WorldWideScience

Sample records for care center comparison

  1. [Ambient noise comparison in 2 intensive care units in a tertiary care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Zárate-Coronado, Olivia; Gaxiola-González, Fabiola; Neyoy-Sombra, Venigna

    2017-04-03

    The World Health Organization has established a maximum noise level of 40 decibels (dB) for an intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to compare the noise level in 2 different intensive care units at a tertiary care center. In an cross-sectional design, the maximum noise level was analyzed within the intensive coronary care unit and intensive care unit with a digital meter. A measurement in 4 different points of each room with 5minute intervals for a period of 60minutes were performed at 7:30, 14:30 and 20:30. Average of the observations were compared with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U. An analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to average noise. The noise observed in the intensive care unit had an average of 64.77±3.33dB (P=.08); something analogous happened in the coronary intensive care room with an average of 60.20±1.58dB (P=.129). 25% or more of the measurements exceeded up to 20 points the level recommended by the World Health Organization. Noise levels in intensive care wards that were studied exceed the maximum recommended level for a hospital. It is necessary to design and implement actions for greater participation of health personnel in the reduction of ambient noise. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana M. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. OBJECTIVE: Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. METHOD: Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children. All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. RESULTS: Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. CONCLUSION: The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers.

  3. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Mariana M.; Carolina Corsi; Marques, Luisa A. P.; Nelci A. C. F. Rocha

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. OBJECTIVE: Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. METHOD: Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of...

  4. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  5. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1).

  6. Comparison of optimal cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with Type 2 diabetes who attended urban medical health center with those attended a tertiary care center: Experiences from Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Moradi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Both centers have failure in target achievement in some risk factors; however, the inability of the primary care center in controlling hyperlipidemia in comparison with the tertiary center is a serious warning to provide training about managing dyslipidemia in these centers.

  7. How is Family Centered Care Perceived by Healthcare Providers from Different Countries? An International Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Paraszczuk, Ann Marie; Çavuşoğlu, Hicran; Shields, Linda; Pars, Hatice; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) is a healthcare delivery model in which planning care for a child incorporates the entire family. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare how healthcare providers from three countries with varied cultural and healthcare systems perceive the concept FCC by measuring attitudes, and to psychometrically identify a measure that would reflect "family-centeredness." The Working with Families questionnaire, translated when appropriate, was used to capture participants' perceptions of caring for hospitalized children and their parents from pediatric healthcare providers in the United States, Australia and Turkey (n=476). The results indicated significantly more positive attitudes reported for working with children than parents for all countries and individual score differences across countries: the U.S. and Turkey child scores were significantly higher than Australia, whereas the U.S. and Australia parent scores were both significantly higher than Turkey. Perceptions of working with families were different for nurses from the three countries that call for a clearer understanding about perceptions in relation to delivery systems. Further analyses revealed FCS scores to be significantly different between nurses and physicians and significantly correlated with age, number of children and education. The results of this study add to our understanding of influences on practice from different countries and healthcare systems. The FCS score may be useful to determine baseline beliefs and ascertain effectiveness of interventions designed to improve FCC implementation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care.

  9. 12 Daghem: Beskrivning av uppfostringsklimat och sociala relationer (Twelve Day Care Centers: A Multisite Comparison of Day-Care Climate and Social Relations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Bodil; Hedin, Anna

    Twelve day care centers in a Swedish commune were systematically observed. Centers were selected on the basis of responses to a questionnaire on attitudes about upbringing which was answered by all the personnel at the 104 day care centers in the commune. Four of the selected centers represented a so-called "present-focused" upbringing…

  10. CURRICULUM GUIDE, CHILD CARE CENTERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    CALIFORNIA CHILD CARE CENTERS WERE ESTABLISHED IN 1943 TO SUPPLY SERVICES TO CHILDREN OF WORKING MOTHERS. THE CHILD CARE PROGRAM PROVIDES, WITHIN NURSERY AND SCHOOLAGE CENTERS, CARE AND EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION FOR PRESCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE CHILD CENTER PROGRAM IS BASED UPON THE BELIEF THAT EACH CHILD…

  11. Comparison of Optimal Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Attended Urban Medical Health Center with those Attended a Tertiary Care Center: Experiences from Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Sedighe; Haji Ghanbari, Mohammad Javad; Ebrahimi, Hedyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, CVD accounts for primary cause of death among diabetic patients. Physicians, especially in the primary care setting, have effective role in the management of cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, we aimed to compare the prevalence of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in Type 2 diabetic patients attending to an urban health center as a primary care center with Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism Diabetes Clinic (IEMDC) as a tertiary center. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 200 adult diabetic patients attending urban health center (Abouzar Health Center) and 201 diabetic patients in a tertiary center. The patients’ cardiovascular risk factors including lipid profile, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), and smoking history were recorded. The number of patients who did not achieve the target according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines was determined and compared. Results: The patients in urban health center were older than those who attending IEMDC (P = 0.004). The duration of diabetes was longer among urban center patients (P glycosylated hemoglobin level, high-density lipoprotein level, and systolic BP. Conclusions: Both centers have failure in target achievement in some risk factors; however, the inability of the primary care center in controlling hyperlipidemia in comparison with the tertiary center is a serious warning to provide training about managing dyslipidemia in these centers. PMID:27761215

  12. Management of pelvic inflammatory disease by primary care physicians. A comparison with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessol, N A; Priddy, F H; Bolan, G; Baumrind, N; Vittinghoff, E; Reingold, A L; Padian, N S

    1996-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published recommendations for clinicians on the management of pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is unknown if providers are aware of the guidelines or follow them. To compare pelvic inflammatory disease screening, diagnosis, treatment, and reporting practices among primary care physicians with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease. A weighted random sample of California primary care physicians surveyed in November 1992 and January 1993. Of the 1,165 physicians surveyed, 553 (48%) returned completed questionnaires. Among respondents, 302 (55%) reported having treated a case of pelvic inflammatory disease during the last 12 months, and of these, 52% answered that they were unsure of or do not follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease. Pediatricians and those with more years since residency were less likely to deviate from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease, and family practitioners were more likely to deviate from the guidelines. Pelvic inflammatory disease is commonly encountered by primary care physicians in California. Training and experience were important predictors of compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations; however, substantial divergence from the guidelines occurs.

  13. Poststroke Rehabilitation and Restorative Care Utilization: A Comparison Between VA Community Living Centers and VA-contracted Community Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Pei, Qinglin; Sullivan, Charles T; Cowper Ripley, Diane C; Wu, Samuel S; Bates, Barbara E; Vogel, W Bruce; Bidelspach, Douglas E; Wang, Xinping; Hoffman, Nannette

    2016-03-01

    Effective poststroke rehabilitation care can speed patient recovery and minimize patient functional disabilities. Veterans affairs (VA) community living centers (CLCs) and VA-contracted community nursing homes (CNHs) are the 2 major sources of institutional long-term care for Veterans with stroke receiving care under VA auspices. This study compares rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care among Veterans residing in VA CLCs versus those Veterans in VA-contracted CNHs. Retrospective observational. All Veterans diagnosed with stroke, newly admitted to the CLCs or CNHs during the study period who completed at least 2 Minimum Data Set assessments postadmission. The outcomes were numbers of days for rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care received by the Veterans during their stays in CLCs or CNHs as documented in the Minimum Data Set databases. For rehabilitation therapy, the CLC Veterans had lower user rates (75.2% vs. 76.4%, P=0.078) and fewer observed therapy days (4.9 vs. 6.4, Ptherapy (odds ratio=1.16, P=0.033), although they had fewer average therapy days (coefficient=-1.53±0.11, Prehabilitation therapy days (both unadjusted and adjusted), but they were significantly more likely to receive restorative nursing care both before and after risk adjustment.

  14. Child Care Center Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-12

    shall include a screening test for tuberculosis, a VDRL and any other tests deemed necessary by appropriate A medical authorities. (2) Staff shall be...approval to care for children the provider shall have a physical examination including a screening test for tuberculosis, a * VDRL and other tests

  15. Counseling Services in Adult Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Gamal; Zaki, Sylvia

    Federal support for adult day care centers began in the United States approximately 10 years ago. To examine the counseling practices in the adult day care centers across the country and to explore how the services are affected by the staffing patterns at these centers, 135 centers completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed…

  16. Quality Aspects of Swedish Family Day Care and Center Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerus, Kerstin

    This paper presents data concerning the use and costs of center and family day care programs in Sweden. The typical center provides full-time care and has 4 sections, each with 2 preschool teachers, 1 attendant, and up to 20 children. In the family day care system, municipalities employ caregivers and parents pay the municipality. This paper…

  17. Center to Advance Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catalogue Membership Brochure Join CAPC Central Registry National Palliative Care Registry™ Enter your data to improve performance, prove ... Members Only) Identifying the Right Patients for Specialty Palliative Care Webinar Amy Kelley, MD and Arta Bakshandeh, DO, ...

  18. The center of caring: adult day care & the VNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, C L

    1994-08-01

    Day care services in conjunction with home care aide services provide a cost-effective, humane solution to caregiver burnout and/or the possible financial and emotional devastation of institutionalization. One adult day care center makes the most of community resources, including the local VNA.

  19. Nursing Reference Center: a point-of-care resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily; Paulaitis, Gediminas Geddy

    2012-01-01

    Nursing Reference Center is a point-of-care resource designed for the practicing nurse, as well as nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and librarians. Users can search across multiple resources, including topical Quick Lessons, evidence-based care sheets, patient education materials, practice guidelines, and more. Additional features include continuing education modules, e-books, and a new iPhone application. A sample search and comparison with similar databases were conducted.

  20. Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines 71 of the 605 licensed child care centers in Atlanta for playground hazards and school accidents. Finds 684 hazards in 66 centers, including climbing equipment over 6 feet high with inadequate impact-absorbing undersurfacing that had over twice the rate of fall injuries as climbing equipment under 6 feet high. (FMW)

  1. Care strategies used by occupational therapists in psychosocial care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Baltazar Assad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The psychosocial rehabilitation centered care in experience with the suffering, thus breaking with the hegemonic logic of disease-focused care. Occupational therapy has supported this detachment, with actions targeting the daily life to achieve social inclusion and autonomy of people with a diagnosis of mental disorder. Objective: To identify the care strategies used by occupational therapists in psychosocial care centers and understand how these strategies contribute to psychosocial rehabilitation. Method: Descriptive Study of qualitative approach, with five occupational therapists of three psychosocial care centers that responded to an interview, which was recorded, transcribed and analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results: Were extracted the categories: Integral Care Strategies; Singular Care Strategies and Interdisciplinary Care Strategies. Another category, Understanding and expansion of everyday life, referred to the contribution in psychosocial rehabilitation. The specificity was diluted between the possibilities of actions, because the strategies are common to other professional groups, but are guided by a new conception of health care from the perspective of integrality and network. From the understanding and expansion of everyday life as a contribution of occupational therapy, emerged the specificity of the group and its contribution in psychosocial rehabilitation. Some strategies have been punctual and effectuated in the service itself; however, many have reached the territory. Conclusion: There is a need for reports of occupational therapists practices even if in care projects common to other groups, in order to keep up with the discussions on strengthening the professional institutionalization in country.

  2. Evaluation of an Intervention to Reduce Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child-Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Revisits 58 child care centers in Atlanta (Georgia) that had received interventions alerting directors to playground safety hazards. Comparison with 71 control centers randomly selected found averages of 9.4 hazards at intervention center playgrounds and 8.0 hazards at control centers. These results indicate the ineffectiveness of the…

  3. Family Care Map: Sustaining family-centered care in Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Ford II, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed sustainability of the Family Care Map, a family-centered approach to providing care for Veterans with polytrauma-related injuries, in four Department of Veterans Affairs Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. We applied a mixed-methods approach. Staff surveys used standardized measures of sustainability, commitment to change, information, and participation during implementation. Qualitative inquiry assessed Family Care Map implementation and facilitators and barriers to sustainability. Staff sustainability perceptions had a significant positive correlation with affective commitment to change, participation, and information received about the change process. Family Care Map integration into standard practices and use of its concepts with patients and families related to staff perceptions about sustainability. The degree of use and integration of the Family Care Map in traumatic brain injury/polytrauma care varied among the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Some successful sustainability strategies included integration into daily workflow and organizational culture. Examples of sustainability barriers included staff awareness and use and outdated information. Some practices, such as measuring and documenting the use of the Family Care Map in treatment plans, may not routinely occur. The focus on family-centered care will require further evaluation of organization-, staff-, and innovation-level attributes that influence sustainability of changes designed to improve family-centered care.

  4. Family care map: Sustaining family-centered care in Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James H; Wise, Meg; Krahn, Dean; Oliver, Karen Anderson; Hall, Carmen; Sayer, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed sustainability of the Family Care Map, a family-centered approach to providing care for Veterans with polytrauma-related injuries, in four Department of Veterans Affairs Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. We applied a mixed-methods approach. Staff surveys used standardized measures of sustainability, commitment to change, information, and participation during implementation. Qualitative inquiry assessed Family Care Map implementation and facilitators and barriers to sustainability. Staff sustainability perceptions had a significant positive correlation with affective commitment to change, participation, and information received about the change process. Family Care Map integration into standard practices and use of its concepts with patients and families related to staff perceptions about sustainability. The degree of use and integration of the Family Care Map in traumatic brain injury/polytrauma care varied among the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Some successful sustainability strategies included integration into daily workflow and organizational culture. Examples of sustainability barriers included staff awareness and use and outdated information. Some practices, such as measuring and documenting the use of the Family Care Map in treatment plans, may not routinely occur. The focus on family-centered care will require further evaluation of organization-, staff-, and innovation-level attributes that influence sustainability of changes designed to improve family-centered care.

  5. Designing robots for care: care centered value-sensitive design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wynsberghe, Aimee

    2013-06-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship--what I refer to as care robots--require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vulnerable and sensitive time in their lives. The ethical evaluation of care robots requires insight into the values at stake in the healthcare tradition. What's more, given the stage of their development and lack of standards provided by the International Organization for Standardization to guide their development, ethics ought to be included into the design process of such robots. The manner in which this may be accomplished, as presented here, uses the blueprint of the Value-sensitive design approach as a means for creating a framework tailored to care contexts. Using care values as the foundational values to be integrated into a technology and using the elements in care, from the care ethics perspective, as the normative criteria, the resulting approach may be referred to as care centered value-sensitive design. The framework proposed here allows for the ethical evaluation of care robots both retrospectively and prospectively. By evaluating care robots in this way, we may ultimately ask what kind of care we, as a society, want to provide in the future.

  6. Training Doctors for Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Jeannine

    2016-03-01

    Person-centered care, in which an individual patient's goals and preferences are treated as paramount, should be the standard throughout the nation. Achieving this ideal will require a change in the culture of health care, and medical schools can play a vital role in helping achieve it. Lack of communication, uncoordinated services, and dealings with sometimes-aloof clinicians and staff all can increase stress and undermine a person's sense of well-being. In a person-centered system, such experiences would be much less common. The cultural shift starts with the idea of "engaging the consumer" rather than "treating the patient." Such engagement requires honoring individuality. The doctor may have a certain way of doing things. But people vary enormously in their values and priorities. They have different goals, different thresholds of pain, different anxieties, different needs for support, different backgrounds, and different resources to draw on. Individuals should feel empowered, aware of their choices, and connected to their health care providers through meaningful communication and understanding. They deserve to feel that their personal dignity and their wishes are a top priority. They should be made to feel that they, along with their caregivers, are members of the care team. This change will benefit not only patients and families but doctors as well. Doctors will benefit from more insight into the individuals they serve, their interactions with consumers and caregivers will be more positive, and the quality of care will improve.

  7. [Cystic fibrosis: centers and care networks organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, G

    2012-05-01

    More than 20 years after the gene discovery, without specific treatment, the observed improvement of the cystic fibrosis prognosis appears due to management's organization as well as early diagnosis (neonatal screening) or progress in symptomatic treatment. The CF Centers (CRCM) official recognition was a necessary step before generalization of routine neonatal screening (October, 2002). Actually French CF management relies on three levels of organization: CF centers, regional care networks and French CF Society, in close relationship with patients association (Vaincre la Mucoviscidose). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrative medicine and patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizes, Victoria; Rakel, David; Niemiec, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Integrative medicine has emerged as a potential solution to the American healthcare crisis. It provides care that is patient centered, healing oriented, emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, and uses therapeutic approaches originating from conventional and alternative medicine. Initially driven by consumer demand, the attention integrative medicine places on understanding whole persons and assisting with lifestyle change is now being recognized as a strategy to address the epidemic of chronic diseases bankrupting our economy. This paper defines integrative medicine and its principles, describes the history of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in American healthcare, and discusses the current state and desired future of integrative medical practice. The importance of patient-centered care, patient empowerment, behavior change, continuity of care, outcomes research, and the challenges to successful integration are discussed. The authors suggest a model for an integrative healthcare system grounded in team-based care. A primary health partner who knows the patient well, is able to addresses mind, body, and spiritual needs, and coordinates care with the help of a team of practitioners is at the centerpiece. Collectively, the team can meet all the health needs of the particular patient and forms the patient-centered medical home. The paper culminates with 10 recommendations directed to key actors to facilitate the systemic changes needed for a functional healthcare delivery system. Recommendations include creating financial incentives aligned with health promotion and prevention. Insurers are requested to consider the total costs of care, the potential cost effectiveness of lifestyle approaches and CAM modalities, and the value of longer office visits to develop a therapeutic relationship and stimulate behavioral change. Outcomes research to track the effectiveness of integrative models must be funded, as well as feedback and dissemination strategies

  9. Valley Interfaith Child Care Center CMS

    OpenAIRE

    Kramolisch, Andrew; Mack, Nate

    2012-01-01

    Included files: viccc.zip, viccc2.zip, viccc3.zip, viccc_final_paper.doc. The project consisted of revamping Valley Interfaith Child Care Center's website to be more modern and feature media. The goal was to cater to two diverse audiences: the families that needed their services and the investors who helped them keep running. This system is the result of efforts to do that. To run this software locally requires: Ruby 1.9.2 or newer, the bundler gem and either SQLite or PostgreSQL. The ...

  10. [Problems in reforming health care centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetova, M V; Blokhin, A B; Polzik, E V

    2000-01-01

    Reformation of therapeutic and prophylactic institutions attached to various institutions and ministries is and important problem of public health at the modern stage of its development. A model developed and tried in Magnitogorsk can serve as a perspective trend of such reforms. A medical institution with mixed form of property has been created. The institution was set up by administration of the territory and a plant (Magnitogorsk metallurgical plant). Creation of a new health center as a non-commercial institution promoted its integration in the municipal public health system; the institution possesses all the potentialities of a budget organization and retains close contact with the plant. Such a solution of the problem improved the financial status of the health center and promoted its adaptation to marketing conditions. Attraction of additional finances from industry to municipal public health allowed the administration of the health center start and carry out internal restructuring aimed at priority development of outpatient care, restructuring of the bed fund, technological updating, and, in general, more rational utilization of the available resources.

  11. [Evaluation of family care delivered at a psychosocial care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Maria de Lourdes Custódio; Kantorski, Luciane Prado

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate qualitatively the care offered to families for a Center of Psychosocial Atention of type I, located in Southern Region of Brazil. The Dialectical hermeneutic circle was used as a technique of data collection, a method recommended by the Fourth Generation Evaluation proposed by Guba and Lincoln. Topics such as reception, family meetings, home visits and involvement of family emerged in interviews with family members of this health service. Interviews and observations were the techniques used to collect data. The way has been consolidated to care for families in services represents a challenge for health professionals, since it entails the restructuring and formation of a reflection of all the actors involved in this process of change.

  12. [Clinical safety audits for primary care centers. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Sánchez, Míriam; Borrell-Carrió, Francisco; Ortodó Parra, Cristina; Fernàndez I Danés, Neus; Fité Gallego, Anna

    2013-01-01

    To identify organizational processes, violations of rules, or professional performances that pose clinical levels of insecurity. Descriptive cross-sectional survey with customized externally-behavioral verification and comparison of sources, conducted from June 2008 to February 2010. Thirteen of the 53 primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalonian Health Institute (ICS Costa de Ponent, Barcelona). Employees of 13 PCT classified into: director, nurse director, customer care administrators, and general practitioners. Non-random selection, teaching (TC)/non-teaching, urban (UC)/rural and small/large (LC) health care centers (HCC). A total of 33 indicators were evaluated; 15 of procedures, 9 of attitude, 3 of training, and 6 of communication. Level of uncertainty: <50% positive answers for each indicator. no collaboration. A total of 55 professionals participated (84.6% UC, 46.2% LC and 76.9% TC). Rank distribution: 13 customer care administrators, 13 nurse directors, 13 HCC directors, and 16 general practitioners. Levels of insecurity emerged from the following areas: reception of new medical professionals, injections administration, nursing weekend home calls, urgent consultations to specialists, aggressive patients, critical incidents over the agenda of the doctors, communication barriers with patients about treatment plans, and with immigrants. Clinical safety is on the agenda of the health centers. Identified areas of uncertainty are easily approachable, and are considered in the future system of accreditation of the Catalonian Government. General practitioners are more critical than directors, and teaching health care centers, rural and small HCC had a better sense of security. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. An observational cohort comparison of facilitators of retention in care and adherence to anti-eetroviral therapy at an HIV treatment center in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loice Achieng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most HIV treatment programs in resource-limited settings utilize multiple facilitators of adherence and retention in care but there is little data on the efficacy of these methods. We performed an observational cohort analysis of a treatment program in Kenya to assess which program components promote adherence and retention in HIV care in East Africa. METHODS: Patients initiating ART at A.I.C. Kijabe Hospital were prospectively enrolled in an observational study. Kijabe has an intensive program to promote adherence and retention in care during the first 6 months of ART that incorporates the following facilitators: home visits by community health workers, community based support groups, pharmacy counseling, and unannounced pill counts by clinicians. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure, defined as a detectable HIV-1 viral load; discontinuation of ART; death; or loss to follow-up. Time to treatment failure for each facilitator was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The relative effects of the facilitators were determined by the Cox Proportional Hazards Model. RESULTS: 301 patients were enrolled. Time to treatment failure was longer in patients participating in support groups (448 days vs. 337 days, P<0.001, pharmacy counseling (480 days vs. 386 days, P = 0.002, pill counts (482 days vs. 189 days, P<0.001 and home visits (485 days vs. 426 days, P = 0.024. Better adherence was seen with support groups (89% vs. 82%, P = 0.05 and pill counts (89% vs. 75%, P = 0.02. Multivariate analysis using the Cox Model found significant reductions in risk of treatment failure associated with pill counts (HR = 0.19, P<0.001 and support groups (HR = 0.43, P = 0.003. CONCLUSION: Unannounced pill counts by the clinician and community based support groups were associated with better long term treatment success and with better adherence.

  14. Evaluation Study of Day-Care Centers in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korazim, Malka; Trachtenberg, Silvia

    In recent years, day-care centers for the elderly have been playing an increasingly important role in the community service system for the elderly in Israel. ESHEL, one of the leading agencies in developing day-care services in Israel initiated a comprehensive evaluation study of day-care centers to identify variations among different types of…

  15. Medicare Managed Care plan Performance, A Comparison...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The study evaluates the performance of Medicare managed care, Medicare Advantage, Plans in comparison to Medicare fee-for-service Plans in three states with...

  16. The ten successful elements of an ambulatory care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, G

    1997-01-01

    Experts in healthcare predict that in the future, over 80% of all care will be provided either in the home or ambulatory care centers. How radiology facilities position themselves for this shifting market is critical to their long-term success, even though it appears there are endless opportunities for providing care in this atmosphere. The ten most critical elements that healthcare providers must address to ensure their preparedness are discussed. Location is critical, particularly since patients no longer want to travel to regional medical centers. The most aggressive providers are building local care centers to serve specific populations. Ambulatory care centers should project a high tech, high touch atmosphere. Patient comfort and the appeal of the overall environment must be considered. Centers need to focus on their customers' needs in multiple areas of care. A quick and easy registration process, providing dressing gowns in patient areas, clear billing functions--these are all important areas that centers should develop. Physicians practicing in the ambulatory care center are key to its overall success and can set the tone for all staff members. Staff members must be friendly and professional in their work with patients. The hours offered by the center must meet the needs of its client base, perhaps by offering evening and weekend appointments. Keeping appointments on schedule is critical if a center wants satisfied customers. It's important to identify the target before developing your marketing plan. Where do your referrals come from? Look to such sources as referring physicians, managed care plans and patients themselves. Careful billing is critical for survival in the ambulatory care world. Costs are important and systems that can track cost per exam are useful. Know your bottom line. Service remains the central focus of all successful ambulatory care center functions.

  17. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  18. [Developmental centered care. Situation in Spanish neonatal units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Maestro, M; Melgar Bonis, A; de la Cruz-Bertolo, J; Perapoch López, J; Mosqueda Peña, R; Pallás Alonso, C

    2014-10-01

    Developmental centered care (DC) is focused on sensorineural and emotional development of the newborns. In Spain we have had information on the application of DC since 1999, but the extent of actual implementation is unknown. To determine the level of implementation of DC in Spanish neonatal units where more than 50 infants weighing under 1500g were cared for in 2012. A comparison was made with previous data published in 2006. A descriptive observational cross-sectional study was performed using a survey with seven questions as in the 2006 questionnaire. The survey was sent to 27 units. The response rate was 81% in 2012 versus 96% in 2006. Noise control measures were introduced in 73% of units in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). The use of saccharose was 50% in 2012 versus 46% in 2006 (P=.6). Parents free entry was 82% in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). Kangaroo care was used without restriction by 82% in 2012 compared to 31% in 2006 (P<.01). The implementation of the DC in Spain has improved. There is still room for improvement in areas, such as the use of saccharose or noise control. However, it is important to highlight the positive change that has occurred in relation to unrestricted parental visits. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of primary care in a nursing center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvie, C O

    1999-01-01

    Nursing opportunities have expanded beyond the traditional bedside role. Nurses serve in a variety of roles such as administrators, teachers, or primary care givers in a variety of settings. The role of primary care giver is a more recent role; it involves relatively independent nursing practice with clients who have acute or chronic illnesses. Client groups may include the elderly in high rise buildings, mothers and children at schools, or homeless and low-income populations at homeless shelters. This care is often provided in a nursing center. Nursing centers are nurse-managed centers in which nurses are accountable and responsible for care of clients; they are the primary provider of care and the one most seen by clients. Case managers may be in a position to refer patients to nursing centers or to work directly with nurse practitioners in nursing centers. However, questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be addressed for healthcare providers, insurance companies, and patients to be confident in the efficacy of this delivery system. Is the primary care comprehensive? Is it of high quality? Is it cost effective? Is it satisfactory to clients? These and other questions about the primary care provided in nursing centers must be answered to effect political and other changes needed to fulfill the role of nursing centers envisioned by early leaders of the movement. This article addresses questions related to the efficacy of primary care provided in nursing centers by family nurse practitioners. After defining efficacy, the discussion focuses on the components identified and studied in one nursing center and includes information on opportunities for case managers to utilize nursing centers for referral and appropriate follow-up of their patients.

  20. [Effects from the Person Centered-Care Model on quality of life of cognitive impaired persons from gerontological centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Veiga, Pura; Sancho, Mayte; García, Álvaro; Rivas, Esther; Abad, Elixabet; Suárez, Nerea; Mondragón, Gabriela; Buiza, Cristina; Orbegozo, Ana; Yanguas, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The Model of Person Centered Care has attracted increasing interest for use in gerontology centers. Therefore, the contributions about its impact are scarce in our context. The objective of this paper is to establish the impact that the interventions associated with the Model of Person Centered Care in the «Etxean Ondo» Project have on the quality of life of residents with cognitive impairment. One hundred and ninetten residents with cognitive impairment were selected: 59 in the control group and 60 in the experimental group. Subjects in each group were sorted by cognitive impairment: mild or severe. Changes were implemented in the physical and organizational environments for the promotion of autonomy and wellbeing. Quality of life was assessed before and 6 months after intervention using the Fumat Scales (mild cognitive impairment) and Qualid (severe cognitive impairment). The t-Student test was used for comparison of means. In intergroup comparisons, significant differences in the Fumat Scale for the control group with mild cognitive impairment were initially identified. These differences were not recorded in the post assessment. The experimental group with severe cognitive impairment was significantly improved in the Qualid Scale post assessment. In intragroup comparisons, significant improvements were evident in the quality of life of experimental subjects, both with severe cognitive impairment (Qualid) and mild (Fumat). The findings support the effectiveness of the interventions and identify methodological and conceptual issues that have been considered to analyze the Model of Person Centered Care efects. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  1. Patient- and family-centered care and the pediatrician's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Drawing on several decades of work with families, pediatricians, other health care professionals, and policy makers, the American Academy of Pediatrics provides a definition of patient- and family-centered care. In pediatrics, patient- and family-centered care is based on the understanding that the family is the child's primary source of strength and support. Further, this approach to care recognizes that the perspectives and information provided by families, children, and young adults are essential components of high-quality clinical decision-making, and that patients and family are integral partners with the health care team. This policy statement outlines the core principles of patient- and family-centered care, summarizes some of the recent literature linking patient- and family-centered care to improved health outcomes, and lists various other benefits to be expected when engaging in patient- and family-centered pediatric practice. The statement concludes with specific recommendations for how pediatricians can integrate patient- and family-centered care in hospitals, clinics, and community settings, and in broader systems of care, as well.

  2. A patient-centered care ethics analysis model for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R; Ells, Carolyn

    2013-09-01

    There exists a paucity of ethics resources tailored to rehabilitation. To help fill this ethics resource gap, the authors developed an ethics analysis model specifically for use in rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a process model to guide careful moral reasoning for particularly complex or challenging matters in rehabilitation. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation was developed over several iterations, with feedback at different stages from rehabilitation professionals and bioethics experts. Development of the model was explicitly informed by the theoretical grounding of patient-centered care and the context of rehabilitation, including the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Being patient centered, the model encourages (1) shared control of consultations, decisions about interventions, and management of the health problems with the patient and (2) understanding the patient as a whole person who has individual preferences situated within social contexts. Although the major process headings of the Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation resemble typical ethical decision-making and problem-solving models, the probes under those headings direct attention to considerations relevant to rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a suitable tool for rehabilitation professionals to use (in real time, for retrospective review, and for training purposes) to help arrive at ethical outcomes.

  3. [Teaching patient-centered holistic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Hwang-Ling; Chen, Huei-Ling; Hwu, Yueh-Juen

    2007-06-01

    Nursing education aims to help students understand concepts and gain competencies in holistic care. The purpose of this paper was to present a nursing curriculum that adapted and introduced holistic care into an adult nursing curriculum taught at a university of science and technology. The course framework included both holistic and nursing domains. The holistic aspect addressed client physical psychological-spiritual needs and related factors, health related factors, and the status of Maslow's hierarchy of needs and related factors. The nursing aspect addressed the way in which nursing was applied to identify client problems and provide individualized, integrated and continuous care in hospital, family or community based settings employing primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention. Scenario with problem based learning and concept mapping were used in class to guide students to consider in depth the concepts that underpin holistic care.

  4. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  5. Clinical Implications of Family-Centered Care in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Kerry Rae; Lutz, Barbara J; Young, Mary Ellen; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R

    2015-01-01

    Most stroke survivors will be cared for at home by family caregivers with limited training. Families actively involved in rehabilitation feel more prepared for the new responsibilities of caring for the stroke survivor. The focus of this article is to highlight the relevant concepts of a family-centered model of care and provide general guidance on how integrating a family-centered mindset may be clinically applicable. Concept Analysis. Synthesis of literature on family-centered care and its application in for rehabilitation nurses. Family-centered care is a model of collaborative healthcare that encourages collaboration and partnership among patients, families, and providers with respect to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care. Care provided within such a model can expand providers' knowledge of the impact of illness and any issues that may affect eventual transition back home. Rehabilitation nurses should view stroke patients and family caregivers as a unit. Using family-centered strategies can help nurses provide appropriate, individualized care during rehabilitation. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  6. Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternullo, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal; Lane, Susan; Myint-U, Khinlei; Havasy, Robert; Carter, Michael; Kvedar, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    This article reviews the history, current status, and future plans of the Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health (the Center). Established in 1995 by Harvard Medical School teaching hospitals, the Center develops strategies to move healthcare from the hospital and doctor's office into the day-to-day lives of patients. It leverages information technology to help manage chronic conditions, maintain health and wellness, and improve adherence to prescribed regimen, patient engagement, and clinical outcomes. Since inception, it has served over 30,000 patients. The Center's core functions include videoconference-based real-time virtual visits, home vital sign monitoring, store-and-forward online consultations, social media, mobile technology, and other novel methods of providing care and enabling health and wellness remotely and independently of traditional time and geographic constraints. It offers a wide range of services, programs, and research activities. The Center comprises over 40 professionals with various technical and professional skills. Internally within Partners HealthCare, the role of the Center is to collaborate, guide, advise, and support the experimentation with and the deployment and growth of connected health technologies, programs, and services. Annually, the Center engages in a deliberative planning process to guide its annual research and operational agenda. The Center enjoys a diversified revenue stream. Funding sources include institutional operating budget/research funds from Partners HealthCare, public and private competitive grants and contracts, philanthropic contributions, ad hoc funding arrangements, and longer-term contractual arrangements with third parties.

  7. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  8. Healthcare professionals' views on patient-centered care in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Berghout (Mathilde); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); L. Leensvaart (Laszlo); J.M. Cramm (Jane)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patient-centered care (PCC) is a main determinant of care quality. Research has shown that PCC is a multi-dimensional concept, and organizations that provide PCC well report better patient and organizational outcomes. However, little is known about the relative importance of

  9. Integrating Primary Care Into Community Mental Health Centers: Impact on Utilization and Costs of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupski, Antoinette; West, Imara I; Scharf, Deborah M; Hopfenbeck, James; Andrus, Graydon; Joesch, Jutta M; Snowden, Mark

    2016-11-01

    This evaluation was designed to assess the impact of providing integrated primary and mental health care on utilization and costs for outpatient medical, inpatient hospital, and emergency department treatment among persons with serious mental illness. Two safety-net, community mental health centers that received a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) grant were the focus of this study. Clinic 1 had a ten-year history of providing integrated services whereas clinic 2 began integrated services with the PBHCI grant. Difference-in-differences (DID) analyses were used to compare individuals enrolled in the PBHCI programs (N=373, clinic 1; N=389, clinic 2) with propensity score-matched comparison groups of equal size at each site by using data obtained from medical records. Relative to the comparison groups, a higher proportion of PBHCI clients used outpatient medical services at both sites following program enrollment (p<.003, clinic 1; p<.001, clinic 2). At clinic 1, PBHCI was also associated with a reduction in the proportion of clients with an inpatient hospital admission (p=.04) and a trend for a reduction in inpatient hospital costs per member per month of $217.68 (p=.06). Hospital-related cost savings were not observed for PBHCI clients at clinic 2 nor were there significant differences between emergency department use or costs for PBHCI and comparison groups at either clinic. Investments in PBHCI can improve access to outpatient medical care for persons with severe mental illness and may also curb hospitalizations and associated costs in more established programs.

  10. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  11. Designing Robots for Care: Care Centered Value-Sensitive Design

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship—what I refer to as care robots—require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vulnerable and sensitive time in their lives. The ethical evaluation of care robots requires insight into the values at stake in the healthcare tradition. What’s more, given the stage of their develo...

  12. Designing Robots for Care: Care Centered Value-Sensitive Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynsberghe, van A.

    2013-01-01

    The prospective robots in healthcare intended to be included within the conclave of the nurse-patient relationship—what I refer to as care robots—require rigorous ethical reflection to ensure their design and introduction do not impede the promotion of values and the dignity of patients at such a vu

  13. Translating person-centered care into practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided...... self-determination [GSD]. METHODS: Comparative analysis included eight components: (1) philosophical origin; (2) development in original clinical setting; (3) theoretical underpinnings; (4) overarching goal and supportive processes; (5) general principles, strategies or tools for engaging peoples; (6...... on managing ambivalence. IIS and GSD were based on grounded theories, and MI was intuitively developed. All apply processes and strategies to advance professionals' communication skills and engagement; GSD includes context-specific reflection sheets. All offer training programs; MI and GSD include fidelity...

  14. [Family-centered care and post-traumatic stress disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Huei; Sun, Yin-Jhen; Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Chiang, Li-Chi

    2012-06-01

    A year has passed since a major earthquake and tsunami hit northeastern Honshu, Japan in March 2011. Amidst mourning for the tens of thousands of victims, survivors have just begun the difficult and urgent tasks of rebuilding. Many survivors suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD causes chronic, long-term suffering for patients and their families and inevitably burdens social and medical care systems. This article tries to integrate PTSD evidence-based treatment experiences into a practical and detailed nursing intervention protocol for PTSD. We also elicit the function and effect of "family-centered care." We hope that nursing professionals apply family-centered care principles to PTSD treatment and care approaches in order to promote PTSD patient resilience. Nurses can thus enhance PTSD care efficacy and improve the opportunity for PTSD patients to overcome their symptoms and recover their life.

  15. Official conceptualizations of person-centered care: which person counts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that a "psycho-social" person-centered care approach, involving the delivery of a compassionate, respectful model of care, leads to a high quality of life, particularly for older people living in residential care. This has prompted policy-makers to endorse this approach. Yet, some commentators have argued that the model of person-centered care in official government policies equates to a "consumer-based" rather than a psycho-social approach, as it focuses solely on offering service-users more choice and on promoting independence. However, as such arguments are made in the absence of any empirical analysis, it is unclear both whether such a distinction exists in practice, and, if so, how this alternative model developed. This study explores the development of minimum standards for residential care settings for older people in Ireland in order to address this gap in our understanding of person-centered care. Findings confirm that a consumer-driven model of person-centered care underpins the Irish Standards; residential care is portrayed as a hotel-like service and residents as discerning consumers, which may be unsuitable for older people in residential care with limited capacity to make key choices. Analysis indicates that this model can be seen both as an extension of consumer-driven policies endorsed by many neo-liberal governments, and also of policy-makers' fears of losing their autonomy when they reach the "Fourth Age". This study is particularly illuminating, given the similarities between the Irish care system with England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Australia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  17. Patient-centered Fertility Care: From Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Healthcare areas, especially fertility care (commonly accompanied with high emotions, as well as long-term and recurring treatment periods could exclusively benefit from patient-centered care (PCC. Despite evident advantages of PCC, this approach has not been practiced as a routine procedure in current clinical environments yet, even in western developed countries. Therefore, this review aimed to evaluate the significance and different aspects of PCC, while emphasizing on patient-centered fertility care, its challenges, and applicable recommendations in this regard. Methods: This narrative review was conducted on 29 relevant medical and clinical papers (published during 1990-2015 collected using various national and international databases (e.g., SID, Magiran, Medlib, Google scholar, Proquest, Pubmed, Wiley, Science direct, and Scopus. Key words and phrases used in this review were “infertility”, “fertility care”, “childlessness”, “patient-centered care”, “patient-centered fertility care” “shared decision-making”, “infertile patient preferences”, and “patient involvement in fertility care”. Results: According to the literature, implementation challenges of patient-centered fertility care were reported as different individual and organizational factors. These factors include lack of professional motivation to change, underestimating the significance of patient-centeredness by healthcare professionals, difficulty in translation of feedback into concrete measures, lack of time and financial resources, insufficient experience of healthcare professionals with regard to identification of needs and preferences of patients, traditional organizational culture, and common misconceptions. Conclusion: Promotion of patient-centered fertility services requires the identification of infertile needs and priorities of individuals, designation of interventional and supportive programs based on sociocultural

  18. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  19. [Surgical Center environment and its elements: implications for nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Denise Conceição; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research was to characterize the elements that constitute the environment of the Surgical Center and to analyze its implications for dynamic of care and nursing care. Based on the Environmental Theory's principals. Participated twelve nurses from the Surgical Center of a College Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Data were gathered through the creativity and sensitivity technique "Map-Speaker", semi-structered interviews and participant observation, and were analyzed by thematic categories. The results showed that care can happen directly and indirectly in favor of full client recovery, counting the environment that the integrate in purpose to maintain harmonic and balanced. The nurse interventions aim to maintain the environment in favorable conditions so that a higher standard of care can be promoted.

  20. Barriers for domestic violence screening in primary health care centers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iman Y. Alotaby

    2012-08-09

    Aug 9, 2012 ... A self- administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Results: Barriers ... spite frequent visits to the health care centers, to disclose their experience of IPV .... domain dealing with the victim herself showed similar patterns ... Guidelines recommended that all adolescent and adult patients should be ...

  1. The web site of the center to advance palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    The web site of the Center to Advance Palliative Care is reviewed. This is an excellent resource containing resources that address financial tutorials and customizable Excel worksheets, development and marketing tools, particularly the decision checklists, satisfaction tools, the information on tracking and reporting outcomes, bereavement tools and a press kit.

  2. A comparison of cognitive and functional care differences in four long-term care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Alyce S; Owen, Donna C; Feng, Du

    2006-02-01

    Matching residential setting with cognitive and physical abilities is crucial for the provision of a supportive long-term care (LTC) environment. This study compares the cognitive and functional care differences of LTC residents on skilled nursing units designed for dementia care, chronic care, or ambulatory care, and an assisted living setting using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) Texas Index of Level for Effort (TILE) clinical categories (heavy care, rehabilitation/restorative, clinically unstable, clinically stable), MDS Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The goal of the comparison was to find a parsimonious approach for determining resident placement in LTC using the MDS and MMSE. Using a descriptive comparative design, the study took place at a not-for-profit, urban, continuing care retirement center (CCRC) with a 120-bed skilled nursing facility and a 34-unit assisted living facility. Sixty residents, 15 from each of the 3 skilled nursing units and assisted living unit, consented to participate. To understand the differences in the MDS and MMSE scores between units, a Level of Care Algorithm was constructed to analyze resident placement. Results revealed that MDS and MMSE scores placed greater than 75% of elders who had extremely poor cognitive or physical function but did not discriminate well for residents with moderate cognitive and/or physical impairment. For these residents, interaction between institutional philosophy (aging in place versus moving to a new location); resource availability; and elder, family, and staff values and preferences may have influenced placement.

  3. Moving family-centered care forward: Bereaved fathers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Betty; Baird, Jennifer; Gudmundsdottir, Maria

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the key behaviors of "excellent" pediatric healthcare providers - a term used by fathers of children with complex, life-threatening illness to describe providers who consistently and effectively engage in family-centered care for children and their families. Using interview data from a multi-site grounded theory study of 60 fathers with a deceased child, five behaviors were identified: getting to know the family as individuals, talking about non-healthcare related topics, connecting in a human-human relationship, including parents as team members, and applying specialized knowledge to help the family. These behaviors are consistent with the goals of family-centered care, but they are inconsistently practiced, resulting in less-than-optimal care for children and their families during periods of crisis and vulnerability. A renewed focus on relationship building and interactions with families is needed, as well as a re-evaluation of the training of pediatric healthcare providers.

  4. Cesarean Outcomes in US Birth Centers and Collaborating Hospitals: A Cohort Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Patrick; McFarlin, Barbara L; Park, Chang; Rankin, Kristin; Schorn, Mavis; Finnegan, Lorna; Stapleton, Susan

    2017-01-01

    High rates of cesarean birth are a significant health care quality issue, and birth centers have shown potential to reduce rates of cesarean birth. Measuring this potential is complicated by lack of randomized trials and limited observational comparisons. Cesarean rates vary by provider type, setting, and clinical and nonclinical characteristics of women, but our understanding of these dynamics is incomplete. We sought to isolate labor setting from other risk factors in order to assess the effect of birth centers on the odds of cesarean birth. We generated low-risk cohorts admitted in labor to hospitals (n = 2527) and birth centers (n = 8776) using secondary data obtained from the American Association of Birth Centers (AABC). All women received prenatal care in the birth center and midwifery care in labor, but some chose hospital admission for labor. Analysis was intent to treat according to site of admission in spontaneous labor. We used propensity score adjustment and multivariable logistic regression to control for cohort differences and measured effect sizes associated with setting. There was a 37% (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.79) to 38% (adjusted OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.49-0.79) decreased odds of cesarean in the birth center cohort and a remarkably low overall cesarean rate of less than 5% in both cohorts. These findings suggest that low rates of cesarean in birth centers are not attributable to labor setting alone. The entire birth center care model, including prenatal preparation and relationship-based midwifery care, should be studied, promoted, and implemented by policy makers interested in achieving appropriate cesarean rates in the United States. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  5. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices.

  6. Family-Centered Care in Juvenile Justice Institutions: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Eva; Rigter, Henk; Breuk, René; van der Vaart, Wander; Vermeiren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment and rehabilitation interventions in juvenile justice institutions aim to prevent criminal reoffending by adolescents and to enhance their prospects of successful social reintegration. There is evidence that these goals are best achieved when the institution adopts a family-centered approach, involving the parents of the adolescents. The Academic Workplace Forensic Care for Youth has developed two programs for family-centered care for youth detained in groups for short-term and long-term stay, respectively. Objective The overall aim of our study is to evaluate the family-centered care program in the first two years after the first steps of its implementation in short-term stay groups of two juvenile justice institutions in the Netherlands. The current paper discusses our study design. Methods Based on a quantitative pilot study, we opted for a study with an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. This pilot is considered the first stage of our study. The second stage of our study includes concurrent quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative part of our study is a pre-post quasi-experimental comparison of family-centered care with usual care in short-term stay groups. The qualitative part of our study involves in-depth interviews with adolescents, parents, and group workers to elaborate on the preceding quantitative pilot study and to help interpret the outcomes of the quasi-experimental quantitative part of the study. Results We believe that our study will result in the following findings. In the quantitative comparison of usual care with family-centered care, we assume that in the latter group, parents will be more involved with their child and with the institution, and that parents and adolescents will be more motivated to take part in therapy. In addition, we expect family-centered care to improve family interactions, to decrease parenting stress, and to reduce problem behavior among the adolescents. Finally, we assume

  7. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  8. Application of theory to family-centered care: a role for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered care is an emerging trend in health care settings today. An explanation, principles, and a definition of family-centered care are offered and discussed. A theoretical framework, Balance Theory of Coordination, which can be utilized by social workers to develop and enhance family-centered care practices, is explained and discussed. Various family-centered care practices are examined within the context of Balance Theory of Coordination as examples.

  9. Improving the financial viability of primary care health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, S A; Knickman, J R; Hanson, K L

    1994-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national demonstration program to improve the long-term financial viability of small not-for-profit primary care health centers. The program initiatives and their implementation are described in some detail. A standard pre/post study design was used to measure the impact of the initiatives on general outcome measures, financial ratios, and the utilization of management techniques. Overall, demonstration centers showed improvement over the study period. Notable short-term improvements included significant growth in the volume of patient visits and increased profit. Observed changes also revealed an increased use of sophisticated management techniques, expected to positively affect longer-term financial health. The findings suggest that improving the financial viability of health centers need not be expensive.

  10. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  11. Language barriers and patient-centered breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Hwang, E Shelley; Nickleach, Dana; Kaplan, Celia P

    2011-08-01

    Provision of high quality patient-centered care is fundamental to eliminating healthcare disparities in breast cancer. We investigated physicians' experiences communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer patients. Survey of a random sample of California oncologists and surgeons. Of 301 respondents who reported treating LEP patients, 46% were oncologists, 75% male, 68% in private practice, and on average 33% of their patients had breast cancer. Only 40% reported at least sometimes using professional interpretation services. Although 75% felt they were usually able to communicate effectively with LEP patients, more than half reported difficulty discussing treatment options and prognosis, and 56% acknowledged having less-patient-centered treatment discussions with LEP breast cancer patients. In multivariate analysis, use of professional interpreters was associated with 53% lower odds of reporting less-patient-centered treatment discussions (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.26-0.85). California surgeons and oncologists caring for breast cancer patients report substantial communication challenges when faced with a language barrier. Although use of professional interpreters is associated with more patient-centered communication, there is a low rate of professional interpreter utilization. Future research and policy should focus on increasing access to and reimbursement for professional interpreter services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  13. Factors related to the performance of Specialized Dental Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Christiane de Azevedo Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC have the mission to expand access to public medium complexity dental care and support the primary health care actions at this level of complexity. However, it is necessary to ensure the quality of services and to evaluate such services continuously to identify weaknesses and strengths that support the processes of leadership/management. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of studies on the assessment of oral health in specialized care that may indicate which factors should be investigated. Therefore, this integrated literature review sought to explore the plethora of publications on the evaluation of SDCC in the LILACS and MEDLINE data bases in October 2013 to identify factors possibly related to the performance of such health services. Thus, 13 references were included in this review pointing to forms of organization and management of work processes related to the creation of healthcare networks (operation of regulation centers and setting up of health consortiums. They include the contextual characteristics of the places where SDCCs are located (population size, Family Health Strategy coverage, Municipal Human Development Index, governance, governing capacity were factors that influenced the SDCCs performance.

  14. Patient-centered care: turning the rhetoric into reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Joel S; Millenson, Michael L; Haring, R Sterling

    2017-01-01

    Although patient-centered care (PCC) was proclaimed a core health system aim in a 2001 Institute of Medicine report, it remains one of the most-used and least-understood terms in healthcare. We interviewed leaders at 15 Medicare accountable care organizations (ACOs) across the country that have been the most successful in putting patient-centeredness into actual practice to develop an operational definition. The ACOs we spoke with had a 3-pronged practical approach of: 1) patients as partners, 2) proactive customer-service orientation, and 3) care coordination with a whole-person approach. We believe this framework can serve as a guide as the healthcare system moves "from volume to value" and a true partnership becomes increasingly critical both to patients and the healthcare system as a whole.

  15. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care in the Intensive Care Unit: A Dissemination Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Buchman, Timothy G; Harmon, Lori; Nielsen, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Awareness of patient-centered and family-centered care research can assist clinicians to promote patient and family engagement in the intensive care unit. Project Dispatch (Disseminating Patient-Centered Outcomes Research to Healthcare Professionals) was developed to disseminate patient- and family-centered care research and encourage its application in clinical practice. The 3-year project involved the development of an interactive website platform, online educational programming, social media channels, a podcast and webcast series, and electronic and print media. The project's webpages received more than 5200 page views with over 4000 unique visitors from 36 countries. The podcast series has download numbers ranging from 35 596 for "Family Presence in the ICU" to 25 843 for "Improving Patient and Family satisfaction in the ICU" and 22 148 for "Family Satisfaction in the ICU." The project therefore successfully developed resources for critical care health care professionals to promote the patient- and family-centric perspective. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Person-centered care--ready for prime time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Inger; Swedberg, Karl; Taft, Charles; Lindseth, Anders; Norberg, Astrid; Brink, Eva; Carlsson, Jane; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve; Johansson, Inga-Lill; Kjellgren, Karin; Lidén, Eva; Öhlén, Joakim; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Rosén, Henrik; Rydmark, Martin; Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant

    2011-12-01

    Long-term diseases are today the leading cause of mortality worldwide and are estimated to be the leading cause of disability by 2020. Person-centered care (PCC) has been shown to advance concordance between care provider and patient on treatment plans, improve health outcomes and increase patient satisfaction. Yet, despite these and other documented benefits, there are a variety of significant challenges to putting PCC into clinical practice. Although care providers today broadly acknowledge PCC to be an important part of care, in our experience we must establish routines that initiate, integrate, and safeguard PCC in daily clinical practice to ensure that PCC is systematically and consistently practiced, i.e. not just when we feel we have time for it. In this paper, we propose a few simple routines to facilitate and safeguard the transition to PCC. We believe that if conscientiously and systematically applied, they will help to make PCC the focus and mainstay of care in long-term illness. Copyright © 2011 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 76 FR 50224 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, September 15th and... second Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care...

  18. [Fusing empowerment concept into patient-centered collaborative care model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2014-12-01

    Chronic diseases are incurable, long-term illnesses. To improve quality of life, patients with chronic diseases must adjust their own personal lifestyle to cope with their diseases and eventually learn to achieve a balance between disease control and daily life. Therefore, self-management necessarily plays a key role in chronic disease management. Different from physician-centered healthcare, the self-management practiced by chronic disease patients is more patient-centered with a greater emphasis on active patient participation. The main goal of this article is to elucidate the essence of the empowerment concept. An example of diabetes care, this article introduces a detailed five-step application as a basic model for incorporating the empowerment concept into the healthcare of patients with chronic disease. The author suggests that healthcare providers apply the empowerment model in clinical practice to assist patients to maintain an optimal balance between their health status and personal lives.

  19. [Systematization of nursing care in the obstetrical center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Raquel Bezerra; Ramos, Karla da Silva

    2012-01-01

    This is a descriptive and exploratory study with a quantitative approach, aiming to propose a protocol for the systematization of nursing care to women in the process of giving birth in the Obstetrical Center of a public hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. A semi-structured instrument was applied to forty women in the process of giving birth, in order to obtaining the nursing history; from which the nursing diagnoses were identified, having as a basis the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®), version 1, and their respective results and nursing interventions were established. The protocol consists in two stages: the first one is the nursing consultation, which involves the anamnesis and physical examination; and the second, involves the judicious identification of the nursing diagnoses, which will guide the planning of the nursing care to provide the individualized attention to women in the process of giving birth, using a universal terminology.

  20. Why Patient Centered Care Coordination Is Important in Developing Countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, D.; Marcelo, A.; Househ, M.; Mandirola, H.; Curioso, W.; Pazos, P.; Villalba, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patient Centered Care Coordination (PCCC) focuses on the patient health care needs. PCCC involves the organization, the patients and their families, that must coordinate resources in order to accomplish the goals of PCCC. In developing countries, where disparities are frequent, PCCC could improve clinical outcomes, costs and patients satisfaction. Objective the IMIA working group Health Informatics for Development analyzes the benefits, identifies the barriers and proposes strategies to reach PCCC. Methods Discussions about PCCC emerged from a brief guide that posed questions about what is PCCC, why consider PCCC important, barriers to grow in this direction and ask about resources considered relevant in the topic. Results PCCC encompasses a broad definition, includes physical, mental, socio-environmental and self care. Even benefits are proved, in developing countries the lack of a comprehensive and integrated healthcare network is one of the main barriers to reach this objective. Working hard to reach strong health policies, focus on patients, and optimizing the use of resources could improve the performance in the devolvement of PCCC programs. International collaboration could bring benefits. We believe information IT, and education in this field will play an important role in PCCC. Conclusion PCCC in developing countries has the potential to improve quality of care. Education, IT, policies and cultural issues must be addressed in an international collaborative context in order to reach this goal. PMID:26123907

  1. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  2. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  3. Customer Quality during Prenatal Care in Health Care Centers in Tabriz City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives :  Customer Quality (CQ refers to customer’s characteristics and is concerned with the knowledge, skills and confidence of health services customers who actively participate with health team in proper decision-making, appropriate activities and changing environment and health related behaviors. The purpose of this study was measuring customer quality of pregnant women during prenatal care. Materials and Methods :  This is a cross- sectional study which was conducted with the participation of 185 pregnant women who received prenatal care from urban health centers in Tabriz city. All participants were selected randomly from 40 health centers. Customer quality was measured based on CQMH-CQ questionnaire.  Questionnaire content validity was reviewed and confirmed by 10 experts and its reliability was confirmed based on Cronbach's alpha index (α = 0.714. Spss v.17 was used for data analysis. Results : According to the results, the mean score of customer quality among pregnant women was (11.29± 67.79   and only %14 of the participants reported the highest customer quality score and ability of continuity of care under stressful situations. There was a positive relationship between customer quality score and visiting midwife and a better evaluation of overall quality of care, but there was inverse relationship with early registration at health centers. Conclusion :  The participation of pregnant women in service delivery process and decision-making can promote costumer quality. Furthermore, training health care providers in empowering patients and using their abilities to improve quality of care and paying attention to patient-centered care will be helpful. ​

  4. The National Palliative Care Research Center and the Center to Advance Palliative Care: a partnership to improve care for persons with serious illness and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2011-10-01

    families must know to request palliative care, medical professionals must have the knowledge and skills to provide palliative care, and hospitals and other healthcare institutions must be equipped to deliver and support palliative care services. The Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) and the National Palliative Care Research Center (NPCRC) are accomplishing this three-part mission by working in partnership to: 1) Develop research to serve as the knowledge base for quality clinical care and the foundation on which to build palliative care programs and systems; 2) Disseminate this knowledge to patients, families, professionals, and institutions throughout the United States and ensure that it is integrated within mainstream healthcare; and 3) Influence and collaborate with policy makers , regulatory bodies, and federal funding agencies to ensure that the healthcare infrastructure supports the continued growth and development of palliative care.

  5. [Talk to them: Narrative care within a person-centered care framework].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of narrative care in the attention of older people who receive care in institutions, underlining how its use provides a better understanding of the Person Centered Care (PCC) model and valuable strategies to put it into practice. To achieve this goal, firstly, we describe the relevance of a narrative approach for understanding the experience of the old person who receive care in institutions, with regards to individual aspects as well as to her/his relationships with professionals and the institutional discourse which contextualize these relationships. Secondly, we specify different ways in which the use of narratives could have an impact on the improvement of the quality of attention and well-being of older people receiving care in institutions. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient-centered care or cultural competence: negotiating palliative care at home for Chinese Canadian immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lisa Seto; Angus, Jan E; Howell, Doris; Husain, Amna; Gastaldo, Denise

    2015-06-01

    The literature about Chinese attitudes toward death and dying contains frequent references to strong taboos against open discussion about death; consequently, there is an assumption that dying at home is not the preferred option. This focused ethnographic study examined the palliative home care experiences of 4 Chinese immigrants with terminal cancer, their family caregivers, and home care nurses and key informant interviews with 11 health care providers. Three main themes emerged: (1) the many facets of taboo; (2) discursive tensions between patient-centered care and cultural competence; and (3) rethinking language barriers. Thus, training on cultural competence needs to move away from models that portray cultural beliefs as shared, fixed patterns, and take into account the complicated reality of everyday care provision at end of life in the home.

  7. Viewpoints of the members of the workers' retirement centers in Tehran about elderly day care centers (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Rohani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no documented evidence regarding elderly day care centers in Iran. This needs analysis study was conducted to investigate the demand for elderly day care centers in Tehran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted recruiting 210 participants aged over 60 who were members of the elderly retirement centers in Tehran in 2012. Data were gathered by Kansas state university questionnaire and analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: About 80% of participants were men with the mean age of 67.5±5.23 years. Results showed that male (P<0.001, married (P=0.01 and literate elderly (P<0.001, and those living in rental homes (P<0.001 expressed a greater need for elderly day care centers. There was no statistically significant relationship between the lifestyle (P=0.051 and income (P=0.08 of the participants and demand for elderly day care centers. Conclusion: Given the rising population of the elderly and their high demand for day care centers, it is necessary to establish well-equipped day care centers for this group of people. Also, these centers may reduce the burden of care for the aged people on public services and family care givers.

  8. Point of Care Tools im Vergleich des Universitätsklinikums Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE: UpToDate, ClinicalResource@Ovid/Clin-eguide und Dynamed / Point of Care Tools in comparison at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf: UpToDate, ClinicalResource@Ovid and Dynamed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menn, Elke

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Point of Care Tools are used for clinical decision making – UpToDate is also used in continuing medical education. These databases compile only evidence-based knowledge which is updated regularly. Using Point of Care Tools promises to improve clinical outcomes. UpToDate has been used at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf for the last four years. In a recent trial the use of ClinicalResource@Ovid/Clin-eguide and Dynamed has been evaluated in comparison with UpToDate.

  9. Improving coordination of care centers for the elderly through IT support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Andreas Kaas; Lauridsen, Frederik Vahr Bjarnø; Manea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    In Denmark, care of elderly people involves numerous and relatively autonomous care providers, including care centers, activity centers, physiotherapists, doctors, and other specialists. However, due to a poor coordination of activities, many elderly experience a lack of continuity of care, misse...

  10. Quality of Prenatal Care Services in Karabuk Community Health Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binali Catak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality and quantity of prenatal care services according to gestastional week in Karabuk Community Health Center (CHC. Methods: In this descriptive study 365 pregnant women was selected as sample among 753 pregnant women registered at Karabuk CHC in 18/01/2011. 93.0% of women in the selected sample has been visited in their homes and the face to face interviews were done. The questionnaire was prepared according to Prenatal Care Management Guidelines (PCMG of Ministry of Health. Findings The number of follow-ups was not complete in 23.7% of 15-24 month, 34.4% of 25-32 month, 52,1% of 33-42 month pregnant women. At least four follow-up visits were completed only in 66,7% of postpartum women. Timing of first visit was after 15th week in 15,6% of women. In follow up visits 62.5% of of women’s height were never measured, in 13,0% the women hearth sound of infants didn’t monitored at least once. Laboratory test numbers were under the level required by PCMG. The delivery conditions weren’t planned in 41,8% of last trimester and postpartum women and training about breastfeeding wasn’t given to 15,5 of the same group. Result In family medicine model in Karabuk CHC developments in number of prenatal follow-up visits were observed, but no substantial improvements were found in quality of prenatal visits. Regular in service trainings shoud be given to family doctors and midwives. The use of prenatal care guideline published by MoH should be increased. Keywords: Prenatal care, pregnancy, timing of first visit, qality of prenatal care [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 153-162

  11. Virtual Visits and Patient-Centered Care: Results of a Patient Survey and Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Kimberlyn Marie; Ahuja, Megan Alyssa; Leaver, Chad Andrew

    2017-05-26

    Virtual visits are clinical interactions in health care that do not involve the patient and provider being in the same room at the same time. The use of virtual visits is growing rapidly in health care. Some health systems are integrating virtual visits into primary care as a complement to existing modes of care, in part reflecting a growing focus on patient-centered care. There is, however, limited empirical evidence about how patients view this new form of care and how it affects overall health system use. Descriptive objectives were to assess users and providers of virtual visits, including the reasons patients give for use. The analytic objective was to assess empirically the influence of virtual visits on overall primary care use and costs, including whether virtual care is with a known or a new primary care physician. The study took place in British Columbia, Canada, where virtual visits have been publicly funded since October 2012. A survey of patients who used virtual visits and an observational study of users and nonusers of virtual visits were conducted. Comparison groups included two groups: (1) all other BC residents, and (2) a group matched (3:1) to the cohort. The first virtual visit was used as the intervention and the main outcome measures were total primary care visits and costs. During 2013-2014, there were 7286 virtual visit encounters, involving 5441 patients and 144 physicians. Younger patients and physicians were more likely to use and provide virtual visits (Pvirtual visit patients indicated that virtual visits were liked by patients, with 372 (93.2%) of respondents saying their virtual visit was of high quality and 364 (91.2%) reporting their virtual visit was "very" or "somewhat" helpful to resolve their health issue. Segmented regression analysis and the corresponding regression parameter estimates suggested virtual visits appear to have the potential to decrease primary care costs by approximately Can $4 per quarter (Can -$3.79, P=.12

  12. Patient-centered care: the key to cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epner, D E; Baile, W F

    2012-04-01

    Much of the early literature on 'cultural competence' focuses on the 'categorical' or 'multicultural' approach, in which providers learn relevant attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors of certain cultural groups. In essence, this involves learning key 'dos and don'ts' for each group. Literature and educational materials of this kind focus on broad ethnic, racial, religious, or national groups, such as 'African American', 'Hispanic', or 'Asian'. The problem with this categorical or 'list of traits' approach to clinical cultural competence is that culture is multidimensional and dynamic. Culture comprises multiple variables, affecting all aspects of experience. Cultural processes frequently differ within the same ethnic or social group because of differences in age cohort, gender, political association, class, religion, ethnicity, and even personality. Culture is therefore a very elusive and nebulous concept, like art. The multicultural approach to cultural competence results in stereotypical thinking rather than clinical competence. A newer, cross cultural approach to culturally competent clinical practice focuses on foundational communication skills, awareness of cross-cutting cultural and social issues, and health beliefs that are present in all cultures. We can think of these as universal human beliefs, needs, and traits. This patient centered approach relies on identifying and negotiating different styles of communication, decision-making preferences, roles of family, sexual and gender issues, and issues of mistrust, prejudice, and racism, among other factors. In the current paper, we describe 'cultural' challenges that arise in the care of four patients from disparate cultures, each of whom has advanced colon cancer that is no longer responding to chemotherapy. We then illustrate how to apply principles of patient centered care to these challenges.

  13. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren R; Zlateva, Ianita; Coman, Emil N; Khatri, Khushbu; Tian, Terrence; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs) receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM) at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention) cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009). There was no significant change in opioid prescribing. Conclusion Implementation of the SCM-PM resulted in clinically significant improvements in several quality of pain care outcomes. These findings, if sustained, may translate into improved patient outcomes. PMID:27881926

  14. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  15. Pattern of Breast Cancer in a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Jha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Breast Cancer is the second commonest cause of cancer death in women. Almost all women survive breast cancer if it is detected before it starts to spread. The aim of the study is to analyze the demographical profile, stage of presentation, histological type, and treatment modalities of breast cancer in a tertiary care setting. METHODS: Total 1141 cases of breast cancer had been followed retrospectively from 1999 to 2006 A.D. in a tertiary care center and their patterns were analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of presentation of breast cancer was 47.30 +/- 11.57 years in female and 59.03 +/- 14.63 in male, 31 (2.1% cases of breast cancer were male. There were 123 (10.78% stage I, 281 (24.62% stage II, 466 (40.84% stage III, and 271 (23.75% stage IV patients. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest variety 610 (53.5%. Chemotherapy was the mainstay for treatment of breast cancer 341 (29.9% followed by surgery 287 (25.2%. CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer trend is rising with more in late and advanced stages, mostly due to lack of awareness. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the commonest variety. Chemotherapy is the most commonly used modality of treatment. Male breast cancer present late and is not so uncommon. Keywords: breast cancer; chemotherapy; infiltrating ductal carcinoma; staging.

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis Infection in a Tertiary Care Vaginitis Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Maria A; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis infection (TVI) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. We sought to determine the features of TVI in a referral-based vaginitis center, focusing on diagnosis and treatment of difficult cases. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with TVI, based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes, seen at the Drexel Vaginitis Center between January 2008 and November 2013. Information collected on each subject included demographics, symptoms, examination findings, diagnostic tests, and treatment regimens. Of approximately 4000 new patient visits during our study period, 80 subjects were identified with TVI. Twenty subjects presented with known TVI, with most having clinically resistant infections. Diagnosis was confirmed by saline microscopy in 45%, OSOM rapid test in 40%, and clinical history in the remaining 15%. Treatment regimens varied: 20% received single 2-g dosing of either metronidazole or tinidazole, 50% received high-dose regimens, 20% received therapy with vaginal paromomycin, and 10% underwent desensitization for nitroimidazole allergy. Sixty subjects had newly diagnosed TVI, with 35% diagnosed by saline microscopy, 41.7% by OSOM rapid test, and 23.3% by APTIMA. Treatment regimens for these subjects included single 2-g dosing in 88.3%, high-dose regimen in 8.3%, and other formulations in the remaining 3.4%. In total, 80% of our subjects returned for follow-up; all of whom were cured. T. vaginalis infection is a rare condition in a tertiary care vaginitis center and often requires nonstandard treatments. Among those who returned for follow-up, the cure rate was 100%.

  17. Incidence of occupational exposures in a tertiary health care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Shriyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational exposure to Hepatitis B virus (HBV, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a cause of concern to all health care workers (HCWs, especially those, in hospitals. Among the HCWs, nurses, interns, technicians, resident doctors and housekeeping staff have the highest incidence of occupational exposure. Aims: To analyze the cases of needle stick injuries and other exposures to patient′s blood or body fluids among health care workers. Materials and Methods: A detailed account of the exposure is documented which includes incidence of needle stick injuries (NSI and implementation of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP as per the hospital guidelines. We report a two-year continuing surveillance study where 255 health care workers (HCWs were included. PEP was given to HCWs sustaining NSI or exposures to blood and body fluids when the source is known sero-positive or even unknown where the risk of transmission is high. Follow-up of these HCW′s was done after three and six months of exposure. Results: Of the 255 HCWs, 59 sustained needle stick injuries and two were exposed to splashes. 31 of the NSI were from known sources and 28 from unknown sources. From known sources, thirteen were seropositive; seven for HIV, three for HCV and three for HBV. Nineteen of them sustained needle stick during needle re-capping, six of them during clean up, six of them while discarding into the container, 17 during administration of injection, eight of them during suturing, two occurred in restless patient, 17 during needle disposal. Conclusion: So far, no case of sero-conversion as a result of needle stick injuries was reported at our center.

  18. Incidence of occupational exposures in a tertiary health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriyan, Amrita; Roche, R; Annamma

    2012-07-01

    Occupational exposure to Hepatitis B virus (HBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a cause of concern to all health care workers (HCWs), especially those, in hospitals. Among the HCWs, nurses, interns, technicians, resident doctors and housekeeping staff have the highest incidence of occupational exposure. To analyze the cases of needle stick injuries and other exposures to patient's blood or body fluids among health care workers. A detailed account of the exposure is documented which includes incidence of needle stick injuries (NSI) and implementation of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) as per the hospital guidelines. We report a two-year continuing surveillance study where 255 health care workers (HCWs) were included. PEP was given to HCWs sustaining NSI or exposures to blood and body fluids when the source is known sero-positive or even unknown where the risk of transmission is high. Follow-up of these HCW's was done after three and six months of exposure. Of the 255 HCWs, 59 sustained needle stick injuries and two were exposed to splashes. 31 of the NSI were from known sources and 28 from unknown sources. From known sources, thirteen were seropositive; seven for HIV, three for HCV and three for HBV. Nineteen of them sustained needle stick during needle re-capping, six of them during clean up, six of them while discarding into the container, 17 during administration of injection, eight of them during suturing, two occurred in restless patient, 17 during needle disposal. So far, no case of sero-conversion as a result of needle stick injuries was reported at our center.

  19. Screening of Developmental Problem, Day care Centers, Sari, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kosaryan, M.D.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: There has not been enough attention towards the domains of development in pediatrics,so there are many deficiencies in monitoring the achievement of developmental milestones in our country.One of the important ways for the improvement of this problem is to use screening method. PEDS questionnaire is one of the screening tools for development. The aim of this study was to investigate about parents' evaluation of developmental status for their children.Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. The population included infants and children under the age of 6 in day care centers of Sari. Sampling method was clustering. The tool for data collection was PEDS questionnaire (Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status which consisted of 38 questions about demographic data and medical history of children as well as parents' concern about different developmental domains along with ''Yes'' , ''No'' and ''little'' answers. The data were analysed using SPSS11 software. Chi square and Wilcoxon were used. P<0.05 was considered significant.Results: Out of 829 questionnaires, 736 were returned (88.7%. The Sample age was 4.23 ± 1.32 gl . Fifty percent of participants were male. By average, in each developmental domains, 3.2% of parents had major concern and 9.5% had partial concern. The most common domains of concern were communication with others (6.4%, behavior (6.1%, speaking (4.3%, preschool and school education (3.1%, children's understanding (2.5%, the self care (2.1%, the use of fingers (1.4%, the use of legs and arms (1.1%. Parents' concern had a significant relationship with parent's education, residence and history of illness in children (P<0.05. Out of 23.4% of the infants and children who had later returned to the diagnosis center, 80% had behavioral disorder, 87.6% had speech disorder and 16.6% had hearing impairment..Conclusion: A considerable percentage of parents was concerned about developmental

  20. Integrating Mental Health In Care For Noncommunicable Diseases: An Imperative For Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Chatterji, Somnath

    2015-09-01

    Mental disorders such as depression and alcohol use disorders often co-occur with other common noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. Furthermore, noncommunicable diseases are frequently encountered in patients with severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia. The pathways underlying the comorbidity of mental disorders and noncommunicable diseases are complex. For example, mental and physical noncommunicable diseases may have common environmental risk factors such as unhealthy lifestyles, and treatments for one condition may have side effects that increase the risk of another condition. Building on the robust evidence base for effective treatments for a range of mental disorders, there is now a growing evidence base for how such treatments can be integrated into the care of people with noncommunicable diseases. The best-established delivery model is a team approach that features a nonspecialist case manager who coordinates care with primary care physicians and specialists. This approach maximizes efficiencies in person-centered care, which are essential for achieving universal health coverage for both noncommunicable diseases and mental disorders. A number of research gaps remain, but there is sufficient evidence for policy makers to immediately implement measures to integrate mental health and noncommunicable disease care in primary care platforms.

  1. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  2. CTEPP-OH DATA COLLECTED ON FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data set contains data for CTEPP-OH concerning the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center including the chemicals that have been applied in the past at the day care center by staff members or by commercial contractors. The day care teacher was asked questions...

  3. DISTRIBUTION OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASES AT TERTIARY CARE CENTER: SINGLE CENTER EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The current study was undertaken at a tertiary care center, Bhopal, MP, India, with the objective of establishing frequency of occurrence of congenital heart diseases by echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHOD 10,000 consecutive cases undergoing Echo Color Doppler in the Cardiology Department Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between 1st Jan 2009 and July 2011 were analysed. Echo CD was performed by consultant cardiologist using Acuson Aspen Color Doppler machine following the ASE guidelines. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In the present study out of 10,000consecutive cases undergoing echo 648 were identified to having congenital heart diseases. Isolated VSD (30.5%, isolated ASD (23.6% PDA (9% and TOF (8.3% were commonest defect observed. Most common congenital heart disease found in the present study is VSD and is most prevalent in males and is highest among 0-5 yrs.

  4. Diabetes in a primary care center among Spaniards and immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca Vilalta M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a disease with different prevalence in different populations. Objectives: The aim of the present study is to describe diabetic patients in a primary care center with regard to their geographic origin, and to determine the status of their disease. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study, with data available from clinical records in South Tarrasa primary care center (Barcelona, Spain in 2004. Results: A total of 1215 diabetic patients with an average age of 65 years, 51% female, were included in the study. Regarding their origin, 97% were from Spain, 2% from Morocco, 0.8% from Latin America, and 0.2% from the rest of Europe. The average Hb1AC was 6.9%. In type 2 diabetic patients, treatment consisted of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA for 46.6%, only dietetic restrictions for 36.5%, OHA + insulin for 7.9%, and only insulin for 9%. In the age group 30-39 years, 0.7% of Moroccans suffer from diabetes versus 0.5% of Spaniards. The values in the 40-49 year group are 3.9% of Moroccans, 3% of Spaniards, and 2.1% of Latin Americans. The values in the 50-59 year group are 13.5% of Moroccans, 10.6% of Spaniards, and 7.7% of Latin Americans. The values in the 60-69 year group are 40% of Moroccans, 18.8% of Spaniards, and 44.5% of Latin Americans. The values in the 70-79 year group are 67% of Moroccans, 26% of Spaniards, and 50% of Latin Americans. The average Hb1AC was 6.3% in Latin Americans, 6.9% in Spaniards, and 8.1% in Moroccans. In type 1 diabetic patients, the average Hb1AC was 10.2% in Moroccans and 8% in Spaniards; while in type 2 diabetes, the average Hb1AC was 7.8% in Moroccans and 6.9% in Spaniards. Gestational diabetes was observed in 6.1% of the Spanish, 10.9% of the Moroccan and 4.2% of the Latin American women. Conclusions: A higher prevalence of diabetes was detected in Moroccans than in patients from other countries. These patients present poor control of the disease.

  5. [Trials for early intervention in Mie Prefectural Mental Care Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masanori; Adachi, Takako; Iwasa, Takashi; Kurita, Kouji; Nakamura, Tomoki; Hama, Yukinobu; Yamamoto, Ayako; Maegawa, Sanae

    2013-01-01

    Mie Prefectural Mental Care Center is a public psychiatric hospital that has 400 beds and 250 outpatients a day. The main catchment area is Tsu City (population: 290,000). Our hospital started early intervention in Aug 2008, and opened the Youth Mental Support Center MIE (YMSC MIE) in Oct 2008. This article reports an early intervention trial in a regional area of Japan. The mission of YMSC MIE is the education, consultation, staff training, and intervention for mental health problems and early psychosis of youths. In Jul 2009, we set up the Youth Assist Clinic (YAC) to support youths with mental health problems and early psychoses. Our activities consist of school-based, community-based, and hospital-based approaches. Specific programs are as follows: 1) School-based approaches: Outreach consultation to school. Mental health lessens. Creating mental health textbooks. Education for parents and teachers. 2) Community-based approaches: To enlighten primary physicians and mental clinic psychiatrists about the importance of early psychosis. To survey their concerns regarding early psychosis. Promoting awareness of community staff and the general public. 3) Hospital-based approaches: YAC. Case manager system. Family meetings for the family including the young with mental disorders. Peer group. Looking back over our 3-year trials, especially in school and the community, we find several problems, as follows: 1) Lack of consultation skills of medical staff outside the hospital. 2) Limiting number of schools which have mental support system. 3) Support for school attendance and learning. 4) Lack of concern about early psychosis of primary physicians and mental clinic psychiatrists. 5) Staff training for early intervention. We are now getting close to improving these issues.

  6. For the Mouths of Babes: Nutrition Literacy Outreach to a Child Care Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ballance, Darra; Webb, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at crisis levels in the United States. Risk factors for obesity can begin as early as infancy. Approximately 12 million children up to five years of age spend about 22.5 hours per week in child care centers where they receive a significant portion of their daily nutrition. Child care center personnel may not know how to select nutritious meal and snack choices. A health sciences librarian, a child care center director and a dietitian designed an outreach...

  7. Quantitative comparisons of urgent care service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Gayle L; Prybutok, Victor R; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop, validate, and use a survey instrument to measure and compare the perceived quality of three types of US urgent care (UC) service providers: hospital emergency rooms, urgent care centres (UCC), and primary care physician offices. This study develops, validates, and uses a survey instrument to measure/compare differences in perceived service quality among three types of UC service providers. Six dimensions measured the components of service quality: tangibles, professionalism, interaction, accessibility, efficiency, and technical quality. Primary care physicians' offices scored higher for service quality and perceived value, followed by UCC. Hospital emergency rooms scored lower in both quality and perceived value. No significant difference was identified between UCC and primary care physicians across all the perspectives, except for interactions. The homogenous nature of the sample population (college students), and the fact that the respondents were recruited from a single university limits the generalizability of the findings. The patient's choice of a health care provider influences not only the continuity of the care that he or she receives, but compliance with a medical regime, and the evolution of the health care landscape. This work contributes to the understanding of how to provide cost effective and efficient UC services. This study developed and validated a survey instrument to measure/compare six dimensions of service quality for three types of UC service providers. The authors provide valuable data for UC service providers seeking to improve patient perceptions of service quality.

  8. Creating New Child Care Slots in Mini Child Care Centers: Big Bang for the Buck in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Small grants of $7,500 with technical assistance were offered to the child care community of New Jersey to either start or increase licensed capacity in mini-child care centers. Results of a subsequent analysis showed that 26 grantees created 481 new child care slots at an average cost of $561 per slot. (Author/SM)

  9. Child Day Care Centers, Day Care Centers, Published in 2007, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2007. It is described as...

  10. Child Day Care Centers, Day Care Center point layer, combined with pre-school points., Published in 2005, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Reno County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2005. It is...

  11. Child Day Care Centers, Day Care Centers in Thomas County, GA, Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Thomas County BOC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2010. It is described as 'Day...

  12. Pediatric Mortality in a Rural Tertiary Care Center in Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Carmelle; Walters, Camila B.; Sampson, John; Kateh, Francis; Chang, Mary P.

    2017-01-01

    Liberia is a low-income country in West Africa that has faced significant challenges, including a civil war and the recent Ebola epidemic. Little data exists on the more current post-war and pre-Ebola trends of child health in Liberia in the rural setting. This study is a retrospective chart review of pediatric mortality in 2013 at a rural tertiary care center in Liberia, 10 years post-war. From January 2013 to December 2013, there were 50 pediatric deaths, or 5.4% of the 920 total pediatric admissions. The most common cause of neonatal death was sepsis, and the most common cause of death under five years of age was malaria. The majority (82.0%) of the deaths were in children under five. Pediatric mortality at this hospital was similar to other reported mortality six years post-war, and lower than that reported immediately post-war. Neonatal sepsis and malaria are two significant causes of pediatric mortality in this community and, therefore, further efforts to decrease childhood mortality should focus on these causes. PMID:28146099

  13. Septic arthritis in adults in a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To describe the history, clinical features and microorganisms involved in a group of adult subjects with and without septic arthritis (SA) at a tertiary care in Mexico. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 96 adults with clinical suspicion of AS in one or more joints. In all cases synovial fluid arthrocentesis and culture was performed. The comparison group subjects were culture negative. A descriptive statistical analysis and binary logistic regression model was performed between the variables associated with the development of AS. A value of P≤.05 was significant. A total of 49 out of 96 subjects had a positive culture, mostly of the monoarticular type (96%; P=.02). The knee was the most common site (61%; P=.06) and pain was the main clinical manifestation (59%; P=.001). Staphylococcus was the most common etiological agent (65%; P<.001). The risk factors revealed in the final regression model were SA the history of joint disease (OR=25; P=.03) and volume increase (OR=13.16; P=.06). Functional limitation (OR=8.54; P=.04) showed a significant risk among borderline for SA. Our results are consistent with previous studies, and can be generalized to geographical areas with similar clinical features to those observed in this study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementing Patient Family-Centered Care Grand Rounds Using Patient/Family Advisor Narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Maureen B Fagan DNP, MHA, FNP-BC; Celene Wong MHA; Martha B Carnie AS; Stanley W Ashley MD; Jacqueline G Somerville RN, PhD

    2015-01-01

    With the emerging trend of patient family–centered care in health care, it is essential that physicians be exposed to patient and family perspectives of care during medical education and training. Grand Rounds provides an ideal format for physicians to learn about patient family–centered care. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, we sought to bring the voice of the patient to Patient Family–Centered Grand Rounds in order to expose clinicians to rich narratives describing the medical care received...

  15. Implementing Patient Family-Centered Care Grand Rounds Using Patient/Family Advisor Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen B Fagan DNP, MHA, FNP-BC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the emerging trend of patient family–centered care in health care, it is essential that physicians be exposed to patient and family perspectives of care during medical education and training. Grand Rounds provides an ideal format for physicians to learn about patient family–centered care. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, we sought to bring the voice of the patient to Patient Family–Centered Grand Rounds in order to expose clinicians to rich narratives describing the medical care received by patients/families and to ultimately change physician practice to reflect patient family–centered principles. We conducted a clinician survey and found promising results indicating that patient/family narratives can be effective at educating physicians about patient family–centered care.

  16. Glycemic control, compliance, and satisfaction for diabetic gravidas in centering group care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Jelin, Angie C; Iqbal, Sara N; Belna, Sarah L; Fries, Melissa H; Patel, Misbah; Desale, Sameer; Ramsey, Patrick S

    2017-05-01

    To determine if diabetic gravidas enrolled in Centering® group care have improved glycemic control compared to those attending standard prenatal care. To compare compliance and patient satisfaction between the groups. We conducted a prospective cohort study of diabetics enrolled in centering group care from October 2013 to December 2015. Glycemic control, compliance and patient satisfaction (five-point Likert scale) were evaluated. Student's t-test, Chi-Square and mixed effects model were used to compare outcomes. We compared 20 patients in centering to 28 standard prenatal care controls. Mean fasting blood sugar was lower with centering group care (91.0 versus 105.5 mg/dL, p =0.017). There was no difference in change in fasting blood sugar over time between the two groups (p = 0.458). The percentage of time patients brought their blood glucose logs did not differ between the centering group and standard prenatal care (70.7 versus 73.9%, p = 0.973). Women in centering group care had better patient satisfaction scores for "ability to be seen by a physician" (5 versus 4, p = 0.041) and "time in waiting room" (5 versus 4, p =0.001). Fasting blood sugar was lower for patients in centering group care. Change in blood sugar over time did not differ between groups. Diabetic gravidas enrolled in centering group care report improved patient satisfaction.

  17. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations – from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. Methods We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Results Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Conclusions Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets

  18. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Peter; Conrad, Douglas A; Hernandez, Susan E; Watts, Carolyn; Marcus-Smith, Miriam

    2012-12-14

    Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations - from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets and addressing conditions for innovation.

  19. Patient- and family-centered care coordination: a framework for integrating care for children and youth across multiple systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Understanding a care coordination framework, its functions, and its effects on children and families is critical for patients and families themselves, as well as for pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists/surgical specialists, and anyone providing services to children and families. Care coordination is an essential element of a transformed American health care delivery system that emphasizes optimal quality and cost outcomes, addresses family-centered care, and calls for partnership across various settings and communities. High-quality, cost-effective health care requires that the delivery system include elements for the provision of services supporting the coordination of care across settings and professionals. This requirement of supporting coordination of care is generally true for health systems providing care for all children and youth but especially for those with special health care needs. At the foundation of an efficient and effective system of care delivery is the patient-/family-centered medical home. From its inception, the medical home has had care coordination as a core element. In general, optimal outcomes for children and youth, especially those with special health care needs, require interfacing among multiple care systems and individuals, including the following: medical, social, and behavioral professionals; the educational system; payers; medical equipment providers; home care agencies; advocacy groups; needed supportive therapies/services; and families. Coordination of care across settings permits an integration of services that is centered on the comprehensive needs of the patient and family, leading to decreased health care costs, reduction in fragmented care, and improvement in the patient/family experience of care. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Biological air contamination in elderly care centers: geria project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Lívia; Mendes, Ana; Pereira, Cristiana; Neves, Paula; Mendes, Diana; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) affects health particularly in susceptible individuals such as the elderly. It has been estimated that the older population spends approximately 19-20 h/d indoors, and the majority of the elderly spend all of their time indoors in elderly care centers (ECC). Older individuals may be particularly at risk of exposure to detrimental effects from pollutants, even at low concentrations, due to common and multiple underlying chronic diseases that increase susceptibility. This study, aimed to assess the impact of indoor biological agents in 22 ECC located in Porto, was conducted during summer and winter from November 2011 to August 2013 at a total of 141 areas within dining rooms, drawing rooms, medical offices, and bedrooms (including the bedridden). Air sampling was carried out with a microbiological air sampler (Merck MAS-100) and using tryptic soy agar for bacteria and malt extract agar for fungi. The results obtained were compared with the recently revised Portuguese standards. In winter, mean fungi concentration exceeded reference values, while bacteria concentrations were within the new standards in both seasons. The main fungi species found indoors were Cladosporium (73%) in summer and Penicillium (67%) in winter. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus flavus, known potential pathogenic/toxigenic species, were also identified. Although the overall rate and mean values of bacteria and fungi found in ECC indoor air met Portuguese legislation, some concern is raised by the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Simple measures, like opening windows and doors to promote air exchange and renewal, may improve effectiveness in enhancing IAQ.

  1. Improving the transition of care in patients transferred through the ochsner medical center transfer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedee, Ronald G; Maronge, Genevieve F; Pinsky, William W

    2012-01-01

    Patient transfers from other hospitals within the Ochsner Health System to the main campus are coordinated through a Transfer Center that was established in fall 2008. We analyzed the transfer process to assess distinct opportunities to enhance the overall transition of patient care. We surveyed internal medicine residents and nocturnists to determine their satisfaction with transfers in terms of safety, efficiency, and usefulness of information provided at the time of transfer. After a kaizen event at which complementary goals for the institution and members of the study team were recognized and implemented, we resurveyed the group to evaluate improvement in the transfer process. The preintervention average satisfaction score was 1.18 (SD=0.46), while the postintervention score was 3.7 (SD=1.01). A t test showed a significant difference in the average scores between the preintervention and postintervention surveys (Pkaizen event), data were collected that facilitated fewer and higher quality handoffs that were performed in less time. In addition, the process resulted in increased awareness of the value of resident participation in institutional quality improvement projects.

  2. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  3. Lead, Allergen, and Pesticide Levels in Licensed Child Care Centers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers was conducted to provide information about lead, allergens, and pesticide levels in licensed U.S. child care centers. Lead levels were measured in settled dust, paint, and play area soil; indoor allergen levels ...

  4. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  5. Developmental stimulation in child care centers contributes to young infants’ cognitive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, E.M.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Weerth, C. de

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the quality of caregiver behavior in child care centers contributes to infant cognitive development at 9 months of age. Sixty-four infants (34 boys) were observed with their primary caregivers in child care centers at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Caregiver behavior was rate

  6. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation November 17 and 18... third and final Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care...

  7. Differences Between Highly Satisfied and Not Highly Satisfied Clients of Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Ellen; Fredlund, Janet

    This study analyzes the differences between those customers in two types of day care centers who are highly satisfied and who are not. Half were supported by client fees, and half used other sources of funding, e.g. tax support, and private philanthropic support. Parents and teachers of 100 children in day care centers in four different…

  8. Developmental stimulation in child care centers contributes to young infants’ cognitive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, E.M.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Weerth, C. de

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the quality of caregiver behavior in child care centers contributes to infant cognitive development at 9 months of age. Sixty-four infants (34 boys) were observed with their primary caregivers in child care centers at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Caregiver behavior was

  9. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  10. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  11. Using Qualitative Research to Inform Development of Professional Guidelines: A Case Study of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Family-Centered Care Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen A; Davidson, Judy E; Nunnally, Mark E; Wickline, Mary A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-08-01

    To explore the importance, challenges, and opportunities using qualitative research to enhance development of clinical practice guidelines, using recent guidelines for family-centered care in the ICU as an example. In developing the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for family-centered care in the neonatal ICU, PICU, and adult ICU, we developed an innovative adaptation of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations approach to explicitly incorporate qualitative research. Using Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies principles, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to establish family-centered domains and outcomes. Thematic analyses were undertaken on study findings and used to support Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome question development. We identified and employed three approaches using qualitative research in these guidelines. First, previously published qualitative research was used to identify important domains for the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome questions. Second, this qualitative research was used to identify and prioritize key outcomes to be evaluated. Finally, we used qualitative methods, member checking with patients and families, to validate the process and outcome of the guideline development. In this, a novel report, we provide direction for standardizing the use of qualitative evidence in future guidelines. Recommendations are made to incorporate qualitative literature review and appraisal, include qualitative methodologists in guideline taskforce teams, and develop training for evaluation of qualitative research into guideline development procedures. Effective methods of involving patients and families as members of guideline development represent opportunities for future work.

  12. Optimizing Patient-centered Communication and Multidisciplinary Care Coordination in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Amber K; Merck, Lisa H; Froemming, Adam T; Vaughan, William; Brown, Michael D; Hess, Erik P; Applegate, Kimberly E; Comfere, Nneka I

    2015-12-01

    Patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging relies on efficient communication and multispecialty care coordination to ensure optimal imaging utilization. The construct of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination cycle with three main phases (pretest, test, and posttest) provides a useful framework to evaluate care coordination in patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. This article summarizes findings reached during the patient-centered outcomes session of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The primary objective was to develop a research agenda focused on 1) defining component parts of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination process, 2) identifying gaps in communication that affect emergency diagnostic imaging, and 3) defining optimal methods of communication and multidisciplinary care coordination that ensure patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. Prioritized research questions provided the framework to define a research agenda for multidisciplinary care coordination in emergency diagnostic imaging.

  13. Shared caregiving: comparisons between home and child-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, L; Rickert, H; Lamb, M E

    2000-05-01

    The experiences of 84 German toddlers (12-24 months old) who were either enrolled or not enrolled in child care were described with observational checklists from the time they woke up until they went to bed. The total amount of care experienced over the course of a weekday by 35 pairs of toddlers (1 member of each pair in child care, 1 member not) did not differ according to whether the toddlers spent time in child care. Although the child-care toddlers received lower levels of care from care providers in the centers, their mothers engaged them in more social interactions during nonworking hours than did the mothers of home-only toddlers, which suggests that families using child care provided different patterns of care than families not using child care. Child-care toddlers experienced high levels of emotional support at home, although they experienced less prompt responses to their distress signals. Mothers' ages were unrelated to the amounts of time toddlers spent with them, but older mothers initiated more proximity.

  14. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This ch...

  15. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  16. Quality of antenatal care in primary health care centers of bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M S A Mansur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To find out the quality of ANC in the Upazila Health Complexes (PHC centres of Bangladesh.This cross sectional study was done in purposively selected three upazilas among the clients receiving antenatal care (ANC. Data were collected with questionnaire cum checklist in the context of two aspects of quality issues, namely assessment of physical arrangements for ANC (input and services rendered by the providers (process.The mean age of respondents was 24.6±4.5 years. Majority of the respondents were with primary level education (60.3%. About half (52.8% of the families had monthly income ranging from 3000-5000 taka (38-64 US$. Nearly half (48.9% had no child, little more than one third (42.3% were primigravida and 528 (57.7% were multigravida. Out of 528 multigravid respondents 360 (68.2% took ANC in their previous pregnancy whereas 168 (31.8% did not take ANC Pregnancy outcome was found to be associated with receiving ANC (χ(2=73.599; p=0.000. Respondents receiving ANC had more good pregnancy outcome. The mean waiting time for receiving ANC was 0.77±.49 hours. Out of the 13 centers, only 3 (23.1% have sufficient instruments to render ANC services. Findings showed that where the modes of ANC service delivery in the ANC centers are fairly satisfactory. Though some of the points of standard operation procedures (SOPs on ANC are not covered by some ANC centers, those were not considered necessary. But, regarding the physical facilities available for rendering ANC services, it is seen that facilities are not quite satisfactory. Number of doctors and nurses are not very satisfactory. One of the centers under this study has no doctor, where ANC services are given by nurses.It can be concluded that the ANC services at the primary health care level is not adequate in Bangladesh. To ensure further improvement of the quality of ANC services, instruments used in logistics and supplies should be enhanced.

  17. What is Patient-Centered Care? A Typology of Models and Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Sandra J

    2015-09-01

    Recently adopted health care practices and policies describe themselves as "patient-centered care." The meaning of the term, however, remains contested and obscure. This paper offers a typology of "patient-centered care" models that aims to contribute to greater clarity about, continuing discussion of, and further advances in patient-centered care. The paper imposes an original analytic framework on extensive material covering mostly US health care and health policy topics over several decades. It finds that four models of patient-centered care emphasize: patients versus their parts; patients versus providers; patients/providers/states versus "the system"; and patients and providers as persons. Each type is distinguishable along three dimensions: epistemological orientations, practical accommodations, and policy tools. Based on this analysis, the paper recommends that four questions be asked of any proposal that claims to provide patient-centered care: Is this care a means to an end or an end in itself? Are patients here subjects or objects? Are patients here individuals or aggregates? How do we know what patients want and need? The typology reveals that models are neither entirely compatible nor entirely incompatible and may be usefully combined in certain practices and policies. In other instances, internal contradictions may jeopardize the realization of coherent patient-centered care.

  18. CTEPP DATA COLLECTION FORM 05: CHILD DAY CARE CENTER PRE-MONITORING QUESTIONNAIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data collection form is used to identify the potential sources of pollutants at the day care center. The day care teacher is asked questions related to the age of their day care building; age and frequency of cleaning carpets or rugs; types of heating and air conditioning de...

  19. Who Are the Clients?: Goal Displacement in an Adult Care Center for Elders with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Corey M.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study of "goal displacement" in an adult day care center explains how and why certain goals come to surpass others in the organizational practices of elder day care settings. Adult day care is often oriented towards providing family caregivers with respite rather than attempting to directly improve the lives of the elders…

  20. Commitment, Community, and Passion: Dimensions of a Care-Centered Approach to Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Lisa S.

    2002-01-01

    Builds on Nel Noddings' work on caring encounters to develop a care-centered approach to teacher education. This model emphasizes the important contributions to the process of preparing caring teachers made by enhanced interpersonal commitment, membership in a community of learners, and passion for the creative, intellectual aspects of teaching.…

  1. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Water Policies in Child Care Centers in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Ann E.; Henderson, Kathryn E.; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Child care policies may contribute to healthy beverage consumption patterns. This study documented availability and accessibility of water and correspondence with state and federal policy and accreditation standards in child care centers. Design: One-day observations were conducted in a random sample of 40 Child and Adult Care Food…

  2. Prehospital management of gunshot patients at major trauma care centers: exploring the gaps in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  3. Student-Centered Deliberations of Ethical Care & Use of Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecore, John; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa; Frantz, Kyle

    2007-01-01

    Most biology teachers implement animal dissection (real or virtual) and often lead discussions on research involving animal subjects. Such activities provide excellent opportunities to explore ideas about ethical conduct in the care and use of animals. The challenge for teachers is to present information about animal care and use that enables…

  4. Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT)

    OpenAIRE

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2012-01-01

    Background: Person-centered care is a multidimensional concept describing good care, especially within aged care and care for people with dementia. Research studies evaluating person-centered care interventions seldom use direct measurement of levels of person-centeredness. Existing scales that measure person-centeredness need further testing. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Methods: A cross-sectional...

  5. Extending residential care through telephone counseling: Initial results from the Betty Ford Center Focused Continuing Care protocol

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a chronic care model may be effective when treating substance use disorders. In 1996, the Betty Ford Center (BFC) began implementing a telephone-based continuing care intervention now called Focused Continuing Care (FCC) to assist and support patients in their transition from residential treatment to longer-term recovery in the “real world”. This article reports on patient utilization and outcomes of FCC. FCC staff placed clinically directed telephone calls t...

  6. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  7. Social influence in child care centers: a test of the theory of normative social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Anderson, Jenn; Shugart, Alicia; Todd, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Child care centers are a unique context for studying communication about the social and personal expectations about health behaviors. The theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real, 2005 ) provides a framework for testing the role of social and psychological influences on handwashing behaviors among child care workers. A cross-sectional survey of child care workers in 21 centers indicates that outcome expectations and group identity increase the strength of the relationship between descriptive norms and handwashing behavior. Injunctive norms also moderate the effect of descriptive norms on handwashing behavior such that when strong injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are positively related to handwashing, but when weak injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are negatively related to handwashing. The findings suggest that communication interventions in child care centers can focus on strengthening injunctive norms in order to increase handwashing behaviors in child care centers. The findings also suggest that the theory of normative social behavior can be useful in organizational contexts.

  8. [Intersubjectivity in Mental Health care: narratives of nursing technicians at a Psychosocial Care Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Rosana Onocko; Baccari, Ivana Preto

    2011-04-01

    Psychosocial Care Centers (Caps) were established as a result of the demand for Mental Health care and were an attempt to update psychiatric treatment for those afflicted with severe mental disorders. This article seeks to analyze subjective repercussions of work conducted in Caps on mid-level professionals and to contribute to healthcare planning. Two focal groups were conducted with workers of a Caps III. The methodology applied to the analysis was based on the critical hermeneutical approach proposed by Ricoeur and espoused by Gadamerian philosophy. Lack of appreciation in the workplace was revealed as being the main cause of suffering. Several themes stood out including the difficulty of obtaining the cooperation of users'; relatives, the tenuous interconnection between Caps and the health network, the attribution of responsibility for the night shift, controversies regarding overnight-stay patients and an excessive workload. Adequate structural planning and institutional organization is proposed when opening new Caps in order to reduce the workload of technicians and improve the clinical performance of the team.

  9. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  10. Establishing a national research center on day care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Tomas

    The paper presents and discusses the current formation of a national research center on ECEC. The center is currently being established. It is partly funded by the Danish union of early childhood and youth educators. It is based on cooperation between a number of Danish universities and this nati...... current new public management policies. However there is also more conflicting issues that emerge in this enterprise – especially on interests, practice relevance and knowledge paradigms....

  11. Expanding The Rubric of "Patient-Centered Care" (PCC) to "Patient and Professional Centered Care" (PPCC) to Enhance Provider Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Stephen G; Roess, Michael

    2017-04-29

    Burnout among physicians, nurses, and students is a serious problem in U.S. healthcare that reflects inattentive management practices, outmoded images of the "good" provider as selflessly ignoring the care of the self, and an overarching rubric of Patient Centered Care (PCC) that leaves professional self-care out of the equation. We ask herein if expanding PCC to Patient and Professional Centered Care (PPCC) would be a useful idea to make provider self-care an explicit part of mission statements, a major part of management strategies and institutional goal setting, and of educational programs. We offer several practical suggestions for PPCC implementation, including structuring healthcare systems so as to nurture professional meaning, integrity, and inter-personal reflective emotional processing as a buffer against burnout and as a key to better patient care. It should not bring into question the primacy of practitioner commitment to the good of patients, nor should it be taken to suggest in any way a shift in focus away from patients' values and respect for patient autonomy. PPCC asserts that the respect for patient's values and autonomous choices properly remains the ethical benchmark of modern healthcare systems, along with altruistic professional commitment to the optimal care of patients. However, it enunciates an explicit commitment to structuring systems that allow for and actively encourage the professional well-being and wellness upon which good patient care depends.

  12. Cancer Care Initiative: Creation of a Comprehensive Cancer Center at Naval Medical Center Dan Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-24

    clinic had Cancer Care Initiative 6 a dedicated satellite pharmacy staffed by a part-time pharmacist who prepared chemotherapy solutions...patient education information; 80% want clinical research trials; and 79% want end-of-life palliative care to be included as part of a CCC. Physicians...prevention, early detection, staging evaluation, initial and subsequent treatment, long-term follow-up, palliative and hospice care , and supportive

  13. A Patient-Centered Understanding of the Referral System in Ethiopian Primary Health Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Abrahim

    Full Text Available Primary healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa have undergone substantial development in an effort to expand access to appropriate facilities through a well-functioning referral system. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current patterns of seeking prior care before arriving at a health center or a hospital as a key aspect of the referral system of the primary health care unit (PHCU in three regions in Ethiopia. We examined what percentage of patients had either sought prior care or had been referred to the present facility and identified demographic and clinical factors associated with having sought prior care or having been referred.We conducted a cross-sectional study using face-to-face interviews in the local language with 796 people (99% response rate seeking outpatient care in three primary health care units serving approximately 100,000 people each and reflecting regional and ethnic diversity; 53% (N = 418 of the sample was seeking care at hospital outpatient departments, and 47% of the sample was seeking care at health centers (N = 378. We used unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression to identify factors associated with having been referred or sought prior care. Our findings indicated that only 10% of all patients interviewed had been referred to their current place of care. Among those in the hospital population, 14% had been referred; among those in the health center population, only 6% had been referred. Of those who had been referred to the hospital, most (74% had been referred by a health center. Among those who were referred to the health center, the plurality portion (32% came from a nearby hospital (most commonly for continued HIV treatment or early childhood vaccinations; only 18% had come from a health post. Among patients who had not been formally referred, an additional 25% in the hospital sample and 10% in the health center sample had accessed some prior source of care for their present health concern. In

  14. Developmental stimulation in child care centers contributes to young infants' cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Esther M; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; de Weerth, Carolina

    2010-12-01

    This study examined whether the quality of caregiver behavior in child care centers contributes to infant cognitive development at 9 months of age. Sixty-four infants (34 boys) were observed with their primary caregivers in child care centers at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Caregiver behavior was rated for sensitivity and for stimulation of infant development during one-to-one caregiving interactions. Infant cognitive development was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (Mental Development Index). Higher levels of developmental stimulation in the centers predicted higher levels of infant cognitive development at 9 months, beyond infant cognitive development at 3 months (just before entering child care), parental education, and maternal sensitivity. The results suggest that even small increases in developmental stimulation provided in child care centers in the first year of life may foster infants' cognitive development.

  15. For the Mouths of Babes: Nutrition Literacy Outreach to a Child Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, Darra; Webb, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is at crisis levels in the United States. Risk factors for obesity can begin as early as infancy. Approximately 12 million children up to five years of age spend about 22.5 hours per week in child care centers where they receive a significant portion of their daily nutrition. Child care center personnel may not know how to select nutritious meal and snack choices. A health sciences librarian, a child care center director and a dietitian designed an outreach program on nutrition that helped child care center teachers gain increased nutrition literacy. The teachers indicated that they gained increased personal understanding of formerly confusing nutrition issues (e.g., how to read a nutrition label and what defines a whole grain). Teachers were also able to identify aspects of web sites linked from MedlinePlus that indicated the sites served as reliable sources of health information.

  16. The Oral Health Care Manager in a Patient-Centered Health Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, Cheryl Westphal; Strauss, Shiela M; Northridge, Mary Evelyn; Birenz, Shirley

    2016-06-01

    The dental hygienist team member has an opportunity to coordinate care within an interprofessional practice as an oral health care manager. Although dental hygienists are currently practicing within interprofessional teams in settings such as pediatric offices, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and federally qualified health centers, they often still assume traditional responsibilities rather than practicing to the full extent of their training and licenses. This article explains the opportunity for the dental hygiene professional to embrace patient-centered care as an oral health care manager who can facilitate integration of oral and primary care in a variety of health care settings. Based on an innovative model of collaboration between a college of dentistry and a college of nursing, an idea emerged among several faculty members for a new management method for realizing continuity and coordination of comprehensive patient care. Involved faculty members began working on the development of an approach to interprofessional practice with the dental hygienist serving as an oral health care manager who would address both oral health care and a patient's related primary care issues through appropriate referrals and follow-up. This approach is explained in this article, along with the results of several pilot studies that begin to evaluate the feasibility of a dental hygienist as an oral health care manager. A health care provider with management skills and leadership qualities is required to coordinate the interprofessional provision of comprehensive health care. The dental hygienist has the opportunity to lead closer integration of oral and primary care as an oral health care manager, by coordinating the team of providers needed to implement comprehensive, patient-centered care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of quality of care using Phaneuf's Nursing Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A; Baker, H

    1992-01-01

    The quality of nursing care delivered to two groups of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus was examined. Using Phaneuf's Nursing Audit, a retrospective audit of the nursing documentation regarding the care of all patients was carried out, and a comparison made of the numeric scores obtained. The nursing care of the group of patients from the Professional Nursing Unit (PNU) obtained mean scores which were 26.4% higher than those obtained by the group from the general hospital wards. There are major variations in scores in specific areas. These give rise to some questions regarding the value to nurses of the caring and nurturing component of nursing work, and how this is affected by differing philosophies and environments.

  18. Use of narrative as an awareness strategy for a Family-Centered Care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Doulavince Amador

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to comprehend the meaning of using illness narratives to raise awareness among nursing students and healthcare professionals toward the family-centred care model. The adopted methodological framework was Qualitative Content Analysis based on the philosophy of Family-Centered Care. Data were collected by means of assessments provided by 29 participants at an event in 2013, in São Paulo. The resulting analytical category was "transformed by the family narrative", which consisted of three sub-categories: Favours a better understanding of the family's experience; facilitates learning of family issues; and triggers thought on family-centered care. Results showed that hearing the family narrative on experiences with illness and hospitalization raises awareness among nursing students and healthcare professionals toward the family-centered care model, and facilitates learning of this model of care.

  19. The Hospice Concept of Care: A Family Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Marilyn

    This description of the Cedar Valley Hospice program emphasizes palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families. The history of the hospice movement is outlined along with a description of the Cedar Valley program and the results of a 1980 program evaluation. The appendices contain a statement of the hospice goals and…

  20. Supporting Children's Participation in Finnish Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venninen, Tuulikki; Leinonen, Jonna; Lipponen, Lasse; Ojala, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Children's participation in the early childhood education context is a multidimensional issue and educators have a significant role in enhancing participation. In this paper, we focus on the existing challenges to children's participation and the ways that child care educators can work as teams to meet those challenges. The data were collected…

  1. Directory of Child Day Care Centers. Volume 2: North Central.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986

    Part of a four-volume reference series on licensed child day care facilities across the United States, this volume targets nearly 13,000 facilities in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Arranged alphabetically by state and city, entries include…

  2. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland ba

  3. Emergency care center turnaround time--an improvement story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelrud, Joan; Burroughs, Helen; Koterwas, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is a nationally recognized barrier to patient safety. Other obstacles to efficiency and adequate care in emergency rooms include lengthy patient waits and side-tracked ambulances. This article explores one community hospital's approach to significantly decreasing emergency visit turnaround times while increasing patient satisfaction.

  4. Association of medical home team-based care functions and perceived improvements in patient-centered care at VHA primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christian D; Dolan, Emily D; Fihn, Stephan D; Rodriguez, Hector P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Lempa, Michele; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Joos, Sandra; Lawler, Lauren H; Harvey, Henry B; Stark, Richard; Schectman, Gordon; Nelson, Karin M

    2014-12-01

    Team-based care is central to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), but most PCMH evaluations measure team structure exclusively. We assessed team-based care in terms of team structure, process and effectiveness, and the association with improvements in teams׳ abilities to deliver patient-centered care. We fielded a cross-sectional survey among 913 VA primary care clinics implementing a PCMH model in 2012. The dependent variable was clinic-level respondent-reported improvements in delivery of patient-centered care. Independent variables included three sets of measures: (1) team structure, (2) team process, and (3) team effectiveness. We adjusted for clinic workload and patient comorbidity. 4819 surveys were returned (25% estimated response rate). The highest ratings were for team structure (median of 89% of respondents being assigned to a teamlet, i.e., a PCP working with the same clinical associate, nurse care manager and clerk) and lowest for team process (median of 10% of respondents reporting the lowest level of stress/chaos). In multivariable regression, perceived improvements in patient-centered care were most strongly associated with participatory decision making (β=32, Peffectiveness measures, often omitted from PCMH evaluations, had stronger associations with perceived improvements in patient-centered care than team structure measures. Team process and effectiveness measures may facilitate synthesis of evaluation findings and help identify positive outlier clinics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. [Policies and standards applied to municipal day care centers in Rio de Janeiro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Rafaela Moledo; Tancredi, Rinaldini Coralini Philippo; Marin, Victor Augustus

    2013-11-01

    Day care centers were first established in Brazil with the aim of reducing infant mortality rates, however the incidence of foodborne disease transmission has been on the increase. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that each year 1.8 million deaths worldwide occur in children under 5 years of age, which is attributed to the consumption of contaminated food. However, Brazilian legislation does not provide specific rules of operation for day care center kitchens. Thus, the scope of this study is to research the standards relating to the operation of day care centers, discussing the health regulations related to food production. By means of a review of electronic pages of various government organs, the regulations inherent to the operation and production of food in day care centers were examined. After scrutiny of the twenty-seven pieces of legislation found, there is a concern with water quality, supply of food, the control of pests and vectors, structural conditions and food policies. In spite of this, it was seen that not all the surveillance policies for the quality of food offered in day care centers are effective. Also observed was the lack of a specific regulation that establishes the quality criteria for safe handling of food in day care centers.

  6. Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumie, Christianne L; Greevy, Robert; Wallston, Kenneth A; Elasy, Tom A; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Kotter, Kristen; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341 veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered primary care. We prospectively collected each patient's antihypertensive medication adherence for 6 months. Patients were characterized as adherent if they had medication for >80%. 654 surveys were returned (50.7%); and 499 patients with complete data were analyzed. Antihypertensive adherence increased as scores in patient centered care increased [RR 3.18 (95% CI 1.44, 16.23) bootstrap 5000 resamples] for PCAS score of 4.5 (highest quartile) versus 1.5 (lowest quartile). Future research is needed to determine if improving patient centered care, particularly communication skills, could lead to improvements in health related behaviors such as medication adherence and health outcomes.

  7. Envisioning Women-Centered HIV Care: Perspectives from Women Living with HIV in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Nadia; Greene, Saara; Carter, Allison; Lewis, Johanna; Nicholson, Valerie; Kwaramba, Gladys; Ménard, Brigitte; Kaufman, Elaina; Ennabil, Nourane; Andersson, Neil; Loutfy, Mona; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Kaida, Angela

    2017-09-05

    Women comprise nearly one-quarter of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Canada. Compared with men, women living with HIV experience inequities in HIV care and health outcomes, prompting a need for gendered and tailored approaches to HIV care. Peer and academic researchers from the Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study conducted focus groups to understand women's experience of seeking care, with the purpose of identifying key characteristics that define a women-centered approach to HIV care. Eleven focus groups were conducted with 77 women living with HIV across Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, Canada. Women envisioned three central characteristics of women-centered HIV care, including i) coordinated and integrated services that address both HIV and women's health care priorities, and protect against exclusion from care due to HIV-related stigma, ii) care that recognizes and responds to structural barriers that limit women's access to care, such as violence, poverty, motherhood, HIV-related stigma, and challenges to safe disclosure, and iii) care that fosters peer support and peer leadership in its design and delivery to honor the diversity of women's experiences, overcome women's isolation, and prioritize women's ownership over the decisions that affect their lives. Despite advances in HIV treatment and care, the current care landscape is inadequate to meet women's comprehensive care needs. A women-centered approach to HIV care, as envisioned by women living with HIV, is central to guiding policy and practice to improve care and outcomes for women living with HIV in Canada. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided.

  9. Eleven Years of Primary Health Care Delivery in an Academic Nursing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Baisch, Mary Jo; Lundeen, Sally P.; Bell-Calvin, Jean; Kelber, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Client visits to an academic community nursing center (n=25,495) were coded and analyzed. Results show expansion of nursing practice and services, strong case management, and management of illness care. The usefulness of computerized clinical documentation system and of the Lundeen conceptional model of community nursing care was demonstrated.…

  10. Factors Related to Depression among Higher Income Mothers with Young Children in Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jay

    1994-01-01

    Examined the association between maternal depression, maternal separation anxiety, social support, and maternal involvement in the day-care center among 54 upper-income mothers and their infants. Found that higher levels of maternal involvement in day care were associated with lower levels of maternal depression. (MDM)

  11. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... beneficiaries. Menus and any other nutritional records required by the State agency shall be maintained to... day care centers shall have Federal, State or local licensing or approval to provide day care services... participate in the Program during the renewal process, unless the State agency has information which...

  12. 7 CFR 226.19 - Outside-school-hours care center provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 226.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational... precondition for any outside-school-hours care center's eligibility for CACFP nutrition benefits. In...

  13. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  14. Partnership and empowerment program: a model for patient-centered, comprehensive, and cost-effective care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corinne; Bornstein, Elizabeth; Wilcox, Catina

    2012-02-01

    The Partnership and Empowerment Program model offers a comprehensive, patient-centered, and cost-effective template for coordinating care for underinsured and uninsured patients with cancer. Attention to effective coordination, including use of internal and external resources, may result in decreased costs of care and improved patient compliance and health outcomes.

  15. Comparing the implementation of team approaches for improving diabetes care in community health centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, P.J. van der; Friedberg, M.W.; Guzman, E.; Ayanian, J.Z.; Rodriguez, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundPatient panel management and community-based care management may be viable strategies for community health centers to improve the quality of diabetes care for vulnerable patient populations. The objective of our study was to clarify implementation processes and experiences of integrating o

  16. Profit centers in clinical care departments: an idea whose time has gone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David W

    2008-03-01

    If a hospital is to use profit centers successfully, it should resolve several philosophical, organizational, and accounting matters, including: How much decisionmaking latitude clinical care chiefs should have. Whether to take a cross-subsidization approach. What role clinical care departments should take in a service line strategy.

  17. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  18. Reality TV positions heart center as cardiac care leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Saint Thomas Heart Institute, Nashville, Tenn., has a long history of successful cardiac care. More than 200,000 patients have been treated at Saint Thomas. Earlier this year the hospital launched a new branding campaign that features former patients who have bonded with the institution. These former patients were provided MiniDV video cameras to record their stories. The campaign has attracted considerable attention, including newspaper and TV news coverage.

  19. Product and service design for patient centered diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitri Varadarajan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Design plays a marginal part in the discourse of diabetes care, mainly in visualizing the form and packaging of medical technologies. The authors however have a practice that advocates that design orientated solutions can add much needed dimensions to problems that havetraditionally been the exclusive preserve of expert discourses. This position has for long been a validated and largely accepted approach in design’s engagement withissues in sustainability and development studies. A similar approach in the area of medicine has been constructed bythe authors and marks out a position of advocacy where the designer takes on agency to intervene on behalf of the user community. This position contains a healthy critique of thetraditional approach of product design for manufacture while simultaneously amplifying a desire to intervene and make a substantial improvement in the quality of life ofpeople with diabetes. This article first opens out contemporary diabetes care as a contested domain and then goes on to sketch out the key aspects of a design practice focussed upon delivering positive health outcomes in diabetes care. The specific context of discussion for this article is the practice of teaching in design studios wherestudents of design listen to the voices of people with diabetes and visualize ways for design to provide products and service solutions that transform the lived experiences of people with diabetes.

  20. Evaluation of Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Child Care Centers within Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jaime S; Contreras, Dawn; Gold, Abby; Keim, Ann; Oscarson, Renee; Peters, Paula; Procter, Sandra; Remig, Valentina; Smathers, Carol; Mobley, Amy R

    2015-10-01

    Although some researchers have examined nutrition and physical activity policies within urban child care centers, little is known about the potentially unique needs of rural communities. Child care centers serving preschool children located within low-income rural communities (n = 29) from seven states (Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) were assessed to determine current nutrition and physical activity (PA) practices and policies. As part of a large-scale childhood obesity prevention project, the Community Healthy Living Index's previously validated Early Childhood Program Assessment Tool was used to collect data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted to identify high-priority areas. Healthy People 2020 and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' recommendations for nutrition and PA policies in child care centers were used as benchmarks. Reports of not fully implementing (nutrition-related policies or practices within rural early child care centers were identified. Centers not consistently serving a variety of fruits (48%), vegetables (45%), whole grains (41%), limiting saturated fat intake (31%), implementing healthy celebration guidelines (41%), involving children in mealtime (62%), and referring families to nutrition assistance programs (24%) were identified. More than one third of centers also had limited structured PA opportunities. Although eligible, only 48% of the centers participated in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Overall, centers lacked parental outreach, staff training, and funding/resources to support nutrition and PA. These results provide insight into where child care centers within low-income, rural communities may need assistance to help prevent childhood obesity.

  1. Comparing the implementation of team approaches for improving diabetes care in community health centers

    OpenAIRE

    Wees, P.J. van der; Friedberg, M.W.; Guzman, E.; Ayanian, J.Z.; Rodriguez, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient panel management and community-based care management may be viable strategies for community health centers to improve the quality of diabetes care for vulnerable patient populations. The objective of our study was to clarify implementation processes and experiences of integrating office-based medical assistant (MA) panel management and community health worker (CHW) community-based management into routine care for diabetic patients. Methods Mixed m...

  2. [Certified prostate cancer centers and second opinion centers for testicular cancer: successful models of uro-oncology cancer care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, J E; Albers, P; Schrader, M

    2011-08-01

    Establishment of organ site-specific cancer centers by the German Cancer Society (GCS) is part of the basic politically driven reform of oncology care in Germany. Since 2007 an increasing number of prostate cancer centers have been guided toward certification by the OnkoZert GmbH of the GCS. Currently 68 centers are certified and together with ongoing certification proceedings will amount to 81 prostate cancer centers, which cover about one fourth of cases of primary prostate cancer. Urology is of particular importance in the management of these centers. For the most part, urologists belonging to a clinical unit are the initiators of the certification process, thus ensuring that uro-oncology is firmly entrenched in the specialty with involvement of outpatient service providers. Fears that authority will be lost are unfounded as long as responsibility for this task is taken seriously and active use is made of the possibilities for creativity. A similarly important function is fulfilled by the testicular cancer centers that offer second opinion services, which were initiated by urology conjointly with German Cancer Aid to pursue the goal of quality assurance for this tumor entity and therefore likewise secure the position of this tumor in the realm of urologists. By applying such strategic approaches, urologists will succeed in sustainably safeguarding their future importance in a very competitive environment and in counteracting the encroachments of other specialties by exhibiting clear orientation.

  3. Connecting teens to caring adults in a school-based health center: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksin, Beth A; Kelly, Patricia J

    2015-01-01

    The traditional medical care system is generally unable to provide the broad health and wellness services needed by many adolescents, especially those from low-income and racial/ethnic minority communities. Using a theoretical framework adapted from Bronfenbrenner's ecological model of multiple influencers, this case study examined how a school-based health center was able to provide a network of connections for adolescents to caring adults within the school and the local community. Contributors to this network were the creation of a student-centered community with access to adolescent-friendly services, providers acting as connectors, and care of the whole adolescent.

  4. "Stay, give me your paw." The benefits of family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardekar, Aditee P; Litman, Ronald S; Schwartz, Alan Jay

    2013-06-01

    The value of family-centered care in general and subspecialty pediatrics has been well documented in the literature. Translation of these principles into perioperative medicine has its logistical challenges; however, there are theoretical benefits. Specifically, pediatric patients with psychiatric diagnoses or special needs related to autism benefit from the incorporation of service animals into their daily routines. We describe the presence of one such service dog, at the request of our patient, during induction of general anesthesia. Consideration of the service dog as part of our family-centered care model improved the quality of care we provided this anxious teenager and her mother.

  5. CenteringParenting: an innovative dyad model for group mother-infant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Joanna; Rising, Sharon Schindler

    2013-01-01

    CenteringParenting is a group model that brings a cohort of 6 to 7 mothers and infants together for care during the first year of life. During 9 group sessions the clinician provides well-baby care and also attends to the health, development, and safety issues of the mother. Ideally, CenteringParenting provides continuity of care for a cohort of women who have received care in CenteringPregnancy, group prenatal care that is 10 sessions throughout the entire pregnancy and that leads to community building, better health outcomes, and increased satisfaction with prenatal care. The postpartum year affects the entire family, but especially the mother, who is redefining herself and her own personal goals. Issues of weight/body image, breastfeeding, depression, contraception, and relationship issues all may surface. In traditional care, health resources for support and intervention are frequently lacking or unavailable. Women's health clinicians also note the loss of contact with women they have followed during the prenatal period, often not seeing a woman again until she returns for another pregnancy. CenteringParenting recognizes that the health of the mother is tied to the health of the infant and that assessment and interventions are more appropriate and efficient when done in a dyad context. Facilitative leadership, rather than didactic education, encourages women to fully engage in their care, to raise issues of importance to them, and to discuss concerns within an atmosphere that allows for the surfacing of culturally appropriate values and beliefs. Implementing the model calls for system changes that are often significant. It also requires the building of a substantial team relationship among care providers. This overview describes the CenteringParenting mother-infant dyad care model with special focus on the mother and reviews the perspectives and experiences of staff from several practice sites.

  6. Market-Based Health Care in Specialty Surgery: Finding Patient-Centered Shared Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy R; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Cote, David; Cybulski, George; Laws, Edward R

    2015-10-01

    : The US health care system is struggling with rising costs, poor outcomes, waste, and inefficiency. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act represents a substantial effort to improve access and emphasizes value-based care. Value in health care has been defined as health outcomes for the patient per dollar spent. However, given the opacity of health outcomes and cost, the identification and quantification of patient-centered value is problematic. These problems are magnified by highly technical, specialized care (eg, neurosurgery). This is further complicated by potentially competing interests of the 5 major stakeholders in health care: patients, doctors, payers, hospitals, and manufacturers. These stakeholders are watching with great interest as health care in the United States moves toward a value-based system. Market principles can be harnessed to drive costs down, improve outcomes, and improve overall value to patients. However, there are many caveats to a market-based, value-driven system that must be identified and addressed. Many excellent neurosurgical efforts are already underway to nudge health care toward increased efficiency, decreased costs, and improved quality. Patient-centered shared value can provide a philosophical mooring for the development of health care policies that utilize market principles without losing sight of the ultimate goals of health care, to care for patients.

  7. Comparison of patient satisfaction with services of vision centers in rural areas of Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovai Vilas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the satisfaction of patients with the services of Vision Center services (primary eye care in large village (s and small village (s in rural settings in Andhra Pradesh state, India. Materials and Methods: We have administered standard questionnaires to randomly selected patients to assess patient satisfaction when assessing Vision Center Services. We used the Chi-square ( P <0.05 to explore differences in satisfaction of patients with Vision Center services located in the large village (s and small village (s rural settings. Results: Vision Center patients at the large village (s expressed higher levels of satisfaction (median 78% than patients treated at the Vision Center at small village (s (median 69%. The difference was statistically significant (Chi square P value ranging from <0.001 to 0.03 for all the items except two - ′easy to identify vision center location′ and ′spectacles dispensing time′ as compared to other (privately run optometry facilities (Chi square P value=0.498 and 0.993 respectively. The location of the Vision Center, convenience of journey, ophthalmic technician′s behavior with patients, are some of the most important factors that determined the patient perception about Vision Center services. Conclusion: The overall satisfaction levels of the Vision Center experience at 78% and 69% were good. However, continual improvement is to be made in service time, staff performance, cost and quality of vision care, especially at more remote primary eye Care Centers.

  8. Costs and benefits of home care for the elderly versus residential care: a comparison using propensity scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, L.; Berden, C.; Sadiraj, K.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the costs of residential care and home care shows that the former is more expensive for society. However, elderly people seem to be happier in residential care. All stakeholders, except the state (and thus the taxpayer), benefit if elderly people enter residential care. This reveals

  9. Health Care Systems Support to Enhance Patient-Centered Care: Lessons from a Primary Care-Based Chronic Pain Management Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Charles R; Debar, Lynn L; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Rumptz, Maureen H; Patterson, Charlotte; Bonifay, Allison; Cowan, Penney; Lancaster, Lindsay; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Supporting day-to-day self-care activities has emerged as a best practice when caring for patients with chronic pain, yet providing this support may introduce challenges for both patients and primary care physicians. It is essential to develop tools that help patients identify the issues and outcomes that are most important to them and to communicate this information to primary care physicians at the point of care. We describe our process to engage patients, primary care physicians, and other stakeholders in the context of a pilot randomized controlled trial of a patient-centered assessment process implemented in an everyday practice setting. We identify lessons on how to engage stakeholders and improve patient-centered care for those with chronic conditions within the primary care setting. A qualitative analysis of project minutes, interviews, and focus groups was conducted to evaluate stakeholder experiences. Stakeholders included patients, caregivers, clinicians, medical office support staff, health plan administrators, an information technology consultant, and a patient advocate. Our stakeholders included many patients with no prior experience with research. This approach enriched the applicability of feedback but necessitated extra time for stakeholder training and meeting preparation. Types of stakeholders varied over the course of the project, and more involvement of medical assistants and Information Technology staff was required than originally anticipated. Meaningful engagement of patient and physician stakeholders must be solicited in a well-coordinated manner with broad health care system supports in place to ensure full execution of patient-centered processes.

  10. Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling of the Influences of Family-Centered Care on Parent and Child Psychological Health

    OpenAIRE

    Dunst, Carl J.; Carol M. Trivette

    2009-01-01

    Background. Family-centered care is now practiced throughout the world by physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals. The call for adoption of family-centered care is based on the contention that the physical and psychological health of a child is influenced by parents' psychological health where family-centered care enhances parent well-being which in turn influences child well-being. We empirically assessed whether these relationships are supported by available evidence. Metho...

  11. Goodness-of-Fit in Center Day Care: Relations of Temperament, Stability, and Quality of Care with the Child's Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schipper, J. Clasien; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Van Zeijl, Jantien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the concept of "goodness-of-fit" between the child's temperament and the environment, introduced by Thomas and Chess [Temperament and Development, Brunner/Mazel, New York, 1977], is applied within the setting of center day care. Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this…

  12. A nurse practitioner-led urgent care center: meeting the needs of the patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, Tracy A

    2013-08-01

    Providing comprehensive care for patients with cancer is complex with regard to severe treatment-related side effects. Hundreds of thousands of patients with cancer visit the emergency department (ED) each year, and more than half report multiple visits. In the United States, few of the National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers have an ED specifically for patients with cancer. EDs often are an overcrowded and expensive way in which to care for the urgent needs of patients with cancer. In addition, a looming shortage exists for both primary care providers and oncologists who can address symptom issues. As the Affordable Care Act is implemented, more patients will enter the healthcare system, placing a demand on providers that the current supply cannot meet. A report from the Institute of Medicine advocates that nurse practitioners (NPs) are more than competent to provide for the unique urgent care needs of patients with cancer. The aim of this article is to describe an NP-led urgent care center for patients with cancer and how that care center provides access to vital, expeditious, and cost-effective care.

  13. Primary care nursing role and care coordination: an observational study of nursing work in a community health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren R; St Hilaire, Daniel; Flinter, Margaret

    2012-05-31

    Care coordination is a core element of the Patient-Centered Medical Home and requires an effective, well educated nursing staff. A greater understanding of roles and tasks currently being carried out by nurses in primary care is needed to help practices determine how best to implement care coordination and transform into PCMHs. We conducted an observational study of primary care nursing in a Community Health Center by creating a classification schema for nursing responsibilities, directly observing and tracking nurses' work, and categorizing their activities. Ten nurses in eight different practice sites were observed for a total of 61 hours. The vast majority of nursing time was spent in vaccine and medication administration; telephone work; and charting and paper work, while only 15% of their time was spent in activity that was classified broadly as care coordination. Care coordination work appeared to be subsumed by other daily tasks, many of which could have been accomplished by other, lesser trained members of the health care team. Practices looking to implement care coordination need a detailed look at work flow, task assignments, and a critical assessment of staffing, adhering to the principal of each team member working to the highest level of his or her education and license. Care coordination represents a distinct responsibility that requires dedicated nursing time, separate from the day to day tasks in a busy practice. To fully support these new functions, reimbursement models are needed that support such non visit-based work and provide incentives to coordinate and manage complex cases, achieve improved clinical outcomes and enhance efficiency of the health system. This article describes our study methods, data collection, and analysis, results, and discussion about reorganizing nursing roles to promote care coordination.

  14. Stakeholder Perspectives on Changes in Hypertension Care Under the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Alison J; Bogner, Hillary R; Cronholm, Peter F; Kellom, Katherine; Miller-Day, Michelle; McClintock, Heather F de Vries; Kaye, Elise M; Gabbay, Robert

    2016-02-25

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease, yet the proportion of adults whose hypertension is controlled is low. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model for care delivery that emphasizes patient-centered and team-based care and focuses on quality and safety. Our goal was to investigate changes in hypertension care under PCMH implementation in a large multipayer PCMH demonstration project that may have led to improvements in hypertension control. The PCMH transformation initiative conducted 118 semistructured interviews at 17 primary care practices in southeastern Pennsylvania between January 2011 and January 2012. Clinicians (n = 47), medical assistants (n = 26), office administrators (n = 12), care managers (n = 11), front office staff (n = 7), patient educators (n = 4), nurses (n = 4), social workers (n = 4), and other administrators (n = 3) participated in interviews. Study personnel used thematic analysis to identify themes related to hypertension care. Clinicians described difficulties in expanding services under PCMH to meet the needs of the growing number of patients with hypertension as well as how perceptions of hypertension control differed from actual performance. Staff and office administrators discussed achieving patient-centered hypertension care through patient education and self-management support with personalized care plans. They indicated that patient report cards were helpful tools. Participants across all groups discussed a team- and systems-based approach to hypertension care. Practices undergoing PCMH transformation may consider stakeholder perspectives about patient-centered, team-based, and systems-based approaches as they work to optimize hypertension care.

  15. Inhalant dependence: Data from a tertiary care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janardhanan C Narayanaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims to understand the sociodemographic and clinical profile of inhalant abusers seeking treatment from a tertiary care psychiatric hospital in South India. Materials and Methods: The clinical charts of patients who utilized the psychiatric services of a tertiary care center in India for over 10 years were examined for the study. Results: The sample had an urban predominance, was mostly unemployed, and was all male. Most of them had an adolescent age of onset of inhalant use (mean - 16.23 years. All patients reported the use of volatile solvents as inhalants. One other substance dependence was identified in more than half of the sample. The psychiatric comorbidity included psychosis and depression. A comparison was made between patients who presented with inhalant dependence only (I and inhalant-dependent individuals who also used other psychoactive substances apart from nicotine (IP. The inhalant-only group (I had an earlier mean age at onset of substance use as compared to the IP group. All patients in the I group reported withdrawal symptoms compared to 77% of patients in the (IP group (P=0.048. The IP group reported a significantly higher occurrence of aggression (54.5 vs. 19%, P=0.02, externalizing symptoms (77.3 vs. 42.9%, P=0.03, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD (50 vs. 14.3%, P=0.02. Conclusion: Inhalant dependence is a serious health problem in adolescent subjects and is associated with high comorbidity of other substance dependence, psychiatric disorder, and externalizing spectrum disorder. There is a need for community-based prospective studies in this area from India.

  16. Cost-income analysis of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Fallahzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Increasing demands for health care's services on one hand and limited resources on the other hand brings about pressure over governments to find out a mechanism for fair and appropriate distribution of resources. Economic analysis is one of the appropriate tools for policy making on this priority. The aim of this study was to assess capital and consumption of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city and comparing it with revenue of these centers and determining of cost effectiveness.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study, all health care centers of Yazd city with active dentistry department were evaluated. The data has been extracted from current documents in health care center of county based issued receipts and daily information registers.Results: Expended cost for providing of oral hygiene services in second half of 2008 in 13 medical health centers of Yazd included active dentistry section was 557.887.500 Rials and revenue to cost ratio was about 34%. The most provided service was related to tooth extraction and the average of tooth restoration in each working day was 0.48.Conclusion: With attention to low tariffs of dentistry services in medical health centers and paying subsidy to target groups, expenses of oral hygiene are always more than its revenue.

  17. Measurement of Family-centered care perception and parental stress in a neonatal unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Simphronio Balbino

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effects of the implementation of the Patient and Family-Centered Care Model on parents and healthcare perceptions and parental stress. Method: a quasi-experimental study developed in a neonatal unit of a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, with the implementation of this model of care. Data collection were performed by two sample groups, one using non-equivalent groups of parents, and another using equivalent groups of healthcare professionals. The instruments Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Parent Brazilian Version, Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Staff Brazilian Version and Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were applied to 132 parents of newborns hospitalized and to 57 professionals. Results: there was a statistically significant improvement in the perceptions of the parents in most items assessed (p ≤0,05 and for the staff in relation to the family welcome in the neonatal unit (p = 0.041 and to the comprehension of the family's experience with the infant´s hospitalization (p = 0,050. There was a reduction in the average scores of parental stress, with a greater decrease in the Alteration in Parental Role from 4,2 to 3,8 (p = 0,048. Conclusion: the interventions improved the perceptions of parents and healthcare team related to patient and family-centered care and contributed to reducing parental stress.

  18. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbin, Leslie A; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K

    2013-09-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Colonic Stent in a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Gajendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colonic obstruction is one of the manifestations of colon cancer for which self-expanding metal stents (SEMS have been effectively used, to restore the luminal patency either for palliative care or as a bridge to resective surgery. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of large diameter SEMS in patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. Methods and Results. A four-year retrospective review of the Medical Archival System was performed and identified 16 patients. The average age was 70.8 years, of which 56% were females. The most common cause of obstruction was colon cancer (9/16, 56%. Rectosigmoid was the main site of obstruction (9/16 and complete obstruction occurred in 31% of cases. The overall technical and clinical success rates were 100% and 87%, respectively. There were no immediate complications (<24 hours, but stent stenosis due to kinking occurred within one week of stent placement in 2 patients. Stent migration occurred in 2 patients at 34 and 91 days, respectively. There were no perforations or bleeding complications. Conclusion. Large diameter SEMS provide a safe method for palliation or as a bridge to therapy in patients with malignant colonic obstruction with high technical success and very low complication rates.

  20. Transforming care teams to provide the best possible patient-centered, collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Cory; Moore, Gordon; Shepherd, John; Jacobs, Tracy; Hupke, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Patient experience of care is now a crucial parameter in assessing the quality of healthcare delivered in the United States. Continuity, patient-driven access to care, and being "known" by a provider or practice, particularly for patients with chronic diseases, have been shown to enhance patient satisfaction with care and health outcomes. Healthcare systems are challenged to effectively meet the wants and needs of patients by tailoring interventions based on each person's unique set factors-his or her strengths, preferences, and personal and social context. Creating care teams, a coordinated multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, enables a practice to take advantage of the skill sets represented and redesign care delivery with the patient and community as the focal point. This article describes the attributes of highly functioning care teams, how to measure them, and guidance on creating them. A case example illustrates how these ideas work in practice.

  1. Partnering Urban Academic Medical Centers And Rural Primary Care Clinicians To Provide Complex Chronic Disease Care

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Many of the estimated thirty-two million Americans expected to gain coverage under the Affordable Care Act are likely to have high levels of unmet need for various chronic illnesses and to live in areas that are already underserved. In New Mexico an innovative new model of health care education and delivery known as Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) provides high-quality primary and specialty care to a comparable population. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technolog...

  2. Using the "customer service framework" to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Bhat, Anita; Seol, Yoon-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing momentum toward patient- and family-centered care at the federal policy level, the organizational literature remains divided on its effectiveness, especially in regard to its key dimension of involving patients and families in treatment decisions and safety practices. Although some have argued for the universal adoption of patient involvement, others have questioned both the effectiveness and feasibility of patient involvement. In this article, we apply a well-established theoretical perspective, that is, the Service Quality Model (SQM) (also known as the "customer service framework") to the health care context, to reconcile the debate related to patient involvement. The application helps support the case for universal adoption of patient involvement and also question the arguments against it. A key contribution of the SQM lies in highlighting a set of fundamental service quality determinants emanating from basic consumer service needs. It also provides a simple framework for understanding how gaps between consumer expectations and management perceptions of those expectations can affect the gap between "expected" and "perceived" service quality from a consumer's perspective. Simultaneously, the SQM also outlines "management requirements" for the successful implementation of a customer service strategy. Applying the SQM to the health care context therefore, in addition to reconciling the debate on patient involvement, helps identify specific steps health care managers could take to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care. Correspondingly, the application also provides insights into strategies for the successful implementation of policy recommendations related to patient- and family-centered care in health care organizations.

  3. Oral health services in primary care nursing centers: opportunities for dental hygiene and nursing collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellona, M O; DeVore, L R

    1999-01-01

    The basic oral health needs of more than 100 million Americans are not being met, which places them at an increased risk for serious oral and systemic health consequences. Primary care nursing centers, a comparatively new method of health care delivery, provide health care screening, education, and referral services to person typically underserved in the traditional health care delivery system. Primary care nursing centers were surveyed to determine to what extent they provide oral health screening, education, and referral services for clients, and to identify factors that discourage and encourage the integration of these services. Nurses from 158 primary care nursing centers in the United States made up the study population. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data from 59 primary care nursing centers were analyzed using frequency distributions and measures of central tendency. Almost half of the responding nurses at primary care nursing centers "almost always" screen their clients for gum infections (49%) and oral lesions (48%). Fewer teach their clients how to perform oral cancer self-examinations (20%); or educate them regarding use of athletic mouth protectors (15%), the effects of xerostomia (19%), and the benefits of fluoride (38%). The majority do not always refer clients needing treatment for dental decay (55%), gum infections (61%), missing teeth (80%), oral lesions (67%), oral pain (64%), or oral trauma (65%). Lack of referral sources (64%) and unavailability of oral health professionals to provide on site basic oral health services (63%) were the leading factors that discourage the integration of oral health services in the centers. An appreciation for the benefits of oral health (73%) and a knowledgeable clinician to perform oral health services (68%) were the leading factors that encourage the integration of oral health services into primary care nursing centers. These data could be useful in planning, implementing, and

  4. Critical Care Pharmacist Market Perceptions: Comparison of Critical Care Program Directors and Directors of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, David R; Persaud, Rosemary A; Naseman, Ryan W; Choudhary, Kavish; Carter, Kristen E; Hansen, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    Background: While hospital beds continue to decline as patients previously treated as inpatients are stabilized in ambulatory settings, the number of critical care beds available in the United States continues to rise. Growth in pharmacy student graduation, postgraduate year 2 critical care (PGY2 CC) residency programs, and positions has also increased. There is a perception that the critical care trained pharmacist market is saturated, yet this has not been evaluated since the rise in pharmacy graduates and residency programs. Purpose: To describe the current perception of critical care residency program directors (CC RPDs) and directors of pharmacy (DOPs) on the critical care pharmacist job market and to evaluate critical care postresidency placement and anticipated changes in PGY2 CC programs. Methods: Two electronic surveys were distributed from October 2015 to November 2015 through Vizient/University HealthSystem Consortium, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), Society of Critical Care Medicine, and American College of Clinical Pharmacy listservs to target 2 groups of respondents: CC RPDs and DOPs. Questions were based on the ASHP Pharmacy Forecast and the Pharmacy Workforce Center's Aggregate Demand Index and were intended to identify perceptions of the critical care market of the 2 groups. Results: Of 116 CC RPDs, there were 66 respondents (56.9% response rate). Respondents have observed an increase in applicants; however, they do not anticipate increasing the number of positions in the next 5 years. The overall perception is that there is a balance in supply and demand in the critical care trained pharmacist market. A total of 82 DOPs responded to the survey. Turnover of critical care pharmacists within respondent organizations is expected to be low. Although a majority of DOPs plan to expand residency training positions, only 9% expect to increase positions in critical care PGY2 training. Overall, DOP respondents indicated a balance of

  5. 78 FR 22911 - Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Seatac, WA; Delta Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Seatac, WA; Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Sioux City, IA... workers and former workers of Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call...

  6. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-01

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m(3) (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  7. Patient-Centered Care and Patient-Reported Measures: Let's Look Before We Leap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel; Steele Gray, Carolyn; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2015-08-01

    This commentary focuses on patient-reported measures as tools to support patient-centered care for patients with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). We argue that those using patient-reported measures in care management or evaluation of services for MCC patients should do so in recognition of the challenges involved in treating them. MCC patient care is challenging because (1) it is difficult to specify the causes of particular symptoms; (2) assessment of many important symptoms relies on subjective report; and (3) patients require care from a variety of providers. Due to the multiple domains of health affected in single individuals, and the large variation in needs, care that is holistic and individualized (i.e. patient-centered) is appropriate for MCC patients. However, due to the afore-mentioned challenges, it is important to carefully consider what this care entails and how practical contexts shape it. Patient-centered care for MCC patients implies continuous, dialogic patient-provider relationships, and the formulation of coherent and adaptive multi-disciplinary care protocols. We identify two broadly defined contextual influences on the nature and quality of these processes and their outputs: (1) busy practice settings and (2) fragmented information technology. We then identify several consequences that may result from inattention to these contextual influences upon introduction of patient-reported measure applications. To maximize the benefits, and minimize the harms of patient-reported measure use, we encourage policy makers and providers to attend carefully to these and other important contextual factors before, during and after the introduction of patient-reported measure initiatives.

  8. Enhancing Disaster Management: Development of a Spatial Database of Day Care Centers in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Singh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Children under the age of five constitute around 7% of the total U.S. population, and represent a segment of the population that is totally dependent on others for day-to-day activities. A significant proportion of this population spends time in some form of day care arrangement while their parents are away from home. Accounting for those children during emergencies is of high priority, which requires a broad understanding of the locations of such day care centers. As concentrations of at risk population, the spatial location of day care centers is critical for any type of emergency preparedness and response (EPR. However, until recently, the U.S. emergency preparedness and response community did not have access to a comprehensive spatial database of day care centers at the national scale. This paper describes an approach for the development of the first comprehensive spatial database of day care center locations throughout the U.S. utilizing a variety of data harvesting techniques to integrate information from widely disparate data sources followed by geolocating for spatial precision. In the context of disaster management, such spatially refined demographic databases hold tremendous potential for improving high-resolution population distribution and dynamics models and databases.

  9. [Management of type 2 diabetes patients in community health care centers in Grenoble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Patrice; Pichon, Philippe; Poulizac, Morgan; Cruaud, Anna; Bal, Gaelle; Hirsch, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Community health care centers in Grenoble aim to provide quality primary health care, including prevention, to populations living in disadvantaged urban areas. The objective of the study was to assess the quality of follow-up provided by physicians in health care centers in Grenoble to patients with diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted for an observation period of one week in june 2007. All type 2 diabetes patients seen in community health care centers during this given week were included in the study's sample (n=121). During the consultation, the physician collected the data on diabetes follow-up recorded in the patient's medical record over the last year. The data were compared with the recommendations and guidance published by the French National Authority for Health in 2006. The result of a hemoglobin A1c test dated less that three months-old was present in 80% of patients' medical records. Serum creatinine concentration, blood lipids, and microalbuminuria levels were obtained and confirmed with annual tests, and were present and recorded in the last year in 95%, 91%, and 77% of cases, respectively. The patient's weight, recorded within the last year, was noted in all cases. An ophthalmology consultation had been provided within the year for 57% of patients and 55% had received an electrocardiogram. Compliance with French National Authority for Health recommendations for the follow-up of diabetics in the community health care centers was satisfactory. Thus, it seems relevant to analyze their organizational methods.

  10. Child Day Care Centers, Statewide Day Cares in the LDSS database., Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2006. It is described as 'Statewide Day Cares in the LDSS database.'. The extent...

  11. Spanish validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Teresa; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Yanguas, Javier; Muñiz, José

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered Care (PCC) is an innovative approach which seeks to improve the quality of care services given to the care-dependent elderly. At present there are no Spanish language instruments for the evaluation of PCC delivered by elderly care services. The aim of this work is the adaptation and validation of the Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT) for a Spanish population. The P-CAT was translated and adapted into Spanish, then given to a sample of 1339 front-line care professionals from 56 residential elderly care homes. The reliability and validity of the P-CAT were analyzed, within the frameworks of Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory models. The Spanish P-CAT demonstrated good reliability, with an alpha coefficient of .88 and a test-retest reliability coefficient of .79. The P-CAT information function indicates that the test measures with good precision for the majority of levels of the measured variables (θ values between -2 and +1). The factorial structure of the test is essentially one-dimensional and the item discrimination indices are high, with values between .26 and .61. In terms of predictive validity, the correlations which stand out are between the P-CAT and organizational climate (r = .689), and the burnout factors; personal accomplishment (r = .382), and emotional exhaustion (r = - .510). The Spanish version of the P-CAT demonstrates good psychometric properties for its use in the evaluation of elderly care homes both professionally and in research.

  12. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah

    2015-10-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice.

  13. Setting up a health care quality management system in a multidisciplinary clinical research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Laktionova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issues of setting up a quality management system in a multidisciplinary specialized clinical research center. It describes the experience with information technologies used in a prophylactic facility to set up effective out- and inpatient health care control. Measures to optimize work under present-day conditions to upgrade the quality of health care are given using the federal health facility as an example.

  14. The impact of managed care on graduate medical education and academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L; Wintroub, B U

    1996-09-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the present and future impact of managed care on graduate medical education (GME) and academic medical centers. Obviously, the later 2 entities are closely intertwined and will share in the consequences of changes in our medical care systems. However, there are differences in the funding of medical schools as compared with GME provided by teaching hospitals, and an appreciation of the vital issues and concerns requires that each be discussed separately.

  15. GATEWAY Report Brief: Tunable-White Lighting at the ACC Care Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-09-30

    Summary of a GATEWAY program report that documented the performance of tunable-white LED lighting systems installed in several spaces within the ACC Care Center, a senior-care facility in Sacramento, CA. The project results included energy savings and improved lighting quality, as well as other possible health-related benefits that may have been attributable, at least in part, to the lighting changes.

  16. Comparison of Antibiograms Developed for Inpatients and Primary Care Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Jessina C.; Bearden, David T.; Townes, John M.; Sharp, Susan E.; Gorman, Paul N.; Elman, Miriam R.; Mori, Motomi; Smith, David H.

    2013-01-01

    To support antimicrobial stewardship, some healthcare systems have begun creating outpatient antibiograms. We developed inpatient and primary care outpatient antibiograms for a regional health maintenance organization (HMO) and academic healthcare system (AHS). Antimicrobial susceptibilities from 16,428 Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures from 2010 were summarized and compared. Methicillin susceptibility among S. aureus was similar in inpatients and primary care outpatients (HMO: 61.2% vs. 61.9%, p=0.951; AHS: 62.9% vs. 63.3%, p>0.999). E. coli susceptibility to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was also similar (HMO: 81.8% vs. 83.6%, p=0.328; AHS: 77.2% vs. 80.9%, p=0.192), but ciprofloxacin susceptibility differed (HMO: 88.9% vs. 94.6%, p<0.001; AHS: 81.2% vs. 90.6%, p<0.001). In the HMO, ciprofloxacin-susceptible P. aeruginosa were more frequent in primary care outpatients than inpatients (91.4% vs. 79.0%, p=0.007). Comparison of cumulative susceptibilities across settings yielded no consistent patterns; therefore, outpatient primary care antibiograms may more accurately inform prudent empiric antibiotic prescribing. PMID:23541690

  17. Integrating patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Denise Baird

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the application of patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice, illustrate the process in a case study, and promote change in the current healthcare clinical ethics model. Nutrition support clinicians have an opportunity to add another dimension to their practice with the incorporation of patient-centered care and clinical ethics. This represents a culture change for healthcare professionals, including nutrition support clinicians, patients and their family. All of these individuals are stakeholders in the process and have the ability to modify the current healthcare system to improve communication and facilitate a change by humanizing nutrition support practice. Nutrition support is a medical, life-sustaining treatment, and the use of this therapy requires knowledge by the nutrition support clinician of patient-centered care concepts, preventive clinical ethics, religion/spirituality and cultural diversity, palliative care team role, and advance care planning. Integrating these into the practice of nutrition support is an innovative approach and results in new knowledge that requires a change in the culture of care and engagement and empowerment of the patient and their family in the process. This is more than a healthcare issue; it involves a social/family conversation movement that will be enhanced by the nutrition support clinician's participation.

  18. Health Care Preferences Among Nursing Home Residents: Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies to Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Lauren R; Abbott, Katherine; Heid, Allison R; Klumpp, Rachel E; Van Haitsma, Kimberly

    2016-02-01

    Although much research has examined end-of-life care preferences of nursing home (NH) residents, little work has examined resident preferences for everyday health care. The current study conducted interviews with 255 residents recruited from 35 NHs. Content analysis identified barriers (i.e., hindrances to the fulfillment of resident preferences) and situational dependencies (i.e., what would make residents change their mind about the importance of these preferences) associated with preferences for using mental health services, choosing a medical care provider, and choosing individuals involved in care discussions. Barriers and situational dependencies were embedded within the individual, facility environment, and social environment. Approximately one half of residents identified barriers to their preferences of choosing others involved in care and choosing a medical care provider. In contrast, the importance of mental health services was situationally dependent on needs of residents. Results highlight opportunities for improvement in practice and facility policies that promote person-centered care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(2), 11-16.].

  19. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes.

  20. Identity of care in a Psychosocial Care Center for Children and Adolescents who uses drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Teixeira Bastos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To associate the territory of identity with the production of care within a PCC focusing on children and adolescents with drug abuse and their institutional identity. Method We used the “ process tracing methodology” in four research categories: focus groups, characterization of professionals, observing the everyday and interviewing two members of emblematic cases of the service. Results territory of identity of the institution, which operates the production of care is crossed by the difficulty of dealing with the complexity brought by the users and the performance of the PCC network. This paper is also permeated by different conceptions of care and small problematization of these issues in collective spaces of service. Conclusion The discussion in focus groups and other devices can be powerful resources to reframe the meaning of care and identity of collective service.

  1. Pharmaceutical care as narrative practice? Rethinking patient-centered care through a pharmacist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naß, Janine; Banerjee, Mita; Efferth, Thomas; Wohlmann, Anita

    2016-12-01

    Illness is a disruptive experience that requires high-quality care. The best evidence-based medical treatment risks losing some of its efficacy, however, when patients feel misunderstood when faced with the complexity of their experiences. They might stop treatment, refuse to disclose relevant information or seek unsound alternatives. A narrative-based approach to health care understands the patient's case history as a narrative that can be read or analyzed like a story. In other words, this approach honors individual illness experiences through the stories that patients tell. While programs that train 'narrative competence' have been successfully implemented in medical education, an application to pharmaceutical training is missing so far. We argue for the necessity to complement evidence-based pharmaceutical practice with narrative-based approaches to ensure high-quality care. Using the perspective of a pharmacist in a case scenario, we exemplify the centrality of "narrative pharmacy" for improving the quality and safety of pharmaceutical health care.

  2. Ventilation, indoor air quality, and human health and comfort in dwellings and day-care centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruotsalainen, R.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the study was to assess the actual ventilation and indoor air quality in the Finnish building stock (dwellings and day-care centers) with special reference to the existing guideline values. Furthermore, the objective was to evaluate the occurrence of symptoms and perceptions among occupants (adult residents, children, workers) in relation to ventilation system, ventilation rate and dampness. The measurements of ventilation and indoor air quality in the dwellings and day-care centers included ventilation rate, CO{sub 2} concentration, and temperature and humidity. Self- and parent-administered questionnaires were distributed to the occupants inquiring their personal characteristics, occurrence of symptoms of interest, perceived indoor air quality and details of their home and work environments. Airflows and air change rates varied remarkably both in the dwellings and day-care centers. In the majority of the dwellings and day-care centers, the Finnish guideline values of ventilation rates were not achieved. No consistent associations were observed between the magnitude of mechanical ventilation rates and the occurrence of eye, respiratory, skin and general symptoms, that is, symptoms of sick building syndrome (SBS) among the day-care workers. The results indicate that there is much room for improvement in the ventilation and indoor air quality of Finnish dwellings and day-care centers. The control of ventilation, temperature and humidity and the prevention of water damage are important issues on which to concentrate in the future. There is need to improve the quality in all phases of construction: design, installation, adjustment, operation, and maintenance

  3. The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    E M B E R 1 8 , 2 0 1 3 The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More...Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight Objective Our audit objective was to determine whether the

  4. Training residents and nurses to work as a patient-centered care team on a medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird-Fick, Heather S; Solomon, David; Jodoin, Christine; Dwamena, Francesca C; Alexander, Kim; Rawsthorne, Larry; Banker, Tammy; Gourineni, Nandu; Aloka, Feras; Frankel, Richard M; Smith, Robert C

    2011-07-01

    To train medical residents and nurses to work together as a patient-centered care (PCC) team on a medical ward and test its feasibility, nurses' learning, and patient outcomes. Working with administrative leadership, we consolidated residents' patients on one 32-bed ward. Already training residents in an evidence-based patient-centered method, we now trained 5 nurse leaders similarly, and they then trained all staff nurses. A national consultant visited twice. Specific team-building activities for nurses and residents fostered ward interactions. We used a retrospective pre/post/6-month post-design to evaluate nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy of patient-centered skills. Patients were assigned non-randomly to our unit or comparison units from our emergency room; using a post-test only design, the primary endpoint was patient satisfaction. 28 trained nurses showed improvement in knowledge (p=0.02) and self-efficacy (p=0.001). 81 treatment patients showed no improvement in satisfaction (p=0.44). Training nurses in patient-centered practices were effective. Unique in this country, we also trained nurses and residents together as a PCC team on a medical ward and showed it was feasible and well accepted. We provide a template for team training and urge that others explore this important new area and contribute to its further development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Susan N.; Kendeigh, Cassandra A.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies. PMID:22218842

  6. A Comparison of Organization-Centered and Agent-Centered Multi-Agent Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Schmidt; Villadsen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Whereas most classical multi-agent systems have the agent in center, there has recently been a development towards focusing more on the organization of the system, thereby allowing the designer to focus on what the system goals are, without considering how the goals should be fulfilled. We have d...... that the agent-oriented approach has a number of advantages when it comes to game-like scenarios with just a few different character types....... developed and evaluated two teams of agents for a variant of the well-known Bomberman computer game. One team is based on the basic Jason system, which is an implementation in Java of an extension of the logic-based agent-oriented programming language AgentSpeak. The other team is based...

  7. A comprehensive palliative care center implementation in S.B. Ulus State Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Kabalak

    2012-06-01

    Every people wants to best care and to die painless in their end-stage of life. This is a human right. Therefore, end-of-life care is considered an indicator of health quality all over the world. The ultimate goal of palliative care is to relieve the suffering of patients and their families by the comprehensive assessment and treatment of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual symptoms experienced by patients. After the patient\\s death, palliative care focuses primarily on bereavement of the family. T.C. Ministry of Health to find a solution of this important issue as a first step, the preparations for the establishment of palliative care centers and units, training of health personnel started. S.B. Ulus State Hospital as a team we have set out to open a comprehensive palliative care center. Our goal is to contribute on take place of palliative care organization in health system and to the spread across the country. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 122-126

  8. Language Discordance and Patient-Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service. PMID:26460475

  9. Increasing access--a qualitative study of homelessness and palliative care in a major urban center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowsky, Yonah; Gofine, Mirriam; Brown, Pnina; Danziger, Jana; Knowles, Holly

    2013-05-01

    Rates of morbidity and mortality are significantly higher in homeless populations. Homeless people experience many barriers to receive adequate palliative care. This qualitative study examines how a major urban city's palliative care resources can be improved to increase access and better serve the homeless. Audiotaped interviews were preformed with 7 homeless care providers in Toronto, Canada, and their transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings of the study suggest that in order to increase access and to serve the city's terminally ill homeless better, the following 4 areas must be addressed: (1) increasing positive interaction between the health care system and the homeless, (2) training staff to deal with the unique issues confronting the homeless, (3) providing patient-centered care, and (4) diversifying the methods of delivery.

  10. Language Discordance and Patient- Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semistructured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service.

  11. Person-Centered Care in the Home Setting for Parkinson's Disease: Operation House Call Quality of Care Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Monari, Erin H; Eilers, Amanda; Thompson-Avila, Amanda; Hwynn, Nelson H; Sriram, Ashok; Haq, Ihtsham; Hardwick, Angela; Malaty, Irene A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective. (1) To evaluate the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a home visit program for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a rural setting. (2) To have movement disorders fellows coordinate and manage health care delivery. Background. The University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration established Operation House Call to serve patients with PD who could not otherwise afford to travel to an expert center or to pay for medical care. PD is known to lead to significant disability, frequent hospitalization, early nursing home placement, and morbidity. Methods. This was designed as a quality improvement project. Movement disorders fellows travelled to the home(s) of underserved PD patients and coordinated their clinical care. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was confirmed using standardized criteria, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was performed and best treatment practices were delivered. Results. All seven patients have been followed up longitudinally every 3 to 6 months in the home setting, and they remain functional and independent. None of the patients have been hospitalized for PD related complications. Each patient has a new updatable electronic medical record. All Operation House Call cases are presented during video rounds for the interdisciplinary PD team to make recommendations for care (neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and social work). One Operation House Call patient has successfully received deep brain stimulation (DBS). Conclusion. This program is a pilot program that has demonstrated that it is possible to provide person-centered care in the home setting for PD patients. This program could provide a proof of concept for the construction of a larger visiting physician or nurse program.

  12. Role for a Labor-Management Partnership in Nursing Home Person-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, Walter; Bishop, Christine E.; Dodson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how a partnership between labor and management works to change the organization and focus of nursing home frontline work, supporting a transition toward person-centered care (PCC) in participating nursing homes. Design and Methods: Using a participatory research approach, we conducted case studies of 2 nursing homes…

  13. Care in a birth center according to the recommendations of the World Health Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Maria Barbosa da Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Birth centers are maternal care models that use appropriate technology when providing care to birthing women. This descriptive study aimed to characterize intrapartum care in a freestanding birth center, in light of the practices recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO, with 1,079 assisted births from 2006 to 2009 in the Sapopemba Birth Center, São Paulo, Brazil. Results included the use of intermittent auscultation (mean=7 controls; maternal positions during delivery: semi-sitting (82.3%, side-lying (16.0%, other positions (1.7%, oral intake (95.6%; companionship (93.3%; exposure to up to three vaginal examinations (85.4%, shower bathing (84.0%, walking (68.0%, massage (60.1%, exercising with a Swiss ball (51.7%; amniotomy (53.4%, oxytocin use during the first (31.0% and second stages of labor (25.8%, bath immersion (29.3% and episiotomy (14.1%. In this birth center, care providers used practices recommended by the WHO, although some practices might have been applied less frequently.

  14. The Role of Attending Center-Based Care for Kindergarten-Aged Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Context: Families have been increasingly utilizing center-based care both during prekindergarten as well as before/after school during kindergarten (CBC-K), and the literature has addressed the relative effectiveness of attending the former on early schooling outcomes. However, missing in the field is an analysis of the efficacy of…

  15. 5 CFR 792.211 - What is the definition of a Federally sponsored child care center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of a Federally sponsored child care center? 792.211 Section 792.211 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Subsidy Program Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.211 What is the definition of a Federally...

  16. Use of Child Centered Play Therapy Responses in a Child Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Joel H.; Muro, Lilia Lamar; Rose, Katherine Kensinger; Webster, Lindsey; Allen, Cassie

    2017-01-01

    The communication process between care providers and children can, at times, be complex. Young children typically lack the verbal language necessary for complex emotional expression. In this article, the authors contend that using some basic "child centered play therapy" (CCPT) techniques would be beneficial in enhancing communicative…

  17. Reenacted Case Scenarios for Undergraduate Healthcare Students to Illustrate Person-Centered Care in Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sandra L.; De Bellis, Anita; Guerin, Pauline; Walters, Bonnie; Wotherspoon, Alison; Cecchin, Maggie; Paterson, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare practitioners have suggested that interpreting person-centered care for people who have dementia to undergraduate students requires guidance in practical application. This article describes the production of a written and digital interdisciplinary educational resource for tertiary students. It uses real-life case scenarios provided by…

  18. Caregiver Objective Burden and Assessments of Patient-Centered, Family-Focused Care for Frail Elderly Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Julia Hannum; Bowman, Karen F.; O'Toole, Elizabeth E.; Abbott, Katherine; Love, Thomas E.; Thomas, Charles; Dawson, Neal V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing consensus that quality of care for frail elders should include family and be evaluated in terms of patient-centered, family-focused care (PCFFC). Family caregivers are in a unique and sometimes sole position to evaluate such care. In the context of caring for physically frail elders, this study examined the extent to…

  19. Pathways to Care of Alcohol -Dependent Patients: An Exploratory Study From a Tertiary Care Substance Use Disorder Treatment Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Singh Balhara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background No study from India has examined pathways to care in alcohol using population systematically. Objectives The present study aimed to understand the pathways to care among alcohol-dependent individuals seeking help at a tertiary care center. Patients and Methods It was a cross-sectional, observational study. A total of 58 subjects diagnosed with alcohol- dependence syndrome as per DSM-IV-TR were included in the study. Pathways to care were assessed using the world health organization encounter form. Results For 56.9% of the subjects, first point of contact was with a tertiary care addiction psychiatrist. Traditional healers were consulted by about 5.2% of the patients seeking help for the first time. The mean duration of main problems due to alcohol use was 5.82 ± 4.95 years. The first contact tended to be at place nearer to the patient’s residence while further contacts tended to be farther away. Family, friends and neighbours together constituted the single largest group suggesting patients to seek care. Conclusions There is a long time lag between the onset of alcohol use related problems and the first help seeking attempt. Of those who do decide to seek help, the proportion of those obtaining specialist help is higher than commonly believed.

  20. Cyberknife fractionated radiotherapy for adrenal metastases: Preliminary report from a multispecialty Indian cancer care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinanjan Basu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Metastasis to adrenal gland from lung, breast, and kidney malignancies are quite common. Historically radiotherapy was intended for pain palliation. Recent studies with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT including Cyberknife robotic radiosurgery aiming at disease control brings about encouraging results. Here we represent the early clinical experience with Cyberknife stereotactic system from an Indian cancer care center. The main purpose of this retrospective review is to serve as a stepping stone for future prospective studies with non- invasive yet effective technique compared to surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed four cases of adrenal metastases (three: lung and one: renal cell carcinoma treated with Cyberknife SBRT. X sight spine tracking was employed for planning and treatment delivery. Patients were evaluated for local response clinically as well as with PETCT based response criteria.Results: With a median gross tumor volume of 20.5 cc and median dose per fraction of 10 Gy, two patients had complete response (CR and two had partial response (PR when assessed 8-12 weeks post treatment as per RECIST. There was no RTOG grade 2 or more acute adverse events and organs at risk dosage were acceptable. Till last follow up all the patients were locally controlled and alive. Conclusion: Cyberknife SBRT with its unique advantages like non- invasive, short duration outpatient treatment technique culminating in similar local control rates in comparison to surgery is an attractive option. World literature of linear accelerator based SBRT and our data with Cyberknife SBRT with small sample size and early follow up are similar in terms of local control in adrenal metastases. Future prospective data would reveal more information on the management of adrenal metastases.

  1. Preventing diseases and outbreaks at child care centers using an education, evaluation, and inspection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jordan; Clodfelter, Sharon

    2014-03-01

    From 2005 to 2008, Washoe County, Nevada, child care centers experienced an increase in illnesses from communicable disease outbreaks. The number of ill children and caregivers from these outbreaks went from 26 in 2005 to 266 in 2008, an increase of 923%. A clear need to reverse this trend existed. Therefore, in 2009 Washoe County strengthened its regulations for child care facilities by adding numerous communicable disease prevention standards. In addition, in 2009 a two-year education, evaluation, and inspection program was implemented at Washoe County child care centers. Following the implementation of this program, a decline occurred in the number of illnesses. The number of ill children and caregivers from outbreaks went from 266 in 2008 to 13 in 2011, a decrease of 95%.

  2. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists.

  3. Distance to Veterans Administration Medical Centers as a Barrier to Specialty Care for Homeless Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Lori M; Pettey, Warren B P; Redd, Andrew M; Suo, Ying; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2017-01-01

    Homeless women Veterans have a high prevalence of chronic mental and physical conditions that necessitate frequent healthcare visits, but travel burdens to specialty services may be overwhelming to navigate for this population, especially for those in rural settings. Access to specialty care is a key priority in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and understanding the geographic distribution and rural designation of this population in relation to medical centers (VAMC) can assist in care coordination. We identified 41,747 women Veterans age 18-44y with administrative evidence of homelessness in the VHA anytime during 2002-2015. We found 7% live in rural settings and 29% live >40miles from a VAMC. The mean travel distance for homeless women Veterans with a rural designation to a VAMC specialty center was 107 miles. Developing interventions to overcome this travel burden and engage vulnerable Veterans in necessary care can improve overall health outcomes for this high-risk population.

  4. Considerations for developing chronic care system for traumatic brain injury based on comparisons of cancer survivorship and diabetes management care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Siobhan M; Caldwell, Barrett S

    2017-07-12

    Experts in traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation recently proposed the framing of TBI as a chronic disease rather than a discrete event. Within the framework of the Chronic Care Model (CCM), a systematic comparison of three diseases - cancer survivorship, diabetes management and TBI chronic care - was conducted regarding chronic needs and the management of those needs. In addition, comparisons of these conditions require comparative evaluations of disease management characteristics and the survivor concept. The analysis found diabetes is more established within the CCM, where care is integrated across specialists and primary care providers. No single comparison provides a full analogue for understanding the chronic care health delivery system for TBI, indicating the need for a separate model to address needs and resources for TBI survivors. The findings from this research can provide practitioners with a context to develop a robust continued care health system for TBI. Practitioner Summary: We examine development of a chronic care system for traumatic brain injury. We conducted a systematic comparison of Chronic Care Model elements of decision and information support. Development of capabilities using a benchmark of diabetes care, with additional insights from cancer care, provides insights for implementing TBI chronic care systems.

  5. Significant Improvements in the Practice Patterns of Adult Related Donor Care in US Transplantation Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthias, Chloe; Shaw, Bronwen E; Kiefer, Deidre M; Liesveld, Jane L; Yared, Jean; Kamble, Rammurti T; D'Souza, Anita; Hematti, Peiman; Seftel, Matthew D; Norkin, Maxim; DeFilipp, Zachariah; Kasow, Kimberly A; Abidi, Muneer H; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Nirali N; Anderlini, Paolo; Diaz, Miguel A; Malone, Adriana K; Halter, Joerg P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Paul V

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% of US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the Joint Accreditation Committee-International Society for Cellular Therapy and European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation standards resulting from the CIBMTR study would have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, we conducted a follow-up survey of US transplantation centers to assess practice changes since 2007, and to investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. A total of 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of RD transplantations in the United States, responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P < .0001). This study identifies several areas where RD management does not meet international donor care standards, however. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are

  6. Significant improvements in the practice patterns of adult related donor care in US transplant centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MBChB, Chloe Anthias; Shaw, Bronwen E; Kiefer, Deidre M; Liesveld, Jane L; Yared, Jean; Kambl, Rammurti T; D'Souza, Anita; Hematti, Peiman; Seftel, Matthew D; Norkin, Maxim; DeFilipp, Zachariah M; Kasow, Kimberly A; Abidi, Muneer H; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Nirali N; Anderlini, Paolo; Diaz, Miguel A; Malone, Adriana K; Halter, Joerg P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Paul V

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 FACT-JACIE Standards, resulting from the CIBMTR study, will have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, a follow-up survey of US transplant centers was conducted to assess practice changes since 2007, and investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of US RD transplants responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P<0.0001). However, this study identifies several areas where RD management does not meet international donor care standards. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are described. PMID:26597080

  7. Patient-centered care and its effect on outcomes in the treatment of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamar N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nashmia Qamar1,*, Andrea A Pappalardo2,*, Vineet M Arora3, Valerie G Press41Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Internal Medicine-Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Section of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA *Drs Qamar and Pappalardo contributed equally to this paperAbstract: Patient-centered care may be pivotal in improving health outcomes for patients with asthma. In addition to increased attention in both research and clinical forums, recent legislation also highlights the importance of patient-centered outcomes research in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, whether patient-centered care has been shown to improve outcomes for this population is unclear. To answer this question, we performed a systematic review of the literature that aimed to define current patient-focused management issues, characterize important patient-defined outcomes in asthma control, and identify current and emerging treatments related to patient outcomes and perspectives. We used a parallel search strategy via Medline®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO®, complemented with a reference review of key articles that resulted in a total of 133 articles; 58 were interventions that evaluated the effect on patient-centered outcomes, and 75 were descriptive studies. The majority of intervention studies demonstrated improved patient outcomes (44; “positive” results; none showed true harm (0; “negative”; and the remainder were equivocal (14; “neutral”. Key themes emerged relating to patients’ desires for asthma knowledge, preferences for tailored management plans, and

  8. Adaptive practices in heart failure care teams: implications for patient-centered care in the context of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tait GR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Glendon R Tait,1 Joanna Bates,2 Kori A LaDonna,3 Valerie N Schulz,4 Patricia H Strachan,5 Allan McDougall,3 Lorelei Lingard3 1Department of Psychiatry and Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 2Centre for Health Education Scholarship, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, 3Centre for Education Research and Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 4Palliative Care, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, London; 5School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Heart failure (HF, one of the three leading causes of death, is a chronic, progressive, incurable disease. There is growing support for integration of palliative care’s holistic approach to suffering, but insufficient understanding of how this would happen in the complex team context of HF care. This study examined how HF care teams, as defined by patients, work together to provide care to patients with advanced disease. Methods: Team members were identified by each participating patient, generating team sampling units (TSUs for each patient. Drawn from five study sites in three Canadian provinces, our dataset consists of 209 interviews from 50 TSUs. Drawing on a theoretical framing of HF teams as complex adaptive systems (CAS, interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with constructivist grounded theory. Results: This paper centers on the dominant theme of system practices, how HF care delivery is reported to work organizationally, socially, and practically, and describes two subthemes: “the way things work around here”, which were commonplace, routine ways of doing things, and “the way we make things work around here”, which were more conscious, effortful adaptations to usual practice in response to emergent needs. An adaptive practice, often a small alteration to routine, could have amplified effects beyond those intended by the innovating team

  9. Introduction of soft drinks and processed juice in the diet of infants attending public day care centers

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    Giovana Longo-Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Identifying at what age infants enrolled in public day care centers are introduced to soft drinks and industrialized juice, as well as comparing the nutritional composition of these goods with natural fruit juice. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the mothers of 636 children (aged 0 to 36 months from nurseries of day care centers, who were asked questions about the age of feeding introduction. This study evaluated the proximate composition of soft drinks and artificial juice, comparing them with those of natural fruit juice regarding energy, sugar, fiber, vitamin C, and sodium values. The chemical composition of fruit juice was obtained by consulting the Table of Food Composition and, for industrialized drinks, the average nutritional information on the labels of the five most consumed product brands. RESULTS: The artificial drinks were consumed before the first year of life by more than half of the children studied, however, approximately 10% consumed them before the age of 6 months. With regard to the comparison among the drinks, artificial fruit juice beverages and soft drinks proved to contain from nine to 13 times higher amounts of sodium, and 15 times less vitamin C than natural juices. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of soft drinks and industrialized juice in the diet of infants was inopportune and premature.. When compared to natural fruit juice, these have inferior nutritional composition, which suggests the urgent need for measures based on strategies for food and nutrition education in order to promote awareness and the maintenance of healthy eating habits.

  10. Introduction of soft drinks and processed juice in the diet of infants attending public day care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Toloni, Maysa Helena de Aguiar; de Menezes, Risia Cristina Egito; Asakura, Leiko; Oliveira, Maria Alice Araújo; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Identifying at what age infants enrolled in public day care centers are introduced to soft drinks and industrialized juice, as well as comparing the nutritional composition of these goods with natural fruit juice. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the mothers of 636 children (aged 0 to 36 months) from nurseries of day care centers, who were asked questions about the age of feeding introduction. This study evaluated the proximate composition of soft drinks and artificial juice, comparing them with those of natural fruit juice regarding energy, sugar, fiber, vitamin C, and sodium values. The chemical composition of fruit juice was obtained by consulting the Table of Food Composition and, for industrialized drinks, the average nutritional information on the labels of the five most consumed product brands. RESULTS: The artificial drinks were consumed before the first year of life by more than half of the children studied, however, approximately 10% consumed them before the age of 6 months. With regard to the comparison among the drinks, artificial fruit juice beverages and soft drinks proved to contain from nine to 13 times higher amounts of sodium, and 15 times less vitamin C than natural juices. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of soft drinks and industrialized juice in the diet of infants was inopportune and premature.. When compared to natural fruit juice, these have inferior nutritional composition, which suggests the urgent need for measures based on strategies for food and nutrition education in order to promote awareness and the maintenance of healthy eating habits. PMID:25662561

  11. Rationale and Design of the Lung Cancer Screening Implementation. Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leah S; Datta, Santanu; Melzer, Anne C; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Davis, James M; Tong, Betty C; Golden, Sara E; Slatore, Christopher G

    2017-10-01

    Screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography has been demonstrated to reduce lung cancer-related mortality and is being widely implemented. Further research in this area is needed to assess the impact of screening on patient-centered outcomes. Here, we describe the design and rationale for a new study entitled Lung Cancer Screening Implementation: Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care. The protocol is composed of an interconnected series of studies evaluating patients and clinicians who are engaged in lung cancer screening in real-world settings. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate communication processes that are being used in routine care and to identify best practices that can be readily scaled up for implementation in multiple settings. We hypothesize that higher overall quality of patient-clinician communication processes will be associated with lower levels of distress and decisional conflict as patients decide whether or not to participate in lung cancer screening. This work is a critical step toward identifying modifiable mechanisms that are associated with high quality of care for the millions of patients who will consider lung cancer screening. Given the enormous potential benefits and burdens of lung cancer screening on patients, clinicians, and the healthcare system, it is important to identify and then scale up quality communication practices that positively influence patient-centered care.

  12. Pathways to care among persons with dementia: Study from a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossien, Sk Altaf; Loganathan, Santosh; Kolar Sridara Murthy, Meena; Palanimuthu Thangaraju, Sivakumar; Bharath, Srikala; Varghese, Mathew

    2017-08-23

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing rapidly, specifically in low and middle income countries (LAMIC) due to demographic aging. Help seeking is delayed and usually sought at an advanced stage of illness and many are yet to receive a formal diagnosis. We interviewed 35 caregivers of persons with Dementia (as per ICD-10) using a semi-structured questionnaire, the Short Explanatory Model Interview (SEMI). We explored the pathways taken by caregivers of people with dementia en route to a tertiary care centre and the interactions they had with different health care providers. Qualitative data analysis was done using ATLAS.ti. We identified three major pathways: I) The Neuropsychiatric pathway II) The General Practitioner pathway and III) The Non-cohesive pathway. In general, the caregivers were poorly informed about the illness details such as diagnosis, course and outcome. Neurologists communicated the diagnosis of 'Dementia' more frequently. When information was made available, the caregivers were satisfied with proper information about illness and with at least, partial improvement of symptoms. There is a need for increasing the awareness of dementia in community at large. Health services and systems that address this important public health problem need strengthening. Sensitization and training of primary care physician and staff to identify dementia at an early stage are the need of the hour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Organizational culture and the implementation of person centered care: results from a change process in Swedish hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Tariq Saleem J; Ekman, Inger; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Dudas, Kerstin; Carlström, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Sweden has one of the oldest, most coherent and stable healthcare systems in the world. The culture has been described as conservative, mechanistic and increasingly standardized. In order to provide a care adjusted to the patient, person centered care (PCC) has been developed and implemented into some parts of the health care industry. The model has proven to decrease patient uncertainty. However, the impact of PCC has been limited in some clinics and hospital wards. An assumption is that organizational culture has an impact on desired outcomes of PCC, such as patient uncertainty. Therefore, in this study we identify the impact of organizational culture on patient uncertainty in five hospital wards during the implementation of PCC. Data from 220 hospitalized patients who completed the uncertainty cardiovascular population scale (UCPS) and 117 nurses who completed the organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) were investigated with regression analysis. The results seemed to indicate that in hospitals where the culture promotes stability, control and goal setting, patient uncertainty is reduced. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that a culture of flexibility, cohesion and trust is positive, a culture of stability can better sustain a desired outcome of reform or implementation of new care models such as person centered care. It is essential for health managers to be aware of what characterizes their organizational culture before attempting to implement any sort of new healthcare model. The organizational values questionnaire has the potential to be used as a tool to aid health managers in reaching that understanding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sharp Injury and Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids among Health Care Workers in Health Care Centers of Eastern Ethiopia

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    T Alemayehu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health care workers are facing certain occupational hazards because of sharp injury and exposure to human blood and body fluids as a result of handling wastes. Though much attention is paid for the protection of these workers, the number of exposures and injuries do not show a sign of decline from time to time. Objective: To examine the occurrence of sharp injury and exposure to blood and body fluids in health care workers in health care centers in Ethiopia. Methods: In a case-control study, a randomly selected sample of 65 health facilities with 391 cases and 429 controls were studied. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Detailed analysis of exposure among the health care workers was done by logistic regression analysis with generalized estimating equations model to control correlation effects of responses within the cluster of health facilities. Results: The number of health care workers who got sharp injury was 217 (26.5%. 296 (36.1% had exposure to blood and body fluids. Working at Harari region (adjusted OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.75 and East Hararghea (adjusted OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.94, being male (adjusted OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.91, and a being nurse (adjusted OR 0.188, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.63 were independent risk factors of the exposure. Conclusion: Regardless of the anticipated low self-reporting for exposure status, the number of health care workers reported having sharp injury and exposure to blood and body fluids was high. Such high exposures indicate that health care workers are at high risk of acquiring blood-borne viral infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV.

  15. Health professionals’ experiences of person-centered collaboration in mental health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Sommerseth

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Rita Sommerseth, Elin DysvikUniversity of Stavanger, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, Stavanger, NorwayObjective: The basic aim in this paper is to discuss health care professionals’ experiences of person-centered collaboration and involvement in mental health rehabilitation and suggest ways of improving this perspective. Furthermore, the paper explains the supportive systems that are at work throughout the process of rehabilitation.Method: The study design is a qualitative approach using three focus group interviews with a total of 17 informants with different professional backgrounds such as nurses, social workers, and social pedagogies. In addition, one nurse and one social worker participated in a semistructured in-depth interview to judge validity.Results: Our results may demonstrate deficits concerning mental health care on several levels. This understanding suggests firstly, that a person-centered perspective and involvement still are uncommon. Secondly, multidisciplinary work seems uncommon and only sporadically follows recommendations. Thirdly, family support is seldom involved. Lastly, firm leadership and knowledge about laws and regulations seems not to be systematically integrated in daily care.Conclusion: Taking these matters together, the improvement of a person-centered perspective implies cooperation between different services and levels in mental health care. In order to bring about improvement the health care workers must critically consider their own culture, coordination of competence must be increased, and leadership at an institutional and organizational level must be improved so that scarce rehabilitation resources are used to the optimal benefit of people with a mental illness.Keywords: multidisciplinary teams, person-centered collaboration, supportive systems, rehabilitation

  16. Tracking non-burn center care: what you don't know may surprise you.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James S; Dearwater, Stephen; Rosales, Oscar; Varas, Robin; Quintana, Olga D; Pizano, Louis; Namias, Nicholas; Schulman, Carl I

    2012-01-01

    The American Burn Association publishes a list of defined criteria for patients who require admission or transfer to a burn center. This study examines the extent to which those criteria are observed within a regional burn network. Hospital discharge data for 2008 were obtained for all hospitals within the South Florida regional burn network. Patients with International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision discharge diagnoses for burns were reviewed, and their triage destination was compared with the burn triage referral criteria to determine whether patients were inappropriately triaged. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Four hundred ninety-eight burn admissions were documented to non-burn center center hospitals, 269 (54%) of which were deemed inappropriate by burn triage referral criteria. Burn center patients had greater length of stay when compared with non-burn center patients (14 vs 7 days), but a greater percentage were discharged home for self-care (88 vs 57%). Thirty-three percent of the inappropriate admissions were in a neighboring county, whereas 27% were in the same county where the burn center is located. Inappropriate burn patient triage may be occurring to more than half of the burn patients within our regional burn network despite better functional outcomes at the burn center. This may be because of a lack of knowledge regarding triage criteria, patient insurance status, or other factors. Further studies are necessary to fully characterize the problem and implement education or incentives to encourage appropriate burn patient triage.

  17. Disruptive innovation in academic medical centers: balancing accountable and academic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Daniel; Chen, Christopher; Ackerly, D Clay

    2015-05-01

    Numerous academic medicine leaders have argued that academic referral centers must prepare for the growing importance of accountability-driven payment models by adopting population health initiatives. Although this shift has merit, execution of this strategy will prove significantly more problematic than most observers have appreciated. The authors describe how successful implementation of an accountable care health strategy within a referral academic medical center (AMC) requires navigating a critical tension: The academic referral business model, driven by tertiary-level care, is fundamentally in conflict with population health. Referral AMCs that create successful value-driven population health systems within their organizations will in effect disrupt their own existing tertiary care businesses. The theory of disruptive innovation suggests that balancing the push and pull of academic and accountable care within a single organization is achievable. However, it will require significant shifts in resource allocation and changes in management structure to enable AMCs to make the inherent difficult choices and trade-offs that will ensue. On the basis of the theories of disruptive innovation, the authors present recommendations for how academic health systems can successfully navigate these issues as they transition toward accountability-driven care.

  18. Integrating Adolescents and Young Adults into Adult-Centered Care for IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Itishree; Holl, Jane L; Hanauer, Stephen; Keefer, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    Planned healthcare transition, initiated in pediatric care, is a gradual process aimed at fostering the adolescent patient's disease knowledge and skills with the ultimate objective of preparing patients and families for adult-centered care. The process is critical in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) where there is an increased risk of non-adherence, hospitalizations, and emergency department use as young adult patients graduate from pediatric to adult-centered care. While evidence for healthcare transition in IBD is mounting, important gaps remain in the understanding of this process from the perspective of the adult gastroenterologist. This paper summarizes what is known about healthcare transition in IBD and explores the unanswered questions-a conceptual and methodological framework for transition interventions, relevant outcomes that define successful transition, and key stakeholder perspectives. For the adult gastroenterologist managing the young adult patient population, this paper presents the paradigm of "care integration"-a process of ongoing, multi-modality support for the patient, initiated in the adult care setting, with the goal of improving self-management skills and active participation in medical decision-making.

  19. Survey of care and evaluation of East African burn unit feasibility: an academic burn center exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katrina B; Giiti, Geofrey; Gallagher, James J

    2013-01-01

    Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, partnered with Weill Bugando Medical College and Sekou Toure Regional Referral Hospital, in Mwanza, Tanzania, to consider the development of a burn unit there. This institutional partnership provided a unique opportunity to promote sustainable academic exchange and build burn care capacity in the East African region. A Weill Cornell burn surgeon and burn fellow collaborated with the Sekou Toure department of surgery to assess its current burn care capabilities and potential for burn unit development. All aspects of interdisciplinary burn care were reviewed and institutional infrastructure evaluated. Sekou Toure is a 375-bed regional referral center and teaching hospital of Weill Bugando Medical College. In 2010-2011, it admitted 5244 pediatric patients in total; 100 of these patients were burn-injured children (2% of admissions). There was no specific data kept on percentage of body surface burned, degree of burn, length of stay, or complications. No adult, operative, or outpatient burn data were available. There are two operating theaters. Patient's families perform wound care with nursing supervision. Rehabilitation therapists consult as needed. Meals are provided three times daily by a central kitchen. Public health outreach is possible through village-based communication networks. Infrastructure to support the development of a burn care unit exists at Sekou Toure, but needs increased clinical focus, human resource capacity building, and record-keeping to track accurate patient numbers. A multidisciplinary center could improve record-keeping and outcomes, encourage referrals, and facilitate outreach through villages.

  20. Patient-centered boundary mechanisms to foster intercultural partnerships in health care: a case study in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitziger, Martin; Berger Gonzalez, Mónica; Gharzouzi, Eduardo; Ochaíta Santizo, Daniela; Solis Miranda, Regina; Aguilar Ferro, Andrea Isabel; Vides-Porras, Ana; Heinrich, Michael; Edwards, Peter; Krütli, Pius

    2017-08-08

    traditional health care due to refined diagnoses and adapted treatment strategies. In individual cases, the beneficial effects of traditional treatments were remarkable, and the doctors continued to collaborate with healers after the study was completed. Comparison of the two linguistic groups illustrated that the outcomes are highly context-dependent. If well adapted to local context, patient-centered boundary mechanisms can enable intercultural partnerships by creating access, building trust and fostering mutual learning, even in circumstances as complex as those in Guatemala. Creating multilateral patient-centered boundary mechanisms is thus a promising approach to improve health care in medically pluralistic developing countries.

  1. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training.

  2. Cortisol levels of infants in center care across the first year of life: links with quality of care and infant temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Esther M; Beijers, Roseriet; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; Sweep, Fred C G J; de Weerth, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Cortisol concentrations of older children in childcare centers have been found to be higher than at home. This study focuses on infant cortisol in childcare centers throughout the first year of life, and aims to investigate whether inter-individual differences can be explained by temperament, the quality of maternal behavior, and the quality of center care. Sixty-four infants were followed for 9 months after entering care at 3 months of age. Salivary samples were taken at 10.00 h and 16.00 h in center care (in post-entry weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, and 36) and at home (in post-entry weeks 1, 24, and 36). Prior to entry, mothers completed a temperament questionnaire and the quality of maternal behavior (sensitivity and cooperation) was observed during routine bathing sessions. Subsequently, the infants were visited three times at center care to observe the quality of infant's interactive experiences with their professional caregiver. Longitudinal regression models showed that both morning and afternoon cortisol were higher in center care compared to home. Longitudinal regression models showed that infants receiving higher quality of maternal behavior displayed higher morning cortisol in center care, compared to infants receiving lower quality of maternal behavior. Higher quality of maternal behavior was also related to higher afternoon cortisol in center care, but only in infants high in negative emotionality. Center care quality was not related to cortisol. In sum, young infants show higher cortisol concentrations in center care that are related to infant temperament and quality of maternal behavior at home.

  3. Comparison of quality control for trauma management between Western and Eastern European trauma center

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    Gambale Giorgio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality control of trauma care is essential to define the effectiveness of trauma center and trauma system. To identify the troublesome issues of the system is the first step for validation of the focused customized solutions. This is a comparative study of two level I trauma centers in Italy and Romania and it has been designed to give an overview of the entire trauma care program adopted in these two countries. This study was aimed to use the results as the basis for recommending and planning changes in the two trauma systems for a better trauma care. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a total of 182 major trauma patients treated in the two hospitals included in the study, between January and June 2002. Every case was analyzed according to the recommended minimal audit filters for trauma quality assurance by The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACSCOT. Results Satisfactory yields have been reached in both centers for the management of head and abdominal trauma, airway management, Emergency Department length of stay and early diagnosis and treatment. The main significant differences between the two centers were in the patients' transfers, the leadership of trauma team and the patients' outcome. The main concerns have been in the surgical treatment of fractures, the outcome and the lacking of documentation. Conclusion The analyzed hospitals are classified as Level I trauma center and are within the group of the highest quality level centers in their own countries. Nevertheless, both of them experience major lacks and for few audit filters do not reach the mmum standard requirements of ACS Audit Filters. The differences between the western and the eastern European center were slight. The parameters not reaching the minimum requirements are probably occurring even more often in suburban settings.

  4. How the center for Medicare and Medicaid innovation should test accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Fisher, Elliott S

    2010-07-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act establishes a national voluntary program for accountable care organizations (ACOs) by January 2012 under the auspices of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The act also creates a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation in the CMS. We propose that the CMS allow flexibility and tiers in ACOs based on their specific circumstances, such as the degree to which they are or are not fully integrated systems. Further, we propose that the CMS assume responsibility for ACO provisions and develop an ordered system for learning how to create and sustain ACOs. Key steps would include setting specific performance goals, developing skills and tools that facilitate change, establishing measurement and accountability mechanisms, and supporting leadership development.

  5. Intestinal Parasites Prevalence in Children from Day Care Centers in Sinop City-MT

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    B. Muchiutti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal parasitosis prevalence of children from municipal day care centers in Sinop MT. Respecting ethical principles established by Resolution 196/96 of Health National Council/Ministry of Health of quantitative research, the anonymity of participants, as well accept and signature of parents of the Term of Free and Enlightened Consent were performed. Between Junes to October 2012 were applied coproparasitological methods for investigation. Fecal samples were analyzed by Hoffmans methods. From 103 students examined observed the prevalence rate of 19.42% of intestinal parasites. The intestinal parasites with highest prevalence rate were: Giardia lamblia (9.70% and Endolimax nana (5.82%. The results of this study demonstrate the need for sensitization of the population front of diagnosis importance, treatment and monitoring of positive cases and the necessity of more health professionals attention, especially with children.Key-words: Intestinal parasites, day care centers, children.

  6. A longitudinal study of enterobiasis in three day care centers of Havana City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, F A; Hernández, M; Finlay, C M

    1996-01-01

    Pinworm infection was prospectively studied during one year in 469 children attending three day care centers. Each child was examined at six months intervals using up to three perianal swabs with adhesive tape. Those found infected were treated with mebendazole. At the beginning of the study we found a prevalence of 28% that dropped to 13% and 12% in the following study periods. The reinfection rate was twice the incidence rate in both study periods. We also found a small percentage (10%) of the children reinfected in most or all study periods. There was a high correlation between reinfection and perianal itching. Our results add further knowledge to the epidemiology of intestinal parasites in day care centers.

  7. What is patient-centered care really? Voices of Hispanic prenatal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Alicia A; Connaughton, Stacey L

    2013-01-01

    Variations in patient-centered care (PCC) models and approaches contribute to ambiguity in how PCC is understood and defined, especially with regard to meeting the needs of diverse patient populations. One of the biggest challenges of putting PCC into practice is knowing what elements are the most important to patients. This qualitative study privileges patients' voices and adds a cultural dimension to existing health communication research on PCC through an empirical investigation of 48 Hispanic prenatal care patients' understandings and expectations of PCC. Semistructured interviews with 48 patients revealed five key themes in order of frequency: (a) una relación amable (a friendly relationship), (b) la atencion médica efectiva (effective medical care), (c) Español hablado (the Spanish language spoken), (d) comprensión de la información (understanding of information), and (e) eliminación del racismo (elimination of racism). The themes reflected several different assumptions and expectations with regard to PCC as compared to those espoused in many of the existing models and frameworks, such as the extent to which friendly interpersonal behaviors (e.g., smiling, making eye contact, displaying patience, and engaging in formal greetings, introductions, and farewells) were critical to patient satisfaction with the health care experience. Not only did patients feel better understood, but accompanied by friendly behaviors, information was viewed as more believable and accurate, and thus more patient-centered. The findings suggest that implementing culturally sensitive PCC approaches to caring for Hispanic prenatal care patients can include training health care staff on the importance of displaying friendly communicative behaviors such as smiling.

  8. Federal Health Care Center: VA and DOD Need to Develop Better Information to Monitor Operations and Improve Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    requirement to include two more reports, resulting in GAO reports in 2011, 2012, and 2016. 5GAO, VA and DOD Health Care: First Federal Health ...FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER VA and DOD Need to Develop Better Information to Monitor Operations and Improve Efficiency...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-17-197, a report to congressional committees January 2017 FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER VA and DOD

  9. Building social participation with a support group users: challenges of care qualification in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Corrêa Detomini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature points out a lack of studies describing practical experiences approaching the role of social participation, even though, the subject Brazilian Health System (SUS as a principle is valued by theoretical-conceptual works. The lack of studies is especially observed in mental health care services, where the existing studies focus on the users’ management engagement as part of psychosocial rehabilitation. Thus, this article introduces an experience developed in a Center for Psycho-Social Attention (CAPS, in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, aiming to address the issue of social participation in care qualification, in accordance to legislation and technical standards. Thisstudy focused on two types of sources. 1 Internship Final Report of a Psycology Student including 54 sessions of a support group, 2 technical and legal documents concerning the SUS and the National Mental Health Policy and Humanization. The service aspects were analyzed through technical and legislative foundations - focusing the needs and claims on group discussions, classified as structure and process, used to assess the health care quality. Most concerns were listed on normative Ordinances and Regulations. Achieving social participation was not an institutional premise and, among the main difficulties was the medical/outpatient centered model and the representation of “crazy”/”CAPS users” as incapable. It requires: i integration of “clinic” and “politics”; ii intensification of interdisciplinary and psychological care; iii respect the citizenship of mental health users, and, finally, iv that the collective participation spaces do not exhaust themselves. Therefore, the collective participation spaces need practical recommendations in order to improve the structures and work processes and meet the users’ needs.

  10. Effectiveness of person-centered care on people with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Park, Myonghwa

    2017-01-01

    Background Person-centered care is a holistic and integrative approach designed to maintain well-being and quality of life for people with dementia, and it includes the elements of care, the individual, the carers, and the family. Aim A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of person-centered care for people with dementia. Methods Literature searches were undertaken using six databases including Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database, and KoreaMed using the following keywords: cognition disorder, dementia, person-centered care, patient-centered care, client-centered care, relationship-centered care, and dementia care. The searches were limited to interventional studies written in English and Korean and included randomized controlled studies and noncontrolled studies for people with dementia living in any setting. Results Nineteen interventional studies, including 3,985 participants, were identified. Of these, 17 studies were from long-term care facilities and two studies were from homecare settings. The pooled data from randomized controlled studies favored person-centered care in reducing agitation, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and depression and improving the quality of life. Subgroup analysis identified greater effectiveness of person-centered care when implemented for people with less severe dementia. For agitation, short-term interventions had a greater effect (standardized mean difference [SMD]: −0.434; 95% conference interval [CI]: −0.701 to −0.166) than long-term interventions (SMD: −0.098; 95% CI: −0.190 to 0.007). Individualized activities resulted in a significantly greater beneficial effect than standard care (SMD: 0.513; 95% CI: −0.994 to −0.032). However, long-term, staff education, and cultural change interventions had a greater effect on improving the quality of life for people with dementia (SMD: 0.191; 95% CI: 0.079 to 0.302). Conclusion This systematic review and

  11. THE ANALYSIS OF THE DIABETIC FOOT OSTEOMYELITIS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTER - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Mithun N; Pattanashetty; Reshmina; Sharath Babu; Harikrishna; Sreedhar Reddy; Ramakrishna J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : India is considered as the diabetic capital of the world. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis is considered as one of the severe complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot osteomyelitis tends to complicate around one third of diabetic foot infections. In v iew of this we conducted a prospective study on the bacteriological analysis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis at a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A prospective study was perform...

  12. Games and playthings in a child day care center: a bioecological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Rute Estanislava Tolocka; Ana Lucia Brollo

    2010-01-01

    Social changes have contributed to decreased opportunities for children to perform physical activities. Children have been introduced in preschools where the opportunities of playing are insufficient, thus being deprived of the benefits of such activity. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between ludic physical activities and child development. A descriptive study was conducted on 68 children of both genders, aged 4 to 6 years, from a public child day care center. A physica...

  13. Assessment of chronic diarrhea in early infancy in Tehran Tertiary Care Center; Tehran-Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Motamed; Naheid Kazemi; Raheleh Nabavizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic diarrhea of infancy is a heterogeneous syndrome that includes several diseases with different etiologies. The aim of this study was investigating chronic diarrhea, its etiologies, clinical features and outcomes in infancy.Materials and Methods Retrospective study investigating infants hospitalized in the gastroenterology department of Tehran tertiary care center.The main demographic data, etiology, characteristics of diarrhea, and outcome were evaluated. Data were analyze...

  14. Feminist health care in a hostile environment: a case study of the Womancare Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the Womancare Health Center in order to illustrate the development of and challenges to the feminist health movement in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the legislative, fiscal, and direct actions by the New Right against this organization. Analysis focuses on the means through which Womancare survived. The repercussions of constant intimidation and harassment for women's health programs and for health care policy overall are discussed.

  15. Hypertensive Crisis, Burden, Management, and Outcome at a Tertiary Care Center in Karachi

    OpenAIRE

    Aysha Almas; Ayaz Ghouse; Ahmed Raza Iftikhar; Munawwar Khursheed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Hypertension, if uncontrolled, can lead to hypertensive crisis. We aim to determine the prevalence of hypertensive crisis, its management, and outcome in patients presenting to a tertiary care center in Karachi. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. Adult inpatients (>18 yrs) presenting to the ER who were known hypertensive and had uncontrolled hypertension were included. Results. Out of 1336 patients, 28.6% (387) had un...

  16. Decision-Making in Audiology: Balancing Evidence-Based Practice and Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemesha, Jennifer; Lundmark, Erik; Crome, Erica; Barr, Caitlin; McMahon, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    Health-care service delivery models have evolved from a practitioner-centered approach toward a patient-centered ideal. Concurrently, increasing emphasis has been placed on the use of empirical evidence in decision-making to increase clinical accountability. The way in which clinicians use empirical evidence and client preferences to inform decision-making provides an insight into health-care delivery models utilized in clinical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the sources of information audiologists use when discussing rehabilitation choices with clients, and discuss the findings within the context of evidence-based practice and patient-centered care. To assess the changes that may have occurred over time, this study uses a questionnaire based on one of the few studies of decision-making behavior in audiologists, published in 1989. The present questionnaire was completed by 96 audiologists who attended the World Congress of Audiology in 2014. The responses were analyzed using qualitative and quantitative approaches. Results suggest that audiologists rank clinical test results and client preferences as the most important factors for decision-making. Discussion with colleagues or experts was also frequently reported as an important source influencing decision-making. Approximately 20% of audiologists mentioned utilizing research evidence to inform decision-making when no clear solution was available. Information shared at conferences was ranked low in terms of importance and reliability. This study highlights an increase in awareness of concepts associated with evidence-based practice and patient-centered care within audiology settings, consistent with current research-to-practice dissemination pathways. It also highlights that these pathways may not be sufficient for an effective clinical implementation of these practices. PMID:28752808

  17. Body, stress and nursing: ethnography of an Intensive Care and Surgical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Maria das Graças Teles [UNIFESP; Castro, Odilon; Pereira,Pedro Paulo Gomes

    2013-01-01

    This text seeks to reflect on the concepts of stress among nurses that work in the Surgical and Intensive Care Centers of a teaching hospital in the State of Paraíba. Qualitative ethnographic research allowed us to perceive that when talking about stress, these professionals mentioned their bodies and bodily manifestations. The research undertaken allowed us to understand the intimate relationships between the body, stress and nursing.

  18. Relationship between organizational culture and commitment of employees in health care centers in west of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Yadollah; Mohammadibakhsh, Roghayeh; Soltanian, Alireza; Behzadifar, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Presence of committed personnel in each organization not only reduces their absenteeism, delays, and displacements but also leads to a dramatic increase in performance and efficiency of an organization, mental freshness of employees, better manifestation of noble objectives, and organizational mission as well as fulfillment of personal goals. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment of employees in administrative units of health care centers in the cities of Hamedan Province based on the Denison model in 2015. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 177 employees in administrative units of health care centers in the cities of Hamedan Province were selected by a multistage stratified sampling method. The data collection instruments included the standardized Denison organizational culture survey and organizational commitment questionnaire by Meyer and Allen. Data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS version 21 using descriptive statistics and Pearson product-moment coefficient. Results Among the 12 indicators of organizational culture, the highest mean scores were assigned to empowerment (16.74), organizational learning (16.41), vision (16.4), and strategic direction (16.35); respectively. Furthermore, the indicators of capability development (14.2), core values (15.31), team orientation (15.45), and goals (15.46) received the lowest mean scores in this respect. Among the four dimensions of organizational culture, the highest mean score was related to “mission” in organizational culture and the lowest score was associated with “involvement.” Meyer and Allen’s organizational commitment model also had three components in which affective commitment in this study obtained the highest score (26.63) and continuance commitment received the lowest score (24.73). In this study, there was a significant correlation between all the components of organizational culture and

  19. Consequences of alcohol consumption among women cared for in a Psychosocial Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cristina Pillon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the consumption of alcohol and its impact on the physical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal realms, as well on the impulse control and social responsibility of a group of women receiving specialized treatment. It is a descriptive qualitative study. The sample comprised 61 women, predominately adults, single, with low education levels and who were domestic workers. On average they consumed high quantities of distilled alcohol per day. The women were diagnosed with alcohol dependence syndrome and presented significant damages to their intrapersonal and impulse control areas. A minority sought treatment to stop drinking, and 59% had initiated a prior treatment for mental and psychiatric disorders. The results provided use with information on alcohol consumption, as well as on the consequences of drinking among women. Such data is essential for rethinking how to plan health care proposals for this population. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22712.

  20. Family centered maternity care: its relationship to perinatal regionalization and neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, W H; Swartz, J V

    1976-09-01

    For several months prior to birth a major portion of a family's attention, conversation, thought, and often worry, is directed toward the idea of a new child. This prolonged attention and anticipation contribute to making childbirth an emotionally charged experience. In psychological terms, it is therefore a critical period of peak motivation for learning, and a time to peak susceptibility to reinforcement. Theory, reason, and scientific evidence indicate thng with childbirth and early postpartum experiences, can significantly affect subsequent parental behaviors, the child's central environment influence. Evidence strongly suggests that these parental attitudes and behaviors so crucial to the child's ultimate well-being are learned rather than derived instinctually, and therefore they are malleable and can be taught, directed, and corrected. Through education and reinforcement it is possible to encourage parental behaviors and child interactions which are products of feelings of control, competence, accomplishment, understanding, and caring. Similarly we can recognize and work toward replacing attitudes, feelings, and behaviors that express fear, worry, and insecurity about the child. Over the past 50 years major changes have occurred in the practice of obstetrics and newborn pediatrics. Other major changes will necessarily occur as we move toward perinatal regionalization. Changes instigated solely on physiologic data can have unrecognized collateral effects on the psychological component of the childbirth experience. All concerned health care personnel, especially obstetricians and pediatricians, can insist that the importance of desirable mother-father-child interactions be recognized and that practices fostering them be afforded a high priority. I would like to endorse a comment from a recent article by Richmond concerning the advent of behavioral pediatrics by adding that behavioral obstetrics is also "an idea whose time has arrived".

  1. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care.

  2. Determinants of quality of life in elderly patients of a psychosocial care center in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottan, Gabriela; Morais, Eliane Pinheiro de; Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Trentini, Clarissa; Heldt, Elizeth

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the sociodemographic, clinical, and functional determinants of quality of life in elderly (older than 60 years) patients from a Psychosocial Care Center. The sample was randomly selected patients undergoing treatment at the center during the study period. Quality of life was assessed using the brief version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL-BREF) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment for older adults (WHOQOL-OLD). A total of 50 elderly individuals with a mean age of 67.5 (SD = 5.72) years were included in the study. A hierarchical linear regression showed that clinical characteristics, such as severe symptoms of depression and a higher number of comorbidities, were related to lower quality of life. Better functional capacity and more frequent visits to the center were determinants of higher quality of life. These findings underscore the importance of assessing quality of life and of taking this variable into account when planning health interventions for elderly patients at a Psychosocial Care Center.

  3. Stakeholders' Recommendations to Improve Patient-centered "LGBTQ" Primary Care in Rural and Multicultural Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Miria; Silva-Bañuelos, Alma Rosa; Sturm, Robert; Willging, Cathleen E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals among gender/sexual minorities share experiences of stigma and discrimination, yet have distinctive health care needs influenced by ethnic/racial minority and rural realities. We collected qualitative data from lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT) and queer persons across the largely rural, multicultural state of New Mexico, particularly those from understudied ethnic groups, regarding factors facilitating or impeding patient-centered primary care. The themes identified formed the basis for a statewide summit on LGBT health care guidelines and strategies for decreasing treatment gaps. Three to 15 individuals, ages 18 to 75 years, volunteered for 1 of 4 town hall dialogues (n = 32), and 175 people took part in the summit. Participants acknowledged health care gaps pertinent to LGBT youth, elders, American Indians, and Latinos/Latinas, expressing specific concern for rural residents. This preliminary research emphasizes the need to improve primary care practices that treat rural and ethnic-minority LGBT people and offers patient-driven recommendations to enhance care delivery while clinic-level transformations are implemented. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  4. "We prefer greeting rather than eating:" life in an elder care center in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teka, Alemnesh; Adamek, Margaret E

    2014-12-01

    In Ethiopia where family care is a centuries-long tradition, living in an elder care institution invariably brings social devaluation. Accordingly, this study explored the psychosocial needs of older adults in a residential elder care center in Ethiopia from the perspective of both staff and residents. Three focus group discussions of 24 residents and interviews with 5 staff persons revealed that elders were living a subsistence lifestyle, eating the same meal every day, mostly cutoff from the surrounding community, and lacking basic amenities. Despite the absence of basic amenities, residents yearned even more so for meaningful social interaction. Psychosocial support was both undervalued and underutilized by staff members, and thus, residents' psychosocial well-being appeared to be at risk. The addition of social workers in institutional care in Ethiopia may help to promote improved living standards. Advocacy is needed on behalf of residents to establish and implement guidelines on care and support of residents in old age homes. As elders in developing countries are living longer--a growing number with disabilities--at the same time that informal supports are waning, the need for developing long term care policies is becoming critical.

  5. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  6. Multipayer patient-centered medical home implementation guided by the chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Robert A; Bailit, Michael H; Mauger, David T; Wagner, Edward H; Siminerio, Linda

    2011-06-01

    A unique statewide multipayer ini Pennsylvania was undertaken to implement the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) guided by the Chronic Care Model (CCM) with diabetes as an initial target disease. This project represents the first broad-scale CCM implementation with payment reform across a diverse range of practice organizations and one of the largest PCMH multipayer initiatives. Practices implemented the CCM and PCMH through regional Breakthrough Series learning collaboratives, supported by Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) practice coaches, with required monthly quality reporting enhanced by multipayer infrastructure payments. Some 105 practices, representing 382 primary care providers, were engaged in the four regional collaboratives. The practices from the Southeast region of Pennsylvania focused on diabetes patients (n = 10,016). During the first intervention year (May 2008-May 2009), all practices achieved at least Level 1 National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Physician Practice Connections Patient-Centered Medical Home (PPC-PCMH) recognition. There was significant improvement in the percentage of patients who had evidence-based complications screening and who were on therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality (statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors). In addition, there were small but statistically significant improvements in key clinical parameters for blood pressure and cholesterol levels, with the greatest absolute improvement in the highest-risk patients. Transforming primary care delivery through implementation of the PCMH and CCM supported by multipayer infrastructure payments holds significant promise to improve diabetes care.

  7. Developing patient-centered teams: The role of sharing stories about patients and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ariana H; Hassinger, Jane A; Martin, Lisa A; Harris, Lisa H; Gold, Marji

    2015-09-01

    Research indicates that health care teams are good for staff, patients, and organizations. The characteristics that make teams effective include shared objectives, mutual respect, clarity of roles, communication, trust, and collaboration. We were interested in examining how teams develop these positive characteristics. This paper explores the role of sharing stories about patients in developing patient-centered teams. Data for this paper came from 1 primary care clinic as part of a larger Providers Share Workshop study conducted by the University of Michigan. Each workshop included 5 facilitated group sessions in which staff met to talk about their work. This paper analyzes qualitative data from the workshops. Through an iterative process, research team members identified major themes, developed a coding scheme, and coded transcripts for qualitative data analysis. One of the most powerful ways group members connected was through sharing stories about their patients. Sharing clinical cases and stories helped participants bond around their shared mission of patient-centered care, build supportive relationships, enhance compassion for patients, communicate and resolve conflict, better understand workflows and job roles, develop trust, and increase morale. These attributes highlighted by participants correspond to those documented in the literature as important elements of teambuilding and key indicators of team effectiveness. The sharing of stories about patients seems to be a promising tool for positive team development in a primary care clinical setting and should be investigated further. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Identifying elements of patient-centered care in underserved populations: a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela Raja

    Full Text Available Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes.

  9. Identifying Elements of Patient-Centered Care in Underserved Populations: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sheela; Hasnain, Memoona; Vadakumchery, Tracy; Hamad, Judy; Shah, Raveena; Hoersch, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:25993110

  10. Caring for Young Children with Asthma: Perspectives from Urban Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ellen; Laws, Margaret A; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Nath, Anjali; Reid, Margaret J; Sandel, Megan; Cohen, Robyn T

    2017-07-24

    Asthma disproportionately affects low-income, minority youth, with notable disparities among children urban community health centers (CHCs) regarding treating young children with asthma could improve care for these patients. This study uses data from semi-structured focus groups with staff from eight urban CHCs. Themes emerged in three domains. Within the parent/family domain, providers noted low rates of follow-up visits, low health literacy, and-for young children specifically-misunderstanding about the diagnosis. At the CHC level, providers needed more staff, space, and comfort with applying the guidelines to infants and young children. CHCs reported asthma registries, population health oversight, and an asthma champion improved care. At the system level, providers wanted improved communication with emergency departments and community outreach programs. Reducing these multi-level barriers may improve care.

  11. Prenatal care in a primary healthcare center for imprisoned pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Silva Fochi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This experience report aimed to describe the prenatal care undertaken in a primary care center in the non-metropolitan area of the State of São Paulo, offered to the female prison population. The data and related information refer to the period June 2010 – June 2012. The article describes the construction of the work process by the local team, the dynamics of providing the attendance, the human resources involved and the consultations undertaken. The prenatal care provided to the pregnant women made it possible to investigate the pluralized universe of imprisoned women and their needs resulting from the condition of being pregnant in the prison environment. Thus, decent attendance to the prison population’s health - a human and constitutional right - is considered important, so as to avoid physical, emotional and social problems, which in the pregnant woman may be passed on to her child.

  12. Characterization of the clientele attended in a Psychosocial Care Center - alcohol and drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliany Nazaré Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This documentary and retrospective study aimed to analyze the profile of the clientele attended in the Psychosocial Care Center Alcohol and Other Drugs from Sobral, Ceará, Brazil in 2010, based on 300 records. Males predominated with 75% (n=225, with age ranging from 11 to 29 years old with 44.3% (n=133, single with 49% (n=147, and with elementary school 45.7% (n=137. The most commonly used drug among men was crack, 31.3% (n=94, and among women, tobacco, 12% (n=36. The losses associated with dependence, are mostly related to the family, with 31.3% (n=94. The highlight to crack requires changes in the care process implemented in institutions. One should remain alert to these new profiles related to chemical dependency, so that quality and integral care can be offered to this clientele.

  13. Evaluation of Managerial Needs for Palliative Care Centers: Perspectives of Medical Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafadar, Didem; Ince, Nurhan; Akcakaya, Adem; Gumus, Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    Palliative therapies have an important role in increasing the quality of healthcare and in dealing with physical and psychosocial problems due to cancer. We here aimed to evaluate the managerial perspectives and opinions of the hospital managers and clinical directors about specialized palliative care centers. This study was conducted in two large-scale hospitals in which oncology care is given with medical directors (n:70). A questionnaire developed by the researchers asking about demographic characteristics and professional experience, opinions and suggestions of medical directors about providing and integrating palliative care into healthcare was used and responses were analyzed. Potential barriers in providing palliative care (PC) and integrating PC into health systems were perceived as institutional by most of the doctors (97%) and nurses (96%). Social barriers were reported by 54% of doctors and 82% of nurses. Barriers due to interest and knowledge of health professionals about PC were reported by 76% of doctors and 75% of nurses. Among encouragement ideas to provide PC were dealing with staff educational needs (72%), improved working conditions (77%) and establishing a special PC unit (49)%. An independent PC unit was suggested by 27.7% of participants and there was no difference between the hospitals. To overcome the barriers for integration of PC into health systems, providing education for health professionals and patient relatives, raising awareness in society, financial arrangements and providing infrastructure were suggested. The necessity for planning and programming were emphasized. In our study, the opinions and perspectives of hospital managers and clinical directors were similar to current approaches. Managerial needs for treating cancer in efficient cancer centers, increasing the capacity of health professionals to provide care in every stage of cancer, effective education planning and patient care management were emphasized.

  14. Challenges facing primary care practices aiming to implement patient-centered medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Melissa M; Rose, Danielle E; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Canelo, Ismelda A; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-01

    While the potential of patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) is promising, little is known empirically about the frontline challenges that primary care (PC) leaders face before making the decision to implement PCMH, let alone in making it a reality. Prior to the design and implementation of the Veterans Health Administration's (VA) national PCMH model--Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT)--we identified the top challenges faced by PC directors and examined the organizational and area level factors that influenced those challenges. A national cross-sectional key informant organizational survey was fielded to the census of PC directors at VA medical centers and large community-based outpatient clinics (final sample n = 229 sites). PC directors were asked to rate the degree to which they faced 48 management challenges in eight PCMH-related domains (access, preventive care, chronic diseases requiring care in PC, challenging medical conditions, mental health/substance abuse, special populations, PC coordination of care, and clinical informatics). Responses were dichotomized as moderately-to-extremely challenging versus somewhat-slightly-not at all challenging. Items were rank ordered; chi square or regression techniques were used to examine variations in facility size, type, urban/rural location, and region. On average, VA PC directors reported 16 moderate-to-extreme challenges, and the top 20 challenges spanned all eight PCMH domains. Four of the top 20 challenges, including the top two challenges, were from the clinical informatics domain. Management of chronic non-malignant pain requiring opiate therapy was the third most reported challenge nationwide. Significant organizational and area level variations in reported challenges were found especially for care coordination. Better understanding of PC challenges ahead of PCMH implementation provides important context for strategic planning and redesign efforts. As a national healthcare system, the VA provides a unique

  15. User-centered design to improve clinical decision support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Julian; Chuang, Emmeline; Goldzweig, Caroline; Cain, Cindy L; Sugar, Catherine; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2017-08-01

    A growing literature has demonstrated the ability of user-centered design to make clinical decision support systems more effective and easier to use. However, studies of user-centered design have rarely examined more than a handful of sites at a time, and have frequently neglected the implementation climate and organizational resources that influence clinical decision support. The inclusion of such factors was identified by a systematic review as "the most important improvement that can be made in health IT evaluations." (1) Identify the prevalence of four user-centered design practices at United States Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinics and assess the perceived utility of clinical decision support at those clinics; (2) Evaluate the association between those user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support. We analyzed clinic-level survey data collected in 2006-2007 from 170 VA primary care clinics. We examined four user-centered design practices: 1) pilot testing, 2) provider satisfaction assessment, 3) formal usability assessment, and 4) analysis of impact on performance improvement. We used a regression model to evaluate the association between user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support, while accounting for other important factors at those clinics, including implementation climate, available resources, and structural characteristics. We also examined associations separately at community-based clinics and at hospital-based clinics. User-centered design practices for clinical decision support varied across clinics: 74% conducted pilot testing, 62% conducted provider satisfaction assessment, 36% conducted a formal usability assessment, and 79% conducted an analysis of impact on performance improvement. Overall perceived utility of clinical decision support was high, with a mean rating of 4.17 (±.67) out of 5 on a composite measure. "Analysis of impact on performance

  16. The ethical leadership challenge: creating a culture of patient- and family-centered care in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2011-01-01

    The growing number of medical errors and resulting preventable deaths in hospitals presents an ethical dilemma that must be addressed by health care leaders and managers. These medical errors and deaths raise questions about safety and quality issues resulting in rising public mistrust and patient dissatisfaction. Many of these medical errors and deaths could have been avoided by including the patient and family in the care. The ethical challenge for leadership is creating a culture of patient- and family-centered care as a means to improve quality, safety, patient satisfaction, and public trust. This article addresses ways to improve safety, quality, patient satisfaction, and cost and thereby reduce medical errors and deaths by implementing a patient- and family-centered care culture. The first critical step for improvement is for hospital leaders and managers to answer the ethical call to create a culture centered on patient- and family-centered care in the hospital setting.

  17. An Integrated Model of Care: A Visit to The SPARK Center, a Program of Boston Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griest, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This article features The SPARK Center, a program of Boston Medical Center, located in Mattapan, Massachusetts. The Center has pioneered a whole-child approach to address the multi-dimensional needs of Boston's most at-risk children, recognizing that vulnerable children need more than educational supports to flourish. The Center's integrated model…

  18. Supply-side barriers to maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There exist several barriers to maternal health service utilization in developing countries. Most of the previous studies conducted in India have focused on demand-side barriers, while only a few have touched upon supply-side barriers. None of the previous studies in India have investigated the factors that affect maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers (HSCs in India, despite the fact that these institutions, which are the geographically closest available public health care facilities in rural areas, play a significant role in providing affordable maternal health care. Therefore, this study aims to examine the supply-side determinants of maternal service utilization at HSCs in rural India. Data and Methods This study uses health facility data from the nationally representative District-Level Household Survey, which was administered in 2007–2008 to examine the effect of supply-side variables on the utilization of maternal health care services across HSCs in rural India. Since the dependent variables (the number of antenatal registrations, in-facility deliveries, and postnatal care services are count variables and exhibit considerable variability, the data were analyzed using negative binomial regression instead of Poisson regression. Results The results show that those HSCs run by a contractual auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM are likely to offer a lower volume of services when compared to those run by a permanent ANM. The availability of obstetric drugs, weighing scales, and blood pressure equipment is associated with the increased utilization of antenatal and postnatal services. The unavailability of a labor/examination table and bed screen is associated with a reduction in the number of deliveries and postnatal services. The utilization of services is expected to increase if essential facilities, such as water, telephones, toilets, and electricity, are available at the HSCs. Monitoring of ANM’s work by Village

  19. Management of a Trichophyton tonsurans outbreak in a day-care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Robert M; Champagne, Caroline; Waghorn, David; Ong, Eugene; Grabczynska, Sophie A; Morris, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Trichophyton tonsurans is the leading cause of tinea capitis in the United Kingdom (UK) as well as causing tinea corporis. This organism has been linked to several outbreaks in the UK and abroad, and such outbreaks may be prolonged since T. tonsurans can be difficult to control. There remains an incomplete consensus in the literature on the optimal management of such outbreaks of this infection. Following notification that a child with T. tonsurans was identified at a day-care center in the UK, initial investigations identified nine cases of fungal infection involving children and staff over the previous 7 months. We report on the management of an outbreak of T. tonsurans tinea capitis and tinea corporis among children and staff in a day-care center. An outbreak control team with representatives from dermatology, microbiology, day-care center management, and the Health Protection Agency initiated case ascertainment by scalp inspection and brushing of all children and staff at the nursery. Two complete rounds of screening were required before the outbreak was declared over. Infection control measures included antifungal shampoo use, exclusion of identified cases for a short period, removal of shared items from the center, and enhanced decontamination of fomites. The outbreak, which lasted longer than 12 months, involved 12 children and 7 staff members. Of these, 12 cases were confirmed by positive fungal culture. T. tonsurans is difficult to manage, especially in childcare settings, but case ascertainment, appropriate treatment with oral agents, and sustained infection control measures can be effective in controlling such outbreaks.

  20. Comparison of patient outcomes in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray AS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrienne S Murray, Michael Griswold, Imran Sunesara, Ed SmithUniversity of Mississippi Health Care, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USABackground: Value analysis is the science of balancing the mandate to deliver high-quality clinical outcomes with the necessity to drive down costs in order to thrive in the challenging economics of health care. This study compared average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality across the cardiology, cardiovascular, neuroscience, and orthopedic service lines, in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs (VAPs. The basic question was, “Do academic medical centers with VAPs have lower average length of stay, better morbidity and mortality rates, and lower overall supply costs?”Methods and results: The clinical data base/resource manager (CDB/RM of the University HealthSystem Consortium was utilized as secondary data for this study. Reports from the CDB/RM were generated from 2006 to 2011. Continuous variable differences across VAP status were examined using Wilcoxon two-sample tests. Primary analyses used multilevel linear mixed model methods to estimate the effects of VAPs on primary outcomes (average length of stay, cost, morbidity, mortality. Association components of the linear mixed models incorporated random effects at the hospital level and robust, Huber-White, standard errors were calculated. There was no significant difference for average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality between academic medical centers with and without VAPs. However, outcomes were not noted to be substantially worse.Conclusion: Numerous case studies reveal that aggressively active VAPs do decrease hospital cost. Also, this study did not find a negative impact on patient care. Further studies are needed to explore the benefits of value analysis and its effect on patient outcomes.Keywords: value analysis, average length of stay, morbidity, mortality

  1. Emergency care and the national quality strategy: highlights from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Goodrich, Kate

    2015-04-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) of the US Department of Health and Human Services seeks to optimize health outcomes by leading clinical quality improvement and health system transformation through a variety of activities, including quality measure alignment, prioritization, and implementation. CMS manages more than 20 federal quality measurement and public reporting programs that cover the gamut of health care providers and facilities, including both hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) and individual emergency physicians. With more than 130 million annual visits, and as the primary portal of hospital admission, US hospital-based EDs deliver a substantial portion of acute care to Medicare beneficiaries. Given the position of emergency care across clinical conditions and between multiple settings of care, the ED plays a critical role in fulfilling all 6 priorities of the National Quality Strategy. We outline current CMS initiatives and future opportunities for emergency physicians and EDs to effect each of these priorities and help CMS achieve the triple aim of better health, better health care, and lower costs.

  2. Primary Care Research in the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Joe V; Slutsky, Jean R

    2016-04-01

    In their article in this issue, Mazur and colleagues analyze the characteristics of early recipients of funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Mazur and colleagues note correctly that PCORI has a unique purpose and mission and suggest that it should therefore have a distinct portfolio of researchers and departments when compared with other funders such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Responding on behalf of PCORI, the authors of this Commentary agree with the characterization of PCORI's mission as distinct from that of NIH and others. They agree too that data found on PCORI's Web site demonstrate that PCORI's portfolio of researchers and departments is more diverse and more heavily populated with clinician researchers, as would be expected. The authors take issue with Mazur and colleagues' suggestion that because half of clinical visits occur within primary care settings, half of PCORI's funded research should be based in primary care departments. PCORI's portfolio reflects what patients and others tell PCORI are the critical questions. Many of these do, in fact, occur with more complex conditions in specialty care. The authors question whether the research of primary care departments is too narrowly focused and whether it sufficiently considers study of these complex conditions. Research on more complex conditions including heart failure, coronary artery disease, and multiple comorbid conditions could be highly valuable when approached from the primary care perspective, where many of the comparative effectiveness questions first arise.

  3. Improving the quality of discharge care for the homeless: a patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Allen, Rebecca; Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Lucas, Georgina I; Wang, Emily A

    2013-05-01

    Homeless patients are at risk for low-quality discharge care, yet there are limited patient-centered data to guide improvement. We explored relationships between assessment of housing status by hospital staff and quality of discharge care using quantitative and qualitative data from interviews and chart reviews with 98 homeless patients: 80% male, mean homelessness 2.8 years, mean age 44. Patient-reported performance of discharge care varied substantially across seven domains from 16-75% and chart review documented lower performance than patient report. Over half (56%) were not asked about their housing status and multivariable logistic regression showed assessment of housing status was independently associated with higher performance in five domains: discussions about cost of medications, physical activity levels, diet, transportation, and mental health follow-up. Qualitative data revealed patient concerns about stigmatization from disclosure of housing status. Our findings suggest that addressing housing status in acute care settings while avoiding stigmatization may improve discharge care for homeless patients.

  4. Toward Culturally Centered Integrative Care for Addressing Mental Health Disparities among Ethnic Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kisha; McGregor, Brian; Thandi, Poonam; Fresh, Edith; Sheats, Kameron; Belton, Allyson; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, recognition and treatment of mental illness and its co-morbidities still remain a significant public health problem in the United States. Ethnic minorities are identified as a population that is vulnerable to mental health disparities and face unique challenges pertaining to mental health care. Psychiatric illness is associated with great physical, emotional, functional, and societal burden. The primary health care setting may be a promising venue for screening, assessment, and treatment of mental illnesses for ethnic minority populations. We propose a comprehensive, innovative, culturally centered integrated care model to address the complexities within the health care system, from the individual level, that includes provider and patient factors, to the system level, which include practice culture and system functionality issues. Our multi-disciplinary investigative team acknowledges the importance of providing culturally tailored integrative healthcare to holistically concentrate on physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral problems among ethnic minorities in a primary care setting. It is our intention that the proposed model will be useful for health practitioners, contribute to the reduction of mental health disparities, and promote better mental health and well-being for ethnic minority individuals, families, and communities. PMID:25383991

  5. Food insecure families: description of access and barriers to food from one pediatric primary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Kahn, Robert S; Klein, Melissa D

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that food insecurity negatively impacts child health, health care providers play little role in addressing the issue. To inform potential primary care interventions, we sought to assess a range of challenges faced by food insecure (FI) families coming to an urban, pediatric primary care setting. A cross-sectional study was performed at a hospital-based, urban, academic pediatric primary care clinic that serves as a medical home for approximately 15,000 patients with 35,000 annual visits. Subjects included a convenience sample of caregivers of children presenting for either well child or ill care over a 4 months period in 2012. A self-administered survey assessed household food security status, shopping habits, transportation access, budgeting priorities, and perceptions about nutrition access in one's community. Bivariate analyses between food security status and these characteristics were performed using Chi square statistics or Fisher's exact test. The survey was completed by 199 caregivers. Approximately 33% of families were FI; 93% received food-related governmental assistance. FI families were more likely to obtain food from a corner/convenience store, utilize food banks, require transportation other than a household car, and prioritize paying bills before purchasing food. FI families perceived less access to healthy, affordable foods within their community. Thus, FI families may face unique barriers to accessing food. Knowledge of these barriers could allow clinicians to tailor in-clinic screening and create family-centered interventions.

  6. Child Day Care Centers, Day_care_preschool_providers, Published in 2008, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Buffalo County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2008. It is described as...

  7. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongDeuk Baek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians’ perception of quality of care. Methods: A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733. Results: The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians’ perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians’ ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Conclusion: Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians’ perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  8. Cancer caregivers advocate a patient- and family-centered approach to advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Natasha; O'Callaghan, Clare; Baird, Angela; Hiscock, Nathaniel; Clayton, Josephine

    2014-06-01

    Cancer caregivers have important roles in delivering practical, emotional, and end-of-life support to patients; however, they express multiple unmet needs, particularly information on future care planning. Early regular communication and decision making may improve access to timely information, alleviate anxiety, reduce uncertainty, and improve coping strategies. This study examines how cancer caregivers view advance care planning (ACP) to inform an ACP program in an Australian cancer center. This study used a qualitative descriptive design with grounded theory overtones. Eighteen caregivers of patients from lung and gastrointestinal tumor streams participated in focus groups or semistructured interviews, which incorporated the vignette technique. Caregivers believe that, although confronting, ACP discussions can be helpful. Conversations are sometimes patient initiated, although caregivers may intend to sensitively broach conversations over time. Findings highlight the impact of caregiver hierarchies, adaptive family decision-making styles, and complex cultural influences on decision making. Some caregivers may develop subsidiary care intentions, based on "knowing" or overriding patients' desires. Hindrances on caregivers supporting patients' ACPs include limited information access, patient or caregiver resistance to engage in conversations, and ACPs association in oncology with losing hope. Many caregivers wanted professional support and further opportunities to obtain information, develop subsidiary plans, and help patients engage in ACP discussions. Findings highlight the influence of cancer caregivers and family dynamics over ACP decisions and actualization of future care plans. A patient- and family-centered care approach to ACP, promoting shared decision making and caregiver support, is recommended. Given that caregivers may override and, plausibly, misinterpret patients' desires, caregivers' subsidiary planning warrants further investigation. Copyright

  9. Obesity perceptions and documentation among primary care clinicians at a rural academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Sohaib; Lasky, Rosalind; Brooks, W Blair; Batsis, John A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity recognition in primary care is important to address the epidemic. We aimed to evaluate primary care clinician-reported documentation, management practices, beliefs and attitudes toward obesity compared to body mass index (BMI) calculation, obesity prevalence and actual documentation of obesity as an active problem in electronic health record in a rural academic center. Our target population for previously validated clinician survey was 56 primary care providers working at 3 sites. We used calendar year 2012 data for assessment of baseline system performance for metrics of documentation of BMI in primary care visits, and proportion of visits in patients with obesity with obesity as a problem. Standard statistical methods assessed the data. Survey response rate was 91%. Average age of respondents was 48.9 years and 62.7% were females. 72.5% clinicians reported having normal BMI. The majority of clinicians reported regularly documenting obesity as an active problem, and utilized motivational interviewing and basic good nutrition and healthy exercise. Clinicians identified lack of discipline and exercise time, access to unhealthy food and psychosocial issues as major barriers. Most denied disliking weight loss discussion or patients taking up too much time. In 21,945 clinic visits and 11,208 annual preventive care visits in calendar year 2012, BMI was calculated in 93% visits but obesity documentation as an active problem only 27% of patients meeting BMI criteria for obesity. Despite high clinician-reported documentation of obesity as an active problem, actual obesity documentation rates remained low in a rural academic medical center. Copyright © 2015 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Creating and sustainable development of specialized centers as a way to improve quality of medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Guzeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of care is evaluated on the completeness of the survey, the correct diagnosis, treatment efficacy, and its duration. Improving the quality and efficiency of medical care for children with paroxysmal disorders of consciousness is one of topical problems of neurology.Aim. The aim of the work is to justify the relationship between improving the quality of health care and sustainable development in the modern conditions of specialized medical centers on the example of the work on the identification and treatment of children with paroxysmal disorders of consciousness of the Center for diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy, and sleep disorders in children and adolescents at the department neurology, neurosurgery and medical genetics SPbGPMU.Materials and methods. For more accurate diagnosis and treatment at the Center conducted a comprehensive examination, including video-EEG оf 527 children aged 1 month to 18 years. A clinical trial study included medical cases, assessment of neurological and somatic status, the study of seizure types and forms of the disease. Instrumental methods of examination were determined by EEG and MRI studies of the brain.Main results. Comprehensive survey of sick children with monitoring video-EEG revealed that 317 children (60,1% had epileptic paroxysms and 210 children (39,8% – non-epileptic paroxysms. Correction treatment was performed in 284 (89,5% children with epileptic paroxysms and altered the treatment in 190 (90,4% children with epileptic paroxysms.Conclusion. The presented clinical data show the high effectiveness of the Centre in the diagnosis and treatment of children with paroxysmal disorders of consciousness. The accumulated experience in the Center confirms the relevance of the creation of the structure of scientific and educational institutions specialized centers in which patients will be given to high-quality medical care.

  11. Stress ulcer prophylaxis guidelines:Are they being implemented in Lebanese health care centers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abeer; Zeitoun; Maya; Zeineddine; Hani; Dimassi

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the current practice of stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) in Lebanese Health care centers.METHODS:A multi-center prospective chart review study was conducted over 8 mo.A questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy students who collected data on demographics,SUP medications,dose,route,duration and associated risk factors.The appropriateness of SUP use was determined as per American Society of Health-System Pharmacists guidelines.Institutional review board approval was obtained from each hospital center.RESULTS:A total of 1004 patients were included.67% of the patients who received prophylaxis did not have an indication for SUP.The majority (71.6%) of the patients who were administered parenteral drugs can tolerate oral medications.Overall,the regimen of acid-suppressant drugs was suboptimal in 87.6% of the sample.This misuse was mainly observed in non-teaching hospitals.CONCLUSION:This study highlighted the need,in Lebanese hospitals,to establish clinical practice guidelines for the use of SUP;mainly in non-critical care settings.

  12. Survey of Wound-Healing Centers and Wound Care Units in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yufeng; Xia, Lei; Jia, Lijing; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the Chinese experience of establishing hospital-based wound care centers over 15 years. A total of 69 wound-healing centers (WHCs) and wound care units (WCUs) were involved. Questionnaires were diverged to the principal directors of these sites; data extracted for this study included origin, year of establishment, medical staff, degree of hospitals, wound etiology, wound-healing rate, hospital stay, and outcomes data. The period of data extraction was defined as before and after 1 year of the establishment of WHCs and WCUs. The earliest WHC was established in 1999, and from 2010 the speeds of establishing WHCs and WCUs rapidly increased. The majority of WHCs were divisions of burn departments, and all WHCs came from departments of outpatient dressing rooms. Full-time multidisciplinary employees of WHCs differed greatly to WCUs. Types of wound and outcomes vary with those of centers reported from Western countries and the United States. Improvement in wound healing caused by the establishment of WHCs and WCUs in China occurred without doubt. Some advices include the following: rearrange and reorganize the distribution of WHCs and WCUs; enact and generalize Chinese guidelines for chronic wounds; utilize medical resources reasonably; improve multidisciplinary medical staff team; draw up and change some medical and public policies and regulations.

  13. Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes of Women with Preeclampsia and Eclampsia at a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hediye Dağdeviren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Preeclampsia is a multisystem disorder of unknown etiology and one of the leading causes of maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. Adverse outcomes can be improved by early identification of the disease and timely referral to a tertiary center. The aims of this study were to evaluate the outcomes of preeclampsia-eclampsia cases and share our experiences in a tertiary center. Methods: The study conducted by retrospectively analyzing the data of 350 women who gave birth between 2008 and 2013 at a tertiary care center. Results: The mean age of the enrolled women was 35 years, the mean gestational age at delivery-36 weeks, the mean birth weight-2.73 kg, and the mean platelet count was 204.000/ mm3. The incidence of preterm deliveries was 66.6%. Severe preeclampsia was noted in 29.4% of cases. Neonatal intensive care unit admissions were seen in 10.6% of cases. A total of 22.9% of these women had vaginal deliveries, while the other 77.1% underwent cesarean section. High systolic blood pressure and elevated serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferase values had significant independent effects of differentiating between mild and severe preeclampsia. Conclusion: Fetomaternal morbidity and mortality rates associated with hypertensive disorders are alarming, especially in developing countries. As such, the high-risk obstetric population should be screened earlier in pregnancy. A system allowing early referral in these cases should be created. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2015; 53:143-6

  14. Incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 complications among Saudi adult patients at primary health care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsenany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed type 2 diabetes and its role in complications among adult Saudi patients. [Subjects] Patients attending four primary health care centers in Jeddah were enrolled. [Methods] A cross-sectional design study among Saudi patients attending Ministry of Health primary health care centers in Jeddah was selected for use by the Primary Health Care administration. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires to determine the presence of diabetes and risk factors using questions about the history of any disease. [Results] Diabetes mellitus was present in 234 subjects during the data collection period (March-June 2014). Mean patient age was 58 years; diabetes prevalence was 42% in males and 58% in females. The mean age for diabetes onset in males and females was 34 and 39 years, respectively. There was a higher incidence of obesity (75%) associated with a sedentary lifestyle (body mass index ≥25) in females (N= 96; 40%) compared with males (N= 87; 36%). In this study, >44% of individuals aged 55 or older had severe to uncontrolled diabetes with long-term complications. The age-adjusted incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease was 38% and 24%, respectively, showing a clear incidence of diabetes associated with cardiovascular disease in Saudi Arabia. [Conclusion] This study found that a multifactorial approach to managing diabetes complication risks is needed.

  15. [Work as a source of pleasure: evaluating a Psychosocial Care Center team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzner, Cecília Helena; Olschowsky, Agnes; Kantorski, Luciane Prado

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pleasure at work felt by the members of a Psychosocial Care Center team. This qualitative case study used Forth Generation Evaluation. This study was performed in Foz do Iguaçu, Parana, Brazil, in November and December 2006. Participants were 10 tem members. Data collection was performed through observation and individual interviews. The analysis was initiated at the same time as the data collection, and the final analysis was performed as per the following steps: data ordering, classification and final analysis. The following analysis themes were developed: work characteristics at the psychological care center, suffering and coping with suffering at work. During the evaluation, the participants showed pleasure and fulfillment with their work by expressing pride, fulfillment and appreciation of what they deliver. Pleasure occurs during the development of psychosocial care, because they always have the freedom to rearrange their manner of working, making possible to develop activities and attitudes capable of giving them pleasure.

  16. Physical activity in child-care centers: do teachers hold the key to the playground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kristen A; Kendeigh, Cassandra A; Saelens, Brian E; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Sherman, Susan N

    2012-02-01

    Many (56%) US children aged 3-5 years are in center-based childcare and are not obtaining recommended levels of physical activity. In order to determine what child-care teachers/providers perceived as benefits and barriers to children's physical activity in child-care centers, we conducted nine focus groups and 13 one-on-one interviews with 49 child-care teachers/providers in Cincinnati, OH. Participants noted physical and socio-emotional benefits of physical activity particular to preschoolers (e.g. gross motor skill development, self-confidence after mastery of new skills and improved mood, attention and napping after exercise) but also noted several barriers including their own personal attitudes (e.g. low self-efficacy) and preferences to avoid the outdoors (e.g. don't like hot/cold weather, getting dirty, chaos of playground). Because individual teachers determine daily schedules and ultimately make the decision whether to take the children outdoors, they serve as gatekeepers to the playground. Participants discussed a spectrum of roles on the playground, from facilitator to chaperone to physical activity inhibitor. These findings suggest that children could have very different gross motor experiences even within the same facility (with presumably the same environment and policies), based on the beliefs, creativity and level of engagement of their teacher.

  17. Designing a patient-centered personal health record to promote preventive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krist Alex H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based preventive services offer profound health benefits, yet Americans receive only half of indicated care. A variety of government and specialty society policy initiatives are promoting the adoption of information technologies to engage patients in their care, such as personal health records, but current systems may not utilize the technology's full potential. Methods Using a previously described model to make information technology more patient-centered, we developed an interactive preventive health record (IPHR designed to more deeply engage patients in preventive care and health promotion. We recruited 14 primary care practices to promote the IPHR to all adult patients and sought practice and patient input in designing the IPHR to ensure its usability, salience, and generalizability. The input involved patient usability tests, practice workflow observations, learning collaboratives, and patient feedback. Use of the IPHR was measured using practice appointment and IPHR databases. Results The IPHR that emerged from this process generates tailored patient recommendations based on guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and other organizations. It extracts clinical data from the practices' electronic medical record and obtains health risk assessment information from patients. Clinical content is translated and explained in lay language. Recommendations review the benefits and uncertainties of services and possible actions for patients and clinicians. Embedded in recommendations are self management tools, risk calculators, decision aids, and community resources - selected to match patient's clinical circumstances. Within six months, practices had encouraged 14.4% of patients to use the IPHR (ranging from 1.5% to 28.3% across the 14 practices. Practices successfully incorporated the IPHR into workflow, using it to prepare patients for visits, augment health behavior counseling, explain test results

  18. Family-centered care in children with epilepsy: Evaluating the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC-20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Kariym C; Wilk, Piotr; Ryan, Bridget L; Speechley, Kathy N

    2016-10-01

    The objective was to test whether the five-domain structure of the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC-20) was observed in a sample of children with epilepsy and, if not, to propose adaptations to improve its utility in this population. Data came from the Health-Related Quality of Life in Children with Epilepsy Study (HERQULES)-a multicenter prospective cohort study (n = 374) following children 4-12 years of age for 2 years after diagnosis. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) tested the applicability of the five domains/factors in a sample of children with epilepsy approximately 6 months following diagnosis (n = 311). Goodness-of-fit statistics were used to examine sources of ill model fit, and modification indices guided the model modification process where there was strong theoretical rationale for changes. The five-factor model described by the originators of the MPOC-20 was found to be inadmissible in children with epilepsy, with four of the five factors demonstrating high correlations (r > 0.85). Upon merging the intercorrelated factors, a two-factor solution with a mediocre fit emerged (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.080, Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.902, Standardized Root Mean Square Residual (SRMR) = 0.060). Modification indices identified four items as the source of poor model fit. Removing these four items and reperforming the CFA resulted in an adequate model fit and a revised 16-item MPOC (RMSEA = 0.057, CFI = 0.958, SRMR = 0.036). The two factors are "Family/Care Provider Interaction" and "Providing Information." Results suggest that the MPOC-16 better reflects family-centered care (FCC) in children with epilepsy than the original MPOC-20. The benefit of having fewer factors is that scoring is simpler and the interpretation of the results is easier. This was the first investigation of the factor structure of the MPOC-20 on a sample entirely composed of children with epilepsy. These results add to evidence that the factor structure

  19. Identification of sapovirus infection among Japanese infants in a day care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akihara, Shiho; Phan, Tung Gia; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Yagyu, Fumihiro; Okitsu, Shoko; Müller, Werner E G; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    A total of 921 fecal specimens collected from 44 infants in a day care center in Tokyo, Japan during June 1999 to July 2000 were tested for the presence of sapovirus by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 88 fecal specimens from infants with acute gastroenteritis, 2.3% (2) were found to be positive for sapovirus. Twenty-two of 833 (2.6%) fecal specimens collected from asymptomatic infants were also infected with this virus. Another interesting feature was the demonstration of high incidence of sapovirus infection (95.5%, 21 of 22) identified in a single day care center, which was not due to viral shedding after the latest acute gastroenteritis. Sapovirus was subjected to genetic analysis by sequencing. Up to 4 of 24 sapoviruses (16.7%) were clustered into genogroup IV known as a rare group. Remarkably, majority (79.2%, 19 of 24) of sapovirus isolates detected in this study turned out to present one novel sapovirus genotype tentatively called GI/8. It was noteworthy to point out that the GI/8 sapovirus infection was apparently confined only within the period of 9 weeks (44th through 52nd weeks). This pattern of infection implied the outbreak of asymptomatic GI/8 sapovirus infection in these subjects. The findings clearly indicate genogroup I sapovirus can be classified into eight genotypes. This is the first report to underscore that sapovirus pathogen causes not only clinical manifestations of acute gastroenteritis but also asymptomatic infection in infants in day care centers in Japan. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, inc.

  20. The effect of aerobic exercise training on work ability of midwives working in health care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Abedian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Maintaining and improving the work ability are important social goals, which challenge the health care and rehabilitation systems as well as health providers. The physical and mental health status affect the work ability. Regarding this, the current study aimed to investigate the effect of aerobic training on the work ability of the midwives in the health care centers of Mashhad, Iran in 2013. Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 midwives working in the health centers of Mashhad, Iran, using purposeful sampling method. The health care centers were selected randomly, and then assigned into the intervention and control groups. Subsequently, the intervention group performed aerobic exercise for 24 sessions. Data collection was performed using the work ability index and the Bruce test (to compare the fitness of the participants at the pre- and post-intervention stages. For data analysis, the two-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U, and Chi-square tests as well as independent and paired sample t-tests were employed, using SPSS version 19. The P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: According to the results of the study, the mean score of work ability was significantly higher in the intervention group than that in the control group (40.5±4.9 vs. 36.4± 5.3, respectively; P=0.004. Furthermore, there was a significant difference between the two groups regarding the two variables including work ability compared with life time best (P

  1. Educational Needs Assessment of Family Health Providers in Tabriz Health Care Centers in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Ghoreyshyzadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study intends to determine the educational needs of family health staff employed in health care centers in Tabriz, the provincial capital of east Azerbaijan, Iran in 2015. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 282 staff were enrolled, together with 22 managers, through census. The data collection tool was a researcher-designed questionnaire whose content validity were confirmed by 5 experts of health care and medical education centers. They self--evaluated their knowledge, skills and attitudes in 6 task processes including "integrated care for pregnant women", "women’s general and reproductive health", "child health care and breastfeeding", "vaccination skills", "teenagers’ and young adults’ health", and "common diseases prevention and control". Cronbach alpha coefficients were over 0.85. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 16 and descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation and one-sample t tests were calculated to compare the mean of scores with midpoint criteria (=3. Results: Generally family health staff self-evaluated their knowledge, skills and attitudes in all task processes in higher than midpoint criteria level, which was consistent with the opinions of the managers, however, educational needs required by personnel in some processes or sub- process including "common diseases prevention and control" ( knowledge on referring thalassemia couples for genetic testing, mental health counseling, "vaccination skills" ( intradermal vaccination skills, "teenagers’ and young adults’ health" (Self-care training and parents education, "women’s general and reproductive health" (principles of family planning counseling and less needs stated in "integrated care for pregnant mothers" (except for diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy, placenta previa and abruption and "child health care" as compared to criteria (All P value <0.05. In contrast to self-assessment results, in interorganization evaluations

  2. Participatory Design and Development of a Patient-centered Toolkit to Engage Hospitalized Patients and Care Partners in their Plan of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Stade, Diana; Chang, Frank; Dalal, Anuj; Getty, George; Kandala, Ravali; Lee, Jaeho; Lehman, Lisa; Leone, Kathleen; Massaro, Anthony F; Milone, Marsha; McNally, Kelly; Ohashi, Kumiko; Robbins, Katherine; Bates, David W; Collins, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Patient engagement has been identified as a key strategy for improving patient outcomes. In this paper, we describe the development and pilot testing of a web-based patient centered toolkit (PCTK) prototype to improve access to health information and to engage hospitalized patients and caregivers in the plan of care. Individual and group interviews were used to identify plan of care functional and workflow requirements and user interface design enhancements. Qualitative methods within a participatory design approach supported the development of a PCTK prototype that will be implemented on intensive care and oncology units to engage patients and professional care team members developing their plan of care during an acute hospitalization.

  3. A hand hygiene intervention to decrease infections among children attending day care centers: Design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Zomer (Tizza); V. Erasmus (Vicky); N. Vlaar (Nico); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); A. Tjon-A-Tsien (Aimée); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Day care center attendance has been recognized as a risk factor for acquiring gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, which can be prevented with adequate hand hygiene (HH). Based on previous studies on environmental and sociocognitive determinants of caregivers'

  4. Learning through teaching: empowering students and culturally diverse patients at a community-based nursing care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensenig, Julia A

    2007-08-01

    This article addresses the effect of a nursing care center on student learning. Associate degree nursing students spend clinical days at a nursing care center that was created in collaboration with an inner-city clinic serving individuals who are uninsured and underinsured. The nursing students learn cultural sensitivity, teaching strategies, and interdisciplinary skills. The service-learning experience benefits the nursing students, the nursing department of the college, the patients who visit the nursing care center, the clinic, and the community. This article describes the development of the nursing care center, examples of teaching-learning opportunities, and evidence of student learning. This successful collaboration between a community college and an inner-city clinic can be Associareplicated by other nursing programs.

  5. Child Day Care Centers, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Brown County, WI.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2008. Data by...

  6. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Tuning the Light in Senior Care: Evaluating a Trial LED Lighting System at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Samla, Connie [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bisbee, Dave [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The GATEWAY program documented the performance of tunable-white LED lighting systems installed in several spaces within the ACC Care Center, a senior-care facility in Sacramento, CA. The project results included energy savings and improved lighting quality, as well as other possible health-related benefits that may have been attributable, at least in part, to the lighting changes.

  7. An observational study of umbilical cord clamping practices of maternity care providers in a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Eileen K; Stoll, Kathrin; Taha, Natalie

    2013-03-01

    Severing the umbilical cord at birth is likely the oldest intervention, the timing of which remains fraught with controversy. Emerging evidence suggests benefit in delaying cord clamping for both term and preterm infants. The objective of this study was to investigate actual cord clamping time and circumstances at a large tertiary care center in Canada. We used a stopwatch to time the interval from the time the infant was born as far as the umbilicus until the time that the umbilical cord was clamped before cutting. We reported on timing of the umbilical cord clamping overall and by practitioner group (obstetrician, midwife, and family practitioner). A total of 98 women and their practitioners consented to be observed at the British Columbia Women's Hospital and Health Center, Vancouver, Canada. More than one-half (56.2%) of all infants had their umbilical cord clamped within 15 seconds. The median (5th, 95th percentile) clamping time in seconds for the full sample was 12 (4, 402) with practitioner subgroups as follows: obstetricians (12 [3, 107]), family physicians (19 [6, 325]), and midwives (81 [6, undefined]). The median clamping time was likely to be longer when the birth occurred spontaneously, no umbilical cord blood was collected, and no birth or neonatal complications occurred. In our sample taken in 2006 to 2007, most infants had umbilical cords clamped immediately after the birth, with more than one-half clamped within 15 seconds of birth. Since the time of our study, delayed umbilical cord clamping for the healthy term newborn has become a part of recommended management of third stage of labor and resuscitation guidelines. It would be informative to repeat a study like this one to determine compliance with the current standards of care. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. "WhatsApp"ening in orthopedic care: a concise report from a 300-bedded tertiary care teaching center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil N; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-07-01

    Smartphones have emerged as essential tools providing assistance in patient care, monitoring, rehabilitation, communication, diagnosis, teaching, research and reference. Among innumerable communication apps, WhatsApp has been widely popular and cost effective. The aim of our study was to report the impact of introduction of a smartphone app "WhatsApp" as an intradepartmental communication tool on (1) awareness of patient-related information, (2) efficiency of the handover process and (3) duration of traditional morning handovers among orthopedic residents in a 300-bedded tertiary care teaching center. Written handovers and paging used for communication at our center led to occasional inefficiencies among residents. Widespread use, low cost, availability and double password protection (phone lock and WhatsApp lock) made WhatsApp's group conversation feature an ideal tool for intradepartmental patient-related communication. Twenty-five consecutive admissions before and after WhatsApp (BW, AW) were included in the study. Eight orthopedic residents attempted fifty randomly arranged questions based on the twenty-five patients in each study period. A null hypothesis that introduction of WhatsApp group would neither increase the awareness of patient-related information nor improve the efficiency of the handovers among residents was assumed. A significant improvement observed in scores obtained by residents in the AW group led to rejection of the null hypothesis. The residents also reported swifter and efficient handovers after the introduction of WhatsApp. Our results indicate that the introduction of a smartphone app "WhatsApp" as an intradepartmental communication tool can bring about an improvement in patient-related awareness, communication and handovers among orthopedic residents.

  9. Effectiveness of person-centered care on people with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SK

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sun Kyung Kim, Myonghwa Park Education and Research Center for Evidence Based Nursing Knowledge, College of Nursing, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea Background: Person-centered care is a holistic and integrative approach designed to maintain well-being and quality of life for people with dementia, and it includes the elements of care, the individual, the carers, and the family.Aim: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of person-centered care for people with dementia.Methods: Literature searches were undertaken using six databases including Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database, and KoreaMed using the following keywords: cognition disorder, dementia, person-centered care, patient-centered care, client-centered care, relationship-centered care, and dementia care. The searches were limited to interventional studies written in English and Korean and included randomized controlled studies and noncontrolled studies for people with dementia living in any setting.Results: Nineteen interventional studies, including 3,985 participants, were identified. Of these, 17 studies were from long-term care facilities and two studies were from homecare settings. The pooled data from randomized controlled studies favored person-centered care in reducing agitation, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and depression and improving the quality of life. Subgroup analysis identified greater effectiveness of person-centered care when implemented for people with less severe dementia. For agitation, short-term interventions had a greater effect (standardized mean difference [SMD]: -0.434; 95% conference interval [CI]: -0.701 to -0.166 than long-term interventions (SMD: -0.098; 95% CI: -0.190 to 0.007. Individualized activities resulted in a significantly greater beneficial effect than standard care (SMD: 0.513; 95% CI: -0.994 to -0.032. However, long-term, staff education, and

  10. Marketing strategy adjustments in the ambulatory care center industry: implications for community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J H

    1989-01-01

    Each stage of a product's life cycle requires marketing strategy modifications in response to changing demand levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in ambulatory care center (ACC) operational characteristics indicative of product, market, and distribution channel adjustments that could have a competitive impact upon community pharmacy practice. A questionnaire was mailed to a national sample of 325 ACC managers. Evidence of new product feature additions includes increased emphasis on continued care and increased prevalence of prescription drug dispensing. Expansion into new market segments and distribution channels was demonstrated by increased participation in HMO and employer relationships. The observed adjustments in ACC marketing strategies present obvious challenges as well as less obvious opportunities for community pharmacy practice.

  11. [Primary health care reform and implications for the organizational culture of Health Center Groups in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Claudia; Dussault, Gilles; Lapão, Luís Velez

    2014-01-01

    The health sector's increasing complexity poses major challenges for administrators. There is considerable consensus on workforce quality as a key determinant of success for any health reform. This study aimed to explore the changes introduced by an action-training intervention in the organizational culture of the 73 executive directors of Health Center Groups (ACES) in Portugal during the primary health care reform. The study covers two periods, before and after the one-year ACES training, during which the data were collected and analyzed. The Competing Values Framework allowed observing that after the ACES action-training intervention, the perceptions of the executive directors regarding their organizational culture were more aligned with the practices and values defended by the primary health care reform. The study highlights the need to continue monitoring results over different time periods to elaborate further conclusions.

  12. Testing family-centered, function-focused care in hospitalized persons with dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Marie; Chippendale, Tracy; Resnick, Barbara; Galvin, James E

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Hospital-acquired disability causes decreased quality of life for patients with dementia and family caregivers, and increased societal costs. Materials & methods A comparative, repeated measures study tested the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the family-centered, function-focused care intervention (Fam-FFC) in dyads of hospitalized, medical patients with dementia and family caregivers (FCGs). Results The intervention group demonstrated better activities of daily living and walking performance, and less severity/duration of delirium and hospital readmissions, but no significant differences in gait/balance. FCGs showed increased preparedness for caregiving and less anxiety but no significant differences in depression, strain and mutuality. Conclusion Fam-FFC presents a possible pathway to meeting the Triple Aim of improved patient care, improved patient health and reduced costs for persons with dementia. PMID:26107319

  13. Adaptation of a best practice guideline to strengthen client-centered care in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwal, Lorraine; Marchuk, Brenda; Laforêt-Fliesser, Yvette; Castanza, Joyce; Davis, Lori; LaSalle, Marg

    2014-01-01

    Best practice guidelines (BPGs) were developed by the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO) to support evidence-based nursing practice. One Ontario public health unit chose to implement the BPG on client-centered care (CCC). A critical review of this BPG revealed issues that would hinder successful implementation within a public health setting. These included a focus on the client as an individual, the predominance of acute care exemplars and training resources that were not representative of public health nursing practice, and the need to reconcile the enforcement roles of public health with the BPG principles. The purpose of this article is to describe the process of adapting the CCC BPG to more accurately reflect the broad scope of public health nursing practice. A model for CCC in public health nursing context is presented and processes for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining CCC are described.

  14. Caring for family caregivers: An analysis of a family-centered intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Ferré-Grau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the effectiveness of Problem-Solving Therapy (PST on family caregivers through the use of scales to measure anxiety, depression and emotional distress; and to explore facilitating factors and obstacles for its use based on the narrative of nurses. Method A clinical trial and an exploratory focus group with the use of mixed analysis methodology. The study was conducted in a primary health care center in Tarragona, Spain, and the sample consisted of 122 family caregivers who were included in the home care service, and 10 nurses who participated in the intervention group. Family caregivers with evident symptoms of anxiety, depression and emotional distress received PST in the intervention group. The intervention group also consisted of a discussion with eight nurses, which was transcribed and submitted to content analysis. Conclusion Problem-Solving Therapy proved to be effective in reducing perceived anxiety, depression and emotional distress. We identified its strong points and obstacles as described by nurses.

  15. Social life of people with diagnosis of schizophrenia, attended at a psychosocial care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Marciana Fernandes; Saeki, Toyoko

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative research aimed to investigate the social life of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia at a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS), and identify how the therapeutic process offered by the CAPS has contributed to their social lives. The subjects of the study were patients with schizophrenia, between eighteen and forty years of age and registered at the CAPS in Uberaba, Brazil. The data were collected through a semi-structured interview. Three categories were identified: the patients' life before and after the illness, their everyday life outside CAPS and CAPS care contributing to their social life and stabilization of symptoms. The results showed that the CAPS regimen enhances treatment compliance and decreases hospitalization. However, social functioning for schizophrenic patients occurs within the family and treatment contexts. This reality evidences the need for a partnership with the Family Health Strategy and the community to improve socialization.

  16. Dientamoeba fragilis - a Commensal in Children in Danish Day Care Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokelainen, Pikka; Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Andreassen, Bente Utoft

    2017-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is an intestinal protozoan of debated clinical significance. Here, we present cross-sectional and longitudinal observations on D. fragilis in children aged 0-6 years from a 1-year multi-day-care-center cohort study set in Copenhagen, Denmark. The inclusion period for the cohort...... factors (age, gender, having siblings, having domestic animals at home, having had infant colic, recent history of intake of antibiotics, and recent history of travel abroad) as well as six reported symptoms (lack of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, weight loss, and diarrhea) and testing...

  17. User-Centered Design of Health Care Software Development: Towards a Cultural Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanziola, Enrique; Uznayo, María Quispe; Ortiz, Juan Marcos; Simón, Mariana; Otero, Carlos; Campos, Fernando; Luna, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Health care software gets better user efficiency, efficacy and satisfaction when the software is designed with their users' needs taken into account. However, it is not trivial to change the practice of software development to adopt user-centered design. In order to produce this change in the Health Informatics Department of the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, a plan was devised and implemented. The article presents the steps of the plan, shows how the steps were carried on, and reflects on the lessons learned through the process.

  18. Great summer reads and family-centered care, all in one!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmann, Elizabeth; Dokken, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Award-winning author Jodi Picoult has written several novels that dramatically portray families caught in personal, financial, medical, legal, and ethical dilemmas related to their children having medical or developmental challenges. At times drawing on personal experience but always conducting extensive background research, Picoult's work is very realistic in its depiction of varied child and family scenarios. These gripping stories, while fiction, point clearly to real issues and highlight the need for and importance of a family-centered approach in pediatric care. Pediatric nurses can confidently pick up a Picoult novel for an entertaining and thought-provoking summer read.

  19. A Study to Determine the Needs for Standards in Army Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    child care centers was formalized. At this time Friedrich Froebel , in his book the Education of Man brought out the importance of the early training of...children. According to Froebel , It is highly pernicious to consider the stages of human development - infant, child, boy or girl, youth or maiden, man...being) is seen but vaguely in the idea and word, and scarcely at all considered in life and for life. (46:99) Ia Froebel is known as the "father of the

  20. Human-centered design of a cyber-physical system for advanced response to Ebola (CARE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Velin; Jagtap, Vinayak; Skorinko, Jeanine; Chernova, Sonia; Gennert, Michael; Padir, Taşkin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the process towards the design of a safe, reliable, and intuitive emergency treatment unit to facilitate a higher degree of safety and situational awareness for medical staff, leading to an increased level of patient care during an epidemic outbreak in an unprepared, underdeveloped, or disaster stricken area. We start with a human-centered design process to understand the design challenge of working with Ebola treatment units in Western Africa in the latest Ebola outbreak, and show preliminary work towards cyber-physical technologies applicable to potentially helping during the next outbreak.

  1. Barriers to specialty care and specialty referral completion in the community health center setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Katharine E; Perrin, James M; Hobrecker, Karin; Donelan, Karen

    2013-02-01

    To assess the frequency of barriers to specialty care and to assess which barriers are associated with an incomplete specialty referral (not attending a specialty visit when referred by a primary care provider) among children seen in community health centers. Two months after their child's specialty referral, 341 parents completed telephone surveys assessing whether a specialty visit was completed and whether they experienced any of 10 barriers to care. Family/community barriers included difficulty leaving work, obtaining childcare, obtaining transportation, and inadequate insurance. Health care system barriers included getting appointments quickly, understanding doctors and nurses, communicating with doctors' offices, locating offices, accessing interpreters, and inconvenient office hours. We calculated barrier frequency and total barriers experienced. Using logistic regression, we assessed which barriers were associated with incomplete referral, and whether experiencing ≥ 4 barriers was associated with incomplete referral. A total of 22.9% of families experienced incomplete referral. 42.0% of families encountered 1 or more barriers. The most frequent barriers were difficulty leaving work, obtaining childcare, and obtaining transportation. On multivariate analysis, difficulty getting appointments quickly, difficulty finding doctors' offices, and inconvenient office hours were associated with incomplete referral. Families experiencing ≥ 4 barriers were more likely than those experiencing ≤ 3 barriers to have incomplete referral. Barriers to specialty care were common and associated with incomplete referral. Families experiencing many barriers had greater risk of incomplete referral. Improving family/community factors may increase satisfaction with specialty care; however, improving health system factors may be the best way to reduce incomplete referrals. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the practice of patient centered care: The role of ethnography and reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Gorli, Mara; Moja, Lorenzo; Galuppo, Laura; Ripamonti, Silvio; Scaratti, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Patient centered care (PCC) is an essential dimension of healthcare systems' mission worldwide and is recognized as an important condition for ensuring the quality of care. Nonetheless, it is also acknowledged that various care providers perceive patient centeredness differently and that there remain several unanswered questions about the aspects of healthcare delivery that are linked to an actual achievement of PCC. In the paper, we categorize the current research on PCC into two streams ("dyadic" and "organizational") and we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each. Despite their important contributions to healthcare services research, these approaches to PCC do not fully capture the network of practices and relationships constituting patients and providers' experiences within healthcare contexts. Therefore, we propose an alternative interpretation of PCC that integrates insights from "practice theories" and emphasizes the negotiated and local nature of patient centeredness, which is accomplished through the engagement of providers and patients in everyday care practices. To develop such interpretation, we propose a research approach combining ethnographic and reflexive methods. Ethnography can help achieve more nuanced descriptions of what PCC truly encapsulates in the care process by drawing attention to the social and material reality of healthcare contexts. Reflexivity can help disentangle and bring to surface the tacit knowledge spread in everyday care practices and transform it into actionable knowledge, a type of knowledge that may support services improvement toward PCC. We anticipate that such improvement is far from straightforward: an actual achievement of PCC may challenge the interests of different stakeholders and unsettle consolidated habits, hierarchies and power dynamics. This unsettlement, however, can also serve as a necessary condition for engaging in a participative process of internal development. We discuss the outcomes, limitations and

  3. Satisfaction of oncologic patients hospitalized in centers with and without service of palliative cares: multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Campaña Castillo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the satisfaction regarding care of patients suffering advanced stage cancer admitted in Hospital Sant Jaume de Calella, Sant Rafael de Barcelona and San Lorenzo de Viladecans, subject to the presence or absence of Palliative Care Unit during 2012. An observational, descriptive and transversal study will be conducted.The assessed population are patients admitted to these centers that meet the requirements for inclusion and exclusion.In the Hospital Sant Jaume de Calella, which provides Palliative Care service, patients will be check into the Internal Medicine unit and the Medium-Stay unit. In the other two hospitals, there isn’t any Palliative Care Service and patients will be admitted in the Internal Medicine units of both hospitals. Data will be collected during one year with a sample of 200 patients and non-probably sampling case row.The main variables to consider are the presence or absence of palliative service, satisfaction of care and quality of life of patients to be studied. The secondaries are sex, age, pap score, reason for admission, cancer diagnosis and origin. For the collection of the data we used the questionnaire EORTC IN-PASAT32 modified by the research team and the EORTC QLQ C-15 PAL.The analysis of the quantitative variables will be done through centralization and dispersal parameters. Categorical variables satisfaction of care and quality of life will be analysed using frequencies and joined together by the Chi square. The statistical program SPSS v 16.0 will be used.

  4. Differences in Acute Ischemic Stroke Quality of Care and Outcomes by Primary Stroke Center Certification Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Cox, Margueritte; Patel, Puja; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xian, Ying; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2017-02-01

    Primary stroke center (PSC) certification was established to identify hospitals providing evidence-based care for stroke patients. The numbers of PSCs certified by Joint Commission (JC), Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, Det Norske Veritas, and State-based agencies have significantly increased in the past decade. This study aimed to evaluate whether PSCs certified by different organizations have similar quality of care and in-hospital outcomes. The study population consisted of acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to PSCs participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Measures of care quality and outcomes were compared among the 4 different PSC certifications. A total of 477 297 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified from 977 certified PSCs (73.8% JC, 3.7% Det Norske Veritas, 1.2% Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, and 21.3% State-based). Composite care quality was generally similar among the 4 groups of hospitals, although State-based PSCs underperformed JC PSCs in a few key measures, including intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator use. The rates of tissue-type plasminogen activator use were higher in JC and Det Norske Veritas (9.0% and 9.8%) and lower in State and Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program certified hospitals (7.1% and 5.9%) (PStroke hospitals with PSC certification, acute ischemic stroke quality of care and outcomes may differ according to which organization provided certification. These findings may have important implications for further improving systems of care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The potential conflict between policy and ethics in caring for undocumented immigrants at academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacari Stone, Lisa; Steimel, Leah; Vasquez-Guzman, Estela; Kaufman, Arthur

    2014-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are at the forefront of delivering care to the diverse medically underserved and uninsured populations in the United States, as well as training the majority of the health care workforce, who are professionally obligated to serve all patients regardless of race or immigration status. Despite AHCs' central leadership role in these endeavors, few consolidated efforts have emerged to resolve potential conflicts between national, state, and local policies that exclude certain classifications of immigrants from receiving federal public assistance and health professionals' social missions and ethical oath to serve humanity. For instance, whereas the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides a pathway to insurance coverage for more than 30 million Americans, undocumented immigrants and legally documented immigrants residing in the United States for less than five years are ineligible for Medicaid and excluded from purchasing any type of coverage through state exchanges. To inform this debate, the authors describe their experience at the University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH) and discuss how the UNMH has responded to this challenge and overcome barriers. They offer three recommendations for aligning AHCs' social missions and professional ethics with organizational policies: (1) that AHCs determine eligibility for financial assistance based on residency rather than citizenship, (2) that models of medical education and health professions training provide students with service-learning opportunities and applied community experience, and (3) that frontline staff and health care professionals receive standardized training on eligibility policies to minimize discrimination towards immigrant patients.

  6. Integration of footprints information systems in palliative care: the case of Medical Center of Central Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsavatewa, Christopher; Musa, Philip F; Ramsingh, Isaac

    2012-06-01

    Healthcare in America continues to be of paramount importance, and one of the most highly debated public policy issues of our time. With annual expenditures already exceeding $2.4 trillion, and yielding less than optimal results, it stands to reason that we must turn to promising tools and solutions, such as information technology (IT), to improve service efficiency and quality of care. Presidential addresses in 2004 and 2008 laid out an agenda, framework, and timeline for national health information technology investment and development. A national initiative was long overdue. This report we show that advancements in both medical technologies and information systems can be capitalized upon, hence extending information systems usage beyond data collection to include administrative and decision support, care plan development, quality improvement, etc. In this paper we focus on healthcare services for palliative patients. We present the development and preliminary accounts of a successful initiative in the Medical Center of Central Georgia where footprints information technology was modified and integrated into the hospital's palliative care service and existing EMR systems. The project provides evidence that there are a plethora of areas in healthcare in which innovative application of information systems could significantly enhance the care delivered to loved ones, and improve operations at the same time..

  7. Fostering innovation in medicine and health care: what must academic health centers do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzau, Victor J; Yoediono, Ziggy; Ellaissi, William F; Cho, Alex H

    2013-10-01

    There is a real need for innovation in health care delivery, as well as in medicine, to address related challenges of access, quality, and affordability through new and creative approaches. Health care environments must foster innovation, not just allowing it but actively encouraging it to happen anywhere and at every level in health care and medicine-from the laboratory, to the operating room, bedside, and clinics. This paper reviews the essential elements and environmental factors important for health-related innovation to flourish in academic health systems.The authors maintain that innovation must be actively cultivated by teaching it, creating "space" for and supporting it, and providing opportunities for its implementation. The authors seek to show the importance of these three fundamental principles and how they can be implemented, highlighting examples from across the country and their own institution.Health innovation cannot be relegated to a second-class status by the urgency of day-to-day operations, patient care, and the requirements of traditional research. Innovation needs to be elevated to a committed endeavor and become a part of an organization's culture, particularly in academic health centers.

  8. Usual Primary Care Provider Characteristics of a Patient-Centered Medical Home and Mental Health Service Use

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, AL; Cochran, SD; Leibowitz, A.; Wells, KB; Kominski, G; Mays, VM

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society of General Internal Medicine BACKGROUND: The benefits of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) over and above that of a usual source of medical care have yet to be determined, particularly for adults with mental health disorders. OBJECTIVE: To examine qualities of a usual provider that align with PCMH goals of access, comprehensiveness, and patient-centered care, and to determine whether PCMH qualities in a usual provider are associated with the use of mental health services...

  9. Relationships of oral habits, oral status and lisping among children in day-care centers of Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Soudabeh Noori; Jalil Kooh Paiehzadeh; Ramin Mozafari Kermani; Mohammadreza Nateghi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Oral habits have hazardous effects on children's speech which are sometimes irreversible and permanent. This study was planned to assess these oral habits among children in day-care centers of Tehran, Iran.Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, 400 children were selected through multistage sampling from 16 day-care centers in Tehran, Iran, They were 24 to 72-month old. Bottle feeding, pacifier usage and digit sucking were determined. After interviewing parent...

  10. Integrating Palliative Care into the Care of Neurocritically Ill Patients: A Report from The IPAL-ICU (Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit) Project Advisory Board and the Center to Advance Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jennifer A.; Curtis, J. Randall; Nelson, Judith E.; Campbell, Margaret; Gabriel, Michelle; Hays, Ross M.; Mosenthal, Anne C.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Lustbader, Dana R.; Brasel, Karen J.; Weiss, Stefanie P.; Weissman, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe unique features of neurocritical illness that are relevant to provision of high-quality palliative care; To discuss key prognostic aids and their limitations for neurocritical illnesses; To review challenges and strategies for establishing realistic goals of care for patients in the neuro-ICU; To describe elements of best practice concerning symptom management, limitation of life support, and organ donation for the neurocritically ill. Data Sources A search of Pubmed and MEDLINE was conducted from inception through January 2015 for all English-language articles using the term “palliative care,” “supportive care,” “end-of-life care,” “withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy,” “limitation of life support,” “prognosis,” or “goals of care” together with “neurocritical care,” “neurointensive care,” “neurological,” “stroke,” “subarachnoid hemorrhage,” “intracerebral hemorrhage,” or “brain injury.” Data Extraction and Synthesis We reviewed the existing literature on delivery of palliative care in the neurointensive care unit setting, focusing on challenges and strategies for establishing realistic and appropriate goals of care, symptom management, organ donation, and other considerations related to use and limitation of life-sustaining therapies for neurocritically ill patients. Based on review of these articles and the experiences of our interdisciplinary/interprofessional expert Advisory Board, this report was prepared to guide critical care staff, palliative care specialists, and others who practice in this setting. Conclusions Most neurocritically ill patients and their families face the sudden onset of devastating cognitive and functional changes that challenge clinicians to provide patient-centered palliative care within a complex and often uncertain prognostic environment. Application of palliative care principles concerning symptom relief, goal setting, and family emotional support, will

  11. Consumer-Centered, Collaborative, and Comprehensive Care: The Core Essentials of Recovery-Oriented System of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiClemente, Carlo C; Norwood, Amber E Q; Gregory, W Henry; Travaglini, Letitia; Graydon, Meagan M; Corno, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Recovery from substance abuse and mental health disorders represents a journey through which individuals move beyond treatment of provider-identified problems toward a path of achieving wellness and productive lives. Overcoming obstacles and barriers encountered along the recovery process, individuals reveal their own strengths and resilience necessary to cope, survive, and thrive in the face of adversity. Recovery-oriented system of care (ROSC) is a framework designed to address the multidimensional nature of recovery by creating a system for coordinating multiple systems, services, and supports that are person centered and build on the strengths and resiliencies of individuals, families, and communities. As is common knowledge among substance abuse and mental health providers, consumers often present with high rates of comorbidity, which complicates care. In addition, behavioral health consumers engage in risky health behaviors (e.g., smoking) at a disproportionate rate, which places them at increased risk for developing noncommunicable diseases. ROSCs are ideal for addressing the complicated and varied needs of consumers as they progress toward wellness. The challenges of creating an ROSC framework that is effective, efficient, and acceptable to consumers is formidable. It requires change on the part of agencies, organizations, providers, and consumers. The importance of comprehensive, integrated screening is highlighted as a critical component of ROSC. Key suggestions for initiating ROSC are offered.

  12. The Obstacles against Nurse-Family Communication in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hadian Shirazi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Communication is one of the key principles in Family-Centered Care (FCC. Studies have shown some drawbacks in communication between families and nurses. Therefore, the present study aimed to recognize the obstacles against nurse-family communication in FCC in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on 8 staff nurses in 2 NICUs affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected using 8 deep semi-structured interviews and 3 observations. Then, they were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in identification of 3 main categories and 7 subcategories. The first category was organizational factors with 2 subcategories of educational domain (inadequate education, lack of a system for nursing student selection, and poor professionalization and clinical domain (difficult working conditions, lack of an efficient system for ongoing education and evaluation, and authoritarian management. The second category was familial factors with socio-cultural, psychological, and economic subcategories. The last category was the factors related to nurses with socio-cultural and psycho-physical subcategories.Conclusion: Identification of the obstacles against nurse-family communication helps managers of healthcare systems to plan and eliminate the challenges of effective communication. Besides, elimination of these factors leads to appropriate strategies in NICUs for effective application of FCC.

  13. [Acceptability and feasibility among primary care doctors of the opportunistic search for HIV in Health Care centers in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes Torres, Rafael Carlos; Aguado Taberné, Cristina; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Espejo Espejo, José; Castro Fernández, Cristina; Fransi Galiana, Luis

    2017-05-10

    To evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of the opportunistic search of HIV according to primary care doctors' experience. To set up the profile of the physician involved in this study. Observational, transversal study. Primary Care Centers of the National Health System. General practitioners and residents who participated in VIH-AP study to measure the acceptability of HIV opportunistic search by patients. Self-filling survey to collect data on age, sex, teaching skills, amount of years dedicated to research, time working with the same quota of patients, acceptability and feasibility of opportunistic HIV search. A total of 197 physicians with a mean age of 45.2±9.7 (SD) years. 18.8% were under 36years old, 70.1% were women and 62.4% had teaching skills. 55.8% worked in towns with a population over 100,000 inhabitants and the mean of years working with the same quota of patients was 6.4±6.6. 91.9% (95%CI: 88.1-98.7) of them considered the opportunistic search of HIV acceptable and 89.3% (95%CI: 85.0-93.6), feasible to perform. The multivariate analysis showed positive relation between the acceptability/feasibility and teaching skills (OR: 2.74; 95%CI: 1.16-6.49). The acceptance of the screening by patients was 93.1% and this was positively related to how long the doctor had worked with the same quota, teaching skills and the amount of years dedicated to research. HIV opportunistic search is an acceptable and feasible method for primary care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Administrative Challenges to the Integration of Oral Health With Primary Care: A SWOT Analysis of Health Care Executives at Federally Qualified Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Connor W; Maxey, Hannah L; Randolph, Courtney; Gano, Laura; Kochhar, Komal

    Inadequate access to preventive oral health services contributes to oral health disparities and is a major public health concern in the United States. Federally Qualified Health Centers play a critical role in improving access to care for populations affected by oral health disparities but face a number of administrative challenges associated with implementation of oral health integration models. We conducted a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis with health care executives to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of successful oral health integration in Federally Qualified Health Centers. Four themes were identified: (1) culture of health care organizations; (2) operations and administration; (3) finance; and (4) workforce.

  15. Using the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale for examining the quality of care for infants and toddlers in Norwegian day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Grethe Baustad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of the presented study is to explore whether ITERS-R is an appropriate tool to use for examining the quality of care for infants and toddlers in Norwegian day care centers. The study is based on a pedagogical perspective of quality, a perspective which takes into account that it is possible both to define and assess the quality in day care centers. This study indicates that ITERS-R can be an appropriate tool to use in examining pedagogical quality in Norwegian day care centers, and especially the concept of process quality. The fit between the values and goals given in the Norwegian Framework Plan and the areas and quality indicators in the ITERS-R is also good; even if there are differences which need to be dealt with. The results are interpreted and discussed within the Norwegian day care center context and the values and goals of Norwegian day care centers. The following four interacting and interdependent dimensions of pedagogical quality made the basis for the discussion: those of the society, the child, the staff (teacher/ teachers and the learning context (Sheridan, 2007, 2009.

  16. Tribally Affiliated Child-Care Center Environment and Obesogenic Behaviors in Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Susan B; Stoner, Julie; Li, Ji; Stephens, Lancer; Campbell, Janis E; Lora, Karina R; Arnold, Sandra H; Horm, Diane; DeGrace, Beth

    2017-03-01

    Child-care centers are an integral part of life for many families with young children. American Indian children are at elevated health risk because of higher levels of obesity and associated health behaviors. Our aim was to assess the child-care environment and children's physical activity (PA) and dietary intake in young children attending tribally affiliated child care. We conducted a cross-sectional study. Participants were from 11 tribally affiliated child-care centers across Oklahoma and included 82 children aged 3 to 5 years old. Classroom observations were conducted using the Environmental and Policy Assessment Observation to measure PA and nutrition environments. Children wore an ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer and lunchtime plate waste was observed. Descriptive statistics, including mean±standard deviation and frequencies, were calculated for the children's behaviors and environment. The total environment score was 23.9±5.2 (maximum=43). The nutrition score was 12.5±3.1 (maximum=21). The PA score was 11.7±2.2 (maximum=22). The participants were 3.8±0.1 years old, 55% were male, 67% were American Indian, and 38% were overweight or obese. Accelerometers were worn for 5.9±1.7 hours, excluding naptime. Children accumulated 4.3±2.2 min/h of moderate to vigorous PA, 4,294±1,883 steps/day, and 12.1±3.7 steps/min. At lunch, children were served 510±241 kcal, and consumed 387±239 kcal. Lunches consisted of 47% carbohydrate, 20% protein, and 33% fat. Total number of F/V served was 2.9±1.9 and consumed was 2.3±1.8, while whole grains served and consumed were 0.3±0.4 and 0.2±0.4, respectively, and lean proteins served and consumed were 0.3±0.4 and 0.2±0.4, respectively. This study describes obesogenic aspects of the child-care environment and identifies areas for improvement. Children did not accumulate adequate PA or consume calories or fat excessively. Children consumed multiple F/V; however, more whole grains and lean proteins could be provided

  17. The impact of trauma-center care on mortality and function following pelvic ring and acetabular injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Morshed (Saam); S.P. Knops (Simon); G.J. Jurkovich (Gregory); J. Wang (Jin); E. MacKenzie (Ellen); F.P. Rivara (Frederick)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractABSTRACT Background: Lower mortality and improved physical function following major polytrauma have been associated with treatment at level-1 trauma centers (TC) compared with that at non-trauma centers (NTC). This study investigates the impact of TC care on outcomes after pelvic a

  18. Evidence, research, and clinical practice: a patient-centered framework for progress in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Gray, Mikel

    2012-01-01

    Traditional criteria used in selecting wound care interventions are being slowly replaced with an evidence-based practice approach. The value of such an approach for providing optimal care has been established, but the definition of evidence-based care and the process used to generate evidence continue to evolve. For example, the role of studies developed to demonstrate efficacy, randomized controlled trials, the value of effectiveness studies designed to evaluate outcomes in real world practice, and the use of disease-oriented (interim) study outcomes for wound care research, such as reduces wound fluid or improves granulation tissue formation, have been topics of international conversations and consensus documents. In addition, the use in some clinical studies and most systematic study reviews of ingredient or characteristic-based categories to group products that may not share a common operational definition of how they function has led to a high variability in outcomes, resulting in inconclusive or low-level evidence. These concerns and debates, along with their influence on practice, may cast doubt on the value of evidence-based practice guidelines for some clinicians, slowing their rate of implementation, and extending the discussion about definitions of evidence-based care and the relative merits of various research designs. At the same time, amid growing concerns about medical device safety, clinicians must answer 3 questions about an intervention and its related products or devices in order to provide safe and effective care: (1) Can it work? (2) Does it work? (3) Is it worth it? Reviewing current knowledge about wound care, wound treatment modalities, and the basic principles of research within the existing framework of questions to be answered suggests a clear path toward obtaining much-needed evidence. In wound care, using clearly defined processes to study patient-centered outcomes (eg, quality of life, complete healing) and only product groupings that

  19. Care staff training based on person-centered care and dementia care mapping, and its effects on the quality of life of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mami; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of care staff training based on person-centered care (PCC) and dementia care mapping (DCM) on the quality of life (QOL) of residents with dementia in a nursing home. An intervention of staff training based on PCC and DCM was conducted with 40 care staff members at a geriatric nursing home. The effects of the staff training on the QOL of residents with dementia were evaluated by the DCM measurements of 40 residents with dementia three times at about one-month intervals (first, baseline; second, pre-intervention; third, post-intervention). The well-being and ill-being values (WIB values) of the residents with dementia measured by DCM were not different between the first and second rounds before the staff training (p = 0.211). Meanwhile, the WIB values increased from the first and second rounds to the third post-intervention round (p = 0.035 and p values. The behavior category 'interactions with others' in DCM also demonstrated a significant increase in the third round compared to the first round (p = 0.041). Staff training based on PCC and DCM could effectively improve the QOL of residents with dementia.

  20. Pathways to care and psychological problems of general practice patients in a "gate keeper" and an "open access" health care system - A comparison of Germany and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, M; Gothe, H; Ormel, J

    2003-01-01

    Background The comparison of different health care systems is one way to give empirical evidence to health care reform and policy. The differences between health care systems in which general practitioners serve as gate keepers in comparison to systems in which patients are free to contact every phy

  1. Survey of 5 European countries suggests that more elements of patient-centered medical homes could improve primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, M.J.; Voerman, G.E.; Erler, A.; Eriksson, T.; Baker, R.; Lepeleire, J. De; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Burgers, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home is a US model for comprehensive care. This model features a personal physician or registered nurse who is augmented by a proactive team and information technology. Such a model could prove useful for advanced European systems as they strive to improve primary care,

  2. Attributes of Child Care Centers and Outdoor Play Areas Associated with Preschoolers' Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Takemi; Okely, Anthony D.; Masters, Jane M.; Moore, Gary T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined characteristics of child care centers associated with preschoolers' moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary behavior while in child care (MVPA-C, SB-C), and attributes of outdoor play areas associated with the same behaviors during outdoor time (MVPA-O, SB-O). Participants were 89 children (3 -5 years) recruited…

  3. Changes across Three Editions of "The Suicidal Patient: Clinical and Legal Standards of Care": Relevance to Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronis, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Treating suicidality is one of the most challenging situations managed by college and university counseling centers. The first edition of Bongar's (1991) "The Suicidal Patient: Clinical and Legal Standards of Care," a compendium of empirical knowledge and clinical research regarding standard of care in the treatment of suicidality, was…

  4. Home-Type Activities at the Day Care Center. (Tipos De Actividades Del Hogar En El Centro De Cuidado Diario.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, May; Moberg, Patricia E.

    This paper argues that home activities comprise a valuable unplanned curriculum and that many of these activities can be transferred to the day care center. It is suggested that these activities foster a closer relationship between child and caregiver and bridge the gap between familiar home environment and novel day care setting. Home activities…

  5. [The meanings constructed in the attention to a crisis in the territory: the psychosocial care center as a protagonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willrich, Janaína Quinzen; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Chiavagatti, Fabieli Gopinger; Cortes, Jandro Moraes; Antonacci, Milena Hohmann

    2013-06-01

    The attention to a crisis is a strategic point in the process of paradigm changes proposed by the Brazilian psychiatric reform, requiring changes in alternative services and in the professionals that must use new technologies of care. This study aimed to identify the actions of attention to a crisis in the territory and the meanings as they evolved, beginning from the discursive practices of the professionals. It was a qualitative study that used the theoretical perspective of social constructionism. From the database of the research, Evaluation of the Psychosocial Care Centers in Southern Brazil (CAPSUL), 27 interviews were analyzed from the professionals of Psychosocial Care Center for Alegrete, along with field diaries with 390 hours of observation. Results showed patient engagement/welcoming and accountability for care. We concluded that freedom, reciprocity, contractuality and responsibility for care were the new meanings needed for the alternative care services to overcome the asylum and sense of exclusion and dangerousness.

  6. Determination of prevalence and causes of hyponatremia in patient's admitted in pediatric intensive care unit of the Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadivar M

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the 708 patients who were admitted in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU of the children's hospital medical center, there were 100 patients with hyponatermia (Na<130 mEq/L. 62% of these patients had hyponatermia at the beginning of admission and 38% during hospitalization in PICU. According to the classification of hyponatermia in comparison to body fluid, this study revealed 7% pseudohyponatermia, 40% euvolemic hyponatermia, 34% hypovolemic hyponatermia and 10% hypovolemic hyponatermia. In conclusion, the most perevalent causes of hyponatermia in this study were syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH (27%, water intoxication (22% and extrarenal losses (20%

  7. The Assimilation of Assistive Technology in Residential Care Centers for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available People with intellectual disability (ID require special support in order to achieve independence in their daily life. Persons with ID are less exposed to assistive technology, although studies have shown that the availability of aids afford an opportunity to reach independence and cooperation. The aim of this study was to examine the nature of the relationship between involvement of the physiotherapy (PT team and the degree to which assistive technology was used. A questionnaire was sent to all PTs employed at all 54 residential care centers for persons with ID of the Division for Mental Retardation at the Ministry of Social Affairs in Israel. A significantly positive correlation was found between the degree of involvement of the PT and the utilization of assistive technology. The study results may be summarized by stating that PTs demonstrated a great deal of involvement, particularly in relation to the extent of their work in the residential care centers. PT's awareness of the importance was indicated as the major reason to use assistive technology.

  8. An asthma and diabetes quality improvement project: enhancing care in clinics and community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Alan; Figge, James; Haskin, Donna L; Pryor, Veronica; Fuller, Karen; Lemme, Thomas; Li, Nancy; O'Brien, Mary Jane

    2011-04-01

    Asthma and diabetes are major chronic conditions in the United States, particularly in the Medicaid population. The majority of care for these diseases occurs at ambulatory practice sites. The New York State Department of Health Office of Health Insurance Programs (OHIP) worked with IPRO, the New York State Medicare quality improvement organization, to develop and implement a quality improvement project (QIP) for these conditions. The approach was based upon the Chronic Care Model and used an iterative academic-detailing methodology. Clinics and community health centers volunteered to participate and used IPRO-collected data with audit and feedback to improve their practices. Several metrics significantly improved for asthma (e.g., use of anti-inflammatory long term controller agents, assessment of asthma severity, use of asthma action plans) and for diabetes (e.g., lipid testing and control, A1c testing). Key organizational elements of success included senior medical leadership commitment and practice site quality improvement team meetings. OHIP has used the QIP experience to begin patient-centered medical home implementation in New York State.

  9. Adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Grainne; Corlett, Jo; Dowling, Maura

    The aim of this study was to explore adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of family-centered care (FCC). A qualitative research design with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with six adult-trained perioperative nurses. Data analysis was guided by Colaizzi's seven-step framework, resulting in a composite description of perioperative nurses' practice of FCC. While participants supported the principle of family involvement in care, they found its implementation in practice difficult and stressful. They reported that families often appeared inadequately prepared for the surgical experience, and subsequent poor experiences for families caused feelings of upset and inadequacy for nurses. While some of these findings are similar to those in previous studies of paediatric nurses' practice of FCC, this is the first known study to examine adult-trained perioperative nurses' practice of FCC. Participants articulated an awareness of what constitutes effective FCC and showed the motivation to accomplish the task of improving family-centered practice in their practice area.

  10. Consumption of industrialized food by infants attending child day care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloni, Maysa Helena de A; Longo-Silva, Giovana; Konstantyner, Tulio; Taddei, José Augusto de A C

    2014-03-01

    To identify the age of introduction of petit suisse cheese and instant noodles in the diet of infants attending nurseries of public day care centers and to compare the nutritional composition of these foods with the healthy recommended diet (breast milk and salt meal) for this age, in order to estimate nutritional errors. Cross-sectional study of 366 children (from nine to 36 months old) who attended day care centers, whose mothers were interviewed about the age of introduction of those foods. The means of the nutrients indicated on the labels of the most consumed brands were considered. For the calculation of the percent composition of breast milk and salt meal, Tables of Food Composition were used. To assess the nutritional adequacy, we used the Dietary Reference Intakes by age group. The percentage of adequacy evaluation of the petit suisse cheese and the instant noodles nutritional compositions was made by comparing them with those of the human milk and the salt meal, respectively. The petit suisse cheese and the instant noodles were consumed by 89.6 and 65.3% of the children in the first year of life. The percentages of adequacy for carbohydrates were more than twice and the percentages for sodium were 20 times higher than those found in the recommended foods. Both industrialized products are inappropriate for infants, emphasizing the need for adoption of norms that can inform health professionals, educators and parents about the risks of consumption.

  11. Consumption of industrialized food by infants attending child day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Helena de A. Toloni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the age of introduction of petit suisse cheese and instant noodles in the diet of infants attending nurseries of public day care centers and to compare the nutritional composition of these foods with the healthy recommended diet (breast milk and salt meal for this age, in order to estimate nutritional errors. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 366 children (from nine to 36 months old who attended day care centers, whose mothers were interviewed about the age of introduction of those foods. The means of the nutrients indicated on the labels of the most consumed brands were considered. For the calculation of the percent composition of breast milk and salt meal, Tables of Food Composition were used. To assess the nutritional adequacy, we used the Dietary Reference Intakes by age group. The percentage of adequacy evaluation of the petit suisse cheese and the instant noodles nutritional compositions was made by comparing them with those of the human milk and the salt meal, respectively. Results: The petit suisse cheese and the instant noodles were consumed by 89.6 and 65.3% of the children in the first year of life. The percentages of adequacy for carbohydrates were more than twice and the percentages for sodium were 20 times higher than those found in the recommended foods. Conclusions: Both industrialized products are inappropriate for infants, emphasizing the need for adoption of norms that can inform health professionals, educators and parents about the risks of consumption.

  12. [At the Savar center, primary health care (PHC) evolves with the health conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirac, P

    1989-01-01

    A war hospital installed close to the front by a group of young Bangladeshi doctors during the 1971 war of liberation from Pakistan was the origin of the new "Gonoshasthaya Kendra" (GK), or people's health center, 40 km north of Dhaka in Savar. At the new center, as in the hospital, trained paramedics furnish basic health care for the population. The center at Savar was applying the principles of primary health care 6 years before they were recognized at the Alma Ata conference. Today, GK has integrated programs to fight poverty into its health activities, with educational, nutrition, and employment programs. The paramedics have a long training course, working under the supervision of a senior paramedic for a year and receiving theoretical training in the evenings. They do not become senior paramedics for several years. The work of the paramedics is oriented toward health education, prevention, and demoepidemiologic surveillance and registration. Each paramedic is responsible for 2 or 3 villages with about 3 thousand inhabitants. The paramedics visit and motivate the population, register births and deaths, identify and care for pregnant women, and vaccinate children and pregnant women. They provide health and nutrition education, treat diarrhea and instruct mothers in use of oral rehydration therapy, and provide family planning information and supplies. Persons in need are referred to "clinic days" held regularly in the larger villages. The paramedics maintain records for each family which allow calculation of vital rates and epidemiologic data. In the region of Savar served by the paramedics, the rates of general mortality and infant mortality are 12/1000 and 85/1000 respectively, vs. 17 and 124/1000 in Bangladesh as a whole. The GK has a new goal of reducing infant mortality to 60/1000. The paramedics have been taught to recognize 2 new symptoms, convulsions and respiratory distress, and to refer infants showing these symptoms to doctors. The GK doctors believe

  13. EBMT transplant centers with FACT-JACIE accreditation have significantly better compliance with related donor care standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthias, Chloe; O'Donnell, Paul V; Kiefer, Deidre M; Yared, Jean; Norkin, Maxim; Anderlini, Paolo; Savani, Bipin N; Diaz, Miguel A; Bitan, Menachem; Halter, Joerg P; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; Shaw, Bronwen E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified healthcare practices that may place undue pressure on related donors (RDs) of hematopoietic cell products, and an increase in serious adverse events associated with morbidities in this population. As a result, specific requirements to safeguard RD health have been introduced to FACT-JACIE Standards, but the impact of accreditation on RD care has not previously been evaluated. A survey of transplant program directors of EBMT member centers was conducted by the Donor Health and Safety Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) to test the hypothesis that RD care in FACT-JACIE accredited centers is more closely aligned with international consensus donor care recommendations than RD care delivered in centers without accreditation. Responses were received from 39% of 304 centers. Our results show that practice in accredited centers was much closer to recommended standards as compared to non-accredited centers. Specifically, a higher percentage of accredited centers use eligibility criteria to assess RDs (93% versus 78%; P=0.02) and a lower percentage have a single physician simultaneously responsible for a RD and their recipient (14% versus 35%; P=0.008). In contrast, where regulatory standards do not exist, both accredited and non-accredited centers fell short of accepted best practice. These results raise concerns that despite improvements in care, current practice can place undue pressure on donors, and may increase the risk of donation-associated adverse events. We recommend measures to address these issues through enhancement of regulatory standards as well as national initiatives to standardize RD care. PMID:26597079

  14. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  15. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  16. Health care expenditure in Sweden--an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdtham, U G; Jönsson, B

    1991-01-01

    This paper analyses health care expenditure in Sweden and compares this with the corresponding expenditure in OECD countries. The definition and measurement problems of health care expenditure are discussed, new figures for the development of health care expenditure are presented and different measures of health care expenditure are provided. We found that health care expenditure has increased by about 20% in constant prices for Sweden between 1980 and 1988, but that health care expenditure as a share of the GDP has dropped during the same period in current prices. Health care expenditure disaggregated on different age groups show for Sweden that in the age group 15-64 years, health care expenditure has not increased in constant prices between 1976 and 1985, but in the oldest age group, health care expenditure has increased considerable during this period. Health care expenditure in Sweden is as high as would be expected, taking into account the degree of economic development and the growth of expenditure during the 80s, and has followed that in comparable OECD countries. However, the relative price is lower, which means that the input of real resources are greater than in other countries.

  17. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with uveitis in an emergency eye care center in Brazil

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    Eduardo Nery Rossi Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with uveitis in an emergency eye care center. Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients with active uveitis admitted between May 2012 and July 2012 to an emergency eye care center. Results: The majority of patients were male (63.2%, with a mean age of 43.2 years; 66.2% patients were of mixed ethnicity, 22.5% were Caucasian, and 11.3% were black. Anterior uveitis was observed in 70.1% patients, posterior uveitis in 26.5%, and panuveitis in 3.4%; no patient was diagnosed with intermediate uveitis. All patients had a sudden and acute presentation. The most frequent symptoms were ocular pain (76.9%, redness (59.8%, and visual blurring (46.2%. The majority of patients had unilateral disease (94.9% with a mean symptom duration of 6.2 days. Diffuse and anterior uveitis were associated with ocular pain (p<0.001. Scotomata and floaters were more frequent in patients with posterior uveitis (p=0.003 and p=0.016, respectively. Patients with anterior uveitis presented with better visual acuity (p=0.025. Granulomatous keratotic precipitates were more frequent in patients with posterior uveitis (p=0.038. An etiological diagnosis based on the evaluation at the emergency center was made in 45 patients (38.5%. Conclusions: Acute anterior uveitis was the most frequent form of uveitis. Initial patient evaluation provided sufficient information for deciding primary therapy and aided in arriving at an etiological diagnosis in a considerable number of patients.

  18. Designing Excellence and Quality Model for Training Centers of Primary Health Care: A Delphi Method Study

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    Jafar-Sadegh TABRIZI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excellence and quality models are comprehensive methods for improving the quality of healthcare. The aim of this study was to design excellence and quality model for training centers of primary health care using Delphi method. Methods: In this study, Delphi method was used. First, comprehensive information were collected using literature review. In extracted references, 39 models were identified from 34 countries and related sub-criteria and standards were extracted from 34 models (from primary 39 models. Then primary pattern including 8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards was developed as a Delphi questionnaire and evaluated in four stages by 9 specialists of health care system in Tabriz and 50 specialists from all around the country.Results: Designed primary model (8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards were concluded with 8 criteria, 45 sub-criteria, and 192 standards after 4 stages of evaluations by specialists. Major criteria of the model are leadership, strategic and operational planning, resource management, information analysis, human resources management, process management, costumer results, and functional results, where the top score was assigned as 1000 by specialists. Functional results had the maximum score of 195 whereas planning had the minimum score of 60. Furthermore the most and the least sub-criteria was for leadership with 10 sub-criteria and strategic planning with 3 sub-criteria, respectively. Conclusion: The model that introduced in this research has been designed following 34 reference models of the world. This model could provide a proper frame for managers of health system in improving quality. Keywords: Quality model, Excellence model, Training centers, Primary cares, Iran

  19. The Cost of Inpatient Care of Schizophrenia and Treatment Schedules Used in German Academic Center: Kiel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprutko, Tomasz; Göder, Robert; Kus, Krzysztof; Rakhman, Lyudmyla; Bilobryvka, Rostyslav; Nowakowska, Elżbieta

    2016-12-01

    The authors aimed at analyzing the costs of inpatient care of schizophrenia in Kiel (Germany). The study was also to present treatment regimens used at the German Academic Center. Moreover, the study is a continuation and complement of the previous study conducted in Polish and Ukrainian Academic Center. Therefore, it helps increase the awareness and knowledge of residents concerning the cost of inpatient care of schizophrenia. The analysis was based on 105 hospital records of patients treated between January 2012 and June 2013. According to inclusion criteria, 50 adult patients (27 women and 23 men) were included in the study. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medicine Faculty of CAU in Kiel. The cost of schizophrenia treatment of 50 patients in Kiel was EUR 604,280.90 ([Formula: see text] = EUR 12,085.62). The duration of hospital stay was on average [Formula: see text] = 51.02 days. The patients were treated with neuroleptics of all generations. The most popular atypical neuroleptic was amisulpride and the most popular typical neuroleptic was haloperidol. Patients from Kiel were provided a comprehensive non-pharmacological treatment. Treatment regiments and evaluations of costs of schizophrenia vary between countries. The costs of inpatient care of schizophrenia are high in Kiel. Treatment of schizophrenia seems to be comprehensive in Kiel and wide range of treatment opportunities contribute to a more effective treatment confirmed by less frequent relapses of schizophrenia than in Lviv (Ukraine), for example. Comprehensive treatment should be available everywhere, because it is a right of every patient.

  20. Behind-the-scenes of patient-centered care: content analysis of electronic messaging among primary care clinic providers and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Renée A; Deppen, Stephen A; Figaro, M Kathleen; Gregg, William M; Jirjis, Jim N; Rothman, Russell L; Johnston, Philip E; Miller, Randolph A; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-12-01

    Transitions to patient-centered health care, the increasing complexity of care, and growth in self-management have all increased the frequency and intensity of clinical services provided outside office settings and between visits. Understanding how electronic messaging, which is often used to coordinate care, affects care is crucial. A taxonomy for codifying clinical text messages into standardized categories could facilitate content analysis of work performed or enhanced via electronic messaging. To codify electronic messages exchanged among the primary care providers and the staff managing diabetes patients at an academic medical center. Retrospective analysis of 27,061 electronic messages exchanged among 578 providers and staff caring for a cohort of 639 adult primary care patients with diabetes between April 1, 2003 and October 31, 2003. Providers and staff using locally developed electronic messaging in an academic medical center's adult primary care clinic. Raw data included clinical text message content, message ID, thread ID, and user ID. Derived measures included user job classification, 35 flags codifying message content, and a taxonomy grouping the flags. Messages contained diverse content: communications with patients, families, and other providers (47.2%), diagnoses (25.4%), documentation (33%), logistics and support functions (29.6%), medications (32.9%), and treatments (28.9%). All messages could be classified; 59.5% of messages addressed 2 or more content areas. Systematic content analysis of provider and staff electronic messages yields specific insight regarding clinical and administrative work carried out via electronic messaging.

  1. Evaluation of pharmacist utilization of a poison center as a resource for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armahizer, Michael J; Johnson, David; Deusenberry, Christina M; Foley, John J; Krenzelok, Edward P; Pummer, Tara L

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate pharmacist use of a Regional Poison Information Center (RPIC), identify potential barriers to utilization, and provide strategies to overcome these barriers. All calls placed to a RPIC by a pharmacist, physician, or nurse over a 5-year period were retrieved. These data were analyzed to assess the pharmacist utilization of the RPIC and the variation of call types. Additionally, a survey, designed to assess the past and future use of the RPIC by pharmacists, was distributed to pharmacists in the region. Of the 37,799 calls made to the RPIC, 26,367 (69.8%) were from nurses, 8096 (21.4%) were from physicians, and 3336 (8.8%) were from pharmacists. Among calls initiated by pharmacists, the majority involved medication identification (n = 2391, 71.7%). The survey had a 38.9% response rate (n = 715) and revealed a trend toward less RPIC utilization by pharmacists with more formal training but less practice experience. The utilization of the RPIC was lowest among pharmacists as compared to other health care professionals. This may be due to pharmacists' unfamiliarity with the poison center's scope of services and resources. Therefore, it is important that pharmacists are educated on the benefit of utilizing poison centers in clinical situations.

  2. Disparities in Diabetes Care Quality by English Language Preference in Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lucinda B; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Martinez, Ana E; Chen, Xiao; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2016-10-21

    To conduct a parallel analysis of disparities in diabetes care quality among Latino and Asian community health center (CHC) patients by English language preference. Clinical outcomes (2011) and patient survey data (2012) for Type 2 diabetes adults from 14 CHCs (n = 1,053). We estimated separate regression models for Latino and Asian patients by English language preference for Clinician & Group-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System, Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care, hemoglobin A1c, and self-reported hypoglycemic events. We used the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method to parse out observed and unobserved differences in outcomes between English versus non-English language groups. After adjusting for socioeconomic and health characteristics, disparities in patient experiences by English language preference were found only among Asian patients. Unobserved factors largely accounted for linguistic disparities for most patient experience measures. There were no significant differences in glycemic control by language for either Latino or Asian patients. Given the importance of patient retention in CHCs, our findings indicate opportunities to improve CHC patients' experiences of care and to reduce disparities in patient experience by English preference for Asian diabetes patients. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. [Partnership between Psychosocial Care Center and Family Health Program: the challenge of a new knowledge construction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Patrícia Santos de Souza; Sato, Miki Takao; Antoneli, Patrícia de Paulo; Guimarães, Paulo Octávio da Silva

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the article is to report an experience of partnership between a Psychosocial Care Center and three teams of the Family Health Program in the central region of São Paulo city. theoretical concepts like territory, subject, subjectivity/collective, receptiveness, bond, co-responsibility as well as the psychiatric and sanitary reform principles are the base and guide of this work. The partnership aims the promotion of mental health care based on articulated actions from different services. This way, the PSF's and mental health's workers are responsible for the demands of a territory. The strategies used in this partnership were meetings with both teams with training, case discussion about the families assisted, support to workers' difficulties and elaboration of therapeutical projects, and joint domiciliary visits. Some difficulties had been found during the research: great demand for health services and lack of institutional guidelines to guarantee the effectiveness of the partnership. The look directed to the family and the social context presents positive results compared to the look directed only to the illness. The partnership enriches the practice and a larger network of care in the territory becomes possible. It is necessary to bring up new proposals and innovative enterprises.

  4. Challenges in the management of nutritional disorders and communicable diseases in child day care centers: a quantitative and qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantyner, Tulio; Konstantyner, Thais Cláudia Roma de Oliveira; Toloni, Maysa Helena Aguiar; Longo-Silva, Giovana; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2017-03-01

    In Brazil, although many children from low income families attend day care centers with appropriate hygiene practices and food programs, they have nutritional disorders and communicable diseases. This quantitative and qualitative cross-sectional study identified staff challenges in child day care centers and suggested alternative activity management to prevent nutritional disorders and communicable diseases. The study included 71 nursery teachers and 270 children from public and philanthropic day care centers (teacher to child ratios of 1:2.57 and 1:6.40, respectively). Interviews and focus groups were conducted with teachers and parents, and anthropometry and blood samples were drawn from the children by digital puncture. Children in philanthropic child day care centers were more likely to be hospitalized due to communicable diseases. Teachers from philanthropic child day care centers had lower age, income and education and higher work responsibilities based on the number of children and working time. The focus groups characterized institutions with organized routines, standard food practices, difficulties with caretaking, and lack of training to provide healthcare to children. Strategies to improve children's health in day care settings should focus on training of teachers about healthcare and nutrition.

  5. Quantitative comparison of measurements of urgent care service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Victor; Prybutok, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction are essential to health care organization success. Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry introduced SERVQUAL, a prominent service quality measure not yet applied to urgent care. We develop an instrument to measure perceived service quality and identify the determinants of patient satisfaction/ behavioral intentions. We examine the relationships among perceived service quality, patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions, and demonstrate that urgent care service quality is not equivalent using measures of perceptions only, differences of expectations minus perceptions, ratio of perceptions to expectations, and the log of the ratio. Perceptions provide the best measure of urgent care service quality.

  6. Using conjoint analysis to model the preferences of different patient segments for attributes of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles E; Deal, Ken; Rimas, Heather; Campbell, Heather; Russell, Ann; Henderson, Jennifer; Matheson, Anne; Melnick, Blake

    2008-12-01

    A consensus regarding the components of a patient-centered approach to healthcare does not exist. Although patient-centered care should be predicated on patient preferences, existing models provide little evidence regarding the relative importance of different care processes to patients themselves. To involve patients in the design of a model of patient-centered care for a corporation of Canadian teaching hospitals. Using themes from focus groups and interviews, a conjoint survey was developed comprising 14 four-level patient-centered care attributes. Sawtooth Software's Choice Based Conjoint module (version 2.6.7) was used to design the survey. Each participant completed 15 choice tasks, each task presenting a choice between three hospitals described by a different combination of patient-centered care attribute levels. Latent class analysis was used to identify segments of participants with similar patient-centered care choice patterns. Randomized First Choice simulations were used to predict the percentage of participants in each segment who would choose different approaches to improving patient-centered care.Representative hospital service users were recruited from a corporation of five Canadian teaching hospitals serving a regional population of 2.2 million. A total of 508 patients and family members of children completed a choice-based conjoint survey. Latent class analysis revealed two segments: an informed care segment and a convenient care segment. Participants in the informed care segment (71.3% of the sample) were more likely to have higher education, be non-immigrants, speak English as a first language, and be outpatients or family members.The information needed to understand health concerns, an opportunity to learn health improvement skills, teams that communicated effectively, short waiting times, and collaborative treatment planning were more important to the informed care segment than to the convenient care segment. Convenient settings, a welcoming

  7. Primary care-public health linkages: Older primary care patients with prediabetes & type 2 diabetes encouraged to attend community-based senior centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly H. Noël

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine (IOM suggests that primary care-public health integration can improve health outcomes for vulnerable patients, but the extent to which formal linkages may enhance patients' use of community resources, or the factors that may influence providers to encourage their patients to use these resources, remain unclear. We conducted baseline assessments in 2014–2015 with 149 older adults with prediabetes or diabetes who had recently joined three senior centers linked to a network of primary care clinics in San Antonio, Texas. In addition to collecting sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, we asked members to identify their source of primary care and whether a health care provider had encouraged them to go to the senior center. We also asked members why they had joined the senior centers and which programs interested them the most. Members' source of primary care was not associated with being encouraged to attend the senior centers by a health care professional. Multivariable analysis indicated that participants with total annual household incomes of $20,000 or less [OR = 2.78; 95% CI = (1.05, 7.14] and those reporting 12 years of education or less [OR = 3.57; 95% CI = (1.11, 11.11] were significantly more likely to report being encouraged to attend the senior center by a health care provider. Providers who are aware of community-based resources to support patient self-management may be just as likely to encourage their socioeconomically vulnerable patients with prediabetes or diabetes to use them as providers who have a more formal partnership with the senior centers.

  8. Primary care-public health linkages: Older primary care patients with prediabetes & type 2 diabetes encouraged to attend community-based senior centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Polly H; Parchman, Michael L; Finley, Erin P; Wang, Chen-Pin; Bollinger, Mary; Espinoza, Sara E; Hazuda, Helen P

    2016-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) suggests that primary care-public health integration can improve health outcomes for vulnerable patients, but the extent to which formal linkages may enhance patients' use of community resources, or the factors that may influence providers to encourage their patients to use these resources, remain unclear. We conducted baseline assessments in 2014-2015 with 149 older adults with prediabetes or diabetes who had recently joined three senior centers linked to a network of primary care clinics in San Antonio, Texas. In addition to collecting sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, we asked members to identify their source of primary care and whether a health care provider had encouraged them to go to the senior center. We also asked members why they had joined the senior centers and which programs interested them the most. Members' source of primary care was not associated with being encouraged to attend the senior centers by a health care professional. Multivariable analysis indicated that participants with total annual household incomes of $20,000 or less [OR = 2.78; 95% CI = (1.05, 7.14)] and those reporting 12 years of education or less [OR = 3.57; 95% CI = (1.11, 11.11)] were significantly more likely to report being encouraged to attend the senior center by a health care provider. Providers who are aware of community-based resources to support patient self-management may be just as likely to encourage their socioeconomically vulnerable patients with prediabetes or diabetes to use them as providers who have a more formal partnership with the senior centers.

  9. The KIzSS network, a sentinel surveillance system for infectious diseases in day care centers: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enserink Remko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Day care-associated infectious diseases are widely recognized as a public health problem but rarely studied. Insights into their dynamics and their association with the day care setting are important for effective decision making in management of infectious disease control. This paper describes the purpose, design and potential of our national multi-center, day care-based sentinel surveillance network for infectious diseases (the KIzSS network. The aim of the KIzSS network is to acquire a long-term insight into the syndromic and microbiological aspects of day care-related infectious diseases and associated disease burden and to model these aspects with day care setting characteristics. Methods/design The KIzSS network applies a prospective cohort design, following day care centers rather than individual children or staff members over time. Data on infectious disease symptoms and related morbidity (children and staff, medical consumption, absenteeism and circulating enteric pathogens (children are collected on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. Every two years, a survey is performed to assess the characteristics of participating day care centers. Discussion The KIzSS network offers a unique potential to study infectious disease dynamics in the day care setting over a sustained period of time. The created (biodatabases will help us to assess day care-related disease burden of infectious diseases among attending children and staff and their relation with the day care setting. This will support the much needed development of evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines for infectious disease control in day care centers.

  10. Auditing in intensive care: comparison of two tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, R

    This article addresses some of the practical aspects of auditing in the intensive care setting by comparing two audit tools. An overview of each tool is provided together with a description of how it was used. Recommendations for auditing in intensive care are given.

  11. Patient-Centered Dialysis Care: Depression, Pain, and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable advancements have been made in the provision of chronic dialysis therapy since its inception decades ago. A series of studies inform current dialysis dosing recommendations, while advancements in strategies to treat mineral and bone disease, acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, and anemia have facilitated the management of these well-recognized complications of ESRD. The collective result has been a model of chronic dialysis care focused principally on the achievement of metabolic and dialysis-related targets. In fact, guidelines such as the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative put forth by the National Kidney Foundation recommend metrics that characterize successful dialysis care, including the attainment of specific solute clearance targets; maintenance of hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorous, and parathyroid hormone levels within target ranges; and the preferred use of primary arteriovenous fistulae for vascular access. This focus on serologic and dialysis-specific outcomes has helped renal providers manage the biochemical effects related to the loss of kidney function and has reduced ESRD-related morbidity and mortality. Yet, absent from this model of care is an emphasis on the treatment of bothersome symptoms and the impact of such treatment on quality of life (QOL). Among the many symptoms that affect patients on chronic dialysis, depression and pain are particularly common, strongly associated with decrements in QOL, and potentially treatable. This review discusses key research findings and unanswered questions pertaining to the prevalence, significance, and treatment of depression and pain and the effect of such treatment on QOL in patients dependent on chronic dialysis, with the broad goal of incorporating symptom management strategies into a paradigm of patient-centered dialysis care. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Patient-Centered Care; Physicians’ View of Obstacles against and Ideas for Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Abdullatif Alnasir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To implement proper family medicine practice and to get the best of it, the concept of patient-centered care (PCC has to be put into use. Studies have found that one of the most important advantages of PCC is the increase in the patients' quality of life. PCC has been recognized as a marker of quality in health service delivery with its improvement. However, the physicians’ belief is essential for its implementation. A cross-sectional study was done to find out what family physicians think of PCC and what they believe are the obstacles that block from its use in Bahrain. Twenty-eight family physicians (FPs working in the primary health care centers were arbitrarily culled from a pool of doctors. To all a pre-designed questionnaire was sent that contained three parts; demographic information, type of facilities that they work and whether it is promoting PCC practice and the last was concerned with the physicians’ view about the barrier against its implementation and what they cerebrate that could avail in promoting it. The results showed that the majority of the participants were family physicians working in governmental health centers. More than 85% knew the congruous definition of PCC and 96.4% thought that the most common barrier for not implementing PCC approach is the time constraint while almost 93% thought that the short duration of time of the consultation is another impediment for implementing PCC. Withal, 57.1% and 53.6% of FPs thought that language and the doctor’s communication skills are other barriers respectively. Since the ultimate aim of provision of health care in any country is the optimal health of the population and since PCC practice could fortify and avail in achieving that goal, it is recommended that policy makers and health authorities are required to abstract all obstacles that works against implementing PCC and change the work environment in order to make it facile for the practitioners to apply PCC practice

  13. Effect of a Comprehensive Health Care Program by Korean Medicine Doctors on Medical Care Utilization for Common Infectious Diseases in Child-Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the role of traditional medicine in community health improvement increases, a comprehensive health care program for infectious diseases management in child-care centers by Korean medicine doctors was developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the program intervention on infection-related medical care utilization among children. The study used a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group, comparing pre- and post-intervention data of the same children. The program implemented interventions in terms of management, education, and medical examination for the teachers, parents, and children in 12-week period. The frequency of utilization, cost, and prescription days of drugs and antibiotics due to infectious diseases prior to the intervention were compared with those during the 3-month intervention, using health insurance claim data. A panel analysis was also conducted to support the findings. A significant reduction (12% in infection-related visit days of hospitals was observed with the intervention (incident rate ratio = 0.88, P=0.01. And medical cost, drug prescription days, and antibiotics prescription days were decreased, although not statistically significant. A further cost-effectiveness analysis in terms of social perspectives, considering the opportunity costs for guardians to take children to medical institutions, would be needed.

  14. Do environmental influences alter motor abilities acquisition? A comparison among children from day-care centers and private schools Influências do ambiente podem alterar a aquisição de habilidades motoras? Uma comparação entre pré-escolares de creches públicas e escolas privadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Mônica F. T. de Barros

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Development occurs in a proper rhythm as result of genetic inheritance and environment factors. This study had the aim to identify some environmental risk factors for the motor development in two groups of healthy children. 100 pre-school aged (five years children from two day-care centers and a private school were evaluated, in Recife-PE. All the children underwent to a motor skills assessment and their parents answered a questionnaire. The children from the public nursery remained behind in fine motor skills. The results showed that the biologically healthy children development can suffer negative influence of the environmental risk factors. In this research these factors were: the father absence, improper toys use to the correct age, the place were the child was kept in the early childhood, the lack of pedagogical guidance and extra-parental socialization and low familiar socioeconomic status.O desenvolvimento ocorre num ritmo resultante da interação entre herança genética e fatores ambientais. Este estudo teve por objetivo identificar alguns fatores de risco ambientais para o desenvolvimento motor, em dois grupos de crianças saudáveis. Foram avaliadas 100 crianças (idade:5 anos provenientes de duas creches públicas e uma escola particular, em Recife-PE. Todas as crianças foram submetidas a uma avaliação das habilidades motoras e seus pais responderam a um questionário. As crianças da creche pública mostraram atraso no campo das habilidades motoras finas. Os resultados indicaram que o desenvolvimento das crianças biologicamente saudáveis pode sofrer influência negativa dos fatores de risco ambientais. Os fatores encontrados foram: a ausência do pai; a utilização de brinquedos inadequados para faixa etária; o local onde a criança era mantida em idades precoces da infância; a falta de orientação pedagógica e de socialização extra-familiar precoce, e a baixa condição socioeconômica familiar.

  15. An Examination of Referral Physician Attitudes Toward Brooke Army Medical Center as a Tertiary Care Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    as a referral center as the basis for developing a marketing strategy . D MTRIPUO =1 ~ ’ 0 N Approved Z.r =uzic :eI’,.~e: I, Dj rzut.:n Un. ::ed 20...have become the principal constituency group that holds the key to meeting this goal. In this regard, a marketing strategy must be developed...Brooke Army Medical Center’s Health Service Region towards BAMC as a referral center as the basis 9 for developing a marketing strategy . Objectives The

  16. [Initiation and consumption of psychoactive substances among adolescents and young adults in an Anti-Drug Psychosocial Care Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carolina Carvalho; Costa, Maria Conceição Oliveira; de Carvalho, Rosely Cabral; Amaral, Magali Teresópolis Reis; Cruz, Nilma Lázara de Almeida; da Silva, Mariana Rocha

    2014-03-01

    The study seeks to characterize the initiation and consumption pattern of psychoactive substances among adolescents and young adults enrolled in an Alcohol and Drug Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS-AD). This study was conducted with records of attendance and the consumption pattern was classified in accordance with WHO: infrequent use (lifetime use, per year or up to five days per month); frequent use (6 to 19 times in the past 30 days); heavy use (≥ 20 times in the last 30 days). In the age group comparison, the test for proportion and association analysis was used and the prevalence and prevalence ratio was calculated with a significance level of 5% and 95% confidence interval. Of the total of adolescents and young adults treated between 2003 and 2008 (475), most were male, single, poorly educated, live with relations and have psychic symptoms. Statistical significance was found for age at initiation of use: adolescents compared to young adults started earlier (≤ 14 years): tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, crack and other SPA consumption. Among adolescents, significant results were found for the less frequent consumption of tobacco, more frequent use of alcohol, and heavy consumption of marijuana. These findings may contribute to the preventive and therapeutic CAPS-AD programs.

  17. Tuning the light in senior care: Evaluating a trial LED lighting system at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    This report summarizes the results from a trial installation of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting systems in several spaces within the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) coordinated the project and invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to document the performance of the LED lighting systems as part of a GATEWAY evaluation. DOE tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct the investigation. SMUD and ACC staff coordinated and completed the design and installation of the LED systems, while PNNL and SMUD staff evaluated the photometric performance of the systems. ACC staff also track behavioral and health measures of the residents; some of those results are reported here, although PNNL staff were not directly involved in collecting or interpreting those data. The trial installation took place in a double resident room and a single resident room, and the corridor that connects those (and other) rooms to the central nurse station. Other spaces in the trial included the nurse station, a common room called the family room located near the nurse station, and the ACC administrator’s private office.

  18. Impact of the application of neurolinguistic programming to mothers of children enrolled in a day care center of a shantytown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Torres de Miranda

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Of the members of a family, the mother is without doubt the most important one, which provides justification for including an evaluation of her mental health as one of the variables to be considered as determining factors in each child’s level of development. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the application of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP on child development, home environment and maternal mental health. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: The study included children enrolled in the municipal day care center of a shantytown in the City of São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 45 pairs of mothers and respective children between 18 and 36 months of age. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Children’s development (Bayley scales; home environment variation (HOME; and maternal mental health (SRQ. Comparison between before and after the intervention was made in terms of children’s psychomotor development, home environment and maternal mental health. INTERVENTION: Application of the NLP technique to the experimental group and comparison with a control group. 1 - Experimental (EG, consisting of 23 children submitted to intervention by NLP; and 2 - Control (CG, with 22 children with no intervention. Length of intervention: 15 sessions of NLP. RESULTS: 37 children remained in the study (EG = 10, CG = 27. Variations in mental development (OR 1.21, IC 95% 0.0 to 23.08 in their home environment (Wilcoxon: p = 0.96 (before and p = 0.09 (after; in maternal mental health: p = 0.26, 2 df. CONCLUSIONS: There was a trend that indicated positive effects on the home environment from the intervention.

  19. [Comparison of level of satisfaction of users of home care: integrated model vs. dispensaries model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Marta; Limonero, Joaquín T; Peñart, Xavier; Jiménez, Jordi; Gassó, Javier

    2014-01-01

    To determine the level of satisfaction of users that receive home health care through two different models of primary health care: integrated model and dispensaries model. cross-sectional, observational study. Two primary care centers in the province of Barcelona. The questionnaire was administered to 158 chronic patients over 65 years old, of whom 67 were receiving health care from the integrated model, and 91 from the dispensaries model. The Evaluation of Satisfaction with Home Health Care (SATISFAD12) questionnaire was, together with other complementary questions about service satisfaction of home health care, as well as social demographic questions (age, sex, disease, etc). The patients of the dispensaries model showed more satisfaction than the users receiving care from the integrated model. There was a greater healthcare continuity for those patients from the dispensaries model, and a lower percentage of hospitalizations during the last year. The satisfaction of the users from both models was not associated to gender, the health perception,or independence of the The user satisfaction rate of the home care by primary health care seems to depend of the typical characteristics of each organisational model. The dispensaries model shows a higher rate of satisfaction or perceived quality of care in all the aspects analysed. More studies are neede to extrapolate these results to other primary care centers belonging to other institutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Games and playthings in a child day care center: a bioecological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute Estanislava Tolocka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Social changes have contributed to decreased opportunities for children to perform physical activities. Children have been introduced in preschools where the opportunities of playing are insufficient, thus being deprived of the benefits of such activity. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between ludic physical activities and child development. A descriptive study was conducted on 68 children of both genders, aged 4 to 6 years, from a public child day care center. A physical education program was offered twice per week and an event involving other children was carried out. Activities, social roles, interpersonal relations, emotions, and personal characteristics were analyzed. Improvement was observed in interpersonal relations and social relationships, as well as in emotional control. Basic emotions and different child characteristics were expressed. Thus, the introduction of games and playthings at school may contribute to child development and to the engagement of children in physical activities.

  1. Detection of anti-Giardia lamblia serum antibody among children of day care centers

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    Guimarães Semíramis

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVES: To detect anti-Giardia lamblia serum antibodies in healthy children attending public day care centers and to assess serological tests as tools for estimating the prevalence of G. lamblia in endemic areas. METHODS: Three separate stool specimens and filter paper blood samples were collected from 147 children ranging from 0 to 6 years old. Each stool sample was processed using spontaneous sedimentation and zinc sulfate flotation methods. Blood samples were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for Giardia IgG. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Of 147 individuals tested, 93 (63.3% showed Giardia cysts in their feces. Using IIF and ELISA, serum antibodies were detected in 93 (63.3% and 100 (68% samples , respectively. Sensitivity of IIF and ELISA was 82% and 72%, respectively. However, ELISA revealed to be less specific (39% than IIF (70%. IIF also showed a higher concordance with microscopic examination than ELISA.

  2. Detection of anti-Giardia lamblia serum antibody among children of day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semíramis Guimarães

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVES: To detect anti-Giardia lamblia serum antibodies in healthy children attending public day care centers and to assess serological tests as tools for estimating the prevalence of G. lamblia in endemic areas. METHODS: Three separate stool specimens and filter paper blood samples were collected from 147 children ranging from 0 to 6 years old. Each stool sample was processed using spontaneous sedimentation and zinc sulfate flotation methods. Blood samples were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for Giardia IgG. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Of 147 individuals tested, 93 (63.3% showed Giardia cysts in their feces. Using IIF and ELISA, serum antibodies were detected in 93 (63.3% and 100 (68% samples , respectively. Sensitivity of IIF and ELISA was 82% and 72%, respectively. However, ELISA revealed to be less specific (39% than IIF (70%. IIF also showed a higher concordance with microscopic examination than ELISA.

  3. The World Trade Center attack. Disaster preparedness: health care is ready, but is the bureaucracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, K

    2001-12-01

    When a disaster occurs, it is for governments to provide the leadership, civil defense, security, evacuation, and public welfare. The medical aspects of a disaster account for less than 10% of resource and personnel expenditure. Hospitals and health care provider teams respond to unexpected occurrences such as explosions, earthquakes, floods, fires, war, or the outbreak of an infectious epidemic. In some geographic locations where natural disasters are common, such as earthquakes in Japan, such disaster practice drills are common. In other locations, disaster drills become pro forma and have no similarity to real or even projected and predicted disasters. The World Trade Center disaster on 11 September 2001 provides new information, and points out new threats, new information systems, new communication opportunities, and new detection methodologies. It is time for leaders of medicine to re-examine their approaches to disaster preparedness.

  4. Nosocomial outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans in a pediatric urgent care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana L. Bicudo

    Full Text Available Pantoea agglomerans is a Gram-negative bacterium whose isolates can be found in blood cultures and other secretions. This article described one outbreak of sepsis due to this bacterium in the pediatric urgent care center of a tertiary hospital, in Brasilia, Federal District. This was a case-control study and it evaluated the risk factors for acquisition of nosocomial sepsis caused by Pantoea agglomerans. Six case-patients and 15 control-patients have been found. The risk factors were: vomiting in the internment and presence of solution compositions in the intravenous hydration therapy received in bigger number than 2 compositions. The transference tube used for the compositions was contaminated with Pantoea agglomerans, characterizing the outbreak with common source. The evolution of all the patients was favorable.

  5. Family-centered care to promote successful community reintegration after war: it takes a nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Shirley M

    2013-12-01

    The papers in this section focus on public health responses and implementation considerations in addressing the challenges military families confront when parents go to war. While many military families show resilience, the challenges resulting from a decade of war with multiple deployments are detailed, as are innovative military and civilian programs designed to help service members and their families reintegrate successfully into the community. As more and more service members leave active duty, the burden of meeting military families' psychological needs will transition from the Department of Defense (DoD) and into the Veterans Administration (VA) and civilian arenas. While many strategies to support successful readjustment are offered, in this time of dwindling mental health resources and competing needs, it is unclear what priority the broader society places on meeting the needs of returning service members and their families. A growing emphasis on family-centered care in the Veterans Administration may help meet this gap.

  6. Fostering person-centered care among nursing students: creative pedagogical approaches to developing personal knowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwind, Jasna K; Beanlands, Heather; Lapum, Jennifer; Romaniuk, Daria; Fredericks, Suzanne; LeGrow, Karen; Edwards, Susanna; McCay, Elizabeth; Crosby, Jamie

    2014-06-01

    Person-centered care (PCC) is grounded in principles of respect, autonomy, and empowerment and requires the development of interpersonal relationships. For nursing students to engage in PCC, they need to intentionally develop personal knowing, which is an essential attribute of therapeutic relationships. Developing personal knowing, as well as professional knowledge, positions students to enact PCC in their practice. Faculty members play a vital role in fostering the development of personal knowing by creating opportunities for students in which genuine and respectful dialogue, reflection, self-awareness, and critical thinking can take place. This article explores several creative approaches faculty have used to actualize these qualities in their teaching-learning encounters with nursing students at various stages of their students' professional development. These approaches offer experiential teaching-learning opportunities that foster the development of personal knowing, as well as constructive and respectful relationships between faculty and students, therefore laying the groundwork for PCC in practice settings.

  7. [The environment of the Intensive Care Center and the work of the nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavaglia, Suzel Regina Ribeiro; Borges, Cristiana Machado; do Amaral, Eliana Maria Scarelli; Iwamoto, Helena Hemiko; Ohl, Rosali Isabel Barduchi

    2011-12-01

    This is a descriptive exploratory study with a quantitative approach. It aims to characterize the environment of the Intensive Care Center (ICC) in regard to its physical area, material resources and equipments, and to identify factors concerned to the work of nurses. It investigates environmental factors that contribute to an aesthetically harmonious, functional and humanized space and that favor the performance of nursing work. The units that make up the ICC meet the recommendations of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) in the evaluated items. he following favorable work conditions were highlighted: thermal conditions, color of the ceiling, walls and floors, luminosity. The following unfavorable work conditions were highlighted: outdoor spaces, privacy and individuality of clients and noise. The conclusion is that the facilities of the units meet the minimum recommendations of ANVISA. Both favorable and unfavorable environmental work conditions were identified. The creation of better environmental conditions allows a better staff performance, influencing positively quality, safety, and job satisfaction.

  8. The Link Between Reproductive Life Plan Assessment And Provision of Preconception Care At Publicly Funded Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Cheryl L; Gavin, Loretta; Carter, Marion W; Moskosky, Susan B

    2017-09-01

    Federal and clinical guidelines recommend integrating reproductive life plan assessments into routine family planning encounters to increase provision of preconception care. Yet, the prevalence of clinical protocols and of relevant practices at publicly funded health centers is unknown. Administrators and providers at a nationally representative sample of publicly funded health centers that provide family planning services were surveyed in 2013-2014; data from 1,039 linked pairs were used to explore the reported prevalence of reproductive life plan protocols, frequent assessment of patients' reproductive life plan and frequent provision of preconception care. Chi-square tests and multivariable general linear models were used to examine differences in reports of protocols and related practices. Overall, 58% of centers reported having reproductive life plan assessment protocols, 87% reported frequently assessing reproductive life plans and 55% reported frequently providing preconception care. The proportions reporting protocols were lower in community health centers than in other center types (32% vs. 52-91%), in primary care centers than in those with another focus (33% vs. 77-80%) and in centers not receiving Title X funding than in those with such support (36% vs. 77%). Reported existence of a written protocol was positively associated with reported frequent assessment (prevalence ratio, 1.1), and the latter was positively associated with reported frequent preconception care (1.4). Further research is needed on associations between written protocols and clinical practice, and to elucidate the preconception care services that may be associated with reproductive life plan assessment. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  9. CenteringPregnancy-Africa: a pilot of group antenatal care to address Millennium Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Crystal L; Abrams, Elizabeth T; Klima, Carrie; Kaponda, Chrissie P N; Leshabari, Sebalda C; Vonderheid, Susan C; Kamanga, Martha; Norr, Kathleen F

    2013-10-01

    severe health worker shortages and resource limitations negatively affect quality of antenatal care (ANC) throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Group ANC, specifically CenteringPregnancy (CP), may offer an innovative approach to enable midwives to offer higher quality ANC. our overarching goal was to prepare to conduct a clinical trial of CenteringPregnancy-Africa (CP-Africa) in Malawi and Tanzania. In Phase 1, our goal was to determine the acceptability of CP as a model for ANC in both countries. In Phase 2, our objective was to develop CP-Africa session content consistent with the Essential Elements of CP model and with national standards in both Malawi and Tanzania. In Phase 3, our objective was to pilot CP-Africa in Malawi to determine whether sessions could be conducted with fidelity to the Centering process. Phases 1 and 2 took place in Malawi and Tanzania. Phase 3, the piloting of two sessions of CP-Africa, occurred at two sites in Malawi: a district hospital and a small clinic. we used an Action Research approach to promote partnerships among university researchers, the Centering Healthcare Institute, health care administrators, health professionals and women attending ANC to develop CP-Africa session content and pilot this model of group ANC. for Phases 1 and 2, members of the Ministries of Health, health professionals and pregnant women in Malawi and Tanzania were introduced to and interviewed about CP. In Phase 2, we finalised CP-Africa content and trained 13 health professionals in the Centering Healthcare model. In Phase 3, we conducted a small pilot with 24 pregnant women (12 at each site). participants enthusiastically embraced CP-Africa as an acceptable model of ANC health care delivery. The CP-Africa content met both CP and national standards. The pilot established that the CP model could be implemented with process fidelity to the 13 Essential Elements. Several implementation challenges and strategies to address these challenges were identified

  10. COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT HELIPORT SOLUTIONS FOR THE CLINICAL HOSPITAL CENTER IN OSIJEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Timko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexity in takeoff and landing operations of helicopters require careful planning and designing of heliport infrastructure. The world's biggest aviation organization, namely Federal Aviation Administration and International Civil Aviation Organization, published their standards and designing recommendations for heliport designers to implement that are analyzed and compared in this paper. In the Republic of Croatia, helicopters are designed according to the recommendations of National heliport regulations which are based on recommendations of International Civil Aviation Organization (Annex 14. The practical part of the paper deals with the implementation of national heliport standard recommendations in two variants of heliport designs for emergency medical service for the clinical hospital center in Osijek. As a potential location of the new heliport for emergency medical transportation a transit port is analyzed because it is close to the clinical hospital center in Osijek and is well connected with the existing road infrastructure, and it is also possible to make a direct access to the hospital complex from the north side. Two solutions were analyzed and compared upon the criteria of accessibility, security of operations and possibility for instrument flight conditions, size of heliport and necessary areas, costs of building and maintenance and helicopter noise. There is an intention that regional capital cities that have clinical hospital centers need to have infrastructure for emergency helicopter transportation near the hospital.

  11. Profile of nicotine use among alcohol dependent patients visiting a tertiary care center in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana Quraishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of tobacco among alcohol dependent population is quite frequent. This co-morbidity increases the risk for various diseases. Understanding the pattern of tobacco use with co-morbid alcohol use may help in planning appropriate prevention/treatment strategies. The study aimed at examining the profile and pattern of nicotine use among alcohol dependent patients visiting a tertiary care treatment center in North India. Materials and Methods: Male patients fulfilling diagnostics and statistical manual of mental disorder fourth edition, criteria for nicotine and alcohol diagnostics and statistical dependence, attending the out-patient department of the tertiary care treatment center were recruited after obtaining informed consent. The socio-demographic profile, drug use history, nicotine associated health problems and general health problem were recorded. Motivation to stop tobacco use was assessed qualitatively using the direct questions about their interest and intentions to quit. Results: A total of 150 subjects were included in the study. The mean age of the study sample was 37.6 ± 10.44 years. Tobacco was reported as the gateway drug in 90% of the cases. Exclusive bidi use reported in 42% of the subjects. Mean duration of bidi and co-morbid alcohol use was higher than cigarette or smokeless tobacco use. Self-reported health problems associated with nicotine use and general health was reported by 41% and 39% of the subjects. Unsuccessful past quit attempts was present in 85% cases. More than 90% of subjects remained interested in quitting the tobacco use. An increased liver enzyme (aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase were observed in 43, 32 and 47% of the cases. Conclusion: The results suggest the nicotine and alcohol dependent patients represent a separate population requiring higher attention from the treating physician.

  12. Assessment of adverse drug events among patients in a tertiary care medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Philip E; France, Daniel J; Byrne, Daniel W; Murff, Harvey J; Lee, Byron; Stiles, Renee A; Speroff, Theodore

    2006-11-15

    Specific patient and clinical characteristics associated with an increased risk of sustaining an adverse event (AE) were identified. AE reports for patients in a 658-bed tertiary care medical center between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2002, were analyzed. The data collected from each report included medical record number, patient sex, patient age, clinical service, date of occurrence, diagnoses, type of error, suspected medication, and severity of the AE. A three-stage logistic regression model with high-risk indicators was used to evaluate key indicators of the most vulnerable patient populations. The number of control patients and those with AEs totaled 60,206. This population was then randomly split into two equal groups of patients: the training data set (n = 30,103) and the validation data set (n = 30,103). AEs occurred in a higher percentage of patients who were age or =60 years than in other groups. A higher percentage of AEs were reported in men than women, but the groups were not significantly different when comparing those with an AE and those without an AE. Asian Indian patients demonstrated a high rate of AEs, but this may be a statistical artifact, reflecting their very small percentage in the study. Evaluation of admission sources revealed that doctors' offices, clinic referrals, and local hospital transfers accounted for higher rates of AEs than other sources. Certain age groups, diagnoses, admission sources, types of insurance, and the use of specific medications or medication classes were associated with increased AE rates at a tertiary care medical center.

  13. [Geriatric trauma centers - requirements catalog. An initiative to promote and guarantee the quality of care of elderly trauma patients receiving inpatient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogol, M; van den Heuvel, D; Lüttje, D; Püllen, R; Reingräber, A C; Schulz, R-J; Veer, A; Wittrich, A

    2014-06-01

    For the care of the elderly, specific geriatric care facilities in hospitals and specialized rehabilitation centers have been established in the last 20 years throughout Germany. In addition, trauma surgery departments in hospitals and clinics also provide comprehensive care for trauma patients. The present requirements catalog was developed with the aim to ensure the standardization and quality assurance of these care facilities. Thus, the structural basics and, in particular, the structured cooperation between geriatrics and trauma surgery are described and defined in terms of structure, process, and outcome quality. The Bundesverband Geriatrie, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie, and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie offer documentation for external and internal use and evaluation of the structures and processes for certification of geriatric trauma centers. Prerequisite for certification is to meet the technical requirements defined in the requirements catalogue or documents derived from it, and proof of a quality management system according to ISO 9001.

  14. Profile of gynecologic malignancies reported at a tertiary care center in India over the past decade: Comparative evaluation with international data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comprehensive statistics on gynecologic malignancies reported from India are deficient. This study was performed to ascertain the profile of gynecologic cancers reported at our center regarding incidence, histologic subtypes, frequency of involvement at various sites and stage at presentation. We endeavored to compare our data with gynecologic cancers reported at other national and international centers. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of records of gynecologic cancers obtained from Departments of Pathology and Gynecology, at a tertiary care center, Delhi from January 2000 to December 2009 was performed. Comparison with international data was performed using Fishcher′s exact test and chi square tests. Results: A total of 1315 gynecologic cancers were reported. Cervical malignancies were the commonest at our center as compared to uterine malignancies in data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER Program of United States and European Union. All malignancies except cervical cancers affected a younger age group at our center than in the US population. Cervical cancer presented at a relatively more advanced stage, ovarian cancers at more localized stages, whereas uterine cancers presented at similar stages as compared to Western data. Conclusions: Our registry presents composite data from North India. Higher age and advanced stage at presentation of cervical cancers suggests lacunae in screening programs available. Ovarian malignancies were more localized at presentation than in the Western population for which environmental or genetic factors may be causative.

  15. Measuring the quality of patient-centered care: why patient-reported measures are critical to reliable assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzelepis F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flora Tzelepis, Robert W Sanson-Fisher, Alison C Zucca, Elizabeth A FradgleyPriority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimensions that stipulated that care must be: respectful to patients’ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordinated and integrated; provide information, communication, and education; ensure physical comfort; provide emotional support; and involve family and friends. Patient-reported measures examine the patient’s perspective and are essential to the accurate assessment of patient-centered care. This article’s objectives are to: 1 use the six IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimensions as a framework to outline why patient-reported measures are crucial to the reliable measurement of patient-centered care; and 2 to identify existing patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centered care dimension.Methods: For each IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimension, the published literature was searched to highlight the essential role of patients in assessing patient-centered care and informing quality improvement efforts. Existing literature was also searched to identify examples of patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centeredness dimension.Conclusion: Patient-reported measures are arguably the best way to measure patient-centeredness. For instance, patients are best positioned to determine whether care aligns with patient values, preferences, and needs and the Measure of Patient Preferences is an example of a patient-reported measure that does so. Furthermore, only the patient knows whether they received the level of information desired, and if information was understood and can be recalled. Patient-reported measures that examine information provision include

  16. Comparison of two theorists on care: Orem and Leininger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J N

    1986-07-01

    Dorothea Orem and Madeleine Leininger are two nursing scholars who are contributing significantly to the body of nursing knowledge. This paper contrasts their backgrounds, the origins of their theories, their views of the nature of nursing, use of theory development strategies, and contributions to nursing science. The concepts of Leininger's care and Orem's self-care will be compared as these relate to their theories with the examination of similarities and differences.

  17. Attitudes toward mandatory occupational vaccinations and vaccination coverage against vaccine-preventable diseases of health care workers in primary health care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezou, Helena C; Katerelos, Panos; Poufta, Sophia; Pavli, Androula; Maragos, Antonios; Theodoridou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes regarding mandatory occupational vaccinations and the vaccination coverage against vaccine-preventable diseases among health care workers (HCWs) working in primary health care centers in Greece. A standardized questionnaire was distributed to HCWs working in all primary health care centers in Greece (n = 185). A total of 2,055 of 5,639 HCWs (36.4% response rate) from 152 primary health care centers participated. The self-reported completed vaccination rates were 23.3% against measles, 23.3% against mumps, 29.8% against rubella, 3% against varicella, 5.8% against hepatitis A, 55.7% against hepatitis B, and 47.3% against tetanus-diphtheria; corresponding susceptibility rates were 17%, 25%, 18.6%, 16.7%, 87.5%, 35%, and 52.6%. Mandatory vaccinations were supported by 65.1% of 1,807 respondents, with wide differences by disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed higher rates of acceptance of mandatory vaccination in physicians compared with other HCW categories. Despite the fact that two-thirds of HCWs working in primary health care centers in Greece support mandatory vaccination for HCWs, completed vaccination rates against vaccine-preventable diseases are suboptimal. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-11-14

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe.

  19. A hospital-centered approach to improve emergency obstetric care in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppi, Lavinia; Somigliana, Edgardo; Pisani, Vincenzo; Ika, Michelina; Mabor, Joseph L; Akec, Henry N; Nhial, John A; Mading, Michel S; Scanagatta, Chiara; Manenti, Fabio; Putoto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    To assess provision of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in Greater Yirol, South Sudan, after implementation of a hospital-centered intervention with an ambulance referral system. In a descriptive study, data were prospectively recorded for all women referred to Yirol County Hospital for delivery in 2012. An ambulance referral system had been implemented in October 2011. Access to the hospital and ambulance use were free of charge. The number of deliveries at Yirol County Hospital increased in 2012 to 1089, corresponding to 13.3% of the 8213 deliveries expected to have occurred in the catchment area. Cesareans were performed for 53 (4.9%) deliveries, corresponding to 0.6% of the expected number of deliveries in the catchment area. Among 950 women who delivered a newborn weighing at least 2500 g at the hospital, 6 (0.6%) intrapartum or very early neonatal deaths occurred. Of 1232 women expected to have major obstetric complications in 2012 in the catchment area, 472 (38.3%) received EmOC at the hospital. Of 115 expected absolute obstetric indications, 114 (99.1%) were treated in the hospital. A hospital-centered approach with an ambulance referral system effectively improves the availability of EmOC in underprivileged remote settings. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

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    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  1. "Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites among Children in Day-care Centers in Damghan - Iran"

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    A Heidari

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the prevalence of parasitic intestinal infections and to determine the impact of some factors, such as age, health houses, education, environmental health etc, on infection, this survey was carried out on 461 stool specimens and scotch tapes obtained from children resident in day-care centers in Damghan city, Semnan province, Iran. The samples were tested using formalin-ether concentration and Graham methods. The analysis of the results showed that at least 68.1 percent of the individuals tested, were infected with one species of pathogen or non-pathogen parasites. The rate of infection for Enterobius vermicularis, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana, Entamoeba coli, Blastocystis hominis, Iodamoeba butschlii and Chilomastix mesnili was 33.8%, 26.2%, 2.4%, 3%, 4.8%, 5.8%, 4.8%, 2.7% and 4% respectively. A significant difference was seen between the rate of infection and parents’ education (P<0.005 but was negative regarding age, sex, and health houses. It is concluded that sanitary measurements should be conducted in such centers to decrease the rate of parasitic infection.

  2. STUDY OF INCIDENCE, MORTALITY & CAUSES OF NEONATAL TETANUS AMONG ALL NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT [NICU] ADMISSIONS IN TERTIARY HEALTH CARE CENTER OF SBHGMC, DHULE

    OpenAIRE

    Neeta; Neelam; Syed; Arjun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To find out incidence & mortality due to Neonatal Tetanus and to study its causes among all the admissions in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit [NICU] of tertiary health care center of Shri Bhausaheb Hire Government Medical College, [SBHGMC] Dhule. OBJECTIVES: 1] To find out incidence of Neonatal Teta nus in all neonatal admissions. 2] To find out mortality rate among all Neonatal Tetanus cases. 3] To take detailed history to find out causes of Neonatal Tetanu...

  3. Comparison of long-term care in an acute care institution and in a long-term care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R; Kalant, N

    1998-11-03

    Acute care hospitals in Quebec are required to reserve 10% of their beds for patients receiving long-term care while awaiting transfer to a long-term care facility. It is widely believed that this is inefficient because it is more costly to provide long-term care in an acute care hospital than in one dedicated to long-term care. The purpose of this study was to compare the quality and cost of long-term care in an acute care hospital and in a long-term care facility. A concurrent cross-sectional study was conducted of 101 patients at the acute care hospital and 102 patients at the long-term care hospital. The 2 groups were closely matched in terms of age, sex, nursing care requirements and major diagnoses. Several indicators were used to assess the quality of care: the number of medical specialist consultations, drugs, biochemical tests and radiographic examinations; the number of adverse events (reportable incidents, nosocomial infections and pressure ulcers); and anthropometric and biochemical indicators of nutritional status. Costs were determined for nursing personnel, drugs and biochemical tests. A longitudinal study was conducted of 45 patients who had been receiving long-term care at the acute care hospital for at least 5 months and were then transferred to the long-term care facility where they remained for at least 6 months. For each patient, the number of adverse events, the number of medical specialist consultations and the changes in activities of daily living status were assessed at the 2 institutions. In the concurrent study, no differences in the number of adverse events were observed; however, patients at the acute care hospital received more drugs (5.9 v. 4.7 for each patient, p cost per patient-year was $7580 higher at the acute care hospital, attributable to the higher cost of drugs ($42), the greater use of laboratory tests ($189) and, primarily, the higher cost of nursing ($7349). For patients requiring 3.00 nursing hours/day, the acute care

  4. Using mHealth to Deliver Behavior Change Interventions Within Prenatal Care at Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriello, Leanne M; Van Marter, Deborah F; Umanzor, Cindy D; Castle, Patricia H; de Aguiar, Emma L

    2016-09-01

    To test an iPad-delivered multiple behavior tailored intervention (Healthy Pregnancy: Step by Step) for pregnant women that addresses smoking cessation, stress management, and fruit and vegetable consumption. A randomized 2 × 5 factorial repeated measures design was employed with randomization on the individual level stratified on behavior risk. Women completed three sessions during pregnancy and two postpartum at postdelivery months 1 and 4. Women were recruited from six locations of federally funded health centers across three states. Participants (N = 335) were English- and Spanish-speaking women at up to 18 weeks gestation. The treatment group received three interactive sessions focused on two priority health behavior risks. The sessions offered individually tailored and stage-matched change strategies based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. The usual care group received March of Dimes brochures. The primary outcome was the number of behavior risks. Stage of change and continuous measures for all behaviors also were assessed. Data were analyzed across all time points using generalized estimating equations examining repeated measures effects. Women in the treatment group reported significantly fewer risks than those in usual care at 1 month (.85 vs. 1.20, odds ratio [OR] = .70) and 4 months postpartum (.72 vs. .91, OR = .81). Healthy Pregnancy is an evidence-based and personalized program that assists pregnant women with reducing behavior risks and sustaining healthy lifestyle behaviors. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  5. Educating Patients about CKD: The Path to Self-Management and Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narva, Andrew S; Norton, Jenna M; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-04-07

    Patient education is associated with better patient outcomes and supported by international guidelines and organizations, but a range of barriers prevent widespread implementation of comprehensive education for people with progressive kidney disease, especially in the United States. Among United States patients, obstacles to education include the complex nature of kidney disease information, low baseline awareness, limited health literacy and numeracy, limited availability of CKD information, and lack of readiness to learn. For providers, lack of time and clinical confidence combine with competing education priorities and confusion about diagnosing CKD to limit educational efforts. At the system level, lack of provider incentives, limited availability of practical decision support tools, and lack of established interdisciplinary care models inhibit patient education. Despite these barriers, innovative education approaches for people with CKD exist, including self-management support, shared decision making, use of digital media, and engaging families and communities. Education efficiency may be increased by focusing on people with progressive disease, establishing interdisciplinary care management including community health workers, and providing education in group settings. New educational approaches are being developed through research and quality improvement efforts, but challenges to evaluating public awareness and patient education programs inhibit identification of successful strategies for broader implementation. However, growing interest in improving patient-centered outcomes may provide new approaches to effective education of people with CKD. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Suboptimal Clinical Documentation in Young Children with Severe Obesity at Tertiary Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Cassandra C.; Lingren, Todd; Woo, Jessica G.; Kennebeck, Stephanie S.; Namjou-Khales, Bahram; Roach, Ashton; Bickel, Jonathan P.; Patibandla, Nandan; Savova, Guergana K.; Solti, Imre; Holm, Ingrid A.; Harley, John B.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Crimmins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The prevalence of severe obesity in children has doubled in the past decade. The objective of this study is to identify the clinical documentation of obesity in young children with a BMI ≥ 99th percentile at two large tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Methods. We used a standardized algorithm utilizing data from electronic health records to identify children with severe early onset obesity (BMI ≥ 99th percentile at age <6 years). We extracted descriptive terms and ICD-9 codes to evaluate documentation of obesity at Boston Children's Hospital and Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center between 2007 and 2014. Results. A total of 9887 visit records of 2588 children with severe early onset obesity were identified. Based on predefined criteria for documentation of obesity, 21.5% of children (13.5% of visits) had positive documentation, which varied by institution. Documentation in children first seen under 2 years of age was lower than in older children (15% versus 26%). Documentation was significantly higher in girls (29% versus 17%, p < 0.001), African American children (27% versus 19% in whites, p < 0.001), and the obesity focused specialty clinics (70% versus 15% in primary care and 9% in other subspecialty clinics, p < 0.001). Conclusions. There is significant opportunity for improvement in documentation of obesity in young children, even years after the 2007 AAP guidelines for management of obesity. PMID:27698673

  7. Lifestyle and Dietary Behaviors among Saudi Preschool Children Attending Primary Health Care Centers, Eastern Saudi Arabia

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    Magdy A. Darwish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study life styles and dietary behaviors among Saudi preschool children (1–5 years attending primary health care centers (PHCCs in Dammam and Qatif areas, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. Data were collected using structured, interviewer-filled questionnaire. Children and their mothers were encountered during their well-baby clinic visits. A total number of 300 preschool children and their mothers were interviewed during study period. Results. Unsatisfactory areas include smoking fathers (32%, smoking in front of children (11.3%, overweight and obesity among mothers (60.3%, noncompliance using seat belts for both parents (56.3% and children (68%, children watching television (T.V more than 2 hours (50%, adherence to exclusive breast feeding (only 20.7%, and late solid food introduction (65.3%. Frequent intake of unhealthy food items was 26%, 25%, and 24% for pizza, burger, and soft drinks. Unfortunately frequent intake of the following unhealthy food items was high: biscuits, deserts/chocolates, and chips which was 78%, 67%, and 72%, respectively. Conclusion. This study provides benchmark about the current situation. It provides health care workers and decision makers with important information that may help to improve health services.

  8. Lifestyle and Dietary Behaviors among Saudi Preschool Children Attending Primary Health Care Centers, Eastern Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Magdy A.; Al-Saif, Ghadeer; Albahrani, Suha; Sabra, Amr A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study life styles and dietary behaviors among Saudi preschool children (1–5 years) attending primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Dammam and Qatif areas, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. Data were collected using structured, interviewer-filled questionnaire. Children and their mothers were encountered during their well-baby clinic visits. A total number of 300 preschool children and their mothers were interviewed during study period. Results. Unsatisfactory areas include smoking fathers (32%), smoking in front of children (11.3%), overweight and obesity among mothers (60.3%), noncompliance using seat belts for both parents (56.3%) and children (68%), children watching television (T.V) more than 2 hours (50%), adherence to exclusive breast feeding (only 20.7%), and late solid food introduction (65.3%). Frequent intake of unhealthy food items was 26%, 25%, and 24% for pizza, burger, and soft drinks. Unfortunately frequent intake of the following unhealthy food items was high: biscuits, deserts/chocolates, and chips which was 78%, 67%, and 72%, respectively. Conclusion. This study provides benchmark about the current situation. It provides health care workers and decision makers with important information that may help to improve health services. PMID:25114804

  9. Prevalence and associated factors of polypharmacy among adult Saudi medical outpatients at a tertiary care center

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    Salih Bin Salih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy (PP and the associated factors in medical outpatients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, observational, descriptive study was carried out in adult medical outpatients attending internal medicine clinics at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from 1 March 2009 to 31 December 2009. PP was defined as the concomitant use of ≥5 medications daily. The number of medications being currently taken by patient was recorded. Effect of patients′ age, gender, educational level, number of prescribers, disease load and disease type on PP was assessed by multivariate analysis using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Incorporated (SPSS Inc Version 18. Results: Out of 766 patients included in the study, 683 (89% had PP. The mean number of prescribed medications, oral pills and doses was 8.8, 9.6 and 12.1, respectively. Factors significantly associated with PP included age (≥61 years, disease load and the number of prescribers. Gender had no impact on PP while education beyond primary education significantly decreased PP. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia alone and as a cluster increased PP. Conclusion: We found an extremely high level of PP in medical outpatients at our tertiary care center. The impact of PP on medication compliance and control of underlying diseases in Saudi Arabia is unknown and needs to be studied at different levels of care.

  10. [Guidelines for evaluating the viability of health care centers: test in northern Cameroon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bene, T; Mevel, A; Yougouda, A; Fontaine, D

    1998-01-01

    A working group has developed a manual of practical guidelines for evaluating the viability of health care centers (HCC). These guidelines were tested in 1996 at the HCC in Badjouma, Cameroon. Viability is assessed in three dimensions, i.e. quality of care, cost-effectiveness, and institutional efficacy on the basis of the demand for services, staff requirements, cash flow, and supply costs. Regular evaluation of these parameters allows identification of areas requiring improvement to enhance the viability of the HCC. With only 0.29 visits per year per inhabitant, the attendance rate at the Badjouma facility is low. Public appeal is adversely affected by an under-qualified staff and poor equipment. Overall operating expenses are 6.8 million CFA francs per year and depreciation costs are 1.7 million CFA francs per year. Direct proceeds related to health care services (mainly sale of medication) are 4.1 million CFA francs. The remaining sources of revenue are state subsidies (2.5 million CFA francs) and international aid (0.4 million CFA francs). The deficit is 1.5 million CFA francs corresponding mainly to depreciation costs. Evaluation of the financial viability based on service-generated revenues alone (49%) and on combined domestic revenues, i.e. service revenues and state subsidies (79%), shows that the HCC depends mainly on depreciation costs. Analysis of institutional efficacy by comparing real activity with activity defined in official texts showed that the state was the main decision-maker but also revealed a tendency to pass off responsibility due to poorly defined command structure. The results of this test validate the proposed manual as a tool for global analysis of the activity and relevance of a HCC. Findings can be used to draw conclusions on the effects of national health policies at the local level.

  11. Pregnancy Outcomes in HIV-Infected Women: Experience from a Tertiary Care Center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhwal, Vatsla; Sharma, Aparna; Khoiwal, Kavita; Deka, Dipika; Sarkar, Plaboni; Vanamail, P

    2017-01-01

    There is conflicting data on the effect of HIV infection as well as antiretroviral therapy (ART) on pregnancy outcome. The objectives of this study were to compare pregnancy outcomes in women with and without HIV infection, and to evaluate the effect of HAART on pregnancy in HIV-infected women. This is a prospective case record analysis of 212 HIV-infected women delivering between 2002 and 2015, in a tertiary health care center in India. The pregnancy outcome in HIV-infected women was compared to 238 HIV-uninfected controls. Women received ART for prevention of mother to child transmission as per protocol which varied during the period of study. Effect of use of ART on preterm birth (PTB) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) was analyzed. HIV-infected women were more likely to have PTB, IUGR, and anemia (9.4%, 9.9%, 5.2%) compared to uninfected women (7.6%, 5%, 3.8%), this did not reach statistical significance (P-value = >0.05). The incidence of PIH, diabetes mellitus and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy was similar in both groups. Mean birth weight was significantly lower in neonates of HIV-infected women (2593.60±499g) than HIV-uninfected women (2919±459g) [P-value=0.001]. neonatal intensive care unit admissions were also significantly higher in infants born to HIV-infected women (P-value=0.002). HIV-infected women on ART had decreased incidence of PTB and IUGR. Good antenatal care and multidisciplinary team approach can optimize pregnancy outcomes in HIV-infected women.

  12. Integrating research, clinical care, and education in academic health science centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Thomson, Nicole; Rothstein, Mitchell; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Parker, Kathryn

    2016-10-10

    Purpose One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational activities to achieve the vision of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) and optimal client care. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach This paper synthesizes literature on organizational learning and collaboration, evidence-informed organizational decision making, and learning-based organizations to derive insights concerning the nature of effective workplace learning in AHSCs. Findings An evidence-informed model of collaborative workplace learning is proposed to aid the alignment of research, clinical, and educational functions in AHSCs. The model articulates relationships among AHSC academic functions and sub-functions, cross-functional activities, and collaborative learning processes, emphasizing the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing collaborative learning processes and optimizing EIDM and client care. Cross-functional activities involving clinicians, researchers, and educators are hypothesized to be a primary vehicle for integration, supported by a learning-oriented workplace culture. These activities are distinct from interprofessional teams, which are clinical in nature. Four collaborative learning processes are specified that are enhanced in cross-functional activities or teamwork: co-constructing meaning, co-learning, co-producing knowledge, and co-using knowledge. Practical implications The model provides an aspirational vision and insight into the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing workplace learning. The paper discusses the conceptual and empirical basis to the model, its contributions and limitations, and implications for AHSCs. Originality/value The model's potential utility for health care is discussed, with implications for organizational culture and the promotion of cross-functional activities.

  13. Domestic Violence against Women in Two Primary Health Care Centers in Kayseri

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    Melis Nacar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the women’s rate of exposure to domestic violence, the factors that affect it and to find out the view of women about domestic violence in two primary health care cervices in Kayseri. METHODS: The data was collected from 355 women aged 16 and over who applied to the selected two primary health care centers. A questionnaire was used. RESULTS: The mean age of the women were 34,0±10,9, 82,3% were married, 12.4% were single and 5.4% were widowed. Fifty two percent of women accept wife beating. Women living in low socioeconomic area (2.1 times more, and women who had 8 and low year of education (2.8 times more think that wife beating would be justified in some cases. Forty nine point nine percent of the women had an experience of domestic violence and 38.6% blame themselves for it. The rate of violence was higher in women whose husband is not working in a continuous work, had taken a beating from her mother-father, and had seen her father beating her mother. Women’s and husbands’ experience of violence in childhood increase the risk of beating their children. CONCLUSION: The rate of domestic violence and acceptance of violence were found high in our study. Man who exposed violence from his parents applies violence to his wife and children; woman who exposed violence from her parents applies violence to her children. To increase awareness of the health care workers about domestic violence we have to pay attention to this subject during training studies. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(2.000: 131-138

  14. Information, education, and communication services in MCH care provided at an urban health center

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    Banerjee Bratati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular IEC programs during antenatal and intranatal period, through individual or group approach, brings desirable changes in health practices of people, resulting in a healthy mother and a healthy baby. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to assess the level of IEC services regarding pregnancy and child care, received by the women at an MCH clinic of an urban health center, where the study subjects comprised 400 antenatal (AN and postnatal (PN women and mothers of children under five years. Results: Warning signs of danger was explained to only 10% of the AN and PN women. Advice regarding family planning appeared to be the most frequently covered, though that too was explained to less than half of the subjects. About one third of the women were advised on breast feeding. Only 8% of the mothers had been told about all issues regarding pregnancy and child care. Breast feeding and weaning was properly explained to 85.7 and 81.1% of the total mothers of U5 children. Advice regarding subsequent nutrition was given to 60.9% of mothers. About only a quarter of the total mothers were advised on home management of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. Very few mothers were counseled about the growth pattern of the children and none were shown the growth chart. Only 12.9% of the mothers were informed about all issues. Conclusion: IEC regarding maternal and child care other than feeding practices is a neglected service in the health facility where the study was conducted.

  15. The Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM: integrating the social dimensions of health into primary care

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    Rebekah Pratt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social dimensions of health are known to contribute to what is often termed “patient complexity”, which is particularly common among patients with multimorbidity. Health-care professionals require tools to help them identify and manage these aspects of patient needs. Objectives: To examine: (i the Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM, a tool for assessing patient complexity in ways that are sensitive to the biopsychosocial dimensions of health, in primary care settings in Scotland; (ii the impact of the PCAM on referral patterns and its perceived value; and (iii the PCAM’s perceived applicability for use in a complex patient population. Design: Two studies are described: (i a mixed-methods prospective cohort study of the implementation of the PCAM in primary care clinics; and (ii a qualitative exploratory study that evaluated the value of the PCAM in a complex patient population. Results: Use of the PCAM did not impact patient satisfaction or perception of practitioners’ empathy, but it did increase both the number of onward referrals per referred patient (9–12% and the proportion of referrals to non-medical services addressing psychological, social, and lifestyle needs. Nurses valued the PCAM, particularly its ability to help them address psychological and social domains of patients’ lives, and found it to be highly relevant for use in populations with known high complexity. Conclusions: The PCAM represents a feasible approach for assessing patient needs with consideration to the social dimensions of health, and allows practitioners to refer patients to a broader range of services to address patient complexity.

  16. Characterization of kinetic handling in a primary care center of Antofagasta in year 2011.

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    Andrés Soto B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Musculoskeletal pathologies are prevalent in primary care, affecting 50.6% of women and 31.4% of men between 45 and 64 years old. In the kinetic care service of CESFAM Corvallis in Antofagasta, physiotherapy management is performed at acute musculoskeletal pathologies. OBJECTIVE : Characterization of kinesiology care of musculoskeletal pathologies in CESFAM Corvallis. MATERIAL AND MET HOD : Cross-sectional study, all treated patients with available data were included, so that there was no exclusion. The daily schedule data were used in the study, analyzing the following variables: age, sex and diagnosis. RESULTS : Of 604 patients, the average age was 56,4 years old, being 78% women. The more frequent age range was between 45 and 64 years old with 48.2%. According to anatomical region, 51.5% were in upper extremities, 33.9% in head and spine and 14.1% in lower extremities. In upper extremities the most frequent was painful shoulder syndrome with 48.1% and rotator cuff tendinitis with 12.3%. In head and spine was mechanical low back pain with 42.9% and cervicobrachialgia with 16.1%. In lower extremities, knee osteoarthritis with 23.5%, ankle sprain with 17.6%, and plantar fasciitis with 15.3%. DISCUSSION : The results are consistent with national studies, showing dominance in women and the most common age range is between 45 and 64 years old. The higher frequency of upper extremities pathologies in this study in comparison with national statistics may be due to overdiagnosis, geographic or biopsycosocial factors. Implementation of an adequate registration system is needed for an adequate patient follow-up.

  17. An Assesment of Emergency Contraception Knowledge of Women Attending the Primary Health Care Center in Umraniye

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    M. Fatih Onsuz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to determined the knowledge of women who were in reproductive age that were attending to a primary health care center which was having family planning service in Umraniye. METHODS: This descriptive research has been performed at a primary health care center in Umraniye, between 18-20 December 2006. In our study study sample isn’t selected and we include women of reproductive age who are attending to the primary health care with any cause in the study dates. Study has been performed at 241 women (89.9% that has been interwieved of 268. Study data has been collected by a three part questionnaire which has 33 question. The data has been evaluated by chi square and Fisher exact tests. RESULTS: The median age of the participants was 28 (25p-75p. Small part of participants have heard emergency contraception (13.7%. There was a significant relationship between hearing the method, being nullipar and high education level (p<0.05. The participants who were hearing the method just 60.6% of them also knew the aim of the method (8.3% of the all participants. In the same group of the participants only 36.4% knew correctly of taking time of the pills and 9.0% of them knew correctly of taking piece of tablet after an unprotected sexual intercourse. Only one of the women who were determining of hearing the method also ever used it. There was a statistically significant difference between young age and high education level and knowing correctly of the aim of the method. Also there was a statisticaly significant difference between high education level and knowing correctly of taking time of the method after an unprotected sexual intercourse (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Although awareness of emergency contraception is at an apparent level the using rate of the method is at a very low level. Giving education about the aim, taking time and how taking of the method to the women who are living at the study area is providing of giving shape

  18. Pathway of care among patients with Dhat syndrome attending a psychosexual clinic in tertiary care center in North India

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    Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to understand the pathway to care among patients with Dhat syndrome and to study the factors leading to delay in seeking professional psychiatric help. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven patients diagnosed with Dhat syndrome as per the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria were assessed for sociodemographic and clinical details and information regarding previous treatment taken to determine the pathways to care at their first contact with the outpatient psychosexual clinic. Results: Majority of the patients were single (70.2%, received formal education for at least more than 10 years (66.0%, were employed (59.6%, followers of Hinduism (68.1 and from middle socio-economic class (59.6%, nuclear family setup (53.2%, and rural locality (63.8%. Comorbidity in the form of any psychiatric illness or sexual dysfunction was present on 61.7% of the patients. The mean age at onset of symptoms of Dhat syndrome was 20.38 years (standard deviation [SD] - 6.91. The mean duration of symptoms of Dhat before the patients presented to our psychosexual clinic was 6.78 years (SD - 6.94 while the mean number of agencies/help contacted before was 2.85 (SD - 1.40; range: 1–5. The favorite choice for the first contact was indigenous practitioners, followed by asking for help from friends or relatives, allopathic doctors, and traditional faith healers or pharmacists. The preference to visit indigenous practitioners gradually declined at each stage. Ayurvedic doctors remained the most preferred among all indigenous practitioners. The absence of any comorbid sexual dysfunction in patients with Dhat syndrome predicted an earlier visit to our center as compared to the patients with any comorbid sexual dysfunction. Conclusions: Majority of the patients with Dhat syndrome present very late to specialized psychosexual clinics. There is a need for improving the sexual knowledge and attitude at the community level which will

  19. A Comparison of the impact of family-centered and patient-centered education methods on attitude toward and adherence to diet and fluid restriction in hemodialysis patients

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    Asgari P

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: One of the major issues in hemodialysis patients is adherence to diet and fluid restriction. In order to reduce the adverse consequences of the disease and improve quality of life, educating these patients is of great importance. Therefore, the present study was conducted in order to compare the impact of two methods of education (patient-centered and family–centered on attitude toward and adherence to diet and fluid restriction in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was performed on patients referred to the hemodialysis ward of hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during May to October 2012. Through purposive sampling method, 60 patients were selected and randomly assigned to two groups patient-centered (n = 30 and family-centered (n = 30. Patients’ attitude toward and adherence to diet regime and fluid restriction were assessed using a researcher-made self-report questionnaire in 3 stages (before the intervention, and 2 and 4 weeks after the intervention. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were approved. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software version 16 and independent t-test, chi-square, Fisher’s exact test, and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Before the intervention, the findings showed no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of adherence to diet and fluid restriction. In the second week after the intervention, mean adherence to diet in the family-centered group was significantly higher than the patient-centered group (P = 0.010. Moreover, at the end of the second (P = 0.001 and fourth weeks (P = 0.002, the attitude toward adherence to diet and fluid restriction was more positive in the family-centered group, in comparison to the patient-centered group. Conclusion: Family-centered education is more effective on patient adherence to the treatment regimen. Thus, it is recommended that family-centered

  20. KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF EPILEPSY AMONG HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN RAJASTHAN

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    Sureka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROND : Despite recent advances in the management of epilepsy the efforts to assess knowledge, attitude and practice towards epilepsy are limited, particularly in the developing countries. O B JECTIVE : To delineate the magnitude and scope of this problem, present study was conducted amongst various health personals, which may help in planning awareness programme for them. MATERIAL AND METHODS : Self - administered questionnaire was completed by all study subjects. In order to analyze possible difference in answers among courses that deal more directly with the patients with epilepsy and the other group who are not directly dealing with the epilepsy patients, the sample was divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included nursing students and nursing faculty and group 2 included physiotherapy students and physiotherapy faculty. RESULTS: Most of our study subjects had heard about epilepsy except Nursing GNM students ( 20%. Most of the participants in Group B ( >70% and the B.Sc. students ( >55% in comparison to nursing faculty ( approx. 15% believed that epilepsy is a mental illness. Majority ( 60.3% of the members of both groups considered epilepsy as hindrance in life but curable.20% of participants considered epilepsy as hereditary. Most of the faculty ( nursing and physiotherapy was of the opinion that epilepsy could be treated with Ayurvedic or Homeopathic medicine also. CONCLUSION : There are major gaps in the knowledge of health care persons for this disease. Misconceptions about epilepsy, are widely prevalent. The present day education, therefore, does not seem to influence the prejudices against persons with epilepsy. Requirement of special education programme is felt to dispel myths and misconceptions about epilepsy

  1. Equity in the finance of health care: some international comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, A; van Doorslaer, E; Calonge, S; Christiansen, T; Gerfin, M; Gottschalk, P; Janssen, R; Lachaud, C; Leu, R E; Nolan, B

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a ten-country comparative study of health care financing systems and their progressivity characteristics. It distinguishes between the tax-financed systems of Denmark, Portugal and the U.K., the social insurance systems of France, the Netherlands and Spain, and the predominantly private systems of Switzerland and the U.S. It concludes that tax-financed systems tend to be proportional or mildly progressive, that social insurance systems are regressive and that private systems are even more regressive. Out-of-pocket payments are in most countries an especially regressive means of raising health care revenues.

  2. Lessons Learned From a Collaborative to Improve Care for Patients With Diabetes in 17 Community Health Centers, Massachusetts, 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Lemay, Celeste A.; Beagan, Brianne M.; Ferguson, Warren J.; Lee, J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In 2006, the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers convened a collaborative to systematically improve health care delivery for patients with diabetes in 17 community health centers. Our goal was to identify facilitators of and barriers to success reported by teams that participated in this collaborative. Methods The collaborative's activities lasted 13 months. At their conclusion, we interviewed participating team members. We asked about their teams' successes, challen...

  3. Measurement of compliance with New York City's regulations on beverages, physical activity, and screen time in early child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Laura; Lesesne, Catherine; Kakietek, Jakub; Breck, Andrew; Jernigan, Jan; Dunn, Lillian; Nonas, Cathy; O'Dell, Sarah Abood; Stephens, Robert L; Xu, Ye; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-10-16

    Policy interventions designed to change the nutrition environment and increase physical activity in child care centers are becoming more common, but an understanding of the implementation of these interventions is yet to be developed. The objective of this study was to explore the extent and consistency of compliance with a policy intervention designed to promote nutrition and physical activity among licensed child care centers in New York City. We used a multimethod cross-sectional approach and 2 independent components of data collection (Center Evaluation Component and Classroom Evaluation Component). The methods were designed to evaluate the impact of regulations on beverages served, physical activity, and screen time at child care centers. We calculated compliance scores for each evaluation component and each regulation and percentage agreement between compliance in the center and classroom components. Compliance with certain requirements of the beverage regulations was high and fairly consistent between components, whereas compliance with the physical activity regulation varied according to the data collection component. Compliance with the regulation on amount and content of screen time was high and consistent. Compliance with the physical activity regulation may be a more fluid, day-to-day issue, whereas compliance with the regulations on beverages and television viewing may be easier to control at the center level. Multiple indicators over multiple time points may provide a more complete picture of compliance - especially in the assessment of compliance with physical activity policies.

  4. Quality of life in older people with dementia: a multilevel study of individual attributes and residential care center characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marventano, Stefano; Prieto-Flores, Maria-Eugenia; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Martín-García, Salomé; Fernandez-Mayoralas, Gloria; Rojo-Perez, Fermina; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Forjaz, Maria João

    2015-01-01

    To analyze how the characteristics of institutionalized older people with dementia and residential care centers are associated with the individual's quality of life (QoL). Data were collected from a survey carried out on 525 elderly people aged 60 years or older in 14 nursing care homes across Spain. Multilevel linear analysis to assess the differences in QoL level between centers and individuals was carried out. The characteristics of the individuals that were associated with a higher QoL were functional independence, health status and gathering with family, friends or neighbors. In contrast, higher levels of dementia, depression and the length of institutionalization had a negative effect on QoL. In relation to the residential care center characteristics, the availability of geriatricians was associated with higher QoL, compared with those centers with no geriatricians on staff. In addition, public centers (public ownership and publicly-funded residents) were also associated with higher QoL than private/mixed centers. The multilevel analysis showed that the 16.4% of the differences in QoL was related to residence factors. These results reflect the importance of the functional, social, mental and residential dimensions in the QoL of older adults with dementia. Actions devoted to improving these key dimensions would contribute to promote the well-being of this vulnerable population. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Equity in the finance of health care: Some international comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wagstaff (Adam); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents the results of a ten-country comparative study of health care financing systems and their progressivity characteristics. It distinguishes between the tax-financed systems of Denmark, Portugal and the U.K., the social insurance systems of France, the Netherlands and Sp

  6. Contextual and Cultural Influences on Parental Feeding Practices and Involvement in Child Care Centers among Hispanic Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Noereem Z; Gorman, Kathleen; Dickin, Kate; Greene, Geoffrey; Tovar, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Parental feeding practices shape children's dietary preferences and behaviors, which can influence a child's weight status. Limited research exists on the precursors and contextual influences of feeding, particularly among Hispanic parents. Therefore, this study explored two areas potentially important for obesity prevention in young children: (1) precursors and contextual influences on parental feeding and (2) parental perceptions and knowledge of the child care food environment. Four focus groups (n=36) were held with Hispanic parents, predominantly mothers, of preschool children at two child care centers. Parents were asked about influences on what and how they feed their children, awareness of the child care center feeding environment, and current involvement in the child care center. Themes were coded using NVivo10 software (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). Participants' childhood experiences influenced how they feed their children. Parents stated that both husbands and grandparents often indulged their children with unhealthy foods and thought this interfered with their efforts to maintain a healthy home environment. Participants reported that what their children ate while in child care sometimes influenced the home feeding environment. Cultural and environmental factors influence parental feeding and involvement in the child care setting. Consistent with socioecological system theory, exploring interactions between the environment and culture using a family focus framework, such as the Family Ecological Model, could provide a better understanding of these influences among Hispanic parents. Future obesity prevention interventions with Hispanic families should be culturally relevant and target the different environments where children spend their time.

  7. Children's health care assistance according to their families: a comparison between models of Primary Care

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    Vanessa Bertoglio Comassetto Antunes de Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To compare the health assistance models of Basic Traditional Units (UBS with the Family Health Strategy (ESF units for presence and extent of attributes of Primary Health Care (APS, specifically in the care of children. METHOD A cross-sectional study of a quantitative approach with families of children attended by the Public Health Service of Colombo, Paraná. The Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCA-Tool was applied to parents of 482 children, 235 ESF units and 247 UBS units covering all primary care units of the municipality, between June and July 2012. The results were analyzed according to the PCA-Tool manual. RESULTS ESF units reached a borderline overall score for primary health care standards. However, they fared better in their attributes of Affiliation, Integration of care coordination, Comprehensiveness, Family Centeredness and Accessibility of use, while the attributes of Community Guidance/Orientation, Coordination of Information Systems, Longitudinality and Access attributes were rated as insufficient for APS. UBS units had low scores on all attributes. CONCLUSION The ESF units are closer to the principles of APS (Primary Health Care, but there is need to review actions of child care aimed at the attributes of APS in both care models, corroborating similar studies from other regions of Brazil.

  8. Who cares? A comparison of informal and formal care provision in Spain, England and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Auró, Aïda; Crimmins, Eileen M

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the prevalence of incapacity in performing daily activities and the associations between household composition and availability of family members and receipt of care among older adults with functioning problems in Spain, England and the United States of America (USA). We examine how living arrangements, marital status, child availability, limitations in functioning ability, age and gender affect the probability of receiving formal care and informal care from household members and from others in three countries with different family structures, living arrangements and policies supporting care of the incapacitated. Data sources include the 2006 Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe for Spain, the third wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (2006), and the eighth wave of the USA Health and Retirement Study (2006). Logistic and multinomial logistic regressions are used to estimate the probability of receiving care and the sources of care among persons age 50 and older. The percentage of people with functional limitations receiving care is higher in Spain. More care comes from outside the household in the USA and England than in Spain. The use of formal care among the incapacitated is lowest in the USA and highest in Spain.

  9. INFECTIONS IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT FOLLOWING LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: PROFILE OF A SINGLE CENTER

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    E. Otan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite the advances in antibiotherapy and critical care management, infectious complications remain among the leading complications after liver transplantation related with mortality and morbidity. This study analysis the incidence and pattern of infections and possible prognostic factors of infectious compli- cations retrospectively in a single center. Patients and Methods. Results of 30 consecutive patients with a primary liver transplantation history in a single center between August 2011 and August 2012 and a positive culture result in the first month in the ICU were analysed retrospectively. Results. During the first 1 month stay in the ICU postoperatively 30 (13,63% patients had at least 1 infection. Total number of infections were 68. Mortality rate of the infected patients was 53,3% (n = 16. Among these infections, 25 (36,76% of them were in deep surgical sites. Eighteen of the 30 patients (60% were infected with a single microorganism. Eleven patients (36,66% had a single infection episode. Microorganism were gram negative in 52 (76,47% of the infections, gram positive in 14 (20,58% of the infections, rest of the 2 (2,94% infections were due to Candidiasis. Among the possible risk factors contributing to mortality, there was a statistically significant dif- ference (p < 0,001 between the platelet counts of the mortality and surviving groups of the patients. Conclu- sion. Infections are among the preventable risk factors for mortality and morbidity after liver transplantation. Our data reveals a significant relation between trombocytopenia and mortality among the infected patients. Further studies focusing on this relation would expose the mechanisms and any possible contribution in cli- nical management of the patients. 

  10. Association between resource utilization and patient satisfaction at a tertiary care medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Eric A; Hall, Matthew; Leonard, Michael S; Pirraglia, Paul A; Alverson, Brian K

    2016-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has emphasized patient satisfaction as a means by which hospitals should be compared and as a component of financial reimbursement. We sought to identify whether resource utilization is associated with patient satisfaction ratings. This was a retrospective, cohort study over a 27-month period from January 2012 to April 2014 of adult respondents (n = 10,007) to the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey at a tertiary care medical center. For each returned survey, we developed a resource intensity score related to the corresponding hospitalization. We calculated a raw satisfaction rating (RSR) for each returned survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the association between resource intensity and top decile RSRs, using those with the lowest resource intensity as the reference group. Adjusting for age, gender, insurance payer, severity of illness, and clinical service, patients in higher resource intensity groups were more likely to assign top decile RSRs than the lowest resource intensity group ("moderate" [adjusted odds ratio {aOR}: 1.42, 95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.11-1.83], "major" [aOR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.22-2.01], and "extreme" [aOR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.8-2.92]). Resource utilization may be positively associated with patient satisfaction. These data suggest that hospitals with higher per-patient expenditures may receive higher ratings, which could result in hospitals with higher per-patient resource utilization appearing more attractive to healthcare consumers. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:785-791. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  11. EURISWEB – Web-based epidemiological surveillance of antibiotic-resistant pneumococci in Day Care Centers

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    Sanches Ilda Santos

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EURIS (European Resistance Intervention Study was launched as a multinational study in September of 2000 to identify the multitude of complex risk factors that contribute to the high carriage rate of drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in children attending Day Care Centers in several European countries. Access to the very large number of data required the development of a web-based infrastructure – EURISWEB – that includes a relational online database, coupled with a query system for data retrieval, and allows integrative storage of demographic, clinical and molecular biology data generated in EURIS. Methods All components of the system were developed using open source programming tools: data storage management was supported by PostgreSQL, and the hypertext preprocessor to generate the web pages was implemented using PHP. The query system is based on a software agent running in the background specifically developed for EURIS. Results The website currently contains data related to 13,500 nasopharyngeal samples and over one million measures taken from 5,250 individual children, as well as over one thousand pre-made and user-made queries aggregated into several reports, approximately. It is presently in use by participating researchers from three countries (Iceland, Portugal and Sweden. Conclusion An operational model centered on a PHP engine builds the interface between the user and the database automatically, allowing an easy maintenance of the system. The query system is also sufficiently adaptable to allow the integration of several advanced data analysis procedures far more demanding than simple queries, eventually including artificial intelligence predictive models.

  12. Profile of retinal vasculitis in a tertiary eye care center in Eastern India

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    Kumar Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To provide a fact file on the etiology, clinical presentations and management of retinal vasculitis in Eastern India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, record based analysis of retinal vasculitis cases in a tertiary care center in Eastern India from January 2007 to December 2009 . Results: One hundred and thirteen eyes of 70 patients of retinal vasculitis were included in this study. Sixty (85.7% patients were male (mean age 33± 11.1 years and 10 (14.3% were female (mean age 32.4 ± 13.6 years. Vasculitis was bilateral in 43 (61.4% and unilateral in 27 (38.6% patients. Commonest symptoms were dimness of vision (73; 64.6% and floaters (36; 31.9%. Vascular sheathing (82; 72.6% and vitritis (51; 45.1% were commonest signs. Mantoux test was positive in 21 (30% patients but tuberculosis was confirmed in only four (5.71% patients. Raised serum angiotensin-converting enzyme level and positive antinuclear antibody level were reported in four (5.71% patients each. Human leukocyte antigen B5 (HLA B5 marker was present in one (1.4% patient. However, none of the total 70 patients were found to have a conclusively proven systemic disease attributable as the cause of retinal vasculitis. Oral corticosteroid (60; 85.7% was the mainstay of treatment. Forty-eight (42.5% eyes maintained their initial visual acuity and 43 (38% gained one or more line at mean follow-up of 16.6± 6.3 months. Conclusion: Retinal vasculitis cases had similar clinical presentations and common treatment plan. There was no systemic disease association with vasculitis warranting a careful approach in prescribing investigations.

  13. Moral Distress in Nurses Providing Direct Patient Care at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirilla, Janet; Thompson, Kathrynn; Yamokoski, Todd; Risser, Mark D; Chipps, Esther

    2017-04-01

    Moral distress is the psychological response to knowing the appropriate action but not being able to act due to constraints. Previous authors reported moral distress among nurses, especially those that work in critical care units. The aims of this study were: (1) to examine the level of moral distress among nurses who work at an academic health system, (2) to compare the level of moral distress in nurses who work across specialty units at an academic health system, (3) to compare moral distress by the demographic characteristics of nurses and work experience variables, and (4) to identify demographic characteristics and type of clinical setting that may predict which nurses are at high risk for moral distress. A cross-sectional survey design was used with staff nurses who work on inpatient units and ambulatory units at an academic medical center. The moral distress scale-revised (MDS-R) was used to assess the intensity and frequency of moral distress. The overall mean MDS-R score in this project was low at 94.97 with mean scores in the low to moderate range (44.57 to 134.58). Nurses who work in critical care, perioperative services, and procedure areas had the highest mean MDS-R scores. There have been no previous reports of higher scores for nurses working in perioperative and procedure areas. There was weak positive correlation between MDS-R scores and years of experience (Rho = .17, p = .003) but no correlation between age (Rho = .02, p = .78) or education (Rho = .05, p = .802) and moral distress. Three variables were found useful in predicting moral distress: the type of unit and responses to two qualitative questions related to quitting their job. Identification of these variables allows organizations to focus their interventions. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Incorporating Patient- and Family-Centered Care Into Resident Education: Approaches, Benefits, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibert, Ingrid; Patow, Carl; Cichon, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A design conference with participants from accredited programs and institutions was used to explore how the principles of patient- and family-centered care (PFCC) can be implemented in settings where residents learn and participate in care, as well as identify barriers to PFCC and simple strategies for overcoming them. Approach In September 2009, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) held a conference with 74 participants representing a diverse range of educational settings and a group of expert presenters and facilitators. Small group sessions explored the status of PFCC in teaching settings, barriers that need to be overcome in some settings, simple approaches, and the value of a national program and ACGME support. Findings Participants shared information on the state of their PFCC initiatives, as well as barriers to implementing PFCC in the learning environment. These emerged in 6 areas: culture, the physical environment, people, time and other constraints, skills and capabilities, and teaching and assessment, as well as simple strategies to help overcome these barriers. Two Ishikawa (Fishbone) diagrams (one for barriers and one for simple strategies) make it possible to select strategies for overcoming particular barriers. Conclusions A group of participants with a diversity of approaches to incorporating PFCC into the learning environment agreed that respectful communication with patients/families needs to be learned, supported, and continuously demanded of residents. In addition, for PFCC to be sustainable, it has to be a fundamental expectation for resident learning and attainment of competence. Participants concurred that improving the environment for patients concurrently improves the environment for learners. PMID:22655161

  15. Critical care issues in solid organ injury: Review and experience in a tertiary trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhavi Sawhney

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Solid organ (spleen and liver injuries are dreaded by both surgeons and anesthesiologists because of associated high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to describe our experience of critical care concerns in solid organ injury, which otherwise has been poorly addressed in the literature. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cohort of solid organ injury (spleen and liver patients was done from January 2010 to December 2011 in tertiary level trauma Center. Results: Out of 624 abdominal trauma patients, a total of 212 patients (70% were admitted in intensive care unit (ICU. Their ages ranged from 6 to 74 years (median 24 years. Nearly 89% patients in liver trauma and 84% patients in splenic trauma were male. Mechanism of injury was blunt abdominal trauma in 96% patients and the most common associated injury was chest trauma. Average injury severity score, sequential organ failure assessment, lactate on admission was 16.84, 4.34 and 3.42 mmol/L and that of dying patient were 29.70, 7.73 and 5.09 mmol/L, respectively. Overall mortality of ICU admitted solid organ injury was 15.55%. Major issues of concern in splenic injury were hemorrhagic shock, overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and post-splenectomy vaccination. Issues raised in liver injury are damage control surgery, deadly triad, thromboelastography guided transfusion protocols and hemostatic agents. Conclusions: A protocol-based and multidisciplinary approach in high dependency unit can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with solid organ injury.

  16. Critical care issues in solid organ injury: Review and experience in a tertiary trauma center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Chhavi; Kaur, Manpreet; Gupta, Babita; Singh, P. M.; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh; Misra, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Solid organ (spleen and liver) injuries are dreaded by both surgeons and anesthesiologists because of associated high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to describe our experience of critical care concerns in solid organ injury, which otherwise has been poorly addressed in the literature. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cohort of solid organ injury (spleen and liver) patients was done from January 2010 to December 2011 in tertiary level trauma Center. Results: Out of 624 abdominal trauma patients, a total of 212 patients (70%) were admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). Their ages ranged from 6 to 74 years (median 24 years). Nearly 89% patients in liver trauma and 84% patients in splenic trauma were male. Mechanism of injury was blunt abdominal trauma in 96% patients and the most common associated injury was chest trauma. Average injury severity score, sequential organ failure assessment, lactate on admission was 16.84, 4.34 and 3.42 mmol/L and that of dying patient were 29.70, 7.73 and 5.09 mmol/L, respectively. Overall mortality of ICU admitted solid organ injury was 15.55%. Major issues of concern in splenic injury were hemorrhagic shock, overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and post-splenectomy vaccination. Issues raised in liver injury are damage control surgery, deadly triad, thromboelastography guided transfusion protocols and hemostatic agents. Conclusions: A protocol-based and multidisciplinary approach in high dependency unit can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with solid organ injury. PMID:25538517

  17. Psychosocial work environment and prediction of quality of care indicators in one Canadian health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Maxime; Courcy, François; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Gagnon, Serge; Maillet, Stéphanie

    2013-05-01

    Few studies link organizational variables and outcomes to quality indicators. This approach would expose operant mechanisms by which work environment characteristics and organizational outcomes affect clinical effectiveness, safety, and quality indicators. What are the predominant psychosocial variables in the explanation of organizational outcomes and quality indicators (in this case, medication errors and length of stay)? The primary objective of this study was to link the fields of evidence-based practice to the field of decision making, by providing an effective model of intervention to improve safety and quality. The study involved healthcare workers (n = 243) from 13 different care units of a university affiliated health center in Canada. Data regarding the psychosocial work environment (10 work climate scales, effort/reward imbalance, and social support) was linked to organizational outcomes (absenteeism, turnover, overtime), to the nurse/patient ratio and quality indicators (medication errors and length of stay) using path analyses. The models produced in this study revealed a contribution of some psychosocial factors to quality indicators, through an indirect effect of personnel- or human resources-related variables, more precisely: turnover, absenteeism, overtime, and nurse/patient ratio. Four perceptions of work environment appear to play an important part in the indirect effect on both medication errors and length of stay: apparent social support from supervisors, appreciation of the workload demands, pride in being part of one's work team, and effort/reward balance. This study reveals the importance of employee perceptions of the work environment as an indirect predictor of quality of care. Working to improve these perceptions is a good investment for loyalty and attendance. In general, better personnel conditions lead to fewer medication errors and shorter length of stay. © Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Age at introduction of ultra-processed food among preschool children attending day-care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Silveira, Jonas Augusto C; Menezes, Rísia Cristina Egito de; Toloni, Maysa Helena de Aguiar

    To identify the age of introduction of ultra-processed food and its associated factors among preschool children. Cross-sectional study carried out from March to June 2014 with 359 preschool children aged 17 to 63 months attending day-care centers. Time until ultra-processed food introduction (outcome variable) was described by the Kaplan-Meier analysis, and the log-rank test was used to compare the survival functions of independent variables. Factors associated with ultra-processed food introduction were investigated using the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. The results were shown as hazard ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals. The median time until ultra-processed food introduction was six months. Between the 3rd and 6th months, there is a significant increase in the probability of introducing ultra-processed food in the children's diet; and while the probability in the 3rd month varies from 0.15 to 0.25, at six months the variation ranges from 0.6 to 1.0. The final Cox proportional hazards model showed that unplanned pregnancy (1.32 [1.05-1.65]), absence of prenatal care (2.50 [1.02-6.16]), and income >2 minimum wages (1, 50 [1.09-2.06]) were independent risk factors for the introduction of ultra-processed food. Up to the 6th month of life, approximately 75% of preschool children had received one or more ultra-processed food in their diet. In addition, it was observed that the poorest families, as well as unfavorable prenatal factors, were associated with early introduction of ultra-processed food. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  19. Peripherally inserted central venous catheter safety in burn care: a single-center retrospective cohort review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan E; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Bolourani, Siavash; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line for central venous access in thermally injured patients has increased in recent years despite a lack of evidence regarding safety in this patient population. A recent survey of invasive catheter practices among 44 burn centers in the United States found that 37% of burn units use PICC lines as part of their treatment protocol. The goal of this study was to compare PICC-associated complication rates with the existing literature in both the critical care and burn settings. The methodology involved is a single institution retrospective cohort review of patients who received a PICC line during admission to a regional burn unit between 2008 and 2013. Fifty-three patients were identified with a total of seventy-three PICC lines. The primary outcome measurement for this study was indication for PICC line discontinuation. The most common reason for PICC line discontinuation was that the line was no longer indicated (45.2%). Four cases of symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (5.5%) and three cases of central line-associated bloodstream infection (4.3%, 2.72 infections per 1000 line days) were identified. PICC lines were in situ an average of 15 days (range 1 to 49 days). We suggest that PICC line-associated complication rates are similar to those published in the critical care literature. Though these rates are higher than those published in the burn literature, they are similar to central venous catheter-associated complication rates. While PICC lines can be a useful resource in the treatment of the thermally injured patient, they are associated with significant and potentially fatal risks.

  20. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it.

  1. Relationship between child care centers' compliance with physical activity regulations and children's physical activity, New York City, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Robert L; Xu, Ye; Lesesne, Catherine A; Dunn, Lillian; Kakietek, Jakub; Jernigan, Jan; Khan, Laura Kettel

    2014-10-16

    Physical activity may protect against overweight and obesity among preschoolers, and the policies and characteristics of group child care centers influence the physical activity levels of children who attend them. We examined whether children in New York City group child care centers that are compliant with the city's regulations on child physical activity engage in more activity than children in centers who do not comply. A sample of 1,352 children (mean age, 3.39 years) served by 110 group child care centers in low-income neighborhoods participated. Children's anthropometric data were collected and accelerometers were used to measure duration and intensity of physical activity. Multilevel generalized linear regression modeling techniques were used to assess the effect of center- and child-level factors on child-level physical activity. Centers' compliance with the regulation of obtaining at least 60 minutes of total physical activity per day was positively associated with children's levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA); compliance with the regulation of obtaining at least 30 minutes of structured activity was not associated with increased levels of MVPA. Children in centers with a dedicated outdoor play space available also spent more time in MVPA. Boys spent more time in MVPA than girls, and non-Hispanic black children spent more time in MVPA than Hispanic children. To increase children's level of MVPA in child care, both time and type of activity should be considered. Further examination of the role of play space availability and its effect on opportunities for engaging in physical activity is needed.

  2. Equity in the finance of health care: some further international comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, A; van Doorslaer, E; van der Burg, H; Calonge, S; Christiansen, T; Citoni, G; Gerdtham, U G; Gerfin, M; Gross, L; Häkinnen, U; Johnson, P; John, J; Klavus, J; Lachaud, C; Lauritsen, J; Leu, R; Nolan, B; Perán, E; Pereira, J; Propper, C; Puffer, F; Rochaix, L; Rodríguez, M; Schellhorn, M; Winkelhake, O

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents further international comparisons of progressivity of health care financing systems. The paper builds on the work of Wagstaff et al. [Wagstaff, A., van Doorslaer E., et al., 1992. Equity in the finance of health care: some international comparisons, Journal of Health Economics 11, pp. 361-387] but extends it in a number of directions: we modify the methodology used there and achieve a higher degree of cross-country comparability in variable definitions; we update and extend the cross-section of countries; and we present evidence on trends in financing mixes and progressivity.

  3. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to

  4. Outcomes from Wraparound and Multisystemic Therapy in a Center for Mental Health Services System-of-Care Demonstration Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Mustillo, Sarah A.; Burns, Barbara J.; Stephens, Robert L.; Baxter, Beth; Edwards, Dan; DeKraai, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This study examined outcomes for 320 youth in a Center for Mental Health Services system-of-care demonstration site. Youth received wraparound-only (n = 213), MST-only (n = 54), or wraparound + MST (n = 53). Participants were 12 years old on average and mostly White (90%), and 75% were Medicaid-eligible. Service use and functional and clinical…

  5. Responses to "Intention to Leave, Anticipated Reasons for Leaving, and 12-Month Turnover of Child Care Center Staff."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Linda; Russell, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Two practitioners address problem of employee turnover in child care centers. The first plan argues for comprehensive wage raises, increased benefits, and low cost options to workers that increase flexibility. The second strategy advocates continuing education opportunities, special mentoring programs, and bonuses or raises paid early in the…

  6. Effects of Experimentally Imposed Noise on Task Performance of Black Children Attending Day Care Centers Near Elevated Subway Trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrick-Dixon, Priscilla Janet

    1986-01-01

    Investigates whether an experimentally imposed 80dB (A) noise affected psychomotor, serial memory words and pictures, incidental memory, visual recall, paired associates, perceptual learning, and coding performance of five-year-old Black children attending day care centers near and far from elevated subways. (HOD)

  7. A hand hygiene intervention to decrease infections among children attending day care centers: Design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Zomer (Tizza); V. Erasmus (Vicky); N. Vlaar (Nico); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); A. Tjon-A-Tsien (Aimée); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Day care center attendance has been recognized as a risk factor for acquiring gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, which can be prevented with adequate hand hygiene (HH). Based on previous studies on environmental and sociocognitive determinants of caregivers' complia

  8. Sociocognitive determinants of observed and self-reported compliance to hand hygiene guidelines in child day care centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, T.P.; Erasmus, V.; Empelen, P. van; Looman, C.; Beeck, E.F. van; Tjon-A-Tsien, A.; Richardus, J.H.; Voeten, H.A.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although hand hygiene (HH) has proven to be an effective measure to prevent infections, HH compliance is generally low. We assessed sociocognitive determinants of caregivers' HH behavior in child day care centers (DCCs) to develop an effective HH intervention. Methods: Caregivers' compli

  9. 75 FR 65515 - NRC Corporation, USPS Help Desk of Customer Care Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Volt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration NRC Corporation, USPS Help Desk of Customer Care Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Volt Consulting, West Columbia, SC; Notice of Affirmative...

  10. Evaluation of a Home-Based Hospice and Palliative Care Program in a Community Health Center in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hyun Kim

    2009-03-01

    Conclusions: A home-based palliative service program delivered by the community health center appears to be an appropriate care model for managing physical symptoms. Reinforcing services for psychosocial and spiritual counseling and encouraging affiliation with free-standing inpatient healthcare providers are warranted. [Asian Nursing Research 2009;3(1:24–30

  11. Effects of Home Environment and Center-Based Child Care Quality on Children's Language, Communication, and Literacy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Isabel; Pessanha, Manuela; Aguiar, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the joint effects of home environment and center-based child care quality on children's language, communication, and early literacy development, while also considering prior developmental level. Participants were 95 children (46 boys), assessed as toddlers (mean age = 26.33 months; Time 1) and preschoolers (mean age = 68.71…

  12. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to ana

  13. Effects of Home Environment and Center-Based Child Care Quality on Children's Language, Communication, and Literacy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Isabel; Pessanha, Manuela; Aguiar, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the joint effects of home environment and center-based child care quality on children's language, communication, and early literacy development, while also considering prior developmental level. Participants were 95 children (46 boys), assessed as toddlers (mean age = 26.33 months; Time 1) and preschoolers (mean age = 68.71…

  14. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to ana

  15. Aerosol distribution during open suctioning and long-term surveillance of air quality in a respiratory care center within a medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Hui-Ling; Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Lien, Angela Shin-Yu; Hsiao, Hsiu-Feng; Chou, Lan-Ti; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of hospital air quality has been conducted in wards, ICUs, operating theaters, and public areas. Few studies have assessed air quality in respiratory care centers (RCCs), especially in mechanically ventilated patients with open suctioning. The RCC air quality indices (temperature, relative humidity, levels of CO2, total volatile organic compounds, particulate matter [PM], bacteria, and fungi) were monitored over 1 y. The air around the patient's head was sampled during open suctioning to examine the probability of bioaerosol exposure affecting health-care workers. This investigation found that the levels of indoor air pollutants (CO2, PM, bacteria, and fungi) were below the indoor air quality standard set by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency. Meanwhile, the levels of total volatile organic compounds sometimes exceeded the indoor air quality standard, particularly in August. The identified bacterial genera included Micrococcus species, Corynebacterium species, and Staphylococcus species, and the predominant fungal genera included yeast, Aspergillus species, Scopulariopsis species, and Trichoderma species. Additionally, airborne PM2.5, PM1, and bacteria were clearly raised during open suctioning in mechanically ventilated patients. This phenomenon demonstrated that open suctioning may increase the bacterial exposure risk of health-care workers. RCC air quality deserves long-term monitoring and evaluation. Health-care workers must implement self-protection strategies during open suctioning to ensure their occupational health and safety in health-care settings. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  16. Barriers along the care cascade of HIV-infected men in a large urban center of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael; MacCarthy, Sarah; Batson, Ashley; Crawford-Roberts, Ann; Rasanathan, Jennifer; Nunn, Amy; Silva, Luis Augusto; Dourado, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Global and national HIV/AIDS policies utilize the care cascade to emphasize the importance of continued engagement in HIV services from diagnosis to viral suppression. Several studies have documented barriers that men experience in accessing services at specific stages of care, but few have analyzed how these barriers operate along the care cascade. Brazil offers a unique setting for analyzing barriers to HIV care because it is a middle-income country with a large HIV epidemic and free, universal access to HIV/AIDS services. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2011 with HIV-infected men (n = 25) receiving care at the only HIV/AIDS state reference center in Salvador, Brazil, the third largest city in the country. Interviews were transcribed and coded for analysis. Researchers identified barriers to services along the care cascade: health service-related obstacles (poor-quality care, lengthy wait times, and drug supply problems); psychosocial and emotional challenges (fear of disclosure and difficulty accepting HIV diagnosis); indirect costs (transportation and absenteeism at work or school); low perceived risk of HIV; and toxicity and complexity of antiretroviral drug (ARV) regimens. The stages of the care cascade interrupted by each barrier were also identified. Most barriers affected multiple, and often all, stages of care, while toxicity and complexity of ARV regimens was only present at a single care stage. Efforts to eliminate more prevalent barriers have the potential to improve care continuity at multiple stages. Going forward, assessing the relative impact of barriers along one's entire care trajectory can help tailor improvements in service provision, facilitate achievement of viral suppression, and improve access to life-saving testing, treatment, and care.

  17. Compliance with New York City's beverage regulations and beverage consumption among children in early child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakietek, Jakub; Osuji, Thearis A; O'Dell, Sarah Abood; Breck, Andrew; Kettel Khan, Laura

    2014-10-16

    This article examines the association between the New York City regulations on beverages served in child care centers and beverage consumption among enrolled children. The regulations include requirements related to beverages served to children throughout the day. Beverage consumption data were collected on 636 children enrolled in 106 group child care centers in New York City. Data on compliance with the regulations were collected through direct observation, interviews with center staff, and a site inventory. Logistic regression for rare events was used to test associations between compliance with the regulations and beverage consumption. Compliance with the regulations was associated with lower odds of children consuming milk with more than 1% fat content and sugar-sweetened beverages during meals and snacks. There was not a significant relationship between compliance with the regulations and children's consumption of water. The findings suggest a strong, direct relationship between what a center serves and what a child consumes, particularly regarding consumption of higher-fat milk and sugar-sweetened beverages. Therefore, policies governing the types of beverages served in child care centers may increase children's consumption of more healthful beverages and reduce the consumption of less healthful ones.

  18. Cytopathology of neoplastic meningitis: A series of 66 cases from a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neoplastic meningitis (NM is a condition characterized by leptomeningeal involvement by metastatic carcinoma. Detection of exfoliated malignant cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF due to meningeal metastasis is frequently associated with diverse neurologic presentations. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study of all cases of NM diagnosed in CSF samples over a 20-year period at a tertiary care referral center, the cytomorphologic features were reviewed. Results: Sixty six cases of NM were identified of which 36 already had an established diagnosis of malignancy while in 30 patients, there was no previously known tumor. The most common known primary in the former group was breast followed by ovary. Single cell pattern, cellular cannibalism, moderate cytoplasm and rounded nuclei were seen in breast and lung tumors. Papillary architecture and cytoplasmic vacuolation were seen in the ovarian primaries. Melanin pigment was seen in malignant melanoma. Conclusion: CSF cytology is an important tool for diagnosis of NM. Cytomorphologic features helped in diagnosis and for prediction of the primary site. Correct identification of this condition is important as it has therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  19. Tibetan women's perspectives and satisfaction with delivery care in a rural birth center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Jessica D; Gyaltsen, Kunchok; Gyal, Lhusham; Kyi, Tsering; Hicks, Andrew L; Pebley, Anne R

    2015-06-01

    To identify sociodemographic characteristics and factors involved in Tibetan women's decisions to deliver at the Tibetan Birth and Training Center (TBTC) in rural western China. In the present mixed-methods study, a random sample of married women who delivered at the TBTC between June 2011 and June 2012 were surveyed. Additionally, four focus group discussions were conducted among married women living in the TBTC catchment area. Descriptive analyses were conducted, and dominant themes were identified. In focus group discussions, women (n=33) reported that improved roads and transportation meant that access to health facilities was easier than in the past. Although some of the 114 survey participants voiced negative perceptions of healthcare facilities and providers, 99 (86.8%) indicated that they chose to deliver at the TBTC because they preferred to have a doctor present. Most women (75 [65.8%]) said their mother/mother-in-law made the final decision about delivery location. Women valued logistic and cultural aspects of the TBTC, and 108 (94.7%) said that they would recommend the TBTC to a friend. Study participants preferred delivery care that combines safety and comfort. The findings highlight avenues for further promotion of facility delivery among populations with lower rates of skilled deliveries. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rising trends of syphilis in a tertiary care center in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Sethi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Syphilis is a classical sexually transmitted disease (STD, caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. In this retrospective study, we analyzed trends of syphilis prevalence in patient groups attending our tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: The data was obtained by reviewing laboratory records of the STD laboratory from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2011. Cases positive by both Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA tests were analyzed for seroprevalence of syphilis in different groups, and to analyze the rising or falling trends, if any. Results: A total of 28,920 serum samples were received in the 6-year study period for VDRL testing, of which 972 (3.4% were found to be reactive. Of these, 1722 sera were also submitted for TPPA testing, 374 (21.7% of which were positive. A total of 375 samples were submitted for both tests, indicating biological false positivity of 0.27%. A rising trend, though not statistically significant, was observed in pregnant women, drug users and patients from wards/out-patient departments, while a statistically significant rise in prevalence of syphilis was found in HIV-positive individuals. A falling trend (not statistically significant was observed in STD clinic attendees. Conclusion: An increasing trend of syphilis was observed during the study period when all groups were analyzed together, especially in HIV-seropositive individuals, which calls for continued and sustained efforts for case detection, treatment, and preventive measures to contain the disease.

  1. [Nutritional risk factors in patients with head and neck cancer in oncology care center Michoacan state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rojas Vázquez, L E; Trujano-Ramos, L A; Pérez-Rivera, E

    2013-01-01

    The head and neck cancer in Michoacán, Mexico, ranks as the third most common cancer and accounts for 12% of deaths. The increase in malnutrition in a patient with this disease has been associated with increased mortality. We studied prospectively 30 patients of both sexes, aged 18 years with head and neck cancer in the Cancer Care Center of Michoacan. In the evaluation period since August 2010 to August 2011. Formats were used VGS-Oncology (Subjective Global Assessment), NRS 2002 (Nutritional risk screen) and Guss (Gugging Swallowing Screen), through which nutritional risk was determined, and established the swallowing capacity of the study population. In our study, 53.3% of the population had moderate malnutrition according to the VGS Oncology, 33% weight loss record. The NRS 2002 show that 43.3% is at risk of malnutrition. The degree of dysphagia is shown more often in older patients, cancer type and stage of illness. Nutritional risk scales relate directly proportional to tumor location and stage, as well, there are other different oncological factors involved in the patient's nutritional deterioration. Therefore it is of vital importance to have a nutritionist as part of the multidisciplinary team, to detect the nutritional risk and to be able to handle it in an opportune way. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Ventilation in day care centers and sick leave among nursery children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarik, B; Andersen, Z Jovanovic; Ibfelt, T; Engelund, E Hoj; Møller, E; Bräuner, E Vaclavik

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have reported poor indoor air quality (IAQ) in day care centers (DCCs), and other studies have shown that children attending them have an increased risk of respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between ventilation in DCCs and sick leave among nursery children. Data on child sick leave within an 11-week period were obtained for 635 children attending 20 DCCs. Ventilation measurements included three proxies of ventilation: air exchange rate (ACR) measured with the decay method, ACR measured by the perfluorocarbon tracer gas (PFT) method, and CO2 concentration measured over a 1-week period. All but two DCCs had balanced mechanical ventilation system, which could explain the low CO2 levels measured. The mean concentration of CO2 was 643 ppm, exceeding 1000 ppm in only one DCC. A statistically significant inverse relationship between the number of sick days and ACR measured with the decay method was found for crude and adjusted analysis, with a 12% decrease in number of sick days per hour increase in ACR measured with the decay method. This study suggests a relationship between sick leave among nursery children and ventilation in DCCs, as measured with the decay method.

  3. Rising trends of syphilis in a tertiary care center in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sunil; Mewara, Abhishek; Hallur, Vinaykumar; Prasad, Amber; Sharma, Kusum; Raj, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a classical sexually transmitted disease (STD), caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. In this retrospective study, we analyzed trends of syphilis prevalence in patient groups attending our tertiary care center. The data was obtained by reviewing laboratory records of the STD laboratory from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2011. Cases positive by both Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) tests were analyzed for seroprevalence of syphilis in different groups, and to analyze the rising or falling trends, if any. A total of 28,920 serum samples were received in the 6-year study period for VDRL testing, of which 972 (3.4%) were found to be reactive. Of these, 1722 sera were also submitted for TPPA testing, 374 (21.7%) of which were positive. A total of 375 samples were submitted for both tests, indicating biological false positivity of 0.27%. A rising trend, though not statistically significant, was observed in pregnant women, drug users and patients from wards/out-patient departments, while a statistically significant rise in prevalence of syphilis was found in HIV-positive individuals. A falling trend (not statistically significant) was observed in STD clinic attendees. An increasing trend of syphilis was observed during the study period when all groups were analyzed together, especially in HIV-seropositive individuals, which calls for continued and sustained efforts for case detection, treatment, and preventive measures to contain the disease.

  4. A descriptive analysis of patients presenting to psychosexual clinic at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosexual problems are very common presentation, be it with psychiatric or physical illness but there are very few studies available on psychosexual disorders especially in the Indian context. Indian society is deeply ingrained in customs and several misconceptions, myths, prejudices, and social taboos are attached to sex which makes it further very difficult to tackle. Objectives: The aim of this current study was to descriptively analyze the nature of sexual disorders in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: The current retrospective chart review included 698 consecutive subjects seeking treatment for their psychosexual problems at the Sexual Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, Dr. Ram Manohar Hospital, New Delhi (between 2006 and 2010. Results: This study observed erectile dysfunction (ED (29.5%, Premature ejaculation (PME (24.6%, Dhat syndrome (DS (18.1%, and ED with PME (17.5% as the common sexual dysfunctions leading to treatment seeking. DS was the major complaint among younger and unmarried individuals. We observed more married individuals seeking treatment for sexual disorders. Conclusions: These findings provide important information on a relatively under-researched area.

  5. Hypertensive Crisis, Burden, Management, and Outcome at a Tertiary Care Center in Karachi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysha Almas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Hypertension, if uncontrolled, can lead to hypertensive crisis. We aim to determine the prevalence of hypertensive crisis, its management, and outcome in patients presenting to a tertiary care center in Karachi. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. Adult inpatients (>18 yrs presenting to the ER who were known hypertensive and had uncontrolled hypertension were included. Results. Out of 1336 patients, 28.6% (387 had uncontrolled hypertension. The prevalence of hypertensive crisis among uncontrolled hypertensive was 56.3% (218. Per oral calcium channel blocker; 35.4% (137 and intravenous nitrate; 22.7% (88 were the most commonly administered medication in the ER. The mean (SD drop in SBP in patients with hypertensive crisis on intravenous treatment was 53.1 (29 mm Hg and on per oral treatment was 43 (27 mm Hg. The maximum mean (SD drop in blood pressure was seen by intravenous sodium nitroprusside; 80 (51 mm Hg in SBP. Acute renal failure was the most common complication with a prevalence of 11.5% (24. Conclusion. The prevalence of hypertensive crisis is high. Per oral calcium channel blocker and intravenous nitrate are the most commonly administered medications in our setup.

  6. Hypertensive Crisis, Burden, Management, and Outcome at a Tertiary Care Center in Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almas, Aysha; Ghouse, Ayaz; Iftikhar, Ahmed Raza; Khursheed, Munawwar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Hypertension, if uncontrolled, can lead to hypertensive crisis. We aim to determine the