WorldWideScience

Sample records for care alpha-1 antitrypsin

  1. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Also known as: Alpha 1 -antitrypsin; A1AT; AAT Formal name: Alpha 1 Antitrypsin; α1-antitrypsin Related ... know? How is it used? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) testing is used to help diagnose alpha-1 ...

  2. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Diagnosed? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency usually is diagnosed after you develop a ... related to the condition. Your doctor may suspect AAT deficiency if you have signs or symptoms of ...

  3. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its related lung ... pulmonary disease). If you have symptoms related to AAT deficiency, your doctor may recommend: Medicines called inhaled ...

  4. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  5. [Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelier, Aquiles A; Winter, Daniel Hugo; Jardim, José Roberto; Barboza, Carlos Eduardo Galvão; Cukier, Alberto; Miravitlles, Marc

    2008-07-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical implications. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is mainly produced in the liver and acts as an antiprotease. Its principal function is to inactivate neutrophil elastase, preventing tissue damage. The mutation most commonly associated with the clinical disease is the Z allele, which causes polymerization and accumulation within hepatocytes. The accumulation of and the consequent reduction in the serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin cause, respectively, liver and lung disease, the latter occurring mainly as early emphysema, predominantly in the lung bases. Diagnosis involves detection of low serum levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin as well as phenotypic confirmation. In addition to the standard treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, specific therapy consisting of infusion of purified alpha-1 antitrypsin is currently available. The clinical efficacy of this therapy, which appears to be safe, has yet to be definitively established, and its cost-effectiveness is also a controversial issue that is rarely addressed. Despite its importance, in Brazil, there are no epidemiological data on the prevalence of the disease or the frequency of occurrence of deficiency alleles. Underdiagnosis has also been a significant limitation to the study of the disease as well as to appropriate treatment of patients. It is hoped that the creation of the Alpha One International Registry will resolve these and other important issues. PMID:18695797

  6. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. However, the ... most often in White people of European descent. AAT deficiency is an inherited condition. "Inherited" means the ...

  7. Alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in deficient individuals enrolled in the Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Adriano

    2009-01-01

    Adriano R Tonelli1, Farshid Rouhani1, Ning Li2, Pam Schreck1, Mark L Brantly11Alpha-1 Research Program, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USAIntroduction: Intravenous augmentation therapy with purified intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin replaces the deficient protein and is the only currently approved treatment for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT...

  8. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality. PMID:27564672

  9. Immunoassay of serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level in uveitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, A K; Sarin, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was measured in 60 patients with endogenous uveitis, 27 patients with phacoallergic endophthalmitis, 12 patients with phacolytic glaucoma, and 58 healthy subjects. Thirty-four patients with endogenous uveitis were also followed up for 6 months after treatment, and the serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was measured again. There was a significant rise in the serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level in cases of endogenous uveitis and phacoallergic endophthalmitis but no ...

  10. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the benefits and harms of augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease. We searched for randomised trials comparing augmentation therapy with placebo or no treatment in PubMed and ClinicalTrials (7 January 2010). Two...

  11. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy for treating patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that can cause lung disease. People who smoke are more seriously affected and have a greater risk of dying from the disease.......Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that can cause lung disease. People who smoke are more seriously affected and have a greater risk of dying from the disease....

  12. Intravenous alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the benefits and harms of augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and lung disease. We searched for randomised trials comparing augmentation therapy with placebo or no treatment in PubMed and ClinicalTrials (7 January 2010). Two...... (difference 1.14 g/l; 95% confidence interval 0.14 to 2.14; p = 0.03) over the total course of the trials. Augmentation therapy with alpha-1 antitrypsin cannot be recommended in view of the lack of evidence of clinical benefit and the cost of treatment....

  13. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin and Lung Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Karina A; Petrache, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Discovery of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) as the principal circulating inhibitor of neutrophil elastase was critical to the appreciation of protease/antiprotease imbalance involvement in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Additional targets of A1AT have been uncovered, along with their contribution to alveolar wall destruction induced by cigarette smoke exposure. We highlight in this report mechanisms of A1AT antiapoptotic effects on structural lung endothelial cells. This function was largely dependent on uptake of the protein from the circulation via clathrin- and, in part, caveolae-mediated endocytosis and on specific interactions with cysteine proteases such as capsase-3, -6, and -7. Exposures to cigarette smoke diminished A1AT intracellular uptake and its anticaspase action, suggesting that even in A1AT-suficient individuals, cigarette smoke may weaken the serpin's endothelial prosurvival effect. In addition, cigarette smoke exposure or genetic mutations known to induce posttranslational modifications such as oxidation or polymerization may alter A1AT bidirectional intracellular traffic in endothelial cells and thus determine its functional bioavailability in certain lung compartments. Uncovering and harnessing the A1AT canonical and noncanonical mechanisms will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of emphysema and may provide means to improve the effectiveness of therapies in both A1AT-sufficient and A1AT-deficient individuals. PMID:27115949

  14. Treatment of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Charlie; Beiko, Tatsiana

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that creates multiple unique phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea, and sputum production all occur with AATD, the phenotypic differences require a computed tomographic (CT) scan to decipher. The availability of augmentation therapy in the United States since 1989 has generated both controversy and evidence that informs the science of usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of the predominance of emphysema in AATD, much of the best evidence concerning biomarkers of emphysema progression comes from this population. Imaging measurement of emphysema progression, impact of emphysema phenotypes on hyperinflation and dynamic hyperinflation, and correlation with traditional spirometric measures of COPD progression are required to understand the impact of AAT therapies. These studies are important for better understanding of usual COPD pathogenesis. Significantly, there are no adequately powered research studies to determine if augmentation therapy is helpful for the non-emphysema phenotypes of AATD. Specifically, phenotypes of chronic bronchitis, asthma predominant disease, and bronchiectasis will require targeted research studies to define optimal therapy. PMID:26238635

  15. How Can Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevented? You can't prevent alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency because the condition is inherited (passed from ... children through genes). If you inherit two faulty AAT genes, you'll have AAT deficiency. Even so, ...

  16. Deficiency Mutations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin. Effects on Folding, Function, and Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Saleh, Aarash D; Dron, Louis; Regan-Mochrie, Gemma L; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Hurst, John R; Gooptu, Bibek; Lomas, David A

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding, polymerization, and defective secretion of functional alpha-1 antitrypsin underlies the predisposition to severe liver and lung disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. We have identified a novel (Ala336Pro, Baghdad) deficiency variant and characterized it relative to the wild-type (M) and Glu342Lys (Z) alleles. The index case is a homozygous individual of consanguineous parentage, with levels of circulating alpha-1 antitrypsin in the moderate deficiency range, but is a biochemical phenotype that could not be classified by standard methods. The majority of the protein was present as functionally inactive polymer, and the remaining monomer was 37% active relative to the wild-type protein. These factors combined indicate an 85 to 95% functional deficiency, similar to that seen with ZZ homozygotes. Biochemical, biophysical, and computational studies further defined the molecular basis of this deficiency. These studies demonstrated that native Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin could populate the polymerogenic intermediate-and therefore polymerize-more readily than either wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin or the Z variant. In contrast, folding was far less impaired in Ala336Pro alpha-1 antitrypsin than in the Z variant. The data are consistent with a disparate contribution by the "breach" region and "shutter" region of strand 5A to folding and polymerization mechanisms. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that, in these variants, folding efficiency does not correlate directly with the tendency to polymerize in vitro or in vivo. They therefore differentiate generalized misfolding from polymerization tendencies in missense variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Clinically, they further support the need to quantify loss-of-function in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency to individualize patient care. PMID:26091018

  17. Fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin in COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls; Marott, J. L.; Rode, L.;

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the hypotheses that fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin are observationally and genetically associated with exacerbations in COPD. Methods We studied 13 591 individuals with COPD from the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2013), of whom 6857 were genotyped for FGB -455...... (rs1800790, G>A) and FGB -448 (rs4220, G>A) and had plasma fibrinogen measured. Furthermore, 13 405 individuals were genotyped for the SERPINA1 S-allele (rs17580) and the Z-allele (rs28929474) and had measurements of plasma alpha(1)-antitrypsin. Exacerbations were defined as hospital admissions or...... exacerbations in instrumental variable analyses. Results Elevated fibrinogen and alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were associated with increased risk of exacerbations in COPD, HR=1.14 (1.07 to 1.22, p...

  18. Alpha-1-antitrypsin studies: canine serum and canine surfactant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine serum alpha-1-antitrypsin was isolated by gel filtration and affinity chromatography and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis. Measurement of the trypsin inhibitory capacity of the separated protein indicated a ninefold concentration of functional trypsin inhibitor during the isolation procedure. Electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of a single protein with alpha-globulin mobility and a molecular weight near that of human alpha-1-antitrypsin. The trypsin inhibitory capacity of pulmonary surfactant protein from five Beagle dogs was measured, related to total surfactant protein concentration, and compared with similar measurements on whole serum from the same animals. Results indicated a variable concentration of trypsin inhibitor in the canine pulmonary surfactant protein. However, the concentration in the surfactant protein was always significantly higher than that in the corresponding serum sample. Preliminary experiments designed to separate the trypsin inhibitory fraction(s) from the other surfactant proteins by gel filtration chromatography indicated that the trypsin inhibitor was probably a single protein with a molecular weight near that of alpha-1-antitrypsin. (U.S.)

  19. SlimQuick™ - associated hepatotoxicity in a woman with alpha-1 antitrypsin heterozygosity

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Douglas H; Twaddell, William S.; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Philosophe, Benjamin; Mindikoglu, Ayse L

    2012-01-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis)-associated hepatotoxicity is reported. However, the presence of alpha-1 antitrypsin MZ phenotype as a predisposing factor to green tea-associated drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is unknown. A previously healthy woman with alpha-1 antitrypsin MZ phenotype who took SlimQuick™, an herbal supplement containing green tea extract, developed severe hepatotoxicity requiring corticosteroid treatment. Green tea-associated hepatotoxicity is reviewed and alpha-1 antitrypsin...

  20. Environmental arsenic exposure, selenium and sputum alpha-1 antitrypsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Jefferey L; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; Poplin, Gerald S;

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased respiratory disease. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protects the lung against tissue destruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether arsenic exposure is associated with changes in airway AAT concentration and whether...... selenium positively associated with sputum AAT (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). In analyses stratified by town, these relationships remained significant only in Ajo, with the higher arsenic exposure. Reduction in AAT may be a means by which arsenic induces respiratory disease, and selenium may protect...

  1. Fluorescent antibody studies of alpha-1-antitrypsin in adult human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of alpha-1-antitrypsin in frozen sections prepared from four specimens of human lung was determined by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique. Three of the specimens were obtained directly from surgical procedures and were peripheral tissue excised with tumors. Specific fluorescence for alpha-1-antitrypsin was observed lining the terminal airways and alveoli throughout the sections from two of the cases. In the other cases, a few focal areas of specific fluorescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that alpha-1-antitrypsin may be distributed in lung in association with pulmonary surfactant and that local tissue concentrations of alpha-1-antitrypsin are variable. (U.S.)

  2. [The interaction of human alpha 1-antitrypsin with human plasmin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurama, S

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) with plasmin was investigated, and the molecular weight of the inhibitor was also re-evaluated. The value of molecular weight of alpha 1-AT determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) method showed a difference depending on the presence or absence of the reducing agent, resulting in 72,000 dalton before reduction and 59,000 dalton after reduction. Conclusively, the molecular weight of alpha 1-AT was appropriate to be 59,000 dalton from considering the molecular shape of the protein. The interaction of alpha 1-AT with plasmin was analysed by SDS-PAGE method. Unreduced analysis revealed that two kinds of complexes with different molecular weight (the major of 155,000 dalton and the minor of 140,000 dalton) were formed time dependently, suggesting that the former was a native complex and the latter was a degraded product. Reduced analysis disclosed that the light chain of plasmin involved the complex formation with the inhibitor, and a peptide of 16,000 dalton appeared during the reaction. From these observations, the mechanism of action was summarized as follows. First, alpha 1-AT inhibited all of the plasmin activities by forming a 1: 1 stoichiometric complex with the enzyme, presumably with the active center of the enzyme, whose complex is undissociable in the presence of denaturing or reducing agents or both. Secondly, the native complex broke into a degraded product and a released peptide by limited proteolysis with the free plasmin which existed in the reaction mixture even with an excess of alpha 1-AT due to the reaction of complex formation being time consuming. The clinical significance of alpha 1-AT on fibrinolysis was also subject for discussion. PMID:6232193

  3. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects. PMID:26413996

  4. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency: a clinical-genetic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abboud RT

    2011-03-01

    in patients with chronic irreversible airflow obstruction, especially in those with early onset of disease or positive family history. Testing is also recommended for immediate family members of those with AATD, asthmatics with persistent airflow obstruction, and infants and older subjects with unexplained liver disease. There are over 100 different AAT gene variants; most are rare and only some are associated with clinical disease.Keywords: AAT, AATD, ZZ, early onset emphysema, panacinar emphysema, neonatal jaundice and hepatitis, childhood liver disease, genetics of alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antitrypsin laboratory testing and phenotyping

  5. A rare case of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent pulmonary thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT belongs to the family of serpins (serine protease inhibitors. Loop sheet polymerization is the pathology behind serpinopathies which encompasses AAT, anti-thrombin III and neuroserpin deficiency. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent pulmonary thrombosis without any concomitant use of drugs.

  6. Diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency by DNA analysis of children with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De TOMMASO Adriana Maria Alves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic disorder which is transmitted in a co-dominant, autosomal form. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency affects mainly the lungs and the liver leading, in the latter case, to neonatal cholestasis, chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. A precise diagnosis of Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency may be obtained by biochemical or molecular analysis. Objective - The purpose of this study was to use DNA analysis to examine the presence of an alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in 12 children suspected of having this deficiency and who showed laboratory and clinical characteristics of the disease. Patients and Methods - Twelve patients, aged 3 months to 19 years, who had serum alpha-1-antitrypsin levels lower than normal and/or had hepatic disease of undefined etiology were studied. The mutant alleles S and Z of the alpha-1-antitrypsin gene were investigated in the 12 children. Alpha-1-antitrypsin gene organization was analyzed by amplification of genoma through the polymerase chain reaction and digestion with the restriction enzymes Xmnl (S allele and Taq 1 (Z allele. Results - Seven of the 12 patients had chronic liver disease of undefined etiology and the other five patients had low serum levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin as well as a diagnosis of neonatal cholestasis and/or chronic liver disease of undefined etiology. Five of the 12 patients were homozygous for the Z allele (ZZ and two had the S allele with another allele (*S different from Z. Conclusion - These results show that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is relatively frequent in children with chronic hepatic disease of undefined etiology and/or low alpha-1-antitrypsin levels (41.6%. A correct diagnosis is important for effective clinical follow-up and for genetic counseling.

  7. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: increasing awareness and improving diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus F

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a hereditary disorder that is characterized by a low serum level of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT). The loss of anti-inflammatory and antiproteolytic functions, together with pro-inflammatory effects of polymerized AAT contribute to protein degradation and increased inflammation resulting in an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema, especially in smokers. AATD is a rare disease that is significantly underdiagnosed. According to recent data that are based on extrapolations, in many countries only 5-15% of homozygous individuals have been identified. Furthermore, the diagnostic delay typically exceeds 5 years, resulting in an average age at diagnosis of about 45 years. Although the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society recommendations state that all symptomatic adults with persistent airway obstruction should be screened, these recommendations are not being followed. Potential reasons for that include missing knowledge about the disease and the appropriate tests, and the low awareness of physicians with regard to the disorder. Once the decision to initiate testing has been made, a screening test (AAT serum level or other) should be performed. Further diagnostic evaluation is based on the following techniques: polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for frequent and clinically important mutations, isoelectric focusing (IEF) with or without immunoblotting, and sequencing of the gene locus coding for AAT. Various diagnostic algorithms have been published for AATD detection (severe deficiency or carrier status). Modern laboratory approaches like the use of serum separator cards, a lateral flow assay to detect the Z-protein, and a broader availability of next-generation sequencing are recent advances, likely to alter existing algorithms. PMID:26341117

  8. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency and its clinical consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolk Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is a genetic disorder that manifests as pulmonary emphysema, liver cirrhosis and, rarely, as the skin disease panniculitis, and is characterized by low serum levels of AAT, the main protease inhibitor (PI in human serum. The prevalence in Western Europe and in the USA is estimated at approximately 1 in 2,500 and 1 : 5,000 newborns, and is highly dependent on the Scandinavian descent within the population. The most common deficiency alleles in North Europe are PI Z and PI S, and the majority of individuals with severe AATD are PI type ZZ. The clinical manifestations may widely vary between patients, ranging from asymptomatic in some to fatal liver or lung disease in others. Type ZZ and SZ AATD are risk factors for the development of respiratory symptoms (dyspnoea, coughing, early onset emphysema, and airflow obstruction early in adult life. Environmental factors such as cigarette smoking, and dust exposure are additional risk factors and have been linked to an accelerated progression of this condition. Type ZZ AATD may also lead to the development of acute or chronic liver disease in childhood or adulthood: prolonged jaundice after birth with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and abnormal liver enzymes are characteristic clinical signs. Cirrhotic liver failure may occur around age 50. In very rare cases, necrotizing panniculitis and secondary vasculitis may occur. AATD is caused by mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding AAT, and is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The diagnosis can be established by detection of low serum levels of AAT and isoelectric focusing. Differential diagnoses should exclude bleeding disorders or jaundice, viral infection, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease and autoimmune hepatitis. For treatment of lung disease, intravenous alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy, annual flu vaccination and a pneumococcal vaccine every 5 years are recommended. Relief of breathlessness

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a potential biomarker for hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Function exertion of specific proteins are key factors in disease progression, thus the systematical identification of those specific proteins is a prerequisite to understand various diseases. Though many proteins have been verified to impact on hepatitis, no systematical protein screening has been documented to hepatitis B virus (HBV induced hepatitis, hindering the comprehensive understanding to this severe disease. Aim To identify the major proteins in the progression of HBV infection from mild stage to severe stage. Methods We performed an integrated strategy by combining two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF analysis, and tissue microarray techniques to screen the functional proteins and detect the localization of those proteins. Results Interestingly, MS/MS identification revealed the expression level of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT was significantly elevated in serum samples from patients with severe chronic hepatitis. Immunoblotting with a specific AAT antibody confirmed that AAT is highly expressed in serum samples from patients with hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis. Furthermore, we observed that AAT is with highest expression in normal tissue and cells, but lowest in hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis tissues and cells, suggesting the specific secretion of AAT from tissues and cells to serum. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of AAT as a potential biomarker for hepatitis B in diagnosis.

  10. Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Deficiency in Infants with Neonatal Cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Monajemzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD is the most important indication for liver transplantation in children. The gene frequencies vary in different ethnic groups. In the present study, we attempt to determine the frequencies of the most common defective alleles, Z and S, in Iranian children suffering from idiopathic neonatal cholestasis. Eighty-seven infants were typed for Z and S alleles.Methods: In a single center study, 87 consecutive liver biopsies from infants with cholestasis were reviewed and patients with neonatal cholestasis enrolled in the study and cases with confirmed biliary tract atresia excluded. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded blocks were used for DNA extraction. AAT genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay and amplification of the two most common deficiency variants, S and Z alleles, and then sequencing of PCR products.Findings: There were 48 (55.2% males and 39 (44.8% females, with a median age of 60 days. Out of 87 of the study subject, 2 (2.2% were heterozygous for the S allele, and no ZZ, SS or MZ individual was found in the patients. No other polymorphism was found in the sequencing results.Conclusion: In comparison to other populations, AAT deficiency seems not to be an important etiologic factor for neonatal cholestatic liver disease in Iran; however, further studies are recommended to estimate the true mutant gene frequencies.

  11. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Investigations Using Animal Models of Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kevin; Serban, Karina A; Batra, Chanan; Petrache, Irina

    2016-08-01

    Animal models of disease help accelerate the translation of basic science discoveries to the bedside, because they permit experimental interrogation of mechanisms at relatively high throughput, while accounting for the complexity of an intact organism. From the groundbreaking observation of emphysema-like alveolar destruction after direct instillation of elastase in the lungs to the more clinically relevant model of airspace enlargement induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, animal models have advanced our understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) function. Experimental in vivo models that, at least in part, replicate clinical human phenotypes facilitate the translation of mechanistic findings into individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and with AAT deficiency. In addition, unexpected findings of alveolar enlargement in various transgenic mice have led to novel hypotheses of emphysema development. Previous challenges in manipulating the AAT genes in mice can now be overcome with new transgenic approaches that will likely advance our understanding of functions of this essential, lung-protective serine protease inhibitor (serpin). PMID:27564666

  12. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first lung-related symptoms of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency may include shortness of breath, less ability ... and weight loss. Some people who have severe AAT deficiency develop emphysema (em-fi-SE-ma)—often ...

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in alpha1-antitrypsin PI MZ heterozygotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Dahl, Morten; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S; Nordestgaard, B G; Silverman, E K

    2004-01-01

    Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, usually related to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of COPD in PI MZ heterozygous individuals is controversial.......Severe alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency, usually related to homozygosity for the protease inhibitor (PI) Z allele, is a proven genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The risk of COPD in PI MZ heterozygous individuals is controversial....

  14. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Therapy in Cystic Fibrosis and the Lung Disease Associated with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two of the commonest lethal hereditary lung diseases affecting white individuals. Although having quite different phenotypic extrapulmonary presentations, the lung disease associated with these conditions is exemplified by a neutrophil-dominated inflammation in which neutrophil elastase plays a major role. In AAT deficiency the diminution of the anti-neutrophil elastase protection, due to diminished AAT levels in the lung, predisposes the lung to an unopposed neutrophil elastase attack, whereas, in cystic fibrosis, the levels of AAT and other antiproteases are normal, but the neutrophil elastase burden is so large that it overwhelms the normal anti-neutrophil elastase protection. With this as background, it seems logical to augment the anti-neutrophil elastase defenses of the lung in both conditions using exogenous AAT. The type of AAT, the route of administration, and the physiologic, radiologic, and clinical readouts for this type of therapy are discussed, along with the similarities and differences between the two conditions and their responses to AAT therapy. PMID:27115956

  15. Survival in severe alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Jan-Åke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of the natural history of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency are mostly based on highly selected patients. The aim of this study was to analyse the mortality of PiZZ individuals. Methods Data from 1339 adult PiZZ individuals from the Swedish National AAT Deficiency Registry, followed from 1991 to 2008, were analysed. Forty-three percent of these individuals were identified by respiratory symptoms (respiratory cases, 32% by liver diseases and other diseases (non-respiratory cases and 25% by screening (screened cases. Smoking status was divided into two groups: smokers 737 (55% and 602 (45% never-smokers. Results During the follow-up 315 individuals (24% died. The standardised mortality rate (SMR for respiratory cases was 4.70 (95% Confidence Interval (CI 4.10-5.40, 3.0 (95%CI 2.35-3.70 for the non-respiratory cases and 2.30 (95% CI 1.46-3.46 for the screened cases. The smokers had a higher mortality risk than never-smokers, with a SMR of 4.80 (95%CI 4.20-5.50 for the smokers and 2.80(95%CI 2.30-3.40 for the never-smokers. The Rate Ratio (RR was 1.70 (95% CI 1.35-2.20. Also among the screened cases, the mortality risk for the smokers was significantly higher than in the general Swedish population (SMR 3.40 (95% CI 1.98-5.40. Conclusion Smokers with severe AAT deficiency, irrespective of mode of identification, have a significantly higher mortality risk than the general Swedish population.

  16. Neutrophilic panniculitis associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, I; Lipsker, D; Lara, B; Janciauskiene, S

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophilic panniculitis associated with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a very rare disease. Its estimated prevalence is 1 in 1000 subjects with severe AATD (usually white individuals with a Pi*ZZ genotype). It is manifested clinically by painful recurrent ulcerating subcutaneous nodules, and characterized histologically by dense infiltrates of neutrophils in the deep dermis and connective-tissue septae, with secondary lobular panniculitis. It may be the only clinical manifestation of AATD, although it can also occur together with the classical pulmonary or hepatic manifestations of the disease. AATD-associated panniculitis is not only very rare but may also be significantly underdiagnosed. The physician managing a case of panniculitis with a clinical presentation suggestive of AATD and a compatible skin biopsy should measure serum AAT concentration and, if low, determine the AAT phenotype by isoelectric focusing. If uncertainty remains, the SERPINA1 gene should be sequenced to identify the genotype. If AATD is diagnosed, AATD testing of first-degree family members should be performed in order to take appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures, including genetic counselling, education on inheritance, risk arising from tobacco smoke, occupational exposure to pollutants and hepatotoxic substances, and the provision of information on clinical management. Cases of panniculitis in which conventional therapy with dapsone has failed may be managed with intravenous augmentative therapy using human AAT. The current manuscript addresses the fundamental concepts of the pathogenesis of AATD-associated panniculitis and describes the clinical presentation and management of cases in order to reduce underdiagnosis and improve outcomes. PMID:26595240

  17. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. METHODS: We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. RESULTS: The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  18. The prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2011-07-13

    Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and classically presents with early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common mutation presenting with clinical evidence is the Z mutation, while the S mutation is associated with a milder plasma deficiency. AATD is an under-diagnosed condition and the World Health Organisation recommends targeted detection programmes for AATD in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), non-responsive asthma, cryptogenic liver disease and first degree relatives of known AATD patients. Methods We present data from the first 3,000 individuals screened following ATS\\/ERS guidelines as part of the Irish National Targeted Detection Programme (INTDP). We also investigated a DNA collection of 1,100 individuals randomly sampled from the general population. Serum and DNA was collected from both groups and mutations in the SERPINA1 gene detected by phenotyping or genotyping. Results The Irish National Targeted Detection Programme identified 42 ZZ, 44 SZ, 14 SS, 430 MZ, 263 MS, 20 IX and 2 rare mutations. Analysis of 1,100 randomly selected individuals identified 113 MS, 46 MZ, 2 SS and 2 SZ genotypes. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that AATD in Ireland is more prevalent than previously estimated with Z and S allele frequencies among the highest in the world. Furthermore, our targeted detection programme enriched the population of those carrying the Z but not the S allele, suggesting the Z allele is more important in the pathogenesis of those conditions targeted by the detection programme.

  19. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitors for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: safety, tolerability, and patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chotirmall, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Sanjay H Chotirmall,1 Mazen Al-Alawi,2 Thomas McEnery,2 Noel G McElvaney2 1Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency remains an underrecognized genetic disease with predominantly pulmonary and hepatic manifestations. AAT is derived primarily from hepatocytes; however, macrophages and neutrophils are secondary sources. As the...

  20. New variants of alpha 1-antitrypsin: comparison of Pi typing techniques.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Four new rare inherited variants (Pi types) of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-protease inhibitor) are described. Each variant has been compared with previously reported genetic variants by several techniques used for Pi typing: isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel, starch gel electrophoresis, and agarose gel electrophoresis. Some variants are identical or very similar by one technique but can be clearly distinguished by another technique. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis and gel immunofixati...

  1. C3, factor B, alpha-1-antitrypsin in neonatal septicaemia with sclerema.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelet, B

    1980-01-01

    C3, factor B, and alpha-1-antitrypsin were determined in newborn infants with septicaemia and sclerema, associated with suspected infections, ABO or Rh incompatibility, and hyperbilirubinaemia of unknown origin, during and after treatment with exchange transfusion. Activation products from C3 and factor B, the clearance of the transfused C3, and its synthesis by the recipient were determined also. Infected newborn infants had low levels of C3 and factor B, but a normal amount of alpha-1-antit...

  2. Efficacy of alpha1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Serres Frederick

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Up to now alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT augmentation therapy has been approved only for commercial use in selected adults with severe AAT deficiency-related pulmonary emphysema (i.e. PI*ZZ genotypes as well as combinations of Z, rare and null alleles expressing AAT serum concentrations

  3. Efficacy of alpha1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in conditions other than pulmonary emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    de Serres Frederick; Lara Beatriz; Blanco Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Up to now alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy has been approved only for commercial use in selected adults with severe AAT deficiency-related pulmonary emphysema (i.e. PI*ZZ genotypes as well as combinations of Z, rare and null alleles expressing AAT serum concentrations

  4. Suspecting and Testing for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency-An Allergist's and/or Immunologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a hereditary, monogenic disorder with no unique clinical features. AATD can be difficult to diagnose as patients commonly present with respiratory symptoms often mistaken for other respiratory syndromes such as asthma or smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In addition, symptoms related to AATD may also affect other organs, including the liver, vasculature, and skin. The severity of AATD varies between individuals, and in severe cases, the irreversible lung damage can develop into emphysema. Early diagnosis is critical to enable the implementation of lifestyle changes and therapeutic options that can slow further deterioration of pulmonary tissue. Once AATD is suspected, a range of tests are available (serum alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor [A1-PI] level measurement, phenotyping, genotyping, gene sequencing) for confirming AATD. Currently, intravenous infusion of A1-PI is the only therapy that directly addresses the underlying cause of AATD, and has demonstrated efficacy in a recent randomized, placebo-controlled trial. This review discusses the etiology, testing, and management of AATD from the allergist's and/or immunologist's perspective. It aims to raise awareness of the condition among physicians who care for people with obstructive lung disorders and are therefore likely to see patients with obstructive lung disease that may, in fact, prove to be AATD. PMID:26032475

  5. Risk factors for symptom onset in PI*Z alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Annyce S; James K. Stoller; Vedal, Sverre; Ruttenber, A James; Strand, Matt; Sandhaus, Robert A.; Newman, Lee S

    2006-01-01

    Background In an early study of highly symptomatic patients with PI*Z alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT), tobacco smoking was identified as a risk factor by comparing the age of symptom onset in smokers and nonsmokers. Age of symptom onset has not been well studied in relationship to other environmental exposures. Methods Environmental exposures were assessed in 313 PI*Z adults through retrospective self-administered questionnaire. Age of onset of symptoms with and without these exposures w...

  6. Heterozygosity for the alpha1-antitrypsin Z allele may confer genetic risk of cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mihalache, Florentina; HÖBLINGER, AKSANA; Grünhage, Frank; Krawczyk, Marcin; Gärtner, Barbara C.; Acalovschi, Monica; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Lammert, Frank; Zimmer, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background & Aim: Alpha1-antitrypsin (?1AT) deficiency caused by Z allele homozygosity represents a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous studies have implicated ?1AT Z heterozygosity in cholangiocarcinogenesis. We assessed the ?common? Z and S alleles as well as the promoter variant rs8004738 for association with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Patients & Methods: We genotyped 182 Caucasian patients and 350 controls for rs28929474 (Z), rs17580 (S) and the varia...

  7. The parallel lives of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Trapnell, Bruce C.; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In 1963, five cases of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency were reported in the scientific literature, as well as an attempt to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis by a massive washing of the lung (whole lung lavage). Now, fifty years later, it seems the ideal moment not only to commemorate these publications, but also to point out the influence both papers had in the following decades and how knowledge on these two fascinating rare respiratory disorders progressed over the years. This paper is th...

  8. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    OpenAIRE

    AL-Bayaty, Fouad H.; NorAdinar Baharuddin; Mahmood A. Abdulla; Hapipah Mohd Ali; Arkilla, Magaji B.; ALBayaty, Mustafa F.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at alpha < 0.05. ...

  9. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, Nancy; Schmerler, Diana; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Ludewig, Katrin; Baier, Michael; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Imhof, Diana; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:27382189

  10. C-Terminal Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Peptide: A New Sepsis Biomarker with Immunomodulatory Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Blaurock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS is a life threatening condition and the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Although single aspects of pathophysiology have been described in detail, numerous unknown mediators contribute to the progression of this complex disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological role of CAAP48, a C-terminal alpha-1 antitrypsin fragment, that we found to be elevated in septic patients and to apply this peptide as diagnostic marker for infectious and noninfectious etiologies of SIRS. Incubation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with synthetic CAAP48, the SNP-variant CAAP47, and several control peptides revealed intense neutrophil activation, induction of neutrophil chemotaxis, reduction of neutrophil viability, and release of cytokines. We determined the abundance of CAAP48 in patients with severe sepsis, severe SIRS of noninfectious origin, and viral infection. CAAP48 levels were 3-4-fold higher in patients with sepsis compared to SIRS of noninfectious origin and allowed discrimination of those patients with high sensitivity and specificity. Our results suggest that CAAP48 is a promising discriminatory sepsis biomarker with immunomodulatory functions, particularly on human neutrophils, supporting its important role in the host response and pathophysiology of sepsis.

  11. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitors for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: safety, tolerability, and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chotirmall SH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay H Chotirmall,1 Mazen Al-Alawi,2 Thomas McEnery,2 Noel G McElvaney2 1Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency remains an underrecognized genetic disease with predominantly pulmonary and hepatic manifestations. AAT is derived primarily from hepatocytes; however, macrophages and neutrophils are secondary sources. As the natural physiological inhibitor of several proteases, most importantly neutrophil elastase (NE, it plays a key role in maintaining pulmonary protease–antiprotease balance. In deficient states, unrestrained NE activity promotes damage to the lung matrix, causing structural defects and impairing host defenses. The commonest form of AAT deficiency results in a mutated Z AAT that is abnormally folded, polymerized, and aggregated in the liver. Consequently, systemic levels are lower, resulting in diminished pulmonary concentrations. Hepatic disease occurs due to liver aggregation of the protein, while lung destruction ensues from unopposed protease-mediated damage. In this review, we will discuss AAT deficiency, its clinical manifestations, and augmentation therapy. We will address the safety and tolerability profiles of AAT replacement in the context of patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness and outline future directions for work in this field. Keywords: alpha-1, augmentation, deficiency, replacement, emphysema

  12. [Role of alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha-2 macroglobulin in hepatopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, L; Mian, G; Magris, D; Novello, E; D'Agnolo, B

    1979-02-18

    Two pictures of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, one associated with alpha 2-macroglobulin deficiency and one isolated case of the latter deficiency have been observed in three patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver and/or hepatoma. On the basis of these cases, the literature on the subject is reviewed. The unusually high incidence of such anti-enzymatic deficiencies (three cases in the first eleven patients studied) in severe liver pathology, calls for a reassessment of such research and suggests that these tests should be carried out on a routine basis in cases of cryptogenetic cirrhosis and probably for long-term prognosis in cases of viral hepatitis. PMID:86175

  13. Prognosis of patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency on long-term oxygen therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J; Seersholm, Niels; Perch, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Data on patients with alpha1-antitrypsine deficiency (AATD) on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is sparse. The aim of this study was to present the incidence of patients with AATD on LTOT, and compare their characteristics, comorbidities and prognosis (lung transplantation, termination.......001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with COPD without AATD, AATD patients are younger, more often males, have a lower prevalence of cardio-vascular diseases and diabetes mellitus, and higher prevalence of osteoporosis. Moreover, they have better prognosis, partly due to greater chance of receiving a lung transplantation....

  14. Anti-apoptotic effects of Z alpha1-antitrypsin in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, C M

    2010-05-01

    alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha(1)-AT) deficiency is a genetic disease which manifests as early-onset emphysema or liver disease. Although the majority of alpha(1)-AT is produced by the liver, it is also produced by bronchial epithelial cells, amongst others, in the lung. Herein, we investigate the effects of mutant Z alpha(1)-AT (ZAAT) expression on apoptosis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) and delineate the mechanisms involved. Control, M variant alpha(1)-AT (MAAT)- or ZAAT-expressing cells were assessed for apoptosis, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, phosphorylation of Bad, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and induced expression of a selection of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Expression of ZAAT in 16HBE14o- cells, like MAAT, inhibited basal and agonist-induced apoptosis. ZAAT expression also inhibited caspase-3 activity by 57% compared with control cells (p = 0.05) and was a more potent inhibitor than MAAT. Whilst ZAAT had no effect on the activity of Bad, its expression activated NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression above control or MAAT-expressing cells. In 16HBE14o- cells but not HEK293 cells, ZAAT upregulated expression of cIAP-1, an upstream regulator of NF-kappaB. cIAP1 expression was increased in ZAAT versus MAAT bronchial biopsies. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which ZAAT may promote human bronchial epithelial cell survival.

  15. Familial alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency cases that are diagnosed in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayan, Y; Çağın, Y F; Erdoğan, M A; Bestas, R; Aladag, M

    2016-01-01

    Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder leading to severe lung and liver diseases worldwide. An accumulation of insoluble heterodimer AAT molecules in hepatocytes is the main cause of liver disorders. The most commonly detected allele worldwide is the PIMM allele, which fulfills the AAT function. The most common missing variant is PiZZ. Serum AAT level is a beneficial but not a reliable determinant for diagnosis. Liver biopsy yields more reliable results. AAT deficiency has no specific treatment. The only treatment modality in children with end stage liver disease is the hepatic transplant. We wanted to present in our article four cases from same family, diagnosed alpha-1 antitrypsindeficiency in adulthood. PMID:26852765

  16. Pulmonary Physiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, James A; Stockley, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is predominantly an airway disease with marked bronchiectatic changes associated with inflammation, chronic colonization, and progressive airflow obstruction. The condition can be identified in childhood and monitored with detectable airway changes early in life while conventional spirometry remains in the normal range. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can also be detected early in life through blood spot and genetic testing and leads (in some) to the development of airflow obstruction and a predominant emphysema phenotype with bronchiectatic changes in about 30%. Early detection also allows the natural history of the pulmonary physiological changes to be determined. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is usually detected late in the disease process when significant damage has occurred. The condition consists of varying combinations of airway disease, bronchiectasis, colonization, and emphysema. Lessons learned from the physiological evolution of airway disease in cystic fibrosis and the emphysema of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency provide strategies to enable early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in general and its phenotypes. PMID:27115945

  17. DNA polymorphisms of the human alpha 1 antitrypsin gene in normal subjects and in patients with pulmonary emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, I; Kalsheker, N

    1987-01-01

    Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency predisposes subjects to developing pulmonary emphysema and childhood liver cirrhosis. We have studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of the alpha 1 antitrypsin gene in a normal population and a group of patients with pulmonary emphysema. We have identified five RFLPs with eight restriction enzymes. The most frequent polymorphisms have been detected with the enzymes MspI, PstI, and TaqI at frequencies of 46.8%, 6.4%, and 5.0% respectively in th...

  18. Infected tracheal diverticulum: a rare association with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Beatriz Alves Amaral

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal diverticulum, defined as a benign outpouching of the tracheal wall, is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. It can be congenital or acquired in origin, and most cases are asymptomatic, typically being diagnosed postmortem. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who was hospitalized after presenting with fever, fatigue, pleuritic chest pain, and a right neck mass complicated by dysphagia. Her medical history was significant: pulmonary emphysema (alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; bronchiectasis; and thyroidectomy. On physical examination, she presented diminished breath sounds and muffled heart sounds, with a systolic murmur. Laboratory tests revealed elevated inflammatory markers, a CT scan showed an air-filled, multilocular mass in the right tracheal wall, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the CT findings. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy failed to reveal any abnormalities. Nevertheless, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal diverticulum. The treatment approach was conservative, consisting mainly of antibiotics. After showing clinical improvement, the patient was discharged.

  19. Alpha-1 antitrypsin: a potent anti-inflammatory and potential novel therapeutic agent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2012-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has long been thought of as an important anti-protease in the lung where it is known to decrease the destructive effects of major proteases such as neutrophil elastase. In recent years, the perception of this protein in this simple one dimensional capacity as an anti-protease has evolved and it is now recognised that AAT has significant anti-inflammatory properties affecting a wide range of inflammatory cells, leading to its potential therapeutic use in a number of important diseases. This present review aims to discuss the described anti-inflammatory actions of AAT in modulating key immune cell functions, delineate known signalling pathways and specifically to identify the models of disease in which AAT has been shown to be effective as a therapy.

  20. [Hereditary deficiency of alpha 1- antitrypsin in rats due to evolving chronic lung pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveva, N A; Grishaeva, O N; Parik, Iu Ia; Kosova, E Iu; Korolenko, T A

    1994-01-01

    W/SSM rats which are characterized by hereditary abnormal changes in the lungs, hepato- and splenomegalia and some other disturbances have also alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. A study of AAT in these rats by means of isoelectrofocusing and immunoblotting with anti-AAT antibodies labelled with peroxidase has demonstrated that deficiency of the protease inhibitor is not associated with any disturbances of its synthesis or any changes of its electrophoretic properties. A higher activity of lysosomal glycosidases and proteinases was found in the liver and leukocytes of W/SSM rats. It is suggested that AAT deficiency is due to its modification under the influence of lysosomal enzymes. The described biochemical distances seem to be associated with an increased hexose transport into the cells, which is controlled by a mutant gene. PMID:7513577

  1. Inhibition of Lassa virus glycoprotein cleavage and multicycle replication by site 1 protease-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maisa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proteolytic processing of the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein precursor GP-C by the host proprotein convertase site 1 protease (S1P is a prerequisite for the incorporation of the subunits GP-1 and GP-2 into viral particles and, hence, essential for infectivity and virus spread. Therefore, we tested in this study the concept of using S1P as a target to block efficient virus replication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We demonstrate that stable cell lines inducibly expressing S1P-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants inhibit the proteolytic maturation of GP-C. Introduction of the S1P recognition motifs RRIL and RRLL into the reactive center loop of alpha(1-antitrypsin resulted in abrogation of GP-C processing by endogenous S1P to a similar level observed in S1P-deficient cells. Moreover, S1P-specific alpha(1-antitrypsins significantly inhibited replication and spread of a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Lassa virus glycoprotein GP as well as authentic Lassa virus. Inhibition of viral replication correlated with the ability of the different alpha(1-antitrypsin variants to inhibit the processing of the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that glycoprotein cleavage by S1P is a promising target for the development of novel anti-arenaviral strategies.

  2. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona McLean

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caitriona McLean*, Catherine M Greene*, Noel G McElvaneyRespiratory Research Division, Dept. Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Education and Research Centre, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland; *Each of these authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys. ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs and RNA interference (RNAi, which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, siRNA, peptide nucleic acid, ribozymes

  3. Impaired hepcidin expression in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency associated with iron overload and progressive liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Benedikt; Haschka, David; Finkenstedt, Armin; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Theurl, Igor; Henninger, Benjamin; Janecke, Andreas R; Wang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Herbert Y; Veits, Lothar; Vogel, Wolfgang; Weiss, Günter; Franke, Andre; Zoller, Heinz

    2015-11-01

    Liver disease due to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is associated with hepatic iron overload in a subgroup of patients. The underlying cause for this association is unknown. The aim of the present study was to define the genetics of this correlation and the effect of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) on the expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Full exome and candidate gene sequencing were carried out in a family with A1ATD and hepatic iron overload. Regulation of hepcidin expression by A1AT was studied in primary murine hepatocytes. Cells co-transfected with hemojuvelin (HJV) and matriptase-2 (MT-2) were used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism of this regulation. Observed familial clustering of hepatic iron overload with A1ATD suggests a genetic cause, but genotypes known to be associated with hemochromatosis were absent. Individuals homozygous for the A1AT Z-allele with environmental or genetic risk factors such as steatosis or heterozygosity for the HAMP non-sense mutation p.Arg59* presented with severe hepatic siderosis. In hepatocytes, A1AT induced hepcidin mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Experiments in overexpressing cells show that A1AT reduces cleavage of the hepcidin inducing bone morphogenetic protein co-receptor HJV via inhibition of the membrane-bound serine protease MT-2. The acute-phase protein A1AT is an inducer of hepcidin expression. Through this mechanism, A1ATD could be a trigger of hepatic iron overload in genetically predisposed individuals or patients with environmental risk factors for hepatic siderosis. PMID:26310624

  4. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  5. A protein structural approach to the solution of biological problems: alpha 1-antitrypsin as a recent example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, D A; Carrell, R W

    1993-09-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin is a circulating serine proteinase inhibitor that protects the lungs against proteolysis by the enzyme neutrophil elastase. Most northern Europeans have only the normal M form, but some 4% are heterozygotes for the Z deficiency mutant. This mutant is characterized by the substitution of a positively charged lysine residue for a negatively charged glutamic acid at position 342 and results in normal gene translation but reduced protein secretion into the plasma. The plasma levels of antitrypsin in homozygotes are only 15% of normal, the other 85% being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. This review describes the effect of the Z mutation on the structure and function of antitrypsin and illustrates the importance of understanding protein structure in solving the mechanism of Z antitrypsin retention within the liver. We demonstrate that antitrypsin accumulation in the liver results from a unique interaction between antitrypsin molecules. The Z mutation perturbs the gap between the third and fifth strands of the A sheet, allowing the reactive center loop of one molecule to insert into the A sheet of a second. This loop-sheet polymerization results in the formation of chains of protein which form insoluble inclusions in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in hepatocellular damage and cirrhosis. In addition, the Z mutation results in a distortion of the circular dichroic spectrum, a rearrangement of the reactive center loop with respect to the A sheet, and a reduction in association rate constant with the cognate proteinase neutrophil elastase. PMID:8214081

  6. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene polymorphism in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Denden

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT plays an important role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, the pathological lesion underlying the majority of the manifestations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. In this study we tested the hypothesis that common AAT polymorphisms influence the risk of developing COPDs. We investigated PiM1 (Ala213Val, PiM2 (Arg101His, PiM3 (Glu376Asp, PiS (Glu264Val and PiZ (Glu342Lys SERPINA1 alleles in 100 COPD patients and 200 healthy controls. No significant differences were observed in allele frequencies between COPD patients and controls, neither did haplotype analysis show significant differences between the two groups. A cross-sectional study revealed no significant relationship between common SERPINA1 polymorphisms (PiM1, PiM2, PiM3 and the emphysematous type of COPD. In addition, FEV1 annual decline, determined during a two-year follow up period, revealed no difference among carriers of the tested polymorphisms.

  7. Is There a Therapeutic Role for Selenium in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel G. McElvaney

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace mineral of fundamental importance to human health. Much of its beneficial influence is attributed to its presence within selenoproteins, a group of proteins containing the rare amino acid selenocysteine. There are 25 known human selenoproteins including glutathione peroxidases, thioredoxin reductases and selenoproteins. Selenoprotein S (SEPS1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER resident selenoprotein involved in the removal of misfolded proteins from the ER. SEPS1 expression can be induced by ER stress, an event that is associated with conformational disorders and occurs due to accumulation of misfolded proteins within the ER. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency, also known as genetic emphysema, is a conformational disorder in which the roles of ER stress, SEPS1 and selenium have been investigated. SEPS1 can relieve ER stress in an in vitro model of AAT deficiency by reducing levels of active ATF6 and inhibiting grp78 promoter- and NFκB activity; some of these effects are enhanced in the presence of selenium supplementation. Other studies examining the molecular mechanisms by which selenium mediates its anti-inflammatory effects have identified a role for prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 in targeting NFκB and PPARγ. Together these ER stress-relieving and anti-inflammatory properties suggest a therapeutic potential for selenium supplementation in genetic emphysema.

  8. Aberrant disulphide bonding contributes to the ER retention of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzoni, Riccardo; Berardelli, Romina; Medicina, Daniela; Sitia, Roberto; Gooptu, Bibek; Fra, Anna Maria

    2016-02-15

    Mutations in alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) can cause the protein to polymerise and be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. The ensuing systemic AAT deficiency leads to pulmonary emphysema, while intracellular polymers are toxic and cause chronic liver disease. The severity of this process varies considerably between individuals, suggesting the involvement of mechanistic co-factors and potential for therapeutically beneficial interventions. We show in Hepa1.6 cells that the mildly polymerogenic I (Arg39Cys) AAT mutant forms aberrant inter- and intra-molecular disulphide bonds involving the acquired Cys39 and the only cysteine residue in the wild-type (M) sequence (Cys232). Substitution of Cys39 to serine partially restores secretion, showing that disulphide bonding contributes to the intracellular retention of I AAT. Covalent homodimers mediated by inter-Cys232 bonding alone are also observed in cells expressing the common Z and other polymerising AAT variants where conformational behaviour is abnormal, but not in those expressing M AAT. Prevention of such disulphide linkage through the introduction of the Cys232Ser mutation or by treatment of cells with reducing agents increases Z AAT secretion. Our results reveal that disulphide interactions enhance intracellular accumulation of AAT mutants and implicate the oxidative ER state as a pathogenic co-factor. Redox modulation, e.g. by anti-oxidant strategies, may therefore be beneficial in AAT deficiency-associated liver disease. PMID:26647313

  9. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:27028823

  10. Selenoprotein S/SEPS1 modifies endoplasmic reticulum stress in Z variant alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-06-19

    Z alpha(1)-antitrypsin (ZAAT) deficiency is a disease associated with emphysematous lung disease and also with liver disease. The liver disease of AAT deficiency is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. SEPS1 is a selenoprotein that, through a chaperone activity, decreases ER stress. To determine the effect of SEPS1 on ER stress in ZAAT deficiency, we measured activity of the grp78 promoter and levels of active ATF6 as markers of the unfolded protein response in HepG2 cells transfected with the mutant form of AAT, a ZAAT transgene. We evaluated levels of NFkappaB activity as a marker of the ER overload response. To determine the effect of selenium supplementation on the function of SEPS1, we investigated glutathione peroxidase activity, grp78 promoter activity, and NFkappaB activity in the presence or absence of selenium. SEPS1 reduced levels of active ATF6. Overexpression of SEPS1 also inhibited grp78 promoter and NFkappaB activity, and this effect was enhanced in the presence of selenium supplementation. This finding demonstrates a role for SEPS1 in ZAAT deficiency and suggests a possible therapeutic potential for selenium supplementation.

  11. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  12. Intestinal apoprotein biosynthesis: alpha-1-antitrypsin identified as a constituent of rat lymph chylomicrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apolipoproteins synthesized in the intestine can serve as a source of constituents for plasma lipoproteins and play an important role in the pathways of lipoprotein formation, interconversion, and catabolism. In the present study, apolipoproteins synthesized by the intestine were identified in mesenteric lymph following intraduodenal administration of lipid and [14C]-leucine to rats. The study was undertaken to assess differences in the rate of appearance of newly synthesized apolipoproteins into chylomicron and VLDL particles of rat mesenteric lymph and to determine if there is a sex-related influence on this process. Examination of qualitative and quantitative differences in apolipoprotein profiles, [14C]-leucine labeling patterns, and the specific activities of the individual apolipoproteins secreted with either chylomicrons or VLDL distinguish the two particles and their pathways of assembly. A protein of molecular weight 54,000 daltons was recovered with the chylomicrons. The protein was shown to be synthesized by rat liver hepatocytes, and immunoprecipitation studies with rat intestinal cells incubated with 35S-methionine included this organ as a source of alpha-1-antitrypsin

  13. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  14. Lung clearance index for monitoring early lung disease in alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Pittschieler, Klaus; Ahrens, Frank; Baden, Winfried; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Gleiber, Wolfgang; Griese, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Köhnlein, Thomas; Reckling, Ludmilla; Rietschel, Ernst; Staab, Doris; Gappa, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and a PI-ZZ genotype are at high risk to develop severe emphysema during adulthood. However, little is known about early stages of emphysema and disease manifestation in other PI-types. Spirometry is commonly used for monitoring although early manifestation of emphysema is suspected within the peripheral airways that are not accessible by forced expiratory manoeuvres. We hypothesized that the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath nitrogen-washout (N2-washout) is useful to bridge this diagnostic gap. Patients from age 4 years onward and different PI-types performed N2-washout and spirometry. Results were compared to controls. 193 patients (4-79 years, 75% PI-ZZ) and 33 controls (8-60 years) were included. Mean (SD) LCI in patients was 9.1 (3.1) and 6.3 (0.6) in controls (p ≤ 0.001). 47% of adult patients with other than PI-ZZ genotypes and 39% of all patients with normal spirometry had abnormal LCIs. The LCI measured by N2-washout discriminates between patients with AATD and controls, reflects AATD related lung disease in all stages and appears to identify early peripheral lung changes in younger age than spirometry. We conclude that a normal spirometry does not exclude presence of AATD related lung disease even in genotypes other than PI-ZZ. PMID:27296827

  15. Alpha-1 antitrypsin prevents the development of preeclampsia through suppression of oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling eFeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE and its complications have become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality in the world. And the development of PE is still barely predictable and thus challenging to prevent and manage clinically. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of the disease. Our previous study demonstrated that exogenous Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT played a cytoprotective role in vascular endothelial cell by suppressing oxidative stress. In this study, we aim to investigate whether AAT contributes to the development of PE, and to identify the mechanism behind these effects. We found that AAT levels were significantly decreased in placenta tissues from women with PE compared that of healthy women. Notably, we demonstrate that AAT injection is able to relieve the high blood pressure and reduce urine protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in PE mice. In addition, our results showed that AAT injection exhibited an anti-oxidative stress role by significantly reducing PE mediated-upregulation of ROS, MMP9 and MDA, and increasing the levels of SOD, eNOS and GPx with increased dosage of AAT. Furthermore, we found that AAT injection inactivated PE mediated activation of PAK/STAT1/p38 signaling. These findings were confirmed in human samples. In conclusion, our study suggests that exogenous AAT injection increases the antioxidants and suppresses oxidative stress, and subsequent prevention of PE development through inactivation of STAT1/p38 signaling. Thus, AAT would become a potential strategy for PE therapy.

  16. Is PiSS Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Associated with Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn McGee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT is an inherited condition that predisposes to lung and/or liver disease. Objective. The current study examined the clinical features of the PiSS genotype. Methods. Nineteen study participants (PiSS and 29 matched control participants (PiMM were telephone interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Demographic features, cigarette smoking, vocation, medication history, and clinical diagnoses were compared. Statistical analysis was performed. Finally, a comprehensive literature review was performed by two investigators. Results. 12/19 (63.2% study participants reported the presence of lung and/or liver disease compared to 12/29 (41.4% control participants. There trended toward having a higher frequency of medication allergies in the study population (42.11% versus 20.69%. Conclusions. The PiSS genotype was associated with a similar incidence of obstructive lung disease to controls. Selective bias intrinsic in testing for AAT deficiency and the rarity of the PiSS genotype will make future study of this association dependent on population-based tests.

  17. Historical role of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in respiratory and hepatic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Pannell, Benjamin K; Zhou, Tingyang; Chuang, Chia-Chen

    2016-09-10

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a heritable disease that is commonly associated with complications in the respiratory and hepatic systems. AAT acts as a regulatory enzyme that primarily inhibits neutrophil elastase activity thus protecting tissues from proteolytic damage after inflammation. This paper provides a historical review of the discovery, classification, phenotypic expression, and treatment of AAT deficiency. While its pattern of inheritance has been long understood, the underlying mechanism between AAT deficiency and related diseases remains to be elucidated. Most commonly, AAT deficiency is associated with the development of emphysema in the lungs as well as various liver injuries. Cigarette smoke has been shown to be particularly detrimental in AAT deficient individuals during the development of lung disease. Therefore, understanding familial history may be beneficial when educating patients regarding lifestyle choices. While numerous AAT deficient phenotypes exist in the human populations, only specific variants have been proven to markedly predispose individuals to lung and liver disorders. The exact relationship between AAT levels and the aforementioned diseases is an essential area of further research. It is imperative that clinicians and researchers alike strive to standardize diagnostic criteria and develop safe and effective therapies for this genetic disease. PMID:26768576

  18. Gene targeted therapeutics for liver disease in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, Caitriona

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is a 52 kDa serine protease inhibitor that is synthesized in and secreted from the liver. Although it is present in all tissues in the body the present consensus is that its main role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase in the lung. A1AT deficiency occurs due to mutations of the A1AT gene that reduce serum A1AT levels to <35% of normal. The most clinically significant form of A1AT deficiency is caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys). ZA1AT polymerizes in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells and the resulting accumulation of the mutant protein can lead to liver disease, while the reduction in circulating A1AT can result in lung disease including early onset emphysema. There is currently no available treatment for the liver disease other than transplantation and therapies for the lung manifestations of the disease remain limited. Gene therapy is an evolving field which may be of use as a treatment for A1AT deficiency. As the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency may represent a gain of function possible gene therapies for this condition include the use of ribozymes, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and RNA interference (RNAi), which by decreasing the amount of aberrant protein in cells may impact on the pathogenesis of the condition.

  19. Circulating alpha1-antitrypsin in the general population: Determinants and association with lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency associated with low AAT blood concentrations is an established genetic COPD risk factor. Less is known about the respiratory health impact of variation in AAT serum concentrations in the general population. We cross-sectionally investigated correlates of circulating AAT concentrations and its association with FEV1. Methods In 5187 adults (2669 females with high-sensitive c-reactive protein (CRP levels ≤ 10 mg/l from the population-based Swiss SAPALDIA cohort, blood was collected at the time of follow-up examination for measuring serum AAT and CRP. Results Female gender, hormone intake, systolic blood pressure, age in men and in postmenopausal women, as well as active and passive smoking were positively, whereas alcohol intake and BMI inversely correlated with serum AAT levels, independent of CRP adjustment. We observed an inverse association of AAT with FEV1 in the total study population (p Conclusion The results of this population-based study reflect a complex interrelationship between tobacco exposure, gender related factors, circulating AAT, systemic inflammatory status and lung function.

  20. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, R F; Li, Y.; Sifers, R N; Wang, H.; Hardick, C; Tsai, S. Y.; Woo, S L

    1987-01-01

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientati...

  1. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Aleksandra; Divac Aleksandra; Stanković Marija; Dinić Jelena; Lukić Snežana; Anđelić-Jelić Marina; Popović Dragan; Radojković Dragica

    2010-01-01

    One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT...

  2. The influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of haptoglobin and alpha 1-antitrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaty, Fouad H; Baharuddin, Noradinar; Abdulla, Mahmood A; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Arkilla, Magaji B; ALBayaty, Mustafa F

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP), and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α ≤ 0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39 ± 5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03 ± 8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05 ± 1.48) and moderate plaque indexes (51.35 ± 11.27) were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9 ± 30.71 ng/dL), haptoglobin (76.04 ± 52.48 mg/dL), and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90 ± 18.40 mg/dL) were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years) and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers. PMID:24286083

  3. The Influence of Cigarette Smoking on Gingival Bleeding and Serum Concentrations of Haptoglobin and Alpha 1-Antitrypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad H. Al-Bayaty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of cigarette smoking on gingival bleeding and serum concentrations of cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin in Malaysian smokers. A total of 197 male smokers and nonsmokers were recruited for this study. Plaque index, bleeding on probing (BOP, and levels of serum cotinine, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0, with the significance level set at α≤0.05. Linear regression analyses were performed. The mean cigarette consumption per day was 13.39±5.75 cigarettes; the mean duration was 16.03±8.78 years. Relatively low BOP values (26.05±1.48 and moderate plaque indexes (51.35±11.27 were found. The levels of serum cotinine (106.9±30.71 ng/dL, haptoglobin (76.04±52.48 mg/dL, and alpha 1-antitrypsin (141.90±18.40 mg/dL were significantly higher in smokers compared to non-smokers. Multiple logistic regression models for all variables and smokers demonstrated observed differences between BOP, the number of cigarettes per day, and duration of smoking, while serum cotinine, haptoglobin and alpha-1 antitrypsin levels showed no significant differences. Duration of smoking (years and the cotinine level in serum showed a significant correlation with plaque index. The present analysis demonstrated that the duration of smoking in years, but not the number of cigarettes smoked per day, was associated with reduced gingival bleeding in smokers.

  4. Alpha 1-antitrypsin Siiyama (Ser53-->Phe). Further evidence for intracellular loop-sheet polymerization.

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Lomas; Finch, J. T.; Seyama, K.; Nukiwa, T; Carrell, R W

    1993-01-01

    Antitrypsin Siiyama is a rare example of the deficiency variants of antitrypsin that accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. The common example is Z antitrypsin, which has a mutation (Glu342-->Lys) at the junction of the head of the fifth strand of the A sheet and the base of the reactive center loop. It was previously shown that Z antitrypsin spontaneously polymerizes due to the insertion of the reactive center loop of one molecule into the A sheet of a second. The mutatio...

  5. Relationship between alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient genotypes S and Z and lung cancer in Jordanian lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) is a secretory glycoprotein produced mainly in the liver and monocytes. It is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor in human plasma. It predominantly inhibits neutrophil elastase thus, it prevents the breakdown of lung tissue. The deficiency of alpha1-AT is an inherited disorder characterized by reduced serum level of alpha1-AT. Protease inhibitors Z (PiZ) and protease inhibitors S (PiS) are the most common deficient genotypes of alpha1-AT. The aim of this study is to test the relationship between alpha1-AT deficient genotypes S and Z and lung cancer in Jordanian lung cancer patients. We obtained the samples used in this study from 100 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of the lung cancer patients from Prince Iman Research Center and Laboratory Sciences at King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan. Analyses of the Z and S genotypes of alpha1-AT were performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques at Jordan University of Science and Technology during 2003 and 2004. We demonstrated that all lung cancer patients were of M genotype, and no Z or S genotypes were detected. There is no relationship between alpha1-AT deficient genotypes S and Z and lung cancer in patients involved in this study. (author)

  6. Oxidized alpha-1 antitrypsin as a predictive risk marker of opisthorchiasis-associated cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamnongkan, Wassana; Techasen, Anchalee; Thanan, Raynoo; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Mairiang, Eimorn; Loilome, Watcharin; Namwat, Nisana; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2013-04-01

    The oxidized alpha-1 antitrypsin (ox-A1AT) is one modified form of A1AT, generated via oxidation at its active site by free radicals released from inflammatory cells which subsequently are unable to inhibit protease enzymes. The presence of ox-A1AT in human serum has been used as oxidative stress indicator in many diseases. As oxidative/nitrative damage is one major contributor in opisthorchiasis-driven cholangiocarcinogenesis, we determined A1AT and ox-A1AT expression in human cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) tissue using immunohistochemical staining and measured serum ox-A1AT levels by ELISA. A1AT and ox-A1AT were found to be expressed in the tumor of CCA patients. The group with high expression has a significant poor prognosis. Serum levels of ox-A1AT were also significantly higher in groups of patients with heavy Opisthorchis viverrini infection, advanced periductal fibrosis (APF) and CCA when compared with healthy controls (P < 0.001). Odds ratio (OR) analysis implicated high ox-A1AT levels as a risk predictor for APF and CCA (P < 0.001; OR = 140.5 and 22.0, respectively). In conclusion, as APF may lead to hepatobiliary diseases and an increased risk of CCA development, our results identified ox-A1AT as a potential risk indicator for opisthorchiasis-associated CCA. This marker could now be explored for screening of subjects living in endemic areas where the prevalence of opisthorchiasis still remains high. PMID:23188705

  7. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  8. Regional distribution of ventilation and perfusion in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional distribution of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion has been determined of 13 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Eight patients had alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (α1ATD). Ventilation studies were carried out using xenon-133 (133Xe) and krypton-81m (sup(81m)Kr) gases. Trapping indices were determined from the wash-out part of the xenon ventilation studies. Results obtained from patients were compared with those of normal controls. Ventilation studies with sup(81m)Kr showed pulmonary changes more clearly than did 133Xe studies and the trapping of radio-xenon was more extensive in lung bases than in apices whether or not the patients had α1 ATD. The distribution of perfusion followed a pattern similar to that of ventilation, but did not differ statistically from that of the normal controls. (orig.)

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-α driven inflammation in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a new model of pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Killian; Reeves, Emer P; Carroll, Tomás P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) has traditionally been thought of as a genetic disorder characterized by lung destruction and early emphysema in a low AAT, and high neutrophil elastase (NE) environment in the lungs of affected individuals. Recently, a growing body of evidence has emerged to support the hypothesis that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is essential in the pathogenesis of both genetic AATD and non-genetic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Reports have highlighted the importance of TNF-α driven immune cell dysfunction in the development of lung disease in AATD. The authors discuss the role of AAT as a key modulator of TNF-α signaling firstly in the setting of AATD and secondly in other conditions where AAT augmentation therapy has potential utility as a novel therapy. PMID:26634397

  10. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is produced by human neutrophil granulocytes and their precursors and liberated during granule exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rørvig, Sara;

    2011-01-01

    stimulation. A1AT is produced at all stages of myeloid maturation in the bone marrow. The production increases as neutrophils enter circulation and increases further upon migration to tissues as observed in skin windows and when blood neutrophils are incubated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor......Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is an important inhibitor of neutrophil proteases including elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. Transcription profiling data suggest that A1AT is expressed by human neutrophil granulocytes during all developmental stages. A1AT has hitherto only been found associated...... with azurophile granules in neutrophils indicative of A1AT expression being restricted to the promyelocyte stage. We examined the localization and production of A1AT in healthy donor neutrophils and found A1AT to be a constituent of all granule subtypes and to be released from neutrophils following...

  11. Correction: Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Veldhuisen, B.; Annovazzi, L.; Zanone, C.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Nieuwenhuizen, W.; Iadarola, P.; Berden, J.H.M.; Luisetti, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  12. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J; Veldhuisen, B; Annovazzi, L; Zanone, C; Versteeg, EM; van Kuppevelt, TH; Nieuwenhuizen, W; Iadarola, P; Luisetti, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  13. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, J.; Veldhuisen, B.; Annovazzi, L.; Zanone, C.; Versteeg, E.M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Nieuwenhuizen, W.; Iadarola, P.; Luisetti, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longi

  14. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P AAT levels were significantly lower (P AAT levels (r = -0.85, P AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  15. A novel SERPINA1 mutation causing serum alpha(1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren N Saunders

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene can cause deficiency in the circulating serine protease inhibitor α(1-Antitrypsin (α(1AT. α(1AT deficiency is the major contributor to pulmonary emphysema and liver disease in persons of European ancestry, with a prevalence of 1 in 2500 in the USA. We present the discovery and characterization of a novel SERPINA1 mutant from an asymptomatic Middle Eastern male with circulating α(1AT deficiency. This 49 base pair deletion mutation (T379Δ, originally mistyped by IEF, causes a frame-shift replacement of the last sixteen α(1AT residues and adds an extra twenty-four residues. Functional analysis showed that the mutant protein is not secreted and prone to intracellular aggregation.

  16. Deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina: diagnóstico e tratamento Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiles A Camelier

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina é um distúrbio genético de descoberta recente e que ocorre com freqüência comparável à da fibrose cística. Resulta de diferentes mutações no gene SERPINA1 e tem diversas implicações clínicas. A alfa-1 antitripsina é produzida principalmente no fígado e atua como uma antiprotease. Tem como principal função inativar a elastase neutrofílica, impedindo a ocorrência de dano tecidual. A mutação mais freqüentemente relacionada à doença clínica é o alelo Z, que determina polimerização e acúmulo dentro dos hepatócitos. O acúmulo e a conseqüente redução dos níveis séricos de alfa-1 antitripsina determinam, respectivamente, doença hepática e pulmonar, sendo que esta se manifesta principalmente sob a forma de enfisema de aparecimento precoce, habitualmente com predomínio basal. O diagnóstico envolve a detecção de níveis séricos reduzidos de alfa-1 antitripsina e a confirmação fenotípica. Além do tratamento usual para doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica, existe atualmente uma terapia específica com infusão de concentrados de alfa-1 antitripsina. Essa terapia de reposição, aparentemente segura, ainda não teve a eficácia clínica definitivamente comprovada, e o custo-efetividade também é um tema controverso e ainda pouco abordado. Apesar da sua importância, não existem dados epidemiológicos brasileiros a respeito da prevalência da doença ou da freqüência de ocorrência dos alelos deficientes. O subdiagnóstico também tem sido uma importante limitação tanto para o estudo da doença quanto para o tratamento adequado dos pacientes. Espera-se que a criação do Registro Internacional de Alfa-1 venha a resolver essas e outras importantes questões.Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a recently identified genetic disease that occurs almost as frequently as cystic fibrosis. It is caused by various mutations in the SERPINA1 gene, and has numerous clinical

  17. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, R F; Li, Y; Sifers, R N; Wang, H; Hardick, C; Tsai, S Y; Woo, S L

    1987-10-26

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientations when complemented by the proximal region in the sense orientation. The results strongly suggest that there are multiple cis-acting elements in the human AAT gene that confer cell specificity for its expression. Nuclear proteins prepared from the hepatoma cells bound specifically to the proximal region in a band-shifting assay that was resistant to competition by the globin promoter DNA. Foot-printing analysis showed a protected domain within the proximal region that contains a nearly perfect palindromic sequence TGGTTAATATTCACCA, which may be important in the regulation of AAT expression in the liver. PMID:2823229

  18. Corticosteroid-binding globulin cleavage is paradoxically reduced in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Implications for cortisol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenke, Marni A; Holmes, Mark; Rankin, Wayne; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J

    2016-01-15

    High-affinity corticosteroid-binding globulin (haCBG) is cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE) resulting in permanent transition to the low cortisol-binding affinity form (laCBG), thereby increasing cortisol availability at inflammatory sites. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major inhibitor of NE. AAT deficiency (AATD) predisposes patients to early-onset emphysema due to increased proteolytic destruction from the inherent proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance. We hypothesized that AATD may result in increased CBG cleavage in vivo. We collected demographic data and blood samples from 10 patients with AATD and 28 healthy controls measuring total CBG and haCBG levels by parallel in-house ELISAs, as well as AAT, total and free cortisol levels. haCBG was higher (median [range]); 329 [210-551] vs. 250 [175-365] nmol/L; PAAT levels (P<0.05, R=-0.64). Paradoxically, proteolytic cleavage of CBG was reduced in AATD, despite the recognized increase in NE activity. This implies that NE activity is not the mechanism for systemic CBG cleavage in basal, low inflammatory conditions. Relatively low levels of laCBG may have implications for cortisol action in AATD. PMID:26522656

  19. Serum concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin is significantly higher in colorectal cancer patients than in healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association between alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency and colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently controversial. The present study compares AAT serum concentrations and gene frequencies between a group of CRC patients and a control group of healthy unrelated people (HUP). 267 CRC subjects (63% males, 72 ± 10 years old) were enlisted from a Hospital Clinic setting in Asturias, Spain. The HUP group comprised 327 subjects (67% males, mean age 70 ± 7.5 years old) from the same geographical region. Outcome measures were AAT serum concentrations measured by nephelometry, and AAT phenotyping characterization by isoelectric focusing. Significantly higher serum concentrations were found among CRC (208 ± 60) than in HUP individuals (144 ± 20.5) (p = 0.0001). No differences were found in the phenotypic distribution of the Pi*S and Pi*Z allelic frequencies (p = 0.639), although the frequency of Pi*Z was higher in CRC (21%) than in HUP subjects (15%). The only statistically significant finding in this study was the markedly higher AAT serum concentrations found in CRC subjects compared with HUP controls, irrespective of whether their Pi* phenotype was normal (Pi*MM) or deficient (Pi*MS, Pi*MZ and Pi*SZ). Although there was a trend towards the more deficient Pi* phenotype the more advanced the tumor, the results were inconclusive due to the small sample size. Consequently, more powerful studies are needed to reach firmer conclusions on this matter

  20. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT mutations Z and S was analyzed in 160 patients with pancreatic diseases (50 patients with pancreatic cancer, 50 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 129 healthy individuals by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis (PSM method. One patient with pancreatic cancer was found to be a carrier of Z mutation, as well as one patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. One patient with chronic pancreatitis was found to be a carrier of S mutation. The common AAT mutations were statistically significantly over-represented in patients with pancreatic diseases (3 of 160 patients, allelic frequency 0.9% than in the control group (1 of 129 individuals, allelic frequency 0.4%. The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that common AAT mutations Z and S may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to the development of pancreatic disease.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and alpha-1 antitrypsin gene variants in Serbian pediatric arterial ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS in children is complex, and different from that in adults. Although rare, stroke in children is an important cause of mortality and morbidity. There is increasing evidence that genetic factors, including inflammation mediators, have a role in occurrence and outcome of stroke. We have chosen to assess the role of polymorphism -308G/A in the promoter of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα gene and S and Z mutations in alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT gene in the etiology of stroke in children. TNFα polymorphism affects plasma levels of this proinflamatory cytokine, and this could contribute to stroke pathology. It has been shown that increased AAT concentration may present a risk for AIS in children. Since S and Z mutations in AAT gene reduce its levels in plasma they could have a protective role in pediatric stroke. In this study twenty six children with AIS and 100 unrelated individuals from Serbian general population were investigated by PCR/RFLP for these gene variations. No statistically significant difference was observed between patients and general population in distribution of genotypes for -308G/A TNFα polymorphism, so its contributory role in the etiology of stroke was not evident in our group of patients. None of the tested AAT gene mutations were found in patients, which is in concordance with the proposed protective role of deficient AAT variants. AIS is a multifactorial disease, with many genes having a modest role in its pathophysiology, so further analyses of their combined effect are needed to elucidate genetic risk factors in the etiology and outcome of stroke in pediatric patients.

  2. Exploring the optimum approach to the use of CT densitometry in a randomised placebo-controlled study of augmentation therapy in alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parr, David G; Dirksen, Asger; Piitulainen, Eeva; Deng, Chunqin; Wencker, Marion; Stockley, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    lung assessment. The EXAcerbations and CT scan as Lung Endpoints (EXACTLE) trial aimed to clarify the optimum approach to the use of CT densitometry data for the assessment of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) augmentation therapy on the progression of emphysema in AAT deficiency (AATD). METHODS: Patients with...... AATD (n = 77) were randomised to weekly infusions of 60 mg/kg human AAT (Prolastin) or placebo over 2 to 2.5 years. Lung volume was included as a covariate in an endpoint analysis and a comparison was made of different CT densitometric indices (15th percentile lung density [PD15], mean lung density...... analysis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered in ClinicalTrials.gov as 'Antitrypsin (AAT) to Treat Emphysema in AAT-Deficient Patients'; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00263887....

  3. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Healthy Liver In the Field Call to Action - Change Tomorrow, Give Today Liver Lowdown Sept 2013 Recovery Month Path to Wellness ... Patient Story-Lynette In the Field Call to Action 5 Things About Hep Healthy Summer Tips Liver Lowdown June 2013 Liver Lowdown July/Aug 2014 ...

  4. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  5. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirooznia Nazanin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha 1- antitrypsin (α1AT belongs to the superfamily of serpins and inhibits different proteases. α1AT protects the lung from cellular inflammatory enzymes. In the absence of α1AT, the degradation of lung tissue results to pulmonary complications. The pulmonary route is a potent noninvasive route for systemic and local delivery. The aerosolized α1AT not only affects locally its main site of action but also avoids remaining in circulation for a long period of time in peripheral blood. Poly (D, L lactide-co glycolide (PLGA is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer approved for sustained controlled release of peptides and proteins. The aim of this work was to prepare a wide range of particle size as a carrier of protein-loaded nanoparticles to deposit in different parts of the respiratory system especially in the deep lung. Various lactide to glycolide ratio of the copolymer was used to obtain different release profile of the drug which covers extended and rapid drug release in one formulation. Results Nonaqueous and double emulsion techniques were applied for the synthesis of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of surface morphology, size distribution, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. To evaluate the nanoparticles cytotoxicity, cell cytotoxicity test was carried out on the Cor L105 human epithelial lung cancer cell line. Nanoparticles were spherical with an average size in the range of 100 nm to 1μ. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be higher when the double emulsion technique was applied. XRD and DSC results indicated that α1AT encapsulated in the nanoparticles existed in an amorphous or disordered-crystalline status in the polymer matrix. The lactic acid to glycolic acid ratio affects the release profile of α1AT. Hence, PLGA with a 50:50 ratios exhibited the ability to release

  6. The clinical significance of determination of serum leptin, c-reactive protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin levels in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum leptin, C-reactive protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin (α1-AT)levels in patients with breast cancer. Methods: Serum leptin(with radioimmunoassay)and CRP, α1-AT (with ELISA)levels were determined in 79 patients with breast cancer and 60 controls. Results: Serum levels of leptin, CRP and α1-AT in breast cancer patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (all P1-AT levels patients with breast cancer might be related with progression of the disease, each played independent biological roles. (authors)

  7. Short-term variability of biomarkers of proteinase activity in patients with emphysema associated with type Z alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieuwenhuizen Willem

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of proteinases from inflammatory cells in the lung of subjects with type Pi ZZ of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is higher than in those without the deficiency. Cross-sectional studies have shown increased levels of biomarkers of extracellular matrix degradation in vivo. Longitudinal variability of these biomarkers is unknown but desirable for clinical studies with proteinase inhibitors. Methods We measured three different types of biomarkers, including desmosines, elastase-formed fibrinogen fragments and heparan sulfate epitope JM403, in plasma and urine for a period of 7 weeks in a group of 12 patients who participated in a placebo-controlled study to assess the safety of a single inhalation of hyaluronic acid. Results Effect of study medication on any of the biomarkers was not seen. Baseline desmosines in plasma and urine correlated with baseline CO diffusion capacity (R = 0.81, p = 0.01 and R = 0.65, p = 0.05. Mean coefficient of variation within patients (CVi for plasma and urine desmosines was 18.7 to 13.5%, respectively. Change in urinary desmosine levels correlated significantly with change in plasma desmosine levels (R = 0.84, p Conclusion We found acceptable variability in our study parameters, indicating the feasibility of their use in an evaluation of biochemical efficacy of alpha-1-antitrypsin augmentation therapy in Pi Z subjects.

  8. Identification of a novel SERPINA-1 mutation causing alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in a patient with severe bronchiectasis and pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milger K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Katrin Milger,1 Lesca Miriam Holdt,2 Daniel Teupser,2 Rudolf Maria Huber,1 Jürgen Behr,1 Nikolaus Kneidinger1 1Department of Internal Medicine V, University of Munich, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, 2Institute of Laboratory Medicine, University of Munich, Munich, Germany Abstract: Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT, is known to cause emphysema and liver disease. Other manifestations, including airway disease or skin disorders, have also been described. A 44-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with dyspnea and respiratory insufficiency. She had never smoked, and had been diagnosed with COPD 9 years earlier. Three months previously, she had suffered a pulmonary embolism. Chest computed tomography scan revealed severe cystic bronchiectasis with destruction of the lung parenchyma. The sweat test was normal and there was no evidence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutation. Capillary zone electrophoresis showed a decrease of alpha-1 globin band and AAT levels were below the quantification limit (<25 mg/dL. No S or Z mutation was identified, but sequencing analysis found a homozygous cytosine and adenine (CA insertion in exon 2 of the SERPINA-1 gene, probably leading to a dysfunctional protein (PI Null/Null. This mutation has not been previously identified. The atypical presentation of the patient, with severe cystic bronchiectasis, highlights AAT deficiency as a differential diagnosis in bronchiectasis. Further, awareness should be raised regarding a possible increased risk of thromboembolism associated with AAT deficiency. Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, bronchiectasis, SERPINA-1 mutation, pulmonary embolism

  9. Relationship between frequency, length, and treatment outcome of exacerbations to baseline lung function and lung density in alpha-1 antitrypsin-deficient COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayasaratha K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kesavaperumal Vijayasaratha,1 Robert A Stockley21Lung Investigation Unit, 2Research and Development, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Birmingham, UKBackground: Diary cards are useful for analyzing exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, although factors influencing the length and frequency of each episode are poorly understood. This study investigated factors that influence the features of exacerbations in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency (PiZ phenotype and COPD.Methods: Daily diary cards were collected over 2 years. Patients had emphysema visualized and quantified by computed tomography scan, and had at least one documented exacerbation in the previous year.Results: The patients (n = 23 had a mean age of 52.5 years, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 of 1.2 L (38.4% predicted, corrected gas transfer (KCO of 0.90 mmol/min/kPa/L (59.7% predicted, and 15th percentile lung density of 44.55 g/L. Two hundred and sixty-three exacerbations (164 treated were identified. The frequency of treated exacerbations correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.432; P = 0.022. Exacerbation length (determined for 17 of the patients for whom diary card data through the episode were available correlated negatively with baseline 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.361; P = 0.003, and increased the longer treatment was delayed (r = 0.503; P < 0.001. Treatment delay was shorter with higher day 1 symptom score, lower baseline FEV1, FEV1/forced vital capacity, and lower 15th percentile lung density (r = −0.368, 0.272, 0.461, and 0.786; P = 0.004, 0.036, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively. Time to resolution of exacerbation after treatment initiation was not affected by treatment delay, but correlated negatively with KCO% predicted (r = −0.647; P = 0.007.Conclusion: In alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, the frequency and length of resolution of exacerbation were related to baseline gas transfer. Treatment

  10. The role of proteases, endoplasmic reticulum stress and SERPINA1 heterozygosity in lung disease and alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2012-02-01

    The serine proteinase inhibitor alpha-1 anti-trypsin (AAT) provides an antiprotease protective screen throughout the body. Mutations in the AAT gene (SERPINA1) that lead to deficiency in AAT are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. The Z mutation encodes a misfolded variant of AAT that is not secreted effectively and accumulates intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells. Until recently, it was thought that loss of antiprotease function was the major cause of ZAAT-related lung disease. However, the contribution of gain-of-function effects is now being recognized. Here we describe how both loss- and gain-of-function effects can contribute to ZAAT-related lung disease. In addition, we explore how SERPINA1 heterozygosity could contribute to smoking-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and consider the consequences.

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of alpha-1 antitrypsin augmentation therapy on the loss of lung tissue: an integrated analysis of 2 randomised clinical trials using computed tomography densitometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolk Jan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have investigated the efficacy of IV alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT augmentation therapy on emphysema progression using CT densitometry. Methods Data from these similar trials, a 2-center Danish-Dutch study (n = 54 and the 3-center EXAcerbations and CT scan as Lung Endpoints (EXACTLE study (n = 65, were pooled to increase the statistical power. The change in 15th percentile of lung density (PD15 measured by CT scan was obtained from both trials. All subjects had 1 CT scan at baseline and at least 1 CT scan after treatment. Densitometric data from 119 patients (AAT [Alfalastin® or Prolastin®], n = 60; placebo, n = 59 were analysed by a statistical/endpoint analysis method. To adjust for lung volume, volume correction was made by including the change in log-transformed total lung volume as a covariate in the statistical model. Results Mean follow-up was approximately 2.5 years. The mean change in lung density from baseline to last CT scan was -4.082 g/L for AAT and -6.379 g/L for placebo with a treatment difference of 2.297 (95% CI, 0.669 to 3.926; p = 0.006. The corresponding annual declines were -1.73 and -2.74 g/L/yr, respectively. Conclusions The overall results of the combined analysis of 2 separate trials of comparable design, and the only 2 controlled clinical trials completed to date, has confirmed that IV AAT augmentation therapy significantly reduces the decline in lung density and may therefore reduce the future risk of mortality in patients with AAT deficiency-related emphysema. Trial registration The EXACTLE study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov as 'Antitrypsin (AAT to Treat Emphysema in AAT-Deficient Patients'; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00263887.

  12. Emergence of a Stage-Dependent Human Liver Disease Signature with Directed Differentiation of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin-Deficient iPS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Wilson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an inexhaustible source of cells for modeling disease and testing drugs. Here we develop a bioinformatic approach to detect differences between the genomic programs of iPSCs derived from diseased versus normal human cohorts as they emerge during in vitro directed differentiation. Using iPSCs generated from a cohort carrying mutations (PiZZ in the gene responsible for alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency, we find that the global transcriptomes of PiZZ iPSCs diverge from normal controls upon differentiation to hepatic cells. Expression of 135 genes distinguishes PiZZ iPSC-hepatic cells, providing potential clues to liver disease pathogenesis. The disease-specific cells display intracellular accumulation of mutant AAT protein, resulting in increased autophagic flux. Furthermore, we detect beneficial responses to the drug carbamazepine, which further augments autophagic flux, but adverse responses to known hepatotoxic drugs. Our findings support the utility of iPSCs as tools for drug development or prediction of toxicity.

  13. Validation and development of an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in dried blood spots from patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Russo Zillmer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To validate and develop an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT levels in dried blood spots from COPD patients in Brazil. METHODS: We determined AAT levels in serum samples and dried blood spots from 192 COPD patients. For the preparation of dried blood spots, a disk (diameter, 6 mm was placed into a tube, eluted with 200 µL of PBS, and stored overnight at 4ºC. All of the samples were analyzed by immunonephelometry in duplicate. We used the bootstrap resampling method in order to determine a cut-off point for AAT levels in dried blood spots. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient between the AAT levels in serum samples and those in dried blood spots was r = 0.45. For dried blood spots, the cut-off value was 2.02 mg/dL (97% CI: 1.45-2.64 mg/dL, with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 95.7%, 27.2%, and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This method for the determination of AAT levels in dried blood spots appears to be a reliable screening tool for patients with AAT deficiency.

  14. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  15. Inhibitory effect of a mixture containing vitamin C, lysine, proline, epigallocatechin gallate, zinc and alpha-1-antitrypsin on lung carcinogenesis induced by benzo(a pyrene in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohamed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was aimed to evaluate protective and therapeutic effects of a specific mixture, containing vitamin C, lysine, proline, epigallocatechin gallate and zinc, as well as alpha-1-antitrypsin protein on lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a pyrene [B(aP] in mice. Materials and Methods: Swiss albino mice were divided into two main experiments, experiment (1 the mice were injected with 100 mg/kg B(aP and lasted for 28 weeks, while experiment (2 the mice were injected with 8 doses each of 50 mg/kg B(aP and lasted for 16 weeks. Each experiment (1 and 2 divided into five groups, group (I received vehicle, group (II received the protector mixture, group (III received the carcinogen B(aP, group (IV received the protector together with the carcinogen (simultaneously and group (V received the carcinogen then the protector (consecutively. Results: Total sialic acid, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, vascular epithelial growth factor, hydroxyproline levels, as well as elastase and gelatinase activities showed significant elevation in group (III in the two experiments comparing to control group (P < 0.001. These biochemical alterations were associated with histopathological changes. Administration of the protector in group IV and group V causes significant decrease in such parameters with improvement in histopathological alterations with improvement in histopathological alterations when compared with group III in the two experiments (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The present protector mixture has the ability to suppress neoplastic alteration and restore the biochemical and histopathological parameters towards normal on lung carcinogenesis induced by benzo(a pyrene in mice. Furthermore, the present mixture have more protective rather than therapeutic action.

  16. Polymorphisms in the HPC/ELAC-2 and alpha 1-antitrypsin genes that correlate with human diseases in a North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobti, Ranbir C; Thakur, Hitender; Gupta, Lipsy; Janmeja, Ashok K; Seth, Amlesh; Singh, Sharwan K

    2011-06-01

    Two genes HPC/ELAC-2 and AAT were studied in north Indian population. HPC/ELAC-2 was studied in prostate cancer cases and AAT was studied in COPD patients. HPC/ELAC-2 is considered as an important cancer-susceptibility gene in prostate cancer. There are two common polymorphisms of this gene, i.e., Ser217Leu and Ala541Thr. Alpha 1 antitrypsin is a highly polymorphic anti-elastase enzyme, especially active in the protection of alveoli and liver. In the present study, we observed the distribution of two deficient alleles PiZ and Pi S in COPD patients. We extracted the DNA from 157 prostate cancer cases, 200 COPD patients, 170 BPH and 370 healthy controls. The polymorphisms were studied by PCR-RFLP technique. The mutant genotype (Leu/Leu) of HPC/ELAC-2 was present in 9.6, 7.6 and 5.9% of BPH, cancer cases and healthy controls, respectively. Higher risk of Ser/Leu as well as Leu/Leu had shown when compared to healthy controls. That was about 1.5 and 1.7-fold (OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 0.96-2.51; OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 0.74-3.92), respectively. Risk was found to be increased in smokers and those consuming non-vegetarian diet. Our results suggest that the HPC/ELAC-2 polymorphisms, especially in localized cases, could help to predict prostate cancer risk and confirm its high prevalence of the leu/leu allele in north Indian population. Considering heterozygous PiZ genotype, we obtained an OR of 3.82 (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis adjusted by age sex and drinking habit showed 4.15-fold increased risk for COPD in PiZ heterozygous individuals. No increased risk was observed in the individuals carrying PiS alleles. PMID:20119870

  17. Altered glycosylation, expression of serum haptoglobin and alpha-1-antitrypsin in chronic hepatitis C, hepatitis C induced liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Gautam; Saroha, Ashish; Bose, Partha Pratim; Chatterjee, B P

    2016-04-01

    Liver cirrhosis with hepatitis C viral infection (HCV-LC) causes high risk to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Besides diagnosis of liver cirrhosis by biochemical test, imaging techniques, assessment of structural liver damage by biopsy shows several disadvantages. Our aim was to monitor the changes in the expression level of serum proteins and their glycosylation pattern among chronic hepatitis C (HCV-CH), HCV-LC and HCC patients with respect to controls. 2D gel electrophoresis of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC patients' sera showed several protein spots, which were identified by LC-MS. The change in the expression of two prominent protein spots, haptoglobin (Hp) and alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) was evaluated by western blot and ELISA. The changes in glycosylation pattern of these serum proteins were assayed using different lectins. Increased level of Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group whereas those were found to be present less in HCV-CH patient groups with respect to control as determined by ELISA using monoclonal antibodies. Decreased level of sialylation in both Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCV-CH patients' group whereas increased level of sialylation was observed in HCC patient groups by ELISA using Sambucus nigra agglutinin. On the other hand increased level of fucosylation in two serum glycoproteins was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group using Lens culinarris agglutinin. High glycan branching was found in HCV-LC and HCC patient groups in Hp but not in HCV-CH as determined by Datura stramonium agglutinin. However, there was no such change observed in glycan branching in AAT of HCV-CH and HCV-LC patients' groups, to the contrary high glycan branching was observed in HCC patients' group. Increased level of exposed galactose in both serum proteins was observed in both HCC patients' group as determined by Ricinus communis agglutinin. The present glycoproteomics study could predict the progression of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC

  18. Diagnóstico tardío de déficit de α-1-antitripsina Delayed diagnosis of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rodríguez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El déficit de alfa-1 antitripsina (D-AAT es una enfermedad genética, relativamente frecuente en poblaciones de origen europeo. Frecuentemente está infradiagnosticada, con largos retrasos entre el inicio de los síntomas respiratorios y el diagnóstico definitivo. El D-AAT puede diagnosticarse con la determinación de los niveles séricos de esta proteína, y, cuando están por debajo del rango normal debe ser confirmado con el fenotipo. El seguimiento correcto de la progresión de la enfermedad debe realizarse en todos los casos, ya que se asocia con mejor pronóstico. Presentamos el caso de una mujer de 69 años, con infecciones respiratorias de repetición y sintomatología asmática. Los niveles de AAT estaban por debajo de la normalidad, confirmándose posteriormente el fenotipo ZZ. El retraso diagnóstico de nuestra paciente parece reforzar la necesidad de alertar a los médicos sobre esta enfermedad, frecuentemente asociada con síntomas de asma o EPOC.Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AAT-D is a genetic disease, relatively common in populations of European ancestry. AAT-D remains undiagnosed in many patients, and there are often long delays between the onset of respiratory symptoms and diagnosis. AAT-D can be readily diagnosed by measurement of the serum or plasma protein level, which should be confirmed by assessing the genotype or protein phenotype when AAT levels are below the normal range. Close monitoring for the development or progression of lung disease or liver disease is required, and can improve the prognosis. We show the case of a 69 year old woman with recurrent respiratory infections and asthma symptoms. The serum levels of AAT were below the normal range, and ZZ genotype was confirmed. The delayed diagnosis of our patient seems to emphasize the need to remind the doctors about AAT-D, frequently associated with asthma or COPD symptoms.

  19. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency PI*Z and PI*S Gene Frequency Distribution Using on Maps of the World by an Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) Multivariate Interpolation Method

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Ignacio; de Serres, Frederick J; Cárcaba, Victoriano; Lara, Beatríz; Fernández-Bustillo, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    1.Background Currently, there is a remarkable lack of genetic epidemiological studies on alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency in about half of the 193 countries of the World. This fact impedes the establishment of a true prevalence pattern of this deleterious hereditary disorder in extensive regions of human population. 2.Objectives The aim of the present study was to generate detailed maps of the frequency distribution of the two most frequent AAT deficiency alleles (i.e., PI*S and PI*Z) in ...

  20. Therapy with Plasma Purified Alpha1-Antitrypsin (Prolastin®) Induces Time-Dependent Changes in Plasma Levels of MMP-9 and MPO

    OpenAIRE

    Koepke, Janine; Dresel, Marc; Schmid, Severin; Greulich, Timm; Beutel, Björn; Schmeck, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus Franz; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert

    2015-01-01

    The common Z mutation (Glu342Lys) of α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) results in the polymerization and intracellular retention of A1AT protein. The concomitant deficiency of functional A1AT predisposes PiZZ subjects to early onset emphysema. Clinical studies have implied that, among the biomarkers associated with emphysema, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) is of particular importance. Increased plasma MMP-9 levels are proposed to predict the decline of lung function as well as greater COPD exacerbati...

  1. Two novel nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction-based assays of dried blood spots, genomic DNA, or whole cells for fast, reliable detection of Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Knudsen, I; Jensen, P K;

    1992-01-01

    Two new nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays for the Z and S mutations in the alpha 1-antitrypsin gene are presented. The assays take advantage of PCR-mediated mutagenesis, creating new diagnostic restriction enzyme sites for unambiguous discrimination between test samples...... from individuals who are normal, heterozygous, or homozygous for the mutations. We show that the two assays can be performed with purified genomic DNA as well as with boiled blood spots. The new assays were validated by parallel testing with a technique in which PCR is combined with allele......-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) probes. In all cases tested the results obtained by the different techniques were in accordance. The new assays can be used for prenatal diagnostics and can be performed directly with boiled tissue samples. Because the new assays are easy to perform and reliable, we conclude that they are...

  2. Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins in end-stage COPD lungs with and without severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koczulla A-Rembert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. An important fraction of COPD cases harbor a major genetic determinant, inherited ZZ (Glu342Lys α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD. A study was undertaken to investigate gene expression patterns in end-stage COPD lungs from patients with and without AATD. Methods Explanted lungs of end-stage ZZ AATD-related (treated and non-treated with AAT augmentation therapy and “normal” MM COPD, and liver biopsies from patients suffering from liver cirrhosis with and without ZZ AATD were used for gene expression analysis by Affymetrix microarrays or RT-PCR. Results A total of 162 genes were found to be differentially expressed (p-value ≤ 0.05 and |FC| ≥ 2 between MM and ZZ COPD patients. Of those, 134 gene sets were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated in ZZ relative to MM lung tissue. A subgroup of genes, zinc finger protein 165, snail homolog 1 (Drosophila (SNAI1, and Krüppel-like transcription factors (KLFs 4 (gut, 9 and 10, perfectly segregated ZZ and MM COPD patients. The higher expression of KLF 9 and KLF10 has been verified in the replication cohort with AATD-related end-stage lung emphysema and liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, higher expression of KLF9, SNAI1 and DEFA1 was found in ZZ COPD lungs without augmentation therapy relative to MM COPD or ZZ COPD with augmentation therapy. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of transcriptional regulators of the zinc-finger family in COPD pathogenesis and provide deeper insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of COPD with and without AATD.

  3. Therapy with plasma purified alpha1-antitrypsin (Prolastin® induces time-dependent changes in plasma levels of MMP-9 and MPO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Koepke

    Full Text Available The common Z mutation (Glu342Lys of α1-antitrypsin (A1AT results in the polymerization and intracellular retention of A1AT protein. The concomitant deficiency of functional A1AT predisposes PiZZ subjects to early onset emphysema. Clinical studies have implied that, among the biomarkers associated with emphysema, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 is of particular importance. Increased plasma MMP-9 levels are proposed to predict the decline of lung function as well as greater COPD exacerbations in A1AT deficiency-associated emphysema. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of A1AT therapy (Prolastin on plasma MMP-9 and myeloperoxidase (MPO levels. In total 34 PiZZ emphysema patients were recruited: 12 patients without and 22 with weekly intravenous (60 mg/kg body weight A1AT therapy. The quantitative analysis of A1AT, MMP-9 and MPO was performed in serum and in supernatants of blood neutrophils isolated from patients before and after therapy. Patients with Prolastin therapy showed significantly lower serum MMP-9 and MPO levels than those without therapy. However, parallel analysis revealed that a rapid infusion of Prolastin is accompanied by a transient elevation of plasma MMP-9 and MPO levels. Experiments with freshly isolated blood neutrophils confirmed that therapy with Prolastin causes transient MMP-9 and MPO release. Prolastin induced the rapid release of MMP-9 and MPO when added directly to neutrophil cultures and this reaction was associated with the presence of IgA in A1AT preparation. Our data support the conclusion that changes in plasma levels of MMP-9 and MPO mirror the effect of Prolastin on blood neutrophils.

  4. Plasma levels of alpha1-antichymotrypsin and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD subjects with and without severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveger Tomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with severe Z α1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency have a considerably increased risk of developing chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD. It has been hypothesized that compensatory increases in levels of other protease inhibitors mitigate the effects of this AAT deficiency. We analysed plasma levels of AAT, α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI in healthy (asymptomatic and COPD subjects with and without AAT deficiency. Methods Studied groups included: 71 asymptomatic AAT-deficient subjects (ZZ, n = 48 and SZ, n = 23, age 31 ± 0.5 identified during Swedish neonatal screening for AAT deficiency between 1972 and 1974; age-matched controls (MM, n = 57, age 30.7 ± 0.6; older asymptomatic ZZ (n = 10; healthy MM (n = 20, age 53 ± 9.6; and COPD patients (ZZ, n = 10, age 47.4 ± 11 and MM, n = 10, age 59.4 ± 6.7. Plasma levels of SLPI, AAT and ACT were analysed using ELISA and immunoelectrophoresis. Results No significant difference was found in plasma ACT and SLPI levels between the healthy MM and the ZZ or SZ subjects in the studied groups. Independent of the genetic variant, subjects with COPD (n = 19 had elevated plasma levels of SLPI and ACT relative to controls (n = 153 (49.5 ± 7.2 vs 40.7 ± 9.1 ng/ml, p Conclusion Our findings show that plasma levels of ACT and SLPI are not elevated in subjects with genetic AAT deficiency compared MM controls and do not appear to compensate for the deficiency of plasma AAT.

  5. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He) Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavngaard, T.; Vejby Soegaard, L. (Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre (Denmark)); Batz, M. (Inst. of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)); Schreiber, L.M. (Dept. of Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Medical School, Mainz (Germany)); Dirksen, A. (Dept. of Respiratory Medicine, Gentofte Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2009-11-15

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P<0.001). Conclusion: This pilot study indicates the possible use of nonionizing HP 3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  6. Progression of Emphysema Evaluated by MRI Using Hyperpolarized 3He (HP 3He Measurements in Patients with Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency Compared with CT and Lung Function Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The progression of emphysema is traditionally measured by pulmonary function test, with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) being the most accepted and used measurement. However, FEV1 is insensitive in detecting mild/slow progression of emphysema because of low reproducibility as compared to yearly decline. Purpose: To investigate the progression of emphysema over a period of 2 years using diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (HP) 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency. Material and Methods: Nine patients with severe A1AT deficiency were studied over a period of 2 years (baseline, year 1, and year 2) with HP 3He MRI using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), lung function tests (FEV1 and carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity [DL,CO]), and computed tomography (CT) using densitometric parameters (15th percentile density [CT-PD15] and relative area of emphysema below -910 HU [CT-RA-910]). Results: Seven patients were scanned three times, one patient two times, and one patient only at baseline. The mean increase in ADC values from first to last HP 3He MR scanning was 3.8% (0.014 cm2/s [SD 0.024 cm2/s]; not significant). The time trends for FEV1, DL,CO, CT-PD15, and CT-RA-910 were all statistically significant. We found a high correlation between ADC and DL,CO (P3He MRI for monitoring the progression of emphysema. However, in the future, larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results

  7. Evaluación del efecto de la ingesta de una alta carga de ácidos grasos saturados sobre los niveles séricos de la proteína C reactiva, alfa1-antitripsina, fibrinógeno y alfa1-glicoproteína ácida en mujeres obesas Effect of a high saturated fatty acids load on serum concentrations of C-reactive protein, alpha1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen and alpha1-acid glycoprotein in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª M. Ramírez Alvarado

    2010-02-01

    en mujeres obesas. Los niveles séricos de PCR y fibrinógeno están incrementados en mujeres obesas y se correlacionan positivamente con el IMC.Obesity is associated with increased inflammation. Creactive protein (CRP and inflammation-sensitive plasma protein (ISPs are inflammatory markers. Proinflammatory process may be influenced by high saturated fatty acid intake. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of saturated fatty acids load on postprandial circulating levels of PCR and ISPs (alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen in obese women. Design: A total of 15 obese women (age = 31,7 ± 4,5 years, BMI = 37,9 ± 7,3 kg/m² and 15 lean controls women (age = 30,6 ± 4,6 years, BMI = 20,6 ± 2,6 kg/m² were recruited for this study. After and overnight fast subjects ate the fat load consisted of 75 g of fat (100% saturated fatty acid, 0% cholesterol, 5 g of carbohydrates, and 6 g of protein per m2 body surface area. Postprandial serum levels of CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen were measured. Anthropometry and blood biochemical parameters were measured in both groups. Results: The obese women had fasting serum PCR levels higher (p = 0,013 and fibrinogen (p = 0,04 than those of control women. Serum CRP and fibrinogen levels was positively related to body mass index (BMI in obese group. There weren't differences in fasting serum alpha1- antitrypsin levels (p = 0,40, and alpha1-acid glucoprotein (p = 0,28 levels in obese group in comparison to lean control group. Serum CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen did not change postprandially (p = > 0,05 difference to fasting levels. Conclusion: A high-saturated fatty acids load is not associated with serum CRP, alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-acid glucoprotein, and fibrinogen levels increase. Serum alpha1-antitripsin and alpha1-acid glucoprotein levels are not increased in obese women. Serum PCR and fibrinogen levels are

  8. Living with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include flower and tree pollen, ash, allergens, air pollution, wood burning stoves, paint fumes, and fumes from ... protein foods, such as lean meats, poultry without skin, seafood, processed soy products, nuts, seeds, beans, and ...

  9. Augmentation therapy for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockley, Robert A; Miravitlles, Marc; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2013-01-01

    combination of age, physiological impairment, exacerbation history and rate of decline in spirometry and other measures of emphysema may be used to improve therapeutic decision making, until a reliable predictive biomarker of the evolution of lung impairment can be identified. In addition, individual...

  10. Learning about Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (AATD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Genetics Coverage & Reimbursement of Genetic Tests Genetic Discrimination Human Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research ... symptoms can include repeated respiratory infections, fatigue, rapid heartbeat upon standing, vision problems and unintentional weight loss. ...

  11. Role of α-1-antitrypsin and oxidative stress in emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M Raut, Suryakar AN, Smita D Mhaisekar, Dilip Mhaisekar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the lungs, deficiency of alpha-1antitrypsin can lead to the development of emphysema. Emphysema involves destruction of the lung’s air sacs (alveoli, where oxygen from the air is exchanged for carbon dioxide in the blood. Alpha 1-antitrypsin is a protein produced by the liver and that circulates in the blood. Among other functions, the protein protects the lungs so they can function properly. In people with the disorder, the liver produces too little or no alpha 1 -antitrypsin. Without enough alpha-1 antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase is free to destroy air sac tissue. 60 emphysema patients were included in the study. 100 healthy non-smokers’ were served as controls. Their baseline clinical examination, Alpha 1- antitrysin (AAT, malondialdehyde (MDA and vitamin E were measured. The mean levels of Alpha 1 antitrysin and vitamin E in the patients at baseline were lower (P< 0.001 than the controls. The malondialdehyde were high (P<0.001 in the emphysema patients compared to controls. We found decreased levels of Alpha 1- antitrysin and vitamin E and increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA. Thus the present study confirmed the existence of oxidative stress and altered levels of alpha 1- antitrypsin in emphysema patients.

  12. Astute, Assertive, and Alpha-1: Quantifying Empowerment in a Rare Genetic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Symma

    2008-01-01

    We investigated empowerment in the Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) community, a rare, genetic disease network in the United States. The research was motivated by nine years of observations in the community. After observing what seemed to be a heightened amount of activism among Alpha-1 community members, I had hypothesized that this…

  13. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliane Guerra Serra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes incluídos no estudo (44 mulheres; idade média, 51,3 ± 18,2 anos, os alelos S e Z foram detectados em 33,3% e 5,7%, respectivamente, com freqüência gênica dos alelos S e Z de 0,16 e 0,028. Dois pacientes tinham genótipo SZ (AAT 141 mg/dL (normal, Grupo 2, n = 57. A freqüência de fumantes foi igual nos dois grupos, com carga tabágica maior no Grupo 2. O alelo S estava presente em 13 e 14 pacientes dos Grupos 1 e 2, respectivamente, enquanto que o alelo Z estava presente em 2 e 1 paciente dos mesmos grupos. Não houve diferença nos testes de função pulmonar, nem na freqüência de bronquiectasias ou enfisema entre os dois grupos. Os valores espirométricos e as concentrações de AAT foram similares entre fumantes e não-fumantes. Bronquiectasias foram mais freqüentes entre os não fumantes, e enfisema foi mais freqüente entre os fumantes. CONCLUSÕES: Trinta pacientes apresentaram níveis de AAT abaixo da média esperada para os genótipos MM e MS, e este fato não pode ser explicado por uma freqüência maior dos alelos S e Z.OBJECTIVE: To determine the levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT and the presence of S and Z alleles in patients with chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: Patients with chronic cough and dyspnea were submitted to clinical evaluation, pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography, nephelometric determination of AAT and determination of S and Z alleles by polymerase chain reaction. Smoking

  14. Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry. The REPAIR study: study design, methodology and quality control of study assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Jan; Cooper, Brendan G; Stoel, Berend; Rames, Alexis; Rutman, Olga; Soliman, Sherif; Stockley, Robert

    2010-12-01

    Emphysema is characterized by the destruction of alveolar wall and enlargement of alveolar airspaces, resulting in a reduction of the total lung gas exchange area, loss of lung elastic recoil and hyperinflation. The REPAIR study (Retinoid treatment of Emphysema in Patients on the Alpha-1 International Registry) is the first proof-of-concept study of a new potential disease-modifying drug, Palovarotene©, an orally active, gamma selective retinoid agonist in patients with emphysema secondary to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) as a model population for the general smoke-induced emphysema population. This article describes the study design as well as the effectiveness of the quality control that was implemented on the key efficacy endpoints, based on data derived from the placebo-treated subjects. In this multicentre, multinational study the implementation of standardized procedures included: careful site selection, use of trained staff, regular monitoring and machine calibration, use of biological controls and regular feedback to sites by an independent quality control centre. All of these procedures resulted in high-quality measurements of lung density, spirometry, static lung volumes and gas transfer. It was also confirmed that CT lung density was the most sensitive endpoint followed by TLco, FEV(1) and RV measured by body box. PMID:20926506

  15. Screening for Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency in Tunisian subjects with obstructive lung disease: a feasibility report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibani Jemni

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AATD is one of the most common inherited disorders in the World. However, it is generally accepted that AATD in North African populations is not a risk factor for lung and/or liver disease, based on a number of small studies. We therefore planned a screening study for detection of AATD in patients with OLD in a cohort of patients from Kairouan in central Tunisia. Methods: One hundred twenty patients with OLD (asthma, emphysema, COPD were enrolled in the screening programme. Laboratory diagnosis for AATD was performed according to current diagnostic standards. Results We found that 6/120 OLD patients carried an AAT deficient allele, 1 PI*MZ, 1 PI*MPlowel, 3 PI*MMmalton, 1 PI*MMwurzburg. Conclusion this pilot study demonstrated that alleles related to deficiency of AAT are not absent in the Tunisian population, and that rare AATD variants prevailed over commonest PI*Z variant. These results would support a larger scale screening for AATD in Tunisia.

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  17. Deficiency of α-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghio AJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew J Ghio,1 Joleen M Soukup,1 Judy H Richards,1 Bernard M Fischer,2 Judith A Voynow,2 Donald E Schmechel31US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics,3Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Medicine (Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: There is evidence that proteases and antiproteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that α-1 antitrypsin (A1AT polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this antiprotease in humans are associated with a systemic disruption in iron homeostasis. Archived plasma samples from Alpha-1 Foundation (30 MM, 30 MZ, and 30 ZZ individuals were analyzed for A1AT, ferritin, transferrin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Plasma samples were also assayed for metals using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES. Plasma levels of A1AT in MZ and ZZ individuals were approximately 60% and 20% of those for MM individuals respectively. Plasma ferritin concentrations in those with the ZZ genotype were greater relative to those individuals with either MM or MZ genotype. Plasma transferrin for MM, MZ, and ZZ genotypes showed no significant differences. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant (negative relationship between plasma concentrations of A1AT and ferritin while that between A1AT and transferrin levels was not significant. Plasma CRP concentrations were not significantly different between MM, MZ, and ZZ individuals. ICPAES measurement of metals confirmed elevated plasma concentrations of nonheme iron among ZZ individuals. Nonheme iron concentrations correlated (negatively with levels of A1AT. A1AT deficiency is associated with evidence of a disruption in iron homeostasis with plasma ferritin and nonheme iron concentrations being elevated among those with the ZZ genotype.Keywords: α-1

  18. Targeted screening programmes in COPD: how to identify individuals with α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Chorostowska-Wynimko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD is a significantly under-recognised autosomal genetic disorder with <10% of affected individuals being clinically diagnosed. Moreover, rigorous genetic epidemiological data regarding AATD are lacking. The majority of findings come from the USA and Western Europe, and no information is available for many countries. To address this concern, an α1-antitrypsin (AAT laboratory was set up in 2009 at the National Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (Warsaw, Poland. In 2010, an AATD screening programme targeting patients with respiratory disorders was initiated in Poland. This targeted survey has provided valuable information regarding AAT-deficient genotypes, clinical disease and levels of expertise at the physician level. After 4 years, almost 2500 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorders have been screened and, in this cohort, ∼13% had AATD alleles. In these patients, the detection frequency for S and Z alleles was four times greater, and the frequency of homozygous PI*ZZ was 16 times greater than that of the general population. These results highlight the need to build awareness in the medical community, and the project is currently being extended to cover central Eastern Europe, with the creation of the Central Eastern European Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Network.

  19. Exploring the role of CT densitometry: a randomised study of augmentation therapy in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Piitulainen, E; Parr, D G;

    2009-01-01

    than other measures of emphysema progression, and the changes in CT and forced expiratory volume in 1 s were correlated. All methods of densitometric analysis concordantly showed a trend suggestive of treatment benefit (p-values for Prolastin versus placebo ranged 0.049-0.084). Exacerbation frequency......Assessment of emphysema-modifying therapy is difficult, but newer outcome measures offer advantages over traditional methods. The EXAcerbations and Computed Tomography scan as Lung End-points (EXACTLE) trial explored the use of computed tomography (CT) densitometry and exacerbations for the......-point was change in CT lung density, and an exploratory approach was adopted to identify optimal methodology, including two methods of adjustment for lung volume variability and two statistical approaches. Other end-points were exacerbations, health status and physiological indices. CT was more sensitive...

  20. Reactivity of alpha 1-antitrypsin mutants against proteolytic enzymes of the kallikrein-kinin, complement, and fibrinolytic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patston, P.A.; Roodi, N.; Schifferli, J.A.; Bischoff, Rainer; Courtney, M.; Schapira, M.

    1990-01-01

    Increased extracellular proteolysis because of unregulated activation of blood coagulation, complement, and fibrinolysis is observed in thrombosis, shock, and inflammation. In the present study, we have examined whether the plasma kallikrein-kinin system, the classical pathway of complement, and the

  1. Rosuvastatin Alters the Proteome of High Density Lipoproteins: Generation of alpha-1-antitrypsin Enriched Particles with Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Scott M; McKenzie, Benjamin; Kemeh, Georgina; Sampson, Maureen; Perl, Shira; Young, Neal S; Fessler, Michael B; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-12-01

    Statins lower plasma cholesterol by as much as 50%, thus reducing future cardiovascular events. However, the physiological effects of statins are diverse and not all are related to low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering. We performed a small clinical pilot study to assess the impact of statins on lipoprotein-associated proteins in healthy individuals (n = 10) with normal LDL-C (J774 macrophages, demonstrated that the association of A1AT with HDL enhances its antiprotease activity, preventing elastase induced production of tumor necrosis factor α. In conclusion, we show that statins can significantly alter the protein composition of both LDL and HDL and our studies reveal a novel functional relationship between A1AT and HDL. The up-regulation of A1AT on HDL enhances its anti-inflammatory functionality, which may contribute to the non-lipid lowering beneficial effects of statins. PMID:26483418

  2. Deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina: diagnóstico e tratamento Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Aquiles A Camelier; Daniel Hugo Winter; José Roberto Jardim; Carlos Eduardo Galvão Barboza; Alberto Cukier; Marc Miravitlles

    2008-01-01

    A deficiência de alfa-1 antitripsina é um distúrbio genético de descoberta recente e que ocorre com freqüência comparável à da fibrose cística. Resulta de diferentes mutações no gene SERPINA1 e tem diversas implicações clínicas. A alfa-1 antitripsina é produzida principalmente no fígado e atua como uma antiprotease. Tem como principal função inativar a elastase neutrofílica, impedindo a ocorrência de dano tecidual. A mutação mais freqüentemente relacionada à doença clínica é o alelo Z, que de...

  3. Alpha-1 antitrypsin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as serum biomarkers of disease severity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Kvist, Peter Helding; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten

    2015-01-01

    (Mayo score) and from 40 healthy controls were analyzed by multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for 78 potential disease biomarkers. Using the statistical software SIMCA-P+ and GraphPad Prism, multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to identify a limited number of biomarkers to assess...

  4. Causal and Synthetic Associations of Variants in the SERPINA Gene Cluster with Alpha1-antitrypsin Serum Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thun, Gian Andri; Imboden, Medea; Ferrarotti, Ilaria;

    2013-01-01

    estimated effect of β = -0.068 g/L per minor allele (P = 1.20*10(-12)). But denser SERPINA1 locus genotyping in 5569 participants with subsequent stepwise conditional analysis, as well as exon-sequencing in a subsample (N = 410), suggested that AAT serum level is causally determined at this locus by rare...... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of more common SERPINA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in respiratory health remains poorly understood. We present here an agnostic investigation of genetic determinants of circulating AAT levels in a general population sample by performing a...

  5. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    OpenAIRE

    R Croft Thomas; Cowley, Patrick M.; Abhishek Singh; Bat-Erdene Myagmar; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mR...

  6. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Croft Thomas

    Full Text Available The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse.

  7. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  8. [Place of genotyping in addition to the phenotype and the assay of serum α-1 antitrypsin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Philippe; Francina, Alain; Lacan, Philippe; Heraut, Jessica; Chapuis-Cellier, Colette

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is based on isoelectric focusing of serum proteins and the extent of serum. However, the focusing is technically difficult and a greatly reduced concentration in abnormal A1AT tapeless does not differentiate an unstable variant of a variant called 'null' (that is to say without any phenotypic expression) to 'heterozygous' state. In this study, we compared the results of the assay, the phenotype and genotype of A1AT in 50 patients. Normal A1AT alleles (Pi*M1 to Pi*M4) or loss of the most common (Pi*S and Pi*Z) were clearly identified in phenotyping. However, genotyping was necessary to characterize: (i) certain alleles rarer A1AT (S-Munich, X-Christchurch); (ii) a null allele and; (iii) two new alleles A1AT not yet described in the literature. In conclusion, although the A1AT genotyping is generally not necessary, it is necessary to resolve complex cases and to obtain witnesses validated for isoelectric focusing. PMID:22008137

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 predicts pulmonary status declines in α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rames Alexis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 may be important in the progression of emphysema, but there have been few longitudinal clinical studies of MMP-9 including pulmonary status and COPD exacerbation outcomes. Methods We utilized data from the placebo arm (n = 126 of a clinical trial of patients with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD and emphysema to examine the links between plasma MMP-9 levels, pulmonary status, and COPD exacerbations over a one year observation period. Pulmonary function, computed tomography lung density, incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT, and COPD exacerbations were assessed at regular intervals over 12 months. Prospective analyses used generalized estimating equations to incorporate repeated longitudinal measurements of MMP-9 and all endpoints, controlling for age, gender, race-ethnicity, leukocyte count, and tobacco history. A secondary analysis also incorporated highly-sensitive C-reactive protein levels in predictive models. Results At baseline, higher plasma MMP-9 levels were cross-sectionally associated with lower FEV1 (p = 0.03, FVC (p Conclusions Increased plasma MMP-9 levels generally predicted pulmonary status declines, including worsening transfer factor and lung density as well as greater COPD exacerbations in AATD-associated emphysema.

  10. Effect of alpha1-blockers on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the clinical efficiency of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones. Materials and Methods From January 2007 to January 2013, 84 patients who have uncomplicated lower ureteral stones treated by ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups, group A (44 patients received indwelled double-J stents and group B (40 patients were treated by alpha1-adrenergic antagonists without stents. All cases of group B were treated with alpha1 blocker for 1 week. Results The mean operative time of group A was significantly longer than group B. The incidences of hematuria, flank/abdominal pain, frequency/urgency after surgery were statistically different between both groups. The stone-free rate of each group was 100%. Conclusions The effect of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists is more significant than indwelling stent after ureteroscopic lithotripsy in treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones.

  11. alpha 1-Adrenoceptors modulate citalopram-induced serotonin release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, Kieran; Folgering, Joost; Westerink, Ben H. C.; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that noradrenaline may regulate serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmission at the serotonin cell body and noradrenaline nerve terminal. Using microdialysis coupled to HPLC, we investigated the effects of alpha 1-adrenoceptor manipulation on extracellular serotonin levels in the v

  12. Alpha-1-antitripsin deficiency: the need of a new diagnostic algorithm for improving the diagnostic ability of perinatologists and pediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavino Faa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Caution should be taken in considering immunoelectrofocusing (IEF as the best method for the diagnosis of alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT deficiency, particularly in some population, including Sardinians, in which a M-like variant represents the most frequent pathological A1AT variant. Regarding the future, my opinion is that the algorithm generally suggested for reaching a proper diagnosis of this disease should be completely changed. The cut-off of the A1AT serum values should be reconsidered, not to avoid the diagnosis of a number of heterozygous subjects who may be affected by liver and/or lung disease. Given that the two A1AT alleles are co-dominant, and since A1AT is a phase acute protein, in all heterozygous PiMZ or PiM/M-Cagliari subjects carrying an inflammation, the M allele is induced to produce high quantities of A1AT, whose serum levels may reach normal values. In these cases, PCR serum levels should be evaluated and, when increased, the diagnosis of A1AT deficiency should not be excluded even in the presence of serum A1AT levels within the normal range. Gene sequencing should be included, on the basis of our experience, in all neonates and pediatric patients with liver or lung disease of unknown origin, including asthma, avoiding IEF. Finally, for a screening in the perinatal period, I suggest the accurate examination of the electrophoresis of serum proteins. With a similar new approach, I think that we will transform A1AT deficiency from a rare disease into a previously rarely diagnosed disease, changing completely the epidemiology of this complex and fascinating metabolic disease.

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors of rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoaffinity probe [125I]aryl azidoprazosin was used to examine structural aspects of rat left ventricular alpha 1-adrenergic receptor. Autoradiography of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-resolved proteins from photoaffinity-labeled membranes revealed a specifically labeled protein of mass 77 kDa. Adrenergic drugs competed with the photoaffinity probe for binding to the receptor. Because the autoradiographic pattern was unaltered by incubating labeled membranes in gel sample buffer containing high concentrations of reducing agents, the binding component of the cardiac alpha 1-adrenergic receptor appears to be a single polypeptide chain. The photoaffinity probe specifically labeled a single protein of approximately 68 kDa in membranes of cardiac myocytes prepared from rat left ventricles. The role played by sulfhydryls in receptor structure and function was also studied. Dithiothreitol (DTT) inhibited [3H]prazosin binding to left ventricular membranes and altered both the equilibrium dissociation constant and maximal number of [3H]prazosin-binding sites but not the ability of the guanine nucleotide guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate to decrease agonist affinity for the receptors. When photoaffinity-labeled membranes were incubated with 40 mM DTT for 30 min at room temperature, two specifically labeled proteins of 77 and 68 kDa were identified. The DTT-induced conversion of the 77-kDa protein to 68 kDa was irreversible with washing, but the effect of DTT on [3H]prazosin binding was reversible. Both 77- and 68-kDa proteins were observed with liver membranes even in the absence of reducing agent. The DTT-induced conversion of the 77-kDa protein to 68 kDa is due to enhancement in protease activity by the reductant. Results document that the cardiac alpha 1-adrenergic receptor is a 77-kDa protein, similar in mass to the receptor in liver and other sites

  14. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency • 3: Clinical manifestations and natural history

    OpenAIRE

    Needham, M; Stockley, R

    2004-01-01

    A review of the clinical manifestations of α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, including lung disease and liver disease, and risk factors affecting the rate of decline in lung function in AAT deficient patients.

  15. Potential relevance of alpha(1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in refractory hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Wenzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agonistic autoantibodies directed at the alpha(1-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1-AAB have been described in patients with hypertension. We implied earlier that alpha(1-AAB might have a mechanistic role and could represent a therapeutic target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To pursue the issue, we performed clinical and basic studies. We observed that 41 of 81 patients with refractory hypertension had alpha(1-AAB; after immunoadsorption blood pressure was significantly reduced in these patients. Rabbits were immunized to generate alpha(1-adrenergic receptor antibodies (alpha(1-AB. Patient alpha(1-AAB and rabbit alpha(1-AB were purified using affinity chromatography and characterized both by epitope mapping and surface plasmon resonance measurements. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC, and Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor were incubated with patient alpha(1-AAB and rabbit alpha(1-AB and the activation of signal transduction pathways was investigated by Western blot, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and gene expression. We found that phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2-IIA and L-type calcium channel (Cacna1c genes were upregulated in cardiomyocytes and VSMC after stimulation with both purified antibodies. We showed that patient alpha(1-AAB and rabbit alpha(1-AB result in protein kinase C alpha activation and transient extracellular-related kinase (EKR1/2 phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that the antibodies exert acute effects on intracellular Ca(2+ in cardiomyocytes and induce mesentery artery segment contraction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Patient alpha(1-AAB and rabbit alpha(1-AB can induce signaling pathways important for hypertension and cardiac remodeling. Our data provide evidence for a potential clinical relevance for alpha(1-AAB in hypertensive patients, and the notion of immunity as a possible cause of hypertension.

  16. α1-antitrypsin increases interleukin-1 receptor antagonist production during pancreatic islet graft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecassis, Avishag; Schuster, Ronen; Shahaf, Galit; Ozeri, Eyal; Green, Ross; Ochayon, David E; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C

    2014-07-01

    Although islet transplantation for individuals with type 1 diabetes has been shown to yield superior blood glucose control, it remains inadequate for long-term control. This is partly due to islet injuries and stresses that can lead to beta cell loss. Inhibition of excess IL-1β activity might minimize islet injuries, thus preserving function. The IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1β, protects islets from cytokine-induced necrosis and apoptosis. Therefore, an imbalance between IL-1β and IL-1Ra might influence the courses of allogeneic and autoimmune responses to islets. Our group previously demonstrated that the circulating serine-protease inhibitor human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT), the levels of which increase in circulation during acute-phase immune responses, exhibits anti-inflammatory and islet-protective properties, as well as immunomodulatory activity. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the pancreatic islet allograft-protective activity of hAAT was mediated by IL-1Ra induction. Our results demonstrated that hAAT led to a 2.04-fold increase in IL-1Ra expression in stimulated macrophages and that hAAT-pre-treated islet grafts exhibited a 4.851-fold increase in IL-1Ra transcript levels, which were associated with a moderate inflammatory profile. Unexpectedly, islets that were isolated from IL-1Ra-knockout mice and pre-treated with hAAT before grafting into wild-type mice yielded an increase in intragraft IL-1Ra expression that was presumably derived from infiltrating host cells, albeit in the absence of hAAT treatment of the host. Indeed, hAAT-pre-treated islets generated hAAT-free conditioned medium that could induce IL-1Ra production in cultured macrophages. Finally, we demonstrated that hAAT promoted a distinct phosphorylation and nuclear translocation pattern for p65, a key transcription factor required for IL-1Ra expression. PMID:25000533

  17. Overexpression of Soluble Human Thymosin Alpha 1 in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Fu CHEN; Hong-Ying ZHANG; Geng-Feng FU; Gen-Xing XU; Ya-Yi HOU

    2005-01-01

    Synthesized gene of human thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1) was inserted into pET-28a, pET-9c,pThioHis B, pGEX-2T or pBV222 and then inductively expressed in strains of Escherichia coli. Among the five expression systems, the BL21/pET-28a system provides the highest expression level of fusion protein in a soluble form, which is up to 70% of total expressed bacterial proteins as visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The resulting fusion protein purified through nickel affinity chromatography accounts for 2.53% of the wet bacterial pellet weight and reaches 94.5% purity by SDS-PAGE. These results indicate the potential of this expression system for high-throughput production of recombinant Tα1.

  18. Functional analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of the integrin {alpha}1 subunit in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abair, Tristin D; Bulus, Nada; Borza, Corina; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2008-10-15

    Integrin alpha1beta1, the major collagen type IV receptor, is expressed by endothelial cells and plays a role in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. Because the molecular mechanisms whereby this collagen IV receptor mediates endothelial cell functions are poorly understood, truncation and point mutants of the integrin alpha1 subunit cytoplasmic tail (amino acids 1137-1151) were generated and expressed into alpha1-null endothelial cells. We show that alpha1-null endothelial cells expressing the alpha1 subunit, which lacks the entire cytoplasmic tail (mutant alpha1-1136) or expresses all the amino acids up to the highly conserved GFFKR motif (mutant alpha1-1143), have a similar phenotype to parental alpha1-null cells. Pro(1144) and Leu(1145) were shown to be necessary for alpha1beta1-mediated endothelial cell proliferation; Lys(1146) for adhesion, migration, and tubulogenesis and Lys(1147) for tubulogenesis. Integrin alpha1beta1-dependent endothelial cell proliferation is primarily mediated by ERK activation, whereas migration and tubulogenesis require both p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt activation. Thus, distinct amino acids distal to the GFFKR motif of the alpha1 integrin cytoplasmic tail mediate activation of selective downstream signaling pathways and specific endothelial cell functions. PMID:18647959

  19. α₁-Antitrypsin protease inhibitor MZ heterozygosity is associated with airflow obstruction in two large cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Johannessen, Ane; Gaarder, Per I; Campbell, Edward J; Agustí, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Donner, Claudio F; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wouters, Emiel F M; Paré, Peter D; Levy, Robert D; Coxson, Harvey O; Lomas, David A; Hersh, Craig P; Silverman, Edwin K

    2010-01-01

    Severe α₁-antitrypsin deficiency is a known genetic risk factor for COPD. Heterozygous (protease inhibitor [PI] MZ) individuals have moderately reduced serum levels of α₁-antitrypsin, but whether they have an increased risk of COPD is uncertain....

  20. Expression and Hydroxylamine Cleavage of Thymosin Alpha 1 Concatemer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Teng Lai

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Human thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1 is an important peptide in the development and senescence of immunological competence in human, and many studies have reported the expression of this peptide. In this study, we designed and synthesized the Tα1 gene according to the E. coli codon usage preference and constructed a 6×Tα1 concatemer. The latter was inserted into an E. coli expression vector pET-22b (+, and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3. After induction with IPTG, the concatemer protein was successfully expressed in E. coli then cleaved by hydroxylamine to release the Tα1 monomer. Gly-SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry confirmed that the recombinant protein was cleaved as intended. The bioactivity of the Tα1 monomer was analyzed by lymphocyte proliferation and by mitochondrial activity in two different tumor cell lines. This study provides a description of the preparation of a bioactive Tα1, which may prove useful in future biomedical research.

  1. Prevalence of α-1-Antitrypsin gene mutations in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Aljarallah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: α-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency results from mutations of the protease inhibitor (PI. The AAT gene is mapped on chromosome 14 and has been associated with chronic liver disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Objective: To determine the frequency of AAT mutations on S and Z carrier alleles in healthy Saudi individuals from Qassim Province in Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods : A total of 158 healthy, unrelated participants from Qassim Province were recruited. They were genotyped for the two AAT-deficiency alleles, PIFNx01S and PIFNx01Z, using polymerase chain reaction, with primers designed throughout to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. Results: Of the 158 subjects, 11.39% were carriers for the S mutation (i.e., had the MS genotype, whereas 2.53% were carriers for the Z mutation (i.e., had the MZ genotype. The SZ genotype was present in 3.8% of subjects, while the homozygous genotype SS was present in 1.9% of subjects. No subjects showed the ZZ mutant genotype. Accordingly, frequency of the mutant S and Z alleles of AAT gene was 9.49% and 3.19%, respectively. Conclusion: The results obtained showed a high prevalence of the AAT deficiency allele in the Saudi population. This probably warrants adoption of a screening program for at-risk individuals, so that they might initiate adequate prophylactic measures.

  2. Intravenous augmentation treatment and lung density in severe α1 antitrypsin deficiency (RAPID)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Kenneth R; Burdon, Jonathan G W; Piitulainen, Eeva; Sandhaus, Robert A; Seersholm, Niels; Stocks, James M; Stoel, Berend C; Huang, Liping; Yao, Zhenling; Edelman, Jonathan M; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    four (5%) in the placebo group. One death occurred in the A1PI group (respiratory failure) and three occurred in the placebo group (sepsis, pneumonia, and metastatic breast cancer). INTERPRETATION: Measurement of lung density with CT at TLC alone provides evidence that purified A1PI augmentation slows......BACKGROUND: The efficacy of α1 proteinase inhibitor (A1PI) augmentation treatment for α1 antitrypsin deficiency has not been substantiated by a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. CT-measured lung density is a more sensitive measure of disease progression in α1 antitrypsin deficiency emphysema...... than spirometry is, so we aimed to assess the efficacy of augmentation treatment with this measure. METHODS: The RAPID study was a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of A1PI treatment in patients with α1 antitrypsin deficiency. We recruited eligible non...

  3. The experience with setting-up radioimmunoassay for alpha-1 fetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decisive factor in the preparation of radioimmunological alpha-1-fetoprotein determination, provided sufficient commercial or own antisera and standards are available for calibration, is the quality of the preparation for labelling. Alpha-1-fetoprotein was separated by affinity chromatography using Sepharose with alpha-1-fetoprotein-bound antibodies. The isolates thus obtained were labelled with 125I using enzyme and chloramine T and Iodogen techniques. The labelled alpha-1-fetoprotein can be used for RIA. In view of reduced immunoreactivity of the preparation, however, the performance of the radioimmunological determination has so far not matched the quality of imported kits. The technique is currently being optimized. (author)

  4. Molecular determinants of desensitization and assembly of the chimeric GABA(A) receptor subunits (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) in combinations with beta2 and gamma2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elster, L; Kristiansen, U; Pickering, D S;

    2001-01-01

    Two gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor chimeras were designed in order to elucidate the structural requirements for GABA(A) receptor desensitization and assembly. The (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) chimeric subunits representing the extracellular N-terminal domain of alpha1 or gamma...... opposed to the staining of the (gamma2/alpha1)-containing receptors, which was only slightly higher than background. To explain this, the (alpha1/gamma2) and (gamma2/alpha1) chimeras may act like alpha1 and gamma2 subunits, respectively, indicating that the extracellular N-terminal segment is important...... for assembly. However, the (alpha1/gamma2) chimeric subunit had characteristics different from the alpha1 subunit, since the (alpha1/gamma2) chimera gave rise to no desensitization after GABA stimulation in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, which was independent of whether the chimera was expressed...

  5. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  6. Loss of integrin alpha1beta1 ameliorates Kras-induced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Perez, Ines; Borza, Corina; Chen, Xiwu; Yan, Xuexian; Ibanez, Raquel; Mernaugh, Glenda; Matrisian, Lynn M; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2008-08-01

    The collagen IV binding receptor integrin alpha1beta1 has been shown to regulate lung cancer due to its proangiogenic properties; however, it is unclear whether this receptor also plays a direct role in promoting primary lung tumors. To investigate this possibility, integrin alpha1-null mice were crossed with KrasLA2 mice that carry an oncogenic mutation of the Kras gene (G12D) and develop spontaneous primary tumors with features of non-small cell lung cancer. We provide evidence that KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice have a decreased incidence of primary lung tumors and longer survival compared with KrasLA2/alpha1 wild-type controls. Tumors from KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice were also smaller, less vascularized, and exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end staining, respectively. Moreover, tumors from the KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice showed diminished extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Primary lung tumor epithelial cells isolated from KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice showed a significant decrease in anchorage-independent colony formation, collagen-mediated cell proliferation, ERK activation, and, most importantly, tumorigenicity when injected into nude mice compared with KrasLA2/alpha1 wild-type tumor cells. These results indicate that loss of the integrin alpha1 subunit decreases the incidence and growth of lung epithelial tumors initiated by oncogenic Kras, suggesting that both Kras and integrin alpha1beta1 cooperate to drive the growth of non-small cell lung cancer in vivo. PMID:18676835

  7. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α 1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Pérez, Juan; Tan, Lu; Dickens, Jennifer A.; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Irving, James A; Haq, Imran; Ekeowa, Ugo; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Miranda, Elena; Lomas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutant Z α 1-antitrypsin (E342K) accumulates as polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes predisposing to liver disease, whereas low levels of circulating Z α 1-antitrypsin lead to emphysema by loss of inhibition of neutrophil elastase. The ideal therapy should prevent polymer formation while preserving inhibitory activity. Here we used mAb technology to identify interactors with Z α 1-antitrypsin that comply with both requirements. We report the generation of an mAb (4B12...

  8. A Novel Antiapoptotic Role for α1-Antitrypsin in the Prevention of Pulmonary Emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Petrache, Irina; Fijalkowska, Iwona; Zhen, Lijie; Medler, Terry R.; Brown, Emile; Cruz, Pedro; Choe, Kang-Hyeon; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Scerbavicius, Robertas; Shapiro, Lee; Zhang, Bing; Song, Sihong; Hicklin, Dan; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Flotte, Terence

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: There is growing evidence that alveolar cell apoptosis plays an important role in emphysema pathogenesis, a chronic inflammatory lung disease characterized by alveolar destruction. The association of α1-antitrypsin deficiency with the development of emphysema has supported the concept that protease/antiprotease imbalance mediates cigarette smoke–induced emphysema.

  9. Rare case of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis in two patients with α-1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiSZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxey, Jordan Maureen; Low, Emma Victoria; Turner, Alice Margaret

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis occurring with α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, both PiSZ phenotype. The simultaneous occurrence of these two conditions has seldom been described in the literature, despite evidence of an association between α-1-antitrypsin deficiency and other forms of vasculitis. Both patients had pulmonary involvement and reported intermittent exacerbations of vasculitic symptoms. Both patients were managed on low-dose oral steroids and azathioprine remaining well with occasional exacerbations. It is important to consider whether there is an association between eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis and α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, as this may lead to more severe pulmonary symptoms during exacerbations. If a genetic association between the two conditions is found, clinicians should be aware of the possible need to screen for α-1-antitrypsin deficiency in appropriate patients. PMID:27118743

  10. Phorbol esters promote alpha 1-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and receptor uncoupling from inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Leeb-Lundberg, L M; Cotecchia, S; Lomasney, J W; DeBernardis, J F; Lefkowitz, R J; Caron, M G

    1985-01-01

    DDT1 MF-2 cells, which are derived from hamster vas deferens smooth muscle, contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (54,800 +/- 2700 sites per cell) that are coupled to stimulation of inositol phospholipid metabolism. Incubation of these cells with tumor-promoting phorbol esters, which stimulate calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, leads to a marked attenuation of the ability of alpha 1-receptor agonists such as norepinephrine to stimulate the turnover of inositol phospholipids. T...

  11. Intracellular modifications of rat alpha 1 inhibitor3. Formation of disulphides, internal thiolester and sulphation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, M; Esnard, F; Fries, E

    1991-04-10

    alpha 1 Inhibitor3 (alpha 1I3) is a monomeric protease inhibitor of about 190 kDa which is secreted by rodent hepatocytes. We have studied intracellular modifications of this protein in [35]methionine-labelled rat hepatocytes by pulse/chase experiments followed by immunoprecipitation and gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Directly after the pulse, most of the unreduced alpha 1I3 migrated faster than the reduced form, indicating that disulphide bridges are formed during or shortly after synthesis yielding a compact structure. With increasing chase time however, an increasing portion of the unreduced alpha 1I3 migrated with a mobility lower than that of the reduced protein, half-maximal conversion occurring after about 10 min. This finding suggests that alpha 1I3 undergoes a conformational change in the endoplasmic reticulum, possibly becoming more elongated. During 10-30 min of chase, the protein acquired the capacity to undergo autolytic cleavage upon heating, a property due to the existence of an internal thiolester bond [Howard, J. B., Vermeulen, M. & Swenson, R. P. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 3820-3823; Esnard, F., Gutman, N., El Moujahed, A. & Gauthier, F. (1985) FEBS Lett. 182, 125-129]. Analysis by subcellular fractionation indicated that this bond is formed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Finally, we show that secreted alpha 1I3 is sulphated, presumably at Tyr618. PMID:2015826

  12. Appearance and cellular distribution of lectin-like receptors for alpha 1-acid glycoprotein in the developing rat testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, U O; Bøg-Hansen, T C; Kirkeby, S

    1996-01-01

    A histochemical avidin-biotin technique with three different alpha 1-acid glycoprotein glycoforms showed pronounced alterations in the cellular localization of two alpha 1-acid glycoprotein lectin-like receptors during cell differentiation in the developing rat testis. The binding of alpha 1-acid...

  13. Serum alpha-antitrypsin in patients with lung cancer or abnormal sputum cytology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C.C.; Cohen, M.H.; Connor, R.; Primack, A.; Saccomanno, G.; Talamo, R.C.

    1976-10-01

    Scrum alpha/sub 1/-antitrypsin Pi types and trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC) were measured in 72 patients with lung cancer and in 196 patients with abnormal sputum cytology but no clinical evidence of lung cancer to determine if a genetic deficiency of alpha/sub 1/-antitrypsin (AAT) predisposes to lung cancer. The distributions of Pi types in these two groups of patients and healthy adults are similar. Serum TIC and AAT concentrations are elevated in lung cancer patients. However, patients with abnormal sputum cytology and no clinical lung cancer have normal levels of serum TIC and AAT. A genetic deficiency of AAT probably does not produce a state of increased susceptibility to the carcinogenic effects of respiratory carcinogens such as tobacco smoke.

  14. Diagnosing α1-antitrypsin deficiency: how to improve the current algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    McElvaney, Noel G.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10–15 years, the diagnosis of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) has markedly improved as a result of increasing awareness and the publication of diagnostic recommendations by the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS). Nevertheless, the condition remains substantially underdiagnosed. Furthermore, when AATD is diagnosed there is a delay before treatment is introduced. This may help explain why AATD is the fourth most common cause of lung transplantation...

  15. Characterising the association of latency with α1-antitrypsin polymerisation using a novel monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Lu; Perez, Juan; Mela, Marianna; Miranda, Elena; Burling, Keith; Rouhani, Farshid N.; DeMeo, Dawn L; Haq, Imran; Irving, James; Ordóñez, Adriana; Dickens, Jennifer; Brantly, Mark L; Marciniak, Stefan J; Alexander, Graeme; Gooptu, Bibekbrata

    2015-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin is primarily synthesised in the liver, circulates to the lung and protects pulmonary tissues from proteolytic damage. The Z mutant (Glu342Lys) undergoes inactivating conformational change and polymerises. Polymers are retained within the hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in homozygous (PiZZ) individuals, predisposing the individuals to hepatic cirrhosis and emphysema. Latency is an analogous process of inactivating, intra-molecular conformational change and may co-occur wit...

  16. Framework for interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them.

  17. A single-chain variable fragment intrabody prevents intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin while allowing its antiproteinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Pérez, Juan; Tan, Lu; Dickens, Jennifer A; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Irving, James A; Haq, Imran; Ekeowa, Ugo; Marciniak, Stefan J; Miranda, Elena; Lomas, David A

    2015-06-01

    Mutant Z α1-antitrypsin (E342K) accumulates as polymers within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes predisposing to liver disease, whereas low levels of circulating Z α1-antitrypsin lead to emphysema by loss of inhibition of neutrophil elastase. The ideal therapy should prevent polymer formation while preserving inhibitory activity. Here we used mAb technology to identify interactors with Z α1-antitrypsin that comply with both requirements. We report the generation of an mAb (4B12) that blocked α1-antitrypsin polymerization in vitro at a 1:1 molar ratio, causing a small increase of the stoichiometry of inhibition for neutrophil elastase. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) intrabody was generated based on the sequence of mAb4B12. The expression of scFv4B12 within the ER (scFv4B12KDEL) and along the secretory pathway (scFv4B12) reduced the intracellular polymerization of Z α1-antitrypsin by 60%. The scFv4B12 intrabody also increased the secretion of Z α1-antitrypsin that retained inhibitory activity against neutrophil elastase. MAb4B12 recognized a discontinuous epitope probably located in the region of helices A/C/G/H/I and seems to act by altering protein dynamics rather than binding preferentially to the native state. This novel approach could reveal new target sites for small-molecule intervention that may block the transition to aberrant polymers without compromising the inhibitory activity of Z α1-antitrypsin. PMID:25757566

  18. The alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mouse. Implications for xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearle, R G; Tange, M J; Zannettino, Z L; Katerelos, M; Shinkel, T A; Van Denderen, B J; Lonie, A J; Lyons, I; Nottle, M B; Cox, T; Becker, C; Peura, A M; Wigley, P L; Crawford, R J; Robins, A J; Pearse, M J; d'Apice, A J

    1996-01-15

    Organ xenografts in discordant combinations such as pig-to-man undergo hyperacute rejection due to the presence of naturally occurring human anti-pig xenoantibodies. The galactose alpha(1,3)-galactose epitope on glycolipids and glycoproteins is the major porcine xenoantigen recognized by these xenoantibodies. This epitope is formed by alpha(1,3)-galactosyltransferase, which is present in all mammals except man, apes, and Old World monkeys. We have generated mice lacking this major xenoantigen by inactivating the alpha(1,3)-galactosyltransferase gene. These mice are viable and have normal organs but develop cataracts. Substantially less xenoantibody from human serum binds to cells and tissues of these mice compared with normal mice. Similarly, there is less activation of human complement on cells from mice lacking the galactose alpha(1,3)-galactose epitope. These mice confirm the importance of the galactose alpha(1,3)-galactose epitope in human xenoreactivity and the logic of continuing efforts to generate pigs that lack this epitope as a source of donor organs. PMID:8560551

  19. Neuronal changes resulting in up-regulation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors after peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter D.Drummond

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the sympathetic neurotransmitter noradrenaline inhibits the pro-duction and release of pro-inlfammatory cytokines. However, after peripheral nerve and tissue injury, pro-inflammatory cytokines appear to induce the expression of the alpha1A-adreno-ceptor subtype on immune cells and perhaps also on other cells in the injured tissue. In turn, noradrenaline may act on up-regulated alpha1-adrenoceptors to increase the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. In addition, the release of inflammatory mediators and nerve growth factor from keratinocytes and other cells may augment the expression of al-pha1-adrenoceptors on peripheral nerve ifbers. Consequently, nociceptive afferents acquire an abnormal excitability to adrenergic agents, and inlfammatory processes build. These mechanisms could contribute to the development of sympathetically maintained pain in conditions such as post-herpetic neuralgia, cutaneous neuromas, amputation stump pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

  20. Glomerular injury is exacerbated in diabetic integrin alpha1-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, R; Yan, X; Su, Y; Hudson, B G; Borza, D-B; Moeckel, G W; Qi, Z; Sado, Y; Breyer, M D; Voziyan, P; Pozzi, A

    2006-08-01

    Excessive glomerular collagen IV and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are key factors in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Integrin alpha1beta1, the major collagen IV receptor, dowregulates collagen IV and ROS production, suggesting this integrin might determine the severity of diabetic nephropathy. To test this possibility, wild-type and integrin alpha1-null mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ) (100 mg/kg single intraperitoneal injection), after which glomerular filtration rate (GFR), glomerular collagen deposition, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickening were evaluated. In addition, ROS and collagen IV production by mesangial cells as well as their proliferation was measured in vitro. Diabetic alpha1-null mice developed worse renal disease than diabetic wild-type mice. A significant increase in GFR was evident in the alpha1-null mice at 6 weeks after the STZ injection; it started to decrease by week 24 and reached levels of non-diabetic mice by week 36. In contrast, GFR only increased in wild-type mice at week 12 and its elevation persisted throughout the study. Diabetic mutant mice also showed increased glomerular deposition of collagen IV and GBM thickening compared to diabetic wild-type mice. Primary alpha1-null mesangial cells exposed to high glucose produced more ROS than wild-type cells, which led to decreased proliferation and increased collagen IV synthesis, thus mimicking the in vivo finding. In conclusion, this study suggests that lack of integrin alpha1beta1 exacerbates the glomerular injury in a mouse model of diabetes by modulating GFR, ROS production, cell proliferation, and collagen deposition. PMID:16775606

  1. Proteomic identification of IPSE/alpha-1 as a major hepatotoxin secreted by Schistosoma mansoni eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eggs deposited in the liver of the mammalian host by the blood fluke parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, normally drive a T-helper-2 (Th2-mediated granulomatous response in immune-competent mice. By contrast, in mice deprived of T-cells and incapable of producing granulomata, egg-secreted proteins (ESP induce acute hepatic injury and death. Previous work has shown that one such ESP, the T2 ribonuclease known as omega-1, is hepatotoxic in vivo in that specific antisera to omega-1 prevent hepatocyte damage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an in vitro culture system employing mouse primary hepatocytes and alanine transaminase (ALT activity as a marker of heptocyte injury, we demonstrated that S. mansoni eggs, egg-secreted proteins (ESP, soluble-egg antigen (SEA, and omega-1 are directly hepatotoxic and in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of omega-1 using a monoclonal antibody abolished the toxicity of pure omega-1 and diminished the toxicity in ESP and SEA by 47 and 33%, respectively. Anion exchange chromatography of ESP yielded one predominant hepatotoxic fraction. Proteomics of that fraction identified the presence of IPSE/alpha-1 (IL-4 inducing principle from S. mansoni eggs, a known activator of basophils and inducer of Th2-type responses. Pure recombinant IPSE/alpha-1 also displayed a dose-dependent hepatotoxicity in vitro. Monoclonal antibody depletion of IPSE/alpha-1 abolished the latter's toxicity and diminished the total toxicity of ESP and SEA by 32 and 35%, respectively. Combined depletion of omega-1 and IPSE/alpha-1 diminished hepatotoxicity of ESP and SEA by 60 and 58% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We identified IPSE/alpha-1 as a novel hepatotoxin and conclude that both IPSE/alpha-1 and omega-1 account for the majority of the hepatotoxicity secreted by S. mansoni eggs.

  2. [Effect of adrenal stress on activity of proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhina, L M; Kaliman, P A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of adrenal stress on the proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activities in blood serum and cytosols of the rat organs were investigated. The reliable change was marked only in the alpha-1-PI level research of lung tissue cytosol. The proteolysis suppression was revealed in the heart and kidney tissue, while the proteolysis activation was revealed in serum and less in the lung tissue cytosol. Changes in proteinase level in the myocardium and kidney tissue play the primary role in respect to those of the other research liquids under study. PMID:7747353

  3. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography

  4. Genomic organization of the bovine alpha-S1 casein gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Koczan, D; Hobom, G.; Seyfert, H.M.

    1991-01-01

    We report the sequence of the complete bovine alpha-s1 casein gene eludicating for the first time the genomic organization of an alpha-s type casein gene. Extending over 17508 bp the gene is split into 19 exons, ranging in size from 24 bp to 385 bp. Except for the translational stop codon not a single coding triplet of the alpha-s1 reading frame is disrupted by any of the splice junctions, which all confirm to known splice consensus sequences. Nine out of 16 coding exons begin with a 'GAX' co...

  5. Molecular evolution of serpins: homologous structure of the human α1-antichymotrypsin and α1-antitrypsin genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    α1-Antichymotrypsin belongs to a supergene family that includes α1-antitrypsin, antithrombin III, ovalbumin, and angiotensinogen. The human chromosomal α1-antichymotrypsin gene has been cloned and its molecular structure established. The gene is approximately 12 kb in length and contains five exons and four introns. The locations of the introns within the α1-antichymotrypsin gene are identical with those of the human α1-antitrypsin and angiotensinogen genes. Other members of this supergene family contain introns located at nonhomologous positions of the genes. The homologous organization of the α1-antichymotrypsin and α1-antitrypsin genes corresponds with the high degree of homology between their protein sequences and suggest that these loci arose by recent gene duplication. A model is presented for the evolution of both the genomic structure and the protein sequences of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily

  6. INOSITOL PHOSPHATES FORMED IN RAT AORTA AFTER ALPHA-1-ADRENOCEPTOR STIMULATION ARE INHIBITED BY FORSKOLIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANOLOPOULOS, VG; PIPILISYNETOS, E; DENHERTOG, A; NELEMANS, A

    1991-01-01

    Rat aortic smooth muscle rings without endothelial cells were subjected to alpha-1-adrenoceptor stimulation. We measured the contractile state of the smooth muscle cells and the formation of inositol phosphates (InsPs) on receptor stimulation. Using different extracellular calcium-containing solutio

  7. Human CRISP-3 binds serum alpha(1)B-glycoprotein across species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udby, Lene; Johnsen, Anders H; Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    CRISP-3 was previously shown to be bound to alpha(1)B-glycoprotein (A1BG) in human serum/plasma. All mammalian sera are supposed to contain A1BG, although its presence in rodent sera is not well-documented. Since animal sera are often used to supplement buffers in experiments, in particular such...

  8. Phosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucans as substrate for potato starch-branching enzyme I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible involvement of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) starch-branching enzyme I (PSBE-I) in the in vivo synthesis of phosphorylated amylopectin was investigated in in vitro experiments with isolated PSBE-I using 33P-labeled phosphorylated and 3H end-labeled nonphosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucans as the substrates. From these radiolabeled substrates PSBE-I was shown to catalyze the formation of dual-labeled (3H/33P) phosphorylated branched polysaccharides with an average degree of polymerization of 80 to 85. The relatively high molecular mass indicated that the product was the result of multiple chain-transfer reactions. The presence of alpha(1 leads to 6) branch points was documented by isoamylase treatment and anion-exchange chromatography. Although the initial steps of the in vivo mechanism responsible for phosphorylation of potato starch remains elusive, the present study demonstrates that the enzyme machinery available in potato has the ability to incorporate phosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucans into neutral polysaccharides in an interchain catalytic reaction. Potato mini tubers synthesized phosphorylated starch from exogenously supplied 33PO4(3-) and [U-14C]Glc at rates 4 times higher than those previously obtained using tubers from fully grown potato plants. This system was more reproducible compared with soil-grown tubers and was therefore used for preparation of 33P-labeled phosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucan chains

  9. Mysteries of α1-antitrypsin deficiency: emerging therapeutic strategies for a challenging disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafe Ghouse

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The classical form of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD is an autosomal co-dominant disorder that affects ~1 in 3000 live births and is an important genetic cause of lung and liver disease. The protein affected, α1-antitrypsin (AT, is predominantly derived from the liver and has the function of inhibiting neutrophil elastase and several other destructive neutrophil proteinases. The genetic defect is a point mutation that leads to misfolding of the mutant protein, which is referred to as α1-antitrypsin Z (ATZ. Because of its misfolding, ATZ is unable to efficiently traverse the secretory pathway. Accumulation of ATZ in the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells has a gain-of-function proteotoxic effect on the liver, resulting in fibrosis, cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma in some individuals. Moreover, because of reduced secretion, there is a lack of anti-proteinase activity in the lung, which allows neutrophil proteases to destroy the connective tissue matrix and cause chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD by loss of function. Wide variation in the incidence and severity of liver and lung disease among individuals with ATD has made this disease one of the most challenging of the rare genetic disorders to diagnose and treat. Other than cigarette smoking, which worsens COPD in ATD, genetic and environmental modifiers that determine this phenotypic variability are unknown. A limited number of therapeutic strategies are currently available, and liver transplantation is the only treatment for severe liver disease. Although replacement therapy with purified AT corrects the loss of anti-proteinase function, COPD progresses in a substantial number of individuals with ATD and some undergo lung transplantation. Nevertheless, advances in understanding the variability in clinical phenotype and in developing novel therapeutic concepts is beginning to address the major clinical challenges of this mysterious disorder.

  10. Selenoprotein S/SEPS1 Modifies Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Z Variant α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency*

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Emer; Catherine M. Greene; Carroll, Tomás P; Noel G. McElvaney; O'Neill, Shane J

    2009-01-01

    Z α1-antitrypsin (ZAAT) deficiency is a disease associated with emphysematous lung disease and also with liver disease. The liver disease of AAT deficiency is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. SEPS1 is a selenoprotein that, through a chaperone activity, decreases ER stress. To determine the effect of SEPS1 on ER stress in ZAAT deficiency, we measured activity of the grp78 promoter and levels of active ATF6 as markers of the unfolded protein response in HepG2 cells transfected...

  11. Activation of two new alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferase activities in Chinese hamster ovary cells by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, B; Stanley, P

    1991-01-01

    Several mammalian alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferases (alpha[1,3]Fuc-T) that synthesize carbohydrates containing alpha(1,3)fucosylated lactosamine units have been identified. Although Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells do not express alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity, the rare mutants LEC11 and LEC12, isolated after mutagenesis or DNA transfection, each express an alpha(1,3)Fuc-T that may be distinguished by several criteria. Two new CHO mutants possessing alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity (LEC29 and LEC30) have now been isolated after treatment of a CHO cell population with 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), ethylnitrosourea (ENU), or 5-AzaC followed by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Like LEC12, both mutants possess an N-ethylmaleimide-resistant alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activity that can utilize a variety of acceptors and both express the Lewis X (Lex) determinant (Gal beta[1,4](Fuc alpha[1,3])GlcNAc beta 1)) but not the sialyl alpha(2,3)Lex determinant on cell-surface carbohydrates. However, LEC29 and LEC30 may be distinguished from LEC11 and LEC12, as well as from each other, on the basis of their unique patterns of lectin resistance and their abilities to bind the VIM-2 monoclonal antibody that recognizes carbohydrates terminating in NeuNAc alpha(2,3)Gal beta(1,4)GlcNAc beta(1,3)Gal beta(1,4)(Fuc alpha[1,3])GlcNAc beta and also by the different in vitro substrate specificities and kinetic properties of their respective alpha(1,3)Fuc-T activities. The combined data provide good evidence that the LEC29 and LEC30 alpha(1,3)Fuc-Ts are novel transferases encoded by distinct gene products. PMID:1724918

  12. Functional characterisation of the human alpha1 glycine receptor in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    and RU 5135>strychnine>brucine>PMBA=picrotoxin>atropine for the antagonists. The actions of three allosteric modulators at the alpha1 GlyR cell line were also characterised in the FMP assay. Micromolar concentrations of Zn2+ inhibited alpha1 GlyR signalling but in contrast to previous reports the...

  13. The antagonistic effect of antipsychotic drugs on a HEK293 cell line stably expressing human alpha(1A1)-adrenoceptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nourian, Zahra; Mulvany, Michael J; Nielsen, Karsten Bork;

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs often cause orthostatic hypotension, probably through antagonist action on resistance vessel alpha(1A)-adrenoceptors. Here we have tested this possibility directly using cells transfected with a relevant human alpha(1A)-adrenoceptor splice variant. To determine a splice varian...

  14. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  15. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... and improvement in objective parameters for bladder outflow obstruction. Approximately 30 to 50% of patients will respond to treatment with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. The definitive role of pharmacological treatment in symptomatic BPH remains to be established, although it seems that patients unfit...

  16. Diagnosing α1-antitrypsin deficiency: how to improve the current algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel G. McElvaney

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 10–15 years, the diagnosis of α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD has markedly improved as a result of increasing awareness and the publication of diagnostic recommendations by the American Thoracic Society (ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS. Nevertheless, the condition remains substantially underdiagnosed. Furthermore, when AATD is diagnosed there is a delay before treatment is introduced. This may help explain why AATD is the fourth most common cause of lung transplantation. Clearly we need to do better. The ATS/ERS recommend testing high-risk groups, such as: all chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients; all nonresponsive asthmatic adults/adolescents; all cases of cryptogenic cirrhosis/liver disease; subjects with granulomatosis with polyangitis; bronchiectasis of unknown aetiology; panniculitis and first-degree relatives of patients with AATD. In terms of laboratory diagnosis, measurement of α1-antitrypsin levels will identify patients with protein deficiency, but cannot differentiate between the various genetic subtypes of AATD. Phenotyping is the current gold standard for detecting rare variants of AATD (except null variants, while advances in molecular diagnostics are making genotyping more effective. An accurate diagnosis facilitates the physician's ability to actively intervene with measures such as smoking cessation and perhaps augmentation therapy, and it will also help provide a better understanding of the natural history of the disease.

  17. Assembly of bioactive multilayered nanocoatings on pancreatic islet cells: incorporation of α1-antitrypsin into the coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Zheng-Liang; Singh, Jashandeep; Austin, Amazon L F; Hope, David C D; King, Aileen J; Persaud, Shanta J; Jones, Peter M

    2015-07-01

    A spontaneous multilayer deposition approach for presenting therapeutic proteins onto pancreatic islet surfaces, using a heparin polyaldehyde and glycol chitosan alternating layering scheme, has been developed to enable the nanoscale engineering of a microenvironment for transplanted cells. The nanocoating incorporating α1-antitrypsin, an anti-inflammatory protein, exhibited effective anti-coagulant activities in vitro. PMID:26051448

  18. Abnormal heart rate and body temperature in mice lacking thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Wikström, L; Johansson, C.; Saltó, C; C Barlow; Campos Barros, A; Baas, F.; Forrest, D; Thorén, P; Vennström, B

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid hormone, acting through several nuclear hormone receptors, plays important roles in thermogenesis, lipogenesis and maturation of the neonatal brain. The receptor specificity for mediating these effects is largely unknown, and to determine this we developed mice lacking the thyroid hormone receptor TR alpha 1. The mice have an average heart rate 20% lower than that of control animals, both under normal conditions and after thyroid hormone stimulation. Electrocardiograms show that the m...

  19. Mutation in collagen II alpha 1 isoforms delineates Stickler and Wagner syndrome phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Soler, Vincent; Quiette, Valencia; POWELL, CALDWELL; Yanovitch, Tammy; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Luo, Xiaoyan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Nading, Erica; Young, Terri L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy with phenotypic overlap with Wagner syndrome. The common Stickler syndrome type I is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with causal mutations in collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1). Wagner syndrome is associated with mutations in versican (VCAN), which encodes for a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. A three-generation Caucasian family variably diagnosed with either syndrome was screened for sequence variants in the COL2A1 and VCAN gen...

  20. Micturition in conscious rats with and without bladder outlet obstruction: role of spinal alpha 1-adrenoceptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishizuka, O; Persson, K.; Mattiasson, A.; Naylor, A; Wyllie, M.; Andersson, K.

    1996-01-01

    1. In normal rats and rats with bladder hypertrophy secondary to outflow obstruction, undergoing continuous cytometry, we examined the responses to the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist doxazosin given intrathecally (i.t.) and intra-arterially (i.a.). In addition, we investigated the effects of the drug on L-dopa-induced bladder hyperactivity in normal, unobstructed rats. 2. Doxazosin 50 nmol (approximately 60 micrograms kg-1), given i.t., decreased micturition pressure in normal rats...

  1. Complications of cataract surgery in patients with BPH treated with alpha 1A-blockers

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Teper, Slawomir; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Wylegala, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and cataract increases with age. Both diseases may develop concomitantly and may affect almost 50% of elderly men as comorbidities. Cataract is treated surgically and it has been reported that there may be an association between use of alpha-blockers for BPH, particularly alpha1A-adrenergic receptor selective drugs, and complications of cataract surgery known as Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS). The article reviews literature publi...

  2. Direct and remote modulation of L-channels in chromaffin cells: distinct actions on alpha1C and alpha1D subunits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelli, Pietro; Hernández-Guijo, Jesus Miguel; Carabelli, Valentina; Novara, Monica; Cesetti, Tiziana; Andrés-Mateos, Eva; Montiel, Carmen; Carbone, Emilio

    2004-02-01

    Understanding precisely the functioning of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and their modulation by signaling molecules will help clarifying the Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms controlling exocytosis in chromaffin cells. In recent years, we have learned more about the various pathways through which Ca2+ channels can be up- or down-modulated by hormones and neurotransmitters and how these changes may condition chromaffin cell activity and catecolamine release. Recently, the attention has been focused on the modulation of L-channels (CaV 1), which represent the major Ca2+ current component in rat and human chromaffin cells. L-channels are effectively inhibited by the released content of secretory granules or by applying mixtures of exogenous ATP, opioids, and adrenaline through the activation of receptor-coupled G proteins. This unusual inhibition persists in a wide range of potentials and results from a direct (membrane-delimited) interaction of G protein subunits with the L-channels co-localized in membrane microareas. Inhibition of L-channels can be reversed when the cAMP/PKA pathway is activated by membrane permeable cAMP analog or when cells are exposed to isoprenaline (remote action), suggesting the existence of parallel and opposite effects on L-channel gating by distinctly activated membrane autoreceptors. Here, the authors review the molecular components underlying these two opposing signaling pathways and present new evidence supporting the presence of two L-channel types in rat chromaffin cells (alpha1C and alpha1D), which open new interesting issues concerning Ca(2+)-channel modulation. In light of recent findings on the regulation of exocytosis by Ca(2+)-channel modulation, the authors explore the possible role of L-channels in the autocontrol of catecholamine release. PMID:15034224

  3. Effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade on myocardial blood flow during exercise after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, C A; Dai, X Z; Bache, R J

    1991-08-01

    The effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin on myocardial blood flow at rest and during two levels of treadmill exercise was assessed in 16 chronically instrumented dogs 9-14 days after myocardial infarction had been produced by occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. During resting conditions prazosin did not alter mean myocardial blood flow or the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in either normally perfused or collateral-dependent myocardium. However, during exercise at comparable external work loads and comparable rate-pressure products, prazosin significantly increased blood flow to normally perfused (27% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) and collateral-dependent myocardium (35% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) compared with control. In addition, prazosin caused a small but significant decrease in the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in both normal (1.27 +/- 0.04 to 1.19 +/- 0.04; P less than 0.01) and collateral-dependent myocardium (0.57 +/- 0.11 to 0.52 +/- 0.11; P less than 0.01) compared with control, reflecting a disproportionally greater increase in subepicardial flow in response to alpha 1-adrenergic blockade. These data demonstrate that alpha 1-adrenergic vasoconstriction inhibits coronary vasodilation during exercise, even in areas of collateral-dependent myocardium relatively early after coronary artery occlusion. PMID:1678929

  4. Lack of positive allosteric modulation of mutated alpha(1)S267I glycine receptors by cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foadi, Nilufar; Leuwer, Martin; Demir, Reyhan; Dengler, Reinhard; Buchholz, Vanessa; de la Roche, Jeanne; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud; Ahrens, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. Ajulemic acid and HU210 are non-psychotropic, synthetic cannabinoids. Cannabidiol is a non-psychotropic plant constituent of cannabis sativa. There are hints that non-cannabinoid receptor mechanisms of these cannabinoids might be mediated via glycine receptors. In this study, we investigated the impact of the amino acid residue serine at position 267 on the glycine-modulatory effects of ajulemic acid, cannabidiol and HU210. Mutated alpha(1)S267I glycine receptors transiently expressed in HEK293 cells were studied by utilising the whole-cell clamp technique. The mutation of the alpha(1) subunit TM2 serine residue to isoleucine abolished the co-activation and the direct activation of the glycine receptor by the investigated cannabinoids. The nature of the TM2 (267) residue of the glycine alpha(1) subunit is crucial for the glycine-modulatory effect of ajulemic acid, cannabidiol and HU210. An investigation of the impact of such mutations on the in vivo interaction of cannabinoids with glycine receptors should permit a better understanding of the molecular determinants of action of cannabinoids. PMID:20339834

  5. Modification of certain pharmacological effects of ethanol by lipophilic alpha-1 adrenergic agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, M.K.; Dinovo, E.C.; Haddox, V.G.

    1987-09-28

    The influence of four centrally-acting alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists, namely, 2(2-chloro-5-trifluoromethylphenylimino) imidazolidine (St 587), cirazoline, (-) 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-8-methoxy-5-methylthio-2-naphthalenamine ((-)SKF 89748A) and 2-(2-methylindazol-4-imino)imidazolidine (Sgd 101/75) on the pharmacological effects of ethanol was investigated. All four drugs reduced the duration of ethanol-induced hypnosis in C57B1/6 mice, this effect being proportional to their relative potencies to exert central alpha-1 agonism. In prazosin-pretreated mice, St 587 failed to reduce the hypnotic effect of ethanol, which provided strong evidence for the role of alpha-1 agonism for the hypnosis reducing effect of St 587. Hyperactivity induced in C57B1/6 mice by a subhypnotic dose of ethanol and St 587 was reported earlier. In the present study, St 587, cirazoline and (-)SKF 89748A produced similar response, but no correlation between this effect and ethanol hypnosis blockade could be established. 19 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Issues in pharmaceutical development of thymosin alpha1 from preclinical studies through marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Cynthia

    2007-09-01

    SciClone Pharmaceuticals licensed the commercial and patent rights to thymosin alpha1, for geographical regions of the world excluding the United States and Europe, in the early 1990s. With this license, SciClone embarked on global drug development, and the issues encountered for thymosin alpha1 are reflective of the roller coaster of modern approval of pharmaceuticals. Most of the required toxicology studies had been completed prior to licensure, but some newer studies had to be conducted to obtain approvals in certain countries. The recent development of the "International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use" (ICH) guidelines allows for a clearer definition of the required battery of toxicology studies, although some countries still have not adopted these guidelines, and the local regulations have had to be understood and followed. Other hurdles include the complications that manufacturing requirements can differ between countries, and certain countries require local clinical experience trials in addition to SciClone's cumulative clinical data. A further obstacle was the pleiotropic nature of the mechanism of action of thymosin alpha1, with the resulting difficulty in the unraveling of its pharmacologic effects. With close attention to these regulatory details, SciClone has obtained approvals in more than 30 countries and has successfully begun commercial sales. PMID:17947591

  7. Distinct roles for laminin globular domains in laminin alpha1 chain mediated rescue of murine laminin alpha2 chain deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga I Gawlik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Laminin alpha2 chain mutations cause congenital muscular dystrophy with dysmyelination neuropathy (MDC1A. Previously, we demonstrated that laminin alpha1 chain ameliorates the disease in mice. Dystroglycan and integrins are major laminin receptors. Unlike laminin alpha2 chain, alpha1 chain binds the receptors by separate domains; laminin globular (LG domains 4 and LG1-3, respectively. Thus, the laminin alpha1 chain is an excellent tool to distinguish between the roles of dystroglycan and integrins in the neuromuscular system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we provide insights into the functions of laminin alpha1LG domains and the division of their roles in MDC1A pathogenesis and rescue. Overexpression of laminin alpha1 chain that lacks the dystroglycan binding LG4-5 domains in alpha2 chain deficient mice resulted in prolonged lifespan and improved health. Importantly, diaphragm and heart muscles were corrected, whereas limb muscles were dystrophic, indicating that different muscles have different requirements for LG4-5 domains. Furthermore, the regenerative capacity of the skeletal muscle did not depend on laminin alpha1LG4-5. However, this domain was crucial for preventing apoptosis in limb muscles, essential for myelination in peripheral nerve and important for basement membrane assembly. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that laminin alpha1LG domains and consequently their receptors have disparate functions in the neuromuscular system. Understanding these interactions could contribute to design and optimization of future medical treatment for MDC1A patients.

  8. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  9. Purification and properties of endo-alpha-1,3-glucanase from a Streptomyces chartreusis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, T; Inoue, M; Morioka, T; Yokogawa, K

    1981-01-01

    An enzyme hydrolyzing the water-insoluble glucans produced from sucrose by Streptococcus mutans was purified from the culture concentrate of Streptomyces chartreusis strain F2 by ion-exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose columns and gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-1.5m. The purification achieved was 6.4-fold, with an overall yield of 27.3%. Electrophoresis of the purified enzyme protein gave a single band on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel slab. Its molecular weight was estimated to be approximately 68,000, but there is a possibility that the native enzyme exists in an aggregated form or is an oligomer of the peptide subunits, have a molecular weight larger than 300,000. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.5 to 6.0, and its temperature optimum was 55 degrees C. The enzyme lost activity on heating at 65 degrees C for 10 min. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the presence of 1 mM Mn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+, Ag2+, or Merthiolate. The Km value for the water-insoluble glucan of S. mutans OMZ176 was an amount of glucan equivalent to 1.54 mM glucose, i.e., 0.89 mM in terms of the alpha-1,3-linked glucose residue. The purified enzyme was specific for glucans containing an alpha-1,3-glucosidic linkage as the major bond. The enzyme hydrolyzed the S. mutans water-insoluble glucans endolytically, and the products were oligosaccharides. These results indicate that the enzyme elaborated by S. chartreusis strain F2 is an endo-alpha-1,3-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.59). Images PMID:7462159

  10. Renal and cardiac function during alpha1-beta-blockade in congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, M; Davidsen, U; Stokholm, K H;

    2002-01-01

    The kidney and the neurohormonal systems are essential in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure (CHF) and the physiologic response. Routine treatment of moderate to severe CHF consists of diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and beta-blockade. The need for control of...... renal function during initiation of ACE-inhibition in patients with CHF is well known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether supplementation by a combined alpha1-beta-blockade to diuretics and ACE-inhibition might improve cardiac function without reducing renal function....

  11. Induction of liver alpha-1 acid glycoprotein gene expression involves both positive and negative transcription factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Y. M. Lee; Tsai, W H; Lai, M Y; Chen, D S; Lee, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene is liver specific and acute phase responsive. Within the 180-bp region of the AGP promoter, at least five cis elements have been found to interact with trans-acting factors. Four of these elements (A, C, D, and E) interacted with AGP/EBP, a liver-enriched transcription factor, as shown by footprinting analysis and by an anti-AGP/EBP antibody-induced supershift in a gel retardation assay. Modification of these sites by site-directed mutage...

  12. Unusual Acute Sequelae of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency: A Myriad of Symptoms With One Common Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Alessandro N; McCarthy, Cormac; Carroll, Tomas P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-11-01

    Panniculitis associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is well documented but rare. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of successful induction of clinical remission of AATD-related panniculitis following a single 120-mg/kg dose administration of plasma-purified α1-antitrypsin (AAT). A 23-year-old man with known PiZZ AATD presented to the hospital with a diffusely swollen and tender right upper limb. This was associated with subcutaneous induration, and a discrepancy of 5 cm in upper limb circumference at the mid arm was noted. There was no convincing precipitant for cellulitis or an infectious cause, and inflammatory markers were raised, with a C-reactive protein (CRP) level of 93.9 mg/L and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 71 mm/h. Doppler ultrasonography ruled out DVT. No antimicrobials or antiinflammatory medications were administered during or prior to admission. Biopsy specimens of the right upper limb revealed extensive panniculitis with neutrophils, foamy macrophages, and fat necrosis. A diagnosis of AATD-associated panniculitis was made. Following this, a single IV dose of 120 mg/kg of plasma-purified AAT was administered. By day 7 post AAT infusion, CRP level had normalized to 4.6 mg/L and ESR had dropped to 22 mm/h. Limb circumference discrepancy on day 7 was 1 cm. There was no tenderness to palpation or induration, and a clinical remission of panniculitis was observed. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of clinical remission following a single treatment with IV AAT at a dose of 120 mg/kg. This opens avenues to more timely and effective treatment of the more severe presentations of AAT-associated panniculitis. PMID:26527439

  13. Time course and extent of alpha 1-adrenoceptor density changes in rat heart after beta-adrenoceptor blockade.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkraus, V.; Nose, M; H. Scholz; Thormählen, K.

    1989-01-01

    1. It has been suggested that impaired beta-adrenoceptor stimulation is a condition under which the functional role of cardiac alpha 1-adrenoceptors is enhanced. We therefore investigated the extent and time course of changes in alpha 1-adrenoceptor characteristics after chronic treatment with the beta-adrenoceptor blocker propranolol in rat heart. For comparison beta-adrenoceptors were also studied. The mechanism of the changes in adrenoceptor density was investigated with cycloheximide, an ...

  14. The use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in children with distal ureterolithiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Glina, F.P.; Castro, P.M.V.; Monteiro, G.G.R.; G.C. Del Guerra; S Glina; M. Mazzurana; Bernardo, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary lithiasis is the main urologic cause of emergency treatment in adult patient. In the past years, the incidence in children population has increased. However, literature about the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in pediatric population with distal ureterolithiasis is still scarce. The drug acts by decreasing ureter contractions, especially in the distal portion, facilitating calculus expulsion. Objective: This review has the objective to evaluate the use of alpha-1 ad...

  15. INFLUENCE OF ALPHA-1-ACID GLYCOPROTEIN UPON PRODUCTION OF CYTOKINES BY PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. V. Osikov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid is a multifunctional acute phase reactant belonging to the family of lipocalines from plasma alpha-2 globulin fraction. In present study, we investigated dosedependent effects of orosomucoid upon secretion of IL-1â, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4 by mononuclear cells from venous blood of healthy volunteers. Mononuclear cells were separated by means of gradient centrifugation, followed by incubation for 24 hours with 250, 500, or 1000 mcg of orosomucoid per ml RPMI-1640 medium (resp., low, medium and high dose. The levels of cytokine production were assayed by ELISA technique. Orosomucoid-induced secretion of IL-1â and IL-4 was increased, whereas IL-3 secretion was inhibited. IL-2 production was suppressed at low doses of orosomucoid, and stimulated at medium and high doses. The effect of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein upon production of IL-2, IL-3 and IL-4 was dose-dependent. Hence, these data indicate that orosomucoid is capable of modifying IL-1â, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-4 secretion by blood mononuclear cells.

  16. Histamine receptors on adult rat cardiomyocytes: antagonism of alpha1-receptor stimulation of cAMP degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of intact cardiomyocytes with the histamine antagonist [3H]mepyramine results in rapid reversible binding to a single class of high affinity sites (K/sub D/ = 1.2nM; 50,000 sites/myocyte). In membranes from purified myocytes histamine competition of [3H]mepyramine binding (K/sub D/ = 300nM) is not altered by GTP (10μM). Competition of [3H]mepyramine binding by H-receptor subtype-selective antagonists suggests the presence of a single class of H1-receptors. Incubation of intact myocytes with histamine (luM, H1 receptor activation) plus norepinephrine (NE 1uM, alpha1 + beta1 receptor activation) for 3 min leads to significantly more cAMP accumulation (36.5 pmol/106 myocytes) than NE alone (30 pmol/106 myocytes). Histamine alone does not alter basal cAMP = 10.4 pmol/106 myocytes, or beta1 stimulation (isoproternol, 1uM) = 39.6 pmol/106 myocytes. Cyclic AMP accumulation with NE plus prazosin 10nM, (alpha1 + beta1 + alpha1 blockade) is indistinguishable from NE + histamine, (alpha1 + beta1 + H1) stimulation. Histamine competition for [3H]prazosin binding suggests that histamine does not block alpha1 receptors on the myocyte. These data suggest that H1 receptor activation leads to antagonism of the alpha1 receptor mediated activation of cAMP phosphodiesterase the authors have recently described

  17. Production of glycosylated physiologically normal human α1-antitrypsin by mouse fibroblasts modified by insertion of a human α1-antitrypsin cDNA using a retroviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    α2-Antitrypsin (α1AT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder characterized by reduced serum levels of α1AT, resulting in destruction of the lower respiratory tract by neutrophil elastase. As an approach to augment α1AT levels in this disorder with physiologically normal human α1AT, the authors have integrated a full-length normal human α1AT cDNA into the genome of mouse fibroblasts. To accomplish this, the retroviral vector N2 was modified by inserting the simian virus 40 early promoter followed by the α1AT cDNA. Southern analysis demonstrated that the intact cDNA was present in the genome of selected clones of the transfected murine fibroblasts psi2 and infected NIH 3T3. The clones produced three mRNA transcripts containing human α1AT sequences, secreted an α1AT molecule recognized by an anti-human α1AT antibody, with the same molecular mass as normal human α1AT and that complexed with and inhibited human neutrophil elastase. The psi2 produced α1AT was glycosylated, and when infused intravenously into mice, it had a serum half-life similar to normal α1AT purified from human plasma and markedly longer than that of nonglycosylated human α1AT cDNA-directed yeast-produced α1AT. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using a retroviral vector to insert the normal human α1AT cDNA into non-α1AT-producing cells, resulting in the synthesis and secretion of physiologically normal α1AT

  18. Alpha1A-adrenergic receptor-directed autoimmunity induces left ventricular damage and diastolic dysfunction in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Wenzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agonistic autoantibodies to the alpha(1-adrenergic receptor occur in nearly half of patients with refractory hypertension; however, their relevance is uncertain. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We immunized Lewis rats with the second extracellular-loop peptides of the human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor and maintained them for one year. Alpha(1A-adrenergic antibodies (alpha(1A-AR-AB were monitored with a neonatal cardiomyocyte contraction assay by ELISA, and by ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rats were followed with radiotelemetric blood pressure measurements and echocardiography. At 12 months, the left ventricles of immunized rats had greater wall thickness than control rats. The fractional shortening and dp/dt(max demonstrated preserved systolic function. A decreased E/A ratio in immunized rats indicated a diastolic dysfunction. Invasive hemodynamics revealed increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressures and decreased dp/dt(min. Mean diameter of cardiomyocytes showed hypertrophy in immunized rats. Long-term blood pressure values and heart rates were not different. Genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, collagens, extracellular matrix proteins, calcium regulating proteins, and proteins of energy metabolism in immunized rat hearts were upregulated, compared to controls. Furthermore, fibrosis was present in immunized hearts, but not in control hearts. A subset of immunized and control rats was infused with angiotensin (Ang II. The stressor raised blood pressure to a greater degree and led to more cardiac fibrosis in immunized, than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that alpha(1A-AR-AB cause diastolic dysfunction independent of hypertension, and can increase the sensitivity to Ang II. We suggest that alpha(1A-AR-AB could contribute to cardiovascular endorgan damage.

  19. Activity of alpha-1, 4-glucosidase in furazolidone-induced glycogenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, C M; Salam, A; Caldwell, R; Jankus, E F

    1978-01-01

    Furazolidone (FZ) at 700 and 800 p.p.m. was added to feed mixtures fed turkey poults two and three weeks posthatching, respectively, to induce acute experimental cardiomyopathy. Poults in the control pen received the same ration but without FZ. From EKG data obtained at 2, 4, and 5 weeks of age, control unaffected and experimental affected poults were selected for sacrifice. Poults were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and appropriate samples of hepatic tissue were removed for assays of activity of alpha-1, 4-glucosidase. Results indicate that enzyme activity in affected FZ-treated poults is similar to that in unaffected control poults. Lack of significant differences in activity of this lysosomal enzyme suggests that FZ-induced glycogenosis may be related to the adult form of idiopathic generalized glucogenosis, the etiology of which remains unidentified. PMID:353772

  20. Alpha1-acid glycoprotein post-translational modifications: a comparative two dimensional electrophoresis based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Roncada

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP is an immunomodulatory protein expressed by hepatocytes in response to the systemic reaction that follows tissue damage caused by inflammation, infection or trauma. A proteomic approach based on two dimensional electrophoresis, immunoblotting and staining of 2DE gels with dyes specific for post-translational modifications (PTMs such as glycosylation and phosphorylation has been used to evaluate the differential interspecific protein expression of AGP purified from human, bovine and ovine sera. By means of these techniques, several isoforms have been identified in the investigated species: they have been found to change both with regard to the number of isoforms expressed under physiological condition and with regard to the quality of PTMs (i.e. different oligosaccharidic chains, presence/absence of phosphorilations. In particular, it is suggested that bovine serum AGP may have one of the most complex pattern of PTMs among serum proteins of mammals studied so far.

  1. Isolation and purification of a neutral alpha(1,2)-mannosidase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonay, P; Fresno, M

    1999-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease in humans. Although a fair amount is known about the biochemistry of certain trypanosomes, very little is known about the enzymic complement of synthesis and processing of glycoproteins and/or functions of the subcellular organelles in this parasite. There have been very few reports on the presence of acid and neutral hydrolases in Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report the first purification and characterization of a neutral mannosidase from the epimastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi. The neutral mannosidase was purified nearly 800-fold with an 8% recovery to apparent homogeneity from a CHAPS extract of epimastigotes by the following procedures: (1) metal affinity chromatography on Co+2-Sepharose, (2) anion exchange, and (3) hydroxylapatite. The purified enzyme has a native molecular weight of 150-160 kDa and is apparently composed of two subunits of 76 kDa. The purified enzyme exhibits a broad pH profile with a maximum at pH 5.9-6.3. It is inhibited by swainsonine (Ki, 0.1 microM), D-mannono-delta-lactam (Ki, 20 microM), kifunensine (Ki, 60 microM) but not significantly by deoxymannojirimycin. The enzyme is activated by Co2+and Ni2+and strongly inhibited by EDTA and Fe2+. The purified enzyme is active against p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannoside (km = 87 microM). High-mannose Man9GlcNAc substrate was hydrolyzed by the purified enzyme to Man7GlcNAc at pH 6.1. The purified enzyme does not show activity against alpha1,3- or alpha1,6-linked mannose residues. Antibodies against the recently purified lysosomal alpha-mannosidase from T.cruzi did not react with the neutral mannosidase reported here. PMID:10207175

  2. Relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and response in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy by agonists or antagonists and the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ was examined. Receptor occupancy was measured using the antagonist [3H]prazosin and correlated with agonist-elicited 45Ca2+ fluxes. The agonists epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and phenylephrine (PE) coordinately activated Ca2+ efflux, reflecting a substantial mobilization of intracellular Ca2+, as well as a smaller 45Ca2+ influx. The agonist concentration dependences for influx and efflux were similar, with the order of potency expected for alpha 1 receptors (E greater than or equal to NE greater than PE). To determine the relationship between receptor occupancy and response, the slowly dissociating antagonist prazosin was used to inactivate specified fractions of the receptor population. A linear relationship was observed between the remaining activatable receptors and residual 45Ca2+ efflux elicited by E or NE, except at saturating agonist concentrations where some curvature was observed. Moreover, the concentration dependence for agonist-elicited 45Ca2+ efflux was shifted toward slightly higher concentrations of E or NE following prazosin inactivation. These results suggest the presence of a modest receptor reserve which is revealed by E or NE, but not by PE. Agonist occupation was measured over the same interval as receptor activation by competition with the initial rate of [3H]prazosin association. All three agonists exhibited the major fraction of receptor occupation over the same concentration ranges required for the functional response. Exposure of receptors to specified agonist concentrations for 30 min had little effect on the number of receptors or their ligand affinities, whereas a 2.5-hr exposure to agonist decreased apparent agonist affinity as well as the number of receptors recognized by [3H]prazosin

  3. Expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor in human alcoholic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewohl, J M; Crane, D I; Dodd, P R

    1997-03-14

    The expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor was studied in the superior frontal and motor cortices of 10 control, 10 uncomplicated alcoholic and 7 cirrhotic alcoholic cases matched for age and post-mortem delay. The assay was based on competitive RT/PCR using a single set of primers specific to the alpha class of isoform mRNA species, and was normalized against a synthetic cRNA internal standard. The assay was shown to be quantitative for all three isoform mRNA species. Neither the patient's age nor the post-mortem interval significantly affected the expression of any isoform in either cortical area. The profile of expression was shown to be significantly different between the case groups, particularly because alpha 1 expression was raised in both groups of alcoholics of controls. The two groups of alcoholics could be differentiated on the basis of regional variations in alpha 1 expression. In frontal cortex, alpha 1 mRNA expression was significantly increased when uncomplicated alcoholics were compared with control cases whereas alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were not significantly different from either controls or uncomplicated alcoholic cases. In the motor cortex, alpha 1 expression was elevated only when alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were compared with control cases. There was no significant difference between case groups or areas for any other isoform. PMID:9098573

  4. Triple helix formation with the promoter of human alpha1(I) procollagen gene by an antiparallel triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotide.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakanishi, M.; K. T. Weber; Guntaka, R V

    1998-01-01

    The promoters of alpha1(I) procollagen genes of vertebrates contain two contiguous stretches of polypyrimidine/polypurine sequences, referred to as C1 (-140 to -170) and C2 (-171 to -200). Antiparallel triplex-forming upstream oligonucleotides form efficient triplexes with C1. The C1 tract of human differs from rodent alpha1(I) promoters by 7 nt which are mainly A-->G transitions. Human triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotide (TFO) formed stable triplexes efficiently with a K d of approximat...

  5. Directing membrane chromatography to manufacture α1-antitrypsin from human plasma fraction IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinxin; Luo, Jianquan; Song, Weijie; Chen, Xiangrong; Wan, Yinhua

    2015-12-01

    The surging demand for plasma proteins, mainly driven by the growing market and the development of new therapeutic indications, is promoting manufacturers to improve the throughput of plasma proteins. Due to the inherent convective mass transfer, membrane chromatography has been proved to be an efficient approach for extracting a small amount of target proteins from large-volume feed. In this study, α1-antitrypsin (AAT) was extracted from human plasma fraction IV by a two-step membrane chromatography. An anion-exchange membrane chromatography (AEMC) was used to capture the plasma proteins in bind/elute mode, and the obtained effluent was further polished by a hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (HIMC) in flow-through mode. Under optimal conditions, the recovery and purity of AAT achieved 87.0% and 0.58 AAT/protein (g/g) by AEMC, respectively. After the precise polishing by HIMC, the purity of AAT was 1.22 AAT/protein (g/g). The comparison results showed that membrane chromatography outperformed column chromatography in both steps because of its high throughput. This two-step membrane chromatography could obtain an AAT recovery of 83.3% and an activity recovery of 91.4%. The outcome of this work not only offers an alternative process for protein purification from plasma, but also provides guidelines for manufacturing product from a large-volume feed with multi-components by membrane chromatography. PMID:26518493

  6. Z α-1 antitrypsin deficiency and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catherine; M; Greene; Noel; G; McElvaney

    2010-01-01

    The serine proteinase inhibitor α-1 antitrypsin(AAT) is produced principally by the liver at the rate of 2 g/d.It is secreted into the circulation and provides an antiprotease protective screen throughout the body but most importantly in the lung,where it can neutralise the activity of the serine protease neutrophil elastase.Mutations leading to def iciency in AAT are associated with liver and lung disease.The most notable is the Z AAT mutation,which encodes a misfolded variant of the AAT protein in which the glutamic acid at position 342 is replaced by a lysine.More than 95% of all individuals with AAT def iciency carry at least one Z allele.ZAAT protein is not secreted effectively and accumulates intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum(ER) of hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells.This results in a loss of function associated with decreased circulating and intrapulmonary levels of AAT.However,the misfolded protein acquires a toxic gain of function that impacts on the ER.A major function of the ER is to ensure correct protein folding.ZAAT interferes with this function and promotes ER stress responses and inflammation.Here the signalling pathways activated during ER stress in response to accumulation of ZAAT are described and therapeutic strategies that can potentially relieve ER stress are discussed.

  7. Deletion of Serpina1a, a murine α1-antitrypsin ortholog, results in embryonic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Wang, Weimin; Dawkins, Paul; Paterson, Trevor; Kalsheker, Noor; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Houghton, A McGarry

    2011-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States Approximately 1% to 2% of COPD patients suffer from α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency, the major inheritable predisposition to COPD/emphysema. To further study the role of A1AT deficiency in the pathogenesis of COPD/emphysema, the authors attempted to generate null-mutant mice for Serpina1a, 1 of 2 A1AT orthologs in mice. Here the authors show that targeted deletion of Serpina1a results in embryonic lethality prior to 8.5 days post conception (dpc). The results are surprising given that A1AT-null humans exist and therefore do not require this gene product for normal development. The Serpina1 gene cluster is substantially different between mouse and man. Through gene duplication, mice have 3 to 5 (depending on the strain) highly homologous proteinase inhibiting (Pi) genes, 2 of which inhibit neutrophil elastase. Despite the abundance of Pi genes in mice, Serpina1a serves a critical, nonredundant function during early mouse development. A1AT-deficient mice have been highly sought after to study emphysema, cancer, and liver disease, and as a model to perfect gene replacement therapy. These results highlight important differences between human and murine serpins and point to the difficulty inherent to using gene-targeted mice to study this common human genetic disease. PMID:21574874

  8. Fecal calprotectin and α1-antitrypsin dynamics in gastrointestinal GvHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, A; Kapel, N; Xhaard, A; Sicre de Fontbrune, F; Manéné, D; Dhedin, N; de Latour, R P; Socié, G; Robin, M

    2015-08-01

    In a previous study, the fecal biomarkers calprotectin and α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) at symptom onset were reported to be significantly associated with the response to steroids in gastrointestinal GvHD (GI-GvHD). The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the dynamics of the fecal biomarkers calprotectin and α1-AT throughout the course of GvHD. Patients who were refractory to steroids had initially higher biomarker levels and in the course of GvHD demonstrated a continuous increase in fecal biomarkers. In contrast, the dynamics of calprotectin and α1-AT demonstrated low and decreasing levels in cortico-sensitive GvHD. In steroid-refractory patients who received a second line of treatment, the biomarker levels at the beginning of second-line treatment did not predict the subsequent response. Nevertheless, calprotectin levels progressively decreased in subsequent responders, whereas non-responders demonstrated continuously high levels of calprotectin. α1-AT values correlated to a lesser extent with the response to second-line treatment and remained elevated in both non-responders and responders. In conclusion, calprotectin monitoring can be of use in the management of immunosuppressive treatment in GI-GvHD. PMID:25961766

  9. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  10. Z α-1 antitrypsin deficiency and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-10-06

    The serine proteinase inhibitor α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is produced principally by the liver at the rate of 2 g\\/d. It is secreted into the circulation and provides an antiprotease protective screen throughout the body but most importantly in the lung, where it can neutralise the activity of the serine protease neutrophil elastase. Mutations leading to deficiency in AAT are associated with liver and lung disease. The most notable is the Z AAT mutation, which encodes a misfolded variant of the AAT protein in which the glutamic acid at position 342 is replaced by a lysine. More than 95% of all individuals with AAT deficiency carry at least one Z allele. ZAAT protein is not secreted effectively and accumulates intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells. This results in a loss of function associated with decreased circulating and intrapulmonary levels of AAT. However, the misfolded protein acquires a toxic gain of function that impacts on the ER. A major function of the ER is to ensure correct protein folding. ZAAT interferes with this function and promotes ER stress responses and inflammation. Here the signalling pathways activated during ER stress in response to accumulation of ZAAT are described and therapeutic strategies that can potentially relieve ER stress are discussed.

  11. Alpha1 receptor coupling events initiated by methoxy-substituted tolazoline partial agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of mono- and dimethyoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives, known to be partial agonists at the alpha1 receptor, were compared with the α1 selective full agonist phenylephrine (PE) on isolated strips of rabbit aorta Agonist activity was evaluated in contraction, 45Ca influx, 45Ca efflux, and 32P-Phospholipid labelling studies. Maximum contractile responses for the 2-, 3-, and 3, 5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives (10-5M) were 53.8, 67.6 and 99.7% of the PE (10-5M) response respectively. These same partial agonists caused a stimulation of 45Ca influx to the extent of 64, 86, and 95% of the PE response respectively. In 45Ca efflux studies, (a measure of the intracellular Ca+2 release) the tolazolines caused: 30%, 63%, and 78% of the PE stimulated level. 32P-Phosphatidic acid (PA) labelling was measured as an index of PI turnover after α1 receptor stimulation. Compared to PE, the 2-, 3-, and 3,5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives caused 22, 46, and 72% PA labelling. The above values are all in reasonable accord with the rank order or agonist activity shown in maximum contractile responses. The results of this investigation suggest that partial agonists stimulate α receptor coupling events at a level which is quantitatively comparable to their potencies in causing contraction of arterial smooth muscle

  12. Collagen type I alpha 1 gene polymorphism in premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujović Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Premature ovarian failure (POF is characterized by amenorrhea, hypergonadotropism and hypoestrogenism in women bellow 40 years. Osteoporosis is one of the late complications of POF. Objective. To correlate collagen type I alpha1 (COLIA1 gene polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD in women with POF. Methods. We determined the COLIA1 genotypes SS, Ss, ss in 66 women with POF. Single nucleotide polymorphism (G to T substitution within the Sp 1-binding site in the first intron of the COLIA1 gene was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis. Bone mineral density (BMD was measured at the lumbar spine region by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Statistics: Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA, Chisquare test, Spearman correlation test. Results. The relative distribution of COLIA1 genotype alleles was SS - 54.4%, Ss - 41.0% and ss - 4.5%. No significant differences were found between genotype groups in body mass index, age, duration of amenorrhea or BMD. A significant positive correlation was observed between BMI and parity. Conclusion. The COLIA1 gene is just one of many genes influencing bone characteristics. It may act as a marker for differences in bone quantity and quality, bone fragility and accelerated bone loss in older women. However, in young women with POF, COLIA1 cannot identify those at higher risk for osteoporosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 173056

  13. Cerebral artery alpha-1 AR subtypes: high altitude long-term acclimatization responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Goyal

    Full Text Available In response to hypoxia and other stress, the sympathetic (adrenergic nervous system regulates arterial contractility and blood flow, partly through differential activities of the alpha1 (α1 - adrenergic receptor (AR subtypes (α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-AR. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that with acclimatization to long-term hypoxia (LTH, contractility of middle cerebral arteries (MCA is regulated by changes in expression and activation of the specific α1-AR subtypes. We conducted experiments in MCA from adult normoxic sheep maintained near sea level (300 m and those exposed to LTH (110 days at 3801 m. Following acclimatization to LTH, ovine MCA showed a 20% reduction (n = 5; P<0.05 in the maximum tension achieved by 10-5 M phenylephrine (PHE. LTH-acclimatized cerebral arteries also demonstrated a statistically significant (P<0.05 inhibition of PHE-induced contractility in the presence of specific α1-AR subtype antagonists. Importantly, compared to normoxic vessels, there was significantly greater (P<0.05 α1B-AR subtype mRNA and protein levels in LTH acclimatized MCA. Also, our results demonstrate that extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2-mediated negative feedback regulation of PHE-induced contractility is modulated by α1B-AR subtype. Overall, in ovine MCA, LTH produces profound effects on α1-AR subtype expression and function.

  14. The resistance of delayed xenograft rejection to alpha(1,3)-galactosyltransferase gene inactivation and CD4 depletion in a mouse-to-rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alastair B; Kirkeby, Svend; Aasted, Bent; Dahl, Kirsten; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Dieperink, Hans; Kemp, Ejvind; Buschard, Karsten; D'Apice, Anthony J F

    2003-01-01

    Critical to the prevention of xenograft loss is the prevention of delayed xenograft rejection (DXR), due to its resistance to conventional immunosuppression. The role of the carbohydrate galactose-alpha1,3-galactose (alpha1,3Gal) has been a matter of great debate and it has been proposed that the......), generated by alpha1,3-galacto-syltransferase gene disruption, were transplanted to anti-alpha1,3Gal antibody-free Lew/Mol rats. This model consists of an alpha1,3Gal/alpha1,3Gal-antibody-free environment, eliminating a possible influence of this specific system on DXR. A subgroup of recipients were...... furthermore CD4 depleted in order to inhibit CD4-dependent B-cell antibody production. Rejected hearts were evaluated by light- and immunofluorescence microscopy. Treatment effects on recipient T-cell subsets and cytokine expression were analyzed by flow cytometry, while antibody production was measured by...

  15. Triiodothyronine causes rapid reversal of alpha 1/cyclic adenosine monophosphate synergism on brown adipocyte respiration and type II deiodinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, M; Raasmaja, A; Moolten, N; Larsen, P R

    1991-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that thyroid status affects the response of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to the sympathetic nervous system. For example, hypothyroidism is associated with the development of a marked synergism between alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic pathways to stimulate type II iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase activity. Hypothyroidism also attenuates the respiratory response (thermogenesis) of isolated brown adipocytes to norepinephrine. To explore the interactions of the sympathetic nervous system and thyroid status in these cells, we compared the thermogenic and 5'-deiodinase responses to adrenergic agonists in isolated brown adipocytes from hypothyroid rats during treatment with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). The fivefold synergism of alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic catecholamines to increase the deiodinase activity was progressively reduced, reaching a control euthyroid value of unity after 5 days of T3 treatment. Hypothyroidism reduced both the O2max (twofold to threefold) and increased the concentration of agonist required for 50% stimulation (10-fold) for both norepinephrine and forskolin. In hypothyroid cells, there was a twofold synergism between the alpha 1-agonist cirazoline and forskolin to increase respiration, which was blocked by prazosin and reproduced by the calcium ionophore, A23187. This synergistic effect of the alpha 1-agonist was lost within 2 days of T3 administration. These studies identify a second Ca(2+)-dependent intra-adrenergic synergism, which functions to ameliorate the reduced cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsiveness of the hypothyroid brown adipocyte. PMID:1683679

  16. Up-regulation of alpha1A-adrenoceptors in rat mesenteric artery involves intracellular signal pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yong-Xiao; Xu, Cang-Bao; Luo, Guo-Gang; Edvinsson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if there is an altered expression of alpha-adrenoceptors during organ culture of rat mesenteric artery segments by using a sensitive pharmacological method and molecular biological techniques. Noradrenalin (NA) induced contraction via alpha1-adrenoc...

  17. Prolastin, a pharmaceutical preparation of purified human α1-antitrypsin, blocks endotoxin-mediated cytokine release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westin Ulla

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α1-antitrypsin (AAT serves primarily as an inhibitor of the elastin degrading proteases, neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3. There is ample clinical evidence that inherited severe AAT deficiency predisposes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Augmentation therapy for AAT deficiency has been available for many years, but to date no sufficient data exist to demonstrate its efficacy. There is increasing evidence that AAT is able to exert effects other than protease inhibition. We investigated whether Prolastin, a preparation of purified pooled human AAT used for augmentation therapy, exhibits anti-bacterial effects. Methods Human monocytes and neutrophils were isolated from buffy coats or whole peripheral blood by the Ficoll-Hypaque procedure. Cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS or zymosan, either alone or in combination with Prolastin, native AAT or polymerised AAT for 18 h, and analysed to determine the release of TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8. At 2-week intervals, seven subjects were submitted to a nasal challenge with sterile saline, LPS (25 μg and LPS-Prolastin combination. The concentration of IL-8 was analysed in nasal lavages performed before, and 2, 6 and 24 h after the challenge. Results In vitro, Prolastin showed a concentration-dependent (0.5 to 16 mg/ml inhibition of endotoxin-stimulated TNFα and IL-1β release from monocytes and IL-8 release from neutrophils. At 8 and 16 mg/ml the inhibitory effects of Prolastin appeared to be maximal for neutrophil IL-8 release (5.3-fold, p Conclusion Our data demonstrate for the first time that Prolastin inhibits bacterial endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, and provide scientific bases to explore new Prolastin-based therapies for individuals with inherited AAT deficiency, but also for other clinical conditions.

  18. Structures of NodZ [alpha]1,6-fucosyltransferase in complex with GDP and GDP-fucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz (NCI); (Polish)

    2012-03-26

    Rhizobial NodZ {alpha}1,6-fucosyltransferase ({alpha}1,6-FucT) catalyzes the transfer of the fucose (Fuc) moiety from guanosine 5'-diphosphate-{beta}-L-fucose to the reducing end of the chitin oligosaccharide core during Nod-factor (NF) biosynthesis. NF is a key signaling molecule required for successful symbiosis with a legume host for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. To date, only two {alpha}1,6-FucT structures have been determined, both without any donor or acceptor molecule that could highlight the structural background of the catalytic mechanism. Here, the first crystal structures of {alpha}1,6-FucT in complex with its substrate GDP-Fuc and with GDP, which is a byproduct of the enzymatic reaction, are presented. The crystal of the complex with GDP-Fuc was obtained through soaking of native NodZ crystals with the ligand and its structure has been determined at 2.35 {angstrom} resolution. The fucose residue is exposed to solvent and is disordered. The enzyme-product complex crystal was obtained by cocrystallization with GDP and an acceptor molecule, penta-N-acetyl-L-glucosamine (penta-NAG). The structure has been determined at 1.98 {angstrom} resolution, showing that only the GDP molecule is present in the complex. In both structures the ligands are located in a cleft formed between the two domains of NodZ and extend towards the C-terminal domain, but their conformations differ significantly. The structures revealed that residues in three regions of the C-terminal domain, which are conserved among {alpha}1,2-, {alpha}1,6- and protein O-fucosyltransferases, are involved in interactions with the sugar-donor molecule. There is also an interaction with the side chain of Tyr45 in the N-terminal domain, which is very unusual for a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase. Only minor conformational changes of the protein backbone are observed upon ligand binding. The only exception is a movement of the loop located between strand {beta}C2 and helix {alpha}C3. In addition

  19. Long-term experience in the treatment of α1-antitrypsin deficiency: 25 years of augmentation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Teschler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although it is often under-recognised, α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD represents one of the most common genetic respiratory disorders worldwide. Since the publication of studies in the late 1980s, which demonstrated that plasma-derived augmentation therapy with intravenous α1-antitrypsin (AAT can reverse the biochemical deficiencies in serum and lung fluid that characterise emphysema, augmentation therapy has become the cornerstone of patient management. This article, with a focus on experience gained in clinical practice in Germany, provides an overview of some of the research highlights and clinical experience gained in the use of augmentation therapy for AATD during the past 25 years, and briefly discusses the potential role of AAT augmentation therapy in lung transplant recipients. Additionally, the goals of AAT augmentation therapy will be discussed, namely to delay the progression of emphysema, reduce the frequency of exacerbations and improve health-related quality of life. Beyond pulmonary disease, there is recent growing evidence to indicate that AATD could also play a role in rare disorders such as panniculitis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and ulcerative colitis.

  20. α-1-Antitrypsin detected by MALDI imaging in the study of glomerulonephritis: Its relevance in chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; De Sio, Gabriele; Ferrario, Franco; Scalia, Carla; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Pontillo, Claudia; Filip, Szymon; Markoska, Katerina; Granata, Antonio; Spasovski, Goce; Jankowski, Joachim; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic glomerulonephritis (GN), such as membranous glomerulonephritis, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and IgA nephropathy (IgAN), represent the most frequent primary glomerular kidney diseases (GKDs) worldwide. Although the renal biopsy currently remains the gold standard for the routine diagnosis of idiopathic GN, the invasiveness and diagnostic difficulty related with this procedure highlight the strong need for new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to be translated into less invasive diagnostic tools. MALDI-MS imaging MALDI-MSI was applied to fresh-frozen bioptic renal tissue from patients with a histological diagnosis of FSGS (n = 6), IgAN, (n = 6) and membranous glomerulonephritis (n = 7), and from controls (n = 4) in order to detect specific molecular signatures of primary glomerulonephritis. MALDI-MSI was able to generate molecular signatures capable to distinguish between normal kidney and pathological GN, with specific signals (m/z 4025, 4048, and 4963) representing potential indicators of chronic kidney disease development. Moreover, specific disease-related signatures (m/z 4025 and 4048 for FSGS, m/z 4963 and 5072 for IgAN) were detected. Of these signals, m/z 4048 was identified as α-1-antitrypsin and was shown to be localized to the podocytes within sclerotic glomeruli by immunohistochemistry. α-1-Antitrypsin could be one of the markers of podocyte stress that is correlated with the development of FSGS due to both an excessive loss and a hypertrophy of podocytes. PMID:26749278

  1. Alpha One Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tested Find Support Find Doctor What Is Alpha-1? Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency (Alpha-1) is a ... results for inhaled augmentation More News Our Number One Goal: Find a cure for Alpha-1. Website ...

  2. Alpha-1 adrenoceptors in brown adipose tissue of lean and ob/ob mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obese (ob/ob) mice have a low capacity to increase thyroxine 5'-deiodinase (T4 5'-D) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) when exposed to cold. This effect is mediated by alpha-1 (A-1) adrenoceptors. The authors objective was to find out whether BAT of the ob/ob mouse has normal A-1 receptors. Saturation analysis of binding of [3H]-WB4101 at 0.05 nM to 10 μM to crude membrane preparations (100,000 g pellets from Polytron homogenates) using the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard, showed two populations of binding sites in BAT of lean (+/+, 11-15 wk old) mice. Acute exposure (12 h, 140C) or acclimation to cold (3 wk, 140C) did not alter affinity or concentration of sites. Displacement with yohimbine and prazosin indicated binding of WB4101 to A-1 receptors. Very young (5 wk) lean (+/.) and obese mice had similar affinity constants (lean 0.13 +/- 0.043 and 34.2 +/- 14.9; obese, 0.12 +/- 0.028 and 20.9 +/- 5.48 nM) and concentrations (lean 22.4 +/- 3.8 and 647 +/- 137; obese, 28.6 +/- 4.6 and 547 +/- 105 fmol/mg protein) of sites. Old (1 yr) mice had high affinity sites similar to those in younger animals (KD lean 0.19 +/- 0.028, obese, 0.25 +/- 0.075; Bmax lean, 60.2 +/- 12.1; obese, 63.1 +/- 13.5 fmol/mg protein). The authors conclude that the ob/ob mouse has normal high affinity A-1 receptors in BAT. Anomalous properties of low affinity binding in old ob/ob mice could not be characterized because of high nonspecific binding. BAT of the ob/ob mouse does not lack A-1 receptors but may have a post-receptor alteration in the A-1 adrenoceptor-mediated response

  3. ACTIVATION OF ALPHA1-ADRENOCEPTORS ENHANCES GLUTAMATE RELEASE ONTO VTA DA CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Martinez, M.C.; Vázquez-Torres, R.; Jiménez-Rivera, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays an important role in reward and motivational processes that facilitate the development of drug addiction. Glutamatergic inputs into the VTA contribute to dopamine (DA) neuronal activation related to reward and response-initiating effects in drug abuse. Previous investigations indicate that alpha1-adrenoreceptors (α1-AR) are primarily localized at presynaptic elements in the ventral midbrain. Studies from several brain regions have shown that presynaptic α1-AR activation enhance glutamate release. Therefore, we hypothesized that glutamate released onto VTA-DA neurons is modulated by pre-synaptic α1-AR. Recordings were obtained from putative VTA-DA cells of male Sprague-Dawley rats (28–50 days postnatal) using voltage clamp techniques. Phenylephrine (10 µM) and methoxamine (80 µM), both α1-AR agonists, increased AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) amplitude evoked by electrical stimulation of afferent fibers (p<0.05). This effect was blocked by the α1-AR antagonist prazosin (1 µM). Phenylephrine decreased the paired-pulse ratio and increased spontaneous EPSCs frequencies but not their amplitudes suggesting a presynaptic locus of action. No changes in miniature EPSCs (0.5 µM TTX) were observed after phenylephrine’s application which suggest that α1-AR effect was action potential dependent. Normal extra- and intracellular Ca2+ concentration seems necessary for the α1-AR effect since phenylephrine in low Ca2+ ACSF and depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin (10 µM) failed to increase the AMPA EPSCs amplitude . Chelerythrine (1 µM, PKC inhibitor) but not Rp-cAMPS (11 µM, PKA inhibitor) blocked the α1-AR activation effect on AMPA EPSCs, indicating that a PKC intracellular pathway is required. These results demonstrated that presynaptic α1-ARs activation modulates glutamatergic inputs that affect VTA-DA neurons excitability. α1-ARs action might be heterosynaptically

  4. Structural basis of carbohydrate recognition by a Man(alpha1-2)Man-specific lectin from Bowringia milbraedii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy

    2006-07-01

    The crystal structure of the seed lectin from the tropical legume Bowringia milbraedii was determined in complex with the disaccharide ligand Man(alpha1-2)Man. In solution, the protein exhibits a dynamic dimer-tetramer equilibrium, consistent with the concanavalin A-type tetramer observed in the crystal. Contacts between the tetramers are mediated almost exclusively through the carbohydrate ligand, resulting in a crystal lattice virtually identical to that of the concanavalin-A:Man(alpha1-2)Man complex, even though both proteins have less than 50% sequence identity. The disaccharide binds exclusively in a "downstream" binding mode, with the non-reducing mannose occupying the monosaccharide-binding site. The reducing mannose is bound in a predominantly polar subsite involving Tyr131, Gln218, and Tyr219. PMID:16567368

  5. Alteration of alpha 1 Na+,K(+)-ATPase 86Rb+ influx by a single amino acid substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sodium- and potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na+,K(+)-ATPase) maintains the transmembrane Na+ gradient to which is coupled all active cellular transport systems. The R and S alleles of the gene encoding the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit isoform were identified in Dahl salt-resistant (DR) and Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats, respectively. Characterization of the S allele-specific Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 complementary DNA identified a leucine substitution of glutamine at position 276. This mutation alters the hydropathy profile of a region in proximity to T3(Na), the trypsin-sensitive site that is only detected in the presence of Na+. This mutation causes a decrease in the rubidium-86 influx of S allele-specific sodium pumps, thus marking a domain in the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha subunit important for K+ transport, and supporting the hypothesis of a putative role of these pumps in hypertension

  6. Effects of jump training on procollagen alpha(1)(i) mRNA expression and its relationship with muscle collagen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducomps, Christophe; Larrouy, Dominique; Mairal, Aline; Doutreloux, Jean-Paul; Lebas, Francois; Mauriege, Pascale

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a prolonged high-intensity exercise, jumping, on procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA level and collagen concentration in different muscles of trained (T) and control (C) rabbits. Procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA expression was much higher (2.8 to 23.5 times) in semimembranosus proprius (SMP), a slow-twitch oxidative muscle, than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL), rectus femoris (RF), and psoas major (Psoas) muscles, both fast-twitch mixed and glycolytic, whatever group was considered (p < 0.001). Procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA level also decreased significantly between 50 and 140 days in all muscles (0.001< p < 0.01). However, mRNA levels were 16 to 97% greater at 140 days in all muscles of T animals compared to C ones (0.01< p <0.05). Collagen concentrations of EDL and RF muscles were also higher (14 to 19%) in T than in C rabbits at 90 and 140 days (0.001 < p < 0.05). In the whole sample, collagen concentration was negatively associated with the procollagen alpha(1)(I) mRNA level in EDL and RF muscles (- 0.49 < r < (- 0.44, p < 0.05), while being positively related to mRNA expression in SMP and Psoas muscles (0.65 < r < 0.85, p < 0.01). It is concluded that jump training clearly restricts the decrease of procollagen (I) mRNA level and probably affects collagen synthesis level. In trained rabbit muscles, the maintenance of a better synthesis level could partly explain the higher collagen concentrations found in EDL and RF at 140 days. Nevertheless, the collagen degradation process seems to play the main role in the increase of total collagen concentration with age in EDL and RF muscles. PMID:15064425

  7. Exclusion of the alpha 1(II) collagen structural gene as the mutant locus in type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, P; Ogilvie, D.; Smith, R.; Sykes, B

    1985-01-01

    We have used a high frequency site polymorphism within the human pro-alpha 1(II) collagen gene (COL2A1) in order to examine the segregation of this gene within a large pedigree with type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The EDS gene and the collagen gene segregate independently within the pedigree and therefore COL2A1 can be excluded as the mutant locus.

  8. Dopamine D2 receptors and alpha1-adrenoceptors synergistically modulate locomotion and behavior of rats in a place avoidance task

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stuchlík, Aleš; Petrásek, Tomáš; Valeš, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 189, č. 1 (2008), s. 139-144. ISSN 0166-4328 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/07/0341; GA MZd(CZ) NR9178; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0517; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : D2 receptors * alpha1-adrenoceptors * behavior Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.171, year: 2008

  9. The use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in children with distal ureterolithiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Glina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary lithiasis is the main urologic cause of emergency treatment in adult patient. In the past years, the incidence in children population has increased. However, literature about the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in pediatric population with distal ureterolithiasis is still scarce. The drug acts by decreasing ureter contractions, especially in the distal portion, facilitating calculus expulsion. Objective: This review has the objective to evaluate the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers as medical expulsive treatment in children with distal ureterolithiasis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and LILACS databases. We further searched manually the references of the primary studies. Searches were concluded on October 4th, 2014. Articles were selected, independently and in pairs, by the respective titles and summaries. Any divergence was resolved by consensus. Evidence Synthesis: Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists increased the probability of calculus expulsion by 27% (NNT=4. Calculi smaller than 5mm, increased by 33% (NNT=3. Larger than 5mm, increased by 34% (NNT=3. Conclusion: Alpha-1 adrenergic blocker use is related with a greater incidence of expulsion of ureteral calculi, smaller or greater than 5mm, and fewer episodes of pain when compared to ibuprofen. However it is necessary larger samples to enhance the power analysis of the expulsion of ureteral calculi larger than 5mm and the episodes of pain. Patient Summary: This review analyzed the outcome of alpha adrenergic antagonist in children with ureteral calculi. We conclude that it is the best medicine for use, since it helps the expulsion of the stone.

  10. The use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in children with distal ureterolithiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Glina, F.P.; Castro, P.M.V.; Monteiro, G.G.R.; G.C. Del Guerra; S. Glina; M. Mazzurana; W.M. Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Urinary lithiasis is the main urologic cause of emergency treatment in adult patient. In the past years, the incidence in children population has increased. However, literature about the use of alpha-1 adrenergic blockers in pediatric population with distal ureterolithiasis is still scarce. The drug acts by decreasing ureter contractions, especially in the distal portion, facilitating calculus expulsion. Objective: This review has the objective to evaluate the use of al...

  11. Effect of aging on alpha-1 adrenergic stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of aging were examined on the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in three brain regions. Tissue minces of thalamus, cerebral cortex and hippocampus from 3-, 18- and 28-month-old male Fischer 344 rats were prelabeled with [3H]myoinositol. Exposure of these prelabeled minces to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine revealed that accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates was selectively reduced by 20 to 30% in the thalamus and cerebral cortex of the oldest age group. Analysis of concentration-response and competition binding curves indicated that this decrease was due to diminished agonist efficacy rather than diminished receptor affinity. The reduction in responsiveness to phenylephrine and (-)-norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex and the lack of any changes in the hippocampus parallel previously reported changes in the density of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors with aging. These data indicate that the ability of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonists to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis is reduced in some, but not all, brain regions of aged Fischer 344 rats

  12. Integrin alpha1beta1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor activation by controlling peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent caveolin-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwu; Whiting, Carrie; Borza, Corina; Hu, Wen; Mont, Stacey; Bulus, Nada; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2010-06-01

    Integrin alpha1beta1 negatively regulates the generation of profibrotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation; however, the mechanism by which it does this is unknown. In this study, we show that caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a scaffolding protein that binds integrins and controls growth factor receptor signaling, participates in integrin alpha1beta1-mediated EGFR activation. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells (MCs) have reduced Cav-1 levels, and reexpression of the integrin alpha1 subunit increases Cav-1 levels, decreases EGFR activation, and reduces ROS production. Downregulation of Cav-1 in wild-type MCs increases EGFR phosphorylation and ROS synthesis, while overexpression of Cav-1 in the integrin alpha1-null MCs decreases EGFR-mediated ROS production. We further show that integrin alpha1-null MCs have increased levels of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which leads to reduced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a transcription factor that positively regulates Cav-1 expression. Moreover, activation of PPARgamma or inhibition of ERK increases Cav-1 levels in the integrin alpha1-null MCs. Finally, we show that glomeruli of integrin alpha1-null mice have reduced levels of Cav-1 and activated PPARgamma but increased levels of phosphorylated EGFR both at baseline and following injury. Thus, integrin alpha1beta1 negatively regulates EGFR activation by positively controlling Cav-1 levels, and the ERK/PPARgamma axis plays a key role in regulating integrin alpha1beta1-dependent Cav-1 expression and consequent EGFR-mediated ROS production. PMID:20368353

  13. The effects of weekly augmentation therapy in patients with PiZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid ST

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available ST Schmid,1 J Koepke,1 M Dresel,1 A Hattesohl,1 E Frenzel,2 J Perez,3 DA Lomas,4 E Miranda,5 T Greulich,1 S Noeske,1 M Wencker,6 H Teschler,6 C Vogelmeier,1 S Janciauskiene,2,* AR Koczulla1,*1Department of Internal Medicine, Division for Pulmonary Diseases, University Hospital Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department of Cellular Biology, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 5Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Istituto Pasteur – Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 6Department of Pneumology, West German Lung Clinic, Essen University Hospital, Essen, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The major concept behind augmentation therapy with human α1-antitrypsin (AAT is to raise the levels of AAT in patients with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ (Glu342Lys-inherited AAT deficiency and to protect lung tissues from proteolysis and progression of emphysema.Objective: To evaluate the short-term effects of augmentation therapy (Prolastin® on plasma levels of AAT, C-reactive protein, and chemokines/cytokines.Materials and methods: Serum and exhaled breath condensate were collected from individuals with protease inhibitor phenotype ZZ AAT deficiency-related emphysema (n = 12 on the first, third, and seventh day after the infusion of intravenous Prolastin. Concentrations of total and polymeric AAT, interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and C-reactive protein were determined. Blood neutrophils and primary epithelial cells were also exposed to Prolastin (1 mg/mL.Results: There were significant fluctuations in serum (but not in exhaled breath condensate levels of AAT polymers, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL

  14. Plasma α1-antitrypsin: A Neglected Predictor of Angiographic Severity in Patients with Stable Angina Pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As an acute phase protein, α1-antitrypsin (AAT has been extensively studied in acute coronary syndrome, but it is unclear whether a relationship exists between AAT and stable angina pectoris (SAP. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between AAT plasma levels and SAP. Methods: Overall, 103 SAP patients diagnosed by coronary angiography and clinical manifestations and 118 control subjects matched for age and gender were enrolled in this case-control study. Plasma levels of AAT, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, lipid profiles and other clinical parameters were assayed for all participants. The severity of coronary lesions was evaluated based on the Gensini score (GS assessed by coronary angiography. Results: Positively correlated with the GS (r = 0.564, P < 0.001, the plasma AAT level in the SAP group was significantly higher than that in the control group (142.08 ± 19.61 mg/dl vs. 125.50 ± 19.67 mg/dl, P < 0.001. The plasma AAT level was an independent predictor for both SAP (odds ratio [OR] = 1.037, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.020-1.054, P < 0.001 and a high GS (OR = 1.087, 95% CI: 1.051-1.124, P < 0.001 in a multivariate logistic regression model. In the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, plasma AAT level was found to have a larger area under the curve (AUC for predicting a high GS (AUC = 0.858, 95% CI: 0.788-0.929, P < 0.001 than that of hsCRP (AUC = 0.665, 95% CI: 0.557-0.773, P = 0.006; Z = 2.9363, P < 0.001, with an optimal cut-off value of 137.85 mg/dl (sensitivity: 94.3%, specificity: 68.2%. Conclusions: Plasma AAT levels correlate with both the presence and severity of coronary stenosis in patients with SAP, suggesting that it could be a potential predictive marker of severe stenosis in SAP patients.

  15. Effect of calcium entry blockers on blood pressure and vasoconstrictor responses to alpha-1 adrenoceptor stimulation in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate whether vascular alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonism plays a role in the antihypertensive effect of verapamil, tiapamil, and nifedipine, we studied their potencies to inhibit K(+)-induced 45Ca2+ influx in rat isolated aorta and [3H]prazosin binding in rat brain membranes in vitro as well as their antihypertensive effect and functional alpha-1 adrenoceptor blockade in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) in vivo. Tiapamil proved 70 times less potent than verapamil in inhibiting calcium influx, but was equipotent in displacing [3H]prazosin. Nifedipine proved 10 times more potent than verapamil as calcium channel blocker but displayed negligible affinity for alpha-1 adrenoceptors in vitro. In conscious SHR, the three calcium channel blockers dose-dependently reduced mean arterial pressure after oral administration. Only at maximal anti-hypertensive doses, the increases in diastolic pressure to intravenous injection of the selective alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonist cirazoline were temporarily suppressed by nifedipine, verapamil, and tiapamil. No relationship existed between the relative potencies as calcium channel blocker and affinities for alpha-1 adrenoceptor binding sites in vitro with functional vascular alpha-1 adrenoceptor blockade in vivo. The data do not support the hypothesis that vascular alpha-1 adrenoceptor blockade plays a significant role in the anti-hypertensive effect of verapamil and related calcium channel blockers

  16. A 32 year old male with idiopathic hepatic encephalopathy and necrotic lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz ED

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old with undiagnosed alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency had an unusual initial presentation of acute liver failure, septic shock; adult respiratory distress syndrome and what appeared to be a left lower extremity soft tissue infection. Skin biopsy revealed panniculitis. Because of the diagnosis of panniculitis, an alpha-1 antitrypsin level was ordered and demonstrated alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency with a ZZ phenotype. The patient recovered with antibiotics and supportive therapy. This case illustrates that alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency can present other that the more usual adult presentation of progressive emphysema. Unexplained panniculitis should prompt investigation of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in the adult patient.

  17. Automated high-content live animal drug screening using C. elegans expressing the aggregation prone serpin α1-antitrypsin Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosai, Sager J; Kwak, Joon Hyeok; Luke, Cliff J; Long, Olivia S; King, Dale E; Kovatch, Kevin J; Johnston, Paul A; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S; Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    The development of preclinical models amenable to live animal bioactive compound screening is an attractive approach to discovering effective pharmacological therapies for disorders caused by misfolded and aggregation-prone proteins. In general, however, live animal drug screening is labor and resource intensive, and has been hampered by the lack of robust assay designs and high throughput work-flows. Based on their small size, tissue transparency and ease of cultivation, the use of C. elegans should obviate many of the technical impediments associated with live animal drug screening. Moreover, their genetic tractability and accomplished record for providing insights into the molecular and cellular basis of human disease, should make C. elegans an ideal model system for in vivo drug discovery campaigns. The goal of this study was to determine whether C. elegans could be adapted to high-throughput and high-content drug screening strategies analogous to those developed for cell-based systems. Using transgenic animals expressing fluorescently-tagged proteins, we first developed a high-quality, high-throughput work-flow utilizing an automated fluorescence microscopy platform with integrated image acquisition and data analysis modules to qualitatively assess different biological processes including, growth, tissue development, cell viability and autophagy. We next adapted this technology to conduct a small molecule screen and identified compounds that altered the intracellular accumulation of the human aggregation prone mutant that causes liver disease in α1-antitrypsin deficiency. This study provides powerful validation for advancement in preclinical drug discovery campaigns by screening live C. elegans modeling α1-antitrypsin deficiency and other complex disease phenotypes on high-content imaging platforms. PMID:21103396

  18. Automated high-content live animal drug screening using C. elegans expressing the aggregation prone serpin α1-antitrypsin Z.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sager J Gosai

    Full Text Available The development of preclinical models amenable to live animal bioactive compound screening is an attractive approach to discovering effective pharmacological therapies for disorders caused by misfolded and aggregation-prone proteins. In general, however, live animal drug screening is labor and resource intensive, and has been hampered by the lack of robust assay designs and high throughput work-flows. Based on their small size, tissue transparency and ease of cultivation, the use of C. elegans should obviate many of the technical impediments associated with live animal drug screening. Moreover, their genetic tractability and accomplished record for providing insights into the molecular and cellular basis of human disease, should make C. elegans an ideal model system for in vivo drug discovery campaigns. The goal of this study was to determine whether C. elegans could be adapted to high-throughput and high-content drug screening strategies analogous to those developed for cell-based systems. Using transgenic animals expressing fluorescently-tagged proteins, we first developed a high-quality, high-throughput work-flow utilizing an automated fluorescence microscopy platform with integrated image acquisition and data analysis modules to qualitatively assess different biological processes including, growth, tissue development, cell viability and autophagy. We next adapted this technology to conduct a small molecule screen and identified compounds that altered the intracellular accumulation of the human aggregation prone mutant that causes liver disease in α1-antitrypsin deficiency. This study provides powerful validation for advancement in preclinical drug discovery campaigns by screening live C. elegans modeling α1-antitrypsin deficiency and other complex disease phenotypes on high-content imaging platforms.

  19. Determination of molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in rat mesenteric artery by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation inactivation of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the purified plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery has been performed with high energy electrons at -45 to -55 degrees C. Alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor inactivation was monitored with [3H] prazosin and [3H]yohimbine binding, respectively. Internal endogenous and external standards of known molecular weight were used in these studies to determine the molecular size. The average value of D37 for the [3H]prazosin binding site was 6.75 +/- 0.62 Mrad (n = 4) with an estimated molecular size of 122,921 +/- 11,329 Daltons. However, the average value of D37 for the [3H] yohimbine binding site was higher (D37 = 10.05 +/- 0.91 Mrad) and accordingly the molecular size of this binding site was less than the [3H]prazosin binding sites (molecular weight = 82,540 +/- 7478 Daltons; n = 4). Irradiation did not change the dissociation constant of either radioligand, suggesting that the loss of the radioligand binding sites after radiation is due to receptor protein inactivation. These results confirm our earlier finding that [3H]prazosin and [3H]yohimbine bind to two distinct sites in the plasma membranes of rat mesenteric artery. Whether both of these sites are the subunits of a common macromolecule of alpha adrenoceptor on vascular smooth muscle in rat mesenteric artery cannot be concluded from these results. This report is the first one in the literature on the molecular size of alpha-1 and alpha-2 binding sites in vascular smooth muscle

  20. Regulation of coronary vascular tone via redox modulation in the alpha1-adrenergic-angiotensin-endothelin axis of the myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Ishibashi, Toshiyuki; Maruyama, Yukio; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation of cardiac myocytes results in the production of an endothelin (ET)-releasing factor that stimulates the coronary vasculature to release ET and, by manipulating the redox state of cardiac and vascular cells, may influence the extent of alpha(1)-adrenergic-ET-1 vasoconstriction. Dihydroethidium (DHE) and dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) intensities were increased by phenylephrine stimulation in isolated rat cardiac myocytes, which were enhanced by the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone (DHE: 20.4 +/- 1.2-fold and DCF: 25.2 +/- 0.9-fold, n = 8, P < 0.01, respectively) but not by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Olmesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, and enalaprilate did not change DHE and DCF intensities by phenylephrine. Next, we measured the vasoconstriction of isolated, pressurized rat coronary arterioles (diameter: 74 +/- 8 microm) in response to supernatant collected from isolated cardiac myocytes. The addition of supernatant from phenylephrine-stimulated myocytes to a 2-ml vessel bath (n = 8 each) caused volume-dependent vasoconstriction (500 microl: -14.8 +/- 2.2%). Olmesartan and TA0201, an ET type A receptor antagonist, converted vasoconstriction into vasodilation (8.5 +/- 1.2% and 10.5 +/- 0.5%, P < 0.01, respectively) in response to supernatant from phenylephrine-stimulated myocytes, which was eliminated with catalase. Vasoconstriction was weakened using supernatant from phenylephrine with rotenone-treated myocytes. Treatment of arterioles with apocynin to myocyte supernatant converted vasoconstriction into vasodilation (7.8 +/- 0.8%, P < 0.01). These results suggest that alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation in cardiac myocytes produces angiotensin I and H(2)O(2) and that angiotensin releases ET-1 through NADPH oxidase in coronary arterioles. Thus, coronary vasoconstriction via the alpha-adrenergic-angiotensin-ET axis appears to require redox

  1. A non-Golgi alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase that modifies Skp1 in the cytoplasm of Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Der Wel, H; Morris, H R; Panico, M; Paxton, T; North, S J; Dell, A; Thomson, J M; West, C M

    2001-09-01

    Skp1 is a subunit of the SCF-E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle and other regulatory factors for degradation. In Dictyostelium, Skp1 is modified by a pentasaccharide containing the type 1 blood group H trisaccharide at its core. To address how the third sugar, fucose alpha1,2-linked to galactose, is attached, a proteomics strategy was applied to determine the primary structure of FT85, previously shown to copurify with the GDP-Fuc:Skp1 alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Tryptic-generated peptides of FT85 were sequenced de novo using Q-TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Degenerate primers were used to amplify FT85 genomic DNA, which was further extended by a novel linker polymerase chain reaction method to yield an intronless open reading frame of 768 amino acids. Disruption of the FT85 gene by homologous recombination resulted in viable cells, which had altered light scattering properties as revealed by flow cytometry. FT85 was necessary and sufficient for Skp1 fucosylation, based on biochemical analysis of FT85 mutant cells and Escherichia coli that express FT85 recombinantly. FT85 lacks sequence motifs that characterize all other known alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferases and lacks the signal-anchor sequence that targets them to the secretory pathway. The C-terminal region of FT85 harbors motifs found in inverting Family 2 glycosyltransferase domains, and its expression in FT85 mutant cells restores fucosyltransferase activity toward a simple disaccharide substrate. Whereas most prokaryote and eukaryote Family 2 glycosyltransferases are membrane-bound and oriented toward the cytoplasm where they glycosylate lipid-linked or polysaccharide precursors prior to membrane translocation, the soluble, eukaryotic Skp1-fucosyltransferase modifies a protein that resides in the cytoplasm and nucleus. PMID:11423539

  2. Efficacy of selective alpha-1 blocker therapy in the treatment of acute urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an alpha-1 adrenoreceptor blocking agent for acute urinary symptoms in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1987 and 1995, 743 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT. A total of 275 (37%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary symptoms as defined by the RTOG morbidity scoring system. Terazosin hydrochloride (THC), a selective alpha-1 adrenoceptor blocking agent, was given to 119 (43%) patients for treatment of their urinary symptoms, whereas nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAID) were administered to 71 patients (26%). Thirty-one patients (11%) were treated with other medications, and 54 (20%) did not seek pharmacologic intervention for their urinary symptoms. Patients were monitored weekly to assess changes in urinary urgency, frequency, and nocturia. Results: Treatment with THC resulted in a significant resolution of urinary symptoms in 79 of 119 patients (66%), while 26 (22%) had moderate improvement, and 14 (12%) had minimal to no response to this drug. In contrast, only 11 of 71 (16%) of the patients treated with NSAIDs experienced significant symptom relief, 20 (28%) had moderate improvement, and 40 (56%) had minimal to no response. The difference in the significant symptomatic improvement between THC and NSAID therapy (66% vs. 16%) was highly significant (p < 0.001). For patients treated with THC, a higher likelihood of significant symptom relief was observed in patients who did not receive neoadjuvant androgen ablation (p = 0.04) and in those who were younger than 65 years of age (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Alpha-1 selective adrenoceptor blocking agents are effective in ameliorating the acute urinary symptoms in patients receiving radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Although this was not a randomized prospective study, the data suggest that NSAIDs were less effective in relieving radiation-induced urinary

  3. Expression and functional importance of collagen-binding integrins, alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1, on virus-activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Susanne Ø; Thomsen, Allan R; Koteliansky, Victor E; Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Sprague, Andrew G; de Fougerolles, Antonin R; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    Adhesive interactions are crucial to cell migration into inflammatory sites. Using murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as an Ag model system, we have investigated expression and function of collagen-binding integrins, alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1), on activated and memory T cells. Using...... this system and MHC tetramers to define Ag-specific T cells, we demonstrate that contrary to being VLAs, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) can be rapidly induced on acutely activated T cells, that expression of alpha(1)beta(1) remains elevated on memory T cells, and that expression of...... alpha(1)beta(1) parallels that of viral-specific effector CD8(+) T cells (defined by tetramer and IFN-gamma staining). In an adoptive transfer model, mAb-mediated blockade of these integrins on activated effector and memory T cells inhibited Ag-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity responses; similar...

  4. In vivo binding in rat brain and radiopharmaceutical preparation of radioiodinated HEAT, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couch, M.W.; Greer, D.M.; Thonoor, C.M.; Williams, C.M.

    1988-03-01

    In vivo binding of (/sup 125/I)-2-(beta-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl tetralone) ((/sup 125/I)HEAT) to alpha-1 adrenoceptors in the rat brain was determined over 4 hr. Uptake in the thalamus and frontal cortex was approximately 0.1% injected dose per gram tissue. Thalamus/cerebellum ratios of 10:1 and frontal cortex/cerebellum ratios of 5:1 were found at 4 hr. Pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist, completely inhibited the accumulation of (/sup 125/I)HEAT in thalamus and frontal cortex; yet uptake of radioactivity was not significantly affected by antagonists and agonists for other receptors classes (propranolol, beta-1; apomorphine, D-1; spiperone, D-2). Binding of (/sup 125/I)HEAT is saturable. At 4 hr, (/sup 125/I)HEAT or (/sup 123/I)HEAT was shown to be the only radioactive material in rat thalamus and frontal cortex. Iodine-123 HEAT and (/sup 125/I)HEAT were synthesized as radiopharmaceuticals within 3 hr in 99% radiochemical purity.

  5. Calcium currents and transients of native and heterologously expressed mutant skeletal muscle DHP receptor alpha1 subunits (R528H)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat-Rott, K; Uetz, U; Pika-Hartlaub, U; Powell, J; Fontaine, B; Melzer, W; Lehmann-Horn, F

    1998-02-20

    Rabbit cDNA of the alpha1 subunit of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine (DHP) receptor was functionally expressed in a muscular dysgenesis mouse (mdg) cell line, GLT. L-type calcium currents and transients were recorded for the wild type and a mutant alpha1 subunit carrying an R528H substitution in the supposed voltage sensor of the second channel domain that is linked to a human disease, hypokalemic periodic paralysis. L-type channels expressed in GLT myotubes exhibited currents similar to those described for primary cultured mdg cells injected with rabbit wild type cDNA, indicating this system to be useful for functional studies of heterologous DHP receptors. Voltage dependence and kinetics of activation and inactivation of L-type calcium currents from mutant and wild type channels did not differ significantly. Intracellular calcium release activation measured by fura-2 microfluorimetry was not grossly altered by the mutation either. Analogous measurements on myotubes of three human R528H carriers revealed calcium transients comparable to controls while the voltage dependence of both activation and inactivation of the L-type current showed a shift to more negative potentials of approximately 6 mV. Similar effects on the voltage dependence of the fast T-type current and changes in the expression level of the third-type calcium current point to factors not primarily associated with the mutation perhaps participating in disease pathogenesis. PMID:9512357

  6. Role of alpha-1 blocker in expulsion of stone fragments after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for renal stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Renal stone disease is a significant and worldwide health problem. Recent advances in stone management have allowed kidney stones to be treated using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), uretero-renoscopy (URS), and percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PCNL). Recently, medical expulsion therapy (MET) has been investigated as a supplement to observation in an effort to improve spontaneous stone passage rates. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, prospective study to determine whether the administration of Alpha-1-adrenergic receptor antagonists as an adjunctive medical therapy, increases the efficacy of ESWL to treat renal stones. Sixty patients with renal stones of 0.5-1.5 Cm in size (average size 1.2 Cm) were included in this study underwent ESWL followed by administration of Alpha-1-adrenergic receptor antagonists at department of Urology Liaquat National Hospital Karachi from Feb 2008 to Sept 2008. This was a comparative study and patients were divided into two groups. In group A patients received conventional treatment Diclofenac sodium, Anti Spasmodic (Drotaverine HCl) as required and Proton Pump inhibitor (Omeprazole 20 mg) once daily after shock wave lithotripsy. In group B patients received alpha-1 blocker, Alfuzosin HCl 5 mg twice daily in addition to conventional treatment. All patients were instructed to drink a minimum of 2 litres water daily. Ultrasound guided Dornier Alpha Impact Lithotripter was utilised for shock wave lithotripsy. Results: Of the 60 patients, 76.7% of those receiving Alfuzosin and 46.7% of controls had achieved clinical success at 1 month (p=0.01). The mean cumulative diclofenac dose was 485 mg per patient in the Alfuzosin group and 768 mg per patient in the control group (p=0.002). This difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Alfuzosin therapy as an adjunctive medical therapy after ESWL is more effective than lithotripsy alone for the treatment of patients with large renal

  7. Loss of Smyhc1 or Hsp90alpha1 function results in different effects on myofibril organization in skeletal muscles of zebrafish embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Codina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myofibrillogenesis requires the correct folding and assembly of sarcomeric proteins into highly organized sarcomeres. Heat shock protein 90alpha1 (Hsp90alpha1 has been implicated as a myosin chaperone that plays a key role in myofibrillogenesis. Knockdown or mutation of hsp90alpha1 resulted in complete disorganization of thick and thin filaments and M- and Z-line structures. It is not clear whether the disorganization of these sarcomeric structures is due to a direct effect from loss of Hsp90alpha1 function or indirectly through the disorganization of myosin thick filaments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we carried out a loss-of-function analysis of myosin thick filaments via gene-specific knockdown or using a myosin ATPase inhibitor BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide in zebrafish embryos. We demonstrated that knockdown of myosin heavy chain 1 (myhc1 resulted in sarcomeric defects in the thick and thin filaments and defective alignment of Z-lines. Similarly, treating zebrafish embryos with BTS disrupted thick and thin filament organization, with little effect on the M- and Z-lines. In contrast, loss of Hsp90alpha1 function completely disrupted all sarcomeric structures including both thick and thin filaments as well as the M- and Z-lines. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these studies indicate that the hsp90alpha1 mutant phenotype is not simply due to disruption of myosin folding and assembly, suggesting that Hsp90alpha1 may play a role in the assembly and organization of other sarcomeric structures.

  8. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is a ligand of alpha1B-glycoprotein in human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udby, Lene; Sørensen, Ole E; Pass, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    -like substances found in lizard saliva or snake venom. Human CRISP-3 is present in exocrine secretions and in secretory granules of neutrophilic granulocytes and is believed to play a role in innate immunity. On the basis of the relatively high content of CRISP-3 in human plasma and the small size of the protein...... (28 kDa), we hypothesized that CRISP-3 in plasma was bound to another component. This was supported by size-exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation of plasma proteins. The binding partner was identified by mass spectrometry as alpha(1)B-glycoprotein (A1BG), which is a known plasma protein of......Human cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3; also known as SGP28) belongs to a family of closely related proteins found in mammals and reptiles. Some mammalian CRISPs are known to be involved in the process of reproduction, whereas some of the CRISPs from reptiles are neurotoxin...

  9. Fetal antigen 2: an amniotic protein identified as the aminopropeptide of the alpha 1 chain of human procollagen type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teisner, B; Rasmussen, H B; Højrup, P;

    1992-01-01

    Fetal antigen (FA2) was purified from second trimester human amniotic fluid by immunospecific chromatography, gel filtration and reversed-phase chromatography. Gel filtration revealed two molecular forms of FA2 eluting at volumes corresponding to an M(r) of approximately 100 kDa and 30 kDa. SDS...... aminopropeptide of the alpha 1 chain of human procollagen type I as determined by nucleotide sequences. After oxidative procedures normally employed for radio-iodination (iodogen and chloramine-T), FA2 lost its immunoreactivity. An antigen which cross-reacted with polyclonal rabbit anti-human FA2 was demonstrated...... in fetal calf serum. Gel filtration with analysis of fractions by inhibition ELISA showed that the bovine homologue was present in the same molecular forms as those in human amniotic fluid, and immunohistochemical analysis with anti-human FA2 showed that its distribution in bovine skin was identical...

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence imaging (TRFI) for direct immunofluorescence of PSA and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in prostatic tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjartell, A; Siivola, P; Hulkko, S; Pettersson, K; Rundt, K; Lilja, H; Lövgren, T

    1999-05-01

    We have developed a direct immunofluorescence technique utilising chelates of the lanthanide ions europium and terbium conjugated to monoclonal IgGs (Mabs) against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) for the detection and quantification on the same tissue section. Strong signals without disturbance from tissue autofluorescence were demonstrated in paraffin sections of ten benign and six malignant prostate tissue specimens. The signal intensity increased linearly with the amount of labelled Mab until epitope saturation began. The highest concentrations of bound IgG in tissue sections were 27.3 fmol/pixel for ACT and 7.2 for PSA. Time-resolved fluorescence imaging (TRFI) offers an attractive method for histochemical studies based on specific and quantitative detection of fluorescent lanthanide chelates. PMID:12496823

  11. Toxin a from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with therminal Gal. cap alpha. 1-3Gal. beta. 1-4GlcNaC sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.; Wilkins, T.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Toxin A is one of two clostridial toxins implicated as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis in patients undergoing postoperative antibiotic therapy. Evidence that the carbohydrate binding determinant for this toxin is a glycoconjugate(s) with non-reducing Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc has recently been reported. Specific agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes by Toxin A is inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin and prevented by pretreatment of cells with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin layer chromatography and the chromatogram overlaid with purified /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected following autoradiography. The major toxin-binding glycolipids were identified as pentasaccharide- and decasaccharide-ceramides expressing terminal Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc sequences. Treatment of the toxin-binding glycolipids with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase abolished binding. Forsmann glycolipid, globoside, Gal..cap alpha..1-4 Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer, and Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer did not bind the toxin. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate specificity of the toxin for the non-reducing terminal sequence, Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc.

  12. The BLT1 Inhibitory Function of α-1 Antitrypsin Augmentation Therapy Disrupts Leukotriene B4 Neutrophil Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Ciara A; O'Brien, M Emmet; Wormald, Mark R; White, Michelle M; Banville, Nessa; Hurley, Killian; McCarthy, Cormac; McElvaney, Noel G; Reeves, Emer P

    2015-10-15

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) contributes to many inflammatory diseases, including genetic and nongenetic forms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. α-1 Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) is characterized by destruction of lung parenchyma and development of emphysema, caused by low AAT levels and a high neutrophil burden in the airways of affected individuals. In this study we assessed whether AATD is an LTB4-related disease and investigated the ability of serum AAT to control LTB4 signaling in neutrophils. In vitro studies demonstrate that neutrophil elastase is a key player in the LTB4 inflammatory cycle in AATD, causing increased LTB4 production, and associated BLT1 membrane receptor expression. AATD patients homozygous for the Z allele were characterized by increased neutrophil adhesion and degranulation responses to LTB4. We demonstrate that AAT can bind LTB4 and that AAT/LTB4 complex formation modulates BLT1 engagement and downstream signaling events, including 1,4,5-triphosphate production and Ca(2+) flux. Additionally, treatment of ZZ-AATD individuals with AAT augmentation therapy decreased plasma LTB4 concentrations and reduced levels of membrane-bound neutrophil elastase. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism by which AAT augmentation therapy impacts on LTB4 signaling in vivo, and not only reinforces the utility of this therapy for resolving inflammation in AATD, but supports useful future clinical applications in treatment of other LTB4-related diseases. PMID:26371243

  13. Toxin A from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of Toxin A isolated from Clostridium difficile to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids has been studied. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and toxin-binding glycolipids detected by using 125I-labeled Toxin A in a direct binding overlay technique. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected in rabbit erythrocytes by this method. The results of structural analyses of the major toxin-binding glycolipids were consistent with a pentasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) and a branched decasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3[Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-6]Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) previously identified as the two most abundant glycolipids in rabbit erythrocytes. 125I-Toxin A binding to these glycolipids could be inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin, monospecific antiserum to the toxin, or by treatment of the glycolipids with alpha-galactosidase. The absence of toxin interaction with isoglobotriaosylceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) isolated from canine intestine suggested that the GlcNAc residue present in the terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GLcNAc sequence common to all known toxin binding glycoconjugates is required for carbohydrate-specific recognition by Toxin A. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate binding specificity of Toxin A for the nonreducing terminal sequence, Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc

  14. Toxin A from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.C.; Wilkins, T.D.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-08-15

    The binding of Toxin A isolated from Clostridium difficile to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids has been studied. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and toxin-binding glycolipids detected by using /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A in a direct binding overlay technique. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected in rabbit erythrocytes by this method. The results of structural analyses of the major toxin-binding glycolipids were consistent with a pentasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) and a branched decasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3(Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-6)Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) previously identified as the two most abundant glycolipids in rabbit erythrocytes. /sup 125/I-Toxin A binding to these glycolipids could be inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin, monospecific antiserum to the toxin, or by treatment of the glycolipids with alpha-galactosidase. The absence of toxin interaction with isoglobotriaosylceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) isolated from canine intestine suggested that the GlcNAc residue present in the terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GLcNAc sequence common to all known toxin binding glycoconjugates is required for carbohydrate-specific recognition by Toxin A. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate binding specificity of Toxin A for the nonreducing terminal sequence, Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine-induced down-regulation of GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M. J.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment of rat cerebellar granule cells induced a transient down-regulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor alpha 1 subunit protein, that was dose-dependent (1 nM-1 microM) and prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 microM). After 2 days of treatment with 1 microM flunitrazepam the alpha 1 subunit protein was reduced by 41% compared to untreated cells, which returned to, and remained at, control cell levels from 4-12 days of treat...

  16. Up-regulation of the integrin alpha 1/beta 1 in human neuroblastoma cells differentiated by retinoic acid: correlation with increased neurite outgrowth response to laminin.

    OpenAIRE

    Rossino, P; P. Defilippi; Silengo, L; Tarone, G.

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is known to induce differentiation of neuroblastoma cells in vitro. Here we show that treatment of two human neuroblastoma cell lines, SY5Y and IMR32, with RA resulted in a fivefold increase of the integrin alpha 1/beta 1 expression. The effect was selective because expression of the alpha 3/beta 1 integrin, also present in these cells, was not increased. The up-regulation of the alpha 1/beta 1 differentiated SY5Y cells correlated with increased neurite response to laminin....

  17. Emphysema and Alpha-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a person inherits a defective copy of the AAT gene from both parents. People who inherit just ... carriers.” These individuals also have lower levels of AAT in the lungs, which predispose them to the ...

  18. Regulation of the expression of Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc glycosphingolipids in kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, S P; He, P; Stults, C L; Macher, B A

    1990-10-15

    Previous studies (Galili, U., Clark, M. R., Shohet, S. B., Buehler, J., and Macher, B. A. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 84, 1369-1373; Galili, U., Shohet, S. B., Korbrin, E., Stults, C. L. M., and Macher, B. A. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 17755-17762) have established that there is a unique evolutionary distribution of glycoconjugates carrying the Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc epitope. These glycoconjugates are expressed by cells from New World monkeys and non-primate mammals, but not by cells from humans, Old World monkeys, or apes. The lack of expression of this epitope in the latter species appears to result from the suppression of gene expression for the enzyme UDP-galactose:nLc4Cer alpha 1-3-galactosyltransferase (alpha 1-3GalT) (Joziasse, D. H., Shaper, J. H., Van den Eijnden, D. H., Van Tunen, A. J., and Shaper, N. L. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 14290-14297). Although many non-primate species are known to express this carbohydrate epitope, the nature (i.e. glycoprotein or glycosphingolipid) of the glycoconjugate carrying this epitope is only known for a few tissues in a few animal species. Furthermore, it is not known whether all animal species express this epitope in the same tissues. We have investigated these questions by analyzing the glycosphingolipids in kidney from several non-primate animal species. Immunostained thin layer chromatograms of glycosphingolipids from sheep, pig, rabbit, cow, and rat kidney with the Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc glycosphingolipid-specific monoclonal antibody, Gal-13, demonstrated that kidney from all of these species except rat contained Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc neutral glycosphingolipids. A lack of expression of Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc glycosphingolipids in rat may be due to the lack of expression of the enzyme (alpha 1-3GalT) which catalyzes the formation of the Gal alpha 1-3Gal nonreducing terminal sequence of these compounds or to the lack of expression of glycosyltransferases which are

  19. The Shapes of Z-α1-Antitrypsin Polymers in Solution Support the C-Terminal Domain-Swap Mechanism of Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Manja Annette; Sendall, Timothy J.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Kjeldgaard, Morten; Huntington, James A.; Jensen, Jan Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Emphysema and liver cirrhosis can be caused by the Z mutation (Glu342Lys) in the serine protease inhibitor α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), which is found in more than 4% of the Northern European population. Homozygotes experience deficiency in the lung concomitantly with a massive accumulation of polymers...... within hepatocytes, causing their destruction. Recently, it was proposed that Z-α1AT polymerizes by a C-terminal domain swap. In this study, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to characterize Z-α1AT polymers in solution. The data show that the Z-α1AT trimer, tetramer, and pentamer all form ring...

  20. Mutations in collagen, type XVII, alpha 1 (COL17A1) cause epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Frida; Byström, Berit; Davidson, Alice E; Backman, Ludvig J; Kellgren, Therese G; Tuft, Stephen J; Koskela, Timo; Rydén, Patrik; Sandgren, Ola; Danielson, Patrik; Hardcastle, Alison J; Golovleva, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Corneal dystrophies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that bilaterally affect corneal transparency. They are defined according to the corneal layer affected and by their genetic cause. In this study, we identified a dominantly inherited epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED)-like disease that is common in northern Sweden. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of a novel mutation, c.2816C>T, p.T939I, in the COL17A1 gene, which encodes collagen type XVII alpha 1. The variant segregated with disease in a genealogically expanded pedigree dating back 200 years. We also investigated a unique COL17A1 synonymous variant, c.3156C>T, identified in a previously reported unrelated dominant ERED-like family linked to a locus on chromosome 10q23-q24 encompassing COL17A1. We show that this variant introduces a cryptic donor site resulting in aberrant pre-mRNA splicing and is highly likely to be pathogenic. Bi-allelic COL17A1 mutations have previously been associated with a recessive skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, with recurrent corneal erosions being reported in some cases. Our findings implicate presumed gain-of-function COL17A1 mutations causing dominantly inherited ERED and improve understanding of the underlying pathology. PMID:25676728

  1. Intravenous administration of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in patients of PiZ and PiM phenotype. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with moderate pulmonary emphysema, six of PiZ phenotype and three of PiM phenotype, have received a single intravenous infusion of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (human) (A1PI), in a dose of 60 mg/kg over a 30-minute period. They also received a tracer dose (300 microCi) of 131I-labeled A1PI. No active or passive immunization against hepatitis was given. No acute toxicity was observed. Compared with baseline data, significant elevations of serum A1PI (measured both antigenically and as anti-elastase activity) occurred, with a serum half-life approximating 110 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, obtained 48 hours after infusion, reflected a significant increase in A1PI concentration versus baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid values. Serial gamma camera images of the lungs confirmed persistence of enhanced lung radioactivity for several days. Urinary desmosine excretion did not change following A1PI infusion. During the period of follow-up thus far, no patient has had chronic toxicity, results of liver function tests have been stable, and there has been no development of hepatitis B antigen or antibodies to hepatitis B surface or core antigens

  2. Amplification of the tetracycline resistance determinant of plasmid pAM alpha 1 in Streptococcus faecalis: dependence on host recombination machinery.

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Y.; Clewell, D B

    1980-01-01

    The plasmid pAM alpha 1 in Streptococcus faecalis was found to be severely impaired in its ability to exhibit amplification (generation of tandem repeats of the tetracycline resistance determinant during extended growth in the presence of tetracycline) when harbored by the recombination-deficient host cell UV202.

  3. Expansion of microsatellite in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene linked to increased receptor expression and less aggressive thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onda, Masamitsu; Li, Daisy; Suzuki, Shinichi;

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the length of the THRA1 microsatellite, which resides in a noncoding portion of the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene, affects receptor expression and is linked to clinicopathological parameters in thyroid cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:...

  4. Prolyl hydroxylation of collagen type I is required for efficient binding to integrin alpha 1 beta 1 and platelet glycoprotein VI but not to alpha 2 beta 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Stéephanie; Eble, Johannes A; Siljander, Pia R-M; Merle, Christine; Farndale, Richard W; Theisen, Manfred; Ruggiero, Florence

    2003-08-01

    Collagen is a potent adhesive substrate for cells, an event essentially mediated by the integrins alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1. Collagen fibrils also bind to the integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein VI to activate and aggregate platelets. The distinct triple helical recognition motifs for these receptors, GXOGER and (GPO)n, respectively, all contain hydroxyproline. Using unhydroxylated collagen I produced in transgenic plants, we investigated the role of hydroxyproline in the receptor-binding properties of collagen. We show that alpha 2 beta 1 but not alpha 1 beta 1 mediates cell adhesion to unhydroxylated collagen. Soluble recombinant alpha 1 beta 1 binding to unhydroxylated collagen is considerably reduced compared with bovine collagens, but binding can be restored by prolyl hydroxylation of recombinant collagen. We also show that platelets use alpha 2 beta 1 to adhere to the unhydroxylated recombinant molecules, but the adhesion is weaker than on fully hydroxylated collagen, and the unhydroxylated collagen fibrils fail to aggregate platelets. Prolyl hydroxylation is thus required for binding of collagen to platelet glycoprotein VI and to cells by alpha 1 beta 1. These observations give new insights into the molecular basis of collagen-receptor interactions and offer new selective applications for the recombinant unhydroxylated collagen I. PMID:12771137

  5. On inequalities of Hermite-Hadamard type for co-ordinated \\((\\alpha_1,m_1\\-\\((\\alpha_2,m_2\\-convex functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ping Bai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the authors establish some Hermite-Hadamard type integral inequalities for co-ordinated \\((\\alpha_1,m_1\\-\\((\\alpha_2,m_2\\-convex functions on a rectangle of the plane \\(\\mathbb{R}_0^2\\.

  6. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 increases solubility and facilitates degradation of the Z variant of α-1-antitrypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deficiency of circulating α-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is the most widely recognized abnormality of a proteinase inhibitor that causes lung disease. AAT-deficiency is caused by mutations of the AAT gene that lead to AAT protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, the mutant AAT accumulated in the ER predisposes the homozygote to severe liver injuries, such as neonatal hepatitis, juvenile cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the fact that mutant AAT protein is subject to ER-associated degradation (ERAD), yeast genetic studies have determined that the ubiquitination machinery, Hrd1/Der3p-cue1p-Ubc7/6p, which plays a prominent role in ERAD, is not involved in degradation of mutant AAT. Here we report that gp78, a ubiquitin ligase (E3) pairing with mammalian Ubc7 for ERAD, ubiquitinates and facilitates degradation of ATZ, the classic deficiency variant of AAT having a Z mutation (Glu 342 Lys). Unexpectedly, gp78 over-expression also significantly increases ATZ solubility. p97/VCP, an AAA ATPase essential for retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins from the ER during ERAD, is involved in gp78-mediated degradation of ATZ. Surprisingly, unlike other ERAD substrates that cause ER stress leading to apoptosis when accumulated in the ER, ATZ, in fact, increases cell proliferation when over-expressed in cells. This effect can be partially inhibited by gp78 over-expression. These data indicate that gp78 assumes multiple unique quality control roles over ATZ, including the facilitation of degradation and inhibition of aggregation of ATZ

  7. Phase 2 clinical trial of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector expressing α1-antitrypsin: interim results.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flotte, Terence R

    2011-10-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors offer promise for the gene therapy of α(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. In our prior trial, an rAAV vector expressing human AAT (rAAV1-CB-hAAT) provided sustained, vector-derived AAT expression for >1 year. In the current phase 2 clinical trial, this same vector, produced by a herpes simplex virus complementation method, was administered to nine AAT-deficient individuals by intramuscular injection at doses of 6.0×10(11), 1.9×10(12), and 6.0×10(12) vector genomes\\/kg (n=3 subjects\\/dose). Vector-derived expression of normal (M-type) AAT in serum was dose dependent, peaked on day 30, and persisted for at least 90 days. Vector administration was well tolerated, with only mild injection site reactions and no serious adverse events. Serum creatine kinase was transiently elevated on day 30 in five of six subjects in the two higher dose groups and normalized by day 45. As expected, all subjects developed anti-AAV antibodies and interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot responses to AAV peptides, and no subjects developed antibodies to AAT. One subject in the mid-dose group developed T cell responses to a single AAT peptide unassociated with any clinical effects. Muscle biopsies obtained on day 90 showed strong immunostaining for AAT and moderate to marked inflammatory cell infiltrates composed primarily of CD3-reactive T lymphocytes that were primarily of the CD8(+) subtype. These results support the feasibility and safety of AAV gene therapy for AAT deficiency, and indicate that serum levels of vector-derived normal human AAT >20 μg\\/ml can be achieved. However, further improvements in the design or delivery of rAAV-AAT vectors will be required to achieve therapeutic target serum AAT concentrations.

  8. Differential effects of angiostatin, endostatin and interferon-alpha(1) gene transfer on in vivo growth of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indraccolo, S; Gola, E; Rosato, A; Minuzzo, S; Habeler, W; Tisato, V; Roni, V; Esposito, G; Morini, M; Albini, A; Noonan, D M; Ferrantini, M; Amadori, A; Chieco-Bianchi, L

    2002-07-01

    The administration of different angiogenesis inhibitors by gene transfer has been shown to result in inhibition of tumor growth in animal tumor models, but the potency of these genes has been only partially evaluated in comparative studies to date. To identify the most effective anti-angiogenic molecule for delivery by retroviral vectors, we investigated the effects of angiostatin, endostatin and interferon(IFN)-alpha(1) gene transfer in in vivo models of breast cancer induced neovascularization and tumor growth. Moloney leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors for expression of murine angiostatin, endostatin and IFN-alpha(1) were generated, characterized, and used to transduce human breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and MDA-MB435). Secretion of the recombinant proteins was confirmed by biological and Western blotting assays. Their production did not impair in vitro growth of these breast cancer cells nor their viability, and did not interfere with the expression of angiogenic factors. However, primary endothelial cell proliferation and migration in vitro were inhibited by supernatants of the transduced cells containing angiostatin, endostatin, and IFN-alpha(1). Stable gene transfer of the IFN-alpha(1) cDNA by retroviral vectors in both MCF7 and MDA-MB435 cells resulted in a marked and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth in nude mice that was associated with reduced vascularization. Endostatin reduced the in vivo growth of MDA-MB435, but not MCF7 cells, despite similar levels of in vivo production, and angiostatin did not impair the in vivo growth of either cell line. These findings indicate heterogeneity in the therapeutic efficacy of angiostatic molecules delivered by viral vectors and suggest that gene therapy with IFN-alpha(1) and endostatin might be useful for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:12080381

  9. Alpha1-adrenergic, D1, and D2 receptors interactions in the prefrontal cortex: implications for the modality of action of different types of neuroleptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioanni, Y; Thierry, A M; Glowinski, J; Tassin, J P

    1998-12-01

    The activation of rat mesocortical dopaminergic (DA) neurons evoked by the electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) induces a marked inhibition of the spontaneous activity of prefrontocortical cells. In the present study, it was first shown that systemic administration of either clozapine (a mixed antagonist of D1, D2, and alpha1-adrenergic receptors) (3-5 mg/kg, i.v.), prazosin (an alpha1-adrenergic antagonist) (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.), or sulpiride (a D2 antagonist) (30 mg/kg, i.v.), but not SCH 23390 (a D1 antagonist) (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.), reversed this cortical inhibition. Second, it was found that following the systemic administration of prazosin, the VTA-induced cortical inhibition reappeared when either SCH 23390 or sulpiride was applied by iontophoresis into the prefrontal cortex. Third, it was seen that, whereas haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.), a D2 antagonist which also blocks alpha1-adrenergic receptors, failed to reverse the VTA-induced inhibition, the systemic administration of haloperidol plus SCH 23390 (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked this inhibition. Finally, it was verified that the cortical inhibitions obtained following treatments with either "prazosin plus sulpiride" or "prazosin plus SCH 23390" were blocked by a superimposed administration of either SCH 23390 or sulpiride, respectively. These data indicate that complex interactions between cortical D2, D1, and alpha1-adrenergic receptors are involved in the regulation of the activity of prefrontocortical cells innervated by the VTA neurons. They confirm that the physiological stimulation of cortical alpha1-adrenergic receptors hampers the functional activity of cortical D1 receptors and suggest that the stimulations of cortical D1 and D2 receptors exert mutual inhibition on each other's transmission. PMID:9826228

  10. Ranolazine enhances nicardipine-induced relaxation of alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction on isolated rabbit aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavaki, Christina; Hatziefthimiou, Apostolia; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Karatzaferi, Christina; Aidonidis, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    Ranolazine (RAN) and nicardipine (NIC) have been studied for their vasorelaxing effects but the combination of these agents against adrenergic vasoconstriction has not been tested. The present study aimed at investigating the vasorelaxing effect by the combination of the two agents on alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction on isolated rabbit aorta. Aortic rings were mounted for isometric tension recording in organ baths containing Krebs-Henseleit solution. Concentration-response curves of RAN (10(-9) to 10(-4) M), NIC (10(-1) to 10(-5) M), and RAN + NIC (3 x 10(-6) M) were obtained in a cumulative manner using phenylephrine (PE, 2 x 10(-6) M) as constrictor agent. The effective concentration (EC)50 values for RAN and NIC were 6.5 x 10(-6) M and 1.4 x 10(-5) M, respectively. The treatment of PE-precontracted aortic rings with either RAN or NIC up to 65 min revealed that both agents displayed a biphasic pattern of initial rising and late sustained phases of relaxation. At 35 min of incubation, RAN and NIC induced relaxation by 23 +/- 3% and 14 +/- 4%, respectively (N = 7, P=NS, RAN vs. NIC); their combination resulted in a 34 +/- 4% relaxation (N=7; P < 0.01, RAN + NIC vs. NIC). At 65 min the effect of NIC prevailed and tended to be closer to the values of the combination treatment (P < 0.01, RAN + NIC vs. RAN). The results indicate that RAN at therapeutic concentrations exerts a significant additive vasorelaxing effect when combined with NIC in rabbit aorta. PMID:26148375

  11. The effect of methotrexate and azathioprine on the serum levels of IgA-a1-antitrypsin complex in juvenile chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Lacki

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the influence of methotrexate (MTX and azathioprine (AZA on the serum levels of the IgA-a1-antitrypsin (IgA-AT complex in patients with the systemic form of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA. Fifty-six JCA patients (22 treated with MTX, 18 treated with AZA, and 16 not treated with any immunosuppressive agent were enrolled in the study. MTX dosage ranged from 0.3 to 0.5 mg kg-1 week-1, while AZA was given daily at an average dose of 1 mg/kg. MTX was given for 13 months (SD = 7 months whereas AZA for 11 months (SD = 6 months. The average value of the complex was higher in JCA patients than in both control groups (0.74 ± 0.73 U vs 0.37 ± 0.13 U (control children, Pa1-acid-glycoprotein (r = 0.45, Pa1-antichymotrypsin (r = 0.52, Pa1-antitrypsin (r = 0.40, P<0.01 and IgA (r = 0.56, P<0.01 was established

  12. Effect of dose-rate of gamma irradiation (60Co) on the anti nutritional compounds phytic acid and antitrypsin on soybean (glycine max L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation on the effect of gamma irradiation at different dose-rate on the anti-nutritional compounds (phytic acid and antitrypsin) and the color of soybean has been conducted. The purpose of the study was to analyze the influence of the dose-rate on the rate of change of anti-nutritional compounds and color. Samples were irradiated with dose-rates of 1.30; 3.17; 5.71 and 8.82 kGy/hour with irradiation time varied from 0.5 to 55 hours. Phytic acid content and antitrypsin activity, as well as their L α b color values were analyzed. Results showed that a simple first order kinetics model can be used to describe changes in the concentration of the anti-nutritional compounds and color soybeans during the radiation processing. Data indicate that irradiation process at higher dose-rate (shorter time) is more effective in destroying anti-nutritional compounds as compared to that of irradiation process at lower dose-rate (longer time). Furthermore, irradiation process at higher dose-rate (shorter time) also have less detrimental effect on color of the soybean and the resulted soybean flour as compared to that of irradiation process at lower dose-rate (longer time). These findings suggest that irradiation process at a same dose may potentially be optimized by selecting the most appropriate combination of dose-rate and time of irradiation. (author)

  13. Purification, cDNA cloning, and expression of GDP-L-Fuc:Asn-linked GlcNAc alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase from mung beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, H; Mucha, J; Staudacher, E; Grimm, R; Glössl, J; Altmann, F

    1999-07-30

    Substitution of the asparagine-linked GlcNAc by alpha1,3-linked fucose is a widespread feature of plant as well as of insect glycoproteins, which renders the N-glycan immunogenic. We have purified from mung bean seedlings the GDP-L-Fuc:Asn-linked GlcNAc alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase (core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase) that is responsible for the synthesis of this linkage. The major isoform had an apparent mass of 54 kDa and isoelectric points ranging from 6. 8 to 8.2. From that protein, four tryptic peptides were isolated and sequenced. Based on an approach involving reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends, core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase cDNA was cloned from mung bean mRNA. The 2200-base pair cDNA contained an open reading frame of 1530 base pairs that encoded a 510-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 56.8 kDa. Analysis of cDNA derived from genomic DNA revealed the presence of three introns within the open reading frame. Remarkably, from the four exons, only exon II exhibited significant homology to animal and bacterial alpha1,3/4-fucosyltransferases which, though, are responsible for the biosynthesis of Lewis determinants. The recombinant fucosyltransferase was expressed in Sf21 insect cells using a baculovirus vector. The enzyme acted on glycopeptides having the glycan structures GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1-3(GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1- 6)Manbeta1-4GlcNAcbet a1-4GlcNAcbeta1-Asn, GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1-3(GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1- 6)Manbeta1-4GlcNAcbet a1-4(Fucalpha1-6)GlcNAcbeta1-Asn, and GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1-3[Manalpha1-3(Manalpha1-6 )Manalpha1-6]Manbeta1 -4GlcNAcbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-Asn but not on, e.g. N-acetyllactosamine. The structure of the core alpha1,3-fucosylated product was verified by high performance liquid chromatography of the pyridylaminated glycan and by its insensitivity to N-glycosidase F as revealed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass

  14. Epithelial but not stromal expression of collagen alpha-1(III) is a diagnostic and prognostic indicator of colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Qing; Tang, Zu-Xiong; Yu, Dong; Cui, Shu-Jian; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-23

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in males and the second in females worldwide with very poor prognosis. Collagen alpha-1(III) (COL3A1) gene, encoding an extracellular matrix protein, is upregulated in human cancers. Here, we revealed that COL3A1 was increased in CRC by analysis of five Oncomine gene expression datasets (n = 496). Immunohistochemistry analysis of a tissue microarray (n = 90) demonstrated that cancer epithelial but not stromal COL3A1 was significantly upregulated comparing with the normal counterparts. High COL3A1 mRNA and/or protein expression was accompanied with high stage, T stage, Dukes stage, grade and older age, as well as smoking and recurrence status. Upregulated COL3A1 predicted poor overall (p = 0.003) and disease-free (p = 0.025) survival. Increased epithelial but not stromal COL3A1 protein predicted worse outcome (p = 0.03). Older patients (age>65) with high COL3A1 had worse survival than younger (age≤65) with high COL3A1. Plasma COL3A1 was increased in CRC patients (n = 86) by 5.4 fold comparing with healthy individuals, enteritis and polyps patients. Plasma COL3A1 had an area under curve (AUC) of 0.92 and the best sensitivity/specificity of 98.8%/69.1%. While plasma CEA had a poorer prediction power (AUC = 0.791, sensitivity/selectivity = 70.2%/73.0%). Older patients (age≥60) had higher plasma COL3A1 than younger patients. The epithelial COL3A1 protein had an AUC of 0.975 and the best sensitivity/specificity of 95.2%/91.1%. Silencing of COL3A1 suppressed CRC cell proliferation in in vitro MTT assay and in in vivo Zebra fish xenograft model by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and WNT signaling. COL3A1 was a novel diagnosis and prognosis marker of CRC. PMID:26741506

  15. The Structure and Function of an Arabinan-specific [alpha]-1,2-Arabinofuranosidase Identified from Screening the Activities of Bacterial GH43 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartmell, Alan; McKee, Lauren S.; Pena, Maria J.; Larsbrink, Johan; Brumer, Harry; Kaneko, Satoshi; Ichinose, Hitomi; Lewis, Richard J.; Vikso-Nielsen, Anders; Gilbert, Harry; Marles-Wright, Jon (Newcastle); (National Food Research Institute); (Novozymes A/S); (RITS); (Georgia)

    2012-03-26

    Reflecting the diverse chemistry of plant cell walls, microorganisms that degrade these composite structures synthesize an array of glycoside hydrolases. These enzymes are organized into sequence-, mechanism-, and structure-based families. Genomic data have shown that several organisms that degrade the plant cell wall contain a large number of genes encoding family 43 (GH43) glycoside hydrolases. Here we report the biochemical properties of the GH43 enzymes of a saprophytic soil bacterium, Cellvibrio japonicus, and a human colonic symbiont, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. The data show that C. japonicus uses predominantly exo-acting enzymes to degrade arabinan into arabinose, whereas B. thetaiotaomicron deploys a combination of endo- and side chain-cleaving glycoside hydrolases. Both organisms, however, utilize an arabinan-specific {alpha}-1,2-arabinofuranosidase in the degradative process, an activity that has not previously been reported. The enzyme can cleave {alpha}-1,2-arabinofuranose decorations in single or double substitutions, the latter being recalcitrant to the action of other arabinofuranosidases. The crystal structure of the C. japonicus arabinan-specific {alpha}-1,2-arabinofuranosidase, CjAbf43A, displays a five-bladed {beta}-propeller fold. The specificity of the enzyme for arabinan is conferred by a surface cleft that is complementary to the helical backbone of the polysaccharide. The specificity of CjAbf43A for {alpha}-1,2-L-arabinofuranose side chains is conferred by a polar residue that orientates the arabinan backbone such that O2 arabinose decorations are directed into the active site pocket. A shelflike structure adjacent to the active site pocket accommodates O3 arabinose side chains, explaining how the enzyme can target O2 linkages that are components of single or double substitutions.

  16. AlphaS1-casein deficiency recorded for defective genotypes induces a chronic ER stress and deep changes in milk composition, signing a singular secretion process in goats

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Patrice; B. Badaoui; Barile, Daniela; Lahouassa, Hichem; Beauvallet, Christian; Cebo, Christelle; Leroux, Christine; Chanat, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The extensive polymorphism recorded at the CSN1S1 locus has been shown to influence goat milk composition and its technological properties. A deficit in alphaS1-casein is responsible for the accumulation of immature caseins in distended rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae of mammary epithelial cells (MEC). This triggers a chronic ER stress which induces, in turn, an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). Our data strongly suggest: i) the existence of a membraneassociated form of alp...

  17. Investigation of the Relationship Between Clinical and EEG Findings of Photosensitive Epilepsy and GABA Receptor Alpha 1 Subunit (GABRA1) Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, E.N.; Demirkan, A.; Moen, S.; Ozdemir, O.; Catal, S.; Bebek, N.; Ozbek, U; Baykan, B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although photosensitive epilepsy (PE) is commonly observed, its pathophysiology has not been clarified yet. However, relevant literature indicates that genetic factors play an important role. Our aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) features and the possible mutations/polymorphisms in the GABA receptor alpha 1 subunit (GABRA1) gene in patients with PE by scanning this gene. Methods: 54 patients diagnosed as ha...

  18. AlphaS1-casein, which is essential for efficient ER-to-Golgi casein transport, is also present in a tightly membrane-associated form

    OpenAIRE

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Léonil, Joelle; Chanat, Eric

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caseins, the main milk proteins, aggregate in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells into large supramolecular structures, casein micelles. The role of individual caseins in this process and the mesostructure of the casein micelle are poorly known. RESULTS: In this study, we investigate primary steps of casein micelle formation in rough endoplasmic reticulum-derived vesicles prepared from rat or goat mammary tissues. The majority of both alphaS1- and beta-casein which a...

  19. Comparison of the effect of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnus, Jan; Rusiecka, Agnieszka; Czerski, Albert; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Hauzer, Willy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effect of selected agonists and antagonists of alpha-adrenergic receptors on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro with particular emphasis on alpha2-adrenergic receptor subtypes. The study was conducted on 30 New Zealand breed rabbits from which specimens of the abdominal aorta were collected. The sections were set up in an automatic water bath in a Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37 degrees C. The experiments showed that alpha1-adrenergic receptors played the main role in the contractile response ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta. Stimulation of alpha1-adrenergic receptor by administration ofphenylephrine resulted in an increase in smooth muscle tonus ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta by an average of 4.75 mN. The reaction after stimulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptors by similar doses of their agonists was much weaker. Prolonged tissue response time and time needed to reach maximum tonus for alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists were observed. The obtained results confirm the thesis that the alpha1-adrenergic receptor is the most important factor controlling the contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta, but the alpha2-adrenergic receptor is also involved in maintaining muscle tissue tonus. PMID:23767297

  20. Boosting of synaptic potentials and spine Ca transients by the peptide toxin SNX-482 requires alpha-1E-encoded voltage-gated Ca channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Giessel

    Full Text Available The majority of glutamatergic synapses formed onto principal neurons of the mammalian central nervous system are associated with dendritic spines. Spines are tiny protuberances that house the proteins that mediate the response of the postsynaptic cell to the presynaptic release of glutamate. Postsynaptic signals are regulated by an ion channel signaling cascade that is active in individual dendritic spines and involves voltage-gated calcium (Ca channels, small conductance (SK-type Ca-activated potassium channels, and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Pharmacological studies using the toxin SNX-482 indicated that the voltage-gated Ca channels that signal within spines to open SK channels belong to the class Ca(V2.3, which is encoded by the Alpha-1E pore-forming subunit. In order to specifically test this conclusion, we examined the effects of SNX-482 on synaptic signals in acute hippocampal slices from knock-out mice lacking the Alpha-1E gene. We find that in these mice, application of SNX-482 has no effect on glutamate-uncaging evoked synaptic potentials and Ca influx, indicating that that SNX-482 indeed acts via the Alpha-1E-encoded Ca(V2.3 channel.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  2. Diagnosis of. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin deficiency by enzymatic amplification of human genomic DNA and direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, C.R.; Graham, A.; Powell, S.; Gammack, A.; Riley, J.; Markham, A.F. (ICI Diagnostics, Cheshire (England)); Kalsheker, N. (Univ. of Wales, Cardiff (Wales))

    1988-09-12

    The authors have compared sequencing of cloned polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products and the direct sequencing of PCR products in the examination of individuals from six families affected with {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. In families where paternity was in question they confirmed consanguinity by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of locus-specific minisatellite probes. They demonstrate that direct sequencing of PCR amplification products is the method of choice for the absolutely specific diagnosis of AAT deficiency and can distinguish normals, heterozygotes and homozygotes in a single, rapid and facile assay. Furthermore, they demonstrate the reproducibility of the PCR and a rapid DNA isolation procedure. They have also shown that two loci can be simultaneously amplified and that the PCR product from each locus can be independently examined by direct DNA sequencing.

  3. Reversal of acquired resistance to adriamycin in CHO cells by tamoxifen and 4-hydroxy tamoxifen: role of drug interaction with alpha 1 acid glycoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, M.; Harris, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    Tamoxifen and 4-OH tamoxifen were used to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in CHO cells with acquired resistance to adriamycin (CHO-Adrr). Because alpha 1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) can bind a range of calcium channel blockers that also reverse MDR and rises in malignancy, its interactions with tamoxifen and 4-OH tamoxifen were also studied. Tamoxifen decreased the IC50 of 10 microM adriamycin 4.8-fold in the parent CHO-K1 cell line and 16-fold in CHO-Adrr. Similarly 4-OH tamoxifen decreased t...

  4. Antiparallel polypurine phosphorothioate oligonucleotides form stable triplexes with the rat alpha1(I) collagen gene promoter and inhibit transcription in cultured rat fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, J.; Kandala, J C; Veerapanane, D; K. T. Weber; Guntaka, R V

    1997-01-01

    The rat alpha1(I) collagen promoter contains a unique polypurine-polypyrimidine sequence between -141 and -200 upstream of the transcription start site. The polypurine sequence from -171 to -200 (C2) is on the coding strand and the adjacent polypurine sequence from -141 to -170 (C1) is on the non-coding strand. Earlier we demonstrated triplex formation with a polypurine 30 nt parallel triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) corresponding to C1 and inhibition of transcriptional activity of the r...

  5. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3f (eIF3f) interacts physically with the alpha 1B-adrenergic receptor and stimulates adrenoceptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Mario Javier; Higareda-Mendoza, Ana Edith; Gómez-Correa, César Adrián; Pardo-Galván, Marco Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background eIF3f is a multifunctional protein capable of interacting with proteins involved in different cellular processes, such as protein synthesis, DNA repair, and viral mRNA edition. In human cells, eIF3f is related to cell cycle and proliferation, and its deregulation compromises cell viability. Results We here report that, in native conditions, eIF3f physically interacts with the alpha 1B-adrenergic receptor, a plasma membrane protein considered as a proto-oncogene, and involved in vas...

  6. The clinicopathological features of three babies with osteogenesis imperfecta resulting from the substitution of glycine by valine in the pro alpha 1 (I) chain of type I procollagen.

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, W G; Patterson, E; Bonadio, J; Campbell, P E; Fortune, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The features of three babies with perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI II) resulting from substitutions of glycine by valine in the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(I) chain of type I collagen were studied. The babies were heterozygous for this substitution at residue 1006 in case 1 (OI35), 973 in case 2 (OI59), and 256 in case 3 (OI7B). OI35 had the most severe clinical form, OI IIC, with premature rupture of membranes, severe antepartum haemorrhage, stillbirth, severe short limb...

  7. A specific pattern of splicing for the horse $\\alpha$S1-Casein mRNA and partial genomic characterization of the relevant locus

    OpenAIRE

    Milenkovic, Dragan; Martin, Patrice; Guérin, Gérard; Leroux, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Mares' milk has a composition very different from that of cows' milk. It is much more similar to human milk, in particular in its casein fraction. This study reports on the sequence of a 994 bp amplified fragment corresponding to a horse $\\alpha$S1-Casein ($\\alpha$ S1-Cn) cDNA and its comparison with its caprine, pig, rabbit and human counterparts. The alignment of these sequences revealed a specific pattern of splicing for this horse primary transcript. As in humans, exons 3$'$, 6$'$ and 13$...

  8. Vascular smooth muscle cells express the alpha(1A) subunit of a P-/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+)Channel, and It is functionally important in renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard; Jensen, Boye L.; Andreasen, D;

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we tested whether the alpha(1A) subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) (P-/Q-type), was present and functional in vascular smooth muscle and renal resistance vessels. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and...... Southern blotting analysis, mRNA encoding the alpha(1A) subunit was detected in microdissected rat preglomerular vessels and vasa recta, in cultures of rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and in cultured rat mesangial cells. With immunoblots, alpha(1A) subunit protein was demonstrated...... in rat aorta, brain, aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5), VSMCs, and mesangial cells. Immunolabeling with an anti-alpha(1A) antibody was positive in acid-macerated, microdissected preglomerular vessels and in A7r5 cells. Patch-clamp experiments on aortic A7r5 cells showed 22+/-4% (n=6) inhibition of...

  9. Dynamic expression of alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin receptors by human vascular smooth muscle cells. Alpha 2 beta 1 integrin is required for chemotaxis across type I collagen-coated membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, M P; Raines, E W; Ross, R.

    1994-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of normal arteries express alpha 1 beta 1 integrin with no detectable alpha 2 beta 1 as determined by immunocytochemistry. In contrast, immunoprecipitation of integrins expressed by human SMCs cultured from medial explants shows strong expression of alpha 2 beta 1 and no expression of alpha 1 beta 1. The apparent reciprocal expression of these two collagen and laminin receptors was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescent labeled ce...

  10. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates residues in the C-terminal domain of the cardiac L-type calcium channel alpha1 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, R N; Brickley, K; Norman, R I

    1996-06-11

    The molecular basis of the regulation of cardiac L-type calcium channel activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cA-PK) remains unclear. Direct cA-PK-dependent phosphorylation of the bovine ventricular alpha1 subunit in vitro has been demonstrated in microsomal membranes, detergent extracts and partially purified (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 receptor preparations. Two 32P-labeled phosphopeptides, derived from cyanogen bromide cleavage, of 4.7 and 9.5 kDa were immunoprecipitated specifically by site-directed antibodies against the rabbit cardiac alpha1 subunit amino acid sequences 1602-1616 and 1681-1694, respectively, consistent with phosphorylation at the cA-PK consensus sites at Ser(1627) and Ser(1700). No phosphopeptide products consistent with phosphorylation at three other C-terminal cA-PK consensus phosphorylation sites (Ser(1575), Ser(1848) and Ser(1928)) were identified using similar procedures suggesting that these sites are poor substrates for this kinase. Ser(1627) and Ser(1700) may represent sites of cA-PK phosphorylation involved in the physiological regulation of cardiac L-type calcium channel function. PMID:8664319

  11. UniProt search blastx result: AK287588 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287588 J065045K19 P01010|A1AT_PAPAN Alpha-1-antitrypsin precursor (Alpha-1 protease inhibitor) ... 1-antiproteinase) (AAT) (Fragment) - Papio anubis (Olive ... baboon) 1.00E-17 ...

  12. Evidence for alpha 1-adrenergic stimulatory control of in vitro release of immunoreactive thyrotropin-releasing hormone from rat median eminence: in vivo corroboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Arancibia, L; Arancibia, S; Astier, H

    1985-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the alpha-adrenergic stimulation of TSH secretion may occur directly at the median eminence (ME) level by modulating the release of TRH. The effects of pharmacological manipulations of the two subtypes of central alpha-adrenergic receptors, alpha 1 and alpha 2, were tested on in vitro TRH release from medial basal hypothalami containing mainly the ME. Hypothalamic fragments were superfused with a modified Locke medium, and TRH was measured by RIA in samples collected every 10 min. After a preliminary period of 40 min to test TRH release during basal conditions, drug effects were checked for 20 min. Superfusion with norepinephrine (NE) (10(-10), 10(-8), 10(-6) M) induced a rapid and dose-dependent rise of TRH release; epinephrine (10(-8) M) induced an effect similar to that of NE 10(-8) M. Phentolamine (10(-7) M), an alpha-adrenergic antagonist, completely blocked the NE (10(-8) M)-induced release of TRH, which was not modified by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol (10(-7) M). Neither antagonist had an effect on basal TRH release when added alone to the medium. The NE-induced release of TRH was completely suppressed by prazosin (10(-7) M), whereas yohimbine had no effect. Superfusion with clonidine (10(-9), 10(-8), 10(-7), 10(-6) M), an alpha 2-receptor agonist, did not alter basal TRH release. In contrast, phenylephrine (10(-8) and 10(-6) M), an alpha 1-receptor agonist, induced a significant (P less than 0.01) rise in TRH release. These results were corroborated in vivo in several unanesthetized rats bearing a push-pull cannula previously and stereotaxically implanted into the ME. Perfusion with artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing NE (10(-7), 10(-6) M) or phenylephrine (10(-7) M) elicited a rapid rise in TRH release, within 15 min after the onset of drug perfusion. Clonidine (10(-5) M), similarly perfused for 15 min, had no effect. Our data suggest a direct stimulatory influence of catecholamines on

  13. Overexpression of interleukin 2 receptor, thymidine kinase and immunoglobulin-associated alpha-1 messenger RNA in a clinical case of enzootic bovine leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfeeq, Mohammad Monir; Tagawa, Michihito; Itoh, Yuuki; Sugimoto, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2012-09-01

    A 49-month-old Holstein cow with anorexia, tachypnea, enlarged peripheral lymph nodes, and difficulty standing up was suspected of bovine leukosis. Hematological examination revealed lymphocytosis with the presence of neoplastic cells. Increased total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, isozymes of LDH-2 and LDH-3 activities and thymidine kinase activity were observed. Cytological findings of fine needle aspiration of subiliac lymph nodes indicated lymphosarcoma. Histopathology and antibody analysis confirmed the diagnosis of enzootic bovine leukosis, a B-cell bovine lymphoma caused by bovine leukemia virus. Gene expressions known as biomarkers of hematopoietic neoplasia in human were also examined in the present case. Increased messenger RNA expression of interleukin 2 receptor, thymidine kinase, and immunoglobulin-associated alpha-1 was observed in the case animal. PMID:23037779

  14. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and soluble IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor from MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confort, C; Rochefort, H; Vignon, F

    1995-09-01

    The growth of hormone-responsive MCF7 human breast cancer cells is controlled by steroid hormones and growth factors. By metabolic labeling of cells grown in steroid- and growth factor-stripped serum conditions, we show that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) increase by approximately 5-fold the release of several proteins including cathepsin D, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and soluble forms of the multifunctional IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor. Two soluble forms of IGF-II/M6P receptors were detected, one major (approximately 260 kilodaltons) and one minor (approximately 85 kilodaltons) that probably represents a proteolytic fragment of the larger soluble molecule. IGFs increased receptor release in a dose-dependent fashion with 50-60% of newly synthesized receptor released at 5-10 nM IGFs. The release of IGF-II/M6P receptors correlated with the levels of secreted cathepsin D in different human breast cancer cells or in rats stable transfectants that are constitutively expressing variable levels of human cathepsin D. IGFs had a stronger effect on IGF-II/M6P receptor release, whereas estradiol treatment preferentially enhanced the release of protease and antiprotease. We thus demonstrate that in human breast cancer cells, IGFs not only act as strong mitogens but also regulate release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, IGF-II/M6P-soluble receptor, and cathepsin D; three proteins that potentially regulate cell proliferation and/or invasion. PMID:7649082

  15. Chronic hypoxia up-regulates alpha1H T-type channels and low-threshold catecholamine secretion in rat chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabelli, V; Marcantoni, A; Comunanza, V; de Luca, A; Díaz, J; Borges, R; Carbone, E

    2007-10-01

    alpha(1H) T-type channels recruited by beta(1)-adrenergic stimulation in rat chromaffin cells (RCCs) are coupled to fast exocytosis with the same Ca(2+) dependence of high-threshold Ca(2+) channels. Here we show that RCCs exposed to chronic hypoxia (CH) for 12-18 h in 3% O(2) express comparable densities of functional T-type channels that depolarize the resting cells and contribute to low-voltage exocytosis. Following chronic hypoxia, most RCCs exhibited T-type Ca(2+) channels already available at -50 mV with the same gating, pharmacological and molecular features as the alpha(1H) isoform. Chronic hypoxia had no effects on cell size and high-threshold Ca(2+) current density and was mimicked by overnight incubation with the iron-chelating agent desferrioxamine (DFX), suggesting the involvement of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). T-type channel recruitment occurred independently of PKA activation and the presence of extracellular Ca(2+). Hypoxia-recruited T-type channels were partially open at rest (T-type 'window-current') and contributed to raising the resting potential to more positive values. Their block by 50 microm Ni(2+) caused a 5-8 mV hyperpolarization. The secretory response associated with T-type channels could be detected following mild cell depolarizations, either by capacitance increases induced by step depolarizations or by amperometric current spikes induced by increased [KCl]. In the latter case, exocytotic bursts could be evoked even with 2-4 mm KCl and spike frequency was drastically reduced by 50 microm Ni(2+). Chronic hypoxia did not alter the shape of spikes, suggesting that hypoxia-recruited T-type channels increase the number of secreted vesicles at low voltages, without altering the mechanism of catecholamine release and the quantal content of released molecules. PMID:17690152

  16. α1-antitrypsin and its C-terminal fragment attenuate effects of degranulated neutrophil-conditioned medium on lung cancer HCC cells, in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westin Ulla

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor microenvironment, which is largely affected by inflammatory cells, is a crucial participant in the neoplastic process through promotion of cell proliferation, survival and migration. We measured the effects of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN conditioned medium alone, and supplemented with serine proteinase inhibitor α-1 antitrypsin (AAT or its C-terminal fragment (C-36 peptide, on cultured lung cancer cells. Methods Lung cancer HCC cells were grown in a regular medium or in a PMN-conditioned medium in the presence or absence of AAT (0.5 mg/ml or its C-36 peptide (0.06 mg/ml for 24 h. Cell proliferation, invasiveness and release of IL-8 and VEGF were analyzed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, Matrigel invasion and ELISA methods, respectively. Results Cells exposed to PMN-conditioned medium show decreased proliferation and IL-8 release by 3.9-fold, p Conclusions Our data provide evidence that neutrophil derived factors decrease lung cancer HCC cell proliferation and IL-8 release, but increase cell invasiveness. These effects were found to be modulated by exogenously present serine proteinase inhibitor, AAT, and its C-terminal fragment, which points to a complexity of the relationships between tumor cell biological activities and local microenvironment.

  17. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and prostaglandin E2 formation in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Possible parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    alpha 1-Adrenergic receptors mediate two effects on phospholipid metabolism in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK-D1) cells: hydrolysis of phosphoinositides and arachidonic acid release with generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The similarity in concentration dependence for the agonist (-)-epinephrine in eliciting these two responses implies that they are mediated by a single population of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. However, we find that the kinetics of the two responses are quite different, PGE2 production occurring more rapidly and transiently than the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides. The antibiotic neomycin selectively decreases alpha 1-receptor-mediated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis without decreasing alpha 1-receptor-mediated arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation. In addition, receptor-mediated inositol trisphosphate formation is independent of extracellular calcium, whereas release of labeled arachidonic acid is largely calcium-dependent. Moreover, based on studies obtained with labeled arachidonic acid, receptor-mediated generation of arachidonic acid cannot be accounted for by breakdown of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate, phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, or phosphatidic acid. Further studies indicate that epinephrine produces changes in formation or turnover of several classes of membrane phospholipids in MDCK cells. We conclude that alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in MDCK cells appear to regulate phospholipid metabolism by the parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2. This parallel activation of phospholipases contrasts with models described in other systems which imply sequential activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol lipase or phospholipase A2

  18. Attenuation of KATP channel-opener induced shortening of repolarization time by alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist during ischemia in canine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T; Aikawa, M; Deguchi, Y; Yoshioka, K; Handa, S

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether a new KATP channel opener, Y 26763 (Y), can influence the electrophysiological properties in the ischemic myocardium as well as to determine whether the blunting effect of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist bunazosin (BN) on an ischemia-induced shortening of repolarization time can be related to the KATP channel activity. The anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery was ligated four times for 5 minutes, separated by 15 minutes of reperfusion (stages 1-4) to test the dose-dependent effect of drugs on repolarization. Dogs received either vehicle (n = 9), Y (0.4, 2.0, and 4.0 micrograms/kg at stages 2, 3, and 4, respectively, with 0.4 microgram/kg/min drip infusion at each of stages 2-4, n = 7), BN (0.1 mg at each of stages 2-4, n = 8), or a combination of these two drugs (BN + Y, the same dose of BN and Y in groups BN and Y, respectively, n = 9). Drugs were administered into the left atrium. The monophasic action potential (MAP) and regional electrograms were recorded. The MAP90 and the duration of the slow deflections (DSD) of the regional electrogram were used as markers of repolarization. The Vmax of the MAP and the rapid deflections (DRD) of the regional electrogram were used as markers of conduction. Y augmented an ischemia-induced shortening of MAP90 and DSD in proportion to an increase in the dose given and the plasma concentration (P DRD in the ischemic zone between periods before and after an increase in each drug dose in the four groups. None of the seven dogs developed ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the Y group, whereas two of the eight dogs in the BN group, three of the nine dogs in the BN + Y group, and three of the nine dogs in the control group developed VT/VF. These results suggest that the alpha 1-adrenergic blocker bunazosin blunts the shortening effect of KATP channel activator on repolarization time, and that the KATP channel opener Y may be

  19. Radioimmunoassay of thymosin alpha 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention relates to an immunoassay for thymosin α1, a heat stable, acidic polypeptide composed of 28 amino acid residues. This immunopotentiating hormone is a component of thymosin fraction 5 and also has been found to be present in the blood of mammalian subjects. The immunogen utilized to prepare the antibody for the instant assay is readily obtained by covalently bonding thymosin α1 to a conventional immunological carrier material. Thymosin α1 may be radioisotopically labelled with tritium, carbon 14 or iodine 125

  20. In Vivo Clearance of Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein Is Influenced by the Extent of Its N-Linked Glycosylation and by Its Interaction with the Vessel Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa R. McCurdy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP is a highly glycosylated plasma protein that exerts vasoprotective effects. We hypothesized that AGP’s N-linked glycans govern its rate of clearance from the circulation, and followed the disappearance of different forms of radiolabeled human AGP from the plasma of rabbits and mice. Enzymatic deglycosylation of human plasma-derived AGP (pdAGP by Peptide: N-Glycosidase F yielded a mixture of differentially deglycosylated forms (PNGase-AGP, while the introduction of five Asn to Gln mutations in recombinant Pichia pastoris-derived AGP (rAGP-N(5Q eliminated N-linked glycosylation. PNGase-AGP was cleared from the rabbit circulation 9-fold, and rAGP-N(5Q, 46-fold more rapidly than pdAGP, primarily via a renal route. Pichia pastoris-derived wild-type rAGP differed from pdAGP in expressing mannose-terminated glycans, and, like neuraminidase-treated pdAGP, was more rapidly removed from the rabbit circulation than rAGP-N(5Q. Systemic hyaluronidase treatment of mice transiently decreased pdAGP clearance. AGP administration to mice reduced vascular binding of hyaluronic acid binding protein in the liver microcirculation and increased its plasma levels. Our results support a critical role of N-linked glycosylation of AGP in regulating its in vivo clearance and an influence of a hyaluronidase-sensitive component of the vessel wall on its transendothelial passage.

  1. Efficient one-pot enzymatic synthesis of alpha-(1-->4)-glucosidic disaccharides through a coupled reaction catalysed by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2010-05-27

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase (LaMalP) of glycoside hydrolase family 65 catalysed enzymatic synthesis of alpha-(1-->4)-glucosidic disaccharides from maltose and five monosaccharides in a coupled phosphorolysis/reverse phosphorolysis one-pot reaction. Thus phosphorolysis of maltose to beta-glucose 1-phosphate circumvented addition of costly beta-glucose 1-phosphate for reverse phosphorolysis with different monosaccharide acceptors, resulting in 91%, 89%, 88%, 86% and 84% yield of alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminopyranose [N-acetyl-maltosamine], alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-glucosaminopyranose [maltosamine], alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-mannopyranose, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-L-fucopyranose and alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-xylopyranose, respectively, from 0.1M maltose, 0.5M N-acetyl glucosamine, 0.1M glucosamine, 0.1M mannose, 1M L-fucose and 0.5M xylose in 0.2M phosphate-citrate pH 6.2. These current yields of 0.27-0.34 g of disaccharide products from 10 mL reaction mixtures are easy to scale up and moreover the strategy can be applied to large-scale production of other oligosaccharides from low-cost disaccharides as catalysed by phosphorylases with different substrate specificities. PMID:20392438

  2. Neutral alpha-1,4-glucosidase and fructose levels contribute to discriminating obstructive and nonobstructive azoospermia in Chinese men with azoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, B; Xing, R; Zhou, X; Lv, D; Wan, B; Shu, F; Zhong, L; Wu, H; Mao, X

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, whether neutral alpha-1,4-glucosidase (NAG) and fructose levels are contributed to discriminating obstructive and nonobstructive azoospermia in Chinese azoospermic patients remains unclear. In this study, we retrospectively analysed the levels of NAG and fructose in 229 patients with obstructive azoospermia and 415 patients with nonobstructive azoospermia from three different medical central. Results indicated that NAG and fructose levels in patients with nonobstructive azoospermia were significantly higher compared with those with obstructive azoospermia (P fructose defined by the World Health Organization (WHO, 2010), decreased level of NAG was observed in 77.3% of patients with obstructive azoospermia, which was significantly higher than those with nonobstructive azoospermia (55.2%, P fructose was observed in 48.0% of patients with obstructive azoospermia, which is also obviously higher than those with nonobstructive azoospermia (31.8%, P fructose was only recorded in 3.7% of patients with SCO syndrome, 5.0% of patients with severe hypospermatogenesis and 18.2% of patients with maturation arrest. Therefore, our results indicated that NAG and fructose levels are contributed to discriminating obstructive and nonobstructive azoospermia in Chinese patients based on the histological types of testes. PMID:26610429

  3. Phosphorylation-independent dual-site binding of the FHA domain of KIF13 mediates phosphoinositide transport via centaurin [alpha]1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yufeng; Tempel, Wolfram; Wang, Hui; Yamada, Kaori; Shen, Limin; Senisterra, Guillermo A.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Chishti, Athar H.; Park, Hee-Won (Toronto); (UICM)

    2011-11-07

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) plays a key role in neuronal polarization and axon formation. PIP3-containing vesicles are transported to axon tips by the kinesin KIF13B via an adaptor protein, centaurin {alpha}1 (CENTA1). KIF13B interacts with CENTA1 through its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. We solved the crystal structures of CENTA1 in ligand-free, KIF13B-FHA domain-bound, and PIP3 head group (IP4)-bound conformations, and the CENTA1/KIF13B-FHA/IP4 ternary complex. The first pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of CENTA1 specifically binds to PIP3, while the second binds to both PIP3 and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-biphosphate (PI(3,4)P2). The FHA domain of KIF13B interacts with the PH1 domain of one CENTA1 molecule and the ArfGAP domain of a second CENTA1 molecule in a threonine phosphorylation-independent fashion. We propose that full-length KIF13B and CENTA1 form heterotetramers that can bind four phosphoinositide molecules in the vesicle and transport it along the microtubule.

  4. Association of collagen type I alpha1 (COLIA1) Sp1 polymorphism with osteoporotic fracture in Caucasian post-menopausal women: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ji, G-R

    2012-01-06

    This study was designed to summarize quantitatively the evidence for a relationship between collagen type I alpha1 (COLIA1) Sp1 polymorphism and osteoporotic fracture risk in Caucasian post-menopausal women. This meta-analysis included 16 studies, which analysed 2294 patients with fractures and 10 285 controls. The combined results showed that there was a significant difference in genotype distribution (SS odds ratio [OR] 0.72; Ss OR 1.18; ss OR 1.97) between patients with fractures and controls. When stratifying by the fracture site, it was found that: (i) patients with vertebral fractures had a significantly higher frequency of the Ss genotype and a lower frequency of the SS genotype than controls; and (ii) patients with non-vertebral fractures had a significantly higher frequency of the ss genotype and a lower frequency of the SS genotype than controls. This meta-analysis suggests that the COLIA1 Sp1 polymorphism may be associated with osteoporotic fracture in Caucasian post-menopausal women.

  5. Effect of thymosin alpha-1 on subpopulations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xia [Institute of Immunology,Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Qian, Feng [Department of General Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); He, Hai-Yang; Liu, Kai-Jun [Institute of Immunology,Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Lan, Yuan-Zhi [Department of General Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ni, Bing; Tian, Yi; Fu, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Ji; Shen, Zi-Gang; Li, Jian; Yin, Yi; Li, Jin-Tao; Wu, Yu-Zhang [Institute of Immunology,Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2011-12-02

    Thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1) has been shown to have beneficial effects on numerous immune system parameters, but little is known about the effects of Tα1 on patients with gastric carcinoma. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Tα1 on subpopulations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro, and to evaluate its efficacy as an immunoregulatory factor in patients with gastric carcinoma. We compared the effect of Tα1 on the frequency of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells, especially the CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from gastric carcinoma patients (N = 35) and healthy donors (N = 22). We also analyzed the changes in the proliferation of PBMCs in response to treatment with Tα1, and examined the production of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines by PBMCs and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. The treatment of PBMCs from gastric cancer patients, with Tα1 (50 µg/mL) alone increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (suppressive antitumor-specific Tregs) from 1.68 ± 0.697 to 2.19 ± 0.795% (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that Tα1 increases the percentage of Tregs and IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 in vitro.

  6. Effect of thymosin alpha-1 on subpopulations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1) has been shown to have beneficial effects on numerous immune system parameters, but little is known about the effects of Tα1 on patients with gastric carcinoma. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Tα1 on subpopulations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro, and to evaluate its efficacy as an immunoregulatory factor in patients with gastric carcinoma. We compared the effect of Tα1 on the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, especially the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from gastric carcinoma patients (N = 35) and healthy donors (N = 22). We also analyzed the changes in the proliferation of PBMCs in response to treatment with Tα1, and examined the production of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines by PBMCs and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. The treatment of PBMCs from gastric cancer patients, with Tα1 (50 µg/mL) alone increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (suppressive antitumor-specific Tregs) from 1.68 ± 0.697 to 2.19 ± 0.795% (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that Tα1 increases the percentage of Tregs and IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 in vitro

  7. Effect of thymosin alpha-1 on subpopulations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin alpha 1 (Tα1 has been shown to have beneficial effects on numerous immune system parameters, but little is known about the effects of Tα1 on patients with gastric carcinoma. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Tα1 on subpopulations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs in vitro, and to evaluate its efficacy as an immunoregulatory factor in patients with gastric carcinoma. We compared the effect of Tα1 on the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, especially the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from gastric carcinoma patients (N = 35 and healthy donors (N = 22. We also analyzed the changes in the proliferation of PBMCs in response to treatment with Tα1, and examined the production of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines by PBMCs and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. The treatment of PBMCs from gastric cancer patients, with Tα1 (50 µg/mL alone increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (suppressive antitumor-specific Tregs from 1.68 ± 0.697 to 2.19 ± 0.795% (P < 0.05. Our results indicate that Tα1 increases the percentage of Tregs and IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 in vitro.

  8. A new class of analogues of the bifunctional radiosensitizer alpha-(1-aziridinylmethyl)-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol (RSU 1069): The cycloalkylaziridines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of compounds related to alpha-(1-aziridinylmethyl)-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol (RSU 1069, 1) were synthesized and evaluated as selective hypoxic cell cytotoxic agents and as radiosensitizers. The aziridine moiety was replaced with a number of other potential alkylating groups including cycloalkylaziridines and azetidines. The data indicated that modification of the aziridine of 1 resulted in a substantial decrease in the ability of the compounds to selectively kill hypoxic cells. However, these modifications did not affect the compounds' in vitro radiosensitizing activity since many of the derivatives were as potent as 1. All of the compounds that were evaluated in vivo were less toxic than 1, and several members of this series had significant activity. The best compound was trans-alpha-[[(4-bromotetrahydro-2H-pyran-3-yl) amino]methyl]-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol (18), which, due to its activity and log P value, is a candidate for additional in vivo studies

  9. Elicitor and resistance-inducing activities of beta-1,4 cellodextrins in grapevine, comparison with beta-1,3 glucans and alpha-1,4 oligogalacturonides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Aziz; Gauthier, Adrien; Bézier, Annie; Poinssot, Benoît; Joubert, Jean-Marie; Pugin, Alain; Heyraud, Alain; Baillieul, Fabienne

    2007-01-01

    Cellodextrins (CD), water-soluble derivatives of cellulose composed of beta-1,4 glucoside residues, have been shown to induce a variety of defence responses in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) cells. The larger oligomers of CD rapidly induced transient generation of H2O2 and elevation in free cytosolic calcium, followed by a differential expression of genes encoding key enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins as well as stimulation of chitinase and beta-1,3 glucanase activities. Most of these defence reactions were also induced by linear beta-1,3 glucans (betaGlu) and alpha-1,4 oligogalacturonides (OGA) of different degree of polymerization (DP), but the intensity of some reactions induced by CD was different when compared with betaGlu and OGA effects. Moreover, desensitization assays using H2O2 production showed that cells treated with CD remained fully responsive to a second application of OGA, suggesting a different mode of perception of these oligosaccharides by grape cells. None of CD, betaGlu, or OGA induced HSR gene expression nor did they induce cell death. In accordance with elicitor activity in grapevine cells, CD-incubated leaves challenged with Botrytis cinerea also resulted in a significant reduction of the disease. Data suggest that CD could operate via other distinct reaction pathways than betaGlu and OGA. They also highlight the requirement of a specific DP for each oligosaccharide to induce the defence response. PMID:17322548

  10. Inhibitory function of adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit in the process of nuclear translocation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfection of human cells with siRNA against adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit (AP2α) was revealed to significantly up-regulate the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This effect was confirmed by cell infection with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 as well as CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Viral adsorption, viral entry and reverse transcription processes were not affected by cell transfection with siRNA against AP2α. In contrast, viral nuclear translocation as well as the integration process was significantly up-regulated in cells transfected with siRNA against AP2α. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that a subpopulation of AP2α was not only localized in the cytoplasm but was also partly co-localized with lamin B, importin β and Nup153, implying that AP2α negatively regulates HIV-1 replication in the process of nuclear translocation of viral DNA in the cytoplasm or the perinuclear region. We propose that AP2α may be a novel target for disrupting HIV-1 replication in the early stage of the viral life cycle

  11. Zolpidem, a selective GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit agonist, induces comparable Fos expression in oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular and accessory but not supraoptic nuclei in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, Alexander; Søderman, Andreas; Bundzikova, Jana;

    2006-01-01

    Functional activation of oxytocinergic (OXY) cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei was investigated in response to acute treatment with Zolpidem (a GABA(A) receptor agonist with selectivity for alpha(1) subunits) utilizing dual Fos/OXY immun...

  12. HPLC/1H NMR spectroscopic studies of the reactive alpha-1-O-acyl isomer formed during acyl migration of S-naproxen beta-1-O-acyl glucuronide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, O; Mortensen, R W; Hansen, S H; Troke, J; Nicholson, J K

    2001-10-01

    A widely held view in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies is that the initial 1-isomer to 2-isomer step in the intramolecular acyl migration of drug ester glucuronides is irreversible, and that alpha-1-O-acyl isomers do not occur under physiological conditions. We investigated this hypothesis using high-performance liquid chromatography directly coupled to proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HPLC/1H NMR) and mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to probe the migration reactions of S-naproxen beta-1-O-acyl glucuronide, in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4, 37 degrees C. We report the first direct observation of the alpha-1-O-acyl isomer of a drug ester glucuronide (S-naproxen) formed in a biosystem via the facile acyl migration of the corresponding pure beta-1-O-acyl glucuronide. The unequivocal identification of the reactive product was achieved using stopped-flow one-dimensional HPLC/1H NMR and two-dimensional 1H-1H total correlation spectroscopy (1H-1H TOCSY). Parallel LC/ion-trap mass spectrometry yielded the confirmatory glucuronide masses. Moreover, "dynamic" stopped-flow HPLC/1H NMR experiments revealed transacylation of the isolated alpha-1-O-acyl isomer to a mixture of alpha/beta-2-O-acyl isomers; the reverse reaction from the isolated alpha/beta-2-O-acyl isomers to the alpha-1-O-acyl isomer was also clearly demonstrated. This application of "dynamic" stopped-flow HPLC/1H NMR allows key kinetic data to be obtained on a reactive metabolite that would otherwise be difficult to follow by conventional HPLC and NMR methods where sample preparation and off-line separations are necessary. These data challenge the widely held view that the alpha-1-O-acyl isomers of drug ester glucuronides do not occur under physiological conditions. Furthermore, the similar formation of alpha-1-O-acyl isomers from zomepirac and diflunisal beta-1-O-acyl glucuronides has recently been confirmed (Corcoran et al., unpublished results). Such reactions are also likely to be widespread

  13. Prenatal Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... am thinking about getting pregnant. How can I take care of myself? You should start taking care of ... What should I do — or not do — to take care of myself and my unborn baby? Follow these ...

  14. Self Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Connections Experiences Research Learning Evaluation Print Email Self Care If you are living with a chronic ... help you cope can make a real difference. Self-care techniques are things you can do for ...

  15. Interaction of new kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and tofacitinib with human serum alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. A comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular Docking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-04-01

    In the current study we have investigated the interaction of newly approved kinase inhibitors namely Cabozantinib (CBZ) and Tofacitinib (TFB) with human Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) under simulated physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching measurements, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking methods. CBZ and TFB binds to AAG with significant affinity and the calculated binding constant for the drugs lie in the order of 104. With the increase in temperature the binding constant values decreased for both CBZ and TFB. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from AAG to CBZ and TFB suggested the fluorescence intensity of AAG was quenched by the two studied drugs via the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the static manner. The molecular distance r value calculated from FRET is around 2 nm for both drugs, fluorescence spectroscopy data was employed for the study of thermodynamic parameters, standard Gibbs free energy change at 300K was calculated as - 5.234 kcal mol- 1 for CBZ-AAG interaction and - 6.237 kcal mol- 1 for TFB-AAG interaction, standard enthalpy change and standard entropy change for CBZ-AAG interaction are - 9.553 kcal mol- 1 and - 14.618 cal mol- 1K- 1 respectively while for AAG-TFB interaction, standard enthalpy and standard entropy change was calculated as 4.019 kcal mol- 1 and 7.206 cal mol- 1K- 1 respectively. Protein binding of the two drugs caused the tertiary structure alterations. Dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated the reduction in the hydrodynamic radii of the protein. Furthermore molecular docking results suggested the Hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding were the interactive forces in the binding process of CBZ to AAG while in case of TFB only hydrophobic interactions were found to be involved, overlap of the binding site for two studied drugs on the AAG molecule was revealed by docking results.

  16. Maintained reduction of intraocular pressure by prostaglandin F2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester applied in multiple doses in ocular hypertensive and glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camras, C B; Siebold, E C; Lustgarten, J S; Serle, J B; Frisch, S C; Podos, S M; Bito, L Z

    1989-09-01

    In a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study, 0.25 microgram (n = 11) or 0.5 microgram (n = 13) of prostaglandin F2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester (PGF2 alpha-IE) was applied topically twice daily for 8 days to one eye of ocular hypertensive or chronic open-angle glaucoma patients. Compared with contralateral, vehicle-treated eyes, PGF2 alpha-IE significantly (P less than 0.05) reduced intraocular pressure (IOP), beginning 4 hours after the first 0.5-microgram dose and lasting at least 12 hours after the fourteenth dose, with a significant (P less than 0.005) mean reduction of 4 to 6 mmHg maintained throughout the last day of therapy with either dose. A contralateral effect was not observed. Mean tonographic outflow facility was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher in PG-treated compared with vehicle-treated eyes (0.17 +/- 0.02 versus 0.12 +/- 0.01 microliter/minute/mmHg, respectively; +/- standard error of the mean) for the 0.5 microgram dose. Conjunctival hyperemia reached a maximum at 30 to 60 minutes after PGF2 alpha-IE application. Some patients reported mild irritation lasting several minutes after some doses. Visual acuity, accommodative amplitude, pupillary diameter, aqueous humor flare, anterior chamber cellular response, Schirmer's test, pulse rate, and blood pressure were not significantly altered. Our findings show that PGF2 alpha-IE is a potent ocular hypotensive agent and a promising drug for glaucoma therapy. PMID:2780003

  17. A novel mutation (Gln226{r_arrow}His) in the alpha1 subunit of the inhibitory glycine-receptor gene (GLRA1) in hereditary hyperekplexia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milani, N.; Dalpra, L.; Larizza, L. [Universita di Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Hereditary hyperekplexia, or Startle disease, is a rare dominant neurological disorder with high penetrance and variable expression, mainly characterized by infantile hypertonia and exaggerated startle response. Genetic and radiation hybrid mapping of the hyperekplexia region on distal 5q pointed to a candidate region that included the gene for glycine receptor. Mutations in the {alpha}1 subunit of the inhibitory glycine-receptor gene (GLRA1) subsequently found both in familial and sporadic cases have been causally related to the disease. The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a ligand-gated chloride-channel protein-mediating synaptic inhibition in the spinal cord and other brain regions. It is a pentameric complex comprising homologous {alpha} and {beta} subunits, built from a large N-terminal region followed by four-membrane-spanning segments (M1-M4). The mutations, which were first identified in the GLRA1 gene, occur in the same base pair of exon 6 and result in the substitution of Arg271 of the mature polypeptide with an uncharged amino acid, either leucine, in one family, or glutamine, in three families. The Arg271{yields}Gln substitution is likely to be the most common, because it has subsequently been found in four other families and in a patient without a clear family history. Two other mutations, Tyr279{yields}Cys and Ile244{yields}Asp have been so far identified. The mutational repertoire underlying human hyperekplexia is thus likely to be incomplete because alterations causing either recessive or dominant forms not associated with the classical site mutation might remain undetected. Consistent with this hypothesis, several sporadic and familiar cases screened by either denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis or SSCP in all exons all escaped detection of the mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1 is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models.

  19. Use of alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonists in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer - a randomized controlled trial of silodosin versus naftopidil -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the effect of two different alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonists on lower urinary tract symptoms in patients who underwent LDR-brachytherapy. A total of 141 patients who had been clinically diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and underwent LDR-brachytherapy were enrolled. Patients were randomized and allocated to two groups (silodosin 8 mg vs. naftopidil 75 mg). The primary endpoint was a change in the international prostate symptom score (IPSS) at 3 months after seed implantation. Secondary endpoints included the recovery rate of IPSS at 12 months after seed implantation, the change in IPSS and overactive bladder symptom score, uroflowmetric parameters, and frequency volume chart (FVC). To determine independent variables that can predict IPSS recovery, logistic regression analysis was carried out. The mean change in the IPSS at 3 months after seed implantation in both groups was ⊿10.6 (naftopidil) and ⊿10.4 (silodosin), respectively. There was not a significant difference between the two groups (p=0.728). An increase in urinary frequency and a decrease in total urinated volume and mean voided volume were observed in FVC for 12 months after seed implantation. Multivariate analysis revealed that the urethral dose (UD30) was an independent predictive parameter of IPSS recovery. Patients with UD30 < 200Gy showed a higher recovery rate of IPSS at 12 months after seed implantation. There was no significant difference of serial change in IPSS between silodosin and naftopidil during the first year after seed implantation. A lower dose on the urethra was an independent predictor of IPSS recovery at 12 months after seed implantation

  20. Identification of the collagen type 1 alpha 1 gene (COL1A1) as a candidate survival-related factor associated with hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related death especially among Asian and African populations. It is urgent that we identify carcinogenesis-related genes to establish an innovative treatment strategy for this disease. Triple-combination array analysis was performed using one pair each of HCC and noncancerous liver samples from a 68-year-old woman. This analysis consists of expression array, single nucleotide polymorphism array and methylation array. The gene encoding collagen type 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1) was identified and verified using HCC cell lines and 48 tissues from patients with primary HCC. Expression array revealed that COL1A1 gene expression was markedly decreased in tumor tissues (log2 ratio –1.1). The single nucleotide polymorphism array showed no chromosomal deletion in the locus of COL1A1. Importantly, the methylation value in the tumor tissue was higher (0.557) than that of the adjacent liver tissue (0.008). We verified that expression of this gene was suppressed by promoter methylation. Reactivation of COL1A1 expression by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment was seen in HCC cell lines, and sequence analysis identified methylated CpG sites in the COL1A1 promoter region. Among 48 pairs of surgical specimens, 13 (27.1%) showed decreased COL1A1 mRNA expression in tumor sites. Among these 13 cases, 10 had promoter methylation at the tumor site. The log-rank test indicated that mRNA down-regulated tumors were significantly correlated with a poor overall survival rate (P = 0.013). Triple-combination array analysis successfully identified COL1A1 as a candidate survival-related gene in HCCs. Epigenetic down-regulation of COL1A1 mRNA expression might have a role as a prognostic biomarker of HCC

  1. Low-threshold exocytosis induced by cAMP-recruited CaV3.2 (alpha1H) channels in rat chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancippoli, A; Novara, M; de Luca, A; Baldelli, P; Marcantoni, A; Carbone, E; Carabelli, V

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the functional role of CaV3 channels in triggering fast exocytosis in rat chromaffin cells (RCCs). CaV3 T-type channels were selectively recruited by chronic exposures to cAMP (3 days) via an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac)-mediated pathway. Here we show that cAMP-treated cells had increased secretory responses, which could be evoked even at very low depolarizations (-50, -40 mV). Potentiation of exocytosis in cAMP-treated cells did not occur in the presence of 50 microM Ni2+, which selectively blocks T-type currents in RCCs. This suggests that the "low-threshold exocytosis" induced by cAMP is due to increased Ca2+ influx through cAMP-recruited T-type channels, rather than to an enhanced secretion downstream of Ca2+ entry, as previously reported for short-term cAMP treatments (20 min). Newly recruited T-type channels increase the fast secretory response at low voltages without altering the size of the immediately releasable pool. They also preserve the Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis, the initial speed of vesicle depletion, and the mean quantal size of single secretory events. All this indicates that cAMP-recruited CaV3 channels enhance the secretory activity of RCCs at low voltages by coupling to the secretory apparatus with a Ca2+ efficacy similar to that of already existing high-threshold Ca2+ channels. Finally, using RT-PCRs we found that the fast inactivating low-threshold Ca2+ current component recruited by cAMP is selectively associated to the alpha1H (CaV3.2) channel isoform. PMID:16361341

  2. A study of Italian pediatric celiac disease patients confirms that the primary HLA association is to the DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzilli, M C; Ferrante, P; Mariani, P; Martone, E; Petronzelli, F; Triglione, P; Bonamico, M

    1992-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has been recently reported to be primarily associated with the DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) heterodimer encoded in cis on DR3 haplotype and in trans in DR5,7 heterozygous individuals. The high incidence of DR5,7 heterozygotes, reflecting the high frequency of the DR5 allele in Italy, makes the analysis of the Italian CD patients critical. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from 50 CD patients and 50 controls, serologically typed for DR and DQw antigens, was hybridized with five DQA1-specific oligonucleotide probes detecting DQA1*0101 + 0102 + 0103, DQA1*0201, DQA1*0301 + 0302, DQA1*0401 + 0501 + 0601, and DQA1*0501 and a DQB1-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe recognizing DQB1*0201 allele. As expected by the DR-DQ disequilibria, DQA1*0201 [62% in patients versus 26% in controls, relative risk (RR) = 5] and DQA1*0501 (96% versus 56%, RR = 19) show positive association with the disease. Of CD patients, 92% (50% DR3 and 42% DR5,7) compared to 18% of the controls carry both DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0201 alleles, so that the combination confers an RR of 52, higher than both the risks of the single alleles (DQA1*0501 RR = 19, DQB1*0201 RR = 30), confirming the primary role of the dimer in determining genetic predisposition to CD both in DR3 and in DR5,7 subjects. PMID:1563982

  3. Relation between increased anxiety and reduced expression of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of GABA(A) receptors in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raud, Sirli; Sütt, Silva; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Innos, Jürgen; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2009-08-28

    Mutations in the coding region of the WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, a rare multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. In clinical studies a relation between mutations in the Wfs1 gene and increased susceptibility for mood disorders has been established. According to our previous studies, mice lacking Wfs1 gene displayed increased anxiety in stressful environment. As the GABA-ergic system plays a significant role in the regulation of anxiety, we analyzed the expression of GABA-related genes in the forebrain structures of wild-type and Wfs1-deficient mice. Experimentally naïve Wfs1-deficient animals displayed a significant down-regulation of alpha1 (Gabra1) and alpha2 (Gabra2) subunits of GABA(A) receptors in the temporal lobe and frontal cortex. Exposure of wild-type mice to the elevated plus-maze decreased levels of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the temporal lobe. A similar tendency was also established in the frontal cortex of wild-type animals exposed to behavioral test. In Wfs1-deficient mice the elevated plus-maze exposure did not induce further changes in the expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes. By contrast, the expression of Gad1 and Gad2 genes, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of GABA, was not significantly affected by the exposure of mice to the elevated plus-maze or by the invalidation of Wfs1 gene. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that increased anxiety of Wfs1-deficient mice is probably linked to reduced expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the frontal cortex and temporal lobe. PMID:19477223

  4. Avaliação da concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina e da presença dos alelos S e Z em uma população de indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos Determination of alpha 1-antitrypsin levels and of the presence of S and Z alleles in a population of patients with chronic respiratory symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Heliane Guerra Serra; Carmen Sílvia Bertuzzo; Mônica Corso Pereira; Cláudio Lúcio Rossi; Walter Pinto Júnior; Ilma Aparecida Paschoal

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT) e a prevalência dos alelos S e Z em indivíduos sintomáticos respiratórios crônicos. MÉTODOS: Pacientes com tosse crônica e dispnéia foram submetidos à avaliação clínica, espirometria, tomografia computadorizada de tórax, dosagem de AAT por nefelometria e pesquisa das mutações S e Z por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Foram consideradas como variáveis dependentes a concentração de AAT e o tabagismo. RESULTADOS: Dos 89 pacientes i...

  5. Phage display of the serpin alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor randomized at consecutive residues in the reactive centre loop and biopanned with or without thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Scott

    Full Text Available In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2-P1 yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352-356 (P7-P3 was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7-P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection

  6. Oncostatin M, but not interleukin-6 or leukemia inhibitory factor, stimulates expression of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor in A549 human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallenave, J M; Tremblay, G M; Gauldie, J; Richards, C D

    1997-06-01

    Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (A1-Pi) is the main serine proteinase inhibitor found in human plasma and is a potent elastase inhibitor in various tissues, including lung. A1-Pi is expressed and induced in liver during inflammatory responses but can also be produced by epithelial cells. Since hepatocyte A1-Pi production is stimulated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and other gp130-cytokines, such as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and oncostatin M (OM), we investigated the role of these cytokines in regulating A1-Pi in lung epithelial cells. We show that OM, a monocyte and T cell product, can specifically and potently induce A1-Pi production in lung-derived A549 alveolar (epithelial) cells, as well as in liver-derived HepG2 cells. Both A1-Pi protein (as detected by ELISA and Western blots) and mRNA levels were enhanced 20-fold to 30-fold in A549 cells. OM was also able to stimulate the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in these cells. Interestingly, other members of the IL-6 family (IL-6 and LIF) had little or no effect on A549 cells, and proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) also had no stimulatory effect on A1-Pi synthesis in A549 cells. Costimulation with IL-1 beta resulted in a decrease in A1-Pi production from OM-stimulated A549 cells. However, IL-6 production was synergistically enhanced. OM was also able to stimulate A1-Pi production from a bronchial epithelial primary cell line, whereas an intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 responded to IL-6 but not OM. These results suggest that lung levels A1-Pi could be derived not only from liver and inflammatory cells but also from epithelial cells, which can be upregulated on stimulation by OM. This may have implications for regulation of local activity of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) in such diseases as emphysema and cystic fibrosis. PMID:9198001

  7. Separate cis-acting DNA elements of the mouse pro-alpha 1(I) collagen promoter direct expression of reporter genes to different type I collagen-producing cells in transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The genes coding for the two type I collagen chains, which are active selectively in osteoblasts, odontoblasts, fibroblasts, and some mesenchymal cells, constitute good models for studying the mechanisms responsible for the cell-specific activity of genes which are expressed in a small number of discrete cell types. To test whether separate genetic elements could direct the activity of the mouse pro-alpha 1(I) collagen gene to different cell types in which it is expressed, transgenic mice wer...

  8. Un anxiolytique naturel: l'hydrolysat trypsique de caseine alpha-s1 de lait bovin. Son intérêt en médecine humaine et vétérinaire

    OpenAIRE

    Bénézech, M.; Mullens, E.; Lalonde, R; Desor, D.; Messaoudi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Tryptic hydrolysate from bovine milk alpha-s1 casein (THC), a natural product, contains a specific active decapeptide called alpha-casozepine which shows interesting pharmacological properties. Preclinical and clinical trials, as well as tests carried out on both humans and animals (rats, dogs, cats), demonstrated certain qualities of this hydrolysate. It shows a marked affinity for GABA-A receptors with a benzodiazepine-like profile and a tranquilizing and antistress acti...

  9. Daily Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know Online Tools Enhancing Daily Life Daily Plan Activities Communication Food & Eating Music & Art Personal Care Incontinence Bathing ... Tweet Email | Print Create a Daily Routine Daily Plan Activities Communication Food/Eating Get Tips on Personal Care Bathing ...

  10. Hair Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Hair care Hair care Short, long, curly, straight, up, down. Hair options can seem endless! Not all of what makes your hair look good comes from the outside, though. Good ...

  11. Continuing Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Obesity at Midlife May Speed Alzheimer’s Onset Hello from my mom Easing the Behavior Problems of ... Managers Continuing Care FOR MORE ARTICLES CLICK HERE Hello from my mom Common Estate Planning Errors Alzheimer’s ...

  12. Tracheostomy care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000076.htm Tracheostomy care To use the sharing features on this ... through your nose and mouth. Caring for Your Tracheostomy Once the hole in your neck is not ...

  13. Expression of mRNAs coding for the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen in human fetal tissues: comparison with expression of mRNAs for collagen types I, II, and III

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the topographic distribution of the multiple mRNAs coding for a novel human short-chain collagen, the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen. To identify the tissues and cells expressing these mRNAs, human fetal tissues of 15-19 gestational wk were studied by Northern and in situ hybridizations. The distribution pattern of the type XIII collagen mRNAs was compared with that of fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III using specific human cDNA probes for each collagen type. No...

  14. Supportive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Pia Riis; Lorenzo, Rosalía

    2016-01-01

    This chapter takes its point of departure in psychosocial aspects of supportive care in adolescent and young adult cancer care. The purpose is to describe some of the challenges that these young people face following a cancer diagnosis and guide healthcare professionals in how to provide care that improves the quality of life. In most hospitals and healthcare systems, adolescents and young adults are cared for and treated in settings for children or adults. Accordingly, healthcare professionals may lack attention to and knowledge about what characterize young peoples' life situation, their special needs and how to meet them. The topics we include in the chapter are the following: the youth friendly environment, social support and social network, parents, information during a psychosocial crisis event, the use of HEADSS, peer support, fertility, body image and self-esteem, after treatment and future challenges and palliative and end of life care. PMID:27595353

  15. Specific Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links from the National Institutes of Health. Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of technetium(III) mixed-ligand complexes with high affinity for the cerebral 5-HT1A receptor and the alpha1-adrenergic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tc(III) and Re(III) complexes [M(NS3)(CNR)] (M=Re, 99mTc, NS3=2,2',2''-nitrilotris(ethanethiol), CNR = functionalized isocyanide bearing a derivative of WAY 100635) have been synthesized and characterized. Re was used as Tc surrogate for chemical characterization and in vitro receptor-binding studies. For two representatives subnanomolar affinities for the 5-HT1A as well as for the alpha1-adrenergic receptor were reached. Biodistribution studies in rats of the 99mTc complexes showed brain uptakes between 0.3 and 0.5% ID/organ (5 min p.i.). In vitro autoradiography of one 99mTc representative in sections of post mortem human brain indicate its accumulation in 5-HT1A receptor-rich brain regions. However, addition of the specific 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT as well as the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin could not substantially block this tracer accumulation. A preliminary SPET study in a monkey showed negligible brain uptake

  17. Careful science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid P; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2014-01-01

    into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday...... lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for...

  18. Comprehensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Providing emotional support Comprehensive care includes attention to emotional health as well as physical health. Mental health professionals provide support and education, as well as diagnose and treat the depression, ...

  19. Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A ... assess the complex needs of the patient and family, facilitate communication with the care team and within the family, ...

  20. Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your care. Other team members may include a music therapist, physical therapist, speech therapist or occupational therapist. ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium ...

  1. Multidisciplinary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Megan E; Riess, Jonathan W

    2016-01-01

    Optimal multidisciplinary care of the lung cancer patient at all stages should encompass integration of the key relevant medical specialties, including not only medical, surgical, and radiation oncology, but also pulmonology, interventional and diagnostic radiology, pathology, palliative care, and supportive services such as physical therapy, case management, smoking cessation, and nutrition. Multidisciplinary management starts at staging and tissue diagnosis with pathologic and molecular phenotyping, extends through selection of a treatment modality or modalities, management of treatment and cancer-related symptoms, and to survivorship and end-of-life care. Well-integrated multidisciplinary care may reduce treatment delays, improve cancer-specific outcomes, and enhance quality of life. We address key topics and areas of ongoing investigation in multidisciplinary decision making at each stage of the lung cancer treatment course for early-stage, locally advanced, and metastatic lung cancer patients. PMID:27535399

  2. Caring Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism may seem to not care about things or have the same range of emotions as those of us who see them and care for them. But they do have empathy and they can be taught how to communicate it, says the author, a teacher of children with autism. We simply need to listen to them, watch them, and be with them in their moment.

  3. The laminin alpha chains: expression, developmental transitions, and chromosomal locations of alpha1-5, identification of heterotrimeric laminins 8-11, and cloning of a novel alpha3 isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, J H; Patton, B L; Lentz, S I; Gilbert, D J; Snider, W D; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G; Sanes, J R

    1997-05-01

    Laminin trimers composed of alpha, beta, and gamma chains are major components of basal laminae (BLs) throughout the body. To date, three alpha chains (alpha1-3) have been shown to assemble into at least seven heterotrimers (called laminins 1-7). Genes encoding two additional alpha chains (alpha4 and alpha5) have been cloned, but little is known about their expression, and their protein products have not been identified. Here we generated antisera to recombinant alpha4 and alpha5 and used them to identify authentic proteins in tissue extracts. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting showed that alpha4 and alpha5 assemble into four novel laminin heterotrimers (laminins 8-11: alpha4beta1gamma1, alpha4beta2gamma1, alpha5beta1gamma1, and alpha5beta2gamma1, respectively). Using a panel of nucleotide and antibody probes, we surveyed the expression of alpha1-5 in murine tissues. All five chains were expressed in both embryos and adults, but each was distributed in a distinct pattern at both RNA and protein levels. Overall, alpha4 and alpha5 exhibited the broadest patterns of expression, while expression of alpha1 was the most restricted. Immunohistochemical analysis of kidney, lung, and heart showed that the alpha chains were confined to extracellular matrix and, with few exceptions, to BLs. All developing and adult BLs examined contained at least one alpha chain, all alpha chains were present in multiple BLs, and some BLs contained two or three alpha chains. Detailed analysis of developing kidney revealed that some individual BLs, including those of the tubule and glomerulus, changed in laminin chain composition as they matured, expressing up to three different alpha chains and two different beta chains in an elaborate and dynamic progression. Interspecific backcross mapping of the five alpha chain genes revealed that they are distributed on four mouse chromosomes. Finally, we identified a novel full-length alpha3 isoform encoded by the Lama3 gene, which was previously

  4. On the transfer of serum proteins to the rat intestinal juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, G H; Olsen, J;

    1994-01-01

    The in vivo pattern of serum proteins in the rat small-intestinal juice was characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Immunoglobulins and albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, transferrin, and orosomucoid were present. Larger serum proteins were absent (ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-macroglob......The in vivo pattern of serum proteins in the rat small-intestinal juice was characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Immunoglobulins and albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, transferrin, and orosomucoid were present. Larger serum proteins were absent (ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, alpha-1...... proteins in the intestinal juice is a selective passage through the capillary wall followed by passive intercellular transport via delivery of the serum in the interstitial space during disintegration of the enterocytes....

  5. Wound Care in Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Nail Ersoz; Ismail Hakki Ozerhan; Fatih Zor

    2008-01-01

    Wound care starts with occuring of wound. Primary health care wound care important as to affect on quality of healing. It is given information about the types of wounds, brief wound physiopathology and presented the options of wound care to primary health care wound care proffessionals in this article. Wound care must be done in a systematic process by health care professionals. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000): 71-74

  6. Wound Care in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail Ersoz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound care starts with occuring of wound. Primary health care wound care important as to affect on quality of healing. It is given information about the types of wounds, brief wound physiopathology and presented the options of wound care to primary health care wound care proffessionals in this article. Wound care must be done in a systematic process by health care professionals. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 71-74

  7. Wound Care in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail Ersoz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound care starts with occuring of wound. Primary health care wound care important as to affect on quality of healing. It is given information about the types of wounds, brief wound physiopathology and presented the options of wound care to primary health care wound care proffessionals in this article. Wound care must be done in a systematic process by health care professionals. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 71-74

  8. Tesofensine, a novel triple monoamine reuptake inhibitor, induces appetite suppression by indirect stimulation of alpha1 adrenoceptor and dopamine D1 receptor pathways in the diet-induced obese rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Anne Marie Dixen; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    Tesofensine is a novel monoamine reuptake inhibitor that inhibits both norepinephrine, 5-HT, and dopamine (DA) reuptake function. Tesofensine is currently in clinical development for the treatment of obesity, however, the pharmacological basis for its strong effect in obesity management is not cl......Tesofensine is a novel monoamine reuptake inhibitor that inhibits both norepinephrine, 5-HT, and dopamine (DA) reuptake function. Tesofensine is currently in clinical development for the treatment of obesity, however, the pharmacological basis for its strong effect in obesity management...... antagonist), or ritanserin (0.03 mg/kg, 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist). Hence, the mechanism underlying the suppression of feeding by tesofensine in the obese rat is dependent on the drug's ability to indirectly stimulate alpha(1) adrenoceptor and DA D(1) receptor function....

  9. Characterization of the pattern of alphas1- and beta-casein breakdown and release of a bioactive peptide by a cell envelope proteinase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Elvira María; Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Raya, Raúl R; Savoy, Graciela; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteinases (CEPs) of the lactobacilli have key roles in bacterial nutrition and contribute to the development of the organoleptic properties of fermented milk products as well, as they can release bioactive health-beneficial peptides from milk proteins. The influence of the peptide supply, carbohydrate source, and osmolites on the CEP activity of the cheese starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 was investigated. The CEP activity levels were controlled by the peptide content of the growth medium. The maximum activity was observed in a basal minimal defined medium, whereas in the presence of Casitone, Casamino Acids, or yeast extract, the synthesis of CEP was inhibited 99-, 70-, and 68-fold, respectively. The addition of specific di- or tripeptides containing branched-chain amino acids, such as leucylleucine, prolylleucine, leucylglycylglycine, or leucylproline, to the growth medium negatively affected CEP activity, whereas dipeptides without branched-chain amino acids had no effect on the enzyme's production. The carbon source and osmolites did not affect CEP activity. The CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 exhibited a mixed-type CEP(I/III) variant caseinolytic specificity. Mass-spectrometric screening of the main peptide peaks isolated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography allowed the identification of 33 and 32 peptides in the alpha(s1)- and beta-casein hydrolysates, respectively. By characterizing the peptide sequence in these hydrolysates, a pattern of alpha(s1)- and beta-casein breakdown was defined and is reported herein, this being the first report for a CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. In this pattern, a series of potentially bioactive peptides (antihypertensive and phosphopeptides) which are encrypted within the precursor protein could be visualized. PMID:18424544

  10. Wound Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve. PMID:26022525

  11. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care is especially useful for persons who need nursing, therapy, or aide services. You may need help if you are dealing with one or more of the following: You have trouble getting around (for example, after a hospital stay or an accident) You have wounds that need to be cleaned, ...

  12. Enacting Care

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2015), s. 216-222. ISSN 1749-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP401/12/P544 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : ethics of care * enactivism * autonomy * social institutions * autism * exclusion Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17496535.2015.1022356

  13. Who cares?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Krogh

    practices. If that is the case, the great challenge is to “come up with ingenious solutions to the problem of how to become interesting enough for practices to care about” (ibid: 72). Through ethnographic fieldwork encounters with Radicand Design Collaboratory, a collaborative product development...

  14. Maternal care

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    In June 2000 a distinguished group of obstetricians, midwives, general practitioners, and medical statisticians came together to discuss maternal care. Chaired by Professor James Drife from Leeds, discussion ranged over many topics, including: the changing role of the obstetrician, general practitioners, and the increasing status and responsibility of midwives. Other subjects include the induction of labour, obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia, and debates about the place and kind of delivery...

  15. Caring for Multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & ... Home > Complications & Loss > The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) > Caring for multiples Caring for multiples E-mail ...

  16. Who cares!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    老晃

    2013-01-01

    1有人再三怂恿,希望我能吐槽《富春山居图》,务求鞭辟入里,揭露丑恶真相。我舍不得,舍不得浪费纸。好吧,小吐一下。传说,在《富春山居图》开拍之前有心人提醒导演孙健君,剧本有硬伤,得改,例举一三三四……话没说完,孙勃然大怒,"Who cares!"这位目空一切的君王,他什么都不care,所以他花钱砸的那堆玩意儿,根本也不是电影。这就是真相。值得一说的,是此刻红得发紫,摸都摸不得的《小时代》。

  17. GDP-fucose: beta-galactoside alpha1,2-fucosyltransferase, MFUT-II, and not MFUT-I or -III, is induced in a restricted region of the digestive tract of germ-free mice by host-microbe interactions and cycloheximide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B; Hayashi, Y; Saito, M; Sakakibara, Y; Yanagisawa, M; Iwamori, M

    2000-09-27

    A shift from sialylation to fucosylation of mucosal glycoconjugates occurred in the mammalian digestive tract in the weaning period, but mice under germ-free conditions were found to express both fucosyl GM1 (FGM1) and fucosyl asialo GM1 (FGA1) in the stomach, cecum and colon, but not in the small intestine. By host-microbe interactions and administration of cycloheximide, FGA1 was quickly induced in the small intestine, but the concentrations of fucosylated glycolipids in the other regions were not altered significantly. Their expression coincided with the activity of GDP-fucose:GA1 alpha(1, 2)-fucosyltransferase (alpha1,2-FT), and we isolated a cDNA with an open reading frame encoding the murine alpha1,2-FT (MFUT-II) of 347 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 39.21 kDa. The intraperitoneal injection of cycloheximide induced the mRNA and activity of alpha1,2-FT (MFUT-II) in the small intestine of germ-free mice, whereas no change in the mRNA or activity was observed in the stomach, cecum and colon, indicating that expression of FGA1 in response to microbial colonization or cycloheximide is transcriptionally regulated in a restricted region of the murine digestive tract. At 24 h after the administration of cycloheximide, FGA1 was preferentially produced in the upper half of the duodenal microvilli. PMID:11018479

  18. Oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. PMID:21325845

  19. Primary structure determination of five sialylated oligosaccharides derived from bronchial mucus glycoproteins of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The occurrence of the NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)] GlcNAc beta(1----.) structural element revealed by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamblin, G; Boersma, A; Klein, A; Roussel, P; van Halbeek, H; Vliegenthart, J F

    1984-07-25

    The structure of sialylated carbohydrate units of bronchial mucins obtained from cystic fibrosis patients was investigated by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with sugar analysis. After subjecting the mucins to alkaline borohydride degradation, sialylated oligosaccharide-alditols were isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography. Five compounds could be obtained in a rather pure state; their structures were established as the following: A-1, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4) [Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----3)Gal-NAc-ol; A-2, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)GlcNAc beta(1----6)-[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAc-o1; A-3, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta-(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----3)Gal beta(1----3) GalNAc-o1; A-4, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]Glc-NAc NAc beta(1----6)[GlcNAc beta(1----3)]GalNAc-o1; A-6,NeuAc alpha-(2----3) Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----6)[Gal beta-(1----4) GlcNAc beta(1----3)]GalNAc-o1. The simultaneous presence of sialic acid in alpha(2----3)-linkage to Gal and fucose in alpha(1----3)-linkage to GlcNAc of the same N-acetyllactosamine unit could be adequately proved by high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy. This sequence constitutes a novel structural element for mucins. PMID:6746638

  20. Vergleichende Einschätzung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft der Kenngrößen freies PSA, Alpha1-Antichymotrypsin-PSA und komplexiertes PSA in der Diagnostik des Prostatakarzinoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumgart E

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ziel der Studie war die vergleichende Einschätzung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft von Gesamt-PSA (tPSA, freiem PSA (fPSA, alpha1-Antichymotrypsin-PSA (ACT-PSA und komplexiertem PSA (cPSA sowie der entsprechenden Quotienten zur Differenzierung zwischen einem Prostatakarzinom (PCa und einer Benignen Prostatahyperplasie (BPH. Die Bestimmung erfolgte bei insgesamt 324 Männern (PCa: n = 144; BPH: n = 89; Kontrollen: n = 91. Die tPSA- und cPSA-Konzentrationen wurden mit dem Bayer Immuno 1 System (Bayer Diagnostics, Tarrytown, USA durchgeführt; die tPSA- und fPSA-Bestimmungen erfolgten mit dem Elecsys System (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Deutschland. Der ACT-PSA-Test ist ein Prototyp für klinische Untersuchungen auf dem ES-System (Roche Diagnostics. Die medianen Konzentrationen von tPSA, ACT-PSA, cPSA und die Quotienten fPSA/tPSA, ACT-PSA/tPSA, cPSA/tPSA waren zwischen PCa- und BPH-Patienten signifikant unterschiedlich. Zur Objektivierung der Diskriminierungsfähigkeit wurde das "Receiver Operating Characteristics Analysis" Verfahren (tPSA 20µg/l eingesetzt. Die Quotienten fPSA/tPSA, ACT-PSA/tPSA und cPSA/tPSA unterschieden sich signifikant vom tPSA. ACT-PSA und cPSA waren nicht signifikant unterschiedlich von tPSA. Signifikante Unterschiede zwischen den Quotienten fPSA/tPSA, ACT-PSA/tPSA und cPSA/tPSA wurden nicht festgestellt. Die Bestimmung von ACT-PSA oder cPSA sowie der entsprechenden Quotienten verbessert nicht die PCa-Diagnostik im Vergleich zum Quotienten fPSA/tPSA. Die Quotienten ACT-PSA/tPSA und cPSA/tPSA können als Alternative zum fPSA/tPSA in Betracht gezogen werden.

  1. Health care operations management

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, M W; Hans, E.W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully selected papers dealing with optimization and decision analysis problems in the field of health care operations management.

  2. Adoption & Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care Adoption & Foster Care Article Body ​Each year, many children join families through adoption and foster care. These families may face unique ...

  3. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with bathing, ... your home. Some types of care and community services are free or donated. Many other types you ...

  4. Skin Care and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Skin Care and Aging Heath and Aging Skin Care and Aging Dry Skin and Itching Bruises Wrinkles Age Spots ... doctor. For More Information About Skin Care and Aging American Academy of Dermatology 1-866-503-7546 ( ...

  5. About Critical Care Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... requiring intense and vigilant nursing care. Number of Critical Care Nurses in the United States According to "The Registered ... nurses who work in a hospital setting. Where Critical Care Nurses Work According to "The Registered Nurse Population" study, ...

  6. Enlarged prostate - after care

    Science.gov (United States)

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... exercises ( Kegel exercises ) that strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. Doing these exercise may help with leaking or ...

  7. Oncology and palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Bausewein, Claudia; Hartenstein, R.

    2000-01-01

    Oncology developed as a discipline over the last decades. Treatment is concentrated on cure or palliation of the illness with the help of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery. Palliative care has its origin in the hospice movement that started around 1960 in the UK. Centre of care is the patient and his family. Focus of care has moved from quantity to quality of life. Symptom control, communication, rehabilitation and care for the dying are main areas of palliative care. Palliative care and ...

  8. Critical care during epidemics

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinson, Lewis; O'Toole, Tara

    2005-01-01

    We recommend several actions that could improve hospitals' abilities to deliver critical care during epidemics involving large numbers of victims. In the absence of careful pre-event planning, demand for critical care services may quickly exceed available intensive care unit (ICU) staff, beds and equipment, leaving the bulk of the infected populace without benefit of potentially lifesaving critical care. The toll of death may be inversely proportional to the ability to augment critical care c...

  9. Pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included. PMID:21628042

  10. Differential actions of antiparkinson agents at multiple classes of monoaminergic receptor. II. Agonist and antagonist properties at subtypes of dopamine D(2)-like receptor and alpha(1)/alpha(2)-adrenoceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier; Audinot, Valérie; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; De Ceuninck, Frédéric; Boutin, Jean-A; Millan, Mark J

    2002-11-01

    properties at multiple subtypes of D(2)-like receptor and alpha(1)/alpha(2)-AR, actions, which likely contribute to their contrasting functional profiles. PMID:12388667

  11. Integrating palliative care into comprehensive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahm, Janet L

    2012-10-01

    While there are operational, financial, and workforce barriers to integrating oncology with palliative care, part of the problem lies in ourselves, not in our systems. First, there is oncologists' "learned helplessness" from years of practice without effective medications to manage symptoms or training in how to handle the tough communication challenges every oncologist faces. Unless they and the fellows they train have had the opportunity to work with a palliative care team, they are unlikely to be fully aware of what palliative care has to offer to their patients at the time of diagnosis, during active therapy, or after developing advanced disease, or may believe that, "I already do that." The second barrier to better integration is the compassion fatigue many oncologists develop from caring for so many years for patients who, despite the oncologists' best efforts, suffer and die. The cumulative grief oncologists experience may go unnamed and unacknowledged, contributing to this compassion fatigue and burnout, both of which inhibit the integration of oncology and palliative care. Solutions include training fellows and practicing oncologists in palliative care skills (eg, in symptom management, psychological disorders, communication), preventing and treating compassion fatigue, and enhancing collaboration with palliative care specialists in caring for patients with refractory distress at any stage of disease. As more oncologists develop these skills, process their grief, and recognize the breadth of additional expertise offered by their palliative care colleagues, palliative care will become integrated into comprehensive cancer care. PMID:23054873

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Donna L.; Hentz, Tracy A.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care provides benefit to children living with life-threatening or terminal conditions. Palliative care should be available to all seriously ill children. Palliative care includes the treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, anorexia, and sialorrhea. This care can occur in a variety of settings, from home to hospice to hospital, and must include bereavement care and follow up after the death of a child. There are many challenges in pediatric palli...

  13. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed. PMID:27055306

  14. Research in cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Deaton, Christi; Fitzsimmons, Donna;

    2014-01-01

    To deliver optimal patient care, evidence-based care is advocated and research is needed to support health care staff of all disciplines in deciding which options to use in their daily practice. Due to the increasing complexity of cardiac care across the life span of patients combined...... of the body of knowledge that is needed to further improve cardiovascular care. In this paper, knowledge gaps in current research related to cardiovascular patient care are identified, upcoming challenges are explored and recommendations for future research are given....

  15. care about还是care for?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾克辉

    2015-01-01

    1问care about和care for可以相互替换使用吗?答:有时可以。但在不同情况下,它们在较确切的含义上还是有区别的。1在表示"喜欢,关心,担心"时,意思一样,常可以互换使用。如:I care about/for your integrity and honesty.我喜欢你的正直和诚实。She doesn’t care about/for politics.她不关心政治。You needn't care about/for his safety.你不必为他的安全担心。2在表示"介意,计较,在乎"等意思时,

  16. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  17. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... happening, the better you’ll be prepared to take care of yourself once you leave the hospital. You ... skin. If you catch a problem early and take care, you will often be able to continue to ...

  18. Caring for the Caregiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But during this time, it’s important that caregivers take care of themselves too. PDF Kindle ePub This booklet ... cancer This booklet is not about how to take care of a patient. Instead, it mainly provides ways ...

  19. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  20. US EPA CARE Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for the subset of Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) grants given out by the US EPA. CARE...

  1. Palliative Care in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care that is given to a person when cancer therapies are no longer controlling the disease. It focuses on caring, not curing. When a person has a terminal diagnosis (usually defined as having a life expectancy ...

  2. Critical Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of these areas: Surgery Internal medicine Pediatrics Anesthesiology Critical care nurse: A highly skilled nurse who provides all aspects ... and can often uphold the patient's wishes. The critical care nurse becomes an important part of decision-making with ...

  3. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  4. Preeclampsia - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000606.htm Preeclampsia - self-care To use the sharing features on this ... have frequent checkups and tests. Bed Rest and Self-care at Home When you are at home, ...

  5. Pet Care: MRSA FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AVMA Meeting Dates Meetings & CE Calendar Symposiums & Summits Pet Health Awareness Events About AVMA Who We Are ... 12 Educators You are here: Home | Public Resources | Pet Care Print Share This! Your Veterinarian Pet Care ...

  6. Does Care Matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling; Hogan, Dennis P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce the concept of care capital and provide an example of its application in the context of child care and maternal employment using the currently most suitable American data. We define care capital as the nexus of available, accessible, and experienced resources...... for care. The American setting is an ideal context to investigate the linkages between child care capital and maternal employment as the patterns of child care use tend to be more diverse compared to other national context. In the presented application of care capital, we examine mothers’ entry to paid...... employment during the first 36 weeks following a birth, and its association with experienced non-parental child care use before labor force entry. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey – Birth Cohort (N = 10,400 mothers), results from discrete-time hazard models show that use of non...

  7. CareCoor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Christensen, Lars Rune; Grönvall, Erik;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The present study aims to augment the network of home care around elderly. We investigate the nature of cooperative work between relatives and home care workers around elderly persons; present the CareCoor system developed to support that work; and report experiences from two pilot tests...... persons. The design implications led to the development of a prototype, called CareCoor, which is accessible via a tablet PC and on the Internet. CareCoor was subsequently evaluated in two pilot tests. The first lasted a week and included three elderly, their next of kin and the affiliated home care...... workers, while the second test lasted for six weeks and involved five elderly people, their next of kin and relevant home care workers. Results In the paper we make three major points, namely, (1) home care work is highly cooperative in nature and involves substantial coordinative efforts on the part...

  8. Diabetes - eye care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000078.htm Diabetes - eye care To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Diabetic retinopathy - care Diabetes and your eyes Diabetes can harm your eyes. It can damage ...

  9. Parental Care and Investment

    OpenAIRE

    González-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, N.

    2010-01-01

    Parental care is common throughout the animal kingdom and among caring species there is a bewildering variation in how parents care for offspring, as well as in the amount of resources parents invest in care. For instance, there is considerable variation in the relative parental investment by the sexes – in some species females invest more, in others males invest more, and in some investment is more or less equally shared. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain patterns of parenta...

  10. Creonization of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals. PMID:2394563

  11. Caring for Yourself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Caring forYourself Taking care of yourself is one of the most important things you ... are some ways you can take care of yourself: • Ask for help when you need it. • Join ...

  12. Education in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Blust, Linda

    2005-02-01

    Palliative care education includes the domains of pain and nonpain symptom management, communications skills, ethics and law, psychosocial care, and health systems. Defining key attitudes, knowledge, and skill objectives, and matching these to appropriate learning formats, is essential in educational planning. Abundant educational resource material is available to support classroom and experiential palliative care training. PMID:15639043

  13. Value of care - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Value of care displays – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the value of care displays associated with a 30-day episode of care for...

  14. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in making health care safe. That includes doctors, nurses and other health care professionals. Health care organizations ... embarrassed if you don't understand what your doctor, nurse or other health care professional tells you. • Don’ ...

  15. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care were...... to North, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for East and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16[95%CI 0.11-0.23, p care utilization...

  16. Neuroeconomics and Integrated Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fragmented specialized care for the frail elderly as claimed by WHO needs horizontal integration across settings. The home of the patient seems to be a promising place to integrate hospital care, primary care and social services for high-risk discharges where the quality...... of rehabilitation makes a difference. Objective: The study aims to reveal how integrated home care may be organised to improve quality of care as compared to usual hospital care. Method: A qualitative case study of the use of a neuroeconomic model in relation to multidisciplianry collaboration on a RCT...... of integrated home care for stroke patients. Results: (1) The classical understanding of CNS is that of a dual system of ANS and Cortex. The new neuroeconomic understanding is that of a reciprocal balance of Limbic System (LS) and Neocortex (NC). This applies directly in favour of integrated homecare compared...

  17. Timely and Effective Care - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Timely and Effective Care measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for measures of heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia care,...

  18. Shin splints - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care; Anterior tibial pain - self-care; Medial tibial stress syndrome - self-care; MTSS - self-care; Exercise-induced ... these medicines have side effects and can cause ulcers and bleeding. Talk to your doctor about how ...

  19. Feasibility of commercial space manufacturing, production of pharmaceuticals. Volume 2: Technical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A technical analysis on the feasibility of commercial manufacturing of pharmaceuticals in space is presented. The method of obtaining pharmaceutical company involvement, laboratory results of the separation of serum proteins by the continuous flow electrophoresis process, the selection and study of candidate products, and their production requirements is described. The candidate products are antihemophilic factor, beta cells, erythropoietin, epidermal growth factor, alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon. Production mass balances for antihemophelic factor, beta cells, and erythropoietin were compared for space versus ground operation. A conceptual description of a multiproduct processing system for space operation is discussed. Production requirements for epidermal growth factor of alpha-1-antitrypsin and interferon are presented.

  20. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  1. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.

    1992-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  2. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Sensenig, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  3. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Sivarajan, Lekha

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avail...

  4. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Sensenig, Arthur L.; Heffler, Stephen K.

    1995-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avail...

  5. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of...

  6. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Sensenig, Arthur L.; Heffler, Stephen K.

    1995-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the avai...

  7. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Lazenby, Helen C.

    1992-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of...

  8. Italian health care reform

    OpenAIRE

    Livio Garattini

    1992-01-01

    It is remarkable how health care systems, created over decades and influenced by very different cultures exhibit similar problems. Most health care systems are compartmentalised with managers at margins responding to perverse incentives and seeking to shift patients and costs onto rival organisations. Decision makers behave selfishly, considering the welfare of their own organisations rather than those of the health care system as a whole, and in the absence if evidence about the cost-effecti...

  9. Health care delivery systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, F; Zee, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A health care delivery system is the organized response of a society to the health problems of its inhabitants. Societies choose from alternative health care delivery models and, in doing so, they organize and set goals and priorities in such a way that the actions of different actors are effective, meaningful, and socially accepted. From a sociological point of view, the analysis of health care delivery systems implies recognition of their distinct history over time, their specific values an...

  10. [Nursing care in prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context. PMID:26975674

  11. Lesbian health care needs.

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, N

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define the special health care needs of Canadian lesbians. DESIGN: A questionnaire containing 61 yes-or-no and multiple-choice questions sought information on six areas: demographics; health care use; habits, diet, and exercise; preventive care; mental health; and physical health. SETTING: The organizational meeting of a lesbian softball league in Toronto. PARTICIPANTS: Of 360 women eligible for the meeting, 205 attended and 195 completed the survey. Questionnaires used for anal...

  12. Improving Palliative Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social,...

  13. Pediatric palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Trapanotto Manuela; Spizzichino Marco; Benini Franca; Ferrante Anna

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life of young patients and their families, and in the vast majority of cases the home is the best place to provide such care, but for cultural, affective, educational and organizational reasons, pediatric patients rarely benefit from such an approach. In daily practice, it is clear that pedi...

  14. Music in child care

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Polikandrioti; Ioannis Koutelekos

    2007-01-01

    Music has been used therapeutically for many centuries, and numerous studies have researched the curative and preventative powers of music in several diseases. Music, as a therapy was shown to have positive effects in child care, such as in premature infants, children in emergency care, children receiving surgery, children in oncology departments and handicapped children. The aim of this review was to study the therapeutic effects of music in child care at hospital. The method οf this study i...

  15. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  16. [Primary care in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  17. Dare to Care, Care to Perform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giangreco, Antonio; Sebastiano, Antnio; Carugati, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    -driven modernization process of an Italian nursing home. Based on qualitative research methods, our aim is to identify what are the elements of a designing approach of an IT-tool meant to enhance a process of modernization in a health care organization. Our results show that a patient-centered, user-friendly, bottomup...... designed and results-driven tool is more likely to be beneficial for the patients and the users and therefore, for the organization at large. This study contributes to the extant literature on health care management providing the alternative view that, if the tool is designed around and for the individuals...... (patients and users), then it will produce positive results for the organization. In other words, who dares to care, will perform....

  18. Penis care (uncircumcised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncircumcised penis - bathing; Cleaning an uncircumcised penis ... An uncircumcised penis has its foreskin intact. An infant boy with an uncircumcised penis does not need special care. Normal bathing ...

  19. Democracy, caring and competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig; Johannesson, Eva Marianne; Purola, Anna-Maija;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how Nordic Early Childhood Education and Care policies frame values education in preschools with a special focus on the values of democracy, caring and competence. The study is part of a larger Nordic project, Valueseducation in Nordic preschools: Basis of...... the study. Keywords related with democratic, caring and competence values were selected. The findings reveal different dimensions and meanings of the three value fields, such as democracy as being and/or becoming; care as fulfilment of basic needs and an ethical relationship; and competence values as...

  20. Nursing Care after Death

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Xi

    2012-01-01

    Nurses care, help and support patients before they are born, when they are alive and after they die. The starting points of this study were how nurses provide physical care for the dead patients and psychological care for the bereaved families. The purpose of this study was to describe the role of a nurse when patients die. The aims of this study were that the results of the study could help the nurses’ clinical work and could be used as part of teaching material in post-mortem care or nu...

  1. Caring for the caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Caring for the Caregiver is information for persons helping to care for people with cancer. The emphasis is on what caregivers can do to help themselves at this stressful time. Topics included are: Who Is a Caregiver, Your Feelings, Asking For Help, Caring for Yourself, Going With Your Loved One to Medical Visits, Talking With Others, Remember, Other Resources for Caregivers. The information is written on a basic level and it is very suitable for health professionals to share with persons helping to care for family members or friends who have cancer. The National Cancer Institute posted this information on its website last June 29. PMID:19062356

  2. Progressive Care of Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambaugh, Lori A; Ecklund, Margaret M

    2016-08-01

    Obese patients have complex needs that complicate their care during hospitalization. These patients often have comorbid conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, pressure ulcers, and difficulty with mobility. Obese patients may be well served in the progressive care setting because they may require more intensive nursing care than can be delivered in a general care unit. Progressive care nurses have core competencies that enable them to safely and effectively care for obese patients. A plan of care with interdisciplinary collaboration illustrates the integrative care for obese progressive care patients. (Critical Care Nurse 2016; 36[4]:58-63). PMID:27481802

  3. Dementia Care: Intersecting Informal Family Care and Formal Care Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhjot Singh; Rafat Hussain; Adeel Khan; Lyn Irwin; Roslyn Foskey

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is one of the major causes of disability and dependence amongst older people and previous research has highlighted how the well-being of people with dementia is inherently connected to the quality of their relationships with their informal carers. In turn, these carers can experience significant levels of emotional stress and physical burden from the demands of caring for a family member with dementia, yet their uptake of formal services tends to be lower than in other conditions rel...

  4. Effect of Primary Health Care Orientation on Chronic Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Schmittdiel, Julie A.; Shortell, Stephen M.; Rundall, Thomas G; Bodenheimer, Thomas; SELBY, Joe V.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE It has been suggested that the best way to improve chronic illness care is through a redesign of primary care emphasizing comprehensive, coordinated care as espoused by the Chronic Care Model (CCM). This study examined the relationship between primary care orientation and the implementation of the CCM in physician organizations.

  5. Educating to Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortari, Luigina

    2004-01-01

    The root of the ecological crisis lies in an ethic of nature consumption. In order to reconstruct our cultural framework, it is necessary to cultivate another ethical approach, an ethic of care. It is the responsibility of school to encourage students to learn how to care for not only the human world, but also for the natural world. This paper is…

  6. Alliance in Youth Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothman, Linda; Rijsingen, Rinie van; Pijnenburg, Huub

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of alliance in youth care. The concept of (therapeutic) alliance originates in adult psychotherapy and related research. Alliance refers to the working relationship between youth care workers and their clients. Within this concept, personal (emotional) and task re

  7. Surgical wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... F for more than 4 hours Alternate Names Surgical incision care; Open wound care Images Proper hand washing References Lynn PB. Cleaning a wound and applying a dry, sterile dressing. In: Lynn PB. Taylor’s Handbook of Nursing Skills . Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Wolters ...

  8. Prevention IS Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-26

    This podcast provides an overview of the Prevention IS Care campaign, which provides HIV prevention tools for medical care providers to use on a daily basis with patients who are living with HIV.  Created: 3/26/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/26/2009.

  9. The Inquiry of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    While discussions of the moral dimensions of the caring relation and their implications for teaching and learning are well developed within the literature, there has not been much analysis of the place of inquiry within our understanding of caring and the education inspired by it. Previous discussions offer important insight into what…

  10. Nail care for newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001914.htm Nail care for newborns To use the sharing features on ... finger or toe instead of the nail. Baby's nails grow quickly, so you may have to cut the fingernails at least once a week. You may only need ... SG, Bedwell C, Cork MJ. Neonatal skin care and toxicology. In: Eichenfield LF, Frieden IJ, Mathes ...

  11. Lean health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Henry C; Masterson, David J

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Lean management are being adopted more widely in health care as a way of improving quality and safety while controlling costs. The authors, who are chief executive officers of rural North Carolina hospitals, explain how their organizations are using Lean principles to improve quality and safety of health care delivery. PMID:23802475

  12. Health care delivery systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, F.; Zee, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A health care delivery system is the organized response of a society to the health problems of its inhabitants. Societies choose from alternative health care delivery models and, in doing so, they organize and set goals and priorities in such a way that the actions of different actors are effective,

  13. Improving Palliative Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual distress. Furthermore, data show that PC continues to be underutilized and inaccessible, and current innovative models of integrating PC into standard cancer care lack uniformity. The aim of this article is to address the existing barriers in implementing PC into our cancer care delivery system and discuss how the oncology advanced practice nurse plays an essential role in providing high-quality cancer care. We also review the IOM recommendations; highlight the work done by the National Consensus Project in promoting quality PC; and discuss a National Cancer Institute-funded program project currently conducted at a National Comprehensive Cancer Center, "Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptoms Concerns in Lung Cancer," which serves as a model to promote high-quality care for patients and their families. PMID:26114013

  14. Child Care Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Melbourne. Women's Bureau.

    Based on a survey of legislation relating to full-day care for preschool children of working mothers and a study of records, this report: (1) covers the number of registered child care centers in Australia and the number of children being served, (2) sets the conditions applying to registration of centers, (3) indicates the extent and levels of…

  15. Child Care at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN, Child Care Initiative

    2008-01-01

    This is a document summarizing a survey of child care needs of CERN staff and users which was performed in February 2008 by the CERN Child Care Initiative. The document presents the analysis of this data. Conclusions on the minimal facilities size are derived and possible funding source at the European Union are discussed.

  16. Health Care Waste Management

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    Health care waste management (HCWM) is a process to help ensure proper hospital hygiene and safety of health care workers and communities. It includes planning and procurement, construction, staff training and behavior, proper use of tools, machines and pharmaceuticals, proper disposal methods inside and outside the hospital, and evaluation. Its many dimensions require a broader focus than ...

  17. Caring about the young

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John Stevens; Evert Pommer; Hetty van Kempen; Elke Zeijl; Isolde Woittiez; Klarita Sadiraj; Rob Gilsing; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2009-01-01

    Original title: De jeugd een zorg. Youth care services are going through major changes. This has created a need for a better insight into the demand that is likely to be placed on these services in the future at both national and regional level. This report suggests that the use of ambulant care w

  18. Improved wound care product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care product comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care product,and a methodof treating an infected wound....

  19. Costs of Emergency Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to care for patients, not fewer, and medical liability reform would help reduce overall costs by reducing ... NewsMediaResources/StatisticsData/Just%202%20booklet.pdf [ii] Report: Accounting for the cost of US health care: A ...

  20. Do We Value Caring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Richard; Anderson, Trisha Ross

    2016-01-01

    When asked about their child-rearing priorities, parents in the United States are likely to say it's more important to raise children who are caring than to raise high achievers. Schools, too, typically trumpet values such as caring, honesty, and fairness. These values are posted on walls, reiterated in assemblies, and included in mission…

  1. Net4Care:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    propose a software ecosystem approach for telemedicine applications, providing a framework, Net4Care, encapsulating national/global design decisions with respect to standardization while allowing for local innovation. This paper presents an analysis of existing systems, of requirements for a software...... ecosystem for telemedicine, and a summary of initial design decisions for the Net4Care framework....

  2. Caring Experience and Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    2005-01-01

    A presentation of a case and a theoretical discussion concerning what characterizes the sozialisation and formation taking place in educations related to care work inside the Danish welfare system presently. The article presents an analysis of the relation between curriculum,didactics and...... clash between competing rationalities, that cause dilemmas in care....

  3. Primary health care quality and diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues Gonçalves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association between primary health care (PHC quality and diabetes mellitus (DM management in adult patients living within the catchment area of PHC services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional, population-based study of adults reporting known diabetes. Quality of PHC was assessed through the Primary Care Assesment Tool (PCATool-Brazil. Statistical analyses were performed with Poisson regression with robust variance. Results: Of the 3,014 adults interviewed, 205 (6.8% reported having diabetes; of these, 64.4% were women and 68.3% were white. Regarding PHC score of the health service attended, people with diabetes that were classified with a high PHC score, presented longer duration of disease (10.9 vs 8.4 anos, p=0.03 and greater frequency of diabetes-related complications (75.3% vs 58.8%, p=0.02. Regarding the proportion of respondents with good glycemic control, no significant difference between groups was found (31.7% vs 38%, p=0.3. In the multivariate analysis, services with a high PHC score presented a better profile of care for the prevention of the main comorbidities – greater blood pressure assessment (PR=1.07; CI95% 1.01-1.14, lipid profile request (PR=1.23; CI95% 1.09-1.39, counseling for physical activity (PR=1.50; CI95% 1.21-1.86, foot examination (PR=2.08; CI95% 1.54-2,81, and counseling for foot care (PR=1.37; CI95% 1.18-1.59. Conclusion: High PHC score services showed better performance in the management of diabetes and care for more complicated patients, but they did not differ significantly from lower PHC score services in terms of patients’ glycemic control.

  4. Orphan Care in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng, Liu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Orphan care in China was once provided by the central government as a means of social control. The centralized welfare delivery guaranteed some of the poorest orphans to be protected by the government. Since the economic reform, the central government started to relinquish its control over social welfare delivery, new forms of orphan care were introduced into China, sharing the responsibilities and burdens for caring the orphans. Yet, many issues and problems exist in social delivery due to a lack of finances, professionals, and policy support. In this chapter, we will discuss the background of social welfare changes in China, as pertains to orphan care, focusing on the different types of orphans as a result of social issues, service delivery, barriers and solutions. It is claimed that during the reform, the burden of orphan care in China may not be reduced in the coming future, and we offer suggestions to cope with that.

  5. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observations...... and semistructured interviews and analyzed according to the guidelines for meaning condensation by Giorgi. The imaging staff found that care is expressed in an administrative, an instrumental, and a compassionate sense. The imaging staff perceived care in a way that clearly differs from the traditional perception...... of care understood as the close relations between people. In their self-understanding, the staff found that care not only comprised the relational aspect but also that it was already delivered during the preparatory phases before the actual meeting with the patient and up until the image...

  6. Measuring integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    respond to these needs, patients and providers face the multiple challenges of today's healthcare environment. Decision makers, planners and managers need evidence based policy options and information on the scope of the integrated care challenges they are facing. The US managed care organization Kaiser...... and performance of the Danish healthcare system and the managed care organization Kaiser Permanente, California, US. 5) To compare primary care clinicians' perception of clinical integration in two healthcare systems: Kaiser Permanente, Northern California and the Danish healthcare system. Further to examine...... of secondary data from the Danish healthcare system and Kaiser Permanente, California were used to compare population characteristics, professional staff, delivery structure, utilisation, quality measures and direct costs. A cross-sectional survey among primary care clinicians in Denmark and in Kaiser...

  7. Becoming Care Helper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses the shaping of students´ identity within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on the correlation between identity construction within the theoretical periods and students´ experiences in the traineeships. In the school setting the future...... care helper is being constructed within the overall term ‘professional’, but students may meet differing ways of being care helper in the traineeships, and the paper points to an ongoing struggle about the definition of ‘being care helper’. The analysis of the identity issues mobilises the concepts...... ‘positioning’ and ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies, and the empirical material consists of interviews and observations in the theoretical periods and in the traineeships. The paper suggests that a shift from identity to subjectivity may help students to deal with the diversity of ‘care helpers’ and thereby...

  8. Empowering and caring professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Agnete Meldgaard

    A wave of policies to reform municipal elderly care services is sweeping across Denmark. Under headings such as ‘help for self-help’, ‘everyday rehabilitation’, and ‘re-ablement’, municipalities are working to make their elderly citizens more self-reliant, active and less dependent on municipal...... care services. The reform programs are put in place to counter the demographic challenges faced by the Nordic (and many other) welfare states, known under the pessimistic expression ‘the burden of ageing’. Based on ethnographic case studies in two Danish municipalities, the paper illustrates how care...... workers negotiate professional identities and understandings of meaningful care work, in the new regime of rehabilitative elderly care – how they manage the ambiguities of a simultaneously empowering and interventionist practice. The paper’s analytical framework draws on an understanding of empowerment as...

  9. Attitudes of Nonpalliative Care Nurses towards Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Tait; Megan Higgs; Linda Magann; Joanne Dixon; Jan Maree Davis; Ritin Fernandez

    2015-01-01

    The quality of palliative care given to terminally ill patients and their family members can be directly impacted by the attitudes that nurses hold towards palliative care. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes of nonpalliative care nurses towards death and dying in the context of palliative care. Nurses working within the medical aged care, cardiology and respiratory wards at two metropolitan teaching hospitals in Sydney completed the Frommelt Attitudes Towards Care of the Dying (FAT...

  10. Advocacy for eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraj D Ravilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services - such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support - either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy.

  11. Who cares about care in nursing education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J; Crouch, M

    1995-06-01

    Many sources indicate that nurses have a negative view of work with ageing patients. Wide-spread stereotypes concerning old age no doubt exercise influences in the formation of nurses' attitudes. The research reported here suggests that nurses' negative attitudes towards the elderly are consolidated rather than dissolved in the course of their training. The reasons for this may not, in fact, lie in the nature of the gerontology components (small as they usually are) of the curriculum. Rather, the course (or the "professional socialisation" process) as a whole appears to carry messages that devalue personal care duties--contra the prestige of activities attached to all levels of medical technology. The ageing patient, often requiring much hands-on (the body) care is thus located well outside areas of work which are perceived by nurses to include clearly focused professional pathways. PMID:7665312

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  13. Hair care and dyeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia can be effectively camouflaged or worsened through the use of hair care techniques and dyeing. Proper hair care, involving hair styling and the use of mild shampoos and body-building conditioners, can amplify thinning scalp hair; however, chemical processing, including hair dyeing, permanent waving, and hair straightening, can encourage further hair loss through breakage. Many patients suffering from alopecia attempt to improve their hair through extensive manipulation, which only increases problems. Frequent haircuts to minimize split ends, accompanied by gentle handling of the fragile fibers, is best. This chapter offers the dermatologist insight into hair care recommendations for the alopecia patient. PMID:26370650

  14. Health care utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Serritzlew, Søren

    An important task in governing health services is to control costs. The literatures on both costcontainment and supplier induced demand focus on the effects of economic incentives on health care costs, but insights from these literatures have never been integrated. This paper asks how economic cost...... make health professionals provide more of this service to each patient, but that lower user payment (unexpectedly) does not necessarily mean higher total cost or a stronger association between the number of patients per supplier and the health care utilization. This implies that incentives...... are important, but that economics cannot alone explain the differences in health care utilization....

  15. Society of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are encouraged to participate in the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition’s (ASPEN) fifth annual ... the 46th Critical Care Congress Register for the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) 46th Critical Care ...

  16. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care provider is. These kinds of providers can take care of you during pregnancy and deliver your baby: ... doctor who has special education and training to take care of pregnant women and deliver babies. About 8 ...

  17. FastStats: Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Sex Men's Health Women's Health State and Territorial Data Reproductive Health Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health ... Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospice Foundation ...

  18. Care for an Uncircumcised Penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Bathing & Skin Care > ...

  19. Chiropractic care for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiropractic care is a way to diagnose and treat health problems that affect the nerves, muscles, bones, ... the body. A health care provider who provides chiropractic care is called a chiropractor. Hands-on adjustment ...

  20. Timely and Effective Care - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Timely and Effective Care measures - national data. This data set includes national-level data for measures of heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia...

  1. Timely and Effective Care - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Timely and Effective Care measures - provider data. This data set includes provider-level data for measures of heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia...

  2. Infant Care and Infant Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Well-baby visit or exam Baby care Pediatric care Newborn care Medical or Scientific ... Life”? NICHD Begins Study in Brazil of Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy Ebola Outbreak Highlights Needs ...

  3. 原发性肝癌TACE及胸腺肽α1治疗对T淋巴细胞亚群的影响%Effects of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization and thymosin peptide Alpha 1 on T lymphocyte subsets in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵莉; 侯敬申

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effects of thymosin peptide alpha 1,an immune regulator,on T lymphocyte subsets following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.Methods:Thirty-six patients with HCC who received TACE between March 2005 and January 2009 were randomly assigned to the thymosin peptide alpha 1 treatment group (n =17) and control group (n =19).A total of 12 healthy subjects who received health check-up were recruited as normal controls.This allowed subsequent analysis on the changes in T cell subsets,alpha fetal protein (AFP),alanine transferrase (ALT),total bilirubin and lymphocyte count.Results:Compared with preoperative levels,TACE resulted in statistically different CD3 + T and CD4 + T、CD8 + T,cell count and the ratio of CD4 +/CD8 + cells (all P < 0.05) at days 1and 7 postoperatively.Treatment with thymosin peptide alpha 1 led to substantially augmented CD4 + T and CD4 +CD8 + T count and the ratio of CD4 +/CD8 + cells at day 7 following TACE compared with preoperative levels and that of control group (all P < 0.05).Conclusion:Thymosin peptide alpha 1 following TACE may improve the cellular immune function and liver function.%目的:探讨TACE术后应用免疫调节剂胸腺肽α1对患者T淋巴细胞亚群的影响.方法:收集2005年3月至2009年1月收治的36例HCC患者作为研究对象,根据治疗方法不同将研究对象随机分为胸腺肽α1治疗组(17例)和肝癌对照组(19例),另选择同期12例门诊健康体检者作为正常对照组.比较T细胞亚群变化及AFP、ALT、总胆红素、淋巴细胞总数等指标.结果:行TACE治疗后1、7d,肝癌对照组患者体内CD3+T、CD4+T、CD8+T、CD4 +/CD8+比值与TACE治疗前比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);胸腺肽α1治疗组在TACE术后应用胸腺肽α1治疗7d后,CD4+T、CD4+/CD8+、淋巴细胞的比值明显增加,与治疗前及肝癌对照组术后7d比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结

  4. Community-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... respite care, transportation, medication coverage, rehabilitation (including maintenance physical and occupational therapy ), hearing aids, eyeglasses, and a variety of other benefits. The program also has the flexibility to pay ...

  5. Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... top Ensuring Quality Care As with any important purchase, it is wise to talk with friends, neighbors, ... dentures, eyeglasses, canes, walkers, hearing aids, etc. Possible behavior problems and how best to handle them Mobility ...

  6. Health Care Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.

    1989-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators.

  7. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition Exercise Coming Of Age Older Adults Allergy ... it is so cold it could hurt your skin. Make sure your electrical system doesn’t overload ...

  8. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to other parts of the mouth. However, your dentist can treat periodontal disease even when you are ... the teeth. Is it safe to visit your dentist in pregnancy? Dental care is safe during pregnancy ...

  9. Quotes on Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge Quest, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In this article, school librarians from Henrico County Public Schools in Virginia [the AASL 2011 National School Library Programs of the Year (NSLPY) Award recipient] share some of their experiences caring for students in their libraries.

  10. Dementia - daily care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000030.htm Dementia - daily care To use the sharing features on ... prevent choking. Tips for Talking with Someone with Dementia Keep distractions and noise down: Turn off the ...

  11. Suprapubic catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000145.htm Suprapubic catheter care To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A suprapubic catheter (tube) drains urine from your bladder. It is ...

  12. Advance Care Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... put on a breathing machine. Organ and tissue donation allows organs or body parts from a generally healthy person ... to your driver’s license. Some people also include organ donation in their advance care planning documents. At the ...

  13. Vacation health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travel health tips ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 - ... or booster) vaccinations before you leave. Ask your health insurance carrier what they will cover (including emergency ...

  14. Hospice Care in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than 50 patients per year to large, national corporate chains that care for thousands of patients each ... provided to patients and families? Among its major responsibilities, the ... for a social worker. Table 12. Distribution of Paid Staff FTEs  ...

  15. Palliative care - managing pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... or if you have side effects from your pain treatments. ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and ... Medicine . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap ...

  16. American Health Care Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testimony AHCA/NCAL PAC Federal Political Directors Political Events Solutions Facility Operations Affordable Care Act Clinical Emergency Preparedness Finance Health Information Technology Integrity Medicaid Medicare Patient Privacy and ...

  17. Office of Child Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 OCC has a variety of resources and tools related to the law. Visit our Reauthorization site to find webinars, program instructions, and other guidance and information. > What is the Office of Child Care (OCC)? The Office of Child ...

  18. Care workers, care drain, and care chains: reflections on care, migration, and citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Helma; Palenga-Möllenbeck, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a case study that deals with the care chain phenomenon and focuses on the question of how Poland and the Ukraine as sending countries and Poland as a receiving country are affected and deal with female migrant domestic workers. We look at the ways in which these women organize care replacement for their families left behind and at those families’ care strategies. As public discourse in both countries is reacting to the feminization of migration in a form that specifically questions the social citizenship obligations of these women, we also look at the media portrayal of the situation of nonmigrating children. Finally, we explore how different aspects of citizenship matter in transnational care work migration movements. PMID:22611571

  19. Skin Care and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It ... if they bother you. See additional resources on aging skin, including information on treatment options, specific conditions, ...

  20. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...