of "bond." The results indicate the need of continuous professional education and definition of guidelines and approaches in care to the most common syndromes in the context of primary health care (PHC). PMID:23827892

  12. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient dem...

  13. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Fizzah Farooq; Robyna Khan; Aliya Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to  patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient de...

  14. Assessment of oral self-care in patients with periodontitis: a pilot study in a dental school clinic in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda Hitomi; Hayakawa Hiroki; Matsumoto Shinya; Ueshima Fumie; Kikuchi Momomi; Saito Atsushi; Makiishi Takemi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Oral hygiene education is central to every stage of periodontal treatment. Successful management of periodontal disease depends on the patient's capacity for oral self-care. In the present study, the oral self-care and perceptions of patients attending a dental school clinic in Japan were assessed using a short questionnaire referring to existing oral health models. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. The study population consisted of sixty-five patients (age ...

  15. Providing quality skin and wound care for the bariatric patient: an overview of clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, (defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥30), and especially morbid obesity (defined as BMI ≥40), has a profound impact on the health and integrity of the patient's integumentary system and on the caregivers who strive to provide care for larger, heavy patients. The purpose of this overview is to address some common skin and wound care issues faced by bariatric patients in order to inform clinicians, patients, and caregivers and enable them to optimize care. For bariatric patients, extra attention must be paid to skin care, cleanliness, skin fold management, perigenital care, odor management, and effective pressure redistribution. Despite these interventions, the multifactorial challenges presented by morbid obesity increase patient risk for serious skin diseases and wound conditions. Implications for practice include how best to educate patients and caregivers for optimal problem prevention. Future research should target improving bariatric care equipment and decreasing risk indices. PMID:24434162

  16. Patient safety culture in Norwegian primary care: a study in out-of-hours casualty clinics and GP practices

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to investigate patient safety attitudes amongst health care providers in Norwegian primary care by using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, in both out-of-hours (OOH) casualty clinics and GP practices. The questionnaire identifies five major patient safety factors: Teamwork climate, Safety climate, Job satisfaction, Perceptions of management, and Working conditions. Design. Cross-sectional study. Statistical analysis included multiple linear regression and indepen...

  17. Patient safety culture in Norwegian primary care: a study in out-of-hours casualty clinics and GP practices

    OpenAIRE

    Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi; Hofoss, Dag; Hansen, Elisabeth Holm; Deilkås, Ellen Catharina Tveter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. This study aimed to investigate patient safety attitudes amongst health care providers in Norwegian primary care by using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, in both out-of-hours (OOH) casualty clinics and GP practices. The questionnaire identifies five major patient safety factors: Teamwork climate, Safety climate, Job satisfaction, Perceptions of management, and Working conditions. Design. Cross-sectional study. Statistical analysis included multiple linear regression an...

  18. Clinician perceptions and patient experiences of antiretroviral treatment integration in primary health care clinics, Tshwane, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Maphuthego D. Mathibe; Stephen J.H. Hendricks; Anne-Marie Bergh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary Health Care (PHC) clinicians and patients are major role players in the South African antiretroviral treatment programme. Understanding their perceptions and experiences of integrated care and the management of people living with HIV and AIDS in PHC facilities is necessary for successful implementation and sustainability of integration.Objective: This study explored clinician perceptions and patient experiences of integration of antiretroviral treatment in PHC clinics.Meth...

  19. Patient safety culture in Norwegian primary care: A study in out-of-hours casualty clinics and GP practices

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. This study aimed to investigate patient safety attitudes amongst health care providers in Norwegian primary care by using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, in both out-of-hours (OOH) casualty clinics and GP practices. The questionnaire identifies five major patient safety factors: Teamwork climate, Safety climate, Job satisfaction, Perceptions of management, and Working conditions. Design. Cross-sectional study. Statistical analysis included multiple linear regression an...

  20. Use of Complementary Therapies Among Primary Care Clinic Patients With Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J. Herman

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. There is little information, however, on CAM use among adults with clinic-confirmed diagnoses, including arthritis, who are treated by primary care physicians. Methods To assess the frequency and types of CAM therapy used by Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women and men with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or fibromyalgia, we used stratified random selection to identify 612 participants aged 18–84 years and seen in university-based primary care clinics. Respondents completed an interviewer-administered survey in English or Spanish. Results Nearly half (44.6% of the study population was of Hispanic ethnicity, 71.4% were women, and 65.0% had annual incomes of less than $25,000. Most (90.2% had ever used CAM for arthritis, and 69.2% were using CAM at the time of the interview. Current use was highest for oral supplements (mainly glucosamine and chondroitin (34.1%, mind-body therapies (29.0%, and herbal topical ointments (25.1%. Fewer participants made current use of vitamins and minerals (16.6%, herbs taken orally (13.6%, a CAM therapist (12.7%, CAM movement therapies (10.6%, special diets (10.1%, or copper jewelry or magnets (9.2%. Those with fibromyalgia currently used an average of 3.9 CAM therapies versus 2.4 for those with rheumatoid arthritis and 2.1 for those with osteoarthritis. Current CAM use was significantly associated with being female, being under 55 years of age, and having some college education. Conclusion Hispanic and non-Hispanic white arthritis patients used CAM to supplement conventional treatments. Health care providers should be aware of the high use of CAM and incorporate questions about its use into routine assessments and treatment planning.

  1. Prevalence and Determinants of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Patients at a Primary Care Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) has prognostic significance on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. However, echocardiography screening for LVH is not routinely done for hypertensive patients in a primary care setting. Thus, this quantitative study aims to determine the prevalence and factors associated with LVH in hypertensive patients at a primary care setting. This was a cross-sectional study of 359 consecutive patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension attending a hospital-b...

  2. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelissen Jessica

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of both interventions. Methods/Design In this randomized, single blind, clinical trial with active controls, we aim to include 170 patients with GOA. The experimental intervention consist of six self-management group sessions provided by a multi-disciplinary team (occupational therapist, physiotherapist, dietician and specialized nurse. The active control group consists of two group sessions and four sessions by telephone, provided by a specialized nurse and physiotherapist. Both therapies last six weeks. Main study outcome is daily functioning during the first year after the treatment, assessed on the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, specific complaints, fatigue, and costs. Illness cognitions, global perceived effect and self-efficacy, will also be assessed for a responder analysis. Outcome assessments are performed directly after the intervention, after 26 weeks and after 52 weeks. Discussion This article describes the design of a randomized, single blind, clinical trial with a one year follow up to compare the costs and effectiveness of two non-pharmacological interventions with different modes of delivery for patients with GOA. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2137

  3. Patient involvement in decision-making: a cross-sectional study in a Malaysian primary care clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Ambigapathy, Ranjini; Chia, Yook Chin; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Shared decision-making has been advocated as a useful model for patient management. In developing Asian countries such as Malaysia, there is a common belief that patients prefer a passive role in clinical consultation. As such, the objective of this study was to determine Malaysian patients’ role preference in decision-making and the associated factors. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Study was conducted at an urban primary care clinic in Malaysia in 2012. Participants Patie...

  4. Opening the Black Box of Clinical Collaboration in Integrated Care Models for Frail, Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Stampa, Matthieu; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard; Novella, Jean-Luc; Lechowski, Laurent; Ankri, Joel; Lapointe, Liette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to understand better the clinical collaboration process among primary care physicians (PCPs), case managers (CMs), and geriatricians in integrated models of care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study with semistructured interviews. A purposive sample of 35 PCPs, 7 CMs, and 4 geriatricians was selected in…

  5. The perioperative nursing care of patients with malignant obstructive jaundice treated with interventional therapy: clinical experience in 71 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience of perioperative nursing for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who were treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Methods: Sufficient preoperative preparation,careful psychological nursing, serious postoperative observation of vital signs, enhancement of the nutritional support,care of the puncture site and drainage tube, maintenance of the electrolyte balance, correct evaluation of the jaundice, etc. were strictly carried out in all 71 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Results: Because the sufficient preoperative preparation and postoperative nursing work were seriously carried out,the obstructive jaundice was well relieved in all patients, the liver function and the living quality were markedly improved and the survival time was prolonged. Conclusion: It is of great clinical significance to intensify the perioperative nursing care for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice who are receiving interventional therapy. (authors)

  6. Stepped care targeting psychological distress in head and neck and lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebber Anne-Marie H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress is common in cancer survivors. Although there is some evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial care in distressed cancer patients, referral rate is low. Lack of adequate screening instruments in oncology settings and insufficient availability of traditional models of psychosocial care are the main barriers. A stepped care approach has the potential to improve the efficiency of psychosocial care. The aim of the study described herein is to evaluate efficacy of a stepped care strategy targeting psychological distress in cancer survivors. Methods/design The study is designed as a randomized clinical trial with 2 treatment arms: a stepped care intervention programme versus care as usual. Patients treated for head and neck cancer (HNC or lung cancer (LC are screened for distress using OncoQuest, a computerized touchscreen system. After stratification for tumour (HNC vs. LC and stage (stage I/II vs. III/IV, 176 distressed patients are randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Patients in the intervention group will follow a stepped care model with 4 evidence based steps: 1. Watchful waiting, 2. Guided self-help via Internet or a booklet, 3. Problem Solving Treatment administered by a specialized nurse, and 4. Specialized psychological intervention or antidepressant medication. In the control group, patients receive care as usual which most often is a single interview or referral to specialized intervention. Primary outcome is the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Secondary outcome measures are a clinical level of depression or anxiety (CIDI, quality of life (EQ-5D, EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-HN35, QLQ-LC13, patient satisfaction with care (EORTC QLQ-PATSAT, and costs (health care utilization and work loss (TIC-P and PRODISQ modules. Outcomes are evaluated before and after intervention and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after intervention. Discussion Stepped care is a system of delivering and

  7. Patient safety and quality of care: how may clinical simulation contribute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The usability of health information technology (IT) is increasingly recognized as critically important to the development of systems that ensure patient safety and quality of care. The substantial complexity of organizations, work practice and physical environments within the healthcare sector...

  8. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Ebrahimi; Ali Navidian; Roghaieh Keykha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A t...

  9. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia admitted to intensive care: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda L; Chan, Kris; Mirza, Imran; Townsend, Derek R; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2010-01-01

    Background There is limited epidemiologic data on patients with acute myelogenous (myeloid) leukemia (AML) requiring life-sustaining therapies in the intensive care unit (ICU). Our objectives were to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes in critically ill AML patients. Methods This was a retrospective case-control study. Cases were defined as adult patients with a primary diagnosis of AML admitted to ICU at the University of Alberta Hospital between January 1st 2002 and June 30th...

  10. Clinical and immunological profile of SLE patients: Experience from a Chennai-based tertiary care centre (revisited)

    OpenAIRE

    Santhanam S; Madeshwaran M; Tamilselvam TN; Rajeswari S

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the clinical and immunological profile of patients with newly detected systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented to a tertiary care centre. Methods: The study involved patients with newly detected SLE (fulfilling the 1997 revised ACR criteria for SLE), admitted in Madras Medical College and Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital Chennai between January 2012 and December 2013. Results: Hundred patients with SLE were assessed for a period of two years, among them, 59...

  11. The one-stop clinic as the standard of out-patient care in a hospital urology department

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Páez; Enrique Redondo; Javier Sáenz; Mercedes Marín; Nuria Juárez; Manuel Durán

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of a 'one-stop' clinic in terms of proportion of discharges or inclusion in surgical waiting lists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients were referred from primary care facilities (population 220.646) and from different departments in the hospital. Eight senior urologists, two registered nurses and two nurse attendants participated in the experience. Prior to the start of the project, referral protocols had been agreed with the primary care physicians invol...

  12. Enhancing patient care via a pharmacist-managed rural anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cindy; Lacombe, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Integrating specialized pharmacist services and follow-up with the laboratory, home care nursing, retail pharmacy and physicians can ensure optimal outcomes for patients receiving anticoagulation, or "blood thinner," therapy. Improved patient education and discharge care planning can bridge disconnects, enable patients to better manage their care and ensure better patient outcomes and more effective use of health system resources. Specially trained pharmacists can provide safe and effective management of a high-alert medication to help prevent potentially life-threatening clots or bleeding. With advanced prescribing authorization, the pharmacist can seamlessly provide this service both locally in a community and via Telehealth to surrounding areas, potentially for any Albertan. Warfarin therapy may be lifelong or short-term (three to six months), but all patients require regular monitoring with blood tests. Many variables, both lifestyle and medication related, can impact therapy, and through extensive education and access via telephone to an "expert" for questions and follow-up of blood tests, patients are empowered to better regulate their anticoagulants. Anticoagulation pharmacists, as part of an AMS (anticoagulation management service), can provide a continuum of care for patients while in hospital, when discharged home, as an outpatient in the community or as a resident of a long-term care facility or seniors' home. PMID:20057253

  13. Computerized clinical decision support systems for acute care management: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahota Navdeep

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute medical care often demands timely, accurate decisions in complex situations. Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs have many features that could help. However, as for any medical intervention, claims that CCDSSs improve care processes and patient outcomes need to be rigorously assessed. The objective of this review was to systematically review the effects of CCDSSs on process of care and patient outcomes for acute medical care. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews databases (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, ACP Journal Club, and others, and the Inspec bibliographic database were searched to January 2010, in all languages, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CCDSSs in all clinical areas. We included RCTs that evaluated the effect on process of care or patient outcomes of a CCDSS used for acute medical care compared with care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results Thirty-six studies met our inclusion criteria for acute medical care. The CCDSS improved process of care in 63% (22/35 of studies, including 64% (9/14 of medication dosing assistants, 82% (9/11 of management assistants using alerts/reminders, 38% (3/8 of management assistants using guidelines/algorithms, and 67% (2/3 of diagnostic assistants. Twenty studies evaluated patient outcomes, of which three (15% reported improvements, all of which were medication dosing assistants. Conclusion The majority of CCDSSs demonstrated improvements in process of care, but patient outcomes were less likely to be evaluated and far less likely to show positive results.

  14. Health-related quality of life among osteoarthritis patients attending primary care clinics of Mangalore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HN Harsha Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoarthritis (OA of the knee is the most common type of arthritis of the elderly among Asians. Reports suggest that it affects the quality of life. Hence, this study was undertaken with the objective to know the impact of OA of the knee on 8 domains of health related quality of life (HRQoL which include: (1 Physical functioning (PF, (2 role limitation due to physical health (RP. (3 Emotional well-being/mental health (MH, (4 role limitation due to emotional problems (RE, (5 energy/vitality, (6 social well-being (short form [SF], (7 body pain, (8 general health. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in primary care rural clinics situated on peripheral areas of Mangalore city. Total sample size was calculated to be 77. Patients who met the criteria of modified American Rheumatologic Association Classification for OA of knee were administered a SF-36 questionnaire to measure the HRQoL in the local language version. Mean scores (with its standard deviation across each domain was calculated. Results: Of 80 patients, 38 were males. OA affected HRQoL. Four out 8 factors had more impact on HRQoL (they are PF, RP, MH, RE. Duration of OA is an important determinant on HRQoL. Patients with newer onset of OA (4 years of OA (Domain, Mean, the emotional impact (MH, 44.67; RE, 45.67 reduced but the physical impact (PF, 47.83; RP, 19.75 persisted/got worse. Conclusion: Osteoarthritis had impact on HRQoL. Duration of OA determines the kind of impact. With the onset of OA emotional/mental support would be needed in addition to the medical treatment. As the disease progresses, they tend to cope with emotional/mental problems even as the physical problems persist/increase.

  15. Retention of antiretroviral naïve patients registered in HIV care in a program clinic in Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha V Ghate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retention in HIV care ensures delivery of services like secondary prevention, timely initiation of treatment, support, and care on a regular basis. The data on retention in pre antiretroviral therapy (ART care in India is scanty. Materials and Methods: Antiretroviral naοve HIV-infected adult patients registered between January 2011 and March 2012 in HIV care (pre-ART were included in the study. The follow-up procedures were done as per the national guidelines. Patients who did not report to the clinic for 1 year were considered as pre-ART lost to follow-up (pre-ART LFU. They were contacted either telephonically or by home visits. Logistic regression analysis was done to find out factors associated with pre-ART loss to follow-up. Results: A total of 689 antiretroviral naοve adult patients were registered in the HIV care. Fourteen (2% patients died and 76 (11% were LFU till March 2013. The multivariate analysis showed that baseline CD4 count >350 cells/mm 3 (P < 0.01 and illiteracy (P = 0.044 were significantly associated with LFU. Of the total pre-ART LFUs, 35 (46.1% informed that they would visit the clinic at their convenient time. NGOs that referred 16 female sex workers (FSWs who were LFU (21.1% informed that they would make efforts to refer them to the clinic. Conclusion: Higher CD4 count and illiteracy were significantly associated with lower retention in pre-ART care. Developing effective "retention package" for patients and strengthening linkage strategies between key sub-population such as FSWs and ART programming will help to plug the leaky cascade in HIV care.

  16. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroaki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System. Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  17. Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients1

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Carla Bridi; Thiago Quinellato Louro; Roberto Carlos Lyra da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue. METHOD: this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds. RESULTS: a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and...

  18. The clinical safety of disabled patients: Proposal for a methodology for analysis of health care risks and specific measures for improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Perea Pérez, Bernardo; Labajo González, María Elena; Bratos Murillo, Manuel; Santiago Sáez, Andrés; Albarrán Juan, María Elena; Villa Vigil, Manuel Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    The clinical risks associated with health care have been a known factor since ancient times, and their prevention has constituted one of the foundations of health care. However, concern for the risks involved in health care treatments has risen very significantly in recent years, becoming a modern current of concern for clinical health care risks which is referred to by the name of “patient safety” in the scientific literature. Unfortunately, there are no studies on patient safety in dental p...

  19. Rehabilitation Therapists’ Clinical Questions in the Context of Evidence-based Patient Care : An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lorie A. Kloda; Bartlett, Joan C.

    2009-01-01

    In this qualitative study, rehabilitation therapists (occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and speech-language pathologists) working in stroke care will be asked about their clinical questions. The goals of the study are: to identify common characteristics of questions, to develop a typology of questions, and to uncover reasons why certain questions are pursued.

  20. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Bilcke

    Full Text Available This is one of the first studies to (1 describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2 assess influential background characteristics, and (3 formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever, a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  1. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries. PMID:25032688

  2. Influenza-Like-Illness and Clinically Diagnosed Flu: Disease Burden, Costs and Quality of Life for Patients Seeking Ambulatory Care or No Professional Care at All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011–2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5–6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86–91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51–€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries. PMID:25032688

  3. QUEST‐RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio; Mäkinen, Heidi; Verstappen, Suzan M M; Hetland, Merete Lund; Naranjo, Antonio; Baecklund, Eva; Herborn, Gertraud; Rau, Rolf; Cazzato, Massimiliano; Gossec, Laure; Skakic, Vlado; Gogus, Feride; Sierakowski, Stanislaw; Bresnihan, Barry; Taylor, Peter; McClinton, Catherine; Pincus, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Objective To conduct a cross‐sectional review of non‐selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. Methods The review included current disease activity using data from clinical assessment and a patient self‐report questionnaire, which was translated into each language. Data on demographic, disease and treatment‐related variables were collected and analysed using descriptive statistics. Variation in disease activity on DAS28 (disease activity score on 28‐joint count) within and between countries was graphically analysed. A median regression model was applied to analyse differences in disease activity between countries. Results Between January 2005 and October 2006, the QUEST‐RA (Quantitative Patient Questionnaires in Standard Monitoring of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis) project included 4363 patients from 48 sites in 15 countries; 78% were female, >90% Caucasian, mean age was 57 years and mean disease duration was 11.5 years. More than 80% of patients had been treated with methotrexate in all but three countries. Overall, patients had an active disease with a median DAS28 of 4.0, with a significant variation between countries (p50 patients included, low disease activity of DAS28 ⩽3.2 was found in the majority of patients in seven sites in five countries; in eight sites in five other countries, >50% of patients had high disease activity of DAS28 >5.1. Conclusions This international multicentre cross‐sectional database provides an overview of clinical status and treatments of patients with RA in standard clinical care in 2005–6 including countries that are infrequently involved in clinical research projects. PMID:17412740

  4. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen Jessica; de Bie Rob A; Stukstette Mirelle JPM; Hoogeboom Thomas J; den Broeder Alfons A; van den Ende Cornelia HM

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT) is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA). The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the...

  5. Clinical Problems in Community Mental Health Care for Patients with Severe Borderline Personality Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Koekkoek, B.; Meijel, van, B.; Schene, A.; Hutschemaekers, G.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the problems that professionals perceive in the community mental health care for patients with severe borderline personality disorder that do not fit into specialized therapy. A group of national experts (n = 8) participated in a four-phase Delphi-procedure to identify and prioritize the problems. A total of 36 problems reflecting five categories was found: patient-related, professional-related, interaction-related, social system-related, and menta...

  6. The one-stop clinic as the standard of out-patient care in a hospital urology department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Páez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of a 'one-stop' clinic in terms of proportion of discharges or inclusion in surgical waiting lists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients were referred from primary care facilities (population 220.646 and from different departments in the hospital. Eight senior urologists, two registered nurses and two nurse attendants participated in the experience. Prior to the start of the project, referral protocols had been agreed with the primary care physicians involved. Compliance with the protocols was periodically tested. Eventually 5537 first visits (January-December 2009 where evaluable. RESULTS: Overall, the 'one-stop' format proved feasible in 74.2% of the patients (4108/5537. Patients, who successfully used the 'one-stop' format, were significantly younger than those who required additional consultations (43 vs 50 years old, respectively, Student's t test < 0.001. For obvious reasons the 'one-stop' format was universally possible in male sterilization and penile phimosis patients. Similarly, the 'one-stop' policy was applied in most consultations due to male sexual dysfunction (75% and urinary tract infection (73%. Other health problems, such as haematuria (62% and renal colic (46%, required more than one visit so that care of the patient reverted to the traditional, outpatient care model. CONCLUSION: A 'one-stop' philosophy is feasible for a number of procedures in a urological outpatient clinic. The costs to implement such an approach would be limited to managerial expenditure.

  7. Clinical Problems in Community Mental Health Care for Patients with Severe Borderline Personality Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Koekkoek; B. van Meijel; A. Schene; G. Hutschemaekers

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the problems that professionals perceive in the community mental health care for patients with severe borderline personality disorder that do not fit into specialized therapy. A group of national experts (n = 8) participated in a four-phase Delphi-procedu

  8. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from...... clinical assessment and a patient self-report questionnaire, which was translated into each language. Data on demographic, disease and treatment-related variables were collected and analysed using descriptive statistics. Variation in disease activity on DAS28 (disease activity score on 28-joint count...

  9. Practicing Patient-Centered Care: The Questions Clinically Excellent Physicians Use to Get to Know their Patients as Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Hanyok, Laura A.; Hellmann, David B.; Cynthia Rand; Ziegelstein, Roy C

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective:Background and Objective: Patient-centered care, which is dependent on knowing each patient as an individual, has been identified as a critical aspect of healthcare. The most effective and efficient methods to get to know patients as individuals have not been defined. Our aim was to identify questions and phrases that can be used by physicians to get to know their patients. Abstract: Methods:Methods: We surveyed 15 physicians who have been formally recognized for thei...

  10. Assessment of oral self-care in patients with periodontitis: a pilot study in a dental school clinic in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Hitomi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral hygiene education is central to every stage of periodontal treatment. Successful management of periodontal disease depends on the patient's capacity for oral self-care. In the present study, the oral self-care and perceptions of patients attending a dental school clinic in Japan were assessed using a short questionnaire referring to existing oral health models. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. The study population consisted of sixty-five patients (age range 23-77 with chronic periodontitis. The pre-tested 19-item questionnaire comprised 3 domains; 1 oral hygiene, 2 dietary habits and 3 perception of oral condition. The questionnaire was used as a part of the comprehensive assessment. Results Analyses of the assessment data revealed no major problems with the respondents' perceived oral hygiene habits, although their actual plaque control levels were not entirely adequate. Most of the respondents acknowledged the importance of prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases, but less than one third of them were regular users of the dental care system. Twenty-five percent of the respondents were considered to be reluctant to change their daily routines, and 29% had doubts about the impact of their own actions on oral health. Analyzing the relationships between patient responses and oral hygiene status, factors like 'frequency of tooth brushing', 'approximal cleaning', 'dental check-up' and 'compliance with self-care advice' showed statistically significant associations (P Conclusion The clinical utilization of the present questionnaire facilitates the inclusion of multiple aspects of patient information, before initiation of periodontal treatment. The significant associations that were found between some of the self-care behaviors and oral hygiene levels document the important role of patient-centered oral health assessment in periodontal care.

  11. Knowledge of and attitude to foot care amongst Type 2 diabetes patients attending a university-based primary care clinic in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi I. Ekore

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals living with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of developing foot ulcers and cardiovascular complications or a neuropathy that may result in amputations. These complications have been shown to be already present in about 10% of diabetic patients at the time of diagnosis.Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the level of awareness and attitude to foot care among adult diabetic patients attending a university health centre (i.e. a primary care centre and to emphasise the ever-present need for health education and promotion and early complication detection (especially of foot problems among diabetic patients.Method: A descriptive cross-sectional, clinic-based study was carried out at the University of Ibadan Health Centre (Jaja Clinic. The study population consisted of consenting adult diabetic patients. Data were collected by the self-administration of structured questionnaires to eligible subjects and were analysed using the SPSS v.15software. Appropriate statistics were employed to analyse the collected data.Results: A total of 137 patients participated in the study and ranged in age from 37 to 75 years, with the mean ± SD age being 58.2 ± 9.2 years. Of the participants, 98 (71.5% were men and 39 (28.5%were women; all of the participants were married. The duration of illness ranged from 1 year to 20 years, with the median duration of illness being 3 ± 1.7 years. One hundred and twenty-six (92%patients had never received any education on foot care from their healthcare providers, while 11(8% had received some form of foot care education. Among those who had never received any foot care education, 92 (73% had been diabetic for 1–5 years, while the remaining 34 (27% had been diabetic for 6 – 20 years. Of the foot care measures that were known, 35 (25.5% patients knew to wash their feet daily and dry in between the toes thoroughly, 31 (22.6% knew not to go outdoors barefooted, 27 (19.7% checked

  12. Assessment of activities performed by clinical nurse practitioners and implications for staffing and patient care at primary health care level in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Igumbor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The shortage of nurses in public healthcare facilities in South Africa is well documented; finding creative solutions to this problem remains a priority.Objective: This study sought to establish the amount of time that clinical nurse practitioners (CNPs in one district of the Western Cape spend on clinical services and the implications for staffing and skills mix in order to deliver quality patient care.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted across 15 purposively selected clinics providing primary health services in 5 sub-districts. The frequency of activities and time CNPs spent on each activity in fixed and mobile clinics were recorded. Time spent on activities and health facility staff profiles were correlated and predictors of the total time spent by CNPs with patients were identified.Results: The time spent on clinical activities was associated with the number of CNPs in the facilities. CNPs in fixed clinics spent a median time of about 13 minutes with each patient whereas CNPs in mobile clinics spent 3 minutes. Fixed-clinic CNPs also spent more time on their non-core functions than their core functions, more time with patients, and saw fewer patients compared to mobile-clinic CNPs.Conclusions: The findings give insight into the time CNPs in rural fixed and mobile clinics spend with their patients, and how patient caseload may affect consultation times. Two promising strategies were identified – task shifting and adjustments in health workerd eployment – as ways to address staffing and skills mix, which skills mix creates the potential for using healthcare workers fully whilst enhancing the long-term health of these rural communities.

  13. Patient education on back care

    OpenAIRE

    C. Van Eck

    2009-01-01

    Study Design: Clinical PerspectiveObjective: To provide back care education for patients with low back pain. Background:  Understanding the internal and external forces the body issubjected to, as well as the spine’s response to these forces, can better equipphysiotherapists in educating patients with low back pain. Methods and Measures: The focus of the clinical perspective is to providephysiotherapists with clinically sound reasoning when educating patients. Results: Providing a patient han...

  14. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Care of Elderly Patients Hospitalized with Delirium

    OpenAIRE

    Ángel Julio Romero Carbrera; Leocadia Amores Hernández; Ernesto Alonso Cabrera; Francisco Olascoaga Pérez; Eduardo Fernández Casteleiro

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is a frequent disorder found in people of advanced age in the hospital setting. It is characterized by an acute disorder of consciousness and alterations in behavior, posing a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the doctors that look after geriatric patients. A clinical practice guideline drawn up by consensus is presented. It highlights the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this complex syndrome. An algorithm that facilitates the management of this condition at Dr. Gustavo Al...

  15. Information, Motivation, and Behavioral Skills for Early Pre-ART Engagement in HIV Care among Patients Entering Clinical Care in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    SMITH, Laramie R.; AMICO, K. Rivet; SHUPER, Paul A.; CHRISTIE, Sarah; FISHER, William A.; CORNMAN, Deborah H.; DOSHI, Monika; MacDONALD, Susan; PILLAY, Sandy; FISHER, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known regarding factors implicated in early engagement and retention in HIV-care among individuals not yet eligible for antiretroviral therapy (pre-ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Identifying such factors is critical for supporting retention in pre-ART clinical care to ensure timely ART initiation and optimize long-term health outcomes. We assessed patients’ pre-ART HIV-care related information, motivation, and behavioral skills among newly diagnosed ART-ineligible patients initiating care in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The survey was interviewer-administered to eligible patients who were 18 years of age or older, newly entering care (diagnosed within the last 6-months), and ineligible for ART (CD4 count >200 cells/mm3) in one of four primary care clinical sites. Self-reported information, motivation and behavioral skills specific to retention in pre-ART HIV-care were characterized by categorizing responses into those reflecting potential strengths and those reflective of potential deficits. Information, motivation, and behavioral skills deficits sufficiently prevalent in the overall sample (i.e., ≥30% prevalent) were identified as areas in need of specific attention through intervention efforts adapted to the clinic level. Gender-based differences were also evaluated. A total of 288 patients (75% female) completed structured interviews. Across the sample, 8 information, 8 motivation, and 8 behavioral skills deficit areas were identified as sufficiently prevalent to warrant specific targeted attention. Gender differences did not emerge. The deficits in pre-ART HIV-care related information, motivation and behavioral skills that were identified suggest that efforts to improve accurate information on immune function and HIV disease are needed, as is accurate information regarding HIV treatment and transmission risk prior to ART initiation. Additional efforts to facilitate the development of social support, including positive interactions with clinic staff

  16. An Integrated Model for Patient Care and Clinical Trials (IMPACT) to support clinical research visit scheduling workflow for future learning health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chunhua; Li, Yu; Berhe, Solomon; Boland, Mary Regina; Gao, Junfeng; Hruby, Gregory W; Steinman, Richard C; Lopez-Jimenez, Carlos; Busacca, Linda; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Bigger, J Thomas

    2013-08-01

    We describe a clinical research visit scheduling system that can potentially coordinate clinical research visits with patient care visits and increase efficiency at clinical sites where clinical and research activities occur simultaneously. Participatory Design methods were applied to support requirements engineering and to create this software called Integrated Model for Patient Care and Clinical Trials (IMPACT). Using a multi-user constraint satisfaction and resource optimization algorithm, IMPACT automatically synthesizes temporal availability of various research resources and recommends the optimal dates and times for pending research visits. We conducted scenario-based evaluations with 10 clinical research coordinators (CRCs) from diverse clinical research settings to assess the usefulness, feasibility, and user acceptance of IMPACT. We obtained qualitative feedback using semi-structured interviews with the CRCs. Most CRCs acknowledged the usefulness of IMPACT features. Support for collaboration within research teams and interoperability with electronic health records and clinical trial management systems were highly requested features. Overall, IMPACT received satisfactory user acceptance and proves to be potentially useful for a variety of clinical research settings. Our future work includes comparing the effectiveness of IMPACT with that of existing scheduling solutions on the market and conducting field tests to formally assess user adoption. PMID:23684593

  17. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Wook Jin; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of compl...

  18. Touch screens as a tool in patient care in the IBD outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lone; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Fallingborg, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We have introduced online touch screens in the waiting room for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) for recording of symptoms before their consultation. This has made disease activity scores readily available to the physician in our newly established database......, 'Gastrobio'. We wanted to validate the use of touch screens compared to paper questionnaires. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 54 patients with UC and 74 patients with CD were included in the study. The UC patients filled out the Short Health Scale (SHS) and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index (SSCAI......). The CD patients filled out the SHS and Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI). Paper questionnaires and touch screen versions were used in random order and comparison between the two modalities was made by Spearman correlation test, Bland-Altman plots, and Kappa-statistics. RESULTS: Among the 128 patients, the...

  19. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    OpenAIRE

    Kaptein AA; Fischer MJ; Scharloo M

    2014-01-01

    Ad A Kaptein, Maarten J Fischer, Margreet Scharloo Medical Psychology Section, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden, the Netherlands Abstract: In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the em...

  20. Somatic awareness in the clinical care of patients with body distress symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coll Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this paper is to provide primary care physicians and medical specialists with an experiential psychosomatic framework for understanding patients with body distress symptoms. The framework relies on somatic awareness, a normal part of consciousness, to resolve the dualism inherent in conventional multidisciplinary approaches. Somatic awareness represents a guiding healing heuristic which acknowledges the validity of the patient's physical symptoms and uses body sensations to identify the psychological, physiological, and social factors needed for symptom self-regulation. The experiential approach is based on psychobiologic concepts which include bodily distress disorder, central sensitization, dysfunctional breathing, and contextual nature of mood.

  1. Caring for caregivers and patients: Research and clinical priorities for informal cancer caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Erin E; Rowland, Julia H; Northouse, Laurel; Litzelman, Kristin; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Timura, Catherine; O'Mara, Ann; Huss, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Informal/family caregivers are a fundamental source of care for cancer patients in the United States, yet the population of caregivers and their tasks, psychosocial needs, and health outcomes are not well understood. Changes in the nature of cancer care and its delivery, along with the growing population of survivors and their caregivers, warrant increased attention to the roles and demands of caregiving. This article reviews current evidence presented at a 2-day meeting examining the state of the science of informal cancer caregiving that was convened by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Nursing Research. The meeting sought to define who is an informal cancer caregiver, summarize the state of the science in informal cancer caregiving, and describe both the kinds of interventions developed to address caregiving challenges and the various outcomes used to evaluate their impact. This article offers recommendations for moving science forward in 4 areas: 1) improving the estimation of the prevalence and burden of informal cancer caregiving; 2) advancing the development of interventions designed to improve outcomes for cancer patients, caregivers, and patient-caregiver dyads; 3) generating and testing strategies for integrating caregivers into formal health care settings; and 4) promoting the use of technology to support informal cancer caregivers. Cancer 2016;122:1987-95. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26991807

  2. QUEST-RA: quantitative clinical assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis seen in standard rheumatology care in 15 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Toloza, Sergio;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a cross-sectional review of non-selected consecutive outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of standard clinical care in 15 countries for an overview of the characteristics of patients with RA. METHODS: The review included current disease activity using data from......) within and between countries was graphically analysed. A median regression model was applied to analyse differences in disease activity between countries. RESULTS: Between January 2005 and October 2006, the QUEST-RA (Quantitative Patient Questionnaires in Standard Monitoring of Patients with Rheumatoid...... Arthritis) project included 4363 patients from 48 sites in 15 countries; 78% were female, >90% Caucasian, mean age was 57 years and mean disease duration was 11.5 years. More than 80% of patients had been treated with methotrexate in all but three countries. Overall, patients had an active disease with a...

  3. Symptomatic reactions, clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction associated with upper cervical chiropractic care: A prospective, multicenter, cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurwitz Eric L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have previously shown that adverse events following manipulation to the neck and/or back are relatively common, although these reactions tend to be mild in intensity and self-limiting. However, no prospective study has examined the incidence of adverse reactions following spinal adjustments using upper cervical techniques, and the impact of this care on clinical outcomes. Methods Consecutive new patients from the offices of 83 chiropractors were recruited for this practice-based study. Clinical outcome measures included 1 Neck pain disability index (100-point scale, 2 Oswestry back pain index (100-point scale, 3 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS for neck, headache, midback, and low back pain, 4 treatment satisfaction, and 5 Symptomatic Reactions (SR. Data were collected at baseline, and after approximately 2 weeks of care. A patient reaching sub-clinical status for pain and disability was defined as a follow-up score 30% based on an 11-point numeric rating scale occurring Results A total of 1,090 patients completed the study having 4,920 (4.5 per patient office visits requiring 2,653 (2.4 per patient upper cervical adjustments over 17 days. Three hundred thirty- eight (31.0% patients had SRs meeting the accepted definition. Intense SR (NRS ≥8 occurred in 56 patients (5.1%. Outcome assessments were significantly improved for neck pain and disability, headache, mid-back pain, as well as lower back pain and disability (p 5 million career upper cervical adjustments without a reported incidence of serious adverse event. Conclusions Upper cervical chiropractic care may have a fairly common occurrence of mild intensity SRs short in duration (

  4. McKenzie Classification of Extremity Lesions - An audit of primary care patients in 3 clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melbye, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Kenzie. The secondary aim was to identify the stability of the initial classification. Patients referred to physical therapy were classified by three physical therapists, certified in McKenzie Mechanical Diagnosis & Therapy with an additional course in extremity problems.  The clinical experience of the...

  5. Genomic analysis in the clinic: benefits and challenges for health care professionals and patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton-Prolla, Patrícia; Goldim, José Roberto; Vairo, Filippo Pinto E; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Sequeiros, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Despite significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases in the last two decades, there is still a significant proportion where a causative mutation cannot be identified and a definitive genetic diagnosis remains elusive. New genome-wide or high-throughput multiple gene tests have brought new hope to the field, since they can offer fast, cost-effective and comprehensive analysis of genetic variation. This is particularly interesting in disorders with high genetic heterogeneity. There are, however, limitations and concerns regarding the implementation of genomic analysis in everyday clinical practice, including some particular to emerging and developing economies, as Brazil. They include the limited number of actionable genetic variants known to date, difficulties in determining the clinical validity and utility of novel variants, growth of direct-to-consumer genetic testing using a genomic approach and lack of proper training of health care professionals to adequately request, interpret and use genetic information. Despite all these concerns and limitations, the availability of genomic tests has grown at an extremely rapid pace and commercially available services include initiatives in almost all areas of clinical genetics, including newborn and carrier screening. We discuss the benefits and limitations of genomic testing, as well as the ethical implications and the challenges for genetic education and enough available and qualified health care professionals, to ensure the adequate process of informed consent, meaningful interpretation and use of genomic data and definition of a clear regulatory framework in the particular context of Brazil. PMID:26040235

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Anemia in Geriatric Patients - A Cross Sectional Study Conducted At Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sfurti Mann, Amit Kumar, Shiv Kumar Singh, Surbhi Katyal, Gaurav Chopra, Sanjeev Kumar Varma

    2014-01-01

    Methods: After taking informed written consent, patients were subjected to a detailed history, thorough clinical examination and various relevant investigations including bone marrow examination and radiological means. Result: 42 patients (70% were male and 18 patients (30% were female. Maximum number of patients, 24 (40% were in the age group 65-69 years. Out of which 15 (62.5% were male and 9 (37.5% were female. Conclusion: Among all the patients (irrespective of age groups and types of anemia, ACD was found to be most common (41.67%, followed by IDA (35%, MDS (5%, Megaloblastic anemia (3.34%, myelofibrosis and haemolytic anemia (3.34% each and aplastic anemia (1.67%.

  7. Beyond the Basics of Clinical Outcomes Assessment: Selecting Appropriate Patient-Rated Outcomes Instruments for Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valier, Alison R.; Lam, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" emphasizes the concepts of clinical outcomes assessment. In athletic training, clinical outcomes assessment, especially as it relates to patient-rated outcomes (PRO) instruments, is new, which produces uncertainty with regard to how to integrate PROs into athletic…

  8. Clinician perceptions and patient experiences of antiretroviral treatment integration in primary health care clinics, Tshwane, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maphuthego D. Mathibe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary Health Care (PHC clinicians and patients are major role players in the South African antiretroviral treatment programme. Understanding their perceptions and experiences of integrated care and the management of people living with HIV and AIDS in PHC facilities is necessary for successful implementation and sustainability of integration.Objective: This study explored clinician perceptions and patient experiences of integration of antiretroviral treatment in PHC clinics.Method: An exploratory, qualitative study was conducted in four city of Tshwane PHC facilities. Two urban and two rural facilities following different models of integration were included. A self-administered questionnaire with open-ended items was completed by 35 clinicians and four focus group interviews were conducted with HIV-positive patients. The data were coded and categories were grouped into sub-themes and themes.Results: Workload, staff development and support for integration affected clinicians’ performance and viewpoints. They perceived promotion of privacy, reduced discrimination and increased access to comprehensive care as benefits of service integration. Delays, poor patient care and patient dissatisfaction were viewed as negative aspects of integration. In three facilities patients were satisfied with integration or semi-integration and felt common queues prevented stigma and discrimination, whilst the reverse was true in the facility with separate services. Single-month issuance of antiretroviral drugs and clinic schedule organisation was viewed negatively, as well as poor staff attitudes, poor communication and long waiting times.Conclusion: Although a fully integrated service model is preferable, aspects that need further attention are management support from health authorities for health facilities, improved working conditions and appropriate staff development opportunities.

  9. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Navidian, Ali; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35) and intervention (n=35) groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention. Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients. PMID:25276758

  10. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35 and intervention (n=35 groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES. Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention.Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients.

  11. Denture care practice among patients attending the prosthetic clinic in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde Joshua Ogunrinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good denture care practice by individuals using Removable Partial Denture (RPD is an important component of oral health measures. An assessment of denture care practice of such individuals by dental care practitioners is necessary. Objective : To evaluate the denture care practice among prosthetics patients attending a tertiary Hospital Dental Centre in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to obtain information from RPD wearers that were willing to participate. The questionnaire assessed among other things, patients′ bio-data, frequency, techniques and device used for cleaning their dentures. Data was analyzed using Chi-square test (P < 0.05. Results: One hundred and ninety eight denture wearers consisting of 100 (50.5% males and 98 (49.5% females participated in the study. Majority 110 (55.6% cleaned their dentures once daily and toothbrush and pastes were used by 105 (53% of the participants. More than 70% of the respondents removed their dentures at night. One hundred and sixty-six (83.8% visited the dentist only when they needed treatment. There was a statistical significant relationship between frequency and technique of cleaning denture, and denture cleanliness (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that once daily cleaning of dentures and cleaning the denture with rest of the teeth are ineffective in prevention of plaque accumulation.

  12. Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carla Bridi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue.METHOD: this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds.RESULTS: a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and 199 were triggered by other equipment (infusion pumps, dialysis pumps, mechanical ventilators, and intra-aortic balloons; that is an average of 10.6 alarms per hour.CONCLUSION: the results reinforce the importance of properly configuring physiological variables, the volume and parameters of alarms of multi-parametric monitors within the routine of intensive care units. The alarms of equipment intended to protect patients have increased noise within the unit, the level of distraction and interruptions in the workflow, leading to a false sense of security.

  13. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczynski Nancy L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC, but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63% RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34% trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29% reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15% and two (5% trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Conclusions

  14. The use of patient-reported outcomes becomes standard practice in the routine clinical care of lung–heart transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Santana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria J Santana1, David Feeny2, Justin Weinkauf1, Roland Nador1, Ali Kapasi1, Kathleen Jackson1, Marianne Schafenacker1, Dalyce Zuk1, Dale Lien11Lung Transplant Program, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2The Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, OR, USAObjective: To assess the use of patient-reported outcome (PROs measures in the routine clinical care of lung–heart transplant patients. We assessed whether the addition of PROs in routine clinical care affected the duration of the consultation and patient’s and clinician’s views.Method: Consecutive lung–heart transplant patients visiting the outpatient clinic, University of Alberta Hospital, completed the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ and the Health Utilities Index (HUI on touchscreen computers. Information on the patient’s responses was made available to the members of the transplant team prior to the encounter with the patient. The duration of clinical encounters was noted. At the end of every visit, clinicians completed a questionnaire on the usefulness of having PRO information available. After 6 months patients completed a survey of their experiences.Results: The final patient sample consisted of 172 patients with a mean (SD age of 52 (13.3 years old; 47% were female; 68% were organ recipients and 32% candidates. The transplant team, comprising four pulmunologists, two nurses, and one pharmacist had an average of 9 years of practical experience in pulmunology. The mean duration of patient–clinician encounters in minutes was 15.15 (4.52. Ninety-eight percent of patients indicated that they would be happy to complete the CRQ and HUI at every clinic visit. Ninety-one percent of the assessments completed by clinicians showed complete satisfaction with the use of PROs in routine practice. Further, the clinicians developed guidelines for the use of PRO information in clinical practice.Conclusions: The incorporation of PRO

  15. Clinical Preventive Services for Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula W. Yoon, ScD, MPH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionClinical preventive services can detect diseases early, when they are most treatable, but these services may not be provided as recommended. Assessing the provision of services to patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD could help identify disparities and areas for improvement.MethodsWe used data on patient visits (n = 21,261 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2006, and classified patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, or diabetes as being at risk for CVD. We assessed differences in the provision of preventive services offered to patients who were and who were not at risk for CVD. Further, for those at risk, we compared the demographic characteristics of those who had and who had not been offered services.ResultsPatients at risk for CVD received significantly more preventive services compared with those not at risk. For patients at risk for CVD, aspirin therapy was more likely to be recommended to those aged 65 years or older than those aged 45 to 64 years and to men than women. Cholesterol screening was more likely for men and was less likely for patients with Medicare/Medicaid or no insurance than for patients who were insured. Rates of counseling for diet and nutrition, weight reduction, and exercise were low overall, but younger patients received these services more than older patients did.ConclusionPatients at risk for CVD are not all receiving the same level of preventive care, suggesting the need to clarify clinical practice guidelines and provide clinicians with education and support for more effective lifestyle counseling.

  16. Health-related quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis attending two primary care clinics in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Zakaria Zainal F; Bakar Azman A; Hasmoni Hadzri M; Rani Fauzi A; Kadir Samiah A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among patients with osteoarthritis (OA) helps the health care provider to understand the impact of the disease in the patients' own perspective and make health services more patient-centered. The main aim of this study was to measure the quality of life among patients with symptomatic knee OA attending primary care clinic. We also aimed to ascertain the association between socio-demographic and medical status of patient...

  17. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing to improve therapeutic adherence in patients over 65 years old with chronic diseases: A cluster randomized clinical trial in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Moral, Roger; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Pulido Ortega, Laura; Criado Larumbe, Margarita; Roldán Villalobos, Ana; Fernández García, José Ángel; Parras Rejano, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) in improving medication adherence in older patients being treated by polypharmacy. Methods: Cluster randomized clinical trial in 16 primary care centers with 27 health care providers and 154 patients. Thirty-two health care providers were assigned to an experimental (EG) or control group (CG). Interventions: MI training program and review of patient treatments. Providers in the EG carried out MI, whereas...

  18. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients referred to psychiatric unit in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very few studies from Pakistan have examined the profile of patients seen by psychiatrists in general hospital. The aim of this research is to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients referred to the psychiatric unit of a general hospital over a one year period. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, from January 1st to December 31st 2012. All patients being referred to psychiatry were included in the study over one year period. The information was recorded on a structured questionnaire and analysed the data using SPSS-19.0. Results: Out of the 105 patients referred to the psychiatric unit, 74 (72.3%) were females. A total of 69 (68.5%) patients were married. More than half were uneducated and only number 4 (3%) patients had university qualification. Housewives made up 64.4% of the patient population followed by students (11%). Majority 55 (53%) had less than Rs. 5000/ monthly income. About 30% patients were shifted to psychiatry ward while, nearly one tenth were discharged. In 35% cases the psychiatrist was asked to help in the management, while in 50% cases only opinion was sought. Aggressive and threatening behaviour was source of concern in majority of patients for the primary team while 34% exhibited suicidal behaviour. Depression was most frequent diagnosis in 45 43% patients, followed by conversion disorder 19 (17%) and delirium 16 (14%). Conclusion: The rate of psychiatric referrals is dismal with only one third of the patients being transferred to the psychiatric ward. The major psychiatric diagnosis was depression. Patients with aggressive and threatening behaviour were more frequently referred. (author)

  19. Factors influencing insulin acceptance among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a primary care clinic: a qualitative exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Hassan, Hasliza; Tohid, Hizlinda; Mohd Amin, Rahmah; Long Bidin, Mohamed Badrulnizam; Muthupalaniappen, Leelavathi; OMAR, Khairani

    2013-01-01

    Background Many Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patients refuse insulin therapy even when they require this modality of treatment. However, some eventually accept insulin. This study aimed to explore the T2DM patients’ reasons for accepting insulin therapy and their initial barriers to use insulin. Methods This qualitative study interviewed twenty-one T2DM patients at a primary care clinic who had been on insulin for more than a year through three in-depth interviews and three focus group dis...

  20. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Care of Elderly Patients Hospitalized with Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Julio Romero Carbrera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a frequent disorder found in people of advanced age in the hospital setting. It is characterized by an acute disorder of consciousness and alterations in behavior, posing a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the doctors that look after geriatric patients. A clinical practice guideline drawn up by consensus is presented. It highlights the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this complex syndrome. An algorithm that facilitates the management of this condition at Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital of Cienfuegos is included.

  1. Clinical effectiveness of usual care with or without antidepressant medication for primary care patients with minor or mild-major depression: a randomized equivalence trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dyck Richard

    2007-12-01

    UCnoAD were more often compliant and had better clinical outcomes. Conclusion UCandAD was as effective as UCnoAD over the first 6 weeks, but not at 13, 26, and 52 weeks. However, superiority of either treatment could not be demonstrated either. The question whether antidepressants add any clinical effect to usual care remains unresolved. We recommend future studies to look for subgroups of patients who may benefit from antidepressants. Trial registration Dutch Trial Registry ISRCN03007807.

  2. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaptein AA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ad A Kaptein, Maarten J Fischer, Margreet Scharloo Medical Psychology Section, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC, Leiden, the Netherlands Abstract: In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients’ functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, self-management, psychology, quality of life, biopsychosocial model, medical humanities

  3. Clinical profile of acute hemorrhagic stroke patients: a study in tertiary care hospital in Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    Omkar P. Baidya; Sunita Tiwari; Kauser Usman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute hemorrhagic stroke, a subtype of acute stroke is one of the leading cause of death and major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The incidence of acute hemorrhagic stroke is increasing with gradual increase in obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and various cardiac problems. This study had been conducted with an objective to study the risk factors and clinical presentation of acute hemorrhagic stroke patients in north-Indian population...

  4. Venous thromboembolism among HIV-positive patients and anticoagulation clinic outcomes integrated within the HIV primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Riddhi A; McGwin, Gerald; Westfall, Andrew O; Powell, Deon W; Burkholder, Greer A; Raper, James L; Willig, James H

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore factors associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE) among a cohort of HIV-infected patients and to describe early outcomes of warfarin anticoagulation therapy treated in a pharmacist-based anticoagulation clinic (ACC). A nested case-control study was conducted using the University of Alabama at Birmingham 1917 HIV Clinic Cohort. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate factors associated with VTE. Among HIV-infected VTE cases, ACC-managed patients were compared to primary care provider (PCP)-managed patients to determine Time within Therapeutic INR Range (TTR). CD4 managed patients compared to 30.5% of PCP-managed patients (p = 0.174). Overall, prior surgical procedures and low CD4 count were associated with an increased risk of VTE among HIV-infected patients. Despite small sample size, patients managed in ACC tend to achieve greater proportion of TTR compared to those managed by PCPs, suggesting that this model of therapy may provide additional benefits to HIV-infected patients. PMID:25414089

  5. CLINICAL PROFILE OF HEMOPHILIA PATIENTS: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Sunder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to determine clinical profile of haemophilia patients in North India. In this cross-sectional study, we obtained family history and clinical profile of 54 diagnosed severe haemophilia patients attending Haemophilia Treatment Centre, Children Hospital LLR Hospital, Kanpur, India, for factor replacement therapy. We also obtained blood samples to investigate for hepatitis B, HIV. In study we observed that majority of the patients having their first presentation in their infancy (70.3% and median age of first presentation was 11 months of age. Though haemophilia is a genetic disorder, family history was negative in majority of patients; (70.3% subcutaneous tissue was most frequent site for initial bleeds, but as age advances joints become frequently involved and hemarthrosis was commonest complication affecting 79.6% patients. Most common involved joint was knee joint (53.7%. This hemarthrosis is the major cause of morbidity affecting quality of life of patients. Due to cost of treatment, many times we have to transfuse blood and blood products which may lead to Transfusion Transmitted Infection (TTI. In our study prevalence of TTI was 1.85% and 3.70% for HIV and Hep. B respectively. We also observed that there was time lag of >1 month in 16.5% cases between onset of symptom and definitive diagnosis, which shows lack of awareness among doctors in community. In view of this high morbidity and TTIs, we emphasize the free availability of factor concentrates and prophylactic treatment should be followed instead of palliative treatment.

  6. Clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre in Kashmir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To study the clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The study was conducted on a group of 1141 patients suspected of having HIV/AIDS on clinical grounds. Screening was done using different Elisa's as advised by NACO and those confirmed as HIV positive were studied for their clinical spectrum and different demographic parameters. Results: Out of 1141 patients tested, 26 proved to have HIV 1 infection with no case of HIV 2 detected. Mean age of presentation was 40.04 +- 7 years, main age group affected 31-40 years and a male: female ratio of 4.2:1 was observed. More than 42% were non Kashmiris with armed forces outnumbering all other occupational classes. Heterosexual transmission was the commonest with married out numbering unmarried. Fever, asthenia and weight loss were the predominant symptoms and pulmonary tuberculosis and oropharyngeal candidiasis commonest opportunistic infections. Conclusion: The clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients in Kashmir is largely similar to the rest of India. Kashmir no longer stands immune to the menace of HIV/AIDS. With increasing globalization, frequent travel and change in social values the state is likely to witness an alarming rise in new cases unless a multi pronged approach is undertaken to control the spread. (author)

  7. Clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection at tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Chandrashekhar Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: AIDS has become chronic illness which is well treated with antiretroviral therapy and management of opportunistic infections (OIs. Aims and Objectives: The study clinical profile and outcome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV seropositive patients. Materials and Methods: This was retrospective observational study carried out over a period of 1 year (January 2011–December 2011. All HIV patients admitted in medicine ward, and ICU were enrolled. Statistical analysis was performed using SSPE statistical software trial version 11. The P< 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Of total 111 patients with a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, 75 (67.56% were male and 36 (32.43% were female patients. A total 52 (46.84% patients presented with respiratory manifestations, of them 23 (44.23% had pulmonary tuberculosis (TB, 6 (11.53% had tubercular effusion, and 3 (5.76% had Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Respiratory manifestations including pulmonary TB were the most common presentation (P< 0.001. Total 27 (24.32% patients were presented with the neurological manifestation of them 8 (29.62% had a cerebro-vascular accident, 5 (18.51% had cryptococcal meningitis, 4 (14.81% had tubercular meningitis, and 1 (3.70% had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Total 12 (38.70% had acute gastroenteritis 6 (19.35% had oral candidiasis, 8 (25% had general tonic clonic seizure and 7 (21.87% had pyrexia of unknown origin, 6 (18.75% had septicemia, 6 (18.75% had acute renal failure, and 6 (94.11% had anemia. A total 11 (9.90% patients succumbed. Conclusions: Overall respiratory manifestations were the common presentation in a present cohort of HIV seropositive patients and TB was the most common OI and the cerebrovascular accident was the most common neurological manifestation.

  8. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN NORTH EAST INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruttam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a severe illness with high mortality in the young adult population in resource limited settings. In north-east part of India, clinicians still continue to face the challenges of identifying and treating the dilated cardiomyopathy to improve quality of life due to various reasons. In India, there have been few investigations focusing on the dilated cardiomyopathy patients. But from this part of the country, there is paucity of data. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the clinical characteristics of dilated cardiomyopathy patients who presented to our hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective observational study was carried out in the Department of General Medicine, Jorhat Medical College and Hospital, Jorhat, Assam, from January 2013 to December 2013. Total 31 consecutive patients fulfilling the criteria of dilated cardiomyopathy were studied. Dilated Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed if enlarged left ventricle with decreased systolic function as measured by left ventricular ejection fraction characterized dilated cardiomyopathy. Patients were excluded from the study if they have one or more of the following; systemic hypertension (>160/100 mm Hg, evidence of coronary artery diseases, pericardial diseases, congenital heart disease, valvular heart diseases, cor pulmonale and rapid, sustained supraventricular tachycardia. Detailed inform consent from the patients and ethical permission from the concerned authorities were taken. RESULTS: Thirty one patients were diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy during the study period who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study. Twenty-nine (92% of 31 patients presented with clinical features of congestive heart failure as their initial presentation and majority presented with dyspnea (70.97%, followed by palpitation (64.52%. The mean cardio thoracic ratio was (0.61. Majority of the patients (70.97% were in sinus rhythm and

  9. Clinical outcomes and health care costs combining metformin with sitagliptin or sulphonylureas or thiazolidinediones in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degli Esposti L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Luca Degli Esposti, Stefania Saragoni, Stefano Buda, Ezio Degli Esposti Health, Economics and Outcome Research, Clicon Srl, Ravenna, ItalyObjectives: To compare clinical outcomes and health care costs across three cohorts of uncontrolled diabetic patients who initiated treatment with one of the following: sulphonylureas (SU, thiazolidinediones (TZD or sitagliptin (SITA.Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective study based on a linkage between administrative and laboratory databases maintained by three Italian local health units. The index period ranged from July 2008–June 2010. Patients were treatment-naïve to either SU, TZD, or SITA, but they were already treated with other oral hypoglycemic agents. Demographics and clinical characteristics were assessed at baseline. Adherence was measured by the medication possession ratio and adherent was defined a patient with a medication possession ratio of 80% or greater. We used a Poisson regression model to estimate the risk ratios for disease-related hospitalizations that occurred during the 18-month follow-up period. The total annual costs included all the pharmacological treatments and the direct costs due to hospitalizations and outpatient services.Results: We identified 928 patients treated with SU, 330 patients treated with TZD, and 83 patients treated with SITA. SITA patients were significantly younger and with fewer previous hospital discharges. The baseline mean glycated hemoglobin level was 8.1% for SU, 8.0% for TZD, and 8.3% for SITA patients. SITA-naïve patients resulted more adherent than the SU- and TZD-naïve patients (79.5% versus 53.2% and 62.8%, respectively; P<0.001. The SU and TZD group showed a significant increased risk of disease-related hospitalizations compared with the SITA group (the unadjusted rate was 10.42 and 7.16 per 100 person-years versus 1.64 per 100 person-years, P=0.003; compared with SU, the adjusted incidence rate ratio for SITA was 0.21, P=0.030. The

  10. Clinical and bacteriological profile of UTI patients attending a North Indian tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Quaiser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common cause of morbidity in patients attending our hospital. Recently UTI has become more complicated and difficult to treat because of appearance of pathogens with increasing resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. Objectives: The main aim of the study was to determine the bacteriological profile and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of UTI patients attending our hospital. Materials and Methods: 1843 patients complaining of fever with or without urinary symptoms attending medicine and nephrology clinics of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College Hospital, Aligarh from June 2012 to July 2014 were analysed. Clean catch mid-stream urine specimens collected from each subject were subjected to urine culture and sensitivity tests. Patients with age 15 to 85 years were included. Results: Significant bacteriuria was detected in 33.4% patients. Diabetes, obstructive uropathy, and previous instrumentation were the major risk factors identified. The most common pathogens isolated were Escherichia coli (52.4%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.3% and Citrobacter spp. (9.1%. Most susceptible antibiotic was Amikacin, Cefoperazone-sulbactum, Piperacillin-tazobactum and Nitrofurantoin for most of the isolates. E. coli which was the main isolate was found to be most susceptible to Amikacin (78.3%, Cefoperazone-sulbactum (72.8%, Piperacillin-tazobactum (70.5%, Gentamicin (69.3%, Nitrofurantoin (67.3%, Cefoperazone (64.1% and Ceftriaxone (61.6%. Conclusion: This study highlights the common pathogens causing UTI in our area and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns which could help clinicians in starting rational empirical antibiotic therapy for such patients while awaiting urine culture reports. This would significantly decrease the incidence of drug resistance and be more cost effective to the patients.

  11. Determinants of misconceptions about diabetes among Saudi diabetic patients attending diabetes clinic at a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alsunni, Ahmed A.; Waleed I Albaker; Ahmed Badar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the determinants of misconceptions about diabetes in patients registered with a diabetes clinic at a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional survey was carried out at a diabetes clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2012. A total of 200 diabetic patients were interviewed using a questionnaire comprising 36 popular misconceptions. The total misconception score was calculate...

  12. Clinical Care for the Therapy of Patients with Diabetes%糖尿病治疗临床护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高占清

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical care of patients with diabetes so as to provide a more effective method of improving the disease conditions and getting good prognosis for the patients with diabetes. Methods 39 patients with diabetes admitted in Department of Blood Endocrinology of our hospital from July, 2013 to August, 2013 were selected, of them, there were 21 males, 18 females, with the average of 47 years old. All the patients were given targeted comprehensive care strategies, such as drug care, diet care, controlling blood sugar and psychological care and so on. Results In this study, the treatment time of 37 cases of patients was 1-2 weeks, and 2 cases reached 3 weeks. After treatment, the blood glucose of all the patients has been improved effectively, blood glucose levels decreased from (12.7 ± 4.5)mmol/L before treatment to (6.7 ± 1.2)mmol/L after treatment, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). And the satisfaction rate of patients reached 100%. Conclusion Comprehensive clinical care for patients with diabetes not only improves the blood glucose level of the patients, but also makes the patients comfortable and satisfied physically and psychologically, and provides a scientific basis for the development of diabetes care.%目的:对糖尿病患者的临床护理进行探讨研究,为糖尿病患者的病情改善和良好预后提供更为有效的手段。方法选择2013年7月-2013年8月我院血液内分泌科收治的39例糖尿病患者。其中男21例,女18例,平均47岁。进行有针对性的综合护理策略,包括药物护理、饮食护理、控制血糖、心理护理等方面。结果该研究中,37例治疗时间为1~2周,2例达到了3周,全部糖尿病患者治疗后,血糖都得到了有效的改善。血糖水平从治疗前的(12.7±4.5)mmol/L降到治疗后的(6.7±1.2)mmol/L,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。病人满意率为100%。结论通过对糖尿病患者的综合临床护理

  13. Intensive care management of patients with acute intermittent porphyria: Clinical report of four cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Madhur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP, the most common and the most severe form of acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant condition. It results from lower-than-normal levels (less than 50% of porphobilinogen (PBG deaminase. Patients may present commonly with gastrointestinal complaints and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Diagnosis may be confirmed with the presence of intermediary metabolites of haem synthesis, amino levulinic acid (ALA and PBG in urine or with specific enzyme assays. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom (90%. Peripheral polyneuropathy, primarily motor with flaccid paresis of proximal musculature, with or without autonomic involvement, is characteristic. Respiratory failure necessitates ventilator and intensive care support. Avoidance of precipitating factors and the use of haem preparations and intravenous dextrose form the basis of management. Gabapentin and propofol, rather than the conventional antiepileptics appear to be the appropriate choice for seizure control. Here, we present intensive care management of four cases of AIP with varying clinical presentation.

  14. Care Management: Adherence to Therapies Among Patients at Bu-Alicina Clinic, Qazvin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Asefzadeh

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-adherence to treatment is a problem of increasing concern for all stakeholders. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of non-adherence among the clients consulting internists or cardiologists at Bu-Alicina Clinic in Qazvin. Methods: A total number of 400 clients came to Bu-Alicina Clinic (center for internal medicine and cardiology were randomly interviewed through a questionnaire during a two month period in 2003. Self-administered methods were used if the clients applied. The data were interpreted using statistical methods. Results: The clients were between 14 and 78 years old (33.7+8.5 and 57.5% of them were women and 42.5% were men. Of total number, 30.7% were consulting for continuation of their therapies and of these clients, 41.5% had pooradherence to their current therapies. The more educated clients were 1.6 times (OR=1.62; 95% CI=0.71, 3.74 likely to be more adherent to the therapies.There was no significant difference between the internal diseases patients and cardiology patients in this regard (41.7%vs 40%. Of the total number of 400 clients, 79.5% had history of consulting to medical clinics during the last three months and 37.4% of them had non-adherence to their past therapies. The more frequent factors were: forgetfulness (13.3%, not to be able to afford to pay for treatment costs (10.3%, disbelieve to the doctor and consulting another ones (8.4%, long distance (8.4%, feeling that it is not important to take medications (7.4%, side effects (7.4%, disbelieve to the diagnosis (7.1%, religious considerations (6.5%, and misunderstanding or lack of information about the prescription (5.8%. No significant difference was found between men and women on this aspect. Conclusion: Patients need advice, supported information from professionals about their health and therapies. Certain studies must be done to determine the pitfalls and effective interventions address that barriers can be developed. Keywords

  15. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  16. A descriptive analysis of patients presenting to psychosexual clinic at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosexual problems are very common presentation, be it with psychiatric or physical illness but there are very few studies available on psychosexual disorders especially in the Indian context. Indian society is deeply ingrained in customs and several misconceptions, myths, prejudices, and social taboos are attached to sex which makes it further very difficult to tackle. Objectives: The aim of this current study was to descriptively analyze the nature of sexual disorders in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: The current retrospective chart review included 698 consecutive subjects seeking treatment for their psychosexual problems at the Sexual Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, Dr. Ram Manohar Hospital, New Delhi (between 2006 and 2010. Results: This study observed erectile dysfunction (ED (29.5%, Premature ejaculation (PME (24.6%, Dhat syndrome (DS (18.1%, and ED with PME (17.5% as the common sexual dysfunctions leading to treatment seeking. DS was the major complaint among younger and unmarried individuals. We observed more married individuals seeking treatment for sexual disorders. Conclusions: These findings provide important information on a relatively under-researched area.

  17. The secret of the care of the patient is in knowing and applying the evidence about effective clinical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, R M; Sherman, H B

    2015-11-01

    American physicians and dentists conduct approximately 140 000-160 000 patient interviews in a practice lifetime, making the interview the most frequently performed medical procedure. Over the past 75 years, a steadily growing stream of scientific research has confirmed the fact that patient-clinician communication affects the course, direction, and both biomedical and functional outcomes of care. The field of clinical communication research has matured from anecdotes and aphorisms about 'bedside manner' to sophisticated randomized control trials and evidence-based outcomes that have been translated into reliable practice guidelines. Several key skills or habits of practice have been identified and studied in terms of their efficacy and effectiveness. These include the importance of agenda-setting, eliciting patients' perspectives about the nature of their ailments, communicating caring and concern, and testing for patient comprehension and agreement with proposed treatments. In addition to being effective, interpersonal communication can be deeply satisfying as well as offering a lower probability of law suits in the event of an adverse outcome. PMID:24725164

  18. Clinical pragmatism and the care of brain damaged patients: toward a palliative neuroethics for disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J

    2005-01-01

    Unraveling the mysteries of consciousness, lost and regained, and perhaps even intervening so as to prompt recovery are advances for which neither the clinical nor the lay community are prepared. These advances will shake existing expectations about severe brain damage and will find an unprepared clinical context, perhaps even one inhospitable to what should clearly be viewed as important advances. This could be the outcome of this line of inquiry, if this exceptionally imaginative research can continue at all. This work faces a restrictive research environment that has the potential to imperil it. Added to the complexity of the scientific challenges that must be overcome is the societal context in which these investigations must occur. Research on human consciousness goes to the heart of our humanity and asks us to grapple with fundamental questions about the self. Added to this is the regulatory complexity of research on subjects who may be unable to provide their own consent because of impaired decision-making capacity, itself a function of altered or impaired consciousness. These factors can lead to a restrictive view of research that can favor risk aversion over discovery. In this paper, I attempt to explain systematically some of these challenges. I suggest that some of the resistance might be tempered if we view the needs of patients with severe brain injury through the prism of palliative care and adopt that field's ethos and methods when caring for and conducting research on individuals with severe brain damage and disorders of consciousness. To make this argument I draw upon the American pragmatic tradition and utilize clinical pragmatism, a method of moral problem-solving that my colleagues and I have developed to address ethical challenges in clinical care and research. PMID:16186050

  19. The Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Quality of Life in Patients with Migraine: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Zarandi, Fatemeh; Raiesifar, Afsaneh; Ebadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Many aspects of the lives of migraineurs are commonly affected by the condition, including occupational affairs, social and family life, responsibilities and ultimately the quality of life. This study was designed to determine the effect of orem's self-care nursing model on quality of life in patients with a migraine. This study was carried out in Tehran, Iran. According to the pre-post design of the randomized clinical trial, 88 patients were selected. After obtaining approval from the ethics committee of the Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University's Research Deputy; Patients who signed the informed consent aged 20-55 years and without any more disease or disability affecting the quality of life were selected and randomly assigned to a group. Data collection tools were a demographic questionnaire, general health survey short form (SF36), and Orem cognition form and self-care checklist. Self-care model were held as four 30-45 minutes training sessions based on self-care deficit needs for the experimental group. The quality of life scores was measured in two stages, before and three months after intervention then were compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with statistical software SPSS and use of descriptive analysis tests, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney u and Wilcoxon. The final analysis was performed on 43 experimental and 40 controls. No significant difference was detected in the two groups in terms of demographic variables (P>0.05). All dimensions of quality of life including physical functioning, physical role limitation, body pain, general health, vitality, social functioning and emotional role limitation and mental health in the experimental group showed a significant increase after intervention compared to the control group (Pnursing model improves function and overall quality of life and reduces the high cost of a migraine and migraine-related disability to individuals and society. PMID:27107519

  20. Clinical and microbiological outcome in septic patients with extremely low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at initiation of critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, G; Vallecoccia, M S; Schiattarella, A; Di Gravio, V; Cutuli, S L; Bello, G; Montini, L; Pennisi, M A; Spanu, T; Zuppi, C; Quraishi, S A; Antonelli, M

    2016-05-01

    A relationship between vitamin D status and mortality in patients in intensive care units (ICU) has been documented. The present study aims to describe the clinical profile and sepsis-related outcome of critically ill septic patients with extremely low (7 ng/mL (80.7% versus 58%, p 0.02; 35.3% versus 68%; p 0.03, respectively). Post hoc analysis showed that, in the extremely low vitamin D group, the 52 patients with pneumonia showed a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (9 days (3.75-12.5 days) versus 4 days (2-9 days), p 0.04) and the 66 with septic shock needed vasopressor support for a longer period of time (7 days (4-10 days) versus 4 days (2-7.25 days), p 0.02). Our results suggest that in critical septic patients extremely low vitamin D levels on admission may be a major determinant of clinical outcome. Benefits of vitamin D replacement therapy in this population should be elucidated. PMID:26721785

  1. [Home hospice care at a clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, F; Osako, M; Shimoaraiso, Y; Sakamoto, T; Miyashita, T; Yamanouchi, H; Kadokura, K; Yoshida, K; Dozono, F; Mamitsuka, K; Dozono, H

    1999-12-01

    For the people who want to stay at home until their last day, the primary doctor and clinic where they were diagnosed will be the most reliable supports. We have been operating a 19 bed clinic since 1996. In these three years, we have established what we call a "combination palliative care system." A team composed of two doctors, 13 nurses, 3 care aids, a social worker, and a counselor provides home care services as well as outpatient and inpatient care. From April, 1998 to March, 1999, 59 patients died of cancer. Among them, 25 patients died at home. Their primary cancers were lung (7), colon (3), pancreatic (2), breast (2), ovarian (2), brain (1), stomach (1), hepatoma (1), neck (1) and others. First of all, sufficient consultation with patients and family makes this care successful. Through this, the patient can choose his style of care. The whole staff is involved in this care in turn, so that all of us become acquainted with each patient. Home care includes: 1) medical and nursing service available 24 hours a day, 2) activation of social resources for the support of the patient user, 3) constructive cooperation with relevant institutions, 4) relieving the patient's physical and mental suffering, 5) aroma therapy, oil massage, hair cuts and music therapy, and 6) support by volunteers. In this way, as a neighborhood clinic, the combination palliative care system is valuable. PMID:10630230

  2. Rethinking attitudes to student clinical supervision and patient care: a change management success story

    OpenAIRE

    O’Keefe, Maree; Wade, Victoria; McAllister, Sue; Stupans, Ieva; Miller, Jennifer; Burgess, Teresa; LeCouteur, Amanda; Starr, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this project was to explore the process of change in a busy community dental clinic following a team development intervention designed to improve the management of student supervision during clinical placements. Methods An action research model was used. Seven members of a community dental clinic team (three dentists, two dental therapists, one dental assistant and the clinic manager), together with the university clinical placement supervisor participated in the team de...

  3. Patient education on back care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Van Eck

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Clinical PerspectiveObjective: To provide back care education for patients with low back pain. Background:  Understanding the internal and external forces the body issubjected to, as well as the spine’s response to these forces, can better equipphysiotherapists in educating patients with low back pain. Methods and Measures: The focus of the clinical perspective is to providephysiotherapists with clinically sound reasoning when educating patients. Results: Providing a patient handout, educating them in how to incorporate back care knowledge into their dailyactivities.Conclusion: Physiotherapists can play a significant role in empowering patients through education to take responsi-bility for their disability.

  4. CLINICAL PRESENTATION, RADIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND COURSE OF THE DISEASE IN SWINE FLU POSITIVE PATIENTS ADMITTED IN THE RESPIRATORY INTENSIVE CARE UNIT OF A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Since the 2009 pandemic of H1N1 or Swine Flu influenza , there have been respiratory emergencies every year throughout India , but in the early part of this year that is between January and April 2015 an explosion of cases was seen throughout the country , and so also in our state , Andhra Pradesh. The study of clinical presentation , radiological features and course of the disease helps in early suspicion , isolation , detection and institution of treatment in swine flu positive patients so that further spread of the disease can be co ntrolled and the patients saved . MATERIAL AND METHODS : This is a cross - sectional study conducted at the Department of Pulmonary Medicine , S.V.R.R. Govt. General Hospital , Tirupathi , between January 2015 and April 2015. Study sample was the total number of swine flu suspects who were admitted in the Respiratory Intensive Care Unit and swine flu wards of the Department of Pulmonary Medicine. SUMMARY : Out of 32 suspects admitted , 13 tested positive for swine flu. 8 of the 13 were females (61% and 5 were males (39%. Cold , cough and breathlessness were present in all the patients (100%. Sore throat was present in only 4 patients (30%. 11 out of the 13 patients were in respiratory failure (85%. 9 out of the 13 had comorbidities like diabetes , bronchial asthma and chronic kidney disease (70%. Chest X - ray and CT chest showed ARDS like pic ture and pneumonia in 11 out of the 13 patients (85%.

  5. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care. PMID:7787486

  6. 'To take care of the patients': Qualitative analysis of Veterans Health Administration personnel experiences with a clinical informatics system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonner Laura M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Veterans Health Administration (VA has invested significant resources in designing and implementing a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR that supports clinical priorities. EHRs in general have been difficult to implement, with unclear cost-effectiveness. We describe VA clinical personnel interactions with and evaluations of the EHR. Methods As part of an evaluation of a quality improvement initiative, we interviewed 72 VA clinicians and managers using a semi-structured interview format. We conducted a qualitative analysis of interview transcripts, examining themes relating to participants' interactions with and evaluations of the VA EHR. Results Participants described their perceptions of the positive and negative effects of the EHR on their clinical workflow. Although they appreciated the speed and ease of documentation that the EHR afforded, they were concerned about the time cost of using the technology and the technology's potential for detracting from interpersonal interactions. Conclusions VA personnel value EHRs' contributions to supporting communication, education, and documentation. However, participants are concerned about EHRs' potential interference with other important aspects of healthcare, such as time for clinical care and interpersonal communication with patients and colleagues. We propose that initial implementation of an EHR is one step in an iterative process of ongoing quality improvement.

  7. Randomized clinical trial of bedside ultrasound among patients with abdominal pain in the emergency department: impact on patient satisfaction and health care consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Laila

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research shows that surgeon-performed ultrasound for patients presenting with abdominal pain in the emergency department leads both to higher diagnostic accuracy and to other benefits. We have evaluated the level of patient satisfaction, health condition and further health care consumption after discharge from the emergency department. Methods A total of 800 patients who attended the emergency department for abdominal pain were randomized to surgeon-performed ultrasound or not as a complement to standard examination. All patients were interviewed by telephone six weeks after the visit to the emergency department using a structured questionnaire including information about health condition, satisfaction and medical examinations. A regional health register was used to check health care consumption over two years and mortality was checked for in the personal data register. Results We found a higher self-rated patient satisfaction in the ultrasound group when leaving the emergency department. After six weeks the figures were equal. There were fewer patients in the ultrasound group with completed or planned complementary examinations after six weeks (31.1% compared with the control group (41.4%, p = 0.004. There was no difference found in the two-year health care consumption or mortality between the groups. Conclusion For patients with acute abdominal pain, bedside ultrasound examination is related to higher satisfaction and decreased short-term health care consumption. No major effects were revealed when evaluating effects on a long-term basis, including mortality. The previously proven benefit together with the lack of adverse effects from the method makes ultrasound well worth considering for implementation in emergency departments. Trial registration The study has been registered in ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00550511.

  8. Clinical factors associated with a Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody positive test in Intensive Care Unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Mazuelos Estrella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor outcomes of invasive candidiasis (IC are associated with the difficulty in establishing the microbiological diagnosis at an early stage. New scores and laboratory tests have been developed in order to make an early therapeutic intervention in an attempt to reduce the high mortality associated with invasive fungal infections. Candida albicans IFA IgG has been recently commercialized for germ tube antibody detection (CAGTA. This test provides a rapid and simple diagnosis of IC (84.4% sensitivity and 94.7% specificity. The aim of this study is to identify the patients who could be benefited by the use of CAGTA test in critical care setting. Methods A prospective, cohort, observational multicentre study was carried out in six medical/surgical Intensive care units (ICU of tertiary-care Spanish hospitals. Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody test was performed twice a week if predetermined risk factors were present, and serologically demonstrated candidiasis was considered if the testing serum dilution was ≥ 1:160 in at least one sample and no other microbiological evidence of invasive candidiasis was found. Results Fifty-three critically ill non-neutropenic patients (37.7% post surgery were included. Twenty-two patients (41.5% had CAGTA-positive results, none of them with positive blood culture for Candida. Neither corrected colonization index nor antifungal treatment had influence on CAGTA results. This finding could corroborate that the CAGTA may be an important biomarker to distinguish between colonization and infection in these patients. The presence of acute renal failure at the beginning of the study was more frequent in CAGTA-negative patients. Previous surgery was statistically more frequent in CAGTA-positive patients. Conclusions This study identified previous surgery as the principal clinical factor associated with CAGTA-positive results and emphasises the utility of this promising technique, which was not

  9. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and health outcomes: protocol for a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Dewan Md Emdadul; Kumari, Varuni; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Romero, Lorena; Evans, Sue M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many developed countries have regional and national clinical registries aimed at improving health outcomes of patients diagnosed with particular diseases or cared for in particular healthcare settings. Clinical quality registries (CQRs) are clinical registries established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care and providing feedback to improve health outcomes. The aim of this systematic review is to understand the impact of CQRs on (1) mortality/survival; (2) measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of healthcare; (3) healthcare utilisation and (4) costs. Methods and analysis The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard strategy using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data abstraction tools will be followed. A search of the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and CINAHL will be undertaken, in addition to Google Scholar and grey literature, to identify studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2014. Case–control, cohort, randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials which describe the registry as an intervention will be eligible for inclusion. Narrative synthesis of study findings will be conducted, guided by a conceptual framework developed to analyse the outcome measure of the registry using defined criteria. If sufficient studies are identified with a similar outcome of interest and measure using the same comparator and time of interval, results will be pooled for random-effects meta-analysis. Test for heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis will be conducted. To identify reporting bias, forest plots and funnel plots will be created and, if required, Egger's test will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. Review results will be published as a part of thesis, peer-reviewed journal and conferences. Trial registration number CRD

  10. Ethnocultural and Sex Characteristics of Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Pain Clinic in Toronto, Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Mailis-Gagnon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ethnocultural factors and sex may greatly affect pain perception and expression. Emerging literature is also documenting racial and ethnic differences in pain access and care.

  11. CHANGING CLINICAL SPECTRUM AND CORRELATION BETWEEN PLATELET COUNT AND BLEEDING TENDENCIES IN DENGUE PATIENTS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Dengue infection is recognized worldwide as the most important arthropod vector borne disease in the last four decades and a major public hea lth problem, assuming epidemic proportion in urban areas of tropical countries in South east Asia. It is caused by one of the four dengue virus serotypes DEN - 1, DEN - 2, DEN - 3 and DEN - 4. Aedes aegypti is the main mosquito vector. Dengue infection can be asym ptomatic or can cause two clinical entities: dengue fever (DF and dengue haemorrhagic fever/ dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS. Dengue is one disease entity with different clinical presentations and often with unpredictable clinical evolution and outcome. T hrombocytopenia may be frequently observed in DF, but is a constant feature and one of the diagnostic criteria of DHF/DSS. There is a need to identify various clinical presentations, complications and treatment outcome of Dengue patients. Hence, this study was undertaken to ascertain all the above mentioned clinical parameters in proven dengue patients who were admitted to this tertiary care hospital, with a special emphasis on correlation between platelet count and bleeding manifestations. MATERIALS AND ME THODS: This cross sectional study was conducted for a period of 2 years from October 2010 to September 2012. 100 hospitalized and confirmed dengue cases were included and they were classified as having dengue fever (DF, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF/ den gue shock syndrome (DSS as per WHO criteria. A detailed clinical evaluation with appropriate laboratory investigations were done. All the patients were treated and followed up with clinical assessment and serial platelet counts. Data was analyzed with sui table software and appropriate statistical methods. RESULTS: There were 57 males and 43 females, with majority in the age group 21 to 40 years. Fever was the most common symptom present in all the patients (100%, followed by vomiting (24%, myalgia (23%, headache (21

  12. Profile and correlates of functional status in elderly patients presenting at a primary care clinic in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A. Ajayi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessing the functional status of elderly patients is central in measuring their health outcome. Little is known about the functional status of elderly patients attending our primary care clinic in Nigeria.Objective: To assess the correlates of functional status in elderly patients presenting at the General Outpatient Clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.Method: A cross-sectional study of 360 randomly selected patients aged 60 years and above was undertaken to assess their functional status by scoring their basic activities of daily living (BADL using the Modified Bathel Index. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to obtain the socio-demographic data, anthropometric measurements and morbidities of each patient.Results: The mean age was 69.1 ± 6.6 years with a female-to-male ratio of 1.9: 1. The prevalence of overall functional disability (defined as when assistance was sought in the performance of at least one of the components of BADL was 88.3%. The highest prevalence of functionaldisability was experienced in the area of personal hygiene and grooming (95.3% and transferring from bed to chair (95.3%. Overall functional disability significantly increasedwith increasing age (χ2 for trend=14.004, p < 0.0001, living in a polygamous family unit (p = 0.025, and lack of formal education (p = 0.020.Conclusion: Functional disability was high amongst the elderly in this setting. Age, education, and living in a polygamous type of family unit had significant influence on the functional status. High premium should, therefore, be placed on considering these factors in reducing functional disability in the elderly.

  13. Building a clinical leadership community to drive improvement: a multi-case educational study to inform 21st century clinical commissioning, professional capability and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Marion; Verner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The new NHS requires transformational leadership; people with the knowledge and motivation to make effective change combined with an understanding of the system they work in. The aim of the Practice Leaders' Programme (PLP) is to generate the conditions needed to focus the energy and collaborative creativity required for innovation to enhance leadership skills across the health economy improving patient care. The PLP engaged 60 local leaders from central England in a new approach enabling them to influence others. It has informed educational policy and practice and helped change professional behaviours. Each participant implemented improvements in care and participated in six action learning sets (ALS) and up to six coaching sessions. Evidence of progress, learning and impact was identified in project reports, reflective diaries and evaluations. The ALS brought together key individuals from clinical and management disciplines across a diverse organisation to redesign a system by developing a shared vision for improving the quality of patient care. The links forged, the projects initiated, and the skills cultivated through the PLP produced ongoing benefits and outcomes beyond the course itself. Coaching sessions helped participants focus their efforts to achieve maximum impact and to become resilient in managing service change effectively. The programme has evolved over four years, building on recommendations from external evaluation which identified statistically significant increases in leadership competences. Further enhancement of this programme secured an International Health Improvement Award. Three key findings of positive impact have emerged; personal growth, service improvement, and legacy and sustainability. PMID:23356759

  14. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  15. Caring for patients with chronic kidney disease: a joint opinion of the ambulatory care and the nephrology practice and research networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Alan J; Saseen, Joseph J; Dehart, Renee M; Dumo, Peter; Grabe, Darren W; Gilmartin, Cheryl; Hachey, David M; Hudson, Joanna Q; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Joy, Melanie S

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Appropriate care for patients with CKD must occur in the earliest stages, preferably before CKD progresses to more severe stages. Therefore, recognition and treatment of CKD and its associated complications must occur in primary care settings. Patients with CKD often have comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, creating specific considerations when treating these diseases. Also, these patients have CKD-related conditions, including anemia and renal osteodystrophy, that are not traditionally evaluated and monitored by the primary care practitioner. Collectively, many opportunities exist for pharmacists who practice in the primary care setting to improve the care of patients with CKD. PMID:15767229

  16. Use of antibiotics in ambulatory care patients and at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan-Mikić Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Optimal pharmacotherapy includes utilization of the right drug at the right time, right duration of therapy and adequate dosage. This study analyzed utilization of antimicrobial drugs at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad and in outpatients of the Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman. Material and methods Utilization of anti-infective agents was examined according to Anatomic-Therapeutic-Chemical Classification (group J. Drug utilization data were presented in Defined Daily Doses at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad in Defined Daily Doses per 100 bed-days, and in the Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman in Defined Daily Doses/1000 inhabitants per day. Results At the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad penicillins susceptible to beta-lactamase were established as most frequently used (39.33% namely: benzylpenicillin (32.18%, quinolone antibacterial agents ciprofloxacin (12.44% and cephalosporins, cephalexin (8.25%. In the Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman most frequently used were extended-spectrum penicillins (24.20% namely tetracyclines, doxycycline (18.98%, amoxicillin (18.27%, macrolides roxithromycin (17.56%. At the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Center Novi Sad the decision on using antibiotics and establishing whether it was bacterial or virus infection in 92.13% cases was made on the basis of following analyses: throat and nasal swabs, urine culture, virus complement-binding reaction. In Outpatient General Service of the Health Center Novi Sad - Liman it was done only in 18.46%. Conclusion Although treatment performed based on clinical picture and experience usually proves to be correct, antibiotic prescription policy should include antibiograms to provide optimal treatment and decrease the degree of resistance. Thus medicine would be

  17. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    OpenAIRE

    DeJesus, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferenc...

  18. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manag...

  19. Does spiritual care program affect levels of depression in patients with Leukemia? A randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Musarezaie, Amir; Moeini, Mahin; Taleghani, Fariba; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although 25-33% of patients with non-hematological malignancies suffer from depression disorder, some studies have reported the rate among patients with leukemia as high as 50%. Furthermore, based on studies chronic disease such as leukemia increases the patients’ spiritual needs and may accelerate the patient problems. Therefore, spirituality has a significant role in adapting to leukemia and coping with its consequent mental disorders such as depression. Owing to the spiritualit...

  20. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among asthmatic patients in primary care clinics in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Alshagga Mustafa; Al-Dubai Sami; Muhamad Faiq Siti; Yusuf Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the knowledge about asthma and the prevalence, disclosure and evaluation of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among asthmatic patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 95 patients diagnosed with asthma in a primary healthcare centre in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Ninety-five patients with a mean age of 47.06 years (±12.8) participated, the majority were fem...

  1. Integrated care for diabetes: clinical, psychosocial, and economic evaluation. Diabetes Integrated Care Evaluation Team.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate integrated care for diabetes in clinical, psychosocial, and economic terms. DESIGN--Pragmatic randomised trial. SETTING--Hospital diabetic clinic and three general practice groups in Grampian. PATIENTS--274 adult diabetic patients attending a hospital clinic and registered with one of three general practices. INTERVENTION--Random allocation to conventional hospital clinic care or integrated care. Integrated care patients seen in general practice every three or four mon...

  2. Identifying cases of undiagnosed, clinically significant COPD in primary care: qualitative insight from patients in the target population

    OpenAIRE

    Leidy, Nancy K.; Kim, Katherine; Bacci, Elizabeth D.; Yawn, Barbara P.; Mannino, David M.; Thomashow, Byron M; Barr, R Graham; Rennard, Stephen I; Houfek, Julia F; Han, Meilan K.; Meldrum, Catherine A.; Make, Barry J.; Bowler, Russ P; Steenrod, Anna W.; Murray, Lindsey T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are diagnosed only after significant loss of lung function or during exacerbations. Aims: This study is part of a multi-method approach to develop a new screening instrument for identifying undiagnosed, clinically significant COPD in primary care. Methods: Subjects with varied histories of COPD diagnosis, risk factors and history of exacerbations were recruited through five US clinics (four pulmonary, one primary care). Ph...

  3. Clinical profile of acute myocardial infarction patients: a study in tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushana Seetharama

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: There is need for early detection of risk factor to prevent the progression of coronary heart disease, need for creating awareness in the community regarding risk factors, symptoms and signs of acute myocardial infarction so that early referral can be done to coronary care unit to prevent morbidity and mortality in the community. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(2.000: 412-419

  4. A review of the empirical evidence of the value of structuring and coding of clinical information within electronic health records for direct patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Kalra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The case has historically been presented that structured and/or coded electronic health records (EHRs benefit direct patient care, but the evidence base for this is not well documented.Methods We searched for evidence of direct patient care value from the use of structured and/or coded information within EHRs. We interrogated nine international databases from 1990 to 2011. Value was defined using the Institute of Medicine’s six areas for improvement for healthcare systems: effectiveness, safety, patient-centredness, timeliness, efficiency and equitability. We included studies satisfying the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC group criteria.Results Of 5016 potentially eligible papers, 13 studies satisfied our criteria: 10 focused on effectiveness, with eight demonstrating potential for improved proxy and actual clinical outcomes if a structured and/or coded EHR was combined with alerting or advisory systems in a focused clinical domain. Three studies demonstrated improvement in safety outcomes. No studies were found reporting value in relation to patient-centredness, timeliness, efficiency or equitability.Conclusions We conclude that, to date, there has been patchy effort to investigate empirically the value from structuring and coding EHRs for direct patient care. Future investments in structuring and coding of EHRs should be informed by robust evidence as to the clinical scenarios in which patient care benefits may be realised.

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL, CLINICAL FEATURES, MANAGEMENT PROFILE & OUTCOME IN PATIENTS OF LIVER ABCESS: A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE EXPERIENCE OF GWALIOR, MADHYA PRADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Singh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available : Liver abscess is a common and major health problem in the lower socio-economic group. Evolution in diagnostics and treatment methodology has resulted in marked reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with liver abscess. Today with improved antibiotics and operative techniques, we could achieve much better response in patients with liver abscess. AIM: The aim of the study was to review the demographic data, etiological profile, predisposing factors, variation in clinical presentation in liver abscesses & to formulate management plan in liver abscess. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery, Gajra Raja Medical College Gwalior and Jaya Arogya Group of Hospitals, a tertiary care centre in Gwalior by reviewing all admitted patients with suspected liver abscess from the period of May 2013 To May 2015 to analyze etiological profile (Etiological & predisposing factors, variation in clinical presentation in liver abscesses, laboratory & microbiological profile and to formulate management plan in liver abscess. RESULTS: Pyogenic & Amoebic liver abscess is most common in 5th & 4th decade of life with male to female ratio of 17:1. Alcohol consumption, Diabetes Mellitus & low socio economic status are important predisposing factors. Most common presenting complain & clinical finding is abdominal pain & RUQ tenderness respectively with intraperitoneal rupture is most common complication. On ultrasound most abscess are solitary, in right lobe of liver & having greater than 150cc of volume. E. coli is commonest among pyogenic while E. histolytica is common in amoebic liver abscess, earlier respond better with pigtail drainage while later with percutaneous aspiration with antibiotics. CONCLUSION: The commonest presentation was young male, alcoholic of low socioeconomic class having right lobe solitary amoebic liver abscess. Appropriate use of minimally invasive drainage along with intravenous antibiotics

  6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among asthmatic patients in primary care clinics in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alshagga Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the knowledge about asthma and the prevalence, disclosure and evaluation of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among asthmatic patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 95 patients diagnosed with asthma in a primary healthcare centre in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Ninety-five patients with a mean age of 47.06 years (±12.8 participated, the majority were female (66.7%, Malay (72.6%. The prevalence of ever-CAM use was 61.1%. The non-ever-CAM users′ mean age was 51±13.9 years while the ever-CAM users′ mean age was 44.5 ±11.5 years ( P = 0.021. Sixty-three females (66.8% used CAM compared to 14 males (43.8% ( P = 0.014. Thirty-six (62.1% CAM users had not discussed use of CAM with their doctors. The main reason of non-disclosure was "the doctor never asked" (55.6%, and the main sources of information about CAM were family and relatives (46.6%. There was no significant difference between use of CAM and knowledge about asthma. The majority of asthmatic patients used rubs (39%, foods (16.9% and herbs (16.9%. About 76% of asthmatic patients perceived CAM as good for their disease management. On linear multiple regression, Malay race ( P = 0.026 and female gender ( P = 0.006 were significant predictors of CAM use. Conclusion: Use of CAM among asthmatic patients is relatively high, particularly among females. The majority of asthmatic patients valued the use of CAM. Non-disclosure was high in this study. Health education of asthmatic patients about CAM is highly recommended.

  7. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider–patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient–provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management.

  8. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  9. Answers to Clinical Questions in the Primary Care Management of People with Obesity: Communication and Patient Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carlos; Nadglowski, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Body weight is a sensitive subject for most people; this statement is particularly true for people who are overweight or have obesity, because social stigmatization is common not only in society but also in the health care setting. Health care providers are often unaware of their own biases toward patients with obesity. Here's how to improve your communication and support of these patients. PMID:27565110

  10. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observations...... and semistructured interviews and analyzed according to the guidelines for meaning condensation by Giorgi. The imaging staff found that care is expressed in an administrative, an instrumental, and a compassionate sense. The imaging staff perceived care in a way that clearly differs from the traditional perception...... of care understood as the close relations between people. In their self-understanding, the staff found that care not only comprised the relational aspect but also that it was already delivered during the preparatory phases before the actual meeting with the patient and up until the image...

  11. Patient attitudes and preferences regarding literacy screening in ambulatory cancer care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Garcia, Sofia F.; Hongyan Du; et al

    2010-01-01

    Elizabeth A Hahn1, Sofia F Garcia1, Hongyan Du2, David Cella11Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago; 2Center on Outcomes, Research and Education, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USAObjectives: To evaluate patient attitudes towards literacy screening, agreement between literacy tests, and associations between literacy, informed consent comprehension, and health-related quality of life (HRQL).Methods: Participants ...

  12. Cohorting Dengue Patients Improves the Quality of Care and Clinical Outcome.

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy C S Lum; Sharifah Faridah Syed Omar; Sasheela Sri La Sri Ponnampalavanar; Tan, Lian H.; Shamala Devi Sekaran; Adeeba Kamarulzaman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The increasing incidence of dengue among adults in Malaysia and other countries has important implications for health services. Before 2004, in order to cope with the surge in adult dengue admissions, each of the six medical wards in a university hospital took turns daily to admit and manage patients with dengue. Despite regular in-house training, the implementation of the WHO 1997 dengue case management guidelines by the multiple medical teams was piecemeal and resulted in high ...

  13. Cohorting Dengue Patients Improves the Quality of Care and Clinical Outcome.

    OpenAIRE

    Lum, Lucy C. S.; Sharifah Faridah Syed Omar; Sasheela Sri La Sri Ponnampalavanar; Lian H Tan; Shamala Devi Sekaran; Adeeba Kamarulzaman

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of dengue among adults in Malaysia and other countries has important implications for health services. Before 2004, in order to cope with the surge in adult dengue admissions, each of the six medical wards in a university hospital took turns daily to admit and manage patients with dengue. Despite regular in-house training, the implementation of the WHO 1997 dengue case management guidelines by the multiple medical teams was piecemeal and resulted in high variability o...

  14. Cohorting Dengue Patients Improves the Quality of Care and Clinical Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Lum, Lucy C. S.; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah; Sri La Sri Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Lian H Tan; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The increasing incidence of dengue among adults in Malaysia and other countries has important implications for health services. Before 2004, in order to cope with the surge in adult dengue admissions, each of the six medical wards in a university hospital took turns daily to admit and manage patients with dengue. Despite regular in-house training, the implementation of the WHO 1997 dengue case management guidelines by the multiple medical teams was piecemeal and resulted in high ...

  15. Prevalence of HBV Infection and Knowledge of Hepatitis B Among Patients Attending Primary Care Clinics in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganczak, Maria; Dmytrzyk-Daniłów, Gabriela; Korzeń, Marcin; Drozd-Dąbrowska, Marzena; Szych, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that community awareness of hepatitis B (HB) can lead to vaccination and testing. The study objectives were to assess the prevalence of HBV infection and knowledge of HB among adult patients attending randomly selected primary care clinics. A cross-sectional sero-survey was conducted in March 2013 in the Zgorzelec region, Poland, with the use of an investigator-developed questionnaire containing 22 questions regarding HB knowledge. Serum samples were assayed for anti-HBc total and anti-HBs with enzyme immunoassay. The prevalence of anti-HBc total among 410 participants (median age 56 years) was 10.3 % (95 % CI 7.6-13.8 %), nobody was aware of an infection. The main sources of HB knowledge were the media and medical staff. The mean knowledge score was 14.8 ± 4.9; 76.7 % of the respondents had scores >50 %. Particular gaps were detected relating to knowledge of unprotected sexual intercourse and MTCT; 45.6 % patients were not aware of the potential asymptomatic course of HBV infection, 41.2 % about chronic HB treatment. A patient's low educational level was negatively associated with a high knowledge level; the willingness for further education on HB and HBV vaccination in the past were independently associated with good knowledge. In conclusion, the HBV infection remains a public health threat in Poland, since the prevalence of infection markers in asymptomatic adult patients was high. Knowledge gaps call for awareness campaigns which may increase testing and diagnosis, audiences representing lower education level should be targeted first. Knowledge on HB might serve as an effective tool in decision making regarding vaccination. PMID:26699149

  16. Enoxaparin, effective dosage for intensive care patients: double-blinded, randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sian; Zincuk, Aleksander; Strøm, Thomas; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Rasmussen, Bjarne; Toft, Palle

    2010-01-01

    an increase in enoxaparin dose, from 0.13 IU/ml at 40 mg, to 0.14 IU/ml at 50 mg, 0.27 IU/ml at 60 mg, and 0.29 IU/ml at 70 mg (P = 0.002). At 12 hours after administration, median aFXa levels were still within therapeutic range for those patients who received 60 mg (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our study...... the subcutaneous (SC) dose of enoxaparin that would give the best anti-factor Xa levels in ICU patients. METHODS: The 72 patients admitted to a mixed ICU at Odense University Hospital (OUH) in Denmark were randomised into four groups to receive 40, 50, 60, or 70 mg SC enoxaparin for a period of 24...... hours. Anti-factor Xa activity (aFXa) was measured before, and at 4, 12, and 24 hours after administration. An AFXa level between 0.1 to 0.3 IU/ml was considered evidence of effective antithrombotic activity. RESULTS: Median peak (4 hours after administration), aFXa levels increased significantly with...

  17. Progressive Care of Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambaugh, Lori A; Ecklund, Margaret M

    2016-08-01

    Obese patients have complex needs that complicate their care during hospitalization. These patients often have comorbid conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, pressure ulcers, and difficulty with mobility. Obese patients may be well served in the progressive care setting because they may require more intensive nursing care than can be delivered in a general care unit. Progressive care nurses have core competencies that enable them to safely and effectively care for obese patients. A plan of care with interdisciplinary collaboration illustrates the integrative care for obese progressive care patients. (Critical Care Nurse 2016; 36[4]:58-63). PMID:27481802

  18. Implantable port devices in paediatric oncology patients: A clinical experience from a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the frequency of infection of portacath in children having malignant tumours and undergoing chemotherapy, and to assess the association of the infection with already known risk factors. Methods: The retrospective review was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and involved patient data related to the period between January 2005 to December 2010. A questionnaire was designed to collect the required data. A total of 67 children were included having portacath inserted for chemotherapy. Children in which portacath was inserted under local anaesthesia in Radiology department, reinserted or inserted because of a reason other than childhood malignancy were excluded. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total, 46 (67%) patients were males and a majority of the total (n=31; 46%) was between 6-10 years of age. Besides, 42 (63%) patients had leukaemia, 7(11%) had lymphoma and 18(26%) had various solid tumours. Six (8.95%) ports were removed due to infection. There was significant difference between infection and non-infection groups with respect to absolute neutrophilic count levels (p <0.001). Positive association was found between low absolute neutrophilic count level (<500) and the occurrence of port infection. Conclusions: Port infection rate is higher in children with low absolute neutrophilic count. The issue needs to be addressed and one may have to alter the timings of port insertion. It is recommended to insert port when absolute neutrophilic count is normal. To further evaluate the subject, a multicentre trial must be conducted. (author)

  19. How can we improve outcomes for patients and families under palliative care? implementing clinical audit for quality improvement in resource limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Selman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach. The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step.

  20. Novel approach to evaluation of medical care quality delivered to patients with ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome: course to clinical result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posnenkova О.М.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to implement system analysis of clinical cases for development of healthcare quality indicators for STe-ACS patients, aimed at achievement of clinical result — decrease of in-hospital mortality. Mathehal and Methods. National recommendations on diagnostic and treatment of patients with myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation on ECG (2007 were used to determine clinical result of treatment and key measures of medical care. To reveal major causes of clinical result non-achievement fishbone diagram was used. Results. Early reperfusion and optimal medical therapy were determined as the key measures of medical care delivered to patients with STe-ACS. The following indicators were developed to control these measures: «Primary reperfusion», «Thrombolysis in 30 minutes», «Primary percutaneous coronary intervention in 90 minutes», «Dual antiplatelet therapy in hospital», «Beta-blockers administration», «ACE-is/ARBs administration». The major causes of in-hospital mortality were separated. Indicators for assessment the major causes of clinical result non-achievement were proposed. Principal stages of performance measures creation were posed. Conclusion. Recommendation-based and clear definition of clinical result of treatment and key measures of the result achievement combined with methods of systems analysis allows development of evidence-based measures for assessment the quality of care delivered to patients with STe-ACS.

  1. Health-related quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis attending two primary care clinics in Malaysia: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Zainal F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL among patients with osteoarthritis (OA helps the health care provider to understand the impact of the disease in the patients' own perspective and make health services more patient-centered. The main aim of this study was to measure the quality of life among patients with symptomatic knee OA attending primary care clinic. We also aimed to ascertain the association between socio-demographic and medical status of patients with knee OA and their quality of life. Methods A clinic based, cross sectional study using the Short Form-36 (SF-36 questionnaire was conducted in two primary care health clinics in Hulu Langat, Selangor, Malaysia over a period of 8 months. The nurses and medical assistants were involved in recruiting the patients while the family physicians conducted the interview. Results A total 151 respondents were recruited. The mean age was 65.6 ± 10.8 years with females constituted 119 (78.8% of the patients. The mean duration of knee pain was 4.07 ± 2.96 years. Half of the patients were overweight and majority, 138 (91.4%, had at least one co-morbidity, the commonest being hypertension. The physical health status showed lower score as compared to mental health component. The domain concerning mental health components showed positive correlation with age. There was a significant negative correlation between age and physical functioning (p Conclusions This study has shown that patients with knee OA attending primary care clinics have relatively poor quality of life pertaining to the physical health components but less impact was seen on the patients' mental health.

  2. International challenges in patient-centred care in fertility clinics offering assisted reproductive technology: providers' gaps and attitudes towards addressing the patients' psychological needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Murray

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psychosocial care provided to patients undergoing fertility treatment has focused on a small proportion of patients with major psychosocial problems, leaving the remaining patients impacted by psychosocial stressors without follow-up. Factors that could influence the ability or willingness of physicians treating infertility to assess and address patients’ psychosocial needs have not been investigated. This study aimed to identify the practice gaps and educational needs of physicians treating and managing patients with infertility, with the aim of informing future educational interventions. Methods. A cross-sectional, exploratory, mixed-methods study incorporating semi-structured qualitative telephone interviews and a quantitative online survey was designed and deployed to actively practising physicians treating infertile couples from 15 countries across the Americas, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East Region. Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data was used to increase trustworthiness of findings. Results. Forty-five participants completed a qualitative interview and 271 participants completed the quantitative online survey (response rates were 4 and 9%, respectively. A majority (74% of respondents reported needing improvement in their psychological assessment skill, which was considered essential to the provision of optimal care by less than half (41% of respondents. A need for improvement in their skill to assess patients’ parenting skills was reported in 72% of respondents, and this skill was considered as essential by 32% of participants. Similarly, 72% reported needing improvement in their ability to identify the needs of patients for psychological and emotional support, and this ability was considered essential by 45%. Statistical differences were observed between countries (p<0.05. Conclusion. Addressing the gaps highlighted in this study, through educational or performance improvement activities, could

  3. [Clinical features and care of patients with congenital and childhood-onset myotonic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Keiko; Muto, Ayako; Osawa, Makiko

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression. DM1 results from a trinucleotide expansion in the 3' untranslated region or the gene for myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK). Severity tends to increase and it shows a younger onset age with vertical transmission, a phenomenon known as anticipation. Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) is classified as the most severe form of DM1, and its phenotype, with severe hypotonia, neonatal respiratory distress and feeding difficulties, is completely different from that of adult-onset type. Involvement of respiratory muscles may be the major cause of mortality in affected infants. Facial weakness with a tented upper lip is often recognized. If infants survive the neonatal period, muscle involvement symptoms gradually improve and most children do not require respiratory support or tube feeding. As CDM patients grow older, mental retardation or a developmental disorder becomes prominent. Furthermore, the main problems in childhood-onset DM, with an onset age under 10 years, are developmental disorders or learning disabilities, rather than muscle symptoms. Early meticulous support and cooperation with teachers are necessary. Medications such as methylphenidate may be helpful in DM1 children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. PMID:23196584

  4. A cluster randomized trial to assess the impact of clinical pathways for patients with stroke: rationale and design of the Clinical Pathways for Effective and Appropriate Care Study [NCT00673491

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri Antonella

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with stroke should have access to a continuum of care from organized stroke units in the acute phase, to appropriate rehabilitation and secondary prevention measures. Moreover to improve the outcomes for acute stroke patients from an organizational perspective, the use of multidisciplinary teams and the delivery of continuous stroke education both to the professionals and to the public, and the implementation of evidence-based stroke care are recommended. Clinical pathways are complex interventions that can be used for this purpose. However in stroke care the use of clinical pathways remains questionable because little prospective controlled data has demonstrated their effectiveness. The purpose of this study is to determine whether clinical pathways could improve the quality of the care provided to the patients affected by stroke in hospital and through the continuum of the care. Methods Two-arm, cluster-randomized trial with hospitals and rehabilitation long-term care facilities as randomization units. 14 units will be randomized either to arm 1 (clinical pathway or to arm 2 (no intervention, usual care. The sample will include 238 in each group, this gives a power of 80%, at 5% significance level. The primary outcome measure is 30-days mortality. The impact of the clinical pathways along the continuum of care will also be analyzed by comparing the length of hospital stay, the hospital re-admissions rates, the institutionalization rates after hospital discharge, the patients' dependency levels, and complication rates. The quality of the care provided to the patients will be assessed by monitoring the use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures during hospital stay and rehabilitation, and by the use of key quality indicators at discharge. The implementation of organized care will be also evaluated. Conclusion The management of patients affected by stroke involves the expertise of several professionals, which can

  5. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  6. A Study on Clinical Features and Cost Incurred by Dengue Syndrome Patients Admitted to a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Chandra MR, Ashwath Narayana DH, Manjunath M

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Professionals and public should be made aware of common clinical manifestations of dengue syndrome for early reporting and seeking prompt treatment there by reducing the case fatality rate and the economic loss to the patients and country at large.

  7. Patient perspectives on the experience of being newly diagnosed with HIV in the emergency department/urgent care clinic of a public hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina A Christopoulos

    Full Text Available We sought to understand patient perceptions of the emergency department/urgent care (ED/UC HIV diagnosis experience as well as factors that may promote or discourage linkage to HIV care. We conducted in-depth interviews with patients (n=24 whose HIV infection was diagnosed in the ED/UC of a public hospital in San Francisco at least six months prior and who linked to HIV care at the hospital HIV clinic. Key diagnosis experience themes included physical discomfort and limited functionality, presence of comorbid diagnoses, a wide spectrum of HIV risk perception, and feelings of isolation and anxiety. Patients diagnosed with HIV in the ED/UC may not have their desired emotional supports with them, either because they are alone or they are with family members or friends to whom they do not want to immediately disclose. Other patients may have no one they can rely on for immediate support. Nearly all participants described compassionate disclosure of test results by ED/UC providers, although several noted logistical issues that complicated the disclosure experience. Key linkage to care themes included the importance of continuity between the testing site and HIV care, hospital admission as an opportunity for support and HIV education, and thoughtful matching by linkage staff to a primary care provider. ED/UC clinicians and testing programs should be sensitive to the unique roles of sickness, risk perception, and isolation in the ED/UC diagnosis experience, as these things may delay acceptance of HIV diagnosis. The disclosure and linkage to care experience is crucial in forming patient attitudes towards HIV and HIV care, thus staff involved in disclosure and linkage activities should be trained to deliver compassionate, informed, and thoughtful care that bridges HIV testing and treatment sites.

  8. Clinical research and medical care: towards effective and complete integration

    OpenAIRE

    Sacristán, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their close relationship, clinical research and medical care have become separated by clear boundaries. The purpose of clinical research is to generate generalizable knowledge useful for future patients, whereas medical care aims to promote the well-being of individual patients. The evolution towards patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research, and the gradual standardization of medicine are contributing to closer ties between clinical research and medical pract...

  9. 临床药师在糖尿病治疗中的药学服务%Pharmaceutical Care of Clinical Pharmacist in Treatment of Diabetic Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许恒忠

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study how the clinical pharmacist to provide the pharmaceutical care for diabetes patients for guiding patients with medication. Methods The clinical pharmacist used the pharmacological knowledge combined with the practice of pharmaceutical care and provided the pharmaceutical care to serve the diabetes patients. Results The clinical pharmacists providing the pharmaceutical services could improve the drug compliance of the diabetic patients, fully play the effect of drug treatment and enhance the patients' confidence to treatment. Conclusion The clinical pharmacy service has important significance to the diabetic patients for taking drugs rationally and controlling blood sugar, which also reflects the value of the clinical pharmacists.%目的 探讨临床药师如何为糖尿病患者提供药学服务.方法 临床药师应利用药学知识并结合药学服务实践,对糖尿病患者进行用药指导.结果 临床药师提供药学服务可提高糖尿病患者用药的依从性,更好地发挥药物疗效,增强患者对治疗的信心.结论 临床药学服务对糖尿病患者进行合理用药和控制血糖具有重要意义,同时也体现了临床药师的价值.

  10. Clinical Profile, Quality of Care, and Recurrence in Arab-American and Caucasians Prostate Cancer Patients in Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Moussawi, Ahmad H.; Yassine, May; Dey, Subhojit; Soliman, Amr S.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States with striking differences in incidence and mortality among ethnic groups. Michigan has one of the largest concentrations of Arab Americans (AAs) in the U.S. and little is known about this ethnic minority with respect to prostate cancer. This study investigated differences in clinical profile, quality of care, and recurrence among prostate cancer survivors comparing AAs and Caucasian Americans (CAs). Participants in this ...

  11. Patient beliefs about medicines and quality of life after a clinical medication review and follow-up by a pharmaceutical care plan: A study in elderly polypharmacy patients with a cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Marlies M.E.; Stewart, Roy E.; Brouwers, Jacobus R.B.J.; de Graeff, Pieter A.; de Gier, Johan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of a clinical medication review, followed up by a pharmaceutical care plan, on the beliefs about medicines and quality of life (QoL) of older patients with polypharmacy and a cardiovascular disorder. Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention or co

  12. A randomised, multicentre clinical trial of specialised palliative care plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone for cancer patients with palliative care needs: the Danish palliative care trial (DanPaCT) protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Damkier, Anette; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn; Lindschou, Jane; Sjøgren, Per; Gluud, Christian Nyfeldt; Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Petersen, Morten Aa; Lundorff, Lena Elisabeth; Pedersen, Lise; Fayers, Peter; Strömgren, Annette S; Higginson, Irene J; Groenvold, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    Advanced cancer patients experience considerable symptoms, problems, and needs. Early referral of these patients to specialised palliative care (SPC) could improve their symptoms and problems.The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) investigates whether patients with metastatic cancer, who report...... palliative needs in a screening, will benefit from being referred to 'early SPC'....

  13. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. Method: descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. Results: 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. Conclusion: the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. PMID:27508902

  14. Dental care of patients with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Nordenram, Gunilla

    1997-01-01

    Dental care of patients with dementia. Clinical and ethical considerations Gunilla Nordenram Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine Huddinge Hospital and School of Dentistry, Division of Geriatric Dentistry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, ISBN 91-628-2416-3 To establish guidelines for fair and proper oral care for patients with dementia, the following aims were specified: To develop an appropriate method for ana...

  15. A basic concept in the clinical ethics of managed care: physicians and institutions as economically disciplined moral co-fiduciaries of populations of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, L B

    1999-02-01

    Managed care employs two business tools of managed practice that raise important ethical issues: paying physicians in ways that impose conflicts of interest on them; and regulating physicians' clinical judgment, decision making, and behavior. The literature on the clinical ethics of managed care has begun to develop rapidly in the past several years. Professional organizations of physicians have made important contributions to this literature. The statements on ethical issues in managed care of four such organizations are considered here, the American Medical Association, the American College of Physicians, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Three themes common to these statements are identified and critically assessed: the primacy of meeting the medical needs of each individual patient; disclosure of conflicts of interest in how physicians are paid; and opposition to gag orders. The paper concludes with an argument for a basic concept in the clinical ethics of managed care: physicians and institutions as economically disciplined moral co-fiduciaries of populations of patients. PMID:10223444

  16. Clinical profile of dengue fever infection in patients admitted in tertiary care centre Agroha, Hisar, Haryana, India

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Younus Shah; Mohd Mubarak Naqash; Goel, R.K.; Deepak Galhan; Sunil Kumar; Vivek Chhabra; Abhishek Saini; K. L. Jaggal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dengue infections can result in a wide spectrum of disease severity ranging from an influenza-like illness (dengue fever; DF) to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The study was aimed to compare the clinical profile of all patients diagnosed with dengue viral infection at MAMC. Methods: This retrospective study included 188 patients infected with dengue virus, age 6 years to 70 years. Laboratory and haematological data were include...

  17. The Road to Excellence for Primary Care Resident Teaching Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Reena; Dubé, Kate; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Primary care residency programs and their associated primary care clinics face challenges in their goal to simultaneously provide a good education for tomorrow's doctors and excellent care for today's patients. A team from the Center for Excellence in Primary Care at the University of California, San Francisco, conducted site visits to 23 family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatric residency teaching clinics. The authors found that a number of programs have transformed themselves with respect to engaged leadership, resident scheduling, continuity of care for patients and residents, team-based care, and resident engagement in practice improvement. In this Commentary, the authors highlight the features of transforming programs that are melding inspiring resident education with excellent patient care. The authors propose a model, the 10 + 3 Building Blocks of Primary Care Teaching Clinics, to illustrate the themes that characterize transforming primary care residency programs. PMID:26826073

  18. Decentralised paediatric HIV care in Ethiopia: a comparison between outcomes of patients managed in health centres and in a hospital clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Hagströmer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to increase access to antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected children, paediatric HIV care has been introduced in health centres in Ethiopia, where patients are managed by health professionals with limited training. Objective: To compare outcomes of paediatric HIV care in hospital and health centre clinics and to determine risk factors for death and loss to follow-up (LTFU. Design: Retrospective comparison of patient characteristics and outcomes among children managed in a public hospital and all five public health centres in the uptake area. Results: Among 1,960 patients (health centres 572, hospital clinic 1,388, 34% were lost to follow-up, 2% died, 14% were transferred out, and 46% remained in care. Children initiating ART in the hospital clinic had lower median CD4 cell counts (age <1 year: 575 vs. 1,183 cells/mm3, p=0.024; age 1–5 years: 370 vs. 598 cells/mm3, p<0.001; age >5 years: 186 vs. 259 cells/mm3, p<0.001, and a higher proportion were <1 year of age (22% vs. 15%, p=0.025. ART initiation rates and retention in care were similar between children managed in health centres and in the hospital clinic (36% vs. 37% and 47% vs. 46%, respectively. Among patients starting ART, mortality was associated with age <1 year [hazard ratio (HR 12.0; 95% confidence interval (CI: 3.5, 41]. LTFU was associated with CD4 cell counts <350 cells/mm3 (HR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2, 3.0, weight-for-age z-scores below −4 (HR 2.8; 95% CI: 1.4, 5.6, and age <5 years (1–5 years: HR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.5; <1 year: HR 3.3; 95% CI: 1.6, 6.6. Conclusions: Outcomes of HIV care were similar for Ethiopian children managed in a hospital clinic or in health centres. However, patients treated at the hospital clinic had characteristics of more advanced disease. Rates of LTFU were high in both types of health facility.

  19. Challenges in Individualizing Drug Dosage for Intensive Care Unit Patients: Is Augmented Renal Clearance What We Really Want to Know? Some Suggested Management Approaches and Clinical Software Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelliffe, Roger

    2016-08-01

    Acutely ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients often have large apparent volumes of distribution of drugs and, because of this, their drug clearance (CL) is usually also increased. 'Augmented renal Cl' is a current issue in the management of drug therapy for acutely ill and unstable ICU patients; however, Cl, the product of volume and the rate constant for excretion, describes only a theoretical volume of drug cleared per unit of time. Information of the actual rate of movement of the drug itself is obscured. It is suggested that the most useful clinical information is given by describing drug volume and elimination rate constant separately. This also permits better understanding of the patient's separate issues of fluid balance and drug elimination, especially when dialysis, renal replacement therapy, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may be used, and facilitates management of these two important separate clinical issues. Optimal management of drug therapy also requires optimal methods embodied in clinical software to describe drug behavior in these highly unstable patients, and considerably more data than for ordinary patients. The interacting multiple model (IMM) clinical software facilitates management of both fluid balance and drug therapy in these unstable patients. Illustrative cases are discussed, and new monitoring and management strategies are suggested. Like other ICU skills, physicians need to learn optimal tools for managing drug therapy in the ICU. Further work should help evaluate these new approaches. PMID:26914772

  20. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Martha L; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care.

  1. Patient, provider, and clinic characteristics associated with public STD clinic patient satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, S; Zenilman, J; Erbelding, E

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: There is a lack of information describing levels of patient satisfaction among patients seeking sexually transmitted diseases (STD) care in a public clinic setting. We sought to identify patient, provider, and clinic characteristics associated with patient satisfaction within public STD clinics.

  2. Epidemiological and clinical use of GMHAT-PC (Global Mental Health assessment tool – primary care in cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Murali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A computer assisted interview, the GMHAT/PC has been developed to assist General Practitioners and other Health Professionals to make a quick, convenient and comprehensive standardised mental health assessment. It has proved to be a reliable and valid tool in our previous studies involving General Practitioners and Nurses. Little is known about its use in cardiac rehabilitation settings. Aim The study aims to assess the feasibility of using a computer assisted diagnostic interview by nurses for patients attending Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinics and to examine the level of agreement between the GMHAT/PC diagnosis and a Psychiatrist clinical diagnosis. Prevalence of mental illness was also measured. Design Cross sectional validation and feasibility study. Methods Nurses using GMHAT/PC examined consecutive patients presenting to a cardiac rehabilitation centre. A total of 118 patients were assessed by nurses and consultant psychiatrist in cardiac rehabilitation centres. The kappa coefficient (κ, sensitivity, and specificity of the GMHAT/PC diagnosis were analysed as measures of validity. The time taken for the interview as well as feedback from patients and interviewers were indicators of feasibility. Data on prevalence of mental disorders in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation setting was collected. Results The mean duration of the interview was 14 minutes. Feedback from patients and interviewers indicated good practical feasibility. The agreement between GMHAT/PC interview-based diagnoses and consultant psychiatrists' ICD-10 criteria-based clinical diagnosis was good or excellent (κ = 0.76, sensitivity = 0.73, specificity = 0.90. The prevalence of mental disorders in this group was 22%, predominantly depression. Very few cases were on treatment. Conclusion GMHAT/PC can assist nurses in making accurate mental health assessments and diagnoses in a cardiac rehabilitation setting and is acceptable to cardiac patients. It can

  3. A feasibility study of functional status and follow-up clinic preferences of patients at high risk of post intensive care syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, K J; Eastwood, G M; Bellomo, R

    2016-05-01

    After prolonged mechanical ventilation patients may experience the 'post intensive care syndrome' (PICS) and may be candidates for post-discharge follow-up clinics. We aimed to ascertain the incidence and severity of PICS symptoms in patients surviving prolonged mechanical ventilation and to describe their views regarding follow-up clinics. In a teaching hospital, we conducted a cohort study of all adult patients discharged alive after ventilation in ICU for ≥7 days during 2013. We administered the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) via telephone interview and asked patients their views about the possible utility of a follow-up clinic. We studied 48 patients. At follow-up (average 19.5 months), seven (15%) patients had died and 14 (29%) did not participate (eight declined; two were non-English speakers; four were non-contactable). Among the 27 responders, 16 (59%) reported at least moderate problems in ≥1 EQ-5D dimension; 10 (37%) in ≥2 dimensions, and 8 (30%) in ≥3 dimensions. Moreover, 10 (37%) patients reported marked psychological symptoms; six (22%) scored borderline or abnormal on the HADS for both anxiety and depression; and four (15%) scored borderline or abnormal for one component. Finally, 21/26 (81%) patients stated that an ICU follow-up clinic would have been beneficial. At long-term follow-up, the majority of survivors of prolonged mechanical ventilation reported impaired quality of life and significant psychological symptoms. Most believed that a follow-up clinic would have been beneficial. PMID:27246943

  4. Effect of tele health care on exacerbations and hospital admissions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringbæk T

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Ringbæk,1,2 Allan Green,1 Lars Christian Laursen,2,3 Ejvind Frausing,1 Eva Brøndum,1 Charlotte Suppli Ulrik1,2 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; 3Pulmonary Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark Background and objective: Tele monitoring (TM of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has gained much interest, but studies have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to investigate the effect of TM with the option of video consultations on exacerbations and hospital admissions in patients with severe COPD.Materials and methods: Patients with severe COPD at high risk of exacerbations were eligible for the study. Of 560 eligible patients identified, 279 (50% declined to participate. The remaining patients were equally randomized to either TM (n=141 or usual care (n=140 for the 6-month study period. TM comprised recording of symptoms, saturation, spirometry, and weekly video consultations. Algorithms generated alerts if readings breached thresholds. Both groups received standard care. The primary outcome was number of hospital admissions for exacerbation of COPD during the study period.Results: Most of the enrolled patients had severe COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second <50%pred in 86% and ≥hospital admission for COPD in the year prior to enrollment in 45%, respectively, of the patients. No difference in drop-out rate and mortality was found between the groups. With regard to the primary outcome, no significant difference was found in hospital admissions for COPD between the groups (P=0.74, and likewise, no difference was found in time to first admission or all-cause hospital admissions. Compared with the control group, TM group patients had more moderate exacerbations (ie, treated with antibiotics/corticosteroid, but not requiring hospital admission; P<0.001, whereas the control group

  5. The prevalence of severe pain, its etiopathological characteristics and treatment profile of patients referred to a tertiary cancer care pain clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the most feared symptom in cancer. About 52-77% patients suffer pain despite World Health Organization (WHO recommendations. Out of total, one-third patients suffer moderate to severe pain. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence, etiopathogenesis and characteristics of severe pain and treatment response among pain clinic referrals in a busy tertiary care cancer center. This study found a high prevalence (31.5% of severe pain. A total of 251 patients who had complete pain data were analyzed for etiopathological characteristics and treatment response. Head and neck cancer contributed the highest prevalence among all regions. Oncologists prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs or paracetamol with or without mild opioids to 14% patients and pain clinic physicians prescribed opioids and overall 63.7% patients had a better response after pain clinic referral, even then, morphine was not prescribed to many deserving patients. Doctors need pain education about opioids to remove any fear of prescribing opioids in presence of severe pain.

  6. Clinical characteristics of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea among patients in a tertiary care center in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Huang, Yi; Li, Yuyuan; Nie, Yuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the incidence, risk factors, and clinical characteristics of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in Chinese patients. Methods: Fecal specimens of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) were collected to test C. difficile toxin A and B using enzyme-linked fluorescent assay to identify CDAD. By adopting a nested case-control design, the matched people (ratio 1:3) without AAD were included as controls. Results: Out of 56,172 inpatients, 39,882 (71.0%) used antibiotics, 470 suffered from AAD, and 93 were diagnosed with CDAD. The incidence of nosocomial CDAD was 166 per 100,000. The proportion of CDAD in AAD was 19.8%. CDAD patients presented with more severe clinical manifestations and exhibited more concurrent illness. Logistic regression analysis showed the risk factors of CDAD: advanced age, nasogastric tube-feeding, high APACHE II scores, high level of serum C-reaction protein, low level of serum albumin, severe underlining disease or comorbidity, and number of antibiotic intake. Twenty-nine patients (31.2%) were cured with vancomycin, 54 (58.1%) were cured after dual therapy of vancomycin plus metronidazole, 7 (7.5%) died of underlying diseases aggravated with CDAD, and 3 (3.2%) were transferred to other hospitals for personal reasons. Conclusion: The incidence of nosocomial CDAD in China was high. Some risk factors could predispose CDAD. PMID:27375724

  7. Attitudes of Patients in Developing Countries Toward Participating in Clinical Trials: A Survey of Saudi Patients Attending Primary Health Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateefa O. Al-Dakhil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Clinical trials are experimental projects that include patients as subjects. A number of benefits are directly associated with clinical trials. Healthcare processes and outcomes can be improved with the help of clinical trials. This study aimed to assess the attitudes and beliefs of patients about their contribution to and enrolment in clinical trials. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used for data collection and analysis. A questionnaire was developed with six categories to derive effective outcomes. Results: Of the 2000 participants approached to take part in the study, 1081 agreed. The majority of the study population was female, well educated, and unaware of clinical trials. Only 324 subjects (30.0% had previously agreed to participate in a clinical trial. The majority (87.1% were motivated to participate in clinical trials due to religious aspects. However, fear of any risk was the principal reason (79.8% that reduced their motivation to participate. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that patients in Saudi Arabia have a low awareness and are less willing to participate in clinical trials. Different motivational factors and awareness programs can be used to increase patient participation in the future.

  8. DRUG SAFETY MONITORING IN PATIENTS ATTENDING EPILEPSY CLINIC IN A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL IN RURAL BENGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder affecting fifty million people globally. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are the mainstay of management in epilepsy. Use of AEDs over prolonged duration makes occurrence of multiple Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs frequently, especially with polytherapy. OBJECTIVES To estimate the incidence of all the ADRs among patients taking AEDs and to assess their causalities and to quantify their severity. MATERIAL AND METHODS This prospective, observational study was carried out at an Outpatient Referral Epilepsy Clinic at Neurology Department at Bankura Sammilani Medical College, West Bengal, between 1st June and 30th September 2015. The demographic data, diagnosis, drugs prescribed and ADRs experienced by the patients were recorded. Causality and severity assessment was done using Naranjo’s Scale and Hartwig’s Severity Assessment Scale respectively. RESULTS Incidence of ADRs among the patients who attended the clinic was 3.3% (105 patients among 3146 experienced at least one ADR. Total 161 ADRs were detected, among which 55.3% were CNS adverse events followed by 15.5% gastrointestinal, 14.3% endocrine, 10.6% psychiatric abnormalities and 4.3% related to dermatological and allergic manifestations. Nearly one-third of the ADRs (32.3% were found to be possible and 109 (67.7% are of probable category, whereas none were deemed to be doubtful or definite. The most commonly implicated suspect drug was valproate (51.5% followed by Phenytoin (22.9%. Most of the ADRs were mild (93.2%, 5.6% were moderate and only 1.2% were deemed severe. CONCLUSION Incidence of ADRs is found to be common in patients on AEDs. Though rare, but they can be life-threatening. Routine safety assessments and pharmacovigilance is necessary in this set up to reduce the incidence and also improve pharmacotherapy and patient compliance

  9. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims: To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods: A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results: Ninety five percent (130/137 of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127 increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001. The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001. Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions: The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  10. Adding point of care ultrasound to assess volume status in heart failure patients in a nurse-led outpatient clinic. A randomised study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Guri Holmen; Norekval, Tone M; Haug, Hilde Haugberg; Skjetne, Kyrre; Kleinau, Jens Olaf; Graven, Torbjorn; Dalen, Havard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical history, physical examination and laboratory testing are not optimal for the assessment of volume status in heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed to study the clinical influence of focused ultrasound of the pleural cavities and inferior vena cava (IVC) performed by specialised nurses to assess volume status in HF patients at an outpatient clinic. Methods HF outpatients were prospectively included and underwent laboratory testing, history recording and clinical examination by two nurses with and without an ultrasound examination of the pleural cavities and IVC using a pocket-size imaging device, in random order. Each nurse worked in a team with a cardiologist. The influence of the different diagnostic tests on diuretic dosing was assessed descriptively and in linear regression analyses. Results Sixty-two patients were included and 119 examinations were performed. Mean±SD age was 74±12 years, EF was 34±14%, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) value was 3761±3072 ng/L. Dosing of diuretics differed between the teams in 31 out of 119 consultations. Weight change and volume status assessed clinically with and without ultrasound predicted dose adjustment of diuretics at follow-up (p<0.05). Change of oedema, NT-proBNP, creatinine, and symptoms did not (p≥0.10). In adjusted analyses, only volume status based on ultrasound predicted dose adjustments of diuretics at first visit and follow-up (all ultrasound p≤0.01, all other p≥0.2). Conclusions Ultrasound examinations of the pleural cavities and IVC by nurses may improve diagnostics and patient care in HF patients at an outpatient clinic, but more studies are needed to determine whether these examinations have an impact on clinical outcomes. Trial registration number NCT01794715. PMID:26438785

  11. Characteristics of antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients lost-to-care in HIV clinics in Democratic Republic of Congo, Cameroon, and Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolka, Kristen; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Kiumbu, Modeste; Atibu, Joseph; Azinyue, Innocent; Akam, Wilfred; Balimba, Ashue; Mfangam Molu, Brigitte; Mukumbi, Henri; Niyongabo, Theodore; Twizere, Christelle; Newman, Jamie; Hemingway-Foday, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve patients are vulnerable to becoming lost-to-care (LTC) because they are not monitored as often as patients on treatment. We examined data from 19,461 HIV positive adults at 10 HIV clinics in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Cameroon, and Burundi participating in the Phase 1 International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS Central Africa (IeDEA-CA) study. Patients were LTC if they were ART-naïve and did not return within 7 months of the end of data collection. Logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk factors associated with LTC. Of 5353 ART-naïve patients, 4420 (83%) were LTC and 933 (17%) were in-care. The odds of being LTC were greatest among patients from DRC (OR = 2.16, CI: 1.64-2.84, p ART-naïve patients may increase earlier initiation of ART. PMID:26855169

  12. Patient care and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter deals with important aspects of patient care, which may become the radiographer's responsibility in the absence of dedicated nursing staff. Although large pediatric centers usually employ nurses for bedside patient management, the general radiographer should be familiar with some aspects of routine patient care. This knowledge guarantees the safety and well-being of children entrusted to the technologist

  13. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS, PREDICTABILITY AND FETO MATERNAL OUTCOME IN A CRITICAL PATIENT S ADMITTED IN OBSTETRIC INTENSIVE CARE UNIT IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayasree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Care of the critically ill parturient is a unique challenge in obstetrics particularly because of its unpredictability. Hemorrhage , toxemia , anemia and septicemia are common causes of mortality and morbidity in these patients. Obstetric critical care in developing countries continues to be ra dically different from developed countries. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To analyze all cases of critically ill obstetric patients admitted to an obstetric intensive care unit in relation to causes for admissions, interventions required, course during their ICU st ay and fetal maternal outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A one year retrospective analysis of all obstetric admissions to the ICU at our referral hospital was conducted, observations made and results were analyzed . RESULTS AND ANALYSIS : There were 24 ICU admi ssions with mean age of 25.21±4.075 years and mean gestational age of 36.04±3.862 weeks. Postpartum admissions were significantly higher (83.33%, n=20, P <0.05 with more patients presenting with obstetric complications (91.66%, n=22, P <0.01 as compared to medical complications (8.32%, n=2. Obstetric hemorrhage (n=15, 62.5% and hemodynamic instability (n=20, 83.33% were considered to be significant risk factors for ICU admission ( P =0.000. Inotropic support was required in 22 patients (91.66% while 17 p atients (70.83% required ventilatory support. The mean duration of ventilation (30.17±21.65 h and ICU stay (39.42±33.70 h were of significantly longer duration in survivors ( P =0.01, P =0.00 respectively versus non - survivors. The observed mortality n=10, 41.67% was significantly higher since ours is a referral tertiary center and delay in reaching the tertiary center from the place of occurrence of the mishap is a usual occurrence. CONCLUSION: Obstetric hemorrhage leading to hemodynamic instability remains the leading cause of ICU admissions and maternal mortality.

  14. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustad EC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliative Research Center, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Background: A fragmented health care system leads to an increased demand for continuity of care across health care levels. Research indicates age-related differences during care transition, with the oldest patients having experiences and needs that differ from those of other patients. To meet the older patients’ needs and preferences during care transition, professionals must understand their experiences.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore how patients ≥80 years of age experienced the care transition from hospital to municipal health care services.Methods: The study has a descriptive, explorative design, using semistructured interviews. Fourteen patients aged ≥80 participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis was used to describe the individuals’ experiences during care transition.Results: Two complementary themes emerged during the analysis: “Participation depends on being invited to plan the care transition” and “Managing continuity of care represents a complex and challenging process”.Discussion: Lack of participation, insufficient information, and vague responsibilities among staff during care transition seemed to limit the continuity of care. The patients are the vulnerable part of the care transition process, although they possess important

  15. Effect of Self Care Education with and without Telephone Follow-Up on the Level of Hope in Renal Dialysis Patients: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad Poorgholami; Parisa Mansoori; Zohreh Montaseri; Kazem Najafi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various strategies such as teaching self care to hemodialysis patients have been employed to increase the level of their hope. This study aimed at examining the effects of a telephone follow-up program on the level of hope in a self care education program. Methods: In this single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 75 hemodialysis patients, selected by convenient sampling, were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=25 each) including a control, a self care education, or a s...

  16. The Buffalo Model: Shifting the Focus of Clinical Licensure Exams in Dentistry to Address Ethical Concerns Regarding Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambacorta, Joseph E; Glick, Michael; Anker, Ashley E; Shampaine, Guy S

    2016-06-01

    Most jurisdictions grant dental licensure to graduating students following successful completion of a clinical exam. Testing agencies, which are independent of dental schools, nevertheless conduct their exams at school facilities. Patient participation in these exams raises ethical concerns regarding such issues as unlicensed providers' performing irreversible procedures with minimal supervision and graduates' limited accessibility to provide follow-up treatment. To address these concerns, a collaborative effort between University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine faculty and testing agency personnel was launched. The aims of this article are to describe the development and implementation of the resulting Buffalo Model, to highlight ethical advantages in its application, and to identify areas of improvement to be addressed in future iterations. With the Buffalo Model, modifications were made to the traditional exam format in order to integrate the exam into the school curriculum, enabling candidates to take it at various points during their fourth year. In addition, after calibration of school faculty members, 98.5% of cases verified by faculty were accepted by the Commission on Dental Competency Assessments for use in the exam. In two cases, restorative treatment completed during the exam did not meet the school's competency standard. This new approach ameliorates ethical concerns associated with clinical licensure exams because treatment is provided only to patients of record within a sequenced treatment plan and timely and appropriate treatment is provided to all patients. The results of this first year of implementation also suggest that calibrated faculty members will not show bias in the selection of lesions or competency evaluations of candidates. PMID:27251344

  17. Extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cader SA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Samária Ali Cader,1 Rodrigo Gomes de Souza Vale,1 Victor Emmanuel Zamora,2 Claudia Henrique Costa,2 Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas11Laboratory of Human Kinetics Bioscience, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro State, 2Pedro Ernesto University Hospital, School of Medicine, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extubation process in bed-ridden elderly intensive care patients receiving inspiratory muscle training (IMT and identify predictors of successful weaning.Methods: Twenty-eight elderly intubated patients in an intensive care unit were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 14 that received conventional physiotherapy plus IMT with a Threshold IMT® device or to a control group (n = 14 that received only conventional physiotherapy. The experimental protocol for muscle training consisted of an initial load of 30% maximum inspiratory pressure, which was increased by 10% daily. The training was administered for 5 minutes, twice daily, 7 days a week, with supplemental oxygen from the beginning of weaning until extubation. Successful extubation was defined by the ventilation time measurement with noninvasive positive pressure. A vacuum manometer was used for measurement of maximum inspiratory pressure, and the patients' Tobin index values were measured using a ventilometer.Results: The maximum inspiratory pressure increased significantly (by 7 cm H2O, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4–10, and the Tobin index decreased significantly (by 16 breaths/min/L, 95% CI −26 to 6 in the experimental group compared with the control group. The Chi-squared distribution did not indicate a significant difference in weaning success between the groups (Χ2 = 1.47; P = 0.20. However, a comparison of noninvasive positive pressure time dependence indicated a significantly lower value for the experimental group (P = 0.0001; 95% CI 13.08–18.06. The receiver

  18. How the psychosocial context of clinical trials differs from usual care: A qualitative study of acupuncture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative studies of participants' experiences in randomised clinical trials (RCTs suggest that the psychosocial context of treatment in RCTs may be quite different to the psychosocial context of treatment in usual practice. This is important, as the psychosocial context of treatment is known to influence patient outcomes in chronic illness. Few studies have directly compared the psychosocial context of treatment across RCTs and usual practice. In this study, we explored differences in psychosocial context between RCT and usual practice settings, using acupuncture as our model. Methods We undertook a secondary analysis of existing qualitative interviews with 54 patients. 27 were drawn from a study of western and traditional acupuncture in usual practice (for a range of painful conditions. 27 were drawn from a qualitative study nested in an RCT of western acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. We used qualitative analysis software to facilitate an inductive thematic analysis in which we identified three main themes. Results In usual practice, starting acupuncture was more likely to be embedded in an active and ongoing search for pain relief, whereas in the RCT starting acupuncture was opportunistic. Usual practice patients reported few uncertainties and these had minimal consequences for them. In the RCT, patients experienced considerable uncertainties about their treatment and its effectiveness, and were particularly concerned about whether they were receiving real (or fake acupuncture. Patients stopped acupuncture only at the end of the fixed course of treatment in the RCT, which was similar to those receiving acupuncture in the public sector National Health Service (NHS. In comparison, private sector patients re-evaluated and re-negotiated treatments particularly when starting to use acupuncture. Conclusions Differences in psychosocial context between RCTs and usual practice could reduce the impact of

  19. Clinical course, characteristics and prognostic indicators in patients presenting with back and leg pain in primary care. The ATLAS study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinou Kika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-back related leg pain with or without nerve root involvement is associated with a poor prognosis compared to low back pain (LBP alone. Compared to the literature investigating prognostic indicators of outcome for LBP, there is limited evidence on prognostic factors for low back-related leg pain including the group with nerve root pain. This 1 year prospective consultation-based observational cohort study will describe the clinical, imaging, demographic characteristics and health economic outcomes for the whole cohort, will investigate differences and identify prognostic indicators of outcome (i.e. change in disability at 12 months, for the whole cohort and, separately, for those classified with and without nerve root pain. In addition, nested qualitative studies will provide insights on the clinical consultation and the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients' symptom management and illness trajectory. Methods Adults aged 18 years and over consulting their General Practitioner (GP with LBP and radiating leg pain of any duration at (n = 500 GP practices in North Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent, UK will be invited to participate. All participants will receive a standardised assessment at the clinic by a study physiotherapist and will be classified according to the clinically determined presence or absence of nerve root pain/involvement. All will undergo a lumbar spine MRI scan. All participants will be managed according to their clinical need. The study outcomes will be measured at 4 and 12 months using postal self-complete questionnaires. Data will also be collected each month using brief postal questionnaires to enable detailed description of the course of low back and leg pain over time. Clinical observations and patient interviews will be used for the qualitative aspects of the study. Discussion This prospective clinical observational cohort will combine self-reported data, comprehensive clinical and MRI

  20. Prevalence of psychological distress and associated factors in tuberculosis patients in public primary care clinics in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peltzer Karl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress has been rarely investigated among tuberculosis patients in low-resource settings despite the fact that mental ill health has far-reaching consequences for the health outcome of tuberculosis (TB patients. In this study, we assessed the prevalence and predictors of psychological distress as a proxy for common mental disorders among tuberculosis (TB patients in South Africa, where over 60 % of the TB patients are co-infected with HIV. Methods We interviewed 4900 tuberculosis public primary care patients within one month of initiation of anti-tuberculosis treatment for the presence of psychological distress using the Kessler-10 item scale (K-10, and identified predictors of distress using multiple logistic regressions. The Kessler scale contains items associated with anxiety and depression. Data on socio-demographic variables, health status, alcohol and tobacco use and adherence to anti-TB drugs and anti-retroviral therapy (ART were collected using a structured questionnaire. Results Using a cut off score of ≥28 and ≥16 on the K-10, 32.9 % and 81 % of tuberculosis patients had symptoms of distress, respectively. In multivariable analysis older age (OR = 1.52; 95 % CI = 1.24-1.85, lower formal education (OR = 0.77; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.91, poverty (OR = 1.90; 95 % CI = 1.57-2.31 and not married, separated, divorced or widowed (OR = 0.74; 95 % CI = 0.62-0.87 were associated with psychological distress (K-10 ≥28, and older age (OR = 1.30; 95 % CI = 1.00-1.69, lower formal education (OR = 0.55; 95 % CI = 0.42-0.71, poverty (OR = 2.02; 95 % CI = 1.50-2.70 and being HIV positive (OR = 1.44; 95 % CI = 1.19-1.74 were associated with psychological distress (K-10 ≥16. In the final model mental illness co-morbidity (hazardous or harmful alcohol use and non-adherence to anti-TB medication and/or antiretroviral therapy were not

  1. Availability of volunteer-led home-based care system and baseline factors as predictors of clinical outcomes in HIV-infected patients in rural Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Estopinal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We assessed the impact of home-based care (HBC for HIV+ patients, comparing outcomes between two groups of Zambians receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART who lived in villages with and without HBC teams. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using medical charts from Macha Mission Hospital, a hospital providing HIV care in Zambia's rural Southern Province. Date of birth, date of ART initiation, place of residence, sex, body mass index (BMI, CD4+ cell count, and hemoglobin (Hgb were abstracted. Logistic regression was used to test our hypothesis that HBC was associated with treatment outcomes. RESULTS: Of 655 patients, 523 (80% were eligible and included in the study. There were 428 patients (82% with favorable outcomes (alive and on ART and 95 patients (18% with unfavorable outcomes (died, lost to follow-up, or stopped treatment. A minority of the 523 eligible patients (n = 84, 16% lived in villages with HBC available. Living in a village with HBC was not significantly associated with treatment outcomes; 80% of patients in a village with HBC had favorable outcomes, compared to 82% of patients in a village without HBC (P = 0.6 by χ(2. In bivariable analysis, lower BMI (P<0.001, low CD4+ cell count (P = 0.02, low Hgb concentration (P = 0.02, and older age at ART initiation (P = 0.047 were associated with unfavorable outcomes. In multivariable analysis, low BMI remained associated with unfavorable outcomes (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find that living in a village with HBC available was associated with improved treatment outcomes. We speculate that the ART clinic's rigorous treatment preparation before ART initiation and continuous adherence counseling during ART create a motivated group of patients whose outcomes did not improve with additional HBC support. An alternative explanation is that the quality of the HBC program is suboptimal.

  2. Modeling in-Hospital Patient Survival During the First 28 Days After Intensive Care Unit Admission: a Prognostic Model for Clinical Trials in General Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, R; Metnitz, P; Metnitz, B; Bauer, P.; Afonso de Carvalho, S; Hoechtl, A; SAPS 3 Investigators

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to develop a model for estimating patient 28-day in-hospital mortality using 2 different statistical approaches. DESIGN: The study was designed to develop an outcome prediction model for 28-day in-hospital mortality using (a) logistic regression with random effects and (b) a multilevel Cox proportional hazards model. SETTING: The study involved 305 intensive care units (ICUs) from the basic Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 cohort. ...

  3. Evaluation of risk factors in patients attending STI clinic in a tertiary care hospital in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Nayyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the past few years, the interest in STDs and their management has increased tremendously because of their proven role in facilitation of HIV infection, which, in turn, also increases the risk of acquiring STIs. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs are a major health problem affecting mostly young people, not only in developing, but also in developed countries Male circumcision is being considered as strategy to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS. Aims: (i To screen the new patients attending the STI clinic for bacterial causes of STIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum and Gardnerella vaginalis and (ii to evaluate the role of various risk factors in the prevalence of STIs. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 200 patients attending the STI clinic. They were evaluated for the prevalence of HIV and bacterial STIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum and Gardnerella vaginalis along with the role of risk factors particularly circumcision. Results: The prevalence of HIV was 7% and prevalence of other STI was 20%. The causative agents were Chlamydia 8%, Gonorrhea 7.5%, Bacterial Vaginosis 2.7% and Syphilis 2%. Conclusion: The factors found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of STI were circumcision, positive HIV status, education, religion, multiple sexual partners, contact with Commercial sex workers (CSW, non use of contraception, profession involving long stay away from home, and past history of STI. The present study suggests that circumcision is a protective factor for acquisition of STIs but other factors like sexual behavior, use of barrier contraceptives, drug abuse etc., also play a role.

  4. Patients' attitudes to medical and psychosocial aspects of care in fertility clinics: Findings from the Copenhagen Multi-centre Psychosocial Infertility (COMPI) Research Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L; Holstein, B E; Boivin, J; Sångren, H; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, T; Blaabjerg, J; Hald, F; Andersen, A Nyboe; Rasmussen, P E

    2003-01-01

    services for both men and women was high infertility-related stress in the marital, personal and social domain. CONCLUSIONS: A supportive attitude from medical staff and the provision of both medical and psychosocial information and support should be integral aspects of medical care in fertility clinics......BACKGROUND: The aims were (i) to identify gender differences in motivations to seek assisted reproduction and gender differences in expectations about medical and psychosocial services and (ii) to examine factors that predict the perceived importance of, and intention to use, psychosocial services...... among infertile people. METHODS: We conducted an epidemiological study based on questionnaires among all new couples attending five fertility clinics with a response rate of 80.0% and a total of 2250 patients. RESULTS: The vast majority of both men and women considered a high level of medical...

  5. The Certified Clinical Nurse Leader in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine M; Shatto, Bobbi J; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Crecelius, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Challenges of the current health system in the United States call for collaboration of health care professionals, careful utilization of resources, and greater efficiency of system processes. Innovations to the delivery of care include the introduction of the clinical nurse leader role to provide leadership at the point of care, where it is needed most. Clinical nurse leaders have demonstrated their ability to address needed changes and implement improvements in processes that impact the efficiency and quality of patient care across the continuum and in a variety of settings, including critical care. This article describes the role of the certified clinical nurse leader, their education and skill set, and outlines outcomes that have been realized by their efforts. Specific examples of how clinical nurse leaders impact critical care nursing are discussed. PMID:27487750

  6. Novel devices for individualized controlled inhalation can optimize aerosol therapy in efficacy, patient care and power of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the treatment of pulmonary diseases the inhalation of aerosols plays a key role - it is the preferred route of drug delivery in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and cystic fibrosis. But, in contrast to oral and intravenous administration drug delivery to the lungs is controlled by additional parameters. Beside its pharmacology the active agent is furthermore determined by its aerosol characteristics as particle diameter, particle density, hygroscopicity and electrical charge. The patient related factors like age and stage of pulmonary disease will be additionally affected by the individual breathing pattern and morphometry of the lower airways. A number of these parameters with essential impact on the pulmonary drug deposition can be influenced by the performance of the inhalation system. Therefore, the optimization of nebulisation technology was a major part of aerosol science in the last decade. At this time the control of inspiration volume and air flow as well as the administration of a defined aerosol bolus was in the main focus. Up to date a more efficient and a more targeted pulmonary drug deposition - e.g., in the alveoli - will be provided by novel devices which also allow shorter treatment times and a better reproducibility of the administered lung doses. By such means of precise dosing and drug targeting the efficacy of inhalation therapy can be upgraded, e.g., the continuous inhalation of budesonide in asthma. From a patients' perspective an optimized inhalation manoeuvre means less side effects, e.g., in cystic fibrosis therapy the reduced oropharyngeal tobramycin exposure causes fewer bronchial irritations. Respecting to shorter treatment times also, this result in an improved quality of life and compliance. For clinical trials the scaling down of dose variability in combination with enhanced pulmonary deposition reduces the number of patients to be included and the requirement of pharmaceutical

  7. Assessment of quality of care given to diabetic patients at Jimma University Specialized Hospital diabetes follow-up clinic, Jimma, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudina Esayas K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-Saharan Africa is currently enduring the heaviest global burden of diabetes and diabetes care in such resource poor countries is far below standards. This study aims to describe the gaps in the care of Ethiopian diabetic patients at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods 329 diabetic patients were selected as participants in the study, aged 15 years or greater, who have been active in follow-up for their diabetes for more than 1 year at the hospital. They were interviewed for their demographic characters and relevant clinical profiles. Their charts were simultaneously reviewed for characters related to diabetes and related morbidities. Descriptive statistics was used for most variables and Chi-square test, where necessary, was used to test the association among various variables. P-value of Results Blood glucose determination was done for 98.5% of patients at each of the last three visits, but none ever had glycosylated haemoglobin results. The mean fasting blood sugar (FBS level was 171.7 ± 63.6 mg/dl and 73.1% of patients had mean FBS levels above 130 mg/dl. Over 44% of patients have already been diagnosed to be hypertensive and 64.1% had mean systolic BP of > 130 and/or diastolic > 80 mmHg over the last three visits. Diabetes eye and neurologic evaluations were ever done for 42.9% and 9.4% of patients respectively. About 66% had urine test for albumin, but only 28.2% had renal function testing over the last 5 years. The rates for lipid test, electrocardiography, echocardiography, or ultrasound of the kidneys during the same time were Conclusions The overall aspects of diabetes care at the hospital were far below any recommended standards. Hence, urgent action to improve care for patients with diabetes is mandatory. Future studies examining patterns and prevalence of chronic complications using appropriate parameters is strongly recommended to see the true burden of diabetes.

  8. Patient determinants of mental health interventions in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Raine, R.; Lewis, L.; Sensky, T; Hutchings, A; Hirsch, S; Black, N.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large proportion of a general practitioner's (GP's) caseload comprises patients with mental health problems. It is important to ensure that care is provided appropriately, on the basis of clinical need. It is therefore necessary to investigate the determinants of the use of mental health care in the primary care sector and, in particular, to identify any non-clinical characteristics of patients that affect the likelihood of their receiving appropriate care. AIM: To identify and ...

  9. Etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in a population-based study: Link between etiology and patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capelastegui Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiologic profile of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP for each age group could be similar among inpatients and outpatients. This fact brings up the link between etiology of CAP and its clinical evolution and outcome. Furthermore, the majority of pneumonia etiologic studies are based on hospitalized patients, whereas there have been no recent population-based studies encompassing both inpatients and outpatients. Methods To evaluate the etiology of CAP, and the relationship among the different pathogens of CAP to patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes, a prospective population-based study was conducted in Spain from April 1, 2006, to June 30, 2007. Patients (age >18 with CAP were identified through the family physicians and the hospital area. Results A total of 700 patients with etiologic evaluation were included: 276 hospitalized and 424 ambulatory patients. We were able to define the aetiology of pneumonia in 55.7% (390/700. The most frequently isolated organism was S. pneumoniae (170/390, 43.6%, followed by C. burnetti (72/390, 18.5%, M. pneumoniae (62/390, 15.9%, virus as a group (56/390, 14.4%, Chlamydia species (39/390, 106%, and L. pneumophila (17/390, 4.4%. The atypical pathogens and the S. pneumoniae are present in pneumonias of a wide spectrum of severity and age. Patients infected by conventional bacteria were elderly, had a greater hospitalization rate, and higher mortality within 30 days. Conclusions Our study provides information about the etiology of CAP in the general population. The microbiology of CAP remains stable: infections by conventional bacteria result in higher severity, and the S. pneumoniae remains the most important pathogen. However, atypical pathogens could also infect patients in a wide spectrum of severity and age.

  10. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  11. The clinical and economic value of the dipeptide alanyl-glutamine in total parenteral nutrition of critically ill patients treated in intensive care units in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Muscaritoli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the supplementation of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide in critically ill patients necessitating total parenteral nutrition (TPN improves clinical outcomes, reducing mortality, infection rate, and shortening ICU hospital lengths of stay (LOS, as compared to standard TPN regimens. Here we present a pharmacoeconomic evaluation of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide in critically ill patients admitted to Italian Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Methods: a Discrete Event Simulation model that incorporates outcomes rates from 200 Italian ICUs for over 60,000 patients, alanyl-glutamine dipeptide efficacy data synthesized by means of a Bayesian Random-Effects meta-analysis, and national cost data has been developed to evaluated the alternatives from the point of view of the hospital. Simulated clinical outcomes are death and infection rates in ICU, death rate in general ward, and hospital LOSs. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses are performed by varying all uncertain parameter values in a plausible range. Results: alanyl-glutamine dipeptide results more effective and less costly than standard TPN: reduced mortality rate (23.55% ± 15.2% vs 34.50% ± 2.06%, infection rate (15.91% ± 3.95% vs 18.97% ± 3.94%, and hospital LOS (25.47 ± 0.26 vs 26.00 ± 0.27 days come at a lower total cost per patient (23,922 ± 3,249 vs 24,145 ± 3,361 Euro. Treatment cost is completely offset by savings on ICU and antibiotic costs. The cost/effectiveness acceptability curve indicates an estimated 78% probability of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide resulting dominant and a 90% probability of resulting cost/effective for a willingness to pay up to 1,500 Euro for one patient death avoided. Conclusions: alanyl-glutamine dipeptide is expected to improve clinical outcomes and to do so with a concurrent saving for the hospital.

  12. Pattern of antidiabetic drugs use in type-2 diabetic patients in a medicine outpatient clinic of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bela Patel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is an important public health problem in developing countries. Drug utilisation study of antidiabetic agents is of paramount importance to promote rational drug use in diabetics and make available valuable information for the healthcare team. The aim of study was to investigate the drug utilization pattern in type-2 diabetic patients. Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in medicine outpatient clinic of tertiary care hospital, Ahmedabad for eight weeks. Patients with type-2 diabetes and on drug therapy for at least one month were included. Patients’ socio-demographic and clinical data were noted in a pre-designed proforma. Data was analysed by using SPSS version 20 and Excel 2007. Results: Total 114 patients were enrolled with mean (± standard deviation age and duration of diabetes of 56.8 ± 10.5 and 8.3 ± 9.4 years respectively. Male: Female ratio was 0.72:1. Mean fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels were 147.5 ± 73.1 and 215.6 ± 97.3 mg/dl respectively. Most common symptom was weakness/fatigue (77.2%. Hypertension (70.2% was most common co-morbid illness. Mean number of drugs prescribed were 7.8 ± 2.5. Total numbers of patients receiving more than five drugs were 89.5%. Most commonly used drug group was biguanides (87.7% followed by sulphonylureas (68.4%. Conclusion: Metformin (biguanide was the most utilized (87.7% antidiabetic drug for type-2 diabetes. This study revealed that the pattern of antidiabetic prescription was rational and largely compliant with NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(4.000: 485-491

  13. Seniors’ perspectives on care: a case study of the Alex Seniors health clinic, Calgary

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Marta; Rypien, Candace; Drummond, Neil; Harasym, Patricia; Nixon, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary care initiatives face an imperative to not only reduce barriers to care for their patients but also to uniquely accommodate the complex needs of at-risk patient populations. Patient-centered multidisciplinary care team models for primary care, like the Alex Seniors Clinic, are one approach for providing comprehensive care for marginalized seniors. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore patient perspectives on the responsiveness of the Alex Seniors Clinic to th...

  14. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting. PMID:27025116

  15. Health care retail clinics: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kaissi, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Amer Kaissi Department of Health Care Administration, Trinity University, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Retail clinics represent a major innovation with a radical value proposition in American health care: convenient locations and hours, walk-in care, short waiting times, and transparent pricing. Many organizations, groups, associations, and individual providers affect and are affected by retail clinics. The main winners from the retail clinic trend are insurance companies and third-party p...

  16. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Bashford Guy; Magee Christopher; Poulos Christopher J; Eagar Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care an...

  17. Computer assisted self interviewing in a sexual health clinic as part of routine clinical care; impact on service and patient and clinician views.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka A Vodstrcil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computer assisted self interviewing (CASI has been used at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC since 2008 for obtaining sexual history and identifying patients' risk factors for sexually transmitted infections (STIs. We aimed to evaluate the impact of CASI operating at MSHC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportion of patients who decline to answer questions using CASI was determined. We then compared consultation times and STI-testing rates during comparable CASI and non-CASI operating periods. Patients and staff completed anonymous questionnaires about their experience with CASI. 14,190 patients completed CASI during the audit period. Men were more likely than women to decline questions about the number of partners they had of the opposite sex (4.4% v 3.6%, p=0.05 and same sex (8.9% v 0%, p<0.001. One third (34% of HIV-positive men declined the number of partners they had and 11-17% declined questions about condom use. Women were more likely than men to decline to answer questions about condom use (2.9% v 2.3%, p=0.05. There was no difference in the mean consultation times during CASI and non-CASI operating periods (p≥0.17. Only the proportion of women tested for chlamydia differed between the CASI and non-CASI period (84% v 88% respectively, p<0.01. 267 patients completed the survey about CASI. Most (72% men and 69% women were comfortable using the computer and reported that all their answers were accurate (76% men and 71% women. Half preferred CASI but 18% would have preferred a clinician to have asked the questions. 39 clinicians completed the staff survey. Clinicians felt that for some STI risk factors (range 11%-44%, face-to-face questioning was more accurate than CASI. Only 5% were unsatisfied with CASI. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that CASI is acceptable to both patients and clinicians in a sexual health setting and does not adversely affect various measures of clinical output.

  18. National Patient Care Database (NPCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Patient Care Database (NPCD), located at the Austin Information Technology Center, is part of the National Medical Information Systems (NMIS). The NPCD...

  19. Dietitians Meet the NHS Agenda for Improved Patient Care and Clinical Outcomes through Nutrition Support Study as a Module Masters Level - A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona McCullough

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available "Aim: The aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of a Master's module in nutrition support to provide dietetic managers with evidence of changed practice from their staff including improved knowledge, confidence and change in practice including patient outcomes as part of a continuing education approach. Background: From 2008/09 the East Midlands Strategic Health Authority provided LBR (Learning beyond registration funding for a Masters module in Nutrition Support for graduate dietitians with 1-4 years experience working in its catchment area (known as band 5 and 6. The module comprised elements of pre-course work, taught and interactive peer working sets, a work place audit and a written case study. Method: Delegates from the first two modules were invited by means of an electronic questionnaire (covering a range of questions including about the content that had been learnt and the resulting effect on patient care to evaluate the course and to see whether it had had any effect on practice. Results: Feedback was very positive in that delegates felt more confident that they were working with a strong evidenced based knowledge which made them more pro-active in interpreting biochemistry and recommending appropriate interventions for complex cases. This, in addition to completion of a small audit project changed practice and improved patient care. Delegates self assessed themselves against nine clinical activities, two thirds of which were rated >7/10. Ratings for the lowest third were: nutrition diagnosis (4.2, objective setting (6.4, critically analysis of the working practice (6.7. Conclusion: The participants felt, based on personal reflection, that the module had changed clinical practice and equipped delegates to take on more specialist roles in the future. However, both the module and this evaluation highlighted shortfalls in relation to clinical objective setting and measuring outcomes. The aim of the present project was to evaluate

  20. Determinants of misconceptions about diabetes among Saudi diabetic patients attending diabetes clinic at a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Alsunni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the determinants of misconceptions about diabetes in patients registered with a diabetes clinic at a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional survey was carried out at a diabetes clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia, from January to December 2012. A total of 200 diabetic patients were interviewed using a questionnaire comprising 36 popular misconceptions. The total misconception score was calculated and categorized into low (0-12, moderate (13-24 and high (25-36 scores. The association of misconception score with various potential determinants was calculated using Chi-square test. Step-wise logistic regression was applied to the variables showing significant association with the misconception score in order to identify the determinants of misconceptions. Results: The mean age was 39.62 ± 16.7 and 112 (56% subjects were females. Type 1 diabetics were 78 (39%, while 122 (61% had Type 2 diabetes. Insulin was being used by 105 (52.5%, 124 (62% were self-monitoring blood glucose and 112 (56% were using diet control. Formal education on diabetes awareness had been received by 167 (83.5% before the interview. The mean misconception score was 10.29 ± 4.92 with 115 (57.5% subjects had low misconception scores (15 years since diagnosis, no self-monitoring, no dietary control and no diabetes education were all significantly (P 15 years since diagnosis, no self-monitoring, no diet control and no education about diabetes.

  1. Exploration of knowledge, attitudes and percepions regarding sexually transmitted infections among patients attending a primary health care clinic in Gauteng - Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.J. Molapo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections are a major public health problem in South Africa. The high incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in South Africa pose a serious threat to public health for two main reasons. Firstly, the long-term consequences of these infections are a major cause of loss of health or life, and secondly, sexually transmitted infections are important co-factors in driving the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS epidemic. The control and prevention of sexually transmitted infections has become an urgent priority. At a primary health care clinic, the nursing personnel experienced an increasing number of persons daily seeking treatment for sexually transmitted infections. The purpose of the study was therefore to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of people seeking treatment at Stanza Bopape Clinic regarding sexually transmitted infections. The study was a contextual, quantitative survey. The population was all patients (15 years and older who visited the clinic for a health-related problem during November 2004 to January 2005. The sampling method was convenient. The data gathering method was self-report using a structured questionnaire basic on current knowledge. The data analysis was done with descriptive statistics.

  2. Critical care clinical trials: getting off the roller coaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    Optimizing care in the ICU is an important goal. The heightened severity of illness in patients who are critically ill combined with the tremendous costs of critical care make the ICU an ideal target for improvement in outcomes and efficiency. Incorporation of evidence-based medicine into everyday practice is one method to optimize care; however, intensivists have struggled to define optimal practices because clinical trials in the ICU have yielded conflicting results. This article reviews examples where such conflicts have occurred and explores possible causes of these discrepant data as well as strategies to better use critical care clinical trials in the future. PMID:22948575

  3. Caring for transgender patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Alyssa

    2016-06-01

    Clinicians need a better understanding of transgender populations and a systematic approach to treating transgender patients medically and psychologically while managing any potential judgment or bias. This article explains key concepts, describes transgender patient health concerns, and discusses how to perform a comprehensive history. PMID:27228044

  4. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with better outcomes in diabetes care. Quality management was measured with newly developed questionnaires about organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, q...

  5. ClinicalKey: a point-of-care search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2013-01-01

    ClinicalKey is a new point-of-care resource for health care professionals. Through controlled vocabulary, ClinicalKey offers a cross section of resources on diseases and procedures, from journals to e-books and practice guidelines to patient education. A sample search was conducted to demonstrate the features of the database, and a comparison with similar tools is presented. PMID:23394422

  6. The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2011-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping

  7. Clinical profile of dengue fever infection in patients admitted in tertiary care centre Agroha, Hisar, Haryana, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Younus Shah

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Significant differences in the clinical profile is possibly because of infection with different serotypes of dengue virus (DENV, concurrent/sequential infection of more than one serotype, and differences in host immune responses associated with host genetic variations. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2146-2149

  8. Carepaths: a framework for quality patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The goals of a carepath are to provide a framework for quality patient care, enhance collaborative practice, improve resource utilization, and increase patient satisfaction. Carepaths are designed to move the patient toward specific clinical outcomes, which have been defined by a multidisciplinary team. Carepaths enhance the quality improvement process by tracking clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this report is to share the 1996 results of our breast cancer carepath. Methods: In 1994 the multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee of the Division of Radiation Oncology constructed a carepath for women with breast cancer receiving breast or chest wall radiation. Eleven clinical outcomes were defined which reflected the educational and selfcare focus of the carepath. Recording on the carepath of patient attainment of the outcomes was done by the RN, RTT and MD. Patient satisfaction tools were designed by the quality improvement committee in conjunction with the Department of Marketing Support. Each patient was given a written survey at two points along the carepath: post simulation and post treatment. Results: Ninety-five women were placed on the breast carepath in 1996. Outcomes were reviewed for 40 of these carepaths. The return rate of patient satisfaction surveys post simulation and post treatment approached 99%. Overall satisfaction was high with 76% of patients feeling 'very satisfied' with the simulation process and 93% 'very satisfied' with the treatment experience. Common themes noted in anecdotes related to comfort and privacy issues. Conclusions: Based on our experience, carepaths facilitated the structuring of a comprehensive and collaborative approach to patient care. Strategies for process improvement were guided by the ongoing surveillance of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

  9. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  10. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients...... with type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action...

  11. Reasons Why Individuals Remain Uninsured Under the Affordable Care Act: Experiences of Patients at a Student-Run Free Clinic in Michigan, a Medicaid Expansion State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Brian S; Laux, Molly A; Levin, Carolyn C; Huang, Jiaxin; Williams, Brent C

    2016-04-01

    Since the enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many people remain uninsured. While studies have examined this population, few have explored patients' experiences seeking insurance. To elucidate these individuals' perspectives, we surveyed patients (n = 80) at the University of Michigan Student-Run Free Clinic concerning their activity accessing insurance. Over half of respondents had sought insurance in the past 6 months; 57 % of respondents qualified for Medicaid by self-reported income (≤138 % FPL) and all but one were eligible for tax credits on the Health Insurance Marketplace. However, only 35 % of apparently Medicaid-eligible respondents had recently applied. There was no significant difference in the rate of applying for those above the income cutoff (p = 0.901). Perceived expense of plans and belief of ineligibility for Medicaid discouraged respondents from actively seeking insurance. Personalized outreach emphasizing new Medicaid eligibility requirements and tax credits may be needed to facilitate Medicaid enrollment for some uninsured persons under the ACA. PMID:26512012

  12. Effectiveness of diclofenac versus acetaminophen in primary care patients with knee osteoarthritis: [NTR1485], DIPA-Trial: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohnen Arthur M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis is the most frequent chronic joint disease which causes pain and disability of especially hip and knee. According to international guidelines and the Dutch general practitioners guidelines for non-traumatic knee symptoms, acetaminophen should be the pain medication of first choice for osteoarthritis. However, of all prescribed pain medication in general practice, 90% consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs compared to 10% of acetaminophen. Because general practitioners may lack evidence showing a similar efficacy of acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, we present the design of a randomized open-label trial to investigate the efficacy of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac compared with acetaminophen in new consulters with knee osteoarthritis in general practice. Methods/Design Patients aged 45 years or older consulting their general practitioner with non-traumatic knee pain, meeting the clinical American College of Rheumatology criteria, and with a pain severity score of 2 or higher (on a 0-10 scale, will be randomly allocated to either diclofenac (maximum daily dose of 150 mg or acetaminophen (maximum daily dose of 3000 mg for 2 weeks and, if required, an additional 1-2 weeks, with a total follow-up period of 12 weeks. The primary outcomes are knee pain measured with a daily diary, and pain and function measured with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS at baseline, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12-weeks follow-up. Secondary outcomes are patients' perceived recovery, quality of life, medical, patient, and productivity costs, compliance to therapy, co-interventions, and adverse reactions. Discussion The successful completion of this trial would lead to a better understanding of which medication should be used in the treatment of primary care patients with mild knee osteoarthritis. Trial registration Dutch trial registry NTR1485.

  13. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. METHODS: This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. RESULTS: Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  14. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry - a tool for improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of dementia patients in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Religa

    Full Text Available The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se. The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes.The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007-2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses.

  15. Clinical importance of re-interpretation of PET/CT scanning in patients referred to a tertiary care medical centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfgren, Johan; Loft, Annika; Barbosa de Lima, Vinicius Araújo;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate, in a controlled prospective manner with double-blind read, whether there are differences in interpretations of PET/CT scans at our tertiary medical centre, Rigshospitalet, compared to the external hospitals. METHODS: Ninety consecutive patients referred to our department who...... had an external F-18-FDG PET/CT scan were included. Only information that had been available at the time of the initial reading at the external hospital was available at re-interpretation. Teams with one radiologist and one nuclear medicine physician working side by side performed the re...

  16. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  17. Study on Drug Prescribing Pattern in Dengue Patients in a Tertiary Care Hospital – A tool to teach Clinical Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Atif Beg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim: Dengue fever (DF is the most common arboviral infection of mankind gaining global attention. Data about drug usage patterns in DF in India are lacking.The present study was undertaken to analyze drug utilization pattern of dengue infections to teach certain basic skills to MBBS students which will form an integral component of practising rational therapeutics. Methods: A total no of 122 cases were followed up by the 5th semester 2nd Professional undergraduate students in the department of pharmacology at hospital wards of SGRRIM &HS, Dehradun from June 2012 to July 2014. Patients were analysed on various parameters using WHO drug use indicators and National List of Essential Medicines. Results: A total of 122 prescriptions were analyzed. Male:Female ratio was (72.95%, 27.05% Age wise distribution of patients was done: 0-15 years were 9 (7.34%, 16-30 years were 45(36.88%, 31-45 years were 46(37.70%, 46-60 years were 18 (14.75% and >60 years were 4 (3.28%. A total of 614 drugs were prescribed. 169(27.52% antimicrobials, 99(16.12% antipyretics, 91(14.82% antacids, 65(10.59% multivitamins, 55(8.96% antiemetics and 135(21.99% in miscellaneous category were prescribed. 243(40.23% oral drugs and 361(59.77% injectable drugs were prescribed. 5.03 drugs per prescription were prescribed. 377(62.42% drugs were prescribed from National Essential Medicine List.100% drugs were prescribed by brand names. Conclusion: Majority of the drugs were prescribed from national essential medicine list. As the incidence of DF is increasing with epidemics, the demand for specific treatment guidelines is in great need.

  18. Comparison of 5 health care professionals’ratings of the clinical significance of drug related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Christine; Hojsted, Jette; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel;

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients have medicines reviews conducted by different health care professionals in different settings. Introducing a clinical panel to drug related problems (DRPs) to evaluate their clinical significance is common practice. The clinical panel discuss the potential consequences and com...

  19. Gay patients. Context for care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, G; Saunders, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Gays and lesbians are a part of our society and our practices: real people with real lives, not stereotypes. Understanding their inner world and their social milieu is the first step to providing care that is holistic and appropriate. The "coming out" process and other unique health issues are described. Guidance is provided on how to identify and relate to gay and lesbian patients.

  20. Evaluation of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD: Information and health education feedback for improving clinical monitoring and quality-of-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferro Juan J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a health problem that is becoming increasingly attended-to in Primary Care (PC. However, there is a scarcity of health-care programs and studies exploring the implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG. The principal objective of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients to improve the grade of clinical control and the quality-of-life (QoL of the patients via a feedback on their state-of-health. A training plan for the health-care professionals is based on CPG and health education. Method/Design Multi-centred, before-after, quasi experimental, prospective study involving an intervention group and a control group of individuals followed-up for 12 months. The patients receive attention from urban and semi-urban Primary Care Centres (PCC within the administrative area of the Costa de Ponent (near Barcelona. All the pacients corresponding to the PCC of one sub-area were assigned to the intervention group and patients from the rest of sub-areas to the group control. The intervention includes providing data to the health-care professionals (clinician/nurse derived from a clinical history and an interview. A course of training focused on aspects of CPG, motivational interview and health education (tobacco, inhalers, diet, physical exercise, physiotherapy. The sample random includes a total of 801 patients (≥ 40 years of age, recorded as having COPD, receiving attention in the PCC or at home, who have had at least one clinical visit, and who provided written informed consent to participation in the study. Data collected include socio-demographic characteristics, drug treatment, exacerbations and hospital admissions, evaluation of inhaler use, tobacco consumption and life-style and health-care resources consumed. The main endpoints are dyspnoea, according to the modified scale of the Medical

  1. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.;

    2005-01-01

    randomized clinical trial to clarify whether hospital-based comprehensive CR is superior to usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk for ischemic heart disease. A combined primary outcome measure included total mortality, myocardial infarction, or...... management, and clinical assessment. Study Population Of 5060 discharged patients, 1614 (32%) were eligible for the trial and 770 patients were randomized (47% of those eligible). Participants were younger (P < .001) and had less comorbidity than nonparticipants (P < .03). Conclusion Our trial shows that a...

  2. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial)--design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    2005-01-01

    randomized clinical trial to clarify whether hospital-based comprehensive CR is superior to usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk for ischemic heart disease. A combined primary outcome measure included total mortality, myocardial infarction, or...... management, and clinical assessment. STUDY POPULATION: Of 5060 discharged patients, 1614 (32%) were eligible for the trial and 770 patients were randomized (47% of those eligible). Participants were younger (P < .001) and had less comorbidity than nonparticipants (P < .03). CONCLUSION: Our trial shows that a...

  3. [Interdisciplinary care for a patient suffering from Diogenes syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggah-Alioua, Sabah; Berger, Jérôme; Cheseaux, Michel

    2014-06-25

    Interdisciplinarity is the combined care of a patient by two or more healthcare professionals. Taking into account the contribution of the different healthcare partners improves patient follow-up, quality of the care and use of resources. General practitioner (GP) becomes the pivot of a combined interdisciplinary ambulatory care allowing a prolonged staying at home and avoiding the multiplication of care offers. This paper, by the clinical description of a patient suffering from Diogenes Syndrome, allows a cross of the care between the GP, home nurse and pharmacist. It deals with follow-up questions, acceptance, objectives of treatment, communication between healthcare partners and "false notes" in the follow-up. PMID:25055477

  4. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families. PMID:24863582

  5. Impact of therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in routine clinical management of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and related health care costs: a real-life study in a large cohort of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrone V

    2014-07-01

    that TDM had been used in 143 of these patients, among whom adherence with therapy was significantly higher than among those in whom TDM had not been used (94% versus 78%. In TDM-controlled patients, the mean length of HIV-related hospitalization stay and mean cost of hospitalization were significantly reduced with respect to those observed in the group in which TDM had not been used (7.21 days versus 29.47 days and €293 versus €688, respectively.Conclusion: Inclusion of TDM as part of routine clinical optimization of drug dosing in HIV-infected patients is associated with higher adherence to therapy, reduced length of hospitalization stay, and reduced cost of illness.Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, therapeutic drug monitoring, health care costs

  6. Application of high quality nursing model to clinical nursing care of patients with fracture%优质护理模式在骨折患者临床护理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王容

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨优质护理模式在骨折患者临床护理中的应用效果。方法:选择我院骨科施行优质护理前后的住院患者130例,将施行优质护理前的65例患者分为对照组,施行优质护理后的65例患者分为观察组,出院前1 d比较住院期间两组临床护理信任度、临床护理质量、护理风险事件发生情况及临床护理满意度。结果:两组患者住院期间临床护理信任度、临床护理质量、护理风险事件发生例数及临床护理满意度比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:采用优质护理模式对骨折患者进行临床护理,可促进患者恢复,提高临床护理满意度,协调医护配合,值得推广应用。%Objective:To investigate the effect of application of high quality nursing model to clinical nursing care of patients with frac -ture.Methods:130 hospitalized patients in the department of orthopedics of our hospital were divided into the observation and control groups (65 cases in each group).The patients in the observation group were given nursing care according to the high quality nursing mod -el.The patient's trust in clinical nursing care ,the quality of clinical nursing care ,the incidence of nursing risk events and patient's satisfac-tion with clinical nursing care in the duration of hospitalization were compared between the two groups one day before patient 's discharge . Results:There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the comparison of the patient 's trust in clinical nursing care,the quality of clinical nursing care ,the incidence of nursing risk events and patient's satisfaction with clinical nursing care in the dura-tion of hospitalization (P<0.05).Conclusion:The high quality nursing model applied to clinical nursing care for the patients with fracture can promote the recovery of patients and improve their satisfaction with clinical nursing care .

  7. Satisfaction with Quality of Care Received by Patients without National Health Insurance Attending a Primary Care Clinic in a Resource-Poor Environment of a Tertiary Hospital in Eastern Nigeria in the Era of Scaling up the Nigerian Formal Sector Health Insurance Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Iloh, GUP; Ofoedu, JN; Njoku, PU; Okafor, GOC; Amadi, AN; Godswill-Uko, EU

    2013-01-01

    Background: The increasing importance of the concept of patients’ satisfaction as a valuable tool for assessing quality of care is a current global healthcare concerns as regards consumer-oriented health services. Aim: This study assessed satisfaction with quality of care received by patients without national health insurance (NHI) attending a primary care clinic in a resource-poor environment of a tertiary hospital in South-Eastern Nigeria. Subject and Methods: This was a cross-sectional stu...

  8. A ‘good hospital’: Nurse and patient perceptions of good clinical care for HIV-positive people on antiretroviral treatment in rural Zimbabwe—A mixed-methods qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Catherine; Scott, Kerry; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antiretroviral treatment for HIV is gradually being made available across sub- Saharan Africa. With antiretroviral treatment, HIV can be approached as a chronic, manageable condition rather than a shorter-term issue of palliative care. This treatment involves repeated interaction between health staff and patients for ongoing check-ups and prescription refills. Objective: This study aimed to understand patient and healthcare staff perceptions of good clinical antiretrovir...

  9. Analysis of clinical nursing care of patients with bedsore of critical%危重患者压疮临床护理分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢秋映

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the targeted care of critically ill patients with pressure sores pressure sore incidence of impact between. Methods: from January 2010 to January 2012 in our hospital,the hospital treatment of critically ill patients,through the development of better care measures and methods to increase the quality of patient care efforts. All patients were divided into observation group and the control group,the observation group targeted care,layered clear lines of responsibility,control group received conventional care,statistics and analysis of 200 cases of hospitalized patients with pressure sores occurred and its results for comparison. The results: the patients after the treatment and care of through the system,the discharge in many ways have varying degrees of improvement. The study found that only 7 patients of the observation group,100 patients with pressure sores. Original less than 16 cases in the control group. Conclusion: The products targeted care in the care of critically ill patients with pressure sores should be vigorously promoted and use.%  目的:探讨针对性护理对危重患者压疮发生率的影响及两者间的关系。方法:选择2010年1月~2012年1月在我院住院治疗的危重患者,通过制定更好的护理措施及方法,加大对患者的优质护理力度。将所有患者分为观察组和对照组,观察组采用针对性的护理方式,分层明确责任,对照组采用传统的护理方式,对200例住院患者的压疮发生情况进行统计和分析,并对其结果进行比对。结果:患者经过系统的治疗和护理,出院时在许多方面均有不同程度的改善。研究发现,观察组100例只有7例患者出现了压疮现象,远少于对照组的16例。结论:有针对性的护理在危重患者的压疮护理中应该得到大力推广和使用。

  10. Electronic access to care system: improving patient's access to clinical information through an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system and Web portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nhan; Marinkovich, Andre; Koisch, John; Wheeler, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Our clinical providers spend an estimated four hours weekly answering phone messages from patients. Our nurses spend five to ten hours weekly on returning phone calls. Most of this time is spent conveying recent clinical results, reviewing with patients the discharge instructions such as consults or studies ordered during the office visits, and handling patients' requests for medication renewals. Over time this will lead to greater patients' dissatisfaction because of lengthy waiting time and lack of timely access to their medical information. This would also lead to greater nursing and providers' dissatisfaction because of unreasonable work load. PMID:14728335

  11. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Court JH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer H Court,1 Michael W Austin1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Neath Port Talbot Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UKPurpose: Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ.Patients and methods: One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records.Results: Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients’ understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this.Conclusion: A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non

  12. Bullying, mentoring, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    The literature suggests that acts of bullying are a root cause of new nurses leaving their units or the profession entirely and have the potential to worsen the nursing shortage. As an effective way to address bullying in the perioperative setting, mentoring benefits the nursing profession. Mentoring can have a direct influence on nurses' longevity in a health care organization, thereby strengthening the nursing workforce. Magnet-designated hospitals support the importance of mentor-mentee relationships for positive employee retention and positive recruitment outcomes. One of the most important tasks that a mentor should undertake is that of a role model. Establishing a culture of mentoring requires authentic leadership, genuine caring and respect for employees, and open communication. The entire nursing profession benefits from a culture of mentoring, as do the patients and families who receive care. PMID:24766920

  13. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL. PMID:16900092

  14. Clinical, epidemiological and virological features of dengue virus infections in vietnamese patients presenting to primary care facilities with acute undifferentiated fever

    OpenAIRE

    Thai, Khoa T. D.; Phuong, Hoang Lan; Thanh Nga, Tran Thi; Giao, Phan Trong; Hung, Le Quoc; Van Nam, Nguyen; Binh, Tran Quang; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy; Hien, Tran Thinh; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Menno D. de Jong; de Vries, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives To explore clinical and virological characteristics and describe the epidemiology of dengue in patients who presented with acute undifferentiated fever (AUF) at primary health centers (PHC) in Binh Thuan Province, Vietnam. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted from 2001 to 2006 to study the aetiology in AUF patients. Demographic and clinical information was obtained, and dengue polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and serology were performed on a random sele...

  15. Wound Care in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Orhan Çizmeci; Samet Vasfi Kuvat

    2011-01-01

    Wound care in one of the most important prognostic factors in burn victims. Open wound carries risks for infection due to hypothermia, protein and fluid losses. In addition, unhealed wounds are the major risk factors for acute-subacute or chronic complications in burn patients. Although no exact algorithm exists for open wound treatment, early escarectomy or debridement together with grafting is the best option. Ointments together with topical epithelizing agents without dressings are generea...

  16. Responding to vulnerability in old age: patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abley, Clare

    Patient-centred care is a term widely used in health policy and is familiar to staff as a principle or commonly agreed approach to care. However, nursing and multidisciplinary teams often do not agree how it should be provided for older patients. This article outlines three different models of patient-centred care applicable to the care of older people. The article also explores the concept of vulnerability in old age, highlighting differences between the perspectives of older people and those of professionals and how clinical practice can be improved to achieve a more patient-centred approach. The links between patient-centred care and vulnerability in old age are considered along with the implications of this for clinical practice. PMID:23240515

  17. Clinical and Biochemical Data of Adult Thalassemia Major patients (TM) with Multiple Endocrine Complications (MEC) versus TM Patients with Normal Endocrine Functions: A long-term Retrospective Study (40 years) in a Tertiary Care Center in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elsedfy, Heba; Soliman, Ashraf T.; Elhakim, Ihab Zaki; Kattamis, Christos; Soliman, Nada A.; Elalaily, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is well known that the older generation of adult TM patients has a higher incidence of morbidities and co-morbidities. At present, little information is available on adult TM patients with multiple endocrine complications (MEC). The main objectives of this longitudinal retrospective survey were: 1) to establish the incidence and progression of MEC (3 or more) in TM patients; 2) to compare the clinical, laboratory and imaging data to a sex and age-matched group of TM patients without MEC; 3) to assess the influence of iron overload represented by serum ferritin (peak and mean annual value at the last endocrine observation). Patients and methods The study was started in January 1974 and was completed by the same physician at the end of December 2015. The registry database of the regularly followed TM patients from diagnosis included 145 adults (> 18 years). All TM patients were of Italian ethnic origin. Eleven out of 145 patients (7.5 %) developed MEC. Twenty-four other patients (12 females and 12 males) had a normal endocrine function (16.5 %) and served as controls. Results In our survey, four important, relevant aspects emerged in the MEC group. These included the late age at the start of chelation therapy with desferrioxamine mesylate (DFO); the higher serum ferritin peak (8521.8 ± 5958.9 vs 3575.2 ± 1801.4 ng/ml); the upper proportion of splenectomized (81.8 % vs. 28.5%) patients and poor compliance registered mainly during the peripubertal and pubertal age (72.7 % vs.16.6 %) in TM patients developing MEC versus those without endocrine complications. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed in all TM patients between LIC and final height (r: −0.424; p = 0.031). Conclusions Our study supports the view that simultaneous involvement of more than one endocrine gland is not uncommon (7.5 %). It mainly occurred in TM patients who started chelation therapy with DFO late in life and who had irregular/poor compliance to treatment. Therefore

  18. CLINICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL DATA OF ADULT THALASSEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS (TM WITH MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE COMPLICATIONS (MEC VERSUS TM PATIENTS WITH NORMAL ENDOCRINE FUNCTIONS: A RETROSPECTIVE LONG-TERM STUDY (40 YEARS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Introduction: It is well known that the older generation of adult TM patients has a higher incidence of morbidities and co-morbidities. At present, little information is available on adult TM patients with multiple endocrine complications (MEC. The main objectives of this longitudinal retrospective survey were: 1 to establish the incidence and progression of MEC (3 or more in TM patients; 2 to compare the clinical, laboratory and imaging data to a sex and age-matched group of TM patients without MEC; 3 to assess the influence of iron overload represented by serum ferritin (peak and mean annual value at the last endocrine observation. Patients and Methods: The study was started in January 1974 and was completed by the same physician at the end of December 2015. The registry database of the regularly followed TM patients from diagnosis included 145 adults (> 18 years. All TM patients were of Italian ethnic origin. Eleven out of 145 patients (7.5 % developed MEC. Twenty-four other patients (12 females and 12 males had a normal endocrine function (16.5 % and served as controls. Results: In our survey, four important, relevant aspects emerged in the MEC group. These included the late age at the start of chelation therapy with desferrioxamine mesylate (DFO; the higher serum ferritin peak (8521.8 ± 5958.9 vs 3575.2± 1801.4 ng/ml ; the higher percentage of splenectomized (81.8 % vs. 28.5% patients and poor compliance registered mainly during the peripubertal and pubertal age (72.7 % vs.16.6 % in TM patients developing MEC versus those without endocrine complications. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed in all TM patients between LIC and final height (r: -0.424; p= 0.031. Conclusions: Our study supports the view that simultaneous involvement of more than one endocrine gland is not uncommon (7.5 %. It mainly occurred in TM patients who started chelation therapy with DFO late in life and who had irregular/poor compliance to

  19. Ferric Citrate, an Iron-Based Phosphate Binder, Reduces Health Care Costs in Patients on Dialysis Based on Randomized Clinical Trial Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rodby, Roger A.; Umanath, Kausik; Niecestro, Robert; Christopher Bond, T.; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia; Dwyer, Jamie P.; . .

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require phosphate binders for hyperphosphatemia and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and intravenous (IV) iron for anemia. Ferric citrate (FC) is a novel, iron-based phosphate binder that increases iron stores and decreases IV iron and ESA usage while maintaining hemoglobin levels, and may decrease the cost of ESRD care. The study objectives were to (1) quantify differences in ESA and IV iron usage among ESRD patients receiving F...

  20. Clinical relevance of pulse pressure variations for predicting fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients: the grey zone approach

    OpenAIRE

    Biais, Matthieu; Ehrmann, Stephan; Mari, Arnaud; Conte, Benjamin; Mahjoub, Yazine; Desebbe, Olivier; Pottecher, Julien; Lakhal, Karim; Benzekri-Lefevre, Dalila; Molinari, Nicolas; Boulain, Thierry; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Muller, Laurent; ,

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pulse pressure variation (PPV) has been shown to predict fluid responsiveness in ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The present study was aimed at assessing the diagnostic accuracy of PPV for prediction of fluid responsiveness by using the grey zone approach in a large population. Methods The study pooled data of 556 patients from nine French ICUs. Hemodynamic (PPV, central venous pressure (CVP) and cardiac output) and ventilator variables were recorded. Responders we...

  1. Nursing care of patients with nephrostomy

    OpenAIRE

    ZIKOVÁ, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The subject of the Bachelor thesis is Nursing care of patient with nephrostomy. Despite the fact that creation of nephrostomy is not as common as for example colostomy, patients with nephrostomies are on the increase. Nursing care is based not only on complex nursing of patient but also on careful raising his awareness and education contributing to complete self-sufficiency in the area of the care of nephrostomy. Nurse has to approach patients with nephrostomy individually with consideration ...

  2. Bedside Reporting: Protocols for Improving Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Teresa D; Howell, Teresa L

    2015-12-01

    Bedside reporting continues to gain much attention and is being investigated to support the premise that "hand-off" communications enhance efficacy in delivery of patient care. Patient inclusion in shift reports enhances good patient outcomes, increased satisfaction with care delivery, enhanced accountability for nursing professionals, and improved communications between patients and their direct care providers. This article discusses the multiple benefits of dynamic dialogue between patients and the health care team, challenges often associated with bedside reporting, and protocols for managing bedside reporting with the major aim of improving patient care. Nursing research supporting the concept of bedside reporting is examined. PMID:26596661

  3. Effect of Self Care Education with and without Telephone Follow-Up on the Level of Hope in Renal Dialysis Patients: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorgholami, Farzad; Mansoori, Parisa; Montaseri, Zohreh; Najafi, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various strategies such as teaching self care to hemodialysis patients have been employed to increase the level of their hope. This study aimed at examining the effects of a telephone follow-up program on the level of hope in a self care education program. Methods: In this single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 75 hemodialysis patients, selected by convenient sampling, were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=25 each) including a control, a self care education, or a self care education with telephone follow-up. The control group received the routine care. The self care education group received 5 instruction sessions. The telephone follow-up group had similar instructional sessions followed by telephone calls during the subsequent 2 months. Data, collected using demographic information list and Miller’s hope questionnaire, were analyzed using Chi-Square, t-test, and one-way ANOVA followed by Scheffee test. Results: There was no significant difference among the scores of hope in the three groups before the intervention (P=0.40). However, after the intervention, the level of hope in the self care education group and self care education plus telephone follow-up groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (P=0.001). Moreover, the level of hope in the group with self care education plus telephone follow-up was significantly (P=0.001) more than that of the self care education group. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that teaching followed by telephone follow-up was associated with higher levels of hope. Therefore, such a strategy may be employed to improve the quality of life of patients with renal dialysis. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014042617440N1 PMID:27382592

  4. Observational study assessing demographic, economic and clinical factors associated with access and utilization of health care services of patients with multiple sclerosis under treatment with interferon beta-1b (EXTAVIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Hadjigeorgiou

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS results in an extensive use of the health care system, even within the first years of diagnosis. The effectiveness and accessibility of the health care system may affect patients' quality of life. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the health care resource use of MS patients under interferon beta-1b (EXTAVIA treatment in Greece, the demographic or clinical factors that may affect this use and also patient satisfaction with the health care system. Structured interviews were conducted for data collection. In total, 204 patients (74.02% females, mean age (SD 43.58 (11.42 years were enrolled in the study. Analysis of the reported data revealed that during the previous year patients made extensive use of health services in particular neurologists (71.08% visited neurologists in public hospitals, 66.67% in private offices and 48.53% in insurance institutes and physiotherapists. However, the majority of the patients (52.45% chose as their treating doctor private practice neurologists, which may reflect accessibility barriers or low quality health services in the public health system. Patients seemed to be generally satisfied with the received health care, support and information on MS (84.81% were satisfied from the information provided to them. Patients' health status (as denoted by disease duration, disability status and hospitalization needs and insurance institute were found to influence their visits to neurologists. Good adherence (up to 70.1% to the study medication was reported. Patients' feedback on currently provided health services could direct these services towards the patients' expectations.

  5. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

  6. Clinical, epidemiological and virological features of dengue virus infections in vietnamese patients presenting to primary care facilities with acute undifferentiated fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Khoa T.D.; Phuong, Hoang Lan; Thanh Nga, Tran Thi; Giao, Phan Trong; Hung, Le Quoc; Van Nam, Nguyen; Binh, Tran Quang; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy; Hien, Tran Thinh; van Doorn, H. Rogier; de Jong, Menno D.; de Vries, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives To explore clinical and virological characteristics and describe the epidemiology of dengue in patients who presented with acute undifferentiated fever (AUF) at primary health centers (PHC) in Binh Thuan Province, Vietnam. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted from 2001 to 2006 to study the aetiology in AUF patients. Demographic and clinical information was obtained, and dengue polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and serology were performed on a random selection of patients. Results Three hundred fifty-one serologically confirmed dengue patients including 68 primary and 283 secondary infections were included in this study. In 25% (86/351) dengue virus (DENV) was detected by RT-PCR among which 32 DENV-1, 16 DENV-2, 1 DENV-3 and 37 DENV-4 were identified. The predominant dengue serotype varied by year with seasonal fluctuation: DENV-4 in 2001–2002, DENV-1 and DENV-2 from 2003 to 2006. Primary dengue was more common in children. Higher viraemia levels (P = 0.010) were found in primary infections compared to secondary infections. DENV-1 infected patients had higher viraemia levels than DENV-2 (P = 0.003) and DENV-4 (P < 0.001) infected patients. Clinical symptoms were often seen in adults. Few differences in clinical symptoms were found between primary and secondary infection and no significant differences in clinical symptoms between the serotypes were observed. Conclusions Our data provide insight in the epidemiology, clinical profile and virological features of mild symptomatic dengue patients who presented to PHC with AUF in Vietnam. PMID:20080126

  7. Depression prevalence and primary care among vulnerable patients at a free outpatient clinic in Paris, France, in 2010: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Rondet, Claire; Cornet, Philippe; Kaoutar, Bacha; Lebas, Jacques; Chauvin, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on the prevalence of depression and on how a depressive episode prompts the sufferer to seek primary care are not scarce, but the available evidence on the prevalence of depression among immigrants and poor people who frequent general practice facilities is scarce. The Baudelaire Outpatient Clinic at the Saint-Antoine Hospital in Paris provides free medical and social assistance to the poor and/or uninsured. The goal of our study was to estimate the prevalence of depression a...

  8. A Pharmacist-Led Point-of-Care INR Clinic: Optimizing Care in a Family Health Team Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Rossiter; Gursharan Soor; Deanna Telner; Babak Aliarzadeh; Jennifer Lake

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Monitoring patients' international normalized ratio (INR) within a family medicine setting can be challenging. Novel methods of doing this effectively and in a timely manner are important for patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led point-of-care (POC) INR clinic. Methods. At a community-based academic Family Health Team in Toronto, Canada, charts of patients with atrial fibrillation managed by a pharmacist with usual care (bloodt...

  9. Clinical evaluation of 413 Thalassemic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korosdari Gh.H

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder in Iran and around the world and these patients need regular careful care. The present study reports results of routine examination of patients visited Thalassemia clinic of Tehran. Data about clinical and laboratory examinations of 413 Thalassemic were extracted and analyzed. The prevalence of heart complications, diabetes, growth retardation, delayed puberty and primary and secondary amenorrhea was 9%, 8%, 21.3%, 3.1% and 6.3%, respectively. 44% didn't have secondary sex characteristics. Splenectomy had been done for 67.2% of cases. HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb were positive in 1.9%, 57.4% and 43%, respectively. We concluded that blood transfusion standards in this clinic was acceptable, whereas because of poor knowledge, iron chelating is unfavorable.

  10. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyse key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. Findings – Patient involvement is important in Denmark at the...... research results may lack generalisability. Practical implications – The paper includes implications for the development of patient involvement in health care. Originality/value – This paper fulfils a need to study different types of patient involvement and to develop a theoretical framework for...... characterizing and analysing such involvement strategies. Keywords: patient involvement, health care...

  11. Design and application of a psychological care clinical pathway table for elderly patients%老年患者心理护理路径表的设计与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓媛; 勇琴歌

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the methods and effects of a psychologial care clinical pathway table applied in elderly patients. Methods The psychological care clinical pathway was designed based on the characteristics and psychological needs of elderly patients,and it included 7 steps to guide the nurses to carry out the psychological care. Results All of the nurses (100.00% ) recognized that the clinical pathway of psychological care was helpful for them to carry out psychological care ,96.67% of the patients claimed that nurees became actively concerned about patients'negative emotions,and 100.00% of the patients experienced more psychological supports. The satisfaction of patients to nursing were improved, the differences were statistically significant (P<0.01 or P <0.05). Conclusion Application of the psychological care clinical pathway table can promote the quality of psychological care services in the elderly ward.%目的 探讨老年患者心理护理路径表的应用方法与效果.方法 根据老年内科患者住院特点及心理需求设计开发临床心理护理路径表,分7个步骤指导责任护士开展心理护理.结果 100.00%的护士认为心理护理路径表能够有效帮助护士开展心理护理服务;观察组96.67%的患者认为责任护士能够积极关注自己的情绪变化;100.00%的患者感受到护士的心理支持,因而对护理服务满意度提高,与对照组比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 心理护理路径表有助于提高老年病房心理护理服务质量.

  12. 临床药师参与感染性休克患者的药学监护实践%Clinical pharmacists providing pharmaceutical care for patient with septic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞恩珠; 胡毅坚

    2013-01-01

    临床药师深入临床一线为感染性休克患者提供药学监护,对药物治疗方案进行分析、审核,为医生提供咨询,提出合理用药建议,对护士进行用药知识教育.临床药师参与解决临床药物治疗实际问题,可使患者更大限度受益.%Clinical pharmacists took part in inspection of ward and provided pharmaceutical care for patient with septic shock. Clinical pharmacists checked pharmaco - therapeutic programs with their professional knowledge, answered doctors' inquires, made recommendations on rational drug use, exerted drug knowledge education on nurses. It can benefit patients to a greater extent that clinical pharmacists resolve problems of clinical therapy.

  13. Integrating wound care research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chester H; Bogie, Kath M

    2007-10-01

    The process of integrating wound care research into clinical practice incorporates research methodology--i.e., the standardized practices, procedures, and rules by which research is performed--and an evidence-based approach. Using examples from the literature and clinician experience treating pressure ulcers in a 32-bed regional spinal cord injury unit in a tertiary referral center in Cleveland, Ohio, the authors describe this process and review the challenges faced by an interdisciplinary skin care team tasked with implementing evidence-based care. Additional considerations include determining the amount of current wound care that is evidence-based and whether wound prevention and care outcomes are improved through the use of evidence-based medicine. Five years after establishing the skin care team and implementing evidence-based care, improvements in care processes and short-term outcomes--specifically, pressure ulcer prevention and treatment protocols including documentation--have been realized. Studies to ascertain the effects of these changes on long-term outcomes are planned. PMID:17978411

  14. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskes, Anne M; Brölmann, Fleur E; Sumpio, Bauer E;

    2012-01-01

    The care for chronic and acute wounds is a substantial problem around the world. This has led to a plethora of products to accelerate healing. Unfortunately, the quality of studies evaluating the efficacy of such wound care products is frequently low. Randomized clinical trials are universally...... acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects, as they eliminate several sources of bias. We propose a framework for the design and conduct of future randomized clinical trials that will offer strong scientific evidence for the effectiveness of wound care interventions. While...... randomization is a necessary feature of a robust comparative study, it is not sufficient to ensure a study at low risk of bias. Randomized clinical trials should also ensure adequate allocation concealment and blinding of outcome assessors, apply intention-to-treat analysis, and use patient-oriented outcomes...

  15. Clinical knowledge management at the point of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong-Lieng Teng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the developing world, clinical knowledgemanagement in primary care has a long way to go.Clinical decision support systems, despite its promise torevolutionise healthcare, is slow in its implementationdue to the lack of financial investment in informationtechnology. Point-of-care resources, such ascomprehensive electronic textbooks delivered via theweb or mobile devices, have yet to be fully utilised bythe healthcare organisation or individual clinicians.Increasing amount of applicable knowledge of goodquality (e.g. clinical practice guidelines and otherpre-appraised resources are now available via theinternet. The policy makers and clinicians need tobe more informed about the potential benefits andlimitations of these new tools and resources and makethe necessary budgetary provision and learn how best toharness them for patient care.

  16. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  17. 临床药师对1例胆道感染患者的药学监护%Pharmaceutical Care of Clinical Pharmacist for One Patient with Biliary Tract Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海燕; 胡斌

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the pharmaceutical care performed by clinical pharmacist for one patient with biliary tract infec -tion to investigate the role of clinical pharmacists in clinical treatment .Methods:The clinical pharmacist supervised the whole process of treatment for the patient and optimized the treatment regimen together with the clinical doctors to achieve good efficacy .Results:With the cooperation of clinical pharmacist , the clinical doctors changed the treatment drugs to avoid the potential adverse drug reac -tions until the patient was cured .Conclusion:The participation of clinical pharmacist in the pharmaceutical care for the patients with biliary tract infection can provide a new thought of working mode .%目的:分析临床药师对1例胆道感染患者抗感染治疗的药学监护,探讨临床药师如何在临床治疗中发挥作用。方法:临床药师监护患者用药全过程,协助医师优化给药方案。结果:临床药师建议医师及时换用恰当药物,避免了潜在药品不良反应的发生,并取得良好治疗效果。结论:为临床药师在胆道感染的药学监护中提供新思路。

  18. Pattern of Cutaneous Pathology among a Cohort of HIV/AIDS Patients Accessing Care in a Rural/Suburban Adult ART Clinic in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Salami, T. A. T.; Adewuyi, G. M.; Echekwube, P.; Affusim, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous diseases are common in patients with HIV/AIDS however there are few documented reports of these lesions from some parts of world such as Nigeria and West Africa. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify cutaneous pathologies in patients attending an adult outpatient (HIV/AIDS) clinic department in a rural/suburban centre in the south geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Additionally it also aims to determine if there are differences in the pattern of presentation as com...

  19. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  20. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  1. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heide Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of ways, including: 'palliative sedation', 'terminal sedation', 'continuous deep sedation until death', 'proportionate sedation' or 'palliative sedation to unconsciousness'. Surveys show large unexplained variation in incidence of sedation at the end of life across countries and care settings and there are ethical concerns about the use, intentions, risks and significance of the practice in palliative care. There are also questions about how to explain international variation in the use of the practice. This protocol relates to the UNBIASED study (UK Netherlands Belgium International Sedation Study, which comprises three linked studies with separate funding sources in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of the study are to explore decision-making surrounding the application of continuous sedation until death in contemporary clinical practice, and to understand the experiences of clinical staff and decedents' informal care-givers of the use of continuous sedation until death and their perceptions of its contribution to the dying process. The UNBIASED study is part of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Methods/Design To realize the study aims, a two-phase study has been designed. The study settings include: the domestic home, hospital and expert palliative care sites. Phase 1 consists of: a focus groups with health care staff and bereaved informal care-givers; and b a preliminary case notes review to study the range of sedation therapy provided at the end of life to cancer patients who died within a 12 week period. Phase 2 employs qualitative methods to develop 30 patient-centred case studies in each country. These involve

  2. Pharmaceutical Care for a Patient with Erlotinib Therapy by Clinical Pharmacists%临床药师对1例使用厄洛替尼患者的药学监护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈集志; 李刚; 徐小燕; 张静; 张增珠

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨临床药师参与临床的切入点与开展药学监护的方法.方法:结合1例使用厄洛替尼患者的病例,临床药师从厄洛替尼的药理作用、药物相互作用、不良反应以及应采取的防范措施进行药学监护.结果:临床药师协助医师,确保患者顺利治疗,取得了明显的效果,提高了药物治疗水平.结论:临床药师通过参与临床实践,可协助医师提高药物治疗的安全性和有效性.%OBJECTIVE: To explore breakthrough point of clinical pharmacists participating in clinical practice and the methods of developing pharmaceutical care. METHODS: According to medical records of a patient receiving erlotinib, clinical pharmacists provided pharmaceutical care from pharmacological functions of erlotinib, drug interaction, adverse drug reactions and preventive measures. RESULTS: Clinical pharmacists assisted doctors to ensure smooth treatment for patients, obtain obvious effect and improve the level of drug treatment. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacists participate in clinical practice and assist physicians to improve the safety and efficacy of drug treatment.

  3. Clinical microbiology in the intensive care unit: Strategic and operational characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya S; Mondal A.

    2010-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs). The application of the principles and the practice of Clinical Microbiology for ICU patients can significantly improve clinical outcome. The present article is aimed at summarising the strategic and operational characteristics of this unique field where medical microbiology attempts to venture into the domain of direct clinical care of critically ill patients. The close and strategic ...

  4. Patient records and clinical overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte Groth

    2016-01-01

    investigate the creation of overview in daily clinical practice and further investigates how respectively a paper-based patient record and an EPR supports the creation of clinical overview. That the change from paper-based patient record to EPR can cause difficulties, interruptions and challenges...... or rendered visible in detail. Studies have been conducted on the differences on using respectively a paper-based patient record and an EPR, but few studies have focused on the creation of overview in daily clinical practice in connection with this transition. Therefore, the aim of this PhD dissertation...... of clinical overview. Considering the change from paper-based patient record to EPR, the dissertation also investigates how the two artefacts support the creation of clinical overview. The present dissertation is primarily based on ethnographic inspired observational studies and semi-structured interviews...

  5. Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Charlotte Brun

    Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma Intensions: The intension of this project is to link new knowledge with the nurses experience based knowledge within the psychosocial care to patients, who have been diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma (MM), thereby improving the care to this...

  6. Older patients in transition : From home care towards emergency care

    OpenAIRE

    Kihlgren, Annica

    2005-01-01

    The overall aim of the thesis was to study the praxis of referrals to the emergency department (ED) from different community health care settings and the caring process of older adults in the ED (I-V). With this knowledge, the prerequisites needed to provide older adults with better care can be attained. The thesis focuses on the older adults and the nurses' involvement in the referrals and the caring process. Study I focused on the extent and reasons that 719 patients > 75...

  7. Investigation into the causes of indwelling urethral catheter implementation and its effects on clinical outcomes and health care resources among dementia patients with pneumonia: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshiki; Babazono, Akira; Nishi, Takumi; Yasui, Midori; Harano, Yumi

    2016-08-01

    There is a possibility that unnecessary treatments and low-quality medical care, such as inappropriate indwelling urethral catheter use, are being provided to older Japanese individuals.The aim of this study was to investigate contextual effects relating to indwelling urethral catheters in older people with dementia and to clarify the effects of indwelling urethral catheter use on patients' mortality, length of stay (LOS), and health care spending. This retrospective cohort study involved 4501 male and female Japanese participants. Those who were aged 75 or older with dementia and had a primary diagnosis of acute lower respiratory disease with antibiotics administered during hospitalization were eligible for inclusion. Patient mortality, LOS, and total charge during hospitalization were the main study outcomes. This study showed that indwelling urethral catheter use was significantly associated with higher mortality, longer LOS, and higher total charge for hospitalization. The pattern of indwelling urethral catheter use was clustered by care facility level. Physician density was significantly associated with indwelling urethral catheter use; the relationship was not linear but U-shaped, such that the approximate median had the lowest rate of urethral catheter use and this increased gradually toward both lower and higher physician densities. Our study found considerable variation in indwelling urethral catheter use between care facilities in older people with dementia. Additionally, indwelling urethral catheter use was related to poor outcomes. Based on these findings, we consider there to be an urgent need for constructing a framework to measure, report on, and promote the improvement of care quality for older individuals in Japan. PMID:27583898

  8. Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury, a Large-Scale Collaborative Project: Patient-Oriented Research Core—Standard Operating Procedures for Clinical Care VII—Guidelines for Antibiotic Administration in Severely Injured Patients

    OpenAIRE

    West, Michael A.; Moore, Ernest E; Shapiro, Michael B.; Nathens, Avery B.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Minei, Joseph P; Bankey, Paul E.; Maier, Ronald V.

    2008-01-01

    When the clinical decision to treat a critically ill patient with antibiotics has been made, one must attempt to identify the site of infection based on clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory or diagnostic radiology studies. Identification of site requires, examination of patient, inspection of all wounds, chest radiograph, and calculation of clinical pulmonary infection score if ventilated, obtaining blood cultures, urinalysis, and line change if clinical suspicion of central venous cathete...

  9. Practical and clinical considerations in assessing patients with atrial fibrillation for switching to non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães PO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrícia O Guimarães,1 Scott Kaatz,2 Renato D Lopes11Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke Medicine, Durham, NC, 2Hurley Medical Center, Flint, MI, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF is an important risk factor for thromboembolic events, and anticoagulation therapy can reduce this risk. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs, such as warfarin, have been used for decades in patients with AF for stroke prevention. Currently, non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs are approved and available for non-valvular AF patients who are at increased risk of stroke. These agents are safe and effective and have important advantages over VKAs, such as significant reduction in intracranial hemorrhage and no need for routine laboratory monitoring. Thus, should all VKA-treated patients be switched to a NOAC? The aims of this article are: 1 to review the advantages of NOACs over VKAs; 2 to identify the group of patients who most benefit from receiving a NOAC and, therefore, are higher priority to be switched from VKAs; and 3 to provide clinical and practical guidance on how to switch patients safely from VKAs to NOACs.Keywords: anticoagulation, atrial fibrillation, clinical practice, stroke prevention

  10. 糖尿病护理小组应用于糖尿病患者临床护理中的效果探讨%The Application Effect of Diabetes Care Team in Diabetic Patients in Clinical Nursing Discussion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹玉梅

    2015-01-01

    Objective Application for diabetes care team in diabetes clinical care results were discussed.MethodsRandomly selected diabetic patients admitted to our hospital 76 cases a year as research subjects, divided into two groups, each of 38 cases. Where the control group with conventional methods of care, nursing care and diabetes team group is applied, compared two groups of patient satisfaction and the indicators score.ResultsIn contrast, patient satisfaction of care group was 94.74% (36/38), signiifcantly higher than the 78.95% (30/38), the differences between the groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The clinical application of diabetes care and diabetes care team model of care can significantly improve patient satisfaction, and enhance the patient's self-management skills to help improve the quality of life of patients.%目的:对糖尿病护理小组应用在糖尿病患者临床护理中的效果进行探讨。方法随机抽取我院1年收治的糖尿病患者76例作为研究对象,平均分为两组,每组各38例。其中对照组采用常规护理方法,护理组则应用糖尿病小组护理,对比两组患者的满意度和各项指标评分。结果经对比,护理组患者的满意度为94.74%(36/38),高于对照组的78.95%(30/38),组间差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在糖尿病的临床护理中应用糖尿病护理小组的护理模式可以提高患者的满意度,增强患者的自我管理能力,有助于改善患者的生活质量。

  11. Clinical Management of Filovirus-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle V. Clark

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Filovirus infection presents many unique challenges to patient management. Currently no approved treatments are available, and the recommendations for supportive care are not evidence based. The austere clinical settings in which patients often present and the sporadic and at times explosive nature of filovirus outbreaks have effectively limited the information available to evaluate potential management strategies. This review will summarize the management approaches used in filovirus outbreaks and provide recommendations for collecting the information necessary for evaluating and potentially improving patient outcomes in the future.

  12. Clinical Pharmacist Participating in Pharmaceutical Care for a Patient with Acute Pancreatitis%临床药师参与1例急性胰腺炎的药学监护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚高琼; 朱深银; 赵语; 邱峰; 张成志

    2012-01-01

    目的:通过临床药师对急性胰腺炎患者的药学服务,探讨临床药师如何在临床治疗中发挥作用.方法:临床药师在1例急性胰腺炎患者的治疗过程中,与临床医师共同制订治疗方案,监护患者用药全过程,针对患者病情变化提出合理换药.结果:在临床药师参与下,临床医师调整治疗方案,真正做到治疗个体化,使患者治愈出院.结论:临床药师通过药学监护,避免了不良反应的发生,优化了急性胰腺炎临床治疗方案,取得了良好的效果.%OBJECTIVE: To discuss pharmaceutical care for patients with acute pancreatitis by clinical pharmacists so as to investigate the role of clinical pharmacists in the clinical treatment. METHODS: The clinical pharmacists formulated the treatment plan with the clinical doctor and supervised the whole process of treatment for the patient, then changed drugs according to disease condition. RESULTS: With the cooperation of clinical pharmacists, the clinical doctor adjusted the treatment plan to individualize treatment. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacist participating in the pharmaceutical care for acute pancreatitis patients can avoid adverse drug reaction and optimize the treatment plan to achieve good efficacy.

  13. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nadeem

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some countries. Emerging from this has been innovation in research design and focus, although less is known of the effect on research output. Conclusion Primary care research is now well placed to lead a broad re-vitalisation of academic medicine, answering questions of relevance to practitioners, patients, communities and Government. Key areas for future primary care research leaders to focus on include exposing undergraduates early to primary care research, integrating this early exposure with doctoral and postdoctoral research career support, further expanding cross disciplinary approaches, and developing useful measures of output for future primary care research investment.

  14. Integrating Spirituality as a Key Component of Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Brémault-Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patient care frequently focuses on physical aspects of disease management, with variable attention given to spiritual needs. And yet, patients indicate that spiritual suffering adds to distress associated with illness. Spirituality, broadly defined as that which gives meaning and purpose to a person’s life and connectedness to the significant or sacred, often becomes a central issue for patients. Growing evidence demonstrates that spirituality is important in patient care. Yet healthcare professionals (HCPs do not always feel prepared to engage with patients about spiritual issues. In this project, HCPs attended an educational session focused on using the FICA Spiritual History Tool to integrate spirituality into patient care. Later, they incorporated the tool when caring for patients participating in the study. This research (1 explored the value of including spiritual history taking in clinical practice; (2 identified facilitators and barriers to incorporating spirituality into person-centred care; and (3 determined ways in which HCPs can effectively utilize spiritual history taking. Data were collected using focus groups and chart reviews. Findings indicate positive impacts at organizational, clinical/unit, professional/personal and patient levels when HCPs include spirituality in patient care. Recommendations are offered.

  15. An instrument assessing patient satisfaction with day care in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleefstra SM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of quality of care in hospitals. Reliable and valid instruments to measure clinical and outpatient satisfaction already exist. Recently hospitals have increasingly provided day care, i.e., admitting patients for one day without an overnight stay. This article describes the adaption of the ‘Core questionnaire for the assessment of Patient Satisfaction’ (COPS for general Day care (COPS-D, and the subsequent validation of the COPS-D. Methods The clinical COPS was supplemented with items to cover two new dimensions: Pre-admission visit and Operation Room. It was sent to a sample of day care patients of five general Dutch hospitals to investigate dimensionality, acceptability, reliability, construct and external validity. Construct validity was established by correlating the dimensions of the COPS-D with patients’ overall satisfaction. Results The COPS-D was returned by 3802 patients (response 46%. Factor analysis confirmed its’ structure: Pre-intake visit, Admission, Operation room, Nursing care, Medical care, Information, Autonomy and Discharge and aftercare (extraction communality 0.63-0.90. The internal consistency of the eight dimensions was good (α = 0.82-0.90; the item internal consistency corrected for overlap was satisfactory (>0.40; all inter-item correlations were higher than 0.45 but not too high (Information dimension had the strongest correlation with overall day care satisfaction. Conclusions The COPS-D is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring satisfaction with day care. It complements the model of measuring patient satisfaction with clinical and outpatient care given in hospitals. It also fulfils the conditions made while developing the clinical and outpatient COPS: a short, core instrument to screen patient satisfaction.

  16. Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158830.html Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care They can face ... first comprehensive look at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care in the United States. COPD is the ...

  17. Developing patient-centered teams: The role of sharing stories about patients and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ariana H; Hassinger, Jane A; Martin, Lisa A; Harris, Lisa H; Gold, Marji

    2015-09-01

    Research indicates that health care teams are good for staff, patients, and organizations. The characteristics that make teams effective include shared objectives, mutual respect, clarity of roles, communication, trust, and collaboration. We were interested in examining how teams develop these positive characteristics. This paper explores the role of sharing stories about patients in developing patient-centered teams. Data for this paper came from 1 primary care clinic as part of a larger Providers Share Workshop study conducted by the University of Michigan. Each workshop included 5 facilitated group sessions in which staff met to talk about their work. This paper analyzes qualitative data from the workshops. Through an iterative process, research team members identified major themes, developed a coding scheme, and coded transcripts for qualitative data analysis. One of the most powerful ways group members connected was through sharing stories about their patients. Sharing clinical cases and stories helped participants bond around their shared mission of patient-centered care, build supportive relationships, enhance compassion for patients, communicate and resolve conflict, better understand workflows and job roles, develop trust, and increase morale. These attributes highlighted by participants correspond to those documented in the literature as important elements of teambuilding and key indicators of team effectiveness. The sharing of stories about patients seems to be a promising tool for positive team development in a primary care clinical setting and should be investigated further. PMID:26348238

  18. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashford Guy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care and rehabilitation teams around patient appropriateness and readiness for transfer. Methods Cohort study of patients in a large acute referral hospital in Australia followed with the InterQual utilization review tool, modified to also include reasons why utilization criteria are not met. Additional data on team decision making about appropriateness for rehabilitation, and readiness for transfer, were collected on a subset of patients. Results There were 696 episodes of care (7189 bed days. Days meeting acute level of care criteria were 56% (stroke, hip fracture and joint replacement patients and 33% (other patients, from the time of referral. Most inappropriate days in acute care were due to delays in processes/scheduling (45% or being more appropriate for rehabilitation or lower level of care (30%. On the subset of patients, the acute care team and the utilization review tool deemed patients ready for rehabilitation transfer earlier than the rehabilitation team (means of 1.4, 1.3 and 4.0 days from the date of referral, respectively. From when deemed medically stable for transfer by the acute care team, 28% of patients became unstable. From when deemed stable by the rehabilitation team or utilization review, 9% and 11%, respectively, became unstable. Conclusions A high proportion of patient days did not meet acute level of care criteria, due predominantly to inefficiencies in care processes, or to patients being more appropriate for an alternative level of

  19. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    -based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes the......-based study of symptomatology in consecutive cancer patients in palliative care, achieving rather complete data from the participants. The symptomatology in these patients was very pronounced. The questionnaires were able to detect clinically important differences between places of service.......BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire...

  20. The enhancement of clinical competence through caring science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Malmberg, Rika; Hilli, Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    This theoretical research attempts to create a new basis for dialogue between two independent research fields that are connected by an inseparable link. The first, nursing science, is a body of professional knowledge, while the second, caring as an independent body of pure knowledge, conducts basic research with an aspiration towards applicability. This theoretical research uses the guidelines of the Buberian dialogue, which provides new meaning to the concept of clinical competence. The results emphasise the need to adopt abstract knowledge into the nursing field in order to improve the graduate's clinical capabilities. The combination of assessing clinical capability in a judgmental manner together with the dialogical humanistic approach of caring science may create a genuine platform and meeting event as a maturing process, which is intended to promote educational goals, which subsequently receive new meaning, that is, a different type of assessment. However, this assessment cannot be measured since a wide range of ethical moral aspects regarding both the student and the patient will have to be included. Nevertheless, this dialogue between nursing science and caring science can implement evidence on the basis of trust and can be used as a dialogical tool for evaluating clinical skills with the goal of empowering the educational field in nursing. Consequently, this clinical competence is called 'caring maturing means', and the goal is to convert the learning process into a meaningful event with the aim of improvement. PMID:24308907

  1. [Clinical practice guidelines and primary care. SESPAS report 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza, Gerardo; Bañeres, Joaquim; Gracia, Francisco Javier

    2012-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are intended to serve as a bridge between the decision levels and the sources of knowledge, giving decision makers the best synthesis of scientific evidence and an analysis of context, to provide elements of judgement and to transfer scientific knowledge into clinical practice. However, the actual impact on health care is variable and effectiveness in changing medical practice, moderate. Qualitative and quantitative studies show that most primary care physicians consider that the guides are a valuable source of advice and training and a kind of improving the quality of healthcare. However, they underline its rigidity, the difficulty to apply to individual patients and that their main goal is to reduce healthcare costs. In Spain, there are several experiences as GuíaSalud in developing clinical practice guidelines aimed specifically at primary care. However, the proper implementation of a clinical practice guideline includes not only the quality and thoroughness of the evidence, but the credibility of professionals and organizations and other contextual factors such as characteristics of patients, providers and organizations or systems. An important step in future research is to develop a better theoretical understanding of organizational change that is required for management and professionals to give appropriate guidance to the implementation of the clinical practice guidelines. PMID:21993072

  2. Wound Care in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Çizmeci

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Wound care in one of the most important prognostic factors in burn victims. Open wound carries risks for infection due to hypothermia, protein and fluid losses. In addition, unhealed wounds are the major risk factors for acute-subacute or chronic complications in burn patients. Although no exact algorithm exists for open wound treatment, early escarectomy or debridement together with grafting is the best option. Ointments together with topical epithelizing agents without dressings are genereally adequate for first-degree burns. However, topical antibacterial agents are usually required for second to third-degree wounds. Standart treatment for the open wound without epithelization is autologous skin grafting. In cases where more than 50% of the skin surface in affected, autologus donor skin may not be enough. For these cases, epidermal cell culture in vitro may be used. Mesenchymal stem cell applications which have immunosupressive effects should be utilized in cases where cells need to be prepared as allografts. (Journal of the Turkish Society intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 51-4

  3. Assessment of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic within a primary care physicians office

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley MJ; Pacitti R; Warning W

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess value-added service of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic to quantify respiratory disease abnormalities within a primary care physicians officeMethods: This retrospective, cohort study was an analysis of physician referred patients who attended our spirometry clinic during 2008-2010 due to pulmonary symptoms or disease. After spirometry testing, data was collected retrospectively to include patient demographics, spirometry results, and pulmonary pharmaceu...

  4. Perioperative Care of the Transgender Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-02-01

    Transgender patients are individuals whose gender identity is not related to their biological sex. Assuming a new gender identity that does not conform to societal norms often results in discrimination and barriers to health care. The exact number of transgender patients is unknown; however, these patients are increasingly seen in health care. Transgender individuals may experience provider-generated discrimination in health care facilities, including refusal of service, disrespect, and abuse, which contribute to depression and low self-esteem. Transgender therapies include mental health counseling for depression and low self-esteem, hormone therapy, and sex reassignment surgery. Health care professionals require cultural competence, an understanding of the different forms of patient identification, and adaptive approaches to care for transgender patients. VA (Veterans Affairs) hospitals provide a model for the care for transgender patients and staff. PMID:26849981

  5. Clinical characteristics and preventable acute care spending among a high cost inpatient population

    OpenAIRE

    Ronksley, Paul E.; Kobewka, Daniel M.; McKay, Jennifer A.; Rothwell, Deanna M.; Mulpuru, Sunita; Forster, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Background A small proportion of patients account for the majority of health care spending. The objectives of this study were to explore the clinical characteristics, patterns of health care use, and the proportion of acute care spending deemed potentially preventable among high cost inpatients within a Canadian acute-care hospital. Methods We identified all individuals within the Ottawa Hospital with one or more inpatient hospitalization between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011. Clinical cha...

  6. 浅谈老年糖尿病患者的临床护理%Clinical Nursing Care of Elderly Patients with Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董英姿

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical nursing of elderly patients with diabetes and analyze the best nursing measures for pa_tients with diabetes. Methods Nursing methods such as psychotherapy, diet therapy, exercise therapy and insulin treatment and so on were given to the patients with diabetes. ResuIts After effective clinical nursing, 65 cases of patients with diabetes recovered well with no complications. ConcIusion The key to the rehabilitation of elderly patients with diabetes is effective nursing method as well as effective treatment.%目的:探讨对老年糖尿病患者的病症进行临床护理研究,分析糖尿病患者的护理最佳措施。方法该院选取自2012年1-2014年1月收治的65例老年糖尿病患者,结果65例糖尿病患者经过有效的临床护理身体恢复较好,没有并发症发生。结论老年糖尿病患者康复的关键不仅是有效的治疗措施更多的是行之有效的护理方法。

  7. Similar clinical outcome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty using a conventional or accelerated care program: a randomized, controlled study of 40 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Lotte; Zerahn, Bo; Bliddal, Henning; Christiansen, Christian; Sylvest, Jesper; Borgwardt, Arne

    2009-01-01

    within 3 months, contact with a general physician or nurse, and level of satisfaction were registered. Patients in the A group attended an information meeting. An intraarticular infiltration with Marcaine and adrenaline was used peroperatively. Patients in the C group had an epidural pump for 2 or 3 days......, average pain on days 1 and 2, use of opioids (during the first week postoperatively), KSS, contact with primary sector, level of satisfaction, or level of confidence. INTERPRETATION: We achieved a reduction in LOS of 5 days without affecting the clinical outcome....

  8. 病毒性肝炎患者的临床护理及预防保健分析%The Analysis of Clinical Treatment and Precaution Health Care on Patients With Viral Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何亚荣; 李凤秋

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical treatment,prevention care and health education about viral hepatitis are to be investigated. Methods Analyzed the clinical treatment data selected from 22 patients with viral hepatitis treated in our hospital from March 2012 to June 2014. Results As for al 22 patients with viral hepatitis after treatment and attendance,11 patients were cured and 10 patients achieved effective results in treatment,but the other one case was ineffective,the treatment time was one month on average. Conclusion It is suggested to inform patients and their relatives of viral hepatitis on prevention care,family care and self-care,according to epidemiological characteristics of viral hepatitis.%目的:探讨病毒性肝炎患者临床护理、预防及健康教育。方法选取临床2012年3月~2014年6月收治的病毒性肝炎患者22例临床护理资料进行分析。结果病毒性肝炎患者22例经治疗及护理,痊愈11例,显效10例,无效1例,平均治疗1个月。结论根据各种病毒性肝炎的流行病学特点,向患者及其家属宣传各型病毒性肝炎的预防、家庭护理和自我保健知识。

  9. Care of patients with permanent tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Erica

    The third article in our series on tracheostomy care discusses the care of patients with a permanent tracheostomy. While these patients make up a small proportion of all patients who have a tracheostomy inserted, they have complex needs. This means they require practitioners in both acute and community settings, who have time, support and competent tracheostomy-care skills, to achieve a successful discharge and ongoing management of their tracheostomy. PMID:27396099

  10. Physician-patient communication in managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, G H; Baker, L; Levinson, W

    1995-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication affects important health care outcomes. Managed care presents a number of challenges to physician-patient communication, including shorter visits, decreased continuity, and lower levels of trust. Good communication skills can help physicians create and maintain healthy relationships with patients in the face of these challenges. We describe 5 communication dilemmas that are common in managed care and review possible solutions suggested by recent ...

  11. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Badley, Andrew D.; Kasten, Mary J.; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W.; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Stacey A Rizza

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and ...

  12. [Individualised care plan during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call Mañosa, S; Pujol Garcia, A; Chacón Jordan, E; Martí Hereu, L; Pérez Tejero, G; Gómez Simón, V; Estruga Asbert, A; Gallardo Herrera, L; Vaquer Araujo, S; de Haro López, C

    2016-01-01

    An individualised care plan is described for a woman diagnosed with pneumonia, intubated, and on invasive mechanical ventilation, who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A nursing care plan was designed based on Marjory Gordon functional patterns. The most important nursing diagnoses were prioritised, using a model of clinical reasoning model (Analysis of the current status) and NANDA taxonomy. A description is presented on, death anxiety, impaired gas exchange, decreased cardiac output, dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility, risk for disuse syndrome, infection risk, and bleeding risk. The principal objectives were: to reduce the fear of the family, achieve optimal respiratory and cardiovascular status, to maintain gastrointestinal function, to avoid immobility complications, and to reduce the risk of infection and bleeding. As regards activities performed: we gave family support; correct management of the mechanical ventilation airway, cardio-respiratory monitoring, skin and nutritional status; control of possible infections and bleeding (management of therapies, care of catheters…). A Likert's scale was used to evaluate the results, accomplishing all key performance indicators which were propose at the beginning. Individualised care plans with NNN taxonomy using the veno-venous ECMO have not been described. Other ECMO care plans have not used the same analysis model. This case can help nurses to take care of patients subjected to veno-venous ECMO treatment, although more cases are needed to standardise nursing care using NANDA taxonomy. PMID:27137415

  13. Glycemia management in critical care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bilotta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the approach to clinical management of blood glucose concentration (BGC in critical care patients has dramatically changed. In this editorial, the risks related to hypo, hyperglycemia and high BGC variability, optimal BGC target range and BGC monitoring devices for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU will be discussed. Hypoglycemia has an increased risk of death, even after the occurrence of a single episode of mild hypoglycemia (BGC < 80 mg/dL, and it is also associated with an increase in the ICU length of stay, the major determinant of ICU costs. Hyperglycemia (with a threshold value of 180 mg/dL is associated with an increased risk of death, longer length of stay and higher infective morbidity in ICU patients. In ICU patients, insulin infusion aimed at maintaining BGC within a 140-180 mg/dL target range (NICE-SUGAR protocol is considered to be the state-of-the-art. Recent evidence suggests that a lower BGC target range (129-145 mg/dL is safe and associated with lower mortality. In trauma patients without traumatic brain injury, tight BGC (target < 110 mg/dL might be associated with lower mortality. Safe BGC targeting and estimation of optimal insulin dose titration should include an adequate nutrition protocol, the length of insulin infusion and the change in insulin sensitivity over time. Continuous glucose monitoring devices that provide accurate measurement can contribute to minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia and improve insulin titration. In conclusion, in ICU patients, safe and effective glycemia management is based on accurate glycemia monitoring and achievement of the optimal BGC target range by using insulin titration, along with an adequate nutritional protocol.

  14. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    OpenAIRE

    Jovana Rančić; Nemanja Rančić; Nemanja Majstorović; Vladimir Biočanin; Marko Milosavljević; Mihajlo Jakovljević

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was...

  15. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  16. 20. Integrating Cannabis Into Clinical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Mental Health, Alleviating Pain Cannabis is now available to patients as a medicine in 18 states and the District of Columbia. Unfortunately, due to the long-standing prohibition, most providers have little information regarding the medicinal use of this versatile botanical. The history of cannabis as medicine will be reviewed. This presentation will summarize the main components of the plant and their pharmacologic effects, highlighting the entour...

  17. Patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and level of care associated with lost to follow-up and mortality in adult patients on first-line ART in Nigerian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Odafe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical outcome is an important determinant of programme success. This study aims to evaluate patients’ baseline characteristics as well as level of care associated with lost to follow-up (LTFU and mortality of patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART. Methods: Retrospective cohort study using routine service data of adult patients initiated on ART in 2007 in 10 selected hospitals in Nigeria. We captured data using an electronic medical record system and analyzed using Stata. Outcome measures were probability of being alive and retained in care at 12, 24 and 36 months on ART. Potential predictors associated with time to mortality and time to LTFU were assessed using competing risks regression models. Results: After 12 months on therapy, 85% of patients were alive and on ART. Survival decreased to 81.2% and 76.1% at 24 and 36 months, respectively. Median CD4 count for patients at ART start, 12, 18 and 24 months were 152 (interquartile range, IQR: 75 to 242, 312 (IQR: 194 to 450, 344 (IQR: 227 to 501 and 372 (IQR: 246 to 517 cells/µl, respectively. Competing risk regression showed that patients’ baseline characteristics significantly associated with LTFU were male (adjusted sub-hazard ratio, sHR=1.24 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.42], ambulatory functional status (adjusted sHR=1.25 [95% CI: 1.01 to 1.54], World Health Organization (WHO clinical Stage II (adjusted sHR=1.31 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.59] and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=0.76 [95% CI: 0.66 to 0.87]. Those associated with mortality include CD4 count <50 cells/µl (adjusted sHR=2.84 [95% CI: 1.20 to 6.71], WHO clinical Stage III (adjusted sHR=2.67 [95% CI: 1.26 to 5.65] and Stage IV (adjusted sHR=5.04 [95% CI: 1.93 to 13.16] and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=2.21 [95% CI: 1.30 to 3.77]. Conclusions: Mortality was associated with advanced HIV disease and care in secondary facilities. Earlier initiation of therapy and strengthening systems in secondary level

  18. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  19. Clinical research in primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasman, P A; Macpherson, L E; Haining, S A; Breckons, M

    2015-08-28

    Many commissioning bodies for research expect that researchers will actively involve the public and patients in their projects. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), for example, involves members of the public in reviewing funding applications and making recommendations about research funding. The NIHR's portfolio is currently operating in 97% of NHS Trusts and this now includes research sited in primary dental care. This paper presents some case studies of these and other projects which are designed specifically for patient benefit in dental services in the community. This means there is no necessity to translate the outcomes of such research from a university or hospital base to the general population as the projects are undertaken in dental practices that provide primary dental care to (predominantly) NHS patients. The relevance of the outcomes to dental care is, therefore, likely to be of direct interest and importance to commissioners of healthcare funding in the UK who have a duty to use evidence bases for commissioning decisions. PMID:26315174

  20. Oral care in patients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Atay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available intensive care patients needs to oral assessment and oral care for avoid complications caused by orafarengeal bacteria. In this literature review, it is aimed to determine the practice over oral hygiene in mechanical ventilator patients in intensive care unit. For the purpose of collecting data, Medline/pub MED and EBSCO HOST databases were searched with the keywords and lsquo;oral hygiene, oral hygiene practice, mouth care, mouth hygiene, intubated, mechanical ventilation, intensive care and critical care and rdquo; between the years of 2000- 2012. Inclusion criteria for the studies were being performed in adult intensive care unit patients on mechanical ventilation, published in peer-reviewed journals in English between the years of 2000-2012, included oral care practice and presence of a nurse among researchers. A total of 304 articles were identified. Six descriptive evaluation studies, three randomised controlled trials, four literature reviews, three meta-Analysis randomized clinical trials, one qualitative study and one semi-experimental study total 18 papers met all of the inclusion criteria. Oral care is emphasized as an infection control practice for the prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP. In conclusion, we mention that oral care is an important nursing practice to prevent VAP development in intensive care unit patients; however, there is no standard oral evaluation tool and no clarity on oral care practice frequency, appropriate solution and appropriate material. It can be recommended that the study projects on oral care in intensive care patients to have high proof level and be experimental, and longitudinal. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 822-829

  1. Memory complaints associated with seeking clinical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Pires; D. Silva; J. Maroco; S. Ginó; T. Mendes; B.A. Schmand; M. Guerreiro; A. de Mendonça

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as c

  2. Clinical profile of hospital acquired pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital, South India

    OpenAIRE

    Vasuki V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospital acquired infections continue to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. Hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) results in a significant increase in the cost of care of hospitalized patients. Its development prolongs a patient's stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Accurate information concerning the clinical profile of HAP is lacking in South India. This study was conducted prospectively to evaluate the clinical profile of HAP in ICU pat...

  3. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...

  4. Factors affecting patients' ratings of health-care satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Marianne K; Fuglsang, Marie; Miiller, Max Mølgaard

    2015-01-01

    completing a questionnaire. A phenomenological-hermeneutical approach was used in the analysis and interpretation. RESULTS: Two major themes emerged: experienced versus expected clinical quality and health-care professional attitude. Patients responded to each question by combining their experiences of both...... play: a care relation and a human relation. This finding can inform health-care practice, but department-specific examples may be needed to initiate improvements. FUNDING: The study received funding from the Centre for Patient Experience and Evaluation, Copenhagen, Denmark. The Danish Scientific...

  5. Assessment of use of complementary alternative medicine and its impact on quality of life in the patients attending rheumatology clinic, in a tertiary care centre in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M P Jadhav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has witnessed an increase in use in recent times in rheumatological conditions and is expected to have impact on the quality of life (QOL. We had planned to conduct this study to investigate the extent of use of CAM and its effect on QOL of patients at a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Ethics committee approval was obtained. Sixty patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA were enrolled as per the selection criteria, after obtaining their informed consent. Each patient was interviewed for CAM use/non-use, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC (modified index for QOL was recorded by the study personnel. Statistical Analysis: The normality was checked by using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Descriptive statistics was performed and Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the QOL of CAM users and non-users. Results: Of the 60 patients enrolled with OA (10 and RA (50, 58% (35/60 used CAM. Ayurveda and massage therapy were the commonest [80% (28/35], followed by yoga asana [34% (12/35] and homoeopathy [20% (7/35]. It was observed that combinations of therapies were used too. Nearly half [49% (17/35] of the CAM users were on self-prescribed medication and 71% (25/35 of them did not inform the physician of CAM use. The QOL of CAM users (WOMAC score: 56.31 ± 6.82 was better than that of CAM non-users (WOMAC score: 60.16 ± 4.02 (P value 0.01. Conclusion:Patients with RA frequently used CAM and QOL improvised with CAM use. We observed that self-administration of CAM was common and this was not informed to the treating physician.

  6. Care of oral cavity in irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures are reviewed of therapeutic and preventive care in patients with malignant tumours in the area of the head and neck during radiotherapy and during the subsequent follow-up of patients. As compared with previous views, the care is now more conservative, indications for tooth extractions are now limited, careful oral hygiene is emphasized and, in particular, the long-term use of fluorine gel is recommended. Surgery is only recommended where conservative treatment fails. (author)

  7. Clinical care of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary emphysema in elderly patients%老年慢性阻塞性肺气肿并发自发性气胸的护理探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张淑华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical care of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary emphysema in elderly patients. Methods After being diagnosed with spontaneous pneumothorax complicated by chronic obstructive pulmonary emphysema, the elderly patients were positive line of vacuum suction thoracentesis, thoracic drainage, bed rest and anti-inflammatory, oxygen, treatment of primary disease and other treatment, while giving a positive care and support, record clinical situation. Results 39 cases were cured,5 cases were of pulmonary bullae resection, two died. Conclusion Chronic obstructive pulmonary emphysema pneumothorax in elderly patients should be closely observed, strengthen psychological care and primary care to prevent complications. To improve the cure rate and reduce mortality.%目的 探讨老年慢性阻塞性肺气肿并发气胸的护理方法.方法 46例老年慢性阻塞性肺气肿并发气胸患者被确诊后,即行胸腔穿刺抽气减压、胸腔闭式引流、卧床休息以及抗炎吸氧治疗,同时给予积极的综合护理支持,并观察记录临床疗效情况.结果 治愈39例,5例肺大泡切除,死亡2例.结论 对老年慢性阻塞性肺气肿并发气胸的患者要密切观察病情,在治疗的同时,加强心理护理及基础护理,防止并发症,以提高治愈率,降低病死率.

  8. 临床药师对1例重度烧伤患者的药学监护%Pharmaceutical Care for One Patient with Severe Burn by Clinical Pharmacists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱先中; 唐美莲; 王冬雪; 谢文忠; 任传路; 仵利军; 徐立平

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the content and mode of pharmaceutical care for the patients with severe burn and promote the rational use of drugs. Methods:Taking the treatment for one patient with severe burn as example,pharmacists provided pharmaceu-tical care in respects of anti-infection therapy,organ preservation,nutritional support, drug interactions, drug precautions, drug incom-patibility, adverse drug reactions and the effect evaluation . Results:The program of rational drug use was provided for clinics through the implementation of pharmaceutical care. The vital signs of the patient were stable, and then the patient left on pass and continued to be treated with rehabilitation therapy. Conclusion:It is necessary for clinical pharmacists to perform pharmaceutical care for the pa-tients with severe burn,reduce the abuse of drugs and improve the medication safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, the collaborative service of doctors,pharmacists,nurses and inspectors to patients reflects the value of clinical pharmacists.%目的::探讨对重度烧伤患者药学监护,促进药物合理使用。方法:以1例重度烧伤患者的救治过程为例,药师针对抗感染治疗,器官保护,营养支持以及用药过程中的药物相互作用、注意事项、配伍禁忌、不良反应进行了药学监护,并进行效果评价。结果:通过实施药学监护,为临床提供了合理用药方案;患者的各项生命体征平稳,脱离了危险期,进入康复期继续巩固治疗。结论:临床药师对重度烧伤患者的药学监护非常必要,减少了药物的滥用,提高了药物治疗安全性和有效性,同时,“医、药、护、检”相互协作服务于患者,体现了临床药师的价值。

  9. Longer-term clinical and economic benefits of offering acupuncture to patients with chronic low back pain assessed as suitable for primary care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K J; Fitter, M; Brazier, J; MacPherson, H; Campbell, M; Nicholl, J P; Roman, M

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the research protocol for a pragmatic study of the benefits of providing an acupuncture service to patients in primary care with chronic low back pain. The proposal was written in response to a call for bids from the NHS Executive's centrally funded research programme for Health Technology Assessment (HTA). The research question posed was 'Does acupuncture have long-term effectiveness in the management of pain in primary care?' The present study was designed as a collaboration between an interdisciplinary team drawn from health services researchers at the University of Sheffield, acupuncture researchers from the Foundation for Traditional Chinese Medicine in York, and practitioners from general practice and acupuncture in York. The proposal presented here was submitted in response to an invitation from the Commissioning Board following a successful outline bid. It is reproduced here, largely as submitted in January 1998, using the headings under which information was requested. We also present an appendix describing methodological alterations made to the design in response the Commissioning Board's comments on the proposal. We present it in this format to give an idea of the evolution of the design and the process by which the research proposal was shaped. The final working protocol comprises a combination of these two elements. PMID:10444912

  10. Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients in a clinical pathway gained less in health-related quality of life as compared with patients who undergo CABG in a conventional-care plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Baz, Noha; Middel, Berrie; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Boonstra, Piet W.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the difference between clinical pathway (CP) and conventional care in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) domains, depression and anxiety, as well as to determine the relative contribution of CP towards an improved HRQoL after coronary artery bypass

  11. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    had a triangulated approach and group dynamics were described as the focus group was used to explore agreement and disagreement among the participants. Little is known about the content of intensive care diaries and their usefulness and meaning for the patients. The participants in our study agreed......The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...

  12. Patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntabaye, M K; Scheutz, F; Poulsen, S

    1998-10-01

    Emergency oral health care, as conceived in Tanzania, is an on-demand service provided at a rural health center or dispensary by a Rural Medical Aide. The service includes: simple tooth extraction under local anesthesia, draining of abscesses, control of acute oral infection with appropriate drug therapy, first aid for maxillo-facial trauma, and recognition of oral conditions requiring patient referral for further care at the district or regional hospital dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to describe patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care services in rural Tanzania and determine the relative importance of factors influencing patient satisfaction. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional interview survey between April 1993 and May 1994 using a patient satisfaction questionnaire in rural villages in the Rungwe district of Tanzania. It included 206 patients aged 18 years or more who had received emergency oral health care between April 1993 and March 1994. Overall, 92.7% of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the service. Patients who were married, had no formal education and lived more than 3 km from the dispensary were more likely to be satisfied with treatment. In a logistic regression model, a good working atmosphere at the dispensary, a good relationship between care provider and patients (art of care) and absence of post-treatment complications significantly influenced patient satisfaction with odds ratios of 10.3, 17.4 and 6.2, respectively. PMID:9792119

  13. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, William T; Zai, Adrian H; Grant, Richard W; Chueh, Henry C

    2008-01-01

    The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge-performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environment where disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their real-world effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT) tools for translating clinical information into clinical action. PMID:18534073

  14. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  15. Thoracic radiology in patients in intensive care. Correlation of chest examinations with clinical and biochemical findings. Radiologische Verlaufskontrolle der Thoraxorgane beim Intensivpflegepatienten. Wertigkeit der Thoraxaufnahme in Korrelation mit klinischen und biochemischen Befunden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenborn, H.; Schild, H.; Hoehne, U.; Gast, U.; Lorenz, J.; Schinzel, H. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische Strahlenkunde)

    1991-05-01

    Correlation between chest radiographs and clinical indicators was studied in 212 patients in intensive care. 1. There was good correlation between raised pulmonary artery pressure and radiological signs of left heart insufficiency, but not with the value of central venous pressure. 2. Fever and leukocytosis nearly always precede radiological evidence of pneumonia; their persistence does not necessarily indicate persistent pneumonia. 3. Pneumonias, effusions, atalectases and emboli are more common on the right. 4. More than 70% of central venous catheters were incorrectly placed; most commonly, the catheter was placed too low. Life-threatening complications occurred in 1.3%. (orig.).

  16. Patients admitted in an Intensive Care Unit with severe clinical manifestations of Influenza, october-december 2009 Pacientes ingresados con formas graves de Enfermedad Tipo Influenza en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, octubre a diciembre 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Octavio Rivero Rodríguez; Diley Moreno Ruiz; Yanli Vázquez Villazón; Pablo Rodríguez Díaz; Alfredo Dario Espinosa Brito; Jaime Geroy Gómez; Francisco García Valdés; Ramón E Álvarez Cepero; Rudis Monzón Rodríguez; Jorge Luis Ulloa Capestani; Yenisey Quintero Mendez

    2011-01-01

    A descriptive study of a series of cases was carried out, where 109 patients with the presumptive diagnosis of severe clinical pictures of Influenza were included, the total of them admitted in one of our Intensive Care Units (ICU), prepared for that purpose during the recent pandemic, during the period comprised between October 1 and December 31, 2009. There were 62 women (56,9%), of which 19 were pregnant or postpartum women (17,4%). The mean age of the sick persons of this serie was of 52,...

  17. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls. PMID:27332171

  18. Measuring patient satisfaction in complex continuing care/rehabilitation care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Navin; Alvaro, Celeste; Kuluski, Kerry; Wilkinson, Andrea J

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop a psychometrically validated survey to assess satisfaction in complex continuing care (CCC)/rehabilitation patients. Design/methodology/approach - A paper or computer-based survey was administered to 252 CCC/rehabilitation patients (i.e. post-acute hospital care setting for people who require ongoing care before returning home) across two hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Findings - Using factor analysis, five domains were identified with loadings above 0.4 for all but one item. Behavioral intention and information/communication showed the lowest patient satisfaction, while patient centredness the highest. Each domain correlated positively and significantly predicted overall satisfaction, with quality and safety showing the strongest predictive power and the healing environment the weakest. Gender made a significant contribution to predicting overall satisfaction, but age did not. Research limitations/implications - Results provide evidence of the survey's psychometric properties. Owing to a small sample, supplemental testing with a larger patient group is required to confirm the five-factor structure and to assess test-retest reliability. Originality/value - Improving the health system requires integrating patient perspectives. The patient experience, however, will vary depending on the population being served. This is the first psychometrically validated survey specific to a smaller specialty patient group receiving care at a CCC/rehabilitation facility in Canada. PMID:27120509

  19. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  20. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sedation practices in the intensive care unit have evolved from deep sedation and paralysis toward lighter sedation and better pain management. The new paradigm of sedation has enabled early mobilization and optimized mechanical ventilator weaning. Intensive care units in the Nordic c...... state, where they face the choice of life or death. Caring nurses and family members play an important role in assisting the patient to transition back to life.......BACKGROUND: Sedation practices in the intensive care unit have evolved from deep sedation and paralysis toward lighter sedation and better pain management. The new paradigm of sedation has enabled early mobilization and optimized mechanical ventilator weaning. Intensive care units in the Nordic...... countries have been particularly close to goals of lighter or no sedation and a more humane approach to intensive care. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to systematically review and reinterpret newer Nordic studies of the patient experience of intensive care to obtain a contemporary description of human...

  1. Clinical management of dying patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrin, J; Chapman, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    Dying is universal, and death should be a peaceful time. Myriad comfort measures are available in the last weeks before life ends. Discussions about end-of-life issues often suffer from lack of informed opinion. Palliative care experts have identified specific somatic and psychological sources of distress for dying patients and their loved ones. Pain, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, and fear of abandonment contribute substantially to both physical and psychological discomfort toward...

  2. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities. PMID:23568381

  3. Development of a decision support tool to facilitate primary care management of patients with abnormal liver function tests without clinically apparent liver disease [HTA03/38/02]. Abnormal Liver Function Investigations Evaluation (ALFIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Frank M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver function tests (LFTs are routinely performed in primary care, and are often the gateway to further invasive and/or expensive investigations. Little is known of the consequences in people with an initial abnormal liver function (ALF test in primary care and with no obvious liver disease. Further investigations may be dangerous for the patient and expensive for Health Services. The aims of this study are to determine the natural history of abnormalities in LFTs before overt liver disease presents in the population and identify those who require minimal further investigations with the potential for reduction in NHS costs. Methods/Design A population-based retrospective cohort study will follow up all those who have had an incident liver function test (LFT in primary care to subsequent liver disease or mortality over a period of 15 years (approx. 2.3 million tests in 99,000 people. The study is set in Primary Care in the region of Tayside, Scotland (pop approx. 429,000 between 1989 and 2003. The target population consists of patients with no recorded clinical signs or symptoms of liver disease and registered with a GP. The health technologies being assessed are LFTs, viral and auto-antibody tests, ultrasound, CT, MRI and liver biopsy. The study will utilise the Epidemiology of Liver Disease In Tayside (ELDIT database to determine the outcomes of liver disease. These are based on hospital admission data (Scottish Morbidity Record 1, dispensed medication records, death certificates, and examination of medical records from Tayside hospitals. A sample of patients (n = 150 with recent initial ALF tests or invitation to biopsy will complete questionnaires to obtain quality of life data and anxiety measures. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility Markov model analyses will be performed from health service and patient perspectives using standard NHS costs. The findings will also be used to develop a computerised clinical decision

  4. Acute porphyrias: clinical spectrum of hodpitalized patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine characteristics, clinical features and triggers of acute porphyria in hospitalized patients presenting to a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Case records of 26 patients hospitalized with diagnosis were identified through computerized hospital patients data. The diagnosis of acute porphyria was based on pertinent clinical features and laboratory investigations after exclusion of other alternative diagnosis and patients previously diagnosed as porphyric. The data was analyzed through SPSS software version 11.0. Twelve patients (46.2%) were males. Mean age was 21 years. Most common manifestation were gastrointestinal (n=22; 88.5%) followed by neurological symptoms (n=14; 54%). Neurological manifestations included seizures (n=9; 34.6%) and neuropathy (n=6; 23%). One patient presented with depression and insomnia. Family history was positive in (n=8; 30.8%). Eighteen (69%) had history of previous attacks at their presentation to the hospital. Most common precipitating factor was eating outside (n=18; 69%). Porphyrias are uncommon and cryptic group of diseases. This study shows a slightly different gender distribution, earlier onset of symptoms, higher number of neuropsychiatric symptoms (especially seizures), more distal neuropathies and different precipitant in the studied subset of patients than described previously in the western studies. (author)

  5. Demographic, clinical and psychological characteristics of patients with self-harm behaviours attending an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Sarkar, Siddharth; Bhalla, Ashish; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the characteristics of those with self-harm behaviour may help in identifying those at risk and providing targeted interventions to this group of patients, especially in the emergency services. The present study aimed to compare the suicidal intent, hopelessness, severity of depressive symptoms, and personality traits of those with and without psychiatric disorders, presenting with a self-harming behaviour to the emergency setting. For this, patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with self-harm behaviour were evaluated for presence or absence of a psychiatric diagnosis, suicidal intent, personality traits, depressive symptoms and hopelessness by using structured instruments. The present study included 132 participants. The mean age of the sample was 28.7 years and the male: female ratio of 1.28:1. At least one psychiatric diagnosis was present in 41.7% of the sample, depression and substance use disorders being most common among them. Impulsive suicide attempt was present in 40.2% of the sample. Those with a psychiatric diagnosis were more likely to be older, males, married, have higher suicidal intent, more planned attempts and higher depressive symptoms as compared to those who did not have a psychiatric disorder. Impulsive suicide attempters had lower suicidal intent than non-impulsive attempters. Present study suggests that those presenting to the emergency with self-harm behaviour comprises 2 interrelated groups, differing on certain demographic features, severity of depressive symptoms, suicidal intent and impulsivity. PMID:27025463

  6. Patient survey of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S M; Kroner, B A

    1997-11-01

    The literature describing pharmacy involvement with anticoagulation services primarily does not include information about patients' perceptions of this involvement. A 22-question survey was developed and administered to 296 patients enrolled in the anticoagulation clinic at the VA Pittsburgh Health Care System. Excluded patients had fewer than four clinic visits or were followed outside of the anticoagulation clinic. The study period was nine weeks and any missed patients were telephoned. The median response to each question was determined. Similar questions were analyzed for acquiescent trends. Results indicate that, overall, patients are comfortable with pharmacists providing warfarin monitoring and dose adjustments. PMID:10174757

  7. Collaborative Depression Care Among Latino Patients in Diabetes Disease Management, Los Angeles, 2011–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Brian; Jin, Haomiao; Vidyanti, Irene; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Ell, Kathleen; Wu, Shinyi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of comorbid diabetes and depression is high, especially in low-income Hispanic or Latino patients. The complex mix of factors in safety-net care systems impedes the adoption of evidence-based collaborative depression care and results in persistent disparities in depression outcomes. The Diabetes–Depression Care-Management Adoption Trial examined whether the collaborative depression care model is an effective approach in safety-net clinics to improve clinical care o...

  8. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care. PMID:27497022

  9. Usual Care as the Control Group in Clinical Trials of Nonpharmacologic Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, B Taylor; Schoenfeld, David

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the pros and cons of including usual care as a control arm in clinical trials of nonpharmacologic interventions. Usual care is a term used to describe the full spectrum of patient care practices in which clinicians have the opportunity (which is not necessarily seized) to individualize care. The decision to use usual care as the control arm should be based on the nature of the research question and the uniformity of usual-care practices. The use of a usual-care arm in a two-arm tri...

  10. Experiences of critical care nurses caring for unresponsive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, N E

    1999-08-01

    Grounded theory methodology was utilized to explore the experiences of critical care nurses caring for patients who were unable to respond due to a traumatic brain injury or receiving neuromuscular blocking agents. The registered nurses participating in the study worked in a neuroscience intensive care unit. Saturation of the categories was achieved with 16 interviews. The core category that emerged from the study is Giving the Patient a Chance. The subcategories of Learning about My Patient, Maintaining and Monitoring, Talking to My Patient, Working with Families, Struggling with Dilemmas and Personalizing the Experience all centered upon the focus of doing everything to help the patient attain the best possible outcome. Factors influencing each of the subcategories were identified such as the acuity of the patient, experience level of the nurse and the presence or absence of family members or significant others. These factors accounted for the variations in the nurses' experience. Several reasons accounting for the variations were determined. The study identified areas that need to be addressed in both general nursing education and nursing practice, such as instruction on talking to comatose patients, working with families and orientation information for nurses new to caring for these populations. Recommendations for improvement in these areas, as well as for future studies are discussed. PMID:10553569

  11. Memory Complaints Associated with Seeking Clinical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Dina Silva; João Maroco; Sandra Ginó; Tiago Mendes; Schmand, Ben A; Manuela Guerreiro; Alexandre Mendonça; Carolina Pires

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as compared to the memory difficulties reported by subjects in the community. Assessment of subjective memory complaints was done with the subjective memory complaints scale (SMC). The mini-mental stat...

  12. Clinical Predictors of Intensive Care Unit Admission for Asthmatic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Kargar Maher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionChildren with severe asthma attack are a challenging group of patients who could be difficult to treat and leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Asthma attack severity is qualitatively estimated as mild, moderate and severe attacks and respiratory failure based on conditions such as respiration status, feeling of dyspnea, and the degree of unconsciousness. part of which are subjective rather than objective. We investigated clinical findings as predictors of severe attack and probable requirement for Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU admission.Materials and MethodsIn a cross sectional and analytical study 120 patients with asthma attack were enrolled from April 2010 to April 2014 (80 admitted in the ward and 40 in pediatric intensive care unit. Predictors of PICU admission were investigated regarding to initial heart rate(HR, respiratory rate (RR, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(SaO2 and PaCo2 and clinically evident cyanosis.ResultsInitial heart rate(p-value=0.02, respiratory rate (p-value=0.03, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(p-value=0.02 and PaCo2(p-value=0.03 and clinically evident cyanosis were significantly different in two groups(Ward admitted and PICU admittedConclusion There was a significant correlation between initial vital sign and blood gas analysis suggesting usefulness of these factors as predictors of severe asthma attack and subsequent clinical course.

  13. Impact of an oncology palliative care clinic on access to home care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Raymond W; Burman, Debika; Swami, Nadia; Kotler, Jennifer; Banerjee, Subrata; Ridley, Julia; Mak, Ernie; Bryson, John; Rodin, Gary; Le, Lisa W; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-08-01

    Home care (HC) is important for patients with cancer as performance status declines. Our study of 1224 patients at a Canadian cancer center examined the impact of an oncology palliative care clinic (OPCC) on HC referral. The HC referral frequency was calculated before and after the first OPCC consultation, in total and according to performance status (Palliative Performance Scale, PPS). Characteristics associated with HC referral were investigated. After the first OPCC consultation, there was an increase in HC referral from 39% (477 of 1224; 49% of those with PPS ≤60) to 69% (841 of 1224; 88% of those with PPS ≤60). Factors independently associated with HC referral were poor PPS (P < .001) and older age (P = .003). Thus OPCC involvement resulted in markedly increased HC referrals, particularly for older patients with poor performance status. PMID:22777408

  14. Emergency Training, Education And Perceived Clinical Skills For Tsunami Care Among Nurses In Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Cut Husna; Urai Hatthakit; Aranya Chaowalit

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nurses are a part of health care provider who has responsibility to respond to disaster. The nurses ought to have sufficient knowledge and skills in caring for patients in disasters such as in a tsunami. Clinical skills of nurses effectively help the nurses in handling the tsunami emergency response.Objectives: To describe the levels of perceived clinical skills for tsunami care in acute response phase (6 months) after tsunami struck, and to examine the relationship between emerge...

  15. PO02 - Clinical profile of children admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit due to acute clinical deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Aagaard, Hanne; Olesen, Hanne Vebert;

    2016-01-01

    Theme: Intensive care Background: There has been an increased number of critically ill patients admitted to paediatric departments. Only a few studies have described the various causes of unplanned admission to paediatric intensive care units (PICU) due to clinical deterioration. However, an...... critical ill children in paediatric wards....

  16. Palliative care in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvennan, Colleen K; Allen, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients, siloed care, lack of knowledge, overlay of comorbidity and frailty, life saving devices with complex trade-offs, and a limited evidence base. This review will summarize the current literature on the emerging role of palliative care in patients with heart failure and the challenges and opportunities for its integration into routine care. It will discuss current initiatives and future directions of the collaborative relationship between the palliative care and heart failure disciplines. PMID:27079896

  17. Experience of clinical pharmaceutical care carried out in pediatric respiratory department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xiao-ming; JIAN Ling-yan; ZHAO Li-mei

    2008-01-01

    Objective To discuss the role of clinical pharmacists in providing pharmaceutical care in pediatric respiratory department. Methods Supply pharmaceutical information, participate in clinical rounds, provide the rationalization proposal, help doctors to formulate correctly dose regimen, enhance medication efficiency; establish medicine record for the patient, record the drugs which were used, provide pharmaceutical care for the patient such as disease propaganda, medicine-use education, medicine consultation and so on. Results Promote rational administration, enhance the security of medical practice, the clinical pharmacists' work obtains the doctors' approval; improve the medication compliance, reduce patients' economy and spiritual burden, and obtain the patients' trust. Conclusions The pharmaeeutical care carried out in pediatric respiratory department can help reduce the incidence of medication errors, cut down the medication cost, shorten the time of patients to be hospitalized, raise the medication efficieney, and promote the doctor-patient relationship harmoniously. In a word the clinical pharmacists are indispensable.

  18. The pharmaceutical care on the infected patients after trauma by clinical pharmacists%临床药师对创伤感染病例的药学监护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛璐

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨临床药师在创伤重症感染病例救治中的作用.方法:临床药师通过参与创伤骨科两例重症感染病例的救治工作,对抗感染药物的选择以及药品不良反应监测等方面提出具体意见,为病人制定个体化的给药方案,并对创伤感染病例的特点及药学监护方向进行了分析总结.结果:重症感染的病人得到及时控制和治疗.结论:临床药师参与临床治疗,有利于提高临床治疗水平,促进合理用药.%Objective: To investigate the role of clinical pharmacists in the treatment of the severe infected patients after trauma. Methods: The clinical pharmacists take part in the therapy team to treat two cases of severe infected patients after trauma. Pharmacists helped the doctors to choose anti-infective drugs, gave a bit of advice on monitoring adverse drug reactions, made individualized drug therapy scheme for the patients,summarized and analyzed characteristics of infection after trauma and the direction of pharmaceutical care for these patients. Results: The patients with severe infection were treated in time. Conclusion: The participation of clinical pharmacists in clinical treatment can improve the therapeutic level and promote the rational use of drugs.

  19. Caring for patients with rabies in developing countries - the neglected importance of palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantola, Arnaud; Crabol, Yoann; Mahendra, Bangalore Jayakrishnappa; In, Sotheary; Barennes, Hubert; Bourhy, Hervé; Peng, Yiksing; Ly, Sowath; Buchy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Although limited publications address clinical management of symptomatic patients with rabies in intensive care units, the overwhelming majority of human rabies cases occur in the rural setting of developing countries where healthcare workers are few, lack training and drugs. Based on our experience, we suggest how clinicians in resource-limited settings can make best use of essential drugs to provide assistance to patients with rabies and their families, at no risk to themselves. Comprehensive and compassionate patient management of furious rabies should aim to alleviate thirst, anxiety and epileptic fits using infusions, diazepam or midazolam and antipyretic drugs via intravenous or intrarectal routes. Although the patient is dying, respiratory failure must be avoided especially if the family, after being informed, wish to take the patient home alive for funereal rites to be observed. Healthcare staff should be trained and clinical guidelines should be updated to include palliative care for rabies in endemic countries. PMID:26806229

  20. Memory Complaints Associated with Seeking Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pires

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment relies on the presence of memory complaints. However, memory complaints are very frequent in healthy people. The objective of this study was to determine the severity and type of memory difficulties presented by elderly patients who seek for clinical help, as compared to the memory difficulties reported by subjects in the community. Assessment of subjective memory complaints was done with the subjective memory complaints scale (SMC. The mini-mental state examination was used for general cognitive evaluation and the geriatric depression scale for the assessment of depressive symptoms. Eight-hundred and seventy-one nondemented subjects older than 50 years were included. Participants in the clinical setting had a higher total SMC score (10.3±4.2 than those in the community (5.1±3.0. Item 3 of the SMC, Do you ever forget names of family members or friends? contributed significantly more to the variance of the total SMC score in the clinical sample (18% as compared to the community sample (11%. Forgetting names of family members or friends plays an important role in subjective memory complaints in the clinical setting. This symptom is possibly perceived as particularly worrisome and likely drives people to seek for clinical help.

  1. Care in the perception of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Henriques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being a cancer patient is a unique and singular. The cancer disease associated with pain and suffering is a challenging process for the sufferer, for whom have around or for those caring for the sick. Pain, considered the 5 th vital sign, is often identified as the main complaint of our patients suffering from cancer. We dare to say that to explore the essence of the care provided by nurses and primary health care to cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time found in his home and family, we would be helping to build a know -how by itself, with positive externalities for patients, families, professionals and nursing itself. Methods: Ask "What does Care for Nurses and primary health care for cancer patients with prolonged pain in time for your family?" we may lead the cornerstone of our problems, by studying quantitative nature using a questionnaire and a significance level of care. Results: the average age is 59.27 years, mostly women, 51% are married and in 29.8% of studies has only completed the first cycle of education. The majority of cancer patients who participated in this study share a room with a relative. In regard to aspects of their pain, cancer patients referred to 47.1% of cases, that their pain started weeks ago and 38.5% even refers to the pain persists for months. The pain felt by these patients is not the severe type, in 68.3% of cases, and has an average intensity of 5, although we have 25% of these patients with pain greater than a 6.75. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of nurses who provide care at primary health reveals an alpha of 0.8857 and 0.9025 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time they are at home shows an alpha of 0.6672and 0.7374 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer family patients with prolonged pain shows an alpha of 0.6712 and an alpha standardized 0

  2. Provider and clinic cultural competence in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K; Carson, Kathryn A; Cooper, Lisa A

    2008-03-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA completed an on-line survey which included items assessing provider and clinic cultural competence. Using simple linear regression, it was found that providers with attitudes reflecting greater cultural motivation to learn were more likely to work in clinics with a higher percent of nonwhite staff, and those offering cultural diversity training and culturally adapted patient education materials. More culturally appropriate provider behavior was associated with a higher percent of nonwhite staff in the clinic, and culturally adapted patient education materials. Enhancing provider and clinic cultural competence may be synergistic strategies for reducing healthcare disparities. PMID:18164114

  3. Patient safety in primary care: A survey of general practitioners in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, S.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care encompasses many different clinical domains and patient groups, which means that patient safety in primary care may be equally broad. Previous research on safety in primary care has focused on medication safety and incident reporting. In this study, the views of general prac

  4. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  5. Patient navigator programs, cancer disparities, and the patient protection and affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Beverly; Chabner, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    Patients in vulnerable population groups suffer disproportionately from cancer. The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of cancer. Patient navigator programs have been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Among its provisions relevant to disparities in cancer care, The Patient Protection and Affordability Care Act authorizes continued funding of patient navigator programs. However, given the current economic and political environment, this funding is in jeopardy. This article describes patient navigator programs and summarizes the elements of the health care law that are relevant to these programs. It is vital that the entire oncology community remain committed to leading efforts toward the improvement of cancer care among our most vulnerable patients. PMID:21804070

  6. 舒适护理在肝癌晚期患者临终护理中的临床价值%Clinical Value of Comfortable Nursing in the Hospice Care of Terminal Liver Cancer Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡招辉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical value of comfortable nursing in the hospice care of terminal liver cancer patients. Methods 42 terminal liver cancer patients admitted in our hospital were selected for the study and analysis. And they were divided into the treatment group (21 cases) and the control group (21 cases), the nursing effects of two groups of patients were compared. Results The difference in the total nursing satisfaction between the two groups of patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion Comfortable nursing in the hospice care for terminal liver cancer patients has significant effect, which can effectively improve the quality of life at the end of life of the patients, and the total nursing satisfaction of the families of patients.%目的:研究分析舒适护理在肝癌晚期患者临终护理中的临床价值。方法选取该院42例肝癌晚期患者研究分析,并随机将其分为治疗组(21例)和对照组(21例),对比两组患者护理效果。结果对比两组患者护理总满意,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论舒适护理在肝癌晚期患者临终护理中具有显著效果,可有效提高患者临终生活质量及患者家属对护理总满意度。

  7. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    for analysis of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyze key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. FINDINGS: Patient involvement is important in Denmark...... be identified when pursuing the strategies at the same time. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed framework further. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The paper includes...... implications for the development of patient involvement in health care. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This paper fulfills a need to study different types of patient involvement and to develop a theoretical framework for characterizing and analyzing such involvement strategies....

  8. 临床路径模式在ICU护理中的实施效果评价%Evaluation of implementation effect of clinical pathway model in nursing care of patients with ICU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐小笋

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveThe clinical path model implementation effect in ICU nursing expand analyzed.Methods 84 patients with ICU clinical data research and analysis,and divided into a treatment group and the control group were 42 cases,compared to treatment effects.ResultsThe time of ICU admission in patients(8.68±1.24)d,nursing adverse event rate of 2.38%,95.23% rate in place of care,quality of care overall satisfaction with 97.62% of patients in the control group(10.89±2.03)d,19.05%,78.57% and 80.95%,compared,P<0.05.ConclusionThe clinical pathway models can significantly improve the quality of care in ICU patients,to promote early recovery of patients.%目的:分析临床路径模式在ICU护理中的实施效果。方法对84例ICU患者的临床资料进行研究分析,将其分为治疗组和对照组各42例,对比护理效果。结果治疗组患者入住ICU时间为(8.68±1.24)d、护理不良事件发生率为2.38%、护理到位率为95.23%、对护理质量总满意度为97.62%,与对照组患者的(10.89±2.03)d、19.05%、78.57%和80.95%比较差异显著(P<0.05)。结论临床路径模式可显著提高ICU患者护理质量,促进患者早日康复。

  9. Intensive Care Management in Pediatric Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ebru Sakallıoğlu Abalı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. This article aimed to review the current principles of management from initial assessment to early management and intensive care for pediatric burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 62-9

  10. Shared care and implementation of a pediatric clinical pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfrits, Mette Sørensen; Thomsen, RW; Rubak, Jens Mørck; Høst, Arne; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck

    and children with uncontrolled asthma should be followed at the pediatrics department. Study 2) An increased overall proportion of children with well-controlled asthma. Study 3) Favorable changes in the use of asthma medication. Study 4) Self-reported higher quality of life among children with asthma...... either at a hospital specialist out-patient clinic at the pediatrics department at Viborg hospital or at one of 100 GPs in the Viborg area. At baseline the involved health care professionals participated in an introduction to the clinical pathway and treatment guide. Furthermore the clinical pathway and...... supported by Folkesundhed i Midten. We sincerely thank Lars G. Hansen (Head of Department of Pediatrics, Viborg Hospital) for his help and participation....

  11. Impact of clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A critically ill patient is treated and reviewed by physicians from different specialties; hence, polypharmacy is a very common. This study was conducted to assess the impact and effectiveness of having a clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit (ICU. It also evaluates the clinical pharmacist interventions with a focus on optimizing the quality of pharmacotherapy and patient safety. Materials and Methods: The prospective, observational study was carried out in medical and surgical/trauma ICU over a period of 1 year. All detected drug-related problems and interventions were categorized based on the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe system. Results: During the study period, average monthly census of 1032 patients got treated in the ICUs. A total of 986 pharmaceutical interventions due to drug-related problems were documented, whereof medication errors accounted for 42.6% (n = 420, drug of choice problem 15.4% (n = 152, drug-drug interactions were 15.1% (n = 149, Y-site drug incompatibility was 13.7% (n = 135, drug dosing problems were 4.8% (n = 47, drug duplications reported were 4.6% (n = 45, and adverse drug reactions documented were 3.8% (n = 38. Drug dosing adjustment done by the clinical pharmacist included 140 (11.9% renal dose, 62 (5.2% hepatic dose, 17 (1.4% pediatric dose, and 104 (8.8% insulin dosing modifications. A total of 577 drug and poison information queries were answered by the clinical pharmacist. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist as a part of multidisciplinary team in our study was associated with a substantially lower rate of adverse drug event caused by medication errors, drug interactions, and drug incompatibilities.

  12. Leadership: improving the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, A

    The satisfaction staff achieve from their work is in part determined by the style of management they work under. This article analyses the impact of a proactive leadership style on team performance and the quality of patient care. PMID:11973895

  13. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy ...

  14. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... view charts and maps. State Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by ... U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. — Washington, D.C. 20201

  15. Effective Perioperative Communication to Enhance Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, J Hudson

    2016-08-01

    Breakdowns in health care communication are a significant cause of sentinel events and associated patient morbidity and mortality. Effective communication is a necessary component of a patient safety program, which enables all members of the interdisciplinary health care team to effectively manage their individual roles and responsibilities in the perioperative setting; set expectations for safe, high-reliability care; and measure and assess outcomes. To sustain a culture of safety, effective communication should be standardized, complete, clear, brief, and timely. Executive leadership and support helps remove institutional barriers and address challenges to support the engagement of patients in health care communication, which has been shown to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and improve the patient experience. PMID:27472971

  16. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and ...

  17. PATIENT EDUCATION ABUOT SELF CARE KNOWLEDGE IN CHF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R DARYABEIGI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiovascular disease are the major cause of mortality in developed countries. CHF is also a chronic cardiovascular disorder. Teaching the self care plays a major role in its prevention and chronic complications. Regarding the importance of self care investigating the, effect of self care education on the knowledge of the patients on CHF is so important. Methods. In this study 42 patients with CHF were selected in the first exam held 15 days before and after a two hour training class. A training booklet was given to them. Data was collected by a questionnarie which includ 5 section as follows. The 1st section included the demographic charactristics. The 2nd section, 7 questions about anatpmy and physiology of the heart, the 3rd section included eight questions about drugs history, the 4th section included nine questions about regimen of the patients and the 5th section included 6 questions about physical activity. Results. The self care knowledge of patients increased 95 percent after education. There was no correlation between the effects of self care education and the age of all units studied. Statistical tests showed no correlation between the effects of self care education and educational level. Discussion. The knowlegde of the patients is low regarding the self care. The self care education to patients is the main duty of nurses. So, it is recommended to be considered as the first nursing intervention regarding these patients.

  18. Effectiveness of dementia follow-up care by memory clinics or general practitioners: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of post-diagnosis dementia treatment and coordination of care by memory clinics compared with general practitioners. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine memory clinics and 159 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Participants 175 patients with a new diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers. Interventions Usual care provided by memory clinic or general practitioner. Main out...

  19. Self-care in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula da Conceição

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to describe self-care behavior and its associated factors in a sample of heart failure Brazilian patients.Method: descriptive cross-sectional study with non-probabilistic sample of 116 ambulatory patients undergoing heart failure treatment. Self-care was evaluated using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index, (scores ≥70 points=appropriate self-care. Association tests were applied, considering a descriptive level of 0.05.Results: the mean age of participants was 57.7 (SD =11.3 years; 54.3% were male; the mean schooling was 5.5 (SD = 4.0 years; and 74.1% had functional class II-III. The mean scores on the subscales of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index indicated inappropriate self-care (self-care maintenance: 53.2 (SD =14.3, selfcare management: 50.0 (SD = 20.3 and self-care confidence: 52.6 (SD=22.7 and it was found low frequencies of participants with appropriate self-care (self-care maintenance, 6.9%, self-care management (14.7% and self-care confidence (19%. Higher scores of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index were associated with: reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (p=0.001, longer time of experience with the disease (p=0.05 and joint monitoring by physician and nurse (p=0.007.Conclusion: investments are needed to improve the self-care behavior and the nursing can play a relevant role in this improvement.

  20. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  1. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D.I.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  2. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Palliative Care Patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is a significant cause of morbidity, especially among patients with advanced cancer. The incidence and significance of yeast carriage and OPC in the palliative care setting in Denmark is unknown. The best diagnostic strategy and treatment regimen has...... to be defined. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the clinical and microbiological incidence of yeast carriage/OPC and assessed available diagnostic procedures-culture and microscopy. The distribution of Candida species and fluconazole susceptibility was determined. METHODS: Terminal care patients admitted...... recently treated with azoles. CONCLUSIONS: In total, 52% of culture-positive patients harbored at least one isolate with innately or acquired decreased fluconazole susceptibility. Therefore, susceptibility testing appears recommendable for patients with clinical signs of OPC....

  3. Patient and nurse experiences of theory-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Jane

    2009-04-01

    The pre-surgery nursing practice model derived from Newman's theory was developed to change the delivery of nursing care in a pre-surgical clinic. Guided by the theoretical knowledge of health as expanding consciousness, transpersonal caring, and reflective practice, key practice changes included a) incorporating Newman's praxis process, b) changing the physical space, and c) providing opportunities to reflect on practice. The purpose of this study was to utilize a phenomenological approach to evaluate a new model of care among 31 patients and 4 nurses. PMID:19342715

  4. Critical-care visitation: the patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Sonya R; Bernhardt-Tindal, Kim; Hart, Ann; Stepp, Amber; Henson, April

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine critically ill patients' satisfaction and preference with the restricted visiting hours in the critical-care units in a 435-bed acute-care hospital in North Carolina. The major aims of the study were to (1) identify the time that most patients preferred for visitation and (2) identify how often patients wanted to have visitors. This article discusses the findings of this study, one of which is that patients want more control over visitation. PMID:21135614

  5. Be More Involved in Your Health Care: Tips for Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Task Force Improving Primary Care Practice Health IT Integration Health Care/System Redesign Clinical-Community Linkages Care Coordination Capacity Building Behavioral and Mental Health Self-Management Support Resources Clinical Community Relationships ...

  6. Is the Internet a useful and relevant source for health and health care information retrieval for German cardiothoracic patients? First results from a prospective survey among 255 Patients at a German cardiothoracic surgical clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diez Claudius

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not clear how prevalent Internet use among cardiopathic patients in Germany is and what impact it has on the health care utilisation. We measured the extent of Internet use among cardiopathic patients and examined the effects that Internet use has on users' knowledge about their cardiac disease, health care matters and their use of the health care system. Methods We conducted a prospective survey among 255 cardiopathic patients at a German university hospital. Results Forty seven respondents (18 % used the internet and 8,8 % (n = 23 went online more than 20 hours per month. The most frequent reason for not using the internet was disinterest (52,3 %. Fourteen patients (5,4 % searched for specific disease-related information and valued the retrieved information on an analogous scale (1 = not relevant, 5 = very relevant on median with 4,0. Internet use is age and education dependent. Only 36 (14,1 % respondents found the internet useful, whereas the vast majority would not use it. Electronic scheduling for ambulatory visits or postoperative telemedical monitoring were rather disapproved. Conclusion We conclude that Internet use is infrequent among our study population and the search for relevant health and disease related information is not well established.

  7. Collaborative Cardiac Care Service: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Caring for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhoff, Brian G; Kuca, Susan; Rasmussen, Jon; Merenich, John A

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death in the US. In 1996, Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO) developed the Collaborative Cardiac Care Service (CCCS) with the goal of improving the health of patients with CAD. Description: CCCS consists of a nursing team (the KP Cardiac Rehabilitation program) and a pharmacy team (the Clinical Pharmacy Cardiac Risk Service). CCCS works collaboratively with patients, primary care physicians, cardiologists, and other health care professionals to coordinate proven cardiac risk reduction strategies for patients with CAD. Activities such as lifestyle modification, medication initiation and adjustment, patient education, laboratory monitoring, and management of adverse events are all coordinated through CCCS. The CCCS uses an electronic medical record and patient-tracking software to document all interactions with patients, track patient appointments, and collect data for evaluation of both short- and long-term outcomes. Outcomes: The CCCS currently follows over 12,000 patients with CAD. The CCCS has demonstrated improvement in surrogate outcomes including: cholesterol screening (55% to 96.3%), the proportion of patients with a goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) <100 mg/dL (22% to 76.9%), and has reduced the average LDL-c to 78.3 mg/dL for the CAD population it follows. The CCCS has shown a reduction in all-cause mortality associated with CAD by 76% in the patients followed by the service. Patient and physician satisfaction have been high with CCCS. Conclusion: The CCCS coordinates many aspects of cardiac risk reduction care resulting in excellent continuity of care. The CCCS has continued to grow and expand the number of patients enrolled by using innovative strategies and technology and has resulted in excellent care and improved outcomes of the CAD population at KPCO. PMID:21331203

  8. Overcoming Recruitment Challenges in Palliative Care Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Lodato, Jordan E.; Currow, David C; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2013-01-01

    Challenges to clinical trial recruitment in palliative care are significant but not insurmountable. Through their experience with designing and deploying a social-marketing based protocol, the authors show that a carefully crafted recruitment and retention protocol can be effective.

  9. Pharmacy intervention at an intensive care rehabilitation clinic

    OpenAIRE

    MacTavish, P.; McPeake, J.; Devine, H.; Kinsella, J; Daniel, M; Fenlon, C.; Quasim, T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: During an intensive care stay, patients often have their chronic medications withheld for a variety of reasons and new drugs commenced [1]. As patients are often under the care of a number of different medical teams during their admission there is potential for these changes to be inadvertently continued [2]. Intensive Care Syndrome: Promoting Independence and Return to Employment (InS:PIRE) is a five week rehabilitation programme for patients and their care...

  10. Experiences of dental care: what do patients value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbaraini Alexandra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dentistry in Australia combines business and health care service, that is, the majority of patients pay money for tangible dental procedures such as fluoride applications, dental radiographs, dental fillings, crowns, and dentures among others. There is evidence that patients question dentists’ behaviours and attitudes during a dental visit when those highly technical procedures are performed. However, little is known about how patients’ experience dental care as a whole. This paper illustrates the findings from a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. It focuses on patients’ experiences of dental care, particularly on the relationship between patients and dentists during the provision of preventive care and advice in general dental practices. Methods Seventeen patients were interviewed. Data analysis consisted of transcript coding, detailed memo writing, and data interpretation. Results Patients described their experiences when visiting dental practices with and without a structured preventive approach in place, together with the historical, biological, financial, psychosocial and habitual dimensions of their experience. Potential barriers that could hinder preventive activities as well as facilitators for prevention were also described. The offer of preventive dental care and advice was an amazing revelation for this group of patients as they realized that dentists could practice dentistry without having to “drill and fill” their teeth. All patients, regardless of the practice they came from or their level of clinical risk of developing dental caries, valued having a caring dentist who respected them and listened to their concerns without “blaming” them for their oral health status. These patients complied with and supported the preventive care options because they were being “treated as a person not as a patient” by their dentists. Patients valued dentists who made

  11. Why do symptomatic patients delay obtaining care for tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, S; Leake, B; Anderson, R; Gelberg, L

    1998-04-01

    The resurgence of tuberculosis (TB) has coincided with deteriorating access to care for high-risk populations. We sought to determine what perceived access barriers delayed symptomatic TB patients from obtaining care. In order to do this, we conducted a survey in Los Angeles County, California, using a consecutive sample of patients with active TB as confirmed by the county TB control authority. The measures used in the study were a self-reported delay in seeking care of more than 60 d from symptom onset, a period sufficient to cause skin-test conversion in exposed contacts, and self-reported access barriers. The county TB registry provided supplementary clinical data. We found that one in five of the 248 symptomatic respondents (response rate: 60%) delayed obtaining care for > 60 d (mean = 74 d, SD = 216 d). During the delay, patients exposed an average of eight contacts. As compared with the rest of the sample, delay was more common in those who were unemployed (25% versus 14%), concerned about cost (27% versus 14%), anticipated prolonged waiting-room time (26% versus 14%), believed they could treat themselves (31% versus 14%), anticipated difficulty in getting an appointment (28% versus 16%), were uncertain about where to get care (33% versus 16%), and feared immigration authorities (47% versus 18%) (p unemployment, and belief in the efficacy of self-treatment independently predicted delay > 60 d. Illness severity as measured by chest radiography, sputum smears, and symptoms had little impact on delay. We conclude that because access variables such as lack of employment and knowledge about where to obtain care were more closely associated with clinically significant delay than was severity of illness, these results raise concerns about the equity of access to care among TB patients. The results suggest that improving the availability of services for high-risk groups may substantially reduce TB patients' delay in obtaining care, and thus may limit the spread of

  12. Investigation on clinical effects of comfort care in postoperative gastrointestinal carcinoma patients with chemical therapy%胃肠道恶性肿瘤术后化疗患者舒适护理的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于淑娟; 于建敏; 杨丽媛; 王芳英

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects and clinical significance of comfort care in postoperative gastrointestinal carcinoma patients with chemical therapy. Methods One hundred and one postoperative gastrointestinal carcinoma patients with chemical therapy were divided into intervention group(n = 51) and control group (n = 50) randomly, intervention group was given three to six months' comfort care besides conventional nursing, while control group only received conventional nursing, and clinical effects were evaluated after intervention. Results Life quality in intervention group (KPS score 80. 5 ±6.2) was significantly higher than that of control group (75.6±8.1), and satisfactory degree to comfort care was higher than that of control group too, but the incidence of adverse effects was significantly lower than that of control group, P<0.05). Conclusions Comfort care in postoperative gastrointestinal carcinoma patients with chemical therapy is of great importance in improving patients' life quality and alleviating adverse effects after chemical therapy.%目的 探讨对胃肠道恶性肿瘤术后化疗患者实施舒适护理的效果.方法 将101例胃肠道恶性肿瘤术后化疗患者随机分为舒适护理组51例和对照组50例.对照组给予常规护理,舒适护理组在此基础上给予为期3~6个月的舒适护理.结果 干预后舒适护理组的生活质量(卡氏评分)为(80.5±6.2)分,高于对照组的(75.6±8.1)分;舒适护理组对护理工作的满意度亦高于对照组,而化疗后毒副作用的发生率明显低于对照组.结论 对胃肠道恶性肿瘤术后化疗患者给予舒适护理,可明显改善患者的生活质量,提高其对化疗毒副作用的耐受性.

  13. Implementation of a drug therapy monitoring clinic in a primary-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchick, J K

    2000-12-15

    The development and implementation of a drug therapy monitoring clinic in the primary-care clinics of a military hospital are described. To improve patient care and decrease costs associated with treating chronic diseases, in August 1995 the pharmacy department established a drug therapy monitoring clinic. The clinic was responsible for initiating and monitoring treatment plans for patients with chronic diseases, implementing clinical guidelines, providing educational programs, collecting and analyzing outcome data, and handling requests for medication extensions. Treatment followed existing national standards and Department of Defense guidelines modified for the institution. The clinic began with one clinical pharmacy specialist, and within a year it added another clinical pharmacist and a technician. The clinic first obtained patients via consultations from providers in primary care; this was soon extended to all departments. In addition, the pharmacist was available to see walk-in patients needing medication extensions. Later, referrals came for inpatients and patients seen in the emergency room for asthma or diabetes mellitus, as well as for inpatients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. For fiscal year 1999, the clinic saw 104 (+/- 44.3) patients per month seeking medication extensions. It also handled 24,873 clinical interventions that year, resulting in projected annual savings of $1,085,560. Chart review indicated that compliance with national standards improved dramatically for patients with diabetes mellitus or asthma followed by pharmacists compared with physician monitoring during the same period and before the clinic began. The wait time for reviewing laboratory results and for patients receiving anticoagulation therapy was eliminated, and doses were changed immediately, if needed. A comprehensive pharmacist-managed drug therapy monitoring clinic for outpatients with chronic diseases can result in positive patient outcomes and more cost

  14. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Killu; Victor Coba; Michael Mendez; Subhash Reddy; Tanja Adrzejewski; Yung Huang; Jessica Ede; Mathilda Horst

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respec...

  15. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  16. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  17. Establishing a community-based lung cancer multidisciplinary clinic as part of a large integrated health care system: aurora health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjegovich-Weidman, Marija; Haid, Max; Kumar, Santhosh; Huibregtse, Carol; McDonald, Jean; Krishnan, Santosh

    2010-11-01

    A community cancer clinic, through cooperation with its parent health care system, developed a lung cancer multidisciplinary clinic (MDC) to enhance patient care and prevent out-migration to competing health care systems. The local medical and radiation oncologists collaborated with a thoracic surgeon from the tertiary care hospital in establishing the lung MDC. All the participating physicians are employed by the health care system. A cancer care coordinator assured that all necessary tests were obtained and available to the physicians at least 1 day before the clinic. The multidisciplinary team also included a pulmonologist and met every third week. Other sub-specialists were involved as necessary. Final treatment recommendations using National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines were made for each patient at the MDC visit. This clinic, once established, resulted in significant improvements in the quality of care, patient satisfaction and retention of patients. Time from diagnosis to initiation of treatment was reduced to a mean of 18 days from a mean of 24 days. The community cancer clinic had an increase in lung cancer patient care by 28% and a 9.1% increase in gross revenue. The tertiary care hospital benefited by providing all patients with definitive surgery, including minimally invasive surgery. The tertiary hospital thoracic surgeon had a 75% increase in referrals from the lung MDC geographic area over the previous year. This collaboration in the development of MDCs demonstrates how patients, caregivers, and the health care system benefit from MDCs. PMID:21358947

  18. Clinical integration at ground zero: perceptions of patients and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, K

    2000-03-01

    As an alternative to the administrative and management views of clinical integration, the perceptions and current research of patients and their families about integration initiatives are presented at "ground zero," i.e., the caregiving level. If there is no integration at ground zero, the other levels are of little merit. Contrary to the pervading opinion, clinical integration is not a value-added endeavor to boost satisfaction scores of patients and families or to make a health care system look good to regulators. Rather, clinical integration is fundamental to the precision, efficiency, and effectiveness of care delivery. Examples of the need for integration spanning situations from critical care to self-care are described. PMID:11075183

  19. Cost Effectiveness of Facility-Based Care, Home-Based Care and Mobile Clinics for Provision of Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Babigumira, Joseph B; Sethi, Ajay K.; Smyth, Kathleen A.; Singer, Mendel E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders in HIV/AIDS care currently use different programmes for provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. It is not known which of these represents the best value for money. Objective: To compare the cost effectiveness of home-based care (HBC), facility-based care (FBC) and mobile clinic care (MCC) for provision of ART in Uganda. Methods: Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using decision and Markov modeling of adult AIDS patients in WHO Clinical ...

  20. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemie Getahun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data.

  1. Leaders, leadership and future primary care clinical research

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi Nadeem; Mitchell Caroline; Magin Parker; McCowan Colin; Lasserson Daniel; Kadam Umesh; Hanratty Barbara; Del Mar Chris; Cleland Jennifer; Furler John; Rait Greta; Steel Nick; van Driel Mieke; Ward Alison

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background A strong and self confident primary care workforce can deliver the highest quality care and outcomes equitably and cost effectively. To meet the increasing demands being made of it, primary care needs its own thriving research culture and knowledge base. Methods Review of recent developments supporting primary care clinical research. Results Primary care research has benefited from a small group of passionate leaders and significant investment in recent decades in some cou...

  2. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rustad, Else

    2016-01-01

    Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Pal...

  3. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rustad EC; Furnes B; Cronfalk BS; Dysvik E

    2016-01-01

    Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliat...

  4. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world.In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care.I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  5. Teaching Humane Care for Dying Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Elise L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an elective, upper-level course on caring for terminally ill patients, designed for baccalaureate nursing students. Discusses the hospice concept and its background, course design, communication with dying patients and their families, and outcomes of the course as measured by a pretest and two posttests. (CH)

  6. Quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, WY; Lam, CLK; Lo, SV

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature regarding quality of care of nurse-led and allied health personnel-led primary care clinics with specific attention to the quality indicators for fall prevention, continence care, pulmonary rehabilitation, mental health, pharmaceutical care, and wound care services. Data sources Literature search from 1990 to 2010 including Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database, RAND (Research and Development) Corporation Health Database, the ACOVE (Assessing the Care of Vulnerab...

  7. Application of psychological care clinical pathway in the rehabilitation of patients with facial neuritis%心理护理临床路径在面神经炎患者中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭晓雪

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of psychological care clinical pathway on the rehabilitation of patients with facial ncuritis.Methods Analysis from 74 cases of hospitalized patients with facial neuritis in neurology from January 2010 to August 2012.They were randomly divided into the path group and control group,37 cases for each.The control group was treated with conventional care,while the path group received the clinical path of psychological care on the basis of conventional care.Anxiety and severity of depression of patients in the first day to hospital,the second day,and discharge from hospital,length of stay,hospital costs,patients' satisfaction,efficacy and other key indicators were observed and compared between the two groups.Results As compared with the control group,the path group had significantly lower in the anxiety score of the discharged day (43.60 ± 9.32),depression (32.91 ± 4.04),hospital stay (18.9 ± 3.9 days),hospital costs(4325.12 ± 706.9 (¥)),and the difference between the two groups was significantly difference (t =6.757,22.320,8.569,3.253,respectively ; P < 0.01).And the patients' satisfaction (94.59%),treatment effect (97.30%),and health education knowledge score (92.1 ± 6.4) in the path group were significantly higher than that in the control group (x2 =5.232,16.207,respectively; t =13.068 ; P < 0.05).Conclusions Using psychological care clinical path mode to strengthen the psychological care of patients with facial paralysis,can improve the patients with adverse psychological state,promote disease recovery,reduce hospitalization costs,and shorter hospital stay,improve patients' satisfaction,and so on.Standardization and procedures of the clinical path of psychological care,patients can get the best care services and health education effect,while enhancing the nurses' professional knowledge level and job satisfaction.%目的 探索心理护理临床路径在面神经炎患者康复中的应用效果.方法 2010年1

  8. Patient's view of dialysis care: development of a taxonomy and rating of importance of different aspects of care. CHOICE study. Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H R; Jenckes, M; Fink, N E; Meyer, K; Wu, A W; Bass, E B; Levin, N; Powe, N R

    1997-12-01

    Quality assessment efforts to enhance public accountability in dialysis care and to support provider efforts to improve care have lacked patient input. To develop brief patient evaluation or satisfaction surveys suitable for busy clinical settings, knowing patients' priorities can be helpful in deciding which aspects of care should be tracked. We conducted a study to identify salient attributes of dialysis care and to rank the importance of these attributes from the perspective of dialysis patients. We analyzed the content of patient focus group transcripts to characterize dialysis care from the patients' perspective. We then surveyed 86 patients to determine how patients would rank the importance of each aspect to quality of dialysis care. The 18 broad aspects of care identified in the focus group included: (1) care provided by nephrologists, (2) care provided by other physicians (nonnephrologists), (3) care provided by dialysis center nurses, (4) care provided by social workers and psychologists, (5) care provided by dieticians, (6) clergy, (7) care provided by technicians and physician assistants/nurse practitioners, (8) care provided by dialysis center staff in general, (9) supplies, (10) treatment choice and effectiveness, (11) patient education and training, (12) self-care, (13) dialysis machines, (14) unit environment and policies, (15) cost containment, (16) billing, (17) cost of care, and (18) health outcomes. Items ranked in the top 10 by both groups of patients included issues related to nephrologists, other doctors, nurses, and patient education and training. Compared with hemodialysis patients, peritoneal dialysis patients gave higher ratings to hospital doctors' and nurses' attention to cleanliness when working with access sites, how correct the nephrologist's instructions to patients are, whether emergency room doctors check with nephrologists, the amount of information patients get about their diet, and how well nurses answer patients' questions

  9. A case of hyperprolactinemia in patient with metastatic breast cancer: clinical case presentation

    OpenAIRE

    L K Dzeranova; E A Pigarova; T. О. Vasilieva; O V Manchenko; V P Vladimirova

    2014-01-01

    The described clinical case illustrates the importance of careful medical care and follow-up for oncology patients which can prevent high degree of tumor dissemination in case of the disease progression and improve survival rate and quality of life.

  10. Use of an Online Patient Portal and Glucose Control in Primary Care Patients with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, Bishnu; Salas, Joanne; Sayavong, Sarah; Scherrer, Jeffrey F

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to assess the effect of online use of a patient portal on improvement of glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes presenting to primary care clinics. This retrospective cohort design used data from a primary care patient data registry that captured all ambulatory visits to the academic medical center's primary care clinics. A total of 1510 patients with diabetes were included because they had at least 1 visit with a documented HbA1c value between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2013. Degree of patient portal use was defined as no use, read only, and read and write. Linear regression models were computed to measure the association between degree of patient portal use and HbA1c control before and after adjusting for demographics, comorbidity, and volume of health care use. Patients who were nonusers of the patient portal's e-mail function had consistently higher average HbA1c values than patients who read and wrote e-mails. After adjusting for demographics, health services utilization, and comorbid conditions, patients who read and wrote e-mails still had significantly (PPopulation Health Management 2016;19:125-131). PMID:26237200

  11. Patient costs in anticoagulation management: a comparison of primary and secondary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, D; Bryan, S; Gee, K; Murray, E.; Fitzmaurice, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for anticoagulation management is increasing. This has led to care being provided in non-hospital settings. While clinical studies have similarly demonstrated good clinical care in these settings, it is still unclear as to which alternative is the most efficient. AIM: To determine the costs borne by patients when attending an anticoagulation management clinic in either primary or secondary care and to use this information to consider the cost-effectiveness of anticoagul...

  12. Considerations for Implementation of Cancer Molecular Diagnostics Into Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Physicians have provided personalized care with as much precision as possible for several centuries. However, increasingly sophisticated understanding of the human genome and of cancer biology has permitted identification of genetic and phenotypic distinctions that might permit development of new tumor biomarker tests for risk categorization, screening, differential diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and monitoring. Both commercial and academic laboratories are offering tests for single analytes, panels of tests of single analytes, multiparameter assays coalesced into a signature, and total genomic, transcriptomic, or proteomic analyses. However, the absence of a consistent regulatory environment has led to marketing of assays without proven analytic validity or clinical utility. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval or clearance does not necessarily imply that use of the test will improve patient outcomes, and FDA discretion to permit laboratory-developed tests results in unknown benefit, or harm, of others. In this regard, a "bad tumor marker is as bad as a bad drug." Caveat emptor is not a satisfactory approach to delivering high-quality care. Rather, adoption of tumor biomarker tests should be based on high levels of evidence generated in scientifically rigorous studies that demonstrate both analytical validity and clinical utility. Doing so will ensure that clinicians and patients are confident that a tumor biomarker test is likely to improve their outcomes. PMID:27249708

  13. The Role of Ambulatory Care Pharmacists in an HIV Multidisciplinary Team within a Free and Bilingual Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Ann M. Fugit, Pharm.D., BCPS; Sallie D. Mayer, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, CDE; Radha S. Vanmali, Pharm.D., BCACP

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the role and integration of ambulatory care pharmacists in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) clinic within a free and bilingual clinic with regards to types of interventions made during the patient-pharmacist visit. Design: Retrospective, single-centered, chart review. Setting: Free, bilingual clinic in Richmond, VA. Participants: Thirty-two adult patients with diagnosed HIV receiving care in the clinic between June 30, 2010 and January 26, 2011. Main Outcome Measure: T...

  14. Clinical characteristics of patients in the persistent vegetative state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresch, D D; Sims, F H; Duthie, E H; Goldstein, M D; Lane, P S

    1991-05-01

    Little is known concerning the specific clinical characteristics of patients in persistent vegetative states (PVS). Fifty-one patients from four nursing homes, approximately 3% of the total patients, were identified as being in a PVS. The mean age of the patients was 64.8 +/- 3.2 years (range, 19 to 96 years) and the mean duration of the PVS was 3.3 +/- 5.0 years (range, 1 to 16.8 years), with 13 patients' PVS being longer than 5 years. Cerebrovascular accidents and dementia were the most common causes of the PVS, accounting for 32 of the cases (63%). In the younger patients cerebral trauma secondary to motor vehicle accidents was the most common cause. All 51 patients were fed via tube feeding and 35 patients had urinary catheters (75%). All patients were receiving daily medications, with greater than 50% taking daily vitamins. Over 30% were taking digitalis and/or diuretics and over 32% were taking H2 blockers. Transfer of patients to an acute care hospital was not uncommon, with 31 patients (61%) requiring 63 acute care hospitalizations during their stay in the nursing home. As expected, infections were the most common reason for acute care hospitalization, although 15 of the patients were hospitalized for surgical procedures. Another common problem encountered by the patients was pressure sores, with 78% of patients requiring specific therapy for at least one pressure sore. Surprisingly, only 27 (53%) of 51 patients had a specific resuscitation status designation in the medical chart, and neither presence of a chart designation nor specific resuscitation order was related to the patient's age or the cause or duration of PVS. From these data it would appear that clinical characteristics of patients in PVS are variable. Some patients are young, others are old. The cause varies from cerebrovascular accidents to cerebral trauma. Survival may be prolonged; complications are not uncommon, with some patients requiring acute care hospitalization. PMID:2025140

  15. [Enriching patient care with aromatherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogno-Lalloz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of initiatives in healthcare institutions focusing on the benefits of essential oils. Received positively by patients who appreciate the resulting wellbeing, these innovative approaches around aromatherapy are based on the initiative of pioneering caregivers. Following on from an international congress held each year in Grasse, this article presents some example schemes. PMID:25065196

  16. Patient Care Partnership: Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ` e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities What to expect during your hospital stay: • High ... e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities W hen you need hospital care, your doctor ...

  17. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  18. Differential Patient-Caregiver Opinions of Treatment and Care For Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Amy Y.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences of opinion between cancer patients and caregivers with regard to treatment and care decisions. 184 advanced lung cancer patients and 171 primary caregivers were recruited as a convenience sample from clinics in Cleveland, Ohio. A telephone interview was conducted to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire. Nonparametric tests and regression analysis were performed. The findings showed that patients and caregivers reported significant disagreement...

  19. The DIAMOND initiative: implementing collaborative care for depression in 75 primary care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Leif I.; Crain, A. Lauren; Jaeckels, Nancy; Ohnsorg, Kris A.; Margolis, Karen L; Beck, Arne; Whitebird, Robin R.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Andrew H. Van de Ven

    2013-01-01

    Background The many randomized trials of the collaborative care model for improving depression in primary care have not described the implementation and maintenance of this model. This paper reports how and the degree to which collaborative care process changes were implemented and maintained for the 75 primary care clinics participating in the DIAMOND Initiative (Depression Improvement Across Minnesota–Offering a New Direction). Methods Each clinic was trained to implement seven components o...

  20. Patients report positive impacts of collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John H; Johnson, Deborah J; Benjamin, Regina; Phillips, Jill; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2006-01-01

    Collaborative Care refers to a partnership between healthcare professionals and patients who feel confident to manage their health conditions. Using an Internet-based assessment of health needs and healthcare quality, we surveyed 24,609 adult Americans aged 19 to 69 who had common chronic diseases or significant dysfunction. In these patients, we examined the association of Collaborative Care with specific measures for treatment effect, disease control, prevention, and economic impacts. These measures were adjusted for respondents' demographic characteristics, burden of illness, health behaviors, and overall quality of healthcare. Only 21% of respondents participated in good Collaborative Care, 36% attained fair Collaborative Care, and 43% experienced poor Collaborative Care. Regardless of overall care quality or the respondents' personal characteristics, burden of illness, or health behaviors, good Collaborative Care was associated with better control of blood pressure, blood glucose level, serum cholesterol level, and treatment effectiveness for pain and emotional problems. Some preventive actions were better, and some adverse economic impacts of illness were mitigated. PMID:16788352

  1. Clinical review: Airway hygiene in the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelic, Sanja; Cunningham, Jennifer A; Factor, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of airway secretion clearance, or airway hygiene, is important for the preservation of airway patency and the prevention of respiratory tract infection. Impaired airway clearance often prompts admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and can be a cause and/or contributor to acute respiratory failure. Physical methods to augment airway clearance are often used in the ICU but few are substantiated by clinical data. This review focuses on the impact of oral hygiene, tracheal suctioning, bronchoscopy, mucus-controlling agents, and kinetic therapy on the incidence of hospital-acquired respiratory infections, length of stay in the hospital and the ICU, and mortality in critically ill patients. Available data are distilled into recommendations for the maintenance of airway hygiene in ICU patients. PMID:18423061

  2. A Pharmacist-Led Point-of-Care INR Clinic: Optimizing Care in a Family Health Team Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Jennifer; Soor, Gursharan; Telner, Deanna; Aliarzadeh, Babak; Lake, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Monitoring patients' international normalized ratio (INR) within a family medicine setting can be challenging. Novel methods of doing this effectively and in a timely manner are important for patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led point-of-care (POC) INR clinic. Methods. At a community-based academic Family Health Team in Toronto, Canada, charts of patients with atrial fibrillation managed by a pharmacist with usual care (bloodtesting at lab and pharmacist follow up of INR by phone) from February 2008 to April 2008 were compared with charts of patients attending a weekly POC INR clinic from February 2010 to April 2010. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was measured for both groups. Results. 119 patient charts were reviewed and 114 had TTR calculated. After excluding patients with planned inconsistent Coumadin use (20), such as initiating Coumadin treatment or stopping for a surgical procedure, the mean TTR increased from 64.41% to 77.09% with the implementation of the POC clinic. This was a statistically significant difference of 12.68% (CI: 1.18, 24.18; P = 0.03). Conclusion. A pharmacist-led POC-INR clinic improves control of anticoagulation therapy in patients receiving warfarin and should be considered for implementation in other family medicine settings. PMID:24455250

  3. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  4. 院前急救护理对脑出血患者预后质量的临床影响分析%Clinical Influence of Prognosis of Pre-hospital Emergency Care on Patients with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒙敏华

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究院前急救护理对于脑出血患者预后质量的临床效果,并分析其作用价值。方法:选取2013年1月-2014年12月笔者所在医院收治的急救脑出血患者82例,按照随机数字表法将其分为对照组和观察组,每组41例。对照组患者未采取院前急救护理,而观察组患者采取院前急救护理,统计两组患者的治疗结果和并发症情况。结果:对照组患者治疗的总有效率为70.73%,12例患者出现并发症,观察组患者治疗的总有效率为92.68%,4例患者出现并发症,即观察组的总体有效率明显要高于对照组,并发症例数少于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:院前急救护理对于脑出血患者预后质量影响显著,能够明显改善患者的治疗结果,降低并发症的发生率,适合在临床上推广使用,应引起广大医学卫生工作者的关注。%Objective:To explore the clinical influence on prognosis of pre-hospital emergency care of patients with cerebral hemorrhage,and analyze its function value.Method:82 patients with emergency cerebral hemorrhage from January 2013 to December 2014 in our hospital were selected, they were randomly divided into the control group and the observation group,41 cases in each group.Patients in the control group did not take pre-hospital emergency care,the observation group was given pre-hospital emergency care,counted treatment results and complications of two groups. Result:The treatment effective rate of the Control group was 70.73%,12 patients occurred complications,the total effective rate of the observation group was 92.68%,4 patients occurred complications,the total effective rate of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group, complications were less than that of the control group,the differences were statistically significant(P<0.05).Conclusion:Pre-hospital emergency care can significantly improvement prognosis

  5. Wearable technology as a booster of clinical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Stephan; Hannig, Andreas; Spreckelsen, Cord; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2014-03-01

    Wearable technology defines a new class of smart devices that are accessories or clothing equipped with computational power and sensors, like Google Glass. In this work, we propose a novel concept for supporting everyday clinical pathways with wearable technology. In contrast to most prior work, we are not focusing on the omnipresent screen to display patient information or images, but are trying to maintain existing workflows. To achieve this, our system supports clinical staff as a documenting observer, only intervening adequately if problems are detected. Using the example of medication preparation and administration, a task known to be prone to errors, we demonstrate the full potential of the new devices. Patient and medication identifier are captured with the built-in camera, and the information is send to a transaction server. The server communicates with the hospital information system to obtain patient records and medication information. The system then analyses the new medication for possible side-effects and interactions with already administered drugs. The result is sent to the device while encapsulating all sensitive information respecting data security and privacy. The user only sees a traffic light style encoded feedback to avoid distraction. The server can reduce documentation efforts and reports in real-time on possible problems during medication preparation or administration. In conclusion, we designed a secure system around three basic principles with many applications in everyday clinical work: (i) interaction and distraction is kept as low as possible; (ii) no patient data is displayed; and (iii) device is pure observer, not part of the workflow. By reducing errors and documentation burden, our approach has the capability to boost clinical care.

  6. Clinical audit, a valuable tool to improve quality of care: General methodology and applications in nephrology

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Pasquale; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation and improvement of quality of care provided to the patients are of crucial importance in the daily clinical practice and in the health policy planning and financing. Different tools have been developed, including incident analysis, health technology assessment and clinical audit. The clinical audit consist of measuring a clinical outcome or a process, against well-defined standards set on the principles of evidence-based medicine in order to identify the changes needed to improve t...

  7. The patient who refuses nursing care

    OpenAIRE

    Aveyard, H

    2004-01-01

    Design: This paper reports on a qualitative study which was undertaken to explore the way in which nurses obtain consent prior to nursing care procedures. Focus groups were carried out to obtain background data concerning how consent is obtained. Critical incidents were collected through in depth interviews as a means of focusing on specific incidents in clinical practice.

  8. Assessing the Quality of Diabetic Patients Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the actions of family doctors and nurses in this area is an indispensable requisite in order to achieve a comprehensive health care. Objective: to assess the quality of health care provided to diabetic patients by the family doctor in Abreus health area. Methods: a descriptive and observational study based on the application of tools to assess the performance of family doctors in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the five family doctors consultation in Abreus health area from January to July 2011 was conducted. The five doctors working in these consultations, as well as the 172 diabetic patients were included in the study. At the same time, 172 randomly selected medical records were also revised. Through observation, the existence of some necessary material resources and the quality of their performance as well as the quality of medical records were evaluated. Patient criteria served to assess the quality of the health care provided. Results: scientific and technical training on diabetes mellitus has been insufficient; the necessary equipment for the appropriate care and monitoring of patients with diabetes is available; in 2.9% of medical records reviewed, interrogation appears in its complete form including the complete physical examination in 12 of them and the complete medical indications in 26. Conclusions: the quality of comprehensive medical care to diabetic patients included in the study is compromised. Doctors interviewed recognized the need to be trained in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes in order to improve their professional performance and enhance the quality of the health care provided to these patients.

  9. Care of patients undergoing external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anxiety and associated depression suffered by most patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed and the possibilities open to the nurse to encourage and reassure patients thus facilitating physical care are considered. The general symptoms of anorexia, nausea, tiredness, skin problems, alopecia, bonemarrow depresssion and rapid tumour destruction are described and nursing care prescribed. The side-effects which may occur following radiation of the brain, head and neck region, eyes, oesophagus, lung, abdomen, pelvis, bones, skin, spine, and spinal cord are considered from the nursing standpoint. The specialised subject of radiotherapy in children is discussed briefly. (U.K.)

  10. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  11. Endometriosis node in Gynaecologic scars: A study of 17 patients and the diagnostic considerations in clinical experience in tertiary care center

    OpenAIRE

    Vellido-Cotelo, Rocío; Jose L. Muñoz-González; Oliver-Pérez, Maria R; de la Hera-Lázaro, Cristina; Almansa-González, Cristina; Pérez-Sagaseta, Concepción; Jiménez-López, Jesús S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endometriosis nodes are observed in extra pelvic locations, particularly in gynaecological scars, with the abdominal wall being one of the most frequent locations. The main objective of the study is to review patient characteristics of cases of endometriosis nodes in gynaecological scars. Methods A retrospective, observational and descriptive study with a cohort of patients from Hospital 12 de Octubre was conducted from January 2000 to January 2012. We analysed all of the patients ...

  12. Exemplary Care and Learning Sites: A Model for Achieving Continual Improvement in Care and Learning in the Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, Greg; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Stevenson, Katherine M.; Shalaby, Marc; Beard, Albertine S.; Thörne, Karin E.; Coleman, Mary T.; Baum, Karyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Current models of health care quality improvement do not explicitly describe the role of health professions education. The authors propose the Exemplary Care and Learning Site (ECLS) model as an approach to achieving continual improvement in care and learning in the clinical setting. Approach From 2008–2012, an iterative, interactive process was used to develop the ECLS model and its core elements—patients and families informing process changes; trainees engaging both in care and the improvement of care; leaders knowing, valuing, and practicing improvement; data transforming into useful information; and health professionals competently engaging both in care improvement and teaching about care improvement. In 2012–2013, a three-part feasibility test of the model, including a site self-assessment, an independent review of each site’s ratings, and implementation case stories, was conducted at six clinical teaching sites (in the United States and Sweden). Outcomes Site leaders reported the ECLS model provided a systematic approach toward improving patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. Most sites found it challenging to incorporate the patients and families element. The trainee element was strong at four sites. The leadership and data elements were self-assessed as the most fully developed. The health professionals element exhibited the greatest variability across sites. Next Steps The next test of the model should be prospective, linked to clinical and educa tional outcomes, to evaluate whether it helps care delivery teams, educators, and patients and families take action to achieve better patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. PMID:26760058

  13. Following AACP Guidelines for Transitions in Care: The Transitional Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn I; Roberts, David; Martinez, Melissa; Fredrick, Megan; Hillner, Kiley; Luber, Philip

    2016-03-01

    The period of transition from hospital to community services is critical for individuals with serious mental illness. The American Association of Community Psychiatry developed guidelines for transitional services in behavioral health care. This column describes ways in which the Transitional Care Clinic (TCC) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio has implemented these guidelines. The TCC includes active outreach to hospitals and a Web-based referral system that allows hospital staff to make TCC appointments for patients for as soon as the day after discharge. The program includes a unique group intake process that allows rapid development of individualized plans while maximizing access to services and use of provider time. PMID:26567939

  14. Screening for major depressive disorder with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 and PHQ-2 in an outpatient clinic staffed by primary care physicians in Japan: a case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Suzuki

    Full Text Available The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 is a self-report questionnaire commonly used to screen for depression, with ≥8-11 generally recommended as the cut-off. In Japan, studies of the validity of the PHQ-9 and PHQ-2 have been limited. In this study, we examined the utility of the PHQ-9 and PHQ-2 at an outpatient clinic in a Medical University Hospital in Japan.New consecutive outpatients were included in the study. We administered the PHQ-9 to 574 patients, and acquired complete PHQ-9 and PHQ-2 data for 521 patients. Major depressive disorders were diagnosed according to the DSM-IV-TR.Forty-two patients were diagnosed with major depressive disorders. The mean PHQ-9 (15.7 and PHQ-2 (3.8 scores of the patients with major depressive disorders were significantly higher than the scores of the patients without depression (6.0 (PHQ-9 and 1.8 (PHQ-2. The best cut-off points for the PHQ-9 and PHQ-2 summary scores were ≥11 (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.81 and ≥3 (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.82, respectively. No relationship was observed between the age and PHQ-9 scores.The PHQ-9 and PHQ-2 were useful instruments for screening for major depressive disorders. The best cut-off point for the PHQ-9 summary score should be ≥11 to detect depression in the primary care setting in Japan.

  15. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  16. 心理护理在临床治疗72例抑郁症患者中的应用%The effect of psychological care on the 72 patients with depression in the clinical treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡立红; 时德菊

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of psychological care on the 72 patients with depression in the clinical treatment. . Methods A total of 72 patients with depression were randomly divided into study group and control group, 36 cases in each group. The two groups were given citalopram ( citalopram,) for treatment. In the control group, drugs delivery time was respectivelyon admission, 14 days, 28 days, 42 daysafter hospitalization, and all the patients were only treated with citalopram, and then the intended treatment compliance scale and Hamilton depression table ( HAMD) were used to assess patients' treatment compliance and efficacy;In the study group, the pa-tients with depression were not only treated with citalopram (20~40 ml/d), but also supplemented by psychological care. Results In the control group, the HAMD total score was significantly higher than that of the study group, compliance was significantly lower than that of the study group. Psychological care can significantly improve patients' compliance. Conclusions The curative effects of the psychological care on rehabilitation of the depression is obvious, and it is worthy of clinical application.%目的:探讨心理护理在抑郁症患者临床治疗中的应用。方法将72例抑郁症患者随机分为研究组和对照组,每组各36例。两组均给予西酞普兰( citalopram )进行治疗。其中对照组的给药时间分别在入院时、第14天、第28天、第42天,且只用西酞普兰进行治疗,然后采用自拟的治疗依从性量表及汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD),对其住院治疗依从性和疗效进行评定;研究组的抑郁症患者除使用西酞普兰(20~40 ml/d)治疗还辅以心理护理。结果对照组HAMD总分明显高于研究组,依从性也明显低于研究组,说明对抑郁症患者实施心理护理可以显著提高患者的依从性,对HAMD减分率也具有明显效果。结论心理护理对抑郁症的康复效果比较显著,值得在临床上推广应用。

  17. Clinical and Financial Effects of Psychoeducational Care Provided by Staff Nurses to Adult Surgical Patients in the Post-DRG Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Elizabeth C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A three-hour, two-stage workshop for staff nurses on providing education and psychological support to 148 patients who had abdominal surgery. After the workshop the patients used fewer sedatives or antiemetics, fewer hypnotics, and were discharged from the hospital on the average half a day sooner. (Author/BJV)

  18. Using the Quebec Task Force Classification to subgroup low back pain patients in primary care: an analysis of longitudinal clinical data from chiropractic and general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Kongsted, Alice; Hestbæk, Lise;

    Background Low back pain (LBP) patients with related leg pain and signs of nerve root involvement (NRI) are considered to have a worse prognosis than patients with LBP alone. However, knowledge is limited about the importance of distinguishing between leg pain above or below the knee and leg pain...

  19. Using diffusion of innovation theory to understand the factors impacting patient acceptance and use of consumer e-health innovations: a case study in a primary care clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Ping; Yan, Jun; Spil, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Background Consumer e-Health is a potential solution to the problems of accessibility, quality and costs of delivering public healthcare services to patients. Although consumer e-Health has proliferated in recent years, it remains unclear if patients are willing and able to accept and use this new

  20. Patient safety in out-of-hours primary care: a review of patient records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients receive healthcare in primary care settings, but relatively little is known about patient safety. Out-of-hours contacts are of particular importance to patient safety. Our aim was to examine the incidence, types, causes, and consequences of patient safety incidents at general practice cooperatives for out-of-hours primary care and to examine which factors were associated with the occurrence of patient safety incidents. Methods A retrospective study of 1,145 medical records concerning patient contacts with four general practice cooperatives. Reviewers identified records with evidence of a potential patient safety incident; a physician panel determined whether a patient safety incident had indeed occurred. In addition, the panel determined the type, causes, and consequences of the incidents. Factors associated with incidents were examined in a random coefficient logistic regression analysis. Results In 1,145 patient records, 27 patient safety incidents were identified, an incident rate of 2.4% (95% CI: 1.5% to 3.2%. The most frequent incident type was treatment (56%. All incidents had at least partly been caused by failures in clinical reasoning. The majority of incidents did not result in patient harm (70%. Eight incidents had consequences for the patient, such as additional interventions or hospitalisation. The panel assessed that most incidents were unlikely to result in patient harm in the long term (89%. Logistic regression analysis showed that age was significantly related to incident occurrence: the likelihood of an incident increased with 1.03 for each year increase in age (95% CI: 1.01 to 1.04. Conclusion Patient safety incidents occur in out-of-hours primary care, but most do not result in harm to patients. As clinical reasoning played an important part in these incidents, a better understanding of clinical reasoning and guideline adherence at GP cooperatives could contribute to patient safety.

  1. Does the presence of a pharmacist in primary care clinics improve diabetes medication adherence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocarnik Beverly Mielke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs are an essential element of therapy for the management of type 2 diabetes, OHA adherence is often suboptimal. Pharmacists are increasingly being integrated into primary care as part of the move towards a patient-centered medical home and may have a positive influence on medication use. We examined whether the presence of pharmacists in primary care clinics was associated with higher OHA adherence. Methods This retrospective cohort study analyzed 280,603 diabetes patients in 196 primary care clinics within the Veterans Affairs healthcare system. Pharmacists presence, number of pharmacist full-time equivalents (FTEs, and the degree to which pharmacy services are perceived as a bottleneck in each clinic were obtained from the 2007 VA Clinical Practice Organizational Survey—Primary Care Director Module. Patient-level adherence to OHAs using medication possession ratios (MPRs were constructed using refill data from administrative pharmacy databases after adjusting for patient characteristics. Clinic-level OHA adherence was measured as the proportion of patients with MPR >= 80%. We analyzed associations between pharmacy measures and clinic-level adherence using linear regression. Results We found no significant association between pharmacist presence and clinic-level OHA adherence. However, adherence was lower in clinics where pharmacy services were perceived as a bottleneck. Conclusions Pharmacist presence, regardless of the amount of FTE, was not associated with OHA medication adherence in primary care clinics. The exact role of pharmacists in clinics needs closer examination in order to determine how to most effectively use these resources to improve patient-centered outcomes including medication adherence.

  2. Clinical Curriculum Reform and Advanced Care Training at the New England College of Optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how the New England College of Optometry has expanded clinical education so graduates are equipped to handle new and advanced clinical and patient-care responsibilities and meet the changing standards of professional entry-level competency. The reform process, third- and fourth-year curriculum components, rotations, and plans for…

  3. Accessibility to dental care for patients with special needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Yuki Fukuoka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to verify the professionals’ perception about the accessibility to dental care establishments for three types of patients with special needs: Diabetes, AIDS, and Cerebral Paralysis patients, in the city of São Paulo. Material and methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study with a non probabilistic sample. For the analysis, 107 dental care establishments were selected and divided into two categories (private and insurance. Each one of the establishments was randomly selected from a list containing a total of 3,234 private and 2,015 insurance establishments. The information for the study was based on phone conversations, when a semi-structured interview was accomplished to verify the accessibility for AIDS, Diabetes, and Cerebral Paralysis special need patients. The analysis of the interviews’ content was executed according to the methodology of Lefèvre and Lefèvre (2000 and in agreement with the central idea. Results: From the total of participants, 55.14% were female and 53.27% worked at a private clinic. In relation to the patients’ accessibility, 96.26% had already treated Diabetes patients, 55.14% AIDS patients, and 28.97% Cerebral Paralysis patients. Conclusion: It can be concluded that concerning to Diabetes patients, the main difficulty is the clinical practice, mainly related to problems in blood coagulation. For Cerebral Paralysis patients, the difficulties were related to personnel training, establishment structure, and also clinical practice. For AIDS patients, although difficulties in clinical practice were mentioned, prejudice still seemed to be the major difficulty.

  4. Taking care: practice and philosophy of communication in a critical care follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Anthony; Harris, Wendy; Howell, David

    2013-06-01

    Human consciousness is inextricable from communication. The conditions of communication in the clinical context are defined by the caring intention and the unequal relationship, which imply special responsibilities on the part of the clinician. The conventional hermeneutic model of communication proposes a close examination of the context of the other, and an objective effort to get close to their consciousness by interpretation of their expressions. The clinician is supposed to lay aside subjective factors but make use of her/his clinical knowledge and skills. At University College Hospital Critical Care follow-up clinic, the communicative task involves history taking; partly by questionnaire and partly by attention to the patient's agenda - assessing needs, providing information and facilitating access to further help. In recent years the provision of Critical Care has become ever more complex, both in terms of the sophisticated medical and nursing techniques it can offer to patients and in the range of conditions it can undertake to treat. This range and complexity is reflected in the variety of problems and consequences that may be encountered at follow-up. Communicative techniques should take account of the emotional vulnerability of patients emerging from severe illness. Attentive listening should identify special anxieties, and care with phraseology aims to avoid further distress. Issues of memory, depression and trauma may be expected, and the interview technique must be flexible enough to offer emotional containment if need be. The consultation should be therapeutic in its conduct but should not embark upon actual psychotherapy or seek to dismantle the patient's defences. Contemporary hermeneutic perspectives emphasise the contextual situatedness of the clinician's consciousness, and propose a model of communication as 'blending of horizons' rather than as objective interpretation. Systems theory contributes to an understanding of the influence on

  5. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Methods Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31–78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Results Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was

  6. Changing the world of patient care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Poulsen, Dorthe Varning; Hørdam, Britta

    2013-01-01

    Political and cultural visions for health care necessitate the need for transnational resources and services optimizing and supporting patients and their families. The project has its approach in an Interregional Project named Pro-hip. Lead partner is University College Zealand collaborating...... - Uncover possibilities and barriers in users perspective - Political and cultural visions in European countries Involving the target group - Testing platform and informatics - Moviemaking - Developing learning programs in collaboration with patient organizations Presentation and sharing: - Targetgroup...

  7. Managing the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Specialty Care Centers, Coordinated Care, and Patient Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakinala, Murali M; Duncan, Maribeth; Wirth, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension remains a challenging condition to diagnose and manage. Decentralized care for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has led to shortcomings in the diagnosis and management of PAH. The Pulmonary Hypertension Association-sponsored Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center program is designed to recognize specialty centers capable of providing multidisciplinary and comprehensive care of PAH. Ideally, Pulmonary Hypertension Care Centers will comanage PAH patients with community-based practitioners and address the growing needs of this emerging population of long-term PAH patients. PMID:27443143

  8. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective. PMID:26683238

  9. Urgency in Pediatric Dentistry: Care Profile of the Integrated Pediatric Clinic of FOUFAL

    OpenAIRE

    Noelle Albuquerque AMORIM; Taciane Roberta Cardoso da SILVA; SANTOS Lucineide de Melo; Maria Dânia Holanda TENÓRIO; José Ivo Limeira dos REIS

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the profile of the urgency care provided atthe Integrated Pediatric Clinic of the School of Dentistry of theFederal University of Alagoas (FOUFAL).Method: 221 patient files were analyzed between April toNovember 2006 and the following data were analyzed by descriptivestatistics: patient identification, type of urgency, involved tooth(teeth), diagnosis and proposed treatment. Only complete files wereincluded.Results: Urgency care was most frequently sought by femalechildr...

  10. Clinical Audit of Diabetes Care in the Bahrain Defence Forces Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Baharna, Marwa M.; Whitford, David L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Primary care audits in Bahrain have consistently revealed a failure to meet recognised standards of delivery of process and outcome measures to patients with diabetes. This study aimed to establish for the first time the quality of diabetes care in a Bahraini hospital setting. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was conducted of a random sample of patients attending the Diabetes and Endocrine Center at the Bahrain Defence Forces Hospital over a 15-month period which ended in J...

  11. Use of dependency and prioritization tools by clinical nurse specialists in palliative care: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Mairéad

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim was to assess the utility of three needs assessment\\/dependency tools for use in community-based palliative care services. Specific objectives were to assess a sample of patients receiving specialist palliative care community nursing using these tools, to assess the predictive ability of each tool, and to explore the utility of prioritizing and measuring patient dependency from a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) perspective.

  12. Impact of therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in routine clinical management of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and related health care costs: a real-life study in a large cohort of patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Valentina; Cattaneo, Dario; Radice, Sonia; Sangiorgi, Diego; Federici, Augusto B; Gismondo, Maria Rita; Medaglia, Massimo; Micheli, Valeria; Vimercati, Stefania; Pallone, Enza; Esposti, Luca Degli; Clementi, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has reduced morbidity and mortality in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Studies have documented high interindividual variability in the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs, which may impair the success of HAART if not managed properly. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a useful diagnostic tool that helps clinicians to optimize drug doses so that drug concentrations associated with the highest therapeutic efficacy are obtained with a reduced risk of concentration-dependent adverse effects. The aim of this study was to assess whether use of TDM improves clinical outcomes and cost of illness. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted at L Sacco University Hospital in Milan, Italy, in HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years with at least one prescription of antiretroviral drugs for which TDM was applied. The inclusion period was from January 2010 to December 2011, with a follow-up period of up to 12 months. Laboratory and administrative databases were analyzed and matched with each other. Results The cohort consisted of 5,347 patients (3,861 males and 1,486 females) of mean age 43.9±12.5 years. We found that TDM had been used in 143 of these patients, among whom adherence with therapy was significantly higher than among those in whom TDM had not been used (94% versus 78%). In TDM-controlled patients, the mean length of HIV-related hospitalization stay and mean cost of hospitalization were significantly reduced with respect to those observed in the group in which TDM had not been used (7.21 days versus 29.47 days and €293 versus €688, respectively). Conclusion Inclusion of TDM as part of routine clinical optimization of drug dosing in HIV-infected patients is associated with higher adherence to therapy, reduced length of hospitalization stay, and reduced cost of illness. PMID:25053888

  13. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday...... lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for...

  14. PROPOSAL OF A CLINICAL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Cavalcante FRANCO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Upper gastrointestinal bleeding implies significant clinical and economic repercussions. The correct establishment of the latest therapies for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. The use of clinical pathways for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with shorter hospital stay and lower hospital costs. Objective - The primary objective is the development of a clinical care pathway for the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to be used in tertiary hospital. Methods - It was conducted an extensive literature review on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, contained in the primary and secondary information sources. Results - The result is a clinical care pathway for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with evidence of recent bleeding, diagnosed by melena or hematemesis in the last 12 hours, who are admitted in the emergency rooms and intensive care units of tertiary hospitals. In this compact and understandable pathway, it is well demonstrated the management since the admission, with definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, passing through the initial clinical treatment, posterior guidance for endoscopic therapy, and referral to rescue therapies in cases of persistent or rebleeding. It was also included the care that must be taken before hospital discharge for all patients who recover from an episode of bleeding. Conclusion - The introduction of a clinical care pathway for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may contribute to standardization of medical practices, decrease in waiting time for medications and services, length of hospital stay and costs.

  15. A Cross-Sectional Study of Attitudes About the Use of Genetic Testing for Clinical Care Among Patients with an Alcohol Use Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Strobel, Brittany; McManus, Lauren; Leong, Shirley; Blow, Frederic; Slaymaker, Valerie; Berrettini, Wade; Gordon, Adam J.; O'Brien, Charles; Oslin, David

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Modification and individualization of medical treatments due to genetic testing has the potential to revolutionize healthcare delivery. As evidence mounts that genetic testing may improve treatment decisions for patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD), we explored patient concerns and attitudes toward genetic testing. Methods: Subjects of two USA cross-sectional AUD studies were surveyed regarding their attitudes regarding the use of genetic testing for AUD treatment. Results: Four hund...

  16. Using diffusion of innovation theory to understand the factors impacting patient acceptance and use of consumer e-health innovations: a case study in a primary care clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Ping; Yan, Jun; Spil, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Background Consumer e-Health is a potential solution to the problems of accessibility, quality and costs of delivering public healthcare services to patients. Although consumer e-Health has proliferated in recent years, it remains unclear if patients are willing and able to accept and use this new and rapidly developing technology. Therefore, the aim of this research is to study the factors influencing patients’ acceptance and usage of consumer e-health innovations. Methods A simple but typic...

  17. HOME CARE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAALDEREN, WMC; MANNES, GPM; BOSMA, ES; ROORDA, RJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous antibiotics and enteral tube feeding at home for the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations and underweight condition in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have become tools that are used in many cystic fibrosis centres, The experience with home care programmes from different countries is quite

  18. Clinical and regulatory protocols for the management of impaired vision in the public health care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva Paula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the procedures used in developing Clinical and Regulatory Protocols for primary care teams to use in the management of the most common scenarios of impaired vision in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1.333 referral forms from all primary care practitioners was performed in Ribeirão Preto city, during a 30-day period. The major ophthalmic diagnostic categories were evaluated from those referrals forms. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols development process was held afterwards and involved scientific cooperation between a university and the health care system, in the form of workshops attended by primary care practitioners and regulatory system team members composed of health care administrators, ophthalmologists, and professors of ophthalmology and social medicine. RESULTS: The management of impaired vision was chosen as the theme, since it accounted for 43.6% of the ophthalmology-related referrals from primary care providers of Ribeirão Preto. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols developed involve distinctive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can be performed at the primary care level and in different health care settings. The most relevant clinical and regulatory interventions were expressed as algorithms in order to facilitate the use of the Clinical and Regulatory Protocols by health care practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: These Clinical and Regulatory Protocols could represent a useful tool for health systems with universal access, as well as for health care networks based on primary care and for regulatory system teams. Implementation of these Clinical and Regulatory Protocols can minimize the disparity between the needs of patients with impaired vision and the treatment modalities offered, resulting in a more cooperative health care network.

  19. Why Patient Centered Care Coordination Is Important in Developing Countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, D.; Marcelo, A.; Househ, M.; Mandirola, H.; Curioso, W.; Pazos, P.; Villalba, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patient Centered Care Coordination (PCCC) focuses on the patient health care needs. PCCC involves the organization, the patients and their families, that must coordinate resources in order to accomplish the goals of PCCC. In developing countries, where disparities are frequent, PCCC could improve clinical outcomes, costs and patients satisfaction. Objective the IMIA working group Health Informatics for Development analyzes the benefits, identifies the barriers and proposes strategies to reach PCCC. Methods Discussions about PCCC emerged from a brief guide that posed questions about what is PCCC, why consider PCCC important, barriers to grow in this direction and ask about resources considered relevant in the topic. Results PCCC encompasses a broad definition, includes physical, mental, socio-environmental and self care. Even benefits are proved, in developing countries the lack of a comprehensive and integrated healthcare network is one of the main barriers to reach this objective. Working hard to reach strong health policies, focus on patients, and optimizing the use of resources could improve the performance in the devolvement of PCCC programs. International collaboration could bring benefits. We believe information IT, and education in this field will play an important role in PCCC. Conclusion PCCC in developing countries has the potential to improve quality of care. Education, IT, policies and cultural issues must be addressed in an international collaborative context in order to reach this goal. PMID:26123907

  20. [Ethics in clinical practice and in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintor, S; Mennuni, G; Fontana, M; Nocchi, S; Giarrusso, P; Serio, A; Fraioli, A

    2015-01-01

    The clinical ethics is the identification, analysis and solution of moral problems that can arise during the care of a patient. Given that when dealing with ethical issues in health care some risks will be encountered (talking about ethics in general, or as a problem overlapped with others in this area, or by delegation to legislative determinations) in the text certain important aspects of the topic are examined. First of all ethics as human quality of the relationship between people for the common good, especially in health services where there are serious problems like the life and the health. It is also necessary a "humanizing relationship" between those who work in these services in order to achieve quality and efficiency in this business. It is important a proper training of health professionals, especially doctors, so that they can identify the real needs and means of intervention. It is also important that scientific research must respect fundamental ethical assumptions. In conclusion, ethics in health care is not a simple matter of "cookbook" rules, but involves the responsibility and consciousness of individual operators. PMID:26378763

  1. The use of weekly text messaging over 6 months was a feasible method for monitoring the clinical course of low back pain in patients seeking chiropractic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axen, I.; Bodin, L.; Bergstrom, G.; Halasz, L.; Lange, F.; Lovgren, P. W.; Rosenbaum, A.; Leboeuf-Yde, C.; Jensen, I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study critically evaluates a new method of collecting frequent data using mobile phones and text messages. Fluctuating conditions such as low back pain (LBP) need frequent monitoring to describe the clinical course in detail and to account for individual and subgroup variations. S...

  2. [Choice of Expiration for Cancer Patients under Home Medical Care - Palliative Care Unit or Home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, Takashi; Okagaki, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Okino, Akie

    2015-12-01

    Kohka Public Hospital(KPH)was rebuilt at a new place in April 2013. The Palliative Care Unit(PCU)was newly constructed during renovation. We examined the will and outcome of cancer patients, especially on expiration. A 123 patients died in 2014: 27 died at the PCU, and the remaining 7 at home. Of 27 patients, 20 were willing to die at the PCU, and one patient visited the hospital after judgment by the Visiting Nurse Center. Other 6 patients were admitted finally after their families experienced fatigue. Six of seven patients who died at home, showed a strong will to stay at home. We think that patients' will drives the clinical course, especially in their end-stage. In this context, the majority of the patients decided their terminal place based on their will. On the contrary, there were several cases whose requests were not fulfilled. To overcome the problem, we should discuss cancer patients' will to make a choice regarding death at the end-stage of their lives and the place of expiration in advance. We including the staff of social care and regional medical resources, should co-operate and share information on these patients to solve the problems. PMID:26809413

  3. 妊高征子痫5例病人临床的抢救与护理%5 cases pregnancy-induced epileptic patients clinical emergency treatment and nursing care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琼

    2012-01-01

      目的减少妊娠高血压综合征子痫发生及保证母婴健康.方法总结2009年本院发生分娩期子痫5例及13例产前、产后先兆子痫的临床资料.结论资料中5例子痫的病人均行剖宫产术,经过及时治疗、护理后,4例母婴平安出院.1例因产后病程反复产妇转院治疗.结论提高护士对妊高征临床护理水平,加强分娩期子痫及先兆子痫的护理及预防措施,确保母婴健康.%  Objective reduce the incidence of eclampsia in pregnancy-induced hypertension syndrome and ensure maternal and child health.Methods occurred in homes in 2009 delivery period 5 and 13 cases of antenatal eclampsia, postpartum preeclampsia clinical data.results in the 5 examples of epileptic patients have cesarean, after a process of timely treatment, care, and 4 cases of maternal hospital.course of 1 cases of postpartum maternal hospitals repeatedly.conclusions enhancing nurses ' clinical standard of care on pregnancy-induced hypertension, strengthening the nursing of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia childbirth and prevention measures to ensure maternal and child health.

  4. What are the effective ways to translate clinical leadership into health care quality improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McSherry R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert McSherry,1 Paddy Pearce2 1School of Health and Social Care, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, 2PKP Consulting, Yarm, United Kingdom Abstract: The presence and/or absence of effective leaders in health care can have a stark consequence on the quality and outcomes of care. The delivery of safe, quality, compassionate health care is dependent on having effective clinical leaders at the frontline. In light of the Kirkup and Francis reports, this article explores some ways of translating clinical leadership into health care quality improvement. This is achieved by exploring what is clinical leadership and why and how this is important to health care quality improvement, clinical leadership, and a duty of candor, along with the importance clinical leadership plays in the provision of quality care improvement and outcomes. Clinical leaders are not predefined roles but emerge from the complex clinical setting by gaining an acquired expertise and from how they then internalize this to develop and facilitate sound relationships within a team. Clinical leaders are effective in facilitating innovation and change through improvement. This is achieved by recognizing, influencing, and empowering individuals through effective communication in order to share and learn from and with each other in practice. The challenge for health care organizations in regard to creating organizational cultures where a duty of candor exists is not to reinvent the wheel by turning something that is simple into something complex, which can become confusing to health care workers, patients, and the public. By focusing on the clinical leader's role and responsibilities we would argue they play a crucial and pivotal role in influencing, facilitating, supporting, and monitoring that this duty of candor happens in practice. This may be possible by highlighting where and how the duty of candor can be aligned within existing clinical governance frameworks. Keywords: governance

  5. Shared care management of patients with type 2 diabetes across the primary and secundary Health care sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Lene; Bennich, Birgitte Bøcher; Arreskov, Anne B;

    2016-01-01

    of this study is to test if T2D patients (who are at intermediate risk of or are already having incipient diabetic complications) jointly managed by a hospital-based outpatient clinic and general practitioners (shared care programme) have a non-inferior outcome compared to an established programme...... in a specialised (hospital based) outpatient diabetes clinic. Methods The study is designed as a randomised controlled trial. The shared care model will be tested during a period of 3 years, with data collection at baseline and at 12, 24 and 36 months. All patients will be offered four medical visits a year......Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is growing globally and hospital-based outpatient clinics are burdened with increasing numbers of patients. To ensure high quality treatment and care, it is necessary to structurally reorganise the management of patients with T2D. The objective...

  6. Hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease: 1. Diagnosis, comprehensive care and assessment. Association of Hemophilia Clinic Directors of Canada.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present current strategies for the assessment and comprehensive care of patients with hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease. OPTIONS: Hospital care, home care, single-provider care and multidisciplinary care. OUTCOMES: Morbidity and quality of life associated with bleeding and treatment. EVIDENCE: Relevant clinical studies and reports published from 1974 to 1994 were examined. A search was conducted of own reprint files, MEDLINE, citations in the articles reviewed and referenc...

  7. Focusing on Patient Safety: the Challenge of Securely Sharing Electronic Medical Records in Complex Care Continuums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Diana; Ferneini, Elie M

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) regulated approach to inclusive provision of care will increase the challenge health care administrators face ensuring secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records between divisions and care subcontractors. This analysis includes a summary overview of the PPACA; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (HCERA) of 2010; and required Essential Health Benefits (EHB). The analysis integrates an overview of how secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records will be essential to clinical outcomes across complex care continuums; as well as the actionable strategies health care leadership can employ to overcome associated IT security challenges. PMID:26506680

  8. Leveraging HIV platforms to work toward comprehensive primary care in rural Malawi: the Integrated Chronic Care Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Emily B; Kalanga, Noel; Mailosi, Bright; Mwalwanda, Stanley; Kachimanga, Chiyembekezo; Nyangulu, Kondwani; Dunbar, Elizabeth; Kerr, Lila; Nazimera, Lawrence; Dullie, Luckson

    2015-12-01

    This case study describes an integrated chronic care clinic that utilizes a robust HIV program as a platform for NCD screening and treatment. A unique model, the integrated chronic care clinic provides longitudinal care for patients with an array of chronic diseases including HIV and common NCDs, allowing for a single visit for all of a patient's conditions. Set in Malawi's remote Neno District, this clinic structure aims to (1) increase access to care for NCD patients, (2) maximize efficiency given the severe human resource shortages, and (3) replicate strong HIV outcomes for patients with other chronic conditions. The goal is to increase the number of health facilities in Neno capable of fully delivering Malawi's Essential Health Package, the set of cost-effective interventions endorsed by Malawi MOH to reduce burden of disease and leading causes of death. While implementation is ongoing and processes are evolving, this model of healthcare delivery has already improved the accessibility of NCD care by allowing patients to have all of their chronic conditions treated on the same day at their nearest health facility, notably without additional investment of human and financial resources. Currently, 6781 patients on antiretroviral therapy and 721 patients with NCDs are benefitting, including 379 with hypertension, 187 with asthma, 144 with epilepsy, and 76 with diabetes. Among the NCD patient population, 15.1% are HIV-positive. Success hinged largely on several factors, including clear leadership and staff ownership of their specific duties, and a well-defined and uniform patient flow process. Furthermore, deliberate and regular conversations about challenges allowed for constant iteration and improvement of processes. Moving forward, several tasks remain. We are refining the data management process to further consolidate medical records, along with integrating our tracking processes for clients who miss appointments. Additionally, we are exploring opportunities for

  9. Specialized home care for patients with AIDS: an experiment in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, M.; Kerkstra, A.; Biewenga, T.

    1994-01-01

    Patients with AIDs are permanently dependent on medical and technical nursing care. During a certain phase of the disease some of the patients have to visit the out-patient clinic of the hospital for regular treatment. It was noticed that AIDS patients find these visits a severe burden. Therefore in

  10. Different Nursing Care Methods for Prevention of Keratopathy Among Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Ehsani, Sohrab; Daneshgar, Farid; Ashtarian, Hossein; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with reduced consciousness level suffer from eye protection disorder and Keratopathy. This study was conducted to compare effect of three eye care techniques in prevention of keratopathy in the patients hospitalized in intensive care unit of Kermanshah. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in 2013 with sample size of 96 persons in three random groups. Routine care included washing of eyes with normal saline and three eye care methods were conducted with poly ethylene cover, liposic ointment, and artificial tear drop randomly on one eye of each sample and a comparison was made with the opposite eye as the control. Eyes were controlled for 5 days in terms of keratopathy. Data collection instrument was keratopathy severity index. Data statistical analysis was performed with SPSS-16 software and chi-squared test, Fisher’s exact test, ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Findings: The use of poly ethylene cover (0.59±0.665) was significantly more effective in prevention of keratopathy than other methods (P=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between two care interventions of liposic ointment and artificial tear drop (P=0.844) but the results indicated the more effective liposic ointment (1.13±0.751) than the artificial tear drop (1.59±0.875) in prevention of corneal abrasion (Phospitalized in intensive care unit.

  11. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  12. Analysis of Patient Service Time in Ambulatory Clinics: Patient Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Zerbe, Tony R.; Zerbe, Shirleen D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, analysis of patient service time (patient tracking) in ambulatory clinics has been performed manually. A case study of Eye and Ear Clinic in Pittsburgh, PA, revealed that this approach to patient data collection was prone to clerical error and did not satisfy the clinic's information-processing needs. Initial attempts at automation identified the features required of a successful computerized scheduling and patient tracking system.

  13. Monitored anesthesia care (MAC sedation: clinical utility of fospropofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Harris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Eric A Harris, David A Lubarsky, Keith A CandiottiDepartment of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Management, and Pain Medicine, University of Miami/Miller School of MedicineAbstract: Fospropofol, a phosphorylated prodrug version of the popular induction agent propofol, is hydrolyzed in vivo to release active propofol, formaldehyde, and phosphate. Pharmacodynamic studies show fospropofol provides clinically useful sedation and EEG/bispectral index suppression while causing significantly less respiratory depression than propofol. Pain at the injection site, a common complaint with propofol, was not reported with fospropofol; the major patient complaint was transitory perianal itching during the drug’s administration. Although many clinicians believe fospropofol can safely be given by a registered nurse, the FDA mandated that fospropofol, like propofol, must be used only in the presence of a trained anesthesia provider.Keywords: fospropofol, propofol, monitored anesthesia care

  14. Administration of Ratanhia-Based Herbal Oral Care Products for the Prophylaxis of Oral Mucositis in Cancer Chemotherapy Patients: A Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mac H. Ramos F.; Michael Toelg; Patric Tiemann

    2007-01-01

    Oral complications are a common side effect of cancer chemotherapy, as antineoplastic agents affect both the immune system and the oral mucosa. This study demonstrates preventive and therapeutic effects of dental treatment and regular use of Weleda Ratanhia-Mundwasser® (herbal mouthwash) and Weleda Pflanzen-Zahngel® (herbal toothgel) on oral mucositis during chemotherapy. Thirty-two female patients with breast cancer starting on chemotherapy were evaluated in this study. Plaque index, gingiva...